WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuro art therapy

  1. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  2. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  3. Social Action Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golub, Deborah

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores intersections among art, action, and community. It describes sociopolitical aspects of the author's art therapy work with survivors of repressive regimes living in Brazil, China, and Denmark and considers ways that unique historical and social processes influenced her conceptualization and practice of social action art therapy.

  4. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  5. Art Therapy Teaching as Performance Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint asserts that art therapy education is a form of performance art. By designing class sessions as performance artworks, art therapy educators can help their students become more fully immersed in their studies. This view also can be extended to conceptualizing each semester--and the entire art therapy curriculum--as a complex and…

  6. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  7. Workshop "Art therapy for an art therapist"

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco-Barrera, Ramón; Spínola Elías, Yolanda; Garrido Muñoz de Arenillas, Rocío

    2017-01-01

    "Art Therapy for an Art Therapist" was an experiential workshop presented at the 5thInternational Health Humanities Conference, Arts and Humanities for improving Social Inclusion, Education and Health: creative practice and mutuality – held in Seville (Spain), from September 15th to 17th, 2016. The main enquiry proposed to the audience was how to conduct an art therapy workshop for an art therapist. This key question addressed an important role in our teaching model, since it was designed to ...

  8. Art therapy for schizophrenia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, María Isabel; Aceituno, David; Rada, Gabriel

    2017-01-19

    Art therapy is used as a complementary treatment to antipsychotics in schizophrenia. However, its effectiveness is not clear. To answer this question, we searched in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening multiple databases. We identified five systematic reviews including 20 studies overall, of which four were randomized trials. We extracted data and prepared summary of findings tables using the GRADE method. We concluded it is not clear whether art therapy leads to clinical improvement in schizophrenia because the certainty of the evidence is very low.

  9. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clients, facilitated by the art therapist, use art media, the creative process, and the resulting artwork to explore their feelings, reconcile emotional conflicts, foster self-awareness, manage behavior and addictions, develop social skills, improve reality orientation, reduce anxiety, and increase ...

  10. Neuro-Music Therapy for Recent-Onset Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Grapp

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this pilot study was the evaluation of the neuro-music therapy approach as a new treatment option for patients with recent-onset tinnitus whose tinnitus symptoms were enduring after initial pharmacological treatment. In all, 15 patients with recent-onset tinnitus took part in our manualized short-term music-therapeutic treatment. Tinnitus severity and individual tinnitus distress were assessed by the German version of the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ and the Attention and Performance Self-Assessment Scale (APSA at three different measurement times: baseline (T0, start of treatment (T1, and end of treatment (T2. Score changes in TQ and APSA from start to end of treatment indicated significant improvements in tinnitus-related distress. According to the Jacobson and Truax reliable change index (RC, 73.3% of the patients showed a reliable reduction in individual TQ-score. The neuro-music therapy for recent-onset tinnitus according to the “Heidelberg Model” introduced in this pilot study seems to provide an effective treatment option for patients with recent-onset tinnitus.

  11. Art therapy in cancer fight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Rodrigues D'Alencar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is the therapeutic use of artistic activity in the context of the professional relationship with people affected by disease, injury or by seeking personal development. This study aims to report the experience of art therapy activities with a group of patients and their caregivers in a university hospital. This is an experience report, in Fortaleza - CE, during September 2010 to February 2011. In the meetings, participated 49 people, who performed activities, using the methods of art therapy, like painting, cutting, drawing, collage, creative visualization and color therapy. In the assessments, after the groups, the participants demonstrated the effects of art therapy, which described that the intervention allowed speak from the process of facing life to cancer fight. It is concluded that the techniques of art therapy provided self-knowledge, self-esteem and redemption sense of well-being with relaxation, and promote happiness and reduce stress.

  12. Material interaction in art therapy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse approaches to art therapy assessment agree that art materials should play a central role. However, relatively little research is done on the role of different art materials. This article describes the results of a qualitative study on the use of art materials by art therapists in art therapy

  13. Art Therapy and Dissociative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Patricia

    1997-01-01

    Demonstrates how art therapy helped a woman address her identity and memory difficulties while she managed her daily activities. The process helped her validate traumatic events in her history and provided a starting point for addressing internal conflicts. The client's artwork helped the therapist learn about the client's unconscious states. (MKA)

  14. Art Therapy: A Transdisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucciarelli, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Historically, art therapy has struggled to clearly define itself as a profession while simultaneously embracing the range of perspectives and knowledge that contribute to clinical practices. In this brief report the author suggests that by shifting the conceptualization of the field from "interdisciplinary" to…

  15. Arts Therapies and Progressive Illness: Nameless Dread

    OpenAIRE

    Waller, Diane E.

    2002-01-01

    Arts Therapies and Progressive Illness is a guide to the use of arts therapies in the treatment of patients with diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. In the last few years arts therapies have been used in an increasingly wide range of applications with new groups of patients, such as patients in palliative care, or with learning disabilities - Diane Waller has been a driving force behind this expansion.\\ud This book covers treatment such as art therapy, dance movement therapy and mus...

  16. Join the Art Club: Exploring Social Empowerment in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Frances Johanna; Willis-Rauch, Mallori

    2014-01-01

    Social Empowerment Art Therapy (SEAT) aims to address the stigma of mental illness through the artistic empowerment of participants. The model was developed within an inpatient psychiatric setting from observations of a shared governance structure that empowered residents. Incorporating an open art studio approach and social action art therapy,…

  17. Group Art Therapy with Incarcerated Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Bonnie J.; Young, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Art therapy is often thought of as an adjunct to counseling; however, because of its unique ability to bypass defenses, in some situations, art therapy may be a treatment of choice to allow clients to discover and express feelings that are often difficult to express verbally. Using art as therapy does not require that the therapist or the client…

  18. Spectrum of Art Therapy Practice: Systematic Literature Review of "Art Therapy," 1983-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.; Mann, Sarah M.; Martinez, Johanna C.; Roach, Ann B.; Wallace, Nina M.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine art therapists' fit in the continuum of health delivery services defined by behavioral health. All publications in "Art Therapy: Journal of the American Art" Therapy Association from 1983 (Volume 1) to 2014 (Volume 31) were systematically reviewed to understand how art therapy has been…

  19. Documenting Art Therapy Clinical Knowledge Using Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Practicing art therapists have vast stores of knowledge and experience, but in most cases, their work is not documented, and their clinical knowledge does not enter the academic discourse. This article proposes a systematic approach to the collection of practice knowledge about art therapy based on conducting interviews with art therapists who…

  20. Art Therapy Exhibitions: Exploitation or Advocacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Promoting awareness of human trafficking by sharing trauma survivors' art and summaries of their life stories suggests ethical complexities that have been typically neglected by bioethicists. Although these survivors voluntarily share the objects they created during art therapy sessions, they are still at risk of harm, including further exploitation, due to their vulnerability, high rates of victim sensitivity, and the mental health consequences of their traumatic experiences. While some argue that the benefits of sublimation and art therapy for human trafficking survivors make sharing their art worth the risk, anti-trafficking organizations and supporters of such art exhibitions have responsibilities to be trauma informed. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Art therapy: an underutilized, yet effective tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Bitonte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy has been recognized as beneficial and effective since first described by Adrian Hill in 1942. Even before this time, art therapy was utilized for moral reinforcement and psychoanalysis. Art therapy aids patients with, but not limited to, chronic illness, physical challenges, and cancer in both pediatric and adult scenarios. Although effective in patient care, the practice of art therapy is extremely underutilized, especially in suburban areas. While conducting our own study in northeastern Ohio, USA, we found that only one out of the five inpatient institutions in the suburban area of Mahoning County, Ohio, that we contacted provided continuous art therapy to it’s patients. In the metropolitan area of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, only eight of the twenty-two inpatient institutions in the area provided art therapy. There could be many reasons as to why art therapy is not frequently used in these areas, and medical institutions in general. The cause of this could be the amount of research done on the practice. Although difficult to conduct formal research on such a broad field, the American Art Therapy Association has succeeded in doing such, with studies showing improvement of the patient groups emotionally and mentally in many case types.

  2. Art Therapy: An Underutilized, yet Effective Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitonte, Robert A; De Santo, Marisa

    2014-03-04

    Art therapy has been recognized as beneficial and effective since first described by Adrian Hill in 1942. Even before this time, art therapy was utilized for moral reinforcement and psychoanalysis. Art therapy aids patients with, but not limited to, chronic illness, physical challenges, and cancer in both pediatric and adult scenarios. Although effective in patient care, the practice of art therapy is extremely underutilized, especially in suburban areas. While conducting our own study in northeastern Ohio, USA, we found that only one out of the five inpatient institutions in the suburban area of Mahoning County, Ohio, that we contacted provided continuous art therapy to it's patients. In the metropolitan area of Cuyahoga County, Ohio, only eight of the twenty-two inpatient institutions in the area provided art therapy. There could be many reasons as to why art therapy is not frequently used in these areas, and medical institutions in general. The cause of this could be the amount of research done on the practice. Although difficult to conduct formal research on such a broad field, the American Art Therapy Association has succeeded in doing such, with studies showing improvement of the patient groups emotionally and mentally in many case types.

  3. Student impressions of an art therapy class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Desiree; Bradburn, Taylor Caitlin; Kelly, Amy; Manahan, Isabel; Merriman, Hannah; Metzinger, Faith; Moore, Heather

    2012-12-01

    Art therapy facilitates the expression of thoughts and feelings and thus may serve as a self-care strategy. This paper describes the implementation of an expressive art therapy class to teach self-care during a required sophomore level nursing wellness course and the outcomes of the class through the eyes of six students. While students were initially reluctant to engage in the activity, the shared stories revealed feelings of relaxation, empowerment, value clarification, and increased self-awareness. The implication for nursing education is that the integration of art therapy into curricula may serve as an effective strategy to teaching self-care and core professional values.

  4. [Effect of forest therapy on the human psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Kawada, Tomoyuki

    2011-09-01

    Traditional thinking considered the nervous system, endocrine system and immune system to be independent of each other. However, it is now widely accepted that these systems interact through the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network. The nervous system affects the endocrine and immune systems by releasing neurotransmitters through the hypothalamus in the hypothalamic-pituitary portal circulation. The endocrine system affects the nervous and immune systems by secreting hormones and the immune system feeds back to the nervous and endocrine systems via cytokines. Forest therapy reduces sympathetic nervous activity, increases parasympathetic nervous activity, and regulates the balance of autonomic nerves. As a result, forest therapy decreases blood pressure and heart rate and has a relaxing effect. Forest therapy affects psychological responses via the brain and nervous system thereby decreasing the scores for anxiety, depression, anger, fatigue, and confusion, and increasing the score for vigor in the POMS test. Forest therapy acts on the endocrine system to reduce stress hormone levels such as urinary adrenaline, urinary noradrenaline, salivary cortisol, and blood cortisol levels and shows a relaxing effect. Forest therapy also acts directly and indirectly on the immune system to promote NK activity by increasing the number of NK cells and intracellular levels of anticancer proteins such as perforin, granulysin and granzymes. Taken together, forest therapy brings various effects on human health via the psycho-neuro-endocrino-immune network.

  5. Restoring Wisconsin Art Therapy Association in Art Therapy History: Implications for Professional Definition and Inclusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan; Burnie, Michele; Pearson, Rosemary; Ramirez, Wayne

    2016-01-01

    The Wisconsin Art Therapy Association (WATA), formally established in 1969, was the first incorporated organization of art therapists in the United States. Under the leadership of Wayne Ramirez, WATA lobbied the national association for an inclusive definition of art therapy that aimed to foster respect for psychiatric, educational, and community…

  6. Possibilities of art technigues with elements of art therapy for people with mental handicap

    OpenAIRE

    Impassa Ifoli, Ivana

    2012-01-01

    The goal of my thesis is to introduce professionals concerned with special educational or art with the art techniques with elements of art which are suitable for individuals with mental disabilities. In the theoretical part, I looked at the themes: Children's creative expression, Special art, Art Therapy, Symbols in art therapy, Goals of art therapy, Art Therapy techniques, Mental ratardacion In the practical part I have to invent an individual training - methodology for working with mentally...

  7. Music therapy in dementia care and neuro-rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2017-01-01

    medication. Music therapists,who play a role in staff training and supervision, and not only in direct music therapy practice, bring new important dimensions to how music therapy discipline is understood and how it is integrated in interdisciplinary work........ Then she turns her head away and wipes away a tear, clearly moved by his singing. In line with the increasing interest in applying music in medical care, the healing power of music has been recently highlighted in journals such as the Scientific American (Thompson & Schlaug 2015) and Musicae Scientiae...... (Croom 2015). In an article published in the journal Nature, the “surprising preservation of musical memory” in persons with Alzheimer’s Disease is explained (Jacobsen et al. 2015: 2439). The common goal for the dementia field is to advance and develop the culture of care. The music therapist may engage...

  8. Principles of Bobath neuro-developmental therapy in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimont, L

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the basics of Bobath Neurodevelopment Therapy (NDT) for the rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy, based on the fundamentals of neurophysiology. Two factors are continually stressed in therapy: first, postural tension, whose quality provides the foundation for the development of motor coordination, both normal and pathological, and plays a role in shaping the mechanism of the normal postural reflex; and secondly, the impact of damage to the central nervous system on the process of its growth and development. The practical application of the theoretical assumptions includes the use of inhibition, facilitation, and stimulation by key points of control, preparatory to evoking more nearly normal motor responses.

  9. Application of art therapy practice in educational and psychological counseling

    OpenAIRE

    Mazehóová, Yvona

    2008-01-01

    The dissertation thesis deals with art therapy applied in educational and psychological counseling. Theoretical part of the thesis defines the term "art therapy", theoretical and historical fundaments of the art therapy and touches upon possible applications in treatment. The art therapy process is described from the projective art therapy point of view; specificities of this particular approach in work with children are explained. The developmental view on the art therapy is esp. accented (a...

  10. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  11. Handbook of Art Therapy. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malchiodi, Cathy A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Providing a complete overview of art therapy, from theory and research to practical applications, this is the definitive handbook in the field. Leading practitioners demonstrate the nuts and bolts of arts-based intervention with children, adults, families, couples, and groups dealing with a wide range of clinical issues. Rich with illustrative…

  12. Technology in Art Therapy: Ethical Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alders, Amanda; Beck, Liz; Allen, Pat B.; Mosinski, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    As technology advances, art therapy practices are adapting to the demands of a new cultural climate. Art therapists face a number of ethical challenges as they interact with increasingly diverse populations and employ new media. This article addresses some of the ethical and professional issues related to the use of technology in clinical…

  13. Art Therapy and Autism: Overview and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Work with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is a growing area of significant interest for many art therapists. The purpose of this viewpoint is to outline the current impediments to the expansion of this specialty as well as to highlight the unique treatment advantages of art therapy from the author's perspectives as an…

  14. Taking a long look at Art: Reflections on the context of production and consumption of art in Art Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gilroy, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This paper draws on experiences of looking at art to consider the influence of social context on the production and consumption of art in art therapy. I draw on art historical discourses to explore the experience and relate this to looking at art in art therapy. I suggest that professional socialisation profoundly influences how art therapists look and think about what they see. I propose that attention to our tacit knowledge about art, extending art therapy’s practices of looking to include ...

  15. [Characteristics of art therapists in rehabilitative therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    Characteristics of art therapists in rehabilitative therapy Objectives: This study examines the sociodemographic, qualification- and activity-related characteristics of art therapists working in the field of rehabilitation. In 2013, an analysis of occupational groups was carried out in Germany, with the objective of describing the art therapists working there.A total of 2,303 complete datasets were submitted. From this group, those therapists mainly working in the field of rehabilitation/follow-up care/participation of disabled persons (according to Social Security Code VI and IX, n = 302) were selected and described. Most art therapists are female (average age 45 years) and largelywork part-time. Music and art therapy are the most common venues.More than 80% have a graduate degree. Methods of quality management are used.More than half of the therapists working in rehabilitation hospitals are employed in the field of psychosomatic medicine. Both individual and group therapy (each patient attending 1-2 times a week) are common. The results provide an overview of art therapy in the field of rehabilitation and show the spread in rehabilitation. Further research is indicated.

  16. Fast Food Art, Talk Show Therapy: The Impact of Mass Media on Adolescent Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic media provides rapid delivery and unlimited access to pictures, sounds, and information. The ubiquitous presence of techno-digital culture in the lives of today's adolescents may influence or contaminate the art therapy process. This article presents two case studies that illustrate how cyberspace entered into art therapy sessions and…

  17. Positive Art Therapy: Linking Positive Psychology to Art Therapy Theory, Practice, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Rebecca A.; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    As a growing movement in the larger field of mental health, positive psychology has much to offer the art therapy profession, which in turn is uniquely poised to contribute to the study of optimal functioning. This article discusses the relationship of positive psychology to art therapy and its capacity to mobilize client strengths, to induce…

  18. Many ways to grow: creative art therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R S

    1989-10-01

    So often, the prevailing thought surrounding treatment is that to be effective the treatment must be serious in tone. Yet, when you ask creative art therapists to describe their work, more often than not they will say that the ability to mix enjoyment with clinical technique is the "secret of our success." Again and again, recalcitrant, angry, underfocused, lethargic, and delayed children spring to life within an arts therapy session. Whether the modality used is music, dance, or the visual arts, children find in it the pleasure, stimulation, fun, and communication that may be missing from other aspects of their world. The creative art therapist helps a child by presenting the two-pronged approach of using the art form to foster mastery while allowing it to be a metaphor for ideas and concerns. Thus, both the process of "making something" and the symbols within the content are simultaneously providing therapeutic acid. Most exciting is the ability of the creative art therapist to unlock the child's inner world and bring new vitality to children and families alike. The creative art therapies are an important and unique tool among the constellation of health services.

  19. EDUCATION, ART AND THERAPY USING PUPPETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josinobu SOI

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available This article was presented by three Japanese professionalists in special education. Based upon their own long experience in using puppets in practice they explored in a scientific way the influence of art in the education of disabled persons and in diving support to the process of "giving sense" to the surrounding. They explained the concept of art-therapy and put an accent on the role of the puppet as a mediator in the educational process. There were few case-studies of their clinical practice given, which conferred the usefulness of puppet therapy method in the education of handicapped children.

  20. A Conversational Model of art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisdell, Nicolette

    2005-03-01

    This paper illustrates a 'Conversational Model' of art therapy. The Conversational Model was jointly created by Robert Hobson and Russell Meares. It is a developmental theory unique in its clinical application. The focus of the paper is two sessions that altered the course of therapy. In these sessions, variations on Donald Winnicott's "squiggle-game" and Hobson's "party game" were used to engage an isolative, reluctant incarcerated patient. The interventions illustrate the basic tenets of the Conversational Model. The theoretical process--from disruption to repair--is visually recorded in the artwork. The central argument of the paper is that interactive art therapy interventions can be effective, when used appropriately. By engaging the patient in a 'visual' conversation, he/she may develop an emotional vocabulary, a prerequisite for a psychotherapeutic conversation. The paper begins with a brief historical overview of the interface between art and psychoanalysis, the context out of which 'art therapy'--a distinct body of theory--evolved. Theory interweaves with clinical material in a narrative style. What I say and do in therapy is aimed at promoting understanding: a 'conversation', a meeting between two experiencing subjects (an I and a Thou), here and now, in such a way that learning can be effective in other relationships. If, as I believe, psychotherapy is a matter of promoting a personal dialogue, then we need to know how to receive, express, and share feeling: how to learn a language of the heart in its 'minute particulars'.

  1. A Framework for Treating Cumulative Trauma with Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naff, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative trauma is relatively undocumented in art therapy practice, although there is growing evidence that art therapy provides distinct benefits for resolving various traumas. This qualitative study proposes an art therapy treatment framework for cumulative trauma derived from semi-structured interviews with three art therapists and artistic…

  2. The Use of Art Therapy Following Perinatal Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speert, Ellen

    1992-01-01

    Sees art therapy as well-suited to needs of grieving women. Presents information on perinatal death and usefulness of group art therapy as intervention within framework of new psychology of women. Client art expressions illustrate how women have used art therapy to work through their grief and move toward deeper sense of personal empowerment and…

  3. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  4. Exploring What Works in Art Therapy with Children with Autism: Tacit Knowledge of Art Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Celine; Spreen, Marinus; Knorth, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are often referred to art therapy. To investigate what works in art therapy with children with ASD, the tacit knowledge of 8 experienced art therapists was explored through interviews. Promising components were arranged into the Context and Outcomes of Art Therapy (COAT) model. According to the…

  5. Exploring what works in art therapy with children with autism : Tacit knowledge of art therapists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schweizer, Celine; Spreen, Marinus; Knorth, Erik J.

    2017-01-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are often referred to art therapy. To investigate what works in art therapy with these children 'tacit knowledge' of eight well experienced art therapists was explored. Promising components were arranged into the Context and Outcomes of Art Therapy

  6. [Child developmental disorder and art therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroquea, Fabienne; Sudres, Jean-luc

    2014-01-01

    Accompanying the art therapy of a young girl suffering from evolutive disharmony shows how this therapeutic mediation can be used in a beneficial way. As part of the workshop proposed by carers, the use of painting and collages of different materials led to a transformation process. The girl became less aggressive, more receptive to her emotions and more open to the outside world.

  7. Personality Disorder and Art Therapy: Selected Personality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Art as therapy enables us to share someone else's pains as it communicates joy and happiness as exemplified in the application of cool colour paintings, whereas the warm colour paintings communicates pain and suffering. The paper recommends that a synergistic relationship could be established between the artists and ...

  8. [Art therapy to support autistic people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, Lysiane

    2014-01-01

    Art therapy, the result of a psychodynamic approach with mediation, can help autistic children and adults to express themselves and communicate. A one-to-one session gives rise to a therapeutic encounter which uses both analytical and educationaI approaches.

  9. EDUCATION, ART AND THERAPY USING PUPPETS

    OpenAIRE

    Josinobu SOI; Jajoi KOMOTO; Hitosi NAKATA

    1999-01-01

    This article was presented by three Japanese professionalists in special education. Based upon their own long experience in using puppets in practice they explored in a scientific way the influence of art in the education of disabled persons and in diving support to the process of "giving sense" to the surrounding. They explained the concept of art-therapy and put an accent on the role of the puppet as a mediator in the educational process. There were few case-studies of their clinical practi...

  10. Auto-adaptative Robot-aided Therapy based in 3D Virtual Tasks controlled by a Supervised and Dynamic Neuro-Fuzzy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Daniel Lledó

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an application formed by a classification method based on the architecture of ART neural network (Adaptive Resonance Theory and the Fuzzy Set Theory to classify physiological reactions in order to automatically and dynamically adapt a robot-assisted rehabilitation therapy to the patient needs, using a three-dimensional task in a virtual reality system. Firstly, the mathematical and structural model of the neuro-fuzzy classification method is described together with the signal and training data acquisition. Then, the virtual designed task with physics behavior and its development procedure are explained. Finally, the general architecture of the experimentation for the auto-adaptive therapy is presented using the classification method with the virtual reality exercise.

  11. An Interactionist Perspective on Understanding Gender Identity in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussak, David

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies social interactionism to gender identity issues as addressed in the art therapy literature and within interview data collected from art therapists working in the field. The findings revealed that perceptions from practicing art therapists differed from ideas put forth in the art therapy literature about gender traits that…

  12. Being Both: An Integrated Model of Art Therapy and Alternative Art Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This viewpoint proposes a model of art therapy integrated into an alternative art education program. Because of the pressure to meet educational standards, school systems may be less likely to support clinical programs that take students out of their classes. A blended model of art therapy and art education that utilizes effective strategies from…

  13. Material interaction and art product in art therapy assessment in adult mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Art materials have a central role in art therapy. The way a client interacts with art materials - material interaction - is an important source of information in art therapy assessment in adult mental health. The aim of this study was to develop the categories of material interaction and

  14. A Postmarket Surveillance Study on Electro-Neuro-Adaptive-Regulator Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod P. Bonello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electro-Neuro-Adaptive-Regulator (ENAR device is a hand-held electrotherapy which is applied using energetic medicine principles and aspects of acupuncture theory. The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a postmarket survey of persons who have used the ENAR device. The conditions for which the therapy was used and its perceived effectiveness are discussed. A web-based survey of Australian recipients of ENAR therapy was completed by 481 respondents. Most (76% used ENAR exclusively for pain relief for musculoskeletal disorders, especially back, shoulder, and neck pain; 8% used ENAR exclusively for nonmusculoskeletal disorders; while 16% used ENAR for both. Respondents reported a mean reduction in pain of 70% (t(423 = 38.73, P<.001 and functional improvement of 62% (t(423 = 10.45, P<.001 using 11-point numerical rating scales. Following ENAR treatment, medication reduction was reported by 91% of respondents. Most respondents reported high satisfaction following ENAR therapy, with between 15 and 20% achieving complete pain relief. The self-delivery of ENAR may, in part, account for the high level of satisfaction.

  15. A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Studies of Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maujean, Annick; Pepping, Christopher A.; Kendall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This review article examines current knowledge about the efficacy of art therapy based on the findings of 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted with adult populations from 2008-2013 that met a high standard of rigor. Of these studies, all but one reported beneficial effects of art therapy. Review findings suggest that art therapy may…

  16. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy in the Treatment of Traumatized Adults: A Systematic Review on Art Therapy and Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, K.A.; Niet, G.J. De; Knipscheer, J.W.; Kleber, R.J.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The

  17. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy in the Treatment of Traumatized Adults. A Systematic Review on Art Therapy and Trauma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, K.A.; Niet, G.J. De; Knipscheer, J.W.; Kleber, R.J.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The

  18. Embracing a Full Spectrum Definition of Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Heather

    2016-01-01

    In this viewpoint the author makes a case for developing a clear and concise definition of art therapy that can easily be adopted by art therapists working across a spectrum of theoretical frameworks. The reader is asked to widen the lens through which art therapy is defined by considering its influence on society, the mind, health, and behavior.…

  19. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  20. Professional Identity Perceptions of Dual-Prepared Art Therapy Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly R.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative study of the development of professional identity in art therapists who also prepare as counselors. Graduates from one university's two distinct master's degree programs were interviewed: (a) art therapy (n = 9) and (b) art therapy combined with counseling (n = 11). Most participants regardless of their degree…

  1. The DO ART Model: An Ethical Decision-Making Model Applicable to Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Jessica; Ling, Thomson

    2016-01-01

    Although art therapists have discussed the importance of taking a positive stance in terms of ethical decision making (Hinz, 2011), an ethical decision-making model applicable for the field of art therapy has yet to emerge. As the field of art therapy continues to grow, an accessible, theoretically grounded, and logical decision-making model is…

  2. Performative, Arts-Based, or Arts-Informed? Reflections on the Development of Arts-Based Research in Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledger, Alison; McCaffrey, Tríona

    2015-01-01

    Arts-based research (ABR) has emerged in music therapy in diverse ways, employing a range of interpretive paradigms and artistic media. It is notable that no consensus exists as to when and where the arts are included in the research process, or which music therapy topics are most suited to arts-based study. This diversity may pose challenges for music therapists who are developing, reading, and evaluating arts-based research. This paper provides an updated review of arts-based research literature in music therapy, along with four questions for researchers who are developing arts-based research. These questions are 1) When should the arts be introduced? 2) Which artistic medium is appropriate? 3) How should the art be understood? and 4) What is the role of the audience? We argue that these questions are key to understanding arts-based research, justifying methods, and evaluating claims arising from arts-based research. Rather than defining arts-based research in music therapy, we suggest that arts-based research should be understood as a flexible research strategy appropriate for exploring the complexities of music therapy practice. © the American Music Therapy Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Using Art in Narrative Therapy: Enhancing Therapeutic Possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Thomas D.

    1997-01-01

    Shows how applying art-therapy techniques to the basic principles of narrative therapy enhances the potential for therapists and families to open the door to externalizing conversations that lead to a new life. (Author/MKA)

  4. Art Therapy Strategies to Raise Self-Esteem in Female Juvenile Offenders: A Comparison of Art Psychotherapy and Art as Therapy Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartz, Liz; Thick, Lynette

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory, quasi-experimental study compared the impact of 2 art therapy approaches on the self-esteem of 27 female juvenile offenders. Participants took part in an art psychotherapy or an art as therapy group intervention. Self-esteem was measured with a questionnaire designed by the authors and the Harter Adolescent Self-Perception…

  5. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Enhances Task-Negative Activity in Tinnitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M. Krick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suffering from tinnitus causes mental distress in most patients. Recent findings point toward a diminished activity of the brain's default-mode network (DMN in subjects with mental disorders including depression or anxiety and also recently in subjects with tinnitus-related distress. We recently developed a therapeutic intervention, namely the Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT, which shows an effective reduction of tinnitus-related distress following a 1-week short-term treatment. This approach offers the possibility to evaluate the neural changes associated with the improvements in tinnitus distress. We previously reported gray matter (GM reorganization in DMN regions and in primary auditory areas following HNMT in cases of recent-onset tinnitus. Here we evaluate on the same patient group, using functional MRI (fMRI, the activity of the DMN following the improvements tinnitus-related distress related to the HNMT intervention.Methods: The DMN activity was estimated by the task-negative activation (TNA during long inter-trial intervals in a word recognition task. The level of TNA was evaluated twice, before and after the 1-week study period, in 18 treated tinnitus patients (“treatment group,” TG, 21 passive tinnitus controls (PTC, and 22 active healthy controls (AC. During the study, the participants in TG and AC groups were treated with HNMT, whereas PTC patients did not receive any tinnitus-specific treatment. Therapy-related effects on DMN activity were assessed by comparing the pairs of fMRI records from the TG and PTC groups.Results: Treatment of the TG group with HNMT resulted in an augmented DMN activity in the PCC by 2.5% whereas no change was found in AC and PTC groups. This enhancement of PCC activity correlated with a reduction in tinnitus distress (Spearman Rho: −0.5; p < 0.005.Conclusion: Our findings show that an increased DMN activity, especially in the PCC, underlies the improvements in tinnitus

  6. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Enhances Task-Negative Activity in Tinnitus Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Christoph M.; Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Plinkert, Peter K.; Reith, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Suffering from tinnitus causes mental distress in most patients. Recent findings point toward a diminished activity of the brain's default-mode network (DMN) in subjects with mental disorders including depression or anxiety and also recently in subjects with tinnitus-related distress. We recently developed a therapeutic intervention, namely the Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT), which shows an effective reduction of tinnitus-related distress following a 1-week short-term treatment. This approach offers the possibility to evaluate the neural changes associated with the improvements in tinnitus distress. We previously reported gray matter (GM) reorganization in DMN regions and in primary auditory areas following HNMT in cases of recent-onset tinnitus. Here we evaluate on the same patient group, using functional MRI (fMRI), the activity of the DMN following the improvements tinnitus-related distress related to the HNMT intervention. Methods: The DMN activity was estimated by the task-negative activation (TNA) during long inter-trial intervals in a word recognition task. The level of TNA was evaluated twice, before and after the 1-week study period, in 18 treated tinnitus patients (“treatment group,” TG), 21 passive tinnitus controls (PTC), and 22 active healthy controls (AC). During the study, the participants in TG and AC groups were treated with HNMT, whereas PTC patients did not receive any tinnitus-specific treatment. Therapy-related effects on DMN activity were assessed by comparing the pairs of fMRI records from the TG and PTC groups. Results: Treatment of the TG group with HNMT resulted in an augmented DMN activity in the PCC by 2.5% whereas no change was found in AC and PTC groups. This enhancement of PCC activity correlated with a reduction in tinnitus distress (Spearman Rho: −0.5; p < 0.005). Conclusion: Our findings show that an increased DMN activity, especially in the PCC, underlies the improvements in tinnitus-related distress

  7. Malarial infection among HIV Patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malarial infection among patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) attending Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Benue State was investigated between April and August 2008 to determine the level of malaria infection in HIV/AIDS patients on ART and those not on ART with respect to CD4+ counts, age and gender. A total of ...

  8. [Art-therapy in anorexia: the mediative elements?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrige, Maïtè; Calestrémé, Marie; Sudres, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Art does not have any inherent curative property; it is used as a therapeutic medium. Three mediative elements, depending on their specificities, have a role to play in the intrapsychic and interpersonal transformation of the patient: the creation the art-therapist and the group of participants. This article looks at the different components of art-therapy used in the treatment of anorexia.

  9. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    Abstract. Background: Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought ...

  10. Ethical Dilemmas of Providing Pro Bono Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.

    2011-01-01

    This viewpoint addresses ethical questions regarding the provision of art therapy as a pro bono service, a term from Latin roots that mean "for the public good." Approaches to ethical reasoning are discussed using the case of pro bono art therapy in a residential treatment program for adolescents.

  11. Establishing a Research Agenda for Art Therapy: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Donna; Deaver, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Art therapy in the United States is a young profession that would benefit from an identified research agenda to marshal resources more effectively to address gaps in the knowledge base. This article describes a Delphi study of U.S. art therapy researchers who were surveyed on research priorities for the profession. The research panelists were…

  12. Art Therapy and Experiences of Acculturation and Immigration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linesch, Debra; Ojeda, Angelica; Fuster, Maria Elena; Moreno, Stephanie; Solis, Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an expanded case study methodology that was used to explore the value that art therapy processes have in expression and understanding of the complications of immigration and acculturation. Data collected from two art therapy groups of Hispanic/Latino youth and immigrant women at an urban parish were analyzed to develop an…

  13. Toward an Ethical Application of Intersectionality in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuri, Erin

    2017-01-01

    A pertinent aim of art therapy is to support clients facing unprecedented barriers to social justice in a time of political uncertainty, which I argue is heightened by the impact of neoliberalism and globalization. In this article, I demonstrate the ongoing need to apply an intersectional framework to art therapy practice in a manner that…

  14. Art therapist's perceptions of the role of the art medium in the treatment of bereaved clients in art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bat-Or, Michal; Garti, Dana

    2018-03-02

    The exploratory study's aim was to examine how art therapists perceive the role of the art medium in the treatment of bereaved clients. Eight Israeli art therapists reflected on this topic through drawings and interviews. Qualitative analysis identified three major roles, specifically art as: 1) a space for the client's grief work; 2) a communication channel that impacts the art therapist's experience and therapeutic relationship; and 3) a shared space where client and therapist create a new narrative. The discussion deals with the findings and their clinical implications, identifying the central therapeutic processes involved in art therapy with bereaved clients.

  15. Advancing Multicultural and Diversity Competence in Art Therapy: American Art Therapy Association Multicultural Committee 1990-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.; Doby-Copeland, Cheryl; Stepney, Stella A.; Washington, Brittney N.; Vance, Lindsey D.; Short, Gwendolyn M.; Boston, Charlotte G.; Ballbé ter Maat, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    For 25 years the Multicultural Committee of the American Art Therapy Association has provided education, networking, and mentoring activities for all art therapists, as well as support for art therapists of color. The formation of the committee demonstrates increasing cultural competence within the profession, and its continuation promises future…

  16. Music Therapy Advances in Neuro-disability - Innovations in Research and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Magee, Wendy L.; Street, Alex

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the oral papers presented during a two day international conference, which took place on 7th & 8th June 2013, at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability (RHN) in London. The summary texts detail innovative research projects and clinical developments across music...

  17. A Study of the Effectiveness of Sensory Integration Therapy on Neuro-Physiological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher; Reynolds, Kathleen Sheena

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sensory integration theory proposes that because there is plasticity within the central nervous system (the brain is moldable) and because the brain consists of systems that are hierarchically organised, it is possible to stimulate and improve neuro-physiological processing and integration and thereby increase learning capacity.…

  18. Martial arts as sport and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, D T; Al-Adawi, S; Lee, Y T; Audette, J

    2007-03-01

    The term Martial Arts is often used as general phrase to describe many of the combat arts, which have developed in eastern cultures over the past millennium. This paper reviews the Martial Arts from the original context of a trio of life skills. This trio includes the healing arts such as acupuncture, the self-exploration arts such as yoga, and the vital life skills such as meditation. As Martial Arts suggests the waging of combat, the origins of the most common combat arts are reviewed, with an overview of the difference between the hard and the soft styles. The arts developed not only in the eastern, but also in all parts of the world, with references of these types of combats arts in the writings of the ancient Egyptians and Greeks. In modern times, the combat arts are performed for both exercise and sport. A review of the injuries that occur, and the health benefits that might be expected are discussed. A review of the medical literature that demonstrates some of these health benefits is included, with Tai Chi Chuan as the most studied of these. The health benefits discussed include strengthen and self-efficacy of the elderly, reduced falls, increased exercise capacity, and benefits to the immune system and autonomic nervous system. The paper emphasized the breadth of the Martial Arts and the import of these to the sports and health community.

  19. Art therapy for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, Bree; Duncan, Angel; Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-01-01

    Patients with dementias commonly experience neuropsychiatric symptoms that diminish their quality of life. Pharmacologic treatments for these symptoms are limited in their efficacy. In the absence of near-future prospects for a cure for degenerative dementias, treatments that improve neuropsychiatric symptoms and quality of life are needed. We explore the hypothesis that art therapy is useful in dementia by reviewing the extant literature. With appropriate structure, patients with dementia can produce and appreciate visual art. Case studies and several small trials suggest that art therapy engages attention, provides pleasure, and improves neuropsychiatric symptoms, social behavior, and self-esteem. Whether these benefits generalize beyond the studio remains unknown. We offer a theoretical framework that motivates the use of art therapy and propose that clinical enquiry to establish methods, assess efficacy, and define optimal conditions for the use of art therapy in Alzheimer's and other dementing disorders is timely.

  20. Redefining the Tools of Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thong, Sairalyn Ansano

    2007-01-01

    The premise of this paper is that computer-generated art is a valid therapeutic modality for empowering clients and fostering the therapeutic alliance. The author presents traditional art making methods (drawing, painting, photography, collage, and sculpture) combined or enhanced with photopaint programs and 3D computer modeling and animation…

  1. The effectiveness of art therapy in the treatment of traumatized adults: a systematic review on art therapy and trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Karin Alice; de Niet, Gerrit J; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; Kleber, Rolf J; Hutschemaekers, Giel J M

    2015-04-01

    Art therapy has often been applied in the treatment of traumatized adults, and good results in clinical practice have been reported. However, although art therapy experts underline these benefits, the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment has not been established by systematic review. The aim of this systematic review is to identify and evaluate empirical evidence of the effectiveness of art therapy for trauma treatment. As a result of the systematic review, six controlled, comparative studies on art therapy for trauma in adult patients were found. In half of the included studies, a significant decrease in psychological trauma symptoms was found in the treatment groups, and one study reported a significant decrease in depression. Although there are limitations in the number of included studies, the number of participants, the heterogeneity of included studies, and their methodological quality, the results contribute to insight into the effectiveness of art therapy in trauma treatment and form an evidence base for the urgent need for further research on art therapy and trauma treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. The meaning art therapy for the development of individual personality with visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    WOHNIGOVÁ, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the influence of art therapy on personality development of visually impaired individuals. Art therapy - an expressive therapy - is aimed at changing the behavior, thinking and emotions of a person with the use of art. Drawing is the basic diagnostic means in art therapy. The advantage of such form of therapy is that every individual is to some extent capable of expressing himself or herself through art. The goal of using art therapy with visually imp...

  3. Jogging the Cogs: Trauma-Focused Art Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy with Sexually Abused Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifalo, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Art therapy in conjunction with cognitive behavioral therapy reduces symptoms and enhances the potential for positive outcomes for sexually abused children in trauma-focused treatment. This article presents a treatment model that utilizes specific art therapy interventions to facilitate treatment, based on research on the effectiveness of combined…

  4. Art Therapy. Prevention Against the Development of Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    The aim in this research study was to focus on art therapy as a method to explore the inner life as prevention against the development of depression and to address the possibility for art therapy to be used as an early intervention tool related to depression. A Jungian epistemology was used...... as a frame for the overall understanding of well-being together with a holistic approach, including the biological, psychological, social and spiritual domains in life. Art therapy processes in the clinical part of the study aimed to include all these levels as the activation of these are considered...... as a mixed-methods design, with the quantitative part imbedded in the qualitative part. Seven participants were chosen to participate in an art therapy group during a 6-month intervention with a total of 13 meetings. The inclusion criteria were identification of mild to moderate depression based on the test...

  5. The Role of the Expressive Arts in Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creadick, Theo Alcott

    1985-01-01

    Components of the expressive arts approach to therapy for disabled students are briefly described in terms of music, movement and dance, sculpture, sandplay, drawing and painting, journal writing, poetry, playwriting, puppetry, and drama. (CL)

  6. Art therapy with serious juvenile offenders: a phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Roy W

    2009-08-01

    Forty-six seriously delinquent, incarcerated boys received individual and group therapy for 32 months. The study examined how art therapy addressed the boys' psychological needs via analysis of the boys' self-selected art productions. In descending order of frequency, the eight most frequent need themes were identity issues; need for security and tranquility; need for freedom, adventure, and fun; need for ideal parental relationships; need for affiliation and affection; erotic and sexual needs; expression of depression, childhood trauma, and other psychological problems; and religious or spiritual needs. The boys' perceptions of what was most helpful about art therapy in descending order were stress relief and relaxation, reduction of boredom, pride and self-confidence, positive recognition, working through frustration, enjoyment and fun, improvement of ability to concentrate, and the way they were treated. Three brief case histories and a description of the art therapy procedures are given. Possible implications for cognitive restructuring are discussed.

  7. Connecting parents of children with chronic pain through art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielech, Melissa; Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E

    2013-09-01

    To help address the unique needs of parents of children with chronic pain, a four module, parent-only, group art therapy curriculum was designed and implemented within an interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation treatment program. We evaluated perceived satisfaction and helpfulness of the group intervention. Fifty-three parents of children experiencing chronic pain enrolled in a day hospital interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation program participated. The voluntary parent art therapy group was offered one time per week for one hour. Participants completed a measure of satisfaction, helpfulness, and perceived social support at the end of each group session. Parents enjoyed participating in the group, agreed that they would try art therapy again, and found it to be a helpful, supportive, and validating experience. Initial results are promising that group art therapy is an appropriate and helpful means of supporting parents of children with chronic pain during interdisciplinary pain rehabilitation.

  8. Art therapy for schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, R; Milnes, D

    2005-10-19

    Many people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses continue to experience symptoms in spite of medication. In addition to medication, creative therapies, such as art therapy, may be helpful. Art therapy allows exploration of the patient's inner world in a non-threatening way through a therapeutic relationship and the use of art materials. It was mainly developed in adult psychiatric inpatient units and was designed for use with people for whom verbal psychotherapy would be impossible. To review the effects of art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia compared with standard care and other psychosocial interventions. We updated the search of the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (February 2005), hand searched reference lists and 'Inscape' (the Journal of the British Association of Art Therapists), and contacted relevant authors. We included all randomised controlled trials that compared art therapy with standard care or other psychosocial interventions for schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data from the studies. We excluded data where more than 50% of participants in any group were lost to follow up. For continuous outcomes we calculated a weighted mean difference and its 95% confidence interval. For binary outcomes we calculated a fixed effects risk ratio (RR), its 95% confidence interval (CI) and a number needed to treat (NNT). The search identified 61 reports but only two studies (total n=137) met the inclusion criteria. Both compared art therapy plus standard care with standard care alone. More people completed the therapy if allocated to the art therapy group compared with standard care in the short (n=90, 1 RCT, RR 0.97 CI 0.41 to 2.29), medium (n=47, 1 RCT, RR 0.34 CI 0.15 to 0.80) and long term (n=47, 1 RCT, RR 0.96 CI 0.57 to 1.60). Data from one mental state measure (SANS) showed a small but significant difference favouring the art-therapy group (n=73, 1 RCT, WMD -2.3 CI -4.10 to -0.5). In

  9. Dance/Movement Therapy. A Healing Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.

    This book examines the field of dance therapy from its inception in the 1940's to the present. A detailed analysis is conducted of the theory and practice of the major pioneers. The book covers biographical reports and the influence of many dance therapy leaders. Laban Movement Analysis (LMA) is discussed as well as dance therapy in specific…

  10. Developmental Transformations Art Therapy: An Embodied, Interactional Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Marni; Pitre, Renée; Johnson, David Read

    2016-01-01

    A new method of art therapy is described, based on Developmental Transformations, in which the therapist participates in joint art making with a client. The therapist's task is to present a graduated set of interpersonal demands on the client through the artwork, helping the client find adaptive responses to accommodations required by others, as…

  11. Art Therapy in Hospice: A Catalyst for Insight and Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safrai, Mary B.

    2013-01-01

    The reach of art therapy in assisting a hospice patient in confronting existential issues at the end of life is illustrated in this article with a case that took place over the course of 22 semiweekly sessions. Painting with an art therapist allowed the patient to shift from a state of anxiety and existential dread to a more accepting, fluid…

  12. Targeted Cytotoxic Therapy Kills Persisting HIV Infected Cells During ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Paul W.; Long, Julie M.; Wietgrefe, Stephen W.; Sykes, Craig; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Snyder, Olivia D.; Perkey, Katherine; Archin, Nancie M.; Choudhary, Shailesh K.; Yang, Kuo; Hudgens, Michael G.; Pastan, Ira; Haase, Ashley T.; Kashuba, Angela D.; Berger, Edward A.; Margolis, David M.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce HIV levels in plasma to undetectable levels, but rather little is known about the effects of ART outside of the peripheral blood regarding persistent virus production in tissue reservoirs. Understanding the dynamics of ART-induced reductions in viral RNA (vRNA) levels throughout the body is important for the development of strategies to eradicate infectious HIV from patients. Essential to a successful eradication therapy is a component capable of killing persisting HIV infected cells during ART. Therefore, we determined the in vivo efficacy of a targeted cytotoxic therapy to kill infected cells that persist despite long-term ART. For this purpose, we first characterized the impact of ART on HIV RNA levels in multiple organs of bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT) humanized mice and found that antiretroviral drug penetration and activity was sufficient to reduce, but not eliminate, HIV production in each tissue tested. For targeted cytotoxic killing of these persistent vRNA+ cells, we treated BLT mice undergoing ART with an HIV-specific immunotoxin. We found that compared to ART alone, this agent profoundly depleted productively infected cells systemically. These results offer proof-of-concept that targeted cytotoxic therapies can be effective components of HIV eradication strategies. PMID:24415939

  13. Creative Arts Therapy as treatment for child trauma: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blignaut-van Westrhenen, Nadine; Fritz, Elzette

    2014-01-01

    To address child trauma caused by events that affect children directly, such as abuse, or indirectly, such as divorce, creative arts therapies are used by creative arts therapists as well as psychologists and counselors. The purpose of this paper is to review such interventions and the research

  14. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Promoting Wellness in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    By combining museum education with art therapy, museums can make significant contributions to healthcare. The Creative Aging program at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., unites these fields, using artworks and art-making as catalysts to explore feelings, invite self-exploration, and build community. The program fosters an interest in…

  15. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2013 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to collect data regarding membership demographics as well as variables concerning the work environment for art therapists. These surveys can provide a detailed description of these characteristics and how they may change over time. This article statistically compares the…

  16. Creating a Framework: Art Therapy Elicits the Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A case study illustrates how art therapy was used to elicit the narrative of an adolescent male student in transition from incarceration to a transfer school setting. Childhood trauma was addressed in individual sessions and within a literacy group co-led by a reading specialist. The art therapist responded to the client's needs by broadening the…

  17. Pre-Professional Arts Based Service-Learning in Music Education and Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly; Matthews, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a study of art therapy and music education students at a Midwestern university in the United States, who participated in single-semester service-learning assignments prior to their clinical internship or student teaching experience. Undergraduate music teacher-candidates taught music to homeschool students; art therapy…

  18. When Art Therapy Migrates: The Acculturation Challenge of Sojourner Art Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Carlier, Natalia; Salom, Andree

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the phenomenon of the art therapy profession's recent migration to one country and the resulting acculturation process for the sojourner practitioner, the country of origin, and the profession itself. For their training, art therapists in Colombia must migrate to study at established international programs, bringing back…

  19. Art Therapy and Art Museum Education: A Visitor-Focused Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochford, Jessie Spraggins

    2017-01-01

    In this article I use a visitor-focused lens to examine ways in which art therapy and art museum education share similar goals and could join their efforts to serve people and communities in mutually beneficial ways. Benefits of such collaboration include affective and social development and education of visitors, a useful framework for exploring…

  20. The Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale: A Measurement System for Global Variables in Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda M.

    2009-01-01

    The Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) is a measurement system for applying numbers to global variables in two-dimensional art (drawing and painting). While it was originally developed for use with the single-picture assessment ("Draw a person picking an apple from a tree" [PPAT]), researchers can also apply many of the 14 scales of the…

  1. Art therapy focus groups for children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Havlena, Janice; Krezinski, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    Children with epilepsy are at risk for numerous psychological and social challenges. We hypothesized that art therapy focus groups would enhance the self-image of children and adolescents with epilepsy. Sixteen children with epilepsy, ages 7-18 years, were recruited from pediatric neurology clinics at the University of Wisconsin to participate in four art therapy sessions. Pre-group assessments included psychological screens (Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale; Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale; Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale) and art therapy instruments (Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale; Seizure Drawing Task; Levick Emotional and Cognitive Art Therapy Assessment). Developmental levels of drawings were significantly below age-expected standards. Following completion of focus groups, a repeat Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale showed no differences between pre- and post-test scores on any measure of this scale. However, subjects and parents were uniformly positive about their group experiences, suggesting a qualitative benefit from participation in art therapy focus groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The HIV-1 transgenic rat model of neuroHIV

    OpenAIRE

    Vigorito, Michael; Connaghan, Kaitlyn P.; Chang, Sulie L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of current combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) to limit the progression of HIV-1 to AIDS, HIV-positive individuals continue to experience neuroHIV in the form of HIV-associated neurological disorders (HAND), which can range from subtle to substantial neurocognitive impairment. NeuroHIV may also influence substance use, abuse, and dependence in HIV-positive individuals. Because of the nature of the virus, variables such as mental health co-morbidities make it difficu...

  3. Can measuring immunity to HIV during antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The vexing issue of whether the immune system can be reconstituted during HIV infection by supplying antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been a question asked about HIV-infected adults and children receiving therapy.1-9 Knowing that the immune system is sufficiently plastic in adults to show restoration of specific and ...

  4. Literature and art therapy in post-stroke psychological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Yeongcheol; Yim, Jongeun

    2015-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and long-term disability worldwide, and post-stroke depression (PSD) is a common and serious psychiatric complication of stroke. PSD makes patients have more severe deficits in activities of daily living, a worse functional outcome, more severe cognitive deficits and increased mortality as compared to stroke patients without depression. Therefore, to reduce or prevent mental problems of stroke patients, psychological treatment should be recommended. Literature and art therapy are highly effective psychological treatment for stroke patients. Literature therapy divided into poetry and story therapy is an assistive tool that treats neurosis as well as emotional or behavioral disorders. Poetry can add impression to the lethargic life of a patient with PSD, thereby acting as a natural treatment. Story therapy can change the gloomy psychological state of patients into a bright and healthy story, and therefore can help stroke patients to overcome their emotional disabilities. Art therapy is one form of psychological therapy that can treat depression and anxiety in stroke patients. Stroke patients can express their internal conflicts, emotions, and psychological status through art works or processes and it would be a healing process of mental problems. Music therapy can relieve the suppressed emotions of patients and add vitality to the body, while giving them the energy to share their feelings with others. In conclusion, literature and art therapy can identify the emotional status of patients and serve as a useful auxiliary tool to help stroke patients in their rehabilitation process.

  5. Evaluating Art Therapy to Heal the Effects of Trauma Among Refugee Youth: The Burma Art Therapy Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Cassandra; Watson-Ormond, Rose; English, Lacey; Rubesin, Hillary; Marshall, Ashley; Linton, Kristin; Amolegbe, Andrew; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    Art therapy uses the creative process to encourage personal growth and alleviate symptoms of mental illness. The Art Therapy Institute provides programs for refugee adolescents from Burma to decrease their trauma-related symptoms. This article describes and discusses the methods and findings from an evaluation of this program. The challenges of assessing art therapy with this population and assessment tool gaps are explored and suggestions for future evaluations discussed. Four validated clinical assessment tools were administered to 30 participants at baseline and follow-up to measure symptoms of anxiety, depression, and behavioral problems. Focus group discussions with clinicians were used to assess the evaluation. Nearly all participants had experienced one or more traumatic events. At baseline, results showed a higher prevalence of depression than national rates among adolescents. Follow-up results showed improvements in anxiety and self-concept. Qualitative findings suggest that specific benefits of art therapy were not adequately captured with the tools used. This evaluation showed some effects of art therapy; however, symptom-focused assessment tools are not adequate to capture clients' growth resulting from the traumatic experience and this unique intervention. Future evaluations will benefit by using an art-based assessment and measuring posttraumatic growth. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Therapy through art. Facilitating treatment of sexual abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, J J

    1992-06-01

    1. Infants and preverbal children encode memory through visual and sensorimotor channels, and there is evidence that at times of intense stress and terror, the cognitive memory system may be bypassed in all age groups. 2. Art therapy offers visual and sensorimotor media that may more easily allow repressed traumatic memories to surface. 3. Art therapy is often used with children and adolescents to overcome resistance, build trust, reduce tension, and stimulate memory. It may also be useful in working with adults, because the repression occurred at a much earlier developmental stage, the adult may also have a child's concept of the traumatic event.

  7. Cohort Profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan AC

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70 000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). PMID:23599235

  8. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Margaret T; Ingle, Suzanne M; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M John; Crane, Heidi M; Saag, Michael S; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A C

    2014-06-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) of HIV cohort studies in Europe and North America was established in 2000, with the aim of studying the prognosis for clinical events in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and the mortality of adult patients treated for HIV-1 infection. In 2002, the ART-CC collected data on more than 12,000 patients in 13 cohorts who had begun combination ART between 1995 and 2001. Subsequent updates took place in 2004, 2006, 2008, and 2010. The ART-CC data base now includes data on more than 70,000 patients participating in 19 cohorts who began treatment before the end of 2009. Data are collected on patient demographics (e.g. sex, age, assumed transmission group, race/ethnicity, geographical origin), HIV biomarkers (e.g. CD4 cell count, plasma viral load of HIV-1), ART regimen, dates and types of AIDS events, and dates and causes of death. In recent years, additional data on co-infections such as hepatitis C; risk factors such as smoking, alcohol and drug use; non-HIV biomarkers such as haemoglobin and liver enzymes; and adherence to ART have been collected whenever available. The data remain the property of the contributing cohorts, whose representatives manage the ART-CC via the steering committee of the Collaboration. External collaboration is welcomed. Details of contacts are given on the ART-CC website (www.art-cohort-collaboration.org). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  9. The Art therapy's methods use at work with handicapped children

    OpenAIRE

    Němcová, Jindřiška

    2011-01-01

    The thesis deals with using art therapy's methods and technique by multi-handicapped children. The first chapter characterizes multi-handicap, defines various disorders and their influence on the personality of a child. The second chapter introduces the therapy options which can be applied to multi-handicapped children, with a strong accent on artetherapy. In the third chapter there are various artetherapic methods and techniques which can be applied to multi-handicapped children. The fourth ...

  10. Broadening History, Expanding Possibilities: Contributions of Wayne Ramirez to Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S.; Ramirez, Wayne A.

    2013-01-01

    A broad history of art therapy in the United States offers important perspectives on which to view contemporary art therapy practice and professional identity. This article provides descriptive research on the contributions of art therapist Wayne Ramirez, an active leader in the early days of the American Art Therapy Association whose attention…

  11. Ethical Responsibilities: Preparing Students for the Real Art Therapy World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussak, David E.; Orr, Penelope

    2005-01-01

    This report addresses several educators' attempts to prepare their students for entering the "real" art therapy world. Two important components necessary to prepare students for entering the professional arenas are introduced: the need to translate theory into practice and the ability to communicate and negotiate with other helping professionals.…

  12. Terminal Stage Leukemia: Integrating Art Therapy and Family Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Emily Scudder

    1995-01-01

    Through art therapy, children express symbolically what they will not or cannot express emotionally to those close to them, and some children have the added stress of family problems that are magnified due to the situation. Presents the case history of a nine-year-old girl in the terminal stages of leukemia whose artwork symbolized family unity.…

  13. Small Waterfalls in Art Therapy Supervision: A Poetic Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreibman, Rachel; Chilton, Gioia

    2012-01-01

    This viewpoint presents aesthetic writing and reflection on the art therapy supervisor and supervisee dyad from a practice of appreciative inquiry. Through writing and exchanging poems, the authors sought to uncover the dynamics of the supervisory relationship that contributed to a positive learning experience. Poetry as inquiry provoked new…

  14. Challenging Neoliberalism and Multicultural Love in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Leah

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I examine the ties between neoliberalism and multiculturalism in art therapy in the United States. I explore the neoliberal privatization of society as an influence of individualistic norms in the profession. I explain my analysis of multiculturalism using the 1954 film "Magnificent Obsession" and introduce the concept…

  15. Facilitative Leadership: A Framework for the Creative Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimal, Girija; Metzl, Einat; Millrod, Eri

    2017-01-01

    We propose a leadership framework for the creative art therapies (CATs) as a means to affect the sociopolitical contexts of our clinical and scholarly practices. The new model of facilitative leadership includes 3 aspects: developing the self, developing others, and envisioning a creative and just future.

  16. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2011 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to gather information on general demographics, employment-related characteristics, licensing, and professional affiliations. The surveys are used in the development of national media opportunities and public policy initiatives to help increase recognition for the field of…

  17. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 90 No. 12 (Supplement) December 2013. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs) IN ROUTINE CLINICAL CARE OVER ONE YEAR. PERIOD IN A COHORT OF HAART NAIVE, HIV POSITIVE KENYAN PATIENTS. C. F. Otieno, MBChB, MMed (Int. Med), ...

  18. Stories in the Cloth: Art Therapy and Narrative Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlock, Lisa Raye

    2016-01-01

    In this article I weave together the relevance of narrative textile work in therapeutic and human rights contexts; showcase Common Threads, an international nonprofit that uses story cloths with survivors of gender-based violence; outline a master's level art therapy course in story cloths; and relate how textiles helped build a sibling…

  19. An Art Therapy Exploration of Immigration with Latino Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linesch, Debra; Aceves, Hilda C.; Quezada, Paul; Trochez, Melissa; Zuniga, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This grounded theory study utilized art therapy techniques to explore the experiences of 8 Latino families that had immigrated to the United States. Focus group facilitators invited the parents and adolescent children in the families to share their acculturation experiences verbally and in family drawings. Emergent themes from each of three focus…

  20. An Application of Art Therapy to the Trauma of Rape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrave-Nykaza, Karen

    1994-01-01

    Explores rape in terms of specific trauma usually experienced after rape: posttraumatic stress disorder, rape trauma syndrome, and permanent life changes. Explores ways in which art therapy can help rape victim engage in healing. Reviews study of one rape victim and current literature as example of life-altering effects of rape and importance of…

  1. [Art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of patients with mental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apotsos, P

    2012-01-01

    Despite the use of art therapy in various psychiatric structures and articles supporting its application, in recent years very few data grounded on primary research have been published. Given the complexity of psychiatric disorders the number of people who suffer from them, and the fact that the primary treatment in psychiatric disorders remains pharmacotherapy, questions about the effectiveness of art therapy (as a complimentary treatment) remain open. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of art therapy in psychosocial rehabilitation of people with psychiatric disorders. A search of the literature and electronic databases using indexing words was conducted. The criteria for inclusion of articles were: a. studies had to be "outcome-intervention" studies, b. studies should concern only intervention in adults, and c. studies had to include patients with diagnoses according to the DSM of the American Psychiatric Association. Finally, only five articles were included in this systematic review. There is evidence for the effectiveness of art therapy in areas related to the psychosocial rehabilitation of persons suffering from psychiatric disorders, usually in combination with pharmacotherapy. The findings of the surveys reviewed are encouraging and justify the conduct of additional primary research.

  2. Cohort profile: Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Margaret T.; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Costagliola, Dominique; Justice, Amy C.; de Wolf, Frank; Cavassini, Matthias; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Casabona, Jordi; Hogg, Robert S.; Mocroft, Amanda; Lampe, Fiona C.; Dabis, François; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Sterling, Timothy R.; del Amo, Julia; Gill, M. John; Crane, Heidi M.; Saag, Michael S.; Guest, Jodie; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Boulle, Andrew; Chêne, Geneviève; Gill, John; Hans-Ulrich Haerry, David; Hogg, Robert; Justice, Amy; Kitahata, Mari; Lampe, Fiona; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael; Sterling, Timothy; Williams, Matthew; Zangerle, Robert; Sterne, Jonathan; May, Margaret; Ingle, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    The advent of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996 resulted in fewer patients experiencing clinical events, so that some prognostic analyses of individual cohort studies of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals had low statistical power. Because of this, the

  3. [The art of therapy in Islamic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masić, I

    1997-01-01

    History is a witness of the great importance and influence of islamic science from the period of "Golden Age of Arabic Civilisation". A famous scientist said: "Sciences has no country, it is international; we all share in fruits of investigations of people from different traditions and all ages." Scientists from the early period of islamic era had set fire of a stream of man's thought and progress, observation, experiments and tradition, that have become a weapon of modern science. All of that was based upon Quran and Hadiths, that have been their guidelines when setting free human mind from taboos. Medieval Arabian scientists have followed the words of Holly Prophet Mohammad s.a.v.s., saying that searching for knowledge have had to be the most important task for people, and that ink more saint than blood of the saints. These attitudes of Holly Prophet have awaken desire for studying with muslim scientists. The result of that desire became a key of scientific progress. There are many worldwide famous arabian scientists: El-Kindi, Er-Razi, Ibn Sina, El-Biruni, Ibu Hajsem, Ez-Zahravi, El-Farabi, Ibn Zuhr, Ibn Ruzd etc. These names, among several hundreds of arabian physicians, attribute "Golden Age" of islamic science. That period was characterised by movements, reprocessing of ideas. That reprocessing of ideas has gained the great minds together, and that process is continuous. That is why we have to be grateful to them. Famous Muslim physicians defined medicine as skill that dealt in keeping good health, coped with ills and health recovering. They have also modified many Greek writings and established basic principles of the art of medicine. What is significant is that, regardless of historical past and modern technical and technological presence, these principles are still accurate for understanding of medical science. These principles are what the author is discussing in detail in this paper about.

  4. Art Enrichment: Evaluating a Collaboration between Head Start and a Graduate Art Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klorer, P. Gussie; Robb, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Head Start, a U.S. federally funded program, prepares children for school through early childhood intervention in social-emotional and cognitive arenas. This article describes program evaluation survey results from the past 5 years of an 18-year collaboration between a university graduate art therapy program and 8 Head Start centers. Graduate art…

  5. The Gorilla Did It!: Integration of Art Therapy and Language Arts in the Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Snow, Peggy

    1997-01-01

    Responds to a study that found that group art therapy, bibliotherapy, and whole language instruction provide a good match for interdisciplinary learning for special needs students. Reviews and analyzes published literature in these areas, as well as in interdisciplinary instruction. Looks at program procedures and strengths and weaknesses. (RJM)

  6. Music Therapy Advances in Neuro-disability - Innovations in Research and Practice: Summary Report and Reflections on a Two-Day International Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Winn O'Kelly; Wendy Magee; Alex Street; Jörg Fachner; Adèle Isabel Drake; Joel Cahen; Teppo Särkämö; Hanne Mette Ridder; Monika Jungblut; Ruth Melhuish; Dale Taylor

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a summary of the oral papers presented during a two day international conference, which took place on 7th & 8th June 2013, at the Royal Hospital for Neuro-disability (RHN) in London. The summary texts detail innovative research projects and clinical developments across music therapy, music neuroscience and music psychology addressing the needs of those with acquired and degenerative neurological conditions. The diverse and evolving work in this field is reflected in the ...

  7. The effectiveness of neuro-music therapy according to the Heidelberg model compared to a single session of educational counseling as treatment for tinnitus: a controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Hutter, Elisabeth; Plinkert, Peter K; Bolay, Hans-Volker

    2015-03-01

    Tinnitus is a very common symptom, yet the quest for an effective treatment is challenging. Results from several clinical trials support the notion that neuro-music therapy is an effective means to reduce tinnitus distress with short duration and long lasting effect. However, until now, the effectiveness has not been tested in a controlled trial against an active comparator. The trial was designed as two-center, parallel intervention group controlled study with two intervention groups: Counseling (50minute individualized personal instruction) or neuro-music therapy (counseling plus eight 50-minute sessions of individualized music therapy). Data of n=290 patients suffering from chronic tinnitus were analyzed. Outcome measure was the change in Tinnitus Questionnaire Total Scores (TQ) from baseline (admission) to end of treatment. Both treatment groups achieved a statistically relevant reduction in TQ scores, though 66% of patients in the music therapy group attained a clinically meaningful improvement compared to 33% in the counseling group. A binary logistic regression revealed two variables significantly influencing therapy outcome: initial tinnitus score and type of therapy with an OR for the music therapy compared to the counseling of 4.34 (CI 2.33-8.09). Counseling is an appropriate treatment option with well above chance of improvement. The neuro-music therapy outperformed the counseling. This treatment targets the tinnitus sound itself, is short in duration, intrinsically motivating and easy to operate and thus presents a possible complement to the therapeutic spectrum in chronic tinnitus. The trial was registered at the ClinicalTrials.gov registry (ID: NCT01845155). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Some aspects of using expressive arts-therapies in education and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miholić Damir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary approaches in different fields of expressive arts-therapies (art-therapy, music therapy, dance movement therapy, bibliotherapy, psychodrama and drama therapy are presented in this article. In that way, theoretical background, some elements of observation and assessment, as well as specific methods of therapy interventions are described. Relevant knowledge about different aspects of expressive art-therapies is presented by reviewing some recent references and results of different investigations. Results of previous researches pointed out that expressive arts-therapy may have positive influence on different aspects of psychosocial functioning. Also, further investigations are needed in order to achieve best practice in different fields of education and rehabilitation.

  9. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2016-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual…

  10. Controversies in neuro-ophthalmology: Steroid therapy for traumatic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is an increase in the incidence of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON due to increasing urbanization and rapid spurt in the number of motor vehicles on the road. Despite early presentation and ease of diagnosis the visual outcomes in TON are still limited. There is also significant confusion about the timing, dose and efficacy of steroid treatment in its management. Purpose: To provide a clinical update of the pros and cons of steroid therapy for TON. Design: The paper is a retrospective review of the currently available literature in the English language indexed in PubMed. Methods: A PubMed search was conducted by the authors using the following terms: Traumatic optic neuropathy, megadose, steroids, methylprednisolone. Relevant original articles, review articles, and case reports related to the topic of discussion were evaluated and discussed in the paper. Results: There is no prospective randomized control trial evaluating the effect of steroids in TON. There are varying reports on the effect of steroid therapy from significant improvement to no difference compared to observation. Conclusion: The decision to give steroids to patients with TON has to be on an individual case to case basis and must involve informed consent from the patient. There are documented advantages and disadvantages of steroid therapy and a prospective, randomized, controlled trial is necessary comparing steroids, surgery and observation before definitive management can be evolved.

  11. Influencing and moderating factors analyzed in the group art therapy of two schizophrenic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Chieh; Ku, Yung-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Art therapy has been considered a guideline treatment for schizophrenia. Due to difficulty in the outcome measurement, the research is difficult and controversial. Here, we presented two schizophrenic patients receiving the regular art group therapy. We compared their characteristics and different outcome. Art therapy is difficult to quantify. However, we could qualify the improvement from the individual case. Further study might be focus on how to make appropriate qualification of art therapy and individualized difference instead of enrollment of huge data bank.

  12. Creative competence, artistic expression and art therapy: new psychoeducational horizons

    OpenAIRE

    Chac??n-L??pez, Helena; R????i??ka, Michal; Gonz??lez-Garc??a, Erika; Caurcel, M. Jes??s

    2016-01-01

    The development of creative competence, through artistic expression is being forgotten in recent times. Moreover, new practices such as art therapy open the way from the field of psychotherapy to education to help fill these gaps by providing tools and strategies for both teachers and students for the integral development of individuals, promoting creativity and imagination, among others. This article discusses the importance of developing creative competence, through artistic expression and ...

  13. [Art therapy in the psychiatric clinic. A historical analysis of the development of art studios].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günter, M

    1990-09-01

    The present study examines the building up of art classes in psychiatric hospitals in the thirties and forties of this century. Until 1950 the worldwide total of 34 art classes had come into being. The growing psychiatric interest in drawings of patients in the 19th century is related to changes in psychiatric theory moving from "moral treatment" to descriptive psychiatry at the turn of the century. All in all the installation of 11 artistic workshops for patients can be traced before the 1st world war. They were part of work therapy in german private clinics as a means to put patients of a higher social standing to a regular activity instead of field and garden work, which was medically indicated but socially unacceptable. During the course of development of a diagnostic interest since 1870 the drawings were all along considered to be the immediate expression of the patients inner world. Such a view had become possible, after in modern art the conceptions about the meaning of art had changed. Paradigmatically this connection can be shown in the work of Prinzhorn. First therapeutic attempts were then started by different psychoanalysts especially in the treatment of children. These formed an important basis for the establishment of art classes in psychiatric hospitals later on. Painting was now considered as a means to approach the hidden unconscious. The study continues to explain in which way the therapeutic applications of art therapy depended on the convergence of view points in esthetic and therapeutic theory.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Snipping, Gluing, Writing: The Properties of Collage as an Arts-Based Research Practice in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Gioia; Scotti, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    This article describes an artistic inquiry conducted by two art therapists using a dialogic method of collage and letter writing over a period of 4 weeks. The goal of the project was to broaden understanding of arts-based research and to discover the properties of collage as a research practice in art therapy. A thematic analysis of the visual and…

  15. The Dis-Art Creative Journey, Art Therapy for Persons with Disabilities: Adaptation of the Creative Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto, Paola; Bruno, Teresa; Cosco, Marianna; Del Curatolo, Annamaria; Frigenti, Franca; Macchioni, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a 10-session group art therapy program for people with physical and neurological disabilities. This program, the DIS-ART Creative Journey, was adapted from the Creative Journey used with cancer patients, and was tested in Italy by 4 art therapists. The 5-step structure of each session and the 10 facilitating techniques used…

  16. Art Therapy and Cognitive Processing Therapy for Combat-Related PTSD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Melissa; Decker, Kathleen P.; Kruk, Kerry; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2018-01-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to determine if art therapy in conjunction with Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) was more effective for reducing symptoms of combat posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than CPT alone. Veterans (N = 11) were randomized to receive either individual CPT, or individual CPT in conjunction with individual art therapy. PTSD Checklist–Military Version and Beck Depression Inventory–II scores improved with treatment in both groups with no significant difference in improvement between the experimental and control groups. Art therapy in conjunction with CPT was found to improve trauma processing and veterans considered it to be an important part of their treatment as it provided healthy distancing, enhanced trauma recall, and increased access to emotions. PMID:29332989

  17. Common Ground of Two Paradigms: Incorporating Critical Theory into Current Art Therapy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Clinical art therapy and studio-based community art therapy represent two major paradigms in art therapy practice. This viewpoint explores how critical theory can be incorporated into both paradigms and result in common ground between them. Critical theory encompasses an understanding of oppression in psychological, social, and cultural contexts…

  18. A Call for Diversity: The Need to Recruit and Retain Ethnic Minority Students in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Yasmine J.; Yali, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear need for greater diversity in the field of art therapy with particular attention to increasing the representation of students of color in art therapy training programs. However, little to no data exists on how art therapy programs are actively recruiting for diversity. Diversity in the classroom can offer novel perspectives on…

  19. What Do We See?: Extending Understanding of Visual Experience in the Art Therapy Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Visual experience and meaning making in art therapy constitute more than looking at the image created. Clients and therapists utilize the environment of therapy in ways that have been hitherto unrecognized. This article presents a key finding from an art-based study of the experience of the art therapy room from the perspectives of client and…

  20. Outcome Studies on the Efficacy of Art Therapy: A Review of Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Sarah; D'Archer, Jeanne; Kaplan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    In response to a review by Reynolds, Nabors, and Quinlan (2000) of the art therapy literature prior to 1999, this review article identifies studies from 1999-2007 that measured outcomes of art therapy effectiveness with all ages of clinical and nonclinical populations. Although numerous studies blend art therapy with other modalities, this review…

  1. The Use of Art Therapy in Treatment Programs to Promote Spiritual Recovery from Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feen-Calligan, Holly

    1995-01-01

    Illustrates the relationship between art therapy, spirituality, and recovery supported by the philosophy of Alcoholic Anonymous, and offers a model in which art therapy can be used in treatment programs to facilitate spiritual recovery from addiction. Discusses personal experiences related to the use of art therapy for assisting in addiction…

  2. Outcomes of Universal Access to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengiz Tsertsvadze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2004, Georgia achieved universal access to free antiretroviral therapy (ART. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the outcomes of Georgia's ART program. The study included adult patients enrolled in the ART program from 2004 through 2009. Of 752 patients, 76% were men, 60% were injection drug users (IDU, 59% had a history of an AIDS-defining illness, and 53% were coinfected with hepatitis C. The median baseline CD4 cell count was 141 cells/mm3. During followup, 152 (20% patients died, with the majority of deaths occurring within 12 months of ART initiation. Mortality was associated with advanced immunodeficiency or the presence of incurable disease at baseline. Among patients remaining on treatment, the median CD4 gain was 216 cell/mm3 and 86% of patients had viral load <400 copies/ml at the last clinical visit. The Georgia ART program has been successful in treating injection drug users infected with HIV.

  3. [NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN NEURO-REHABILITATION: ROBOT MEDIATED THERAPY IN CONDITONS POST CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM IMPAIRMENTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazekas, Gábor; Tavaszi, Ibolya; Tóth, András

    2016-03-30

    Decreasing the often-seen multiple disabilities as a consequence of central nervous system impairments requires broadening of the tools of rehabilitation. A promising opportunity for this purpose is the application of physiotherapy robots. The development of such devices goes back a quarter of century. Nowadays several robots are commercially available both for supporting upper and lower limb therapy. The aim is never to replace the therapists, but rather to support and supplement their work. It is worthwhile applying these devices for goal-oriented exercises in high repetition, which one physically fatiguing for the therapist or for the correction of functional movement by various strategies. Robot mediated therapy is also useful for motivation of the patient and making the rehabilitation programme more versatile. Robots can be used for assessment of the neuromotor status as well. Several clinical studies have been executed in this field, all over the world. Meta-analyses based on randomized, controlled trials show that supplementing the traditional physiotherapy with a robot-mediated component presents advantage for the patients. Further studies are necessary to clarify which modality and intensity of the exercises, in which group of patients, in which stage lead to the expected outcome.

  4. Creative competence, artistic expression and art therapy: new psychoeducational horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Chacón-López

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of creative competence, through artistic expression is being forgotten in recent times. Moreover, new practices such as art therapy open the way from the field of psychotherapy to education to help fill these gaps by providing tools and strategies for both teachers and students for the integral development of individuals, promoting creativity and imagination, among others. This article discusses the importance of developing creative competence, through artistic expression and art therapy practices that have found benefits both in lifelong education, and clinical performance, helping to prevent or heal existing conditions, achieving improvement of individual and collective welfare. Resumen: El desarrollo de la competencia creativa, a través de la expresión artística está siendo olvidada en los últimos tiempos. Asimismo, nuevas prácticas como la arteterapia se abren camino, desde el ámbito de la psicoterapia al educativo, para ayudar suplir estas carencias, proporcionando herramientas y estrategias tanto al profesorado, como al alumnado, para conseguir el desarrollo integral de las personas, potenciando la creatividad y la imaginación, entre otras. Este artículo expone la importancia del desarrollo de la competencia creativa, a través de la expresión artística y de la arteterapia, prácticas que han constatado beneficios tanto en los procesos educativos a lo largo de la vida, como en la actuación clínica, ayudando a prevenir o curar patologías existentes, consiguiendo una mejora del bienestar individual y colectivo.

  5. Healing pathways: art therapy for American Indian cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warson, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    There is a paucity of research addressing quality of life factors for American Indian and Alaska Native cancer survivors. Complementary forms of therapy, such as art therapy, are beginning to address quality of life factors through the "healing" arts for cancer survivors. The purpose of this mixed methods pilot was to explore the effects of culturally relevant art interventions on stress reduction for American Indian cancer survivors and their family members. Forty-six adult participants attended one of three workshops held within two settlements of the Coharie tribe and one southeastern urban tribal center. The data collected consisted of a pretest and posttest State-Trait Personality Inventory (STPI) and artwork resulting from three directed interventions. The artwork was analyzed using qualitative coding methods; however, the scores from the STPI were inconclusive because the inventory was determined to be culturally biased. While statistical significance was not achieved, the findings from qualitative coding reinforced a native concept of wellness focusing on the complex interaction between mind, body, spirit, and context. This pilot study also demonstrated how a community-driven approach was instrumental in the development of the overall workshop format. An expansion of the pilot study is also presented with preliminary results available in 2012.

  6. Measuring the contribution of art therapy in multidisciplinary treatment of personality disorders: The construction of the Self-expression and Emotion Regulation in Art Therapy Scale (SERATS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeyen, S.W.; Hooren, S. van; Veld, W.M. van der; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the use of art therapy in clinical practice, its appreciation and reported beneficial results, no instruments are available to measure specific effects of art therapy among patients with personality disorders cluster B/C in multidisciplinary treatment. In the present study, we described the

  7. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, Gordana Mandić

    2013-11-01

    The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original "Synallactic collective image technique" (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.). The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  8. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. Case report. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original “Synallactic collective image technique” (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.. The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Conclusion. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  9. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Restores Attention-Related Activity in the Angular Gyrus in Chronic Tinnitus Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Christoph M.; Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Plinkert, Peter K.; Reith, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tinnitus is the perception of a phantom sound without external acoustic stimulation. Recent tinnitus research suggests a relationship between attention processes and tinnitus-related distress. It has been found that too much focus on tinnitus comes at the expense of the visual domain. The angular gyrus (AG) seems to play a crucial role in switching attention to the most salient stimulus. This study aims to evaluate the involvement of the AG during visual attention tasks in tinnitus sufferers treated with Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT), an intervention that has been shown to reduce tinnitus-related distress. Methods: Thirty-three patients with chronic tinnitus, 45 patients with recent-onset tinnitus, and 35 healthy controls were tested. A fraction of these (21/21/22) were treated with the “compact” version of the HNMT lasting 1 week with intense treatments, while non-treated participants were included as passive controls. Visual attention was evaluated during functional Magnet-Resonance Imaging (fMRI) by a visual Continous Performance Task (CPT) using letter-based alarm cues (“O” and “X”) appearing in a sequence of neutral letters, “A” through “H.” Participants were instructed to respond via button press only if the letter “O” was followed by the letter “X” (GO condition), but not to respond if a neutral letter appeared instead (NOGO condition). All participants underwent two fMRI sessions, before and after a 1-week study period. Results: The CPT results revealed a relationship between error rates and tinnitus duration at baseline whereby the occurrence of erroneous “GO omissions” and the reaction time increased with tinnitus duration. Patients with chronic tinnitus who were treated with HNMT had decreasing error rates (fewer GO omissions) compared to treated recent-onset patients. fMRI analyses confirmed greater activation of the AG during CPT in chronic patients after HNMT treatment compared to treated recent

  10. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Restores Attention-Related Activity in the Angular Gyrus in Chronic Tinnitus Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph M. Krick

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tinnitus is the perception of a phantom sound without external acoustic stimulation. Recent tinnitus research suggests a relationship between attention processes and tinnitus-related distress. It has been found that too much focus on tinnitus comes at the expense of the visual domain. The angular gyrus (AG seems to play a crucial role in switching attention to the most salient stimulus. This study aims to evaluate the involvement of the AG during visual attention tasks in tinnitus sufferers treated with Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT, an intervention that has been shown to reduce tinnitus-related distress.Methods: Thirty-three patients with chronic tinnitus, 45 patients with recent-onset tinnitus, and 35 healthy controls were tested. A fraction of these (21/21/22 were treated with the “compact” version of the HNMT lasting 1 week with intense treatments, while non-treated participants were included as passive controls. Visual attention was evaluated during functional Magnet-Resonance Imaging (fMRI by a visual Continous Performance Task (CPT using letter-based alarm cues (“O” and “X” appearing in a sequence of neutral letters, “A” through “H.” Participants were instructed to respond via button press only if the letter “O” was followed by the letter “X” (GO condition, but not to respond if a neutral letter appeared instead (NOGO condition. All participants underwent two fMRI sessions, before and after a 1-week study period.Results: The CPT results revealed a relationship between error rates and tinnitus duration at baseline whereby the occurrence of erroneous “GO omissions” and the reaction time increased with tinnitus duration. Patients with chronic tinnitus who were treated with HNMT had decreasing error rates (fewer GO omissions compared to treated recent-onset patients. fMRI analyses confirmed greater activation of the AG during CPT in chronic patients after HNMT treatment compared to treated

  11. Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy Restores Attention-Related Activity in the Angular Gyrus in Chronic Tinnitus Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Christoph M; Argstatter, Heike; Grapp, Miriam; Plinkert, Peter K; Reith, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tinnitus is the perception of a phantom sound without external acoustic stimulation. Recent tinnitus research suggests a relationship between attention processes and tinnitus-related distress. It has been found that too much focus on tinnitus comes at the expense of the visual domain. The angular gyrus (AG) seems to play a crucial role in switching attention to the most salient stimulus. This study aims to evaluate the involvement of the AG during visual attention tasks in tinnitus sufferers treated with Heidelberg Neuro-Music Therapy (HNMT), an intervention that has been shown to reduce tinnitus-related distress. Methods: Thirty-three patients with chronic tinnitus, 45 patients with recent-onset tinnitus, and 35 healthy controls were tested. A fraction of these (21/21/22) were treated with the "compact" version of the HNMT lasting 1 week with intense treatments, while non-treated participants were included as passive controls. Visual attention was evaluated during functional Magnet-Resonance Imaging (fMRI) by a visual Continous Performance Task (CPT) using letter-based alarm cues ("O" and "X") appearing in a sequence of neutral letters, "A" through "H." Participants were instructed to respond via button press only if the letter "O" was followed by the letter "X" (GO condition), but not to respond if a neutral letter appeared instead (NOGO condition). All participants underwent two fMRI sessions, before and after a 1-week study period. Results: The CPT results revealed a relationship between error rates and tinnitus duration at baseline whereby the occurrence of erroneous "GO omissions" and the reaction time increased with tinnitus duration. Patients with chronic tinnitus who were treated with HNMT had decreasing error rates (fewer GO omissions) compared to treated recent-onset patients. fMRI analyses confirmed greater activation of the AG during CPT in chronic patients after HNMT treatment compared to treated recent-onset patients. Conclusions: Our

  12. The Relationship of School Art Therapy and the American School Counselor National Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randick, Nicole M.; Dermer, Shannon B.

    2013-01-01

    Art therapists must overcome systemic challenges in order to continue to provide art therapy services in U.S. public schools. An understanding of how art therapy programs fit within the national standards of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) and the ASCA National Model may help in this effort. This review article compares recently…

  13. The History of Art Therapy at the National Institutes of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2012-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Center is a government facility that has a long history of groundbreaking research. Art therapy research began at NIH in 1958 with Hanna Kwiatkowska, whose work contributed to the foundation of art therapy with families, and with Harriet Wadeson, who conducted psychodynamic art therapy…

  14. Social Action in Practice: Shifting the Ethnocentric Lens in Cross-Cultural Art Therapy Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    With the advance of globalization and changing demographics, an intercultural perspective that is self-reflexively aware of ethnocentric bias is increasingly important for art therapists. This article draws from cross-cultural art therapy in the international service realm to consider the nature of art therapy as a distinctly cultural practice.…

  15. A Story of a Healing Relationship: The Person-Centered Approach in Expressive Arts Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunhee

    2010-01-01

    In expressive arts therapy, visual art, movement, music, poetry, and creative writing offer clients opportunities to explore their hidden feelings expressed in the art forms. The colors, lines, motions, or sounds expressed during the therapy session promote better understanding of the self with support of the therapist. It is crucial to have a…

  16. Claiming the Polarity of Art Therapy: Lessons from the Field in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salom, Andrée

    2017-01-01

    Long-posed questions about art therapy's artistic and psychological polarity are revisited when the profession is introduced into a new country. In a symposium dedicated to the process of advancing the profession in Colombia, attendees who were unfamiliar with art therapy raised questions that resonated with the historical polarity of art versus…

  17. Art Therapy for Individuals with Borderline Personality: Using a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drass, Jessica Masino

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy has shown benefits for people with borderline personality disorder and borderline personality traits by alleviating interpersonal difficulties such as affect regulation, an unstable sense of self, self-injurious behaviors, and suicidal ideation. Borderline personality disorder is currently viewed as a trauma spectrum disorder, because…

  18. Art therapy with cancer patients during chemotherapy sessions: an analysis of the patients' perception of helpfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forzoni, Silvia; Perez, Michela; Martignetti, Angelo; Crispino, Sergio

    2010-03-01

    Art therapy has been shown to be helpful to cancer patients at different stages in the course of their illness, especially during isolation for bone marrow transplantation, during radiotherapy treatment, and after treatment. The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to assess whether patients during chemotherapy sessions perceive art therapy as helpful and (2) to outline in which way art therapy is perceived as helpful. 157 cancer patients attending an Oncology Day Hospital (Siena, Italy) met the art therapist during their chemotherapy sessions. The art therapist used the same art therapy technique with each patient during the first encounter ("free collage"); afterward the relationship would evolve in different ways according to the patients' needs. A psychologist interviewed a randomized group of 54 patients after the chemotherapy treatment using a semistructured questionnaire. Out of the 54 patients, 3 found art therapy "not helpful" ("childish," "just a chat," "not interesting"). The other 51 patients described their art therapy experience as "helpful." From patients' statements, three main groups emerged: (1) art therapy was perceived as generally helpful (e.g., "relaxing," "creative"; 37.3%), (2) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the dyadic relationship (e.g., "talking about oneself and feeling listened to"; 33.3%), and (3) art therapy was perceived as helpful because of the triadic relationship, patient-image-art therapist (e.g., "expressing emotions and searching for meanings"; 29.4%). These data have clinical implications, as they show that art therapy may be useful to support patients during the stressful time of chemotherapy treatment. Different patients use it to fulfil their own different needs, whether it is a need to relax (improved mood) or to talk (self-narrative) or to visually express and elaborate emotions (discovering new meanings). Some illustrations of patients using the art therapy process to fulfill these three different needs are

  19. Creating an art therapy anger management protocol for male inmates through a collaborative relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiner, Mary J; Tuomisto, Laura; Bouyea, Elizabeth; Gussak, David E; Aufderheide, Dean

    2012-10-01

    A training partnership was established with the Florida Department of Corrections in 2003, and over the ensuing years, art therapy graduate student interns from Florida State University's Graduate Art Therapy Program have been placed in local prisons at different times. Recently, the art therapy interns worked closely with the supervising psychologist in one prison to alleviate and redirect aggression by integrating cognitive-behavioral techniques with art therapy directives. The art therapy interns and the psychologist developed a curriculum using a combination of workbook exercises and art tasks to develop and increase the participants' anger management skills, the Art Therapy Anger Management Protocol. This article provides an overview of art therapy in prison, the cognitive-behavioral approach to anger management with prison inmates, and how art therapy was used to support this approach. Examples of completed art tasks designed to correspond with the workbook curriculum are presented. Overall, this article presents the successful collaboration between the psychologist and art therapists and demonstrates how they facilitated improvement in the participants' anger management skills through this program.

  20. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) rationing and access mechanisms and their impact on youth ART utilization in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jimmy-Gama; Gibson, Sarah; McPake, Barbara; Maleta, Ken

    2011-06-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) staging is a commonly used rationing mechanism for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) among various HIV infected populations including youths in most developing countries. Rationing is defined as any policy or practice that restricts consumption of or access to certain goods due to its limited supply. However, as HIV prevalence is rapidly increasing among youth, understanding the capacity of the staging approach to achieve HAART uptake in youth is of considerable importance. This study aimed to explore how HAART rationing and access mechanisms impact on youth's utilization of HAART in Malawi. The study used mixed methods with quantitative analysis of existing Ministry of Health Clinical HIV Unit data used to determine existing levels of youth HAART use. Qualitative methods employed in-depth interviews that interviewed nine ART providers, nine HIV positive youth on HAART and nine HIV positive youth not on HAART; and field observations to nine ART clinics were used to understand HAART rationing and access mechanisms and how such mechanisms impact youth uptake of HAART. The findings revealed that ART providers use both explicit rationing mechanisms like WHO clinical staging and implicit rationing mechanisms like use of waiting lists, queues and referral in ART provision. However, the WHO staging approach had some challenges in its implementation. It was also observed that factors like non-comprehensive approach to HAART provision, costs incurred to access HAART, negative beliefs and misconceptions about HAART and HIV were among the key factors that limit youth access to HAART. The study recommends that while WHO staging is successful as a rationing mechanism in Malawi, measures should be put in place to improve access to CD4 assessment for clients who may need it. ART providers also need to be made aware of the implicit rationing mechanisms that may affect HAART access. There is also need to improve monitoring of those HIV

  1. Art Therapy Outcomes in the Rehabilitation Treatment of a Stroke Patient: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Min-Young; Lee, Jae-Hyuk; Chun, Sae-il

    2008-01-01

    This case report discusses the potential for art therapy to aid in the recovery of early-chronic stroke patients. The patient was diagnosed with having a subarachnoid hemorrhage from a cerebral aneurysm rupture 1 year prior to hospitalization. Therapies used as part of the patient's treatment included 10 weeks of art therapy conducted twice a…

  2. A Pilot Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for Refugee Youth from Burma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah Dorothy; Emmerling, Dane; Gavarkavich, Diane; Mershon, Claire-Helene; Linton, Kristin; Rubesin, Hillary; Agnew-Brune, Christine; Eng, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Art therapy is a promising form of therapy to address mental health concerns for refugee youth. This article describes the development and implementation of a pilot evaluation of an art therapy program for refugee adolescents from Burma currently living in the United States. Evaluation activities were based on the Centers for Disease Control and…

  3. Supportive care with art therapy, for patients in isolation during stem cell transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnese, Alessandra; Lamparelli, Teresa; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Luzzatto, Paola

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the art therapy study was twofold: 1) to identify the specific factors of the art therapy experience perceived as helpful by patients undergoing an allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT); and 2) to establish an appropriate criterion for referral to art therapy among this population. Between 2006 and 2010, a dedicated art therapist met all the patients who were referred to her by the hematologist. The art therapy approach and techniques are described. Outcome was evaluated by self-assessment, based on written questionnaires that were given to the patients before discharge. Seventy-four patients followed the weekly individual sessions during isolation and filled out the questionnaire. All of them defined the art therapy experience as "helpful" and specified in which way it had been helpful. Through a thematic analysis of the patients' written comments, three specific aspects of art therapy, which the patients found most helpful, were identified: (1) being able to calm down from anxiety, through the use of art therapy techniques (77.02%); (2) feeling free to express and share difficult feelings, which they had not communicated verbally (75.67%); and (3) establishing meaningful connections with their loved ones, through images made in art therapy (36.48%). Case illustrations are provided. The results suggest that referral to art therapy from the team might be helpful and appropriate: (1) when patients are anxious; (2) when they are uncommunicative and hide their feelings; and (3) when they feel disconnected from their loved ones at home.

  4. Visual art therapy in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Rajeet; Trauger-Querry, Barbara; Loughrin, Athena; Appleby, Brian S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the diagnostic and treatment utility of visual art therapy in a case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Visual art therapy was compared longitudinally with clinical and neuroimaging data over five-month period in an autopsy-confirmed case of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease of MM2-cortical subtype. Art therapy sessions and content were useful in ascertaining neuropsychiatric symptoms during the course of her illness. Art therapy offered a unique emotional and cognitive outlet as illness progressed. Patients and families affected by sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease may benefit from art therapy despite the rapidly progressive nature of the illness. Art therapy can also be useful for assessment of patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease by healthcare professionals.

  5. A randomized trial to test the effectiveness of art therapy for children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Anya; Gelfand, Erwin W; Bender, Bruce

    2010-08-01

    Art therapy has been used to help children cope with chronic illness but has not been specifically tested with children who have asthma. To test an art therapy intervention in a randomized controlled trial in children with asthma. Twenty-two children with asthma were randomized to an active art therapy or wait-list control group. Those in the active art therapy group participated in 60-minute art therapy sessions once a week for 7 weeks. Sessions included specific art therapy tasks designed to encourage expression, discussion, and problem-solving in response to the emotional burden of chronic illness. Measures taken at baseline, immediately after, and 6 months after the final art therapy session included the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale applied to the Person Picking an Apple from a Tree assessment, the parent and child versions of the Pediatric Quality of Life Asthma Module, and the Beck Youth Inventories. Those children assigned to the wait-list control group completed all evaluations at the same intervals as the children receiving art therapy but did not receive the art therapy interventions. Score changes from baseline to completion of art therapy indicated (1) improved problem-solving and affect drawing scores; (2) improved worry, communication, and total quality of life scores; and (3) improved Beck anxiety and self concept scores in the active group relative to the control group. At 6 months, the active group maintained some positive changes relative to the control group including (1) drawing affect scores, (2) the worry and quality of life scores, and (3) the Beck anxiety score. Frequency of asthma exacerbations before and after the 6-month study interval did not differ between the 2 groups. This was the first randomized trial demonstrating that children with asthma receive benefit from art therapy that includes decreased anxiety and increased quality of life. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All

  6. [The role of art therapy in the rehabilitation of psycho-socially disabled people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lajos; Kovács, Emese

    2015-01-01

    The present review focuses on the generally accepted and applied community psychiatry based models of psycho-social rehabilitation. The basics of the Strenghts model and the Recovery based model are introduced in this paper. Both models can be assisted by art therapy in various ways. The forms and the therapeutic factors of art therapy are also discussed, as well as the effects of the creating experience during the art therapy sessions. The authors introduce the good practice of the Moravcsik Foundation with highlights in two special areas that are beyond the generally applied art therapy work and representing important support in reaching the goals set during the rehabilitation process. Further, the authors describe the Budapest Art Brut Gallery and the PsychArt24 art marathon project in details.

  7. Associations between alcohol use, other psychosocial factors, structural factors and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among South African ART recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morojele, Neo K; Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Nkosi, Sebenzile

    2014-03-01

    We examined whether alcohol use is associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence independently of structural and psychosocial factors among 304 male and female ART recipients in ART sites in Tshwane, South Africa. ART adherence was assessed by the CASE Adherence Index. Independent variables were demographic, structural, psycho-social, and alcohol use (AUDIT score) factors. In hierarchical multiple regression, demographic variables (Step 1) explained 4 % of variance in ART adherence (p ≤ 0.01). Variance explained increased to 16 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering structural variables (Step 2); 19 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering psychosocial variables (Step 3); and 24 % (p ≤ 0.001) after entering AUDIT score (Step 4). Alcohol use is independently associated with ART adherence.

  8. Art therapy for people with psychosis: a narrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attard, Angelica; Larkin, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Art therapy enables individuals to use art to creatively express themselves and communicate differently with themselves, others, and their reality. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence guidelines for psychosis and schizophrenia suggest that arts therapies, which include art therapy, are considered to improve negative symptoms of psychosis. We examined the effectiveness of art therapy for people with psychosis and explored whether art therapy is a meaningful and acceptable intervention in this Review. Seven electronic databases were searched for empirical papers that concerned the use of art therapy for adults with psychosis that were published from 2007 onwards. The search identified 18 papers. High-quality quantitative articles provided inconclusive evidence for the effectiveness of art therapy in adults with psychosis. However, high-quality qualitative articles indicated that therapists and clients considered art therapy to be a beneficial, meaningful, and acceptable intervention, although this conclusion was based on a small number of studies. In this Review, we discuss the theoretical, clinical, and methodological issues in light of the development of more robust research, which is needed to corroborate individuals' experiences and guide evidence-based practice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between contemporary art and Occuptional Therapy “Thoughts”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiso Rolán, J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Emperor's Suit is a well-known fairy tale; many professionals in this field have compared Contemporary Art with the moral of this tale, and precisely enough, this transgression is produced. But does the same occur in Occupational Therapy? These and other thoughts are some of the ideas we are trying to lay on the table.The initial idea to link these two disciplines emerged in a peculiar way: patients and therapist sitting down around a table in a room in the department of Occupational Therapy in a hospital.For us it is revision of something we have experienced as well as an activity which has not been planned strictly from the therapeutic point of view.It has been interesting to participate in a joint project of this kind in which both Therapist and user can collaborate. And in which we would like to count on the same comprehension effort that we expect from our patients, spectators... readers.

  10. [Proton imaging applications for proton therapy: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amblard, R; Floquet, V; Angellier, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Hérault, J

    2015-04-01

    Proton therapy allows a highly precise tumour volume irradiation with a low dose delivered to the healthy tissues. The steep dose gradients observed and the high treatment conformity require a precise knowledge of the proton range in matter and the target volume position relative to the beam. Thus, proton imaging allows an improvement of the treatment accuracy, and thereby, in treatment quality. Initially suggested in 1963, radiographic imaging with proton is still not used in clinical routine. The principal difficulty is the lack of spatial resolution, induced by the multiple Coulomb scattering of protons with nuclei. Moreover, its realization for all clinical locations requires relatively high energies that are previously not considered for clinical routine. Abandoned for some time in favor of X-ray technologies, research into new imaging methods using protons is back in the news because of the increase of proton radiation therapy centers in the world. This article exhibits a non-exhaustive state of the art in proton imaging. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Provision and practice of art therapy for people with schizophrenia: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Sue; Debate, James; Anju, Soni; Waller, Diane; Crawford, Mike J

    2011-08-01

    Art therapy has been recommended as a treatment for people with psychosis. However, little is known about the availability, organisation or delivery of art therapy within NHS settings. To describe the availability, structure and content of art therapy for people with schizophrenia provided by NHS services in England. A survey of art therapists working in a randomly selected sample of half of all mental health Trusts in England. Not all mental health Trusts employ art therapists. Those which do employ few therapists, typically on a sessional basis who work across a variety of inpatient and community-based settings. Most art therapists report that their practice is underpinned by psychodynamically grounded understandings of psychosis. However, rather than seek to explore underlying dynamics, art therapists typically adopt a non-directive approach encouraging patients to use image making to express feelings and reflect on these in a concrete way to develop self-understanding. While three-quarters of respondents reported that their work was valued by colleagues, less than half considered art therapy well understood by colleagues or integrated with other services. People diagnosed with schizophrenia have limited access to art therapy in NHS settings. Further research is needed to understand the experience and outcomes of art therapy to support its meaningful integration within the spectrum of care required to meet the needs of people with schizophrenia.

  12. The Life Cycle of Images: Revisiting the Ethical Treatment of the Art Therapy Image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Lisa D.

    2013-01-01

    Using the metaphor of the human life cycle, the author of this viewpoint suggests that consideration of the birth, life, and death of images made in art therapy may promote a new perspective on their ethical treatment. A developmental view of images encourages art therapists to see art images as living entities that undergo a natural life cycle.…

  13. 9. Evaluation of an Art Therapy Programme for Clients with Difficult Life Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krčmáriková Zuzana Ťulák

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper evaluates selected art therapy programmes (NAT=19 that were realized by therapeutic pedagogues – art therapists in the years 2009-2014 as parts of research projects. The quantitative aspect of the research processes the fulfilment of the conditions of art therapy programmes. In the framework of interpretative phenomenological analysis, we processed the data of each category as a part of the qualitative aspect of the research and supplemented them with authentic statements of clients (NP=8. The quantitative and qualitative aspect indicates a narrower characterisation of art therapy programmes in the group of clients with difficult life situations.

  14. Effects of Art Therapy on Distress Levels of Adults with Cancer: A Proxy Pretest Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinzak, Leara

    2016-01-01

    This study identified decreased distress after art therapy in a proxy pretest study with a convenience sample of 73 patients being treated for cancer. Art therapy outcomes from 4 settings (oncology unit, infusion clinic, individual sessions, and open studio) were measured via the self-report Distress Thermometer, which was collected as part of an…

  15. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (Art) for HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) means treating retroviral infections like HIV with drugs. These drugs though do not kill the virus but slowed down the growth of the virus. When the virus is slowed down, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease is also slowed down. ART drugs are referred to as ARV and ARV therapy is ...

  16. Using Animal Assisted Therapy with Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder in the Art Room Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenburg, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    This case study focused on the addition of a therapy dog in an Art I level class at a public high school level that included students with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The purpose of this study is to determine how Animal Assisted Therapy may benefit autism support students in the art classroom. The students participated in lessons that focused on…

  17. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  18. Art-therapy and Asperger Syndrome: ¿why, and what for?

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro José Regis Sansalonis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the reason and importance of using art-therapy in groups dealing with Asperger Syndrome, through a bibliographic review, specially of secondary sources as a research work. Finally, it is recognized the scarce bibliography found, and the need of continuing to investigate art-therapy in this social group, still unknown by most of the society.

  19. Flow Indicators in Art Therapy: Artistic Engagement of Immigrant Children with Acculturation Gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeon

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored flow experiences in art therapy with three children from families that had immigrated to the United States from South Korea and were facing acculturation gaps. The children's flow experiences were examined through multiple data sources including videotaped art therapy sessions, children's post-session interviews,…

  20. National Survey Assessing Perceived Multicultural Competence in Art Therapy Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Multicultural competence is essential to contemporary art therapy practice. Current education standards require that culturally sound theories and practices be taught along with self-awareness, but there is little research on the effects of such training in art therapy. The current study examined data from the Multicultural Awareness, Knowledge,…

  1. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Study of Community Mural Making and Social Action Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Erica

    2012-01-01

    Through a hermeneutic phenomenological study of interview data from 8 community artists, the author sought to discover commonalities and differences in the worldviews and philosophies of self that underlie community mural making as they relate to art therapy as social action and art therapy practice within a traditional Western cultural framework.…

  2. Beyond Erasure: The Ethics of Art Therapy Research with Trans and Gender-Independent People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Asha

    2017-01-01

    Trans and gender-independent clients, who often experience unnecessary pathologization when accessing mental health care, can benefit from art therapy because it offers practitioners and clients the unique potential to disrupt social hierarchies. Art therapy research, however, has often replicated social structures that oppress people from diverse…

  3. The Effects of Group Art Therapy on Mothers of Children with Special Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sau-Lai; Peng, Maria Sau-Chi

    2017-01-01

    In this study we explored the effects of group art therapy on the emotional well-being and parental empathy of mothers of children with special educational needs. Eleven mothers of children who were diagnosed with at least 1 kind of special educational need participated in a 16-week program. We hypothesized that the art therapy group would help…

  4. Art Therapy for an Individual with Late Stage Dementia: A Clinical Case Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucknott-Cohen, Tisah; Ehresman, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the healing benefits of art therapy for an individual with dementia of the Alzheimer's type. In this clinical case description, a woman diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease received individual art therapy for 17 weeks. The treatment concerns that arose, altered view of reality, agitation, and retrogenesis provide insight on…

  5. Efforts in Increasing Racial and Ethnic Diversity in the Field of Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, Yasmine J.; Yali, Ann Marie

    2015-01-01

    There is a clear need for greater diversity in the field of art therapy, with a particular need to increase the representation of racial and ethnic minorities in educational programs. In a sample of 16 art therapy program directors, strategies and barriers to recruitment were identified through an anonymous online survey. The results of the survey…

  6. Process and Outcome Evaluation of an Art Therapy Program for People Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew B.; Betts, Donna J.; Blausey, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Program evaluation offers an opportunity for improving the implementation and impact of art therapy. This article describes a process and outcomes evaluation of an art therapy program within the mental health services unit of a community-based organization for people living with HIV/AIDS. The aims were to assess utilization patterns and program…

  7. Promoting Well-Being and Gerotranscendence in an Art Therapy Program for Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Raquel Chapin

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a community art therapy program that was designed to promote health and well-being in old age. Observations of diverse participant interactions in the nondirective therapy studio over the course of 6 years revealed the benefits of art making and how it may influence well-being during the process of advancing age. Program…

  8. Art Therapy with Pediatric Cancer Patients: Helping Normal Children Cope with Abnormal Circumstances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Councill, Tracy

    1993-01-01

    Notes that art therapy with pediatric cancer patients addresses emotional and developmental needs of normal population under extreme stress. Reviews literature on the problems likely to be encountered by pediatric cancer patient and presents case examples to illustrate the emergence of these issues and their management in art therapy. (Author/NB)

  9. The influence of the arts-and-crafts movement on the professional status of occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R E

    1987-04-01

    This paper explores why occupational therapists use arts and crafts as therapeutic modalities. Beginning with the turn-of-the-century origins of occupational therapy, the paper traces the similarities and differences in the ideas and beliefs of the founders of occupational therapy and the proponents of the arts-and-crafts movement.

  10. Last Breath: Art Therapy with a Lung Cancer Patient Facing Imminent Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Art therapy can be an effective way to focus on end of life issues with cancer patients facing imminent death. This viewpoint discusses ethical challenges in the treatment of a 63-year-old man with terminal lung cancer who was participating in short-term individual art therapy. Difficult issues that often surface in the final days of life may…

  11. Art therapy for terminal cancer patients in a hospice palliative care unit in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Hwai; Moh, Shwu-Lan; Kuo, Yu-Cheng; Wu, Pin-Yuan; Lin, Chiung-Ling; Tsai, Mei-Hui; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2012-03-01

    Even though terminal cancer patients receive help from a hospice palliative care team, they have to suffer the pressure of death with deteriorating conditions. This study aims to evaluate the effect of art therapy for these terminal cancer patients. The patients involved were terminal cancer patients who were under the care of team members, which included physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, art therapists, and volunteers in a hospice palliative care unit in Taiwan. The art therapy in our study took the form of visual fine art appreciation and hands-on painting. The effects of the art therapy were evaluated according to patients' feelings, cognitions, and behaviors. There were 177 patients (105 males and 72 females; mean age: 65.4 ±15.8 years) in the study. Each patient received a mean of 2.9 ± 2.0 sessions of the art therapy and produced a mean of 1.8 ± 2.6 pieces of art. During the therapy, most patients described their feelings well, and created art works attentively. Patients expressed these feelings through image appreciation and hands-on painting, among which the landscape was the most common scene in their art. After the therapy, the mean score of patients' artistic expressions (one point to each category: perception of beauty, art appreciation, creativity, hands-on artwork, and the engagement of creating artwork regularly) was 4.0 ± 0.7, significantly higher than the score before therapy (2.2 ± 1.4, p art therapy through visual art appreciation and hands-on creative artwork.

  12. Perceptions of Nursing Students Regarding Usage of Art Therapy in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Robyn; Hunter, Joyce; Spies, Marty; Cooley, Tracy

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of baccalaureate nursing students regarding the use of art therapy to promote a therapeutic relationship and communication with mental health patients. A literature review revealed a lack of research on this topic. This was a qualitative study using principles of thematic analysis. Major themes found in the study included: Nursing Students' Initial Experiences With Mental Health Patients, Nursing Students' Observations of Mental Health Patients, and Nursing Students' and Mental Health Patients' Responses to Art Therapy. The intentional use of art therapy should be integrated into undergraduate nursing education. Further research should be conducted to determine whether art therapy is useful with students in other settings. In addition, innovations using art therapy in nursing education should be studied. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(10):605-610.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. ART THERAPY AS A TOOL OF SOCIAL WORK IN THE FIELD OF PUBLIC HEALTH PROTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Anatolievna Bortnyuk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of the topic is determined by the search for new tools of social work. In the article the possibilities of art therapy is to strengthen and preserve the social health of the modern man.Purpose. Formation of ideas about art therapy is as a method of social work in the field of public health.Results. The paper summarizes the theoretical principles of art therapy as a method of social work in health care. The results of the social project implemented in the 2015-2016 biennium in the Eastern State Medical University. The degree of understanding of the art therapy students in the Eastern State Medical University and selectively presents the results of questioning of students.Practical implications. The results of the study can be used to the Art therapy as a tool for social work, as well as in the educational process as a whole.

  14. Analyzing pictorial artifacts from psychotherapy and art therapy when overcoming stress and trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerge, Anna; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    to look for in pictorial artifacts related overcome traumatization and dissociation. After an introduction to psychotraumatology and it’s adaptions to creative arts therapy and art therapy, a literature review on assessment tools in art therapy, which can be applicable for measuring overcome...... traumatization, will be addressed. The need of a multi-dimensional tool for analysis of pictorial artifacts done in therapy is asked for and the needed components are briefly sketched. Finally the value of pictorial artifacts, made by clients in psycho-social interventions, as valid “windows” of implicit change...

  15. Art therapy for patients with depression: expert opinions on its main aspects for clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomdahl, Christina; Gunnarsson, Birgitta A; Guregård, Suzanne; Rusner, Marie; Wijk, Helle; Björklund, Anita

    2016-12-01

    Art therapy is based mainly on clinical experience and is rarely described and evaluated scientifically. There is a need for further exploration of its use in patients with depression. The aim of this study was to explore what experts consider to be the main aspects of art therapy in clinical practice for patients with depression. Eighteen occupational therapists experienced and educated in art therapy participated. The experts answered three rounds of Delphi questionnaires and ranked their agreement with 74 assertions. Consensus was defined as 70% or higher. The experts agreed more on assertions about theoretical frames of reference than about clinical practice. The main aspects of art therapy were agreed to be the patients' opportunity to express themselves verbally and through making art. It was equally important that art tasks provided an opportunity to address depressive thoughts, feelings, life experiences, and physical symptoms. Experts in the field of art therapy considered that the main aspect of clinical practice in art therapy for patients with depression is that art themes should promote expression related to both to depression and personal history.

  16. Observing mentalizing art therapy groups for people diagnosed with\\ud borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Springham, N.; Camic, Paul M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes video-based observation of three mentalization-based treatment (MBT) art therapy groups in services for people who have received a diagnosis of personality disorder.Four focus groups (service user researchers, MBT trained psychologists, MBT trained art therapists, and the three art therapists who submitted videos) developed descriptions of the\\ud practice they observed on video. A grounded theory method was used to develop a proposition that if the art therapist uses ar...

  17. The use of art and music therapy in substance abuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M; Bride, Brian E

    2014-01-01

    Although the implementation of evidence-based practices in the treatment of substance use disorders has attracted substantial research attention, little consideration has been given to parallel implementation of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. Using data from a nationally representative sample (N = 299) of U.S. substance abuse treatment programs, this study modeled organizational factors falling in the domains of patient characteristics, treatment ideologies, and structural characteristics, associated with the use of art therapy and music therapy. We found that 36.8% of treatment programs offered art therapy and 14.7% of programs offered music therapy. Programs with a greater proportion of women were more likely to use both therapies, and programs with larger proportions of adolescents were more likely to offer music therapy. In terms of other treatment ideologies, programs' use of Motivational Enhancement Therapy was positively related to offering art therapy, whereas use of contingency management was positively associated with offering music therapy. Finally, our findings showed a significant relationship between requiring 12-step meetings and the use of both art therapy and music therapy. With increasing use of CAM in a diverse range of medical settings and recent federal legislation likely to reduce barriers in accessing CAM, the inclusion of CAM in addiction treatment is growing in importance. Our findings suggest treatment programs may be utilizing art and music therapies to address unique patient needs of women and adolescents.

  18. The Use of Art and Music Therapy in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aletraris, Lydia; Paino, Maria; Edmond, Mary Bond; Roman, Paul M.; Bride, Brian E.

    2014-01-01

    While the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the treatment of substance use disorders (SUD) has attracted substantial research attention, little consideration has been given to parallel implementation of complementary and alternative medical (CAM) practices. Using data from a nationally representative sample (N = 299) of U.S. substance abuse treatment programs, this study modeled organizational factors falling in the domains of patient characteristics, treatment ideologies, and structural characteristics, associated with the use of art therapy and music therapy. We found that 36.8% of treatment programs offered art therapy and 14.7% of programs offered music therapy. Programs with a greater proportion of women were more likely to use both therapies, and programs with larger proportions of adolescents were more likely to offer music therapy. In terms of other treatment ideologies, programs’ use of Motivational Enhancement Therapy (MET) was positively related to offering art therapy, while use of Contingency Management (CM) was positively associated with offering music therapy. Finally, our findings showed a significant relationship between requiring 12-step meetings and the use of both art therapy and music therapy. With increasing use of CAM in a diverse range of medical settings, and recent federal legislation likely to reduce barriers in accessing CAM, the inclusion of CAM in addiction treatment is growing in importance. Our findings suggest treatment programs may be utilizing art and music therapies to address unique patient needs of women and adolescents. PMID:25514689

  19. Optimizing Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for Maternal and Child Health (MCH): Rationale and Design of the MCH-ART Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Phillips, Tamsin K; Zerbe, Allison; Ronan, Agnes; Hsiao, Nei-Yuan; Mellins, Claude A; Remien, Robert H; Le Roux, Stanzi M; Brittain, Kirsty; Ciaranello, Andrea; Petro, Greg; McIntyre, James A; Abrams, Elaine J

    2016-08-01

    Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV implementation faces significant challenges globally, particularly in the context of universal lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-infected pregnant women. We describe the rationale and methods of the Maternal and Child Health-Antiretroviral Therapy (MCH-ART) study, an implementation science project examining strategies for providing HIV care and treatment to HIV-infected women who initiate ART during pregnancy and their HIV-exposed infants. MCH-ART is composed of 3 interrelated study designs across the antenatal and postnatal periods. Phase 1 is a cross-sectional evaluation of consecutive HIV-infected pregnant women seeking antenatal care; phase 2 is an observational cohort of all women from phase 1 who are eligible for initiation of ART following local guidelines; and phase 3 is a randomized trial of strategies for delivering ART to breastfeeding women from phase 2 during the postpartum period. During each phase, a set of study measurement visits is carried out separately from antenatal care and ART services; a maximum of 9 visits takes place from the beginning of antenatal care through 12 months postpartum. In parallel, in-depth interviews are used to examine issues of ART adherence and retention qualitatively, and costs and cost-effectiveness of models of care are examined. Separate substudies examine health outcomes in HIV-uninfected women and their HIV-unexposed infants, and the role of the adherence club model for long-term adherence and retention. Combining observational and experimental components, the MCH-ART study presents a novel approach to understand and optimize ART delivery for MCH.

  20. Impact of generic antiretroviral therapy (ART) and free ART programs on time to initiation of ART at a tertiary HIV care center in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sunil S; Lucas, Gregory M; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Yepthomi, Tokugha; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Ganesh, Aylur K; Anand, Santhanam; Moore, Richard D; Solomon, Suniti; Mehta, Shruti H

    2013-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) access in the developing world has improved, but whether increased access has translated to more rapid treatment initiation among those who need it is unknown. We characterize time to ART initiation across three eras of ART availability in Chennai, India (1996-1999: pregeneric; 2000-2003: generic; 2004-2007: free rollout). Between 1996 and 2007, 11,171 patients registered for care at the YR Gaitonde Centre for AIDS Research and Education (YRGCARE), a tertiary HIV referral center in southern India. Of these, 5726 patients became eligible for ART during this period as per Indian guidelines for initiation of ART. Generalized gamma survival models were used to estimate relative times (RT) to ART initiation by calendar periods of eligibility. Time to initiation of ART among patients in Chennai, India was also compared to an HIV clinical cohort in Baltimore, USA. Median age of the YRGCARE patients was 34 years; 77% were male. The median CD4 at presentation was 140 cells/µl. After adjustment for demographics, CD4 and WHO stage, persons in the pregeneric era took 3.25 times longer (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.53-4.17) to initiate ART versus the generic era and persons in the free rollout era initiated ART more rapidly than the generic era (RT: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.63-0.83). Adjusting for differences across centers, patients at YRGCARE took longer than patients in the Johns Hopkins Clinical Cohort (JHCC) to initiate ART in the pregeneric era (RT: 4.90; 95% CI: 3.37-7.13) but in the free rollout era, YRGCARE patients took only about a quarter of the time (RT: 0.31; 95% CI: 0.22-0.44). These data demonstrate the benefits of generic ART and government rollouts on time to initiation of ART in one developing country setting and suggests that access to ART may be comparable to developed country settings.

  1. Neuro-Oncology Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BTTC are experts in their respective fields. Neuro-Oncology Clinical Fellowship This is a joint program with ... can increase survival rates. Learn more... The Neuro-Oncology Branch welcomes Dr. Mark Gilbert as new Branch ...

  2. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsah, Julius Y; Njamnshi, Alfred K; Kouanfack, Charles; Qiu, Fang; Njamnshi, Dora M; Tagny, Claude T; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Heaton, Robert; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2017-01-01

    Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (pART regimen, age, gender, and education showed that subjects with opportunistic infections had 3.1-times higher odds of having been non-adherent (p40 years) were less likely to be non-adherent (pART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04), and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.04) and longer non-adherent periods (p = 0.04). Change in ART regimen was significantly associated with increased likelihood of non-adherence and increased duration of the non-adherence period. Addressing these underlying risk factors could improve ART adherence, retention in care and treatment outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in Cameroon.

  3. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsah, Julius Y.; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Kouanfack, Charles; Qiu, Fang; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Tagny, Claude T.; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Léopoldine; Mbanya, Dora; Heaton, Robert; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2017-01-01

    Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART) access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (pART regimen, age, gender, and education showed that subjects with opportunistic infections had 3.1-times higher odds of having been non-adherent (p40 years) were less likely to be non-adherent (pART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04), and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.04) and longer non-adherent periods (p = 0.04). Change in ART regimen was significantly associated with increased likelihood of non-adherence and increased duration of the non-adherence period. Addressing these underlying risk factors could improve ART adherence, retention in care and treatment outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in Cameroon. PMID:28141867

  4. The Bodymind Model: A platform for studying the mechanisms of change induced by art therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czamanski-Cohen, J; Weihs, K L

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces the Bodymind model of Art Therapy and delineates the processes through which it has salutary effects on individuals coping with a variety of health related challenges. The goal of this model is to articulate how activation, reorganization, growth and reintegration of the self can emerge from bodymind processes activated by art therapy. It provides a framework for the conduct of research that will test the key theoretical mechanisms through which art therapy benefits clients. We expect this model to be a spring board for discussion, debate and development of the profession of art therapy. Furthermore, we hope readers can use this model to conduct sound mechanistic studies. This paper can inform social scientists and medical professionals on the manner in which art making can contribute to health.

  5. Measuring the contribution of art therapy in multidisciplinary treatment of personality disorders: The construction of the Self-expression and Emotion Regulation in Art Therapy Scale (SERATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeyen, Suzanne; van Hooren, Susan; van der Veld, William M; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    2018-02-01

    Despite the use of art therapy in clinical practice, its appreciation and reported beneficial results, no instruments are available to measure specific effects of art therapy among patients with personality disorders cluster B/C in multidisciplinary treatment. In the present study, we described the development and psychometric evaluation of the Self-expression and Emotion Regulation in Art Therapy Scale (SERATS). Structural validity (exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis), reliability, construct validity and sensitivity to change were examined using two independent databases (n = 335; n = 34) of patients diagnosed with personality disorders cluster B/C. This resulted in a nine-item effect scale with a single factor with a high internal reliability and high test-retest reliability; it demonstrated discriminant validity and sensitivity to change. In conclusion, the SERATS is brief and content-valid and offers objective and reliable information on self-expression and emotion regulation in art therapy among patients with personality disorders cluster B/C. Although more research on construct validity is needed, the SERATS is a promising tool to be applied as an effect scale and as a monitoring tool during art therapy treatment. © 2017 The Authors Personality and Mental Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. © 2017 The Authors Personality and Mental Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. I followed the butterflies: Poetry of positive emotions in art therapy research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioia Chilton

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a profession that offers potential avenues to improve mental health by increasing positive emotions and counteracting depression and negativity through art-making processes within a therapeutic relationship. As art therapy research is scant, this study of how positive emotions are expressed through art-making was needed. Pairs of art therapists (N = 5 conducted participatory arts-based research to explore emotional expression through visual art-making and discussion. Results included artwork and illustrated poems that demonstrate the expression of positive and other emotions within an interpersonal relationship. As part of multi-modal aesthetic exploration, poetry was used as a means of data analysis and as a vehicle for conveying findings.

  7. Art in Occupational Therapy Education: An Exploratory Mixed-Methods Study of an ArtsBased Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Coppola

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Art-based learning experiences have demonstrated a range of benefits, including improved observation skills and perspective taking. This article describes the effects of an art-based module in an entry-level curriculum for occupational therapy (OT students. An exploratory pilot study investigated the feasibility of a groupadministered visual art-based module for 20 first-year OT graduate students. Outcomes were evaluated using a mixed-methods approach that combined pre-post quantitative results from survey questionnaires and qualitative reflective essays. Pre- and post-surveys revealed significant changes in the students’ perception regarding the benefits of art in OT curricula. The students’ reflective essays on their learning described artbased sessions as: (a opportunities to practice perspective shifting, (b tapping into emotion, (c exemplars of the therapeutic encounter, (d integrative and “out of the box,” and (e impacting student roles and the classroom environment. Findings support art-based pedagogies to complement coursework to build an understanding of clients, creative thinking, and valued learning experiences. Learning partnerships between occupational therapy faculty, art museum educators, and artists can offer fruitful interdisciplinary learning experiences.

  8. Significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Aquiléia Helena; Roecker, Simone; Salvagioni, Denise Albieri Jodas; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin

    2014-01-01

    To understand the significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, undertaken with 16 patients in a day hospital in Londrina, in the state of Parana, Brazil, who participated in seven clay therapy sessions. Data collection took place from January to July 2012 through interviews guided by a semi structured questionnaire and the data were submitted to content analysis. Three themes emerged: Becoming familiar with clay art therapy; Feeling clay therapy; and Realizing the effect of clay therapy. The use of clay as a therapeutic method by psychiatric patients promoted creativity, self-consciousness, and benefited those who sought anxiety relief.

  9. Balancing the focus: art and music therapy for pain control and symptom management in hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauger-Querry, B; Haghighi, K R

    1999-01-01

    Pain and symptom management are a major part of hospice care. Literature and direct experience suggest that pain can be resistant if psychological, emotional, or spiritual issues are not addressed. This article explains how art and music therapies can work in conjunction with traditional medical treatment of pain control in the hospice setting. The process of pain modulation through the use of art and music interventions is diagrammed and described. Brief clinical examples demonstrate the use of art and music therapies for pain reduction with a variety of hospice patients. Information regarding appropriate education and training necessary for art and music therapists to practice in their field is presented.

  10. Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART in Yaoundé-Cameroon: Association with Opportunistic Infections, Depression, ART Regimen and Side Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Y Fonsah

    Full Text Available Following global efforts to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART access in Sub-Saharan Africa, ART coverage among HIV-infected Cameroonians increased from 0% in 2003 to 22% in 2014. However, the success of current HIV treatment programs depends not only on access to ART, but also on retention in care and good treatment adherence. This is necessary to achieve viral suppression, prevent virologic failure, and reduce viral transmission and HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Previous studies in Cameroon showed poor adherence, treatment interruption, and loss to follow-up among HIV+ subjects on ART, but the factors that influence ART adherence are not well known. In the current cross-sectional study, patient/self-reported questionnaires and pharmacy medication refill data were used to quantify ART adherence and determine the factors associated with increased risk of non-adherence among HIV-infected Cameroonians. We demonstrated that drug side-effects, low CD4 cell counts and higher viral loads are associated with increased risk of non-adherence, and compared to females, males were more likely to forego ART because of side effects (p40 years were less likely to be non-adherent (p<0.01 and had shorter non-adherent periods (p<0.0001. The presence of depression symptoms correlated with non-adherence to ART during antibiotic treatment (r = 0.53, p = 0.04, and was associated with lower CD4 cell counts (p = 0.04 and longer non-adherent periods (p = 0.04. Change in ART regimen was significantly associated with increased likelihood of non-adherence and increased duration of the non-adherence period. Addressing these underlying risk factors could improve ART adherence, retention in care and treatment outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in Cameroon.

  11. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  12. Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure with Art Therapy Students: Assessing Preservice Students after One Multicultural Self-Reflection Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    Graduate art therapy students enrolled in a multicultural art therapy course were given the Multigroup Ethnic Identity Measure as a pretest and posttest to assess their own cultural identity. Results indicate that stronger cultural identification is possible following the completion of one multicultural art therapy course. (Contains 25 references…

  13. The Influence of Medication Attitudes on Utilization of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Indonesian Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Gabriel J; Bazazi, Alexander R; Waluyo, Agung; Murni, Astia; Muchransyah, Azalia P; Iriyanti, Mariska; Finnahari; Polonsky, Maxim; Levy, Judith; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-05-01

    Negative attitudes toward HIV medications may restrict utilization of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesian prisons where many people living with HIV (PLH) are diagnosed and first offered ART. This mixed-method study examines the influence of medication attitudes on ART utilization among HIV-infected Indonesian prisoners. Randomly-selected HIV-infected male prisoners (n = 102) completed face-to-face in-depth interviews and structured surveys assessing ART attitudes. Results show that although half of participants utilized ART, a quarter of those meeting ART eligibility guidelines did not. Participants not utilizing ART endorsed greater concerns about ART efficacy, safety, and adverse effects, and more certainty that ART should be deferred in PLH who feel healthy. In multivariate analyses, ART utilization was independently associated with more positive ART attitudes (AOR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.002) and higher internalized HIV stigma (AOR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07, p = 0.016). Social marketing of ART is needed to counteract negative ART attitudes that limit ART utilization among Indonesian prisoners.

  14. A Discussion of Art Therapy as a Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda M.

    1998-01-01

    Examines four factors that may cause art therapists to reject the scientific method. Gives an overview of historical developments in science to provide a background for a discussion of each factor. Includes material from anthropology, psychoanalysis, and alternative health care. Offers suggestions for training art therapists in scientific…

  15. Art therapy for relief of symptoms associated with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Deepa; Nainis, Nancy; Williams, Lisa; Langner, Daughon; Eisin, Audra; Paice, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Symptom management for persons living with HIV/AIDS is an extremely important component of care management. The importance of pharmacologic interventions for management of symptoms is well recognized, and non-pharmacologic strategies such as art therapy are gaining interest in lay and professional communities. The aim of this research project was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of art therapy for relief of symptoms experienced by people living with HIV/AIDS. In this randomized clinical trial of art therapy, the primary objective was to assess change in physical and psychological symptoms. Participants were recruited from a large urban hospital's inpatient population and outpatient HIV clinic. Seventy-nine people with a diagnosis of HIV infection provided socio-demographic information, participated in either a one-hour art therapy session or viewed a videotape about art therapy, and completed pre- and posttest measures of psychological and physical symptoms. Two separate analysis of covariance models were used to identify if the treatment condition influenced psychological and physical symptoms, after adjusting for pretest score, age, gender, and race/ethnicity. The analyses showed that physical symptom mean scores were better for those who participated in the art therapy compared to those who viewed the videotape, and this difference between conditions was statistically significant (part therapy in relation to symptoms associated with HIV/AIDS.

  16. Mural art therapy for young offenders hospitalised with a mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Oleen; Kasinathan, John

    2015-02-01

    To describe a mural art therapy project completed within an adolescent unit of a secure forensic psychiatric hospital. The planning, implementation and consecutive stages of the mural art therapy project are described. Pertinent themes are identified. A cohort of adolescent forensic inpatients was engaged in a group therapeutic process involving collaboration, design and the completion of an art mural. The participants generally approved of the project and identified themes of gaining a sense of achievement, empowerment, teamwork, involvement and ownership. The art mural transformed and improved the visual and spatial environment of the Adolescent unit courtyard. Mural art therapy was acceptable to young offenders hospitalised with mental illness, which has relevance for adolescent psychiatric units and youth detention centres. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  17. Art-therapy and Asperger Syndrome: ¿why, and what for?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pedro José Regis Sansalonis

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explain the reason and importance of using art-therapy in groups dealing with Asperger Syndrome, through a bibliographic review, specially of secondary sources as a research work...

  18. Art therapy among palliative cancer patients: Aesthetic dimensions and impacts on symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Cédric; Ledoux, Mathilde; Filbet, Marilène

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to explore whether aesthetic beauty and the pleasure that results from artistic activity can contribute to a reduction in the symptoms experienced by palliative care patients, and to improve the effectiveness of art therapy sessions. A self-assessment of six symptoms (pain, anxiety, ill-being, tiredness, sadness, and depression) adapted from the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) was completed by patients before and after a one-hour art therapy session. This assessment was completed after the session with a self-assessment of aesthetic feeling. A correlation analysis was then performed. From July of 2012 to December of 2013, 28 patients took part in 63 art therapy sessions. On the whole, these sessions reduced the global distress of patients by 47% (p art therapy in reducing distress within the palliative context. We also make suggestions for the future direction and improvement of these sessions.

  19. [Art therapy for cancer patients in outpatient care. Psychological distress and coping of the participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Heide; Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Singer, Susanne; Schwarz, Reinhold

    2009-02-01

    Various types of art therapy increasingly gain importance in psycho-oncology. The aim of this article is to determine whether art therapy may help decrease psychological distress and increase coping skills in cancer patients. An art therapy course for use in psycho-oncological care for outpatients was developed and implemented in a prospective observation study of the Department of Social Medicine,Leipzig University. Participants' levels of psychological distress (HADS) as well as their coping skills (TSK) were quantitatively evaluated before (t1) and after (t2) the intervention. After completion of the course mean anxiety of the participants(n = 18) had significantly decreased from 11.06 to 9.33 (p Art therapy interventions can make an important contribution to the psychological well-being of cancer patients.

  20. Development of a Creative Arts Therapies Center for People with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Suzanne; Tanguay, Denise; Snow, Stephen; D'Amico, Miranda

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for the Arts in Human Development in Montreal has provided art, drama, music, and dance/movement therapies to adults with developmental disabilities for over 10 years with the goals of developing and enhancing self-esteem, social skills, and communication abilities. This report describes the development and purpose of the center,…

  1. Art Therapy and Flow: A Review of the Literature and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    Flow is a construct developed by Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi that describes a psychological state of optimal attention and engagement. Creativity and improved well-being have been empirically linked to the flow experience; therefore, the study of flow has implications for art therapy research and practice. Art therapists may facilitate personal growth…

  2. Study on the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteder, L.M.; Kuijpers, N.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van Horn, J.E.; Hendriks, J.; Wissink, I.B.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART), a Dutch intervention for 16- to 21-year-old juveniles. Re-ART aims to decrease severe aggressive behavior using a cognitive behavioral approach combined

  3. Efficacy of Group Art Therapy on Depressive Symptoms in Adult Heterogeneous Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandraiah, Shambhavi; Ainlay Anand, Susan; Avent, Lindsay Cherryl

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the potential benefit of weekly group art therapy in groups of adult psychiatric outpatients at a university medical center. Eighteen patients participated in 4 successive 8-week groups of 6 to 8 patients each that met weekly and were led by 2 therapists (a board-certified art therapist and a psychiatry resident). The…

  4. Effectiveness of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese Patients with Advanced Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Michiyo; Kira, Haruko; Hayashida, Shigeru; Ito, Sayoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of the Mindfulness Art Therapy Short Version for Japanese patients with advanced cancer. Patients learned mindfulness practices and then made art to express their feelings in the first session. After receiving instruction on practicing mindfulness 2 weeks later, they participated in a second…

  5. Varied sensitivity to therapy of HIV-1 strains in CD4+ lymphocyte subpopulations upon ART initiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeregrave, Edwin J.; Geels, Mark J.; Baan, Elly; van der Sluis, Renee M.; Paxton, William A.; Pollakis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven its success against HIV-1, the long lifespan of infected cells and viral latency prevent eradication. In this study we analyzed the sensitivity to ART of HIV-1 strains in naive, central memory and effector memory CD4+ lymphocyte

  6. Creating a Culture of Connection: A Postmodern Punk Rock Approach to Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drass, Jessica Masino

    2016-01-01

    Punk culture is based on an ideology that emphasizes questioning conformity and creating a space for individuality within community. It has inspired fans to create their own music and art as part of their quest for authenticity. Art therapy informed by punk culture can be a way to create a culture of connection while also building resiliency and…

  7. From Dot to Line to Plane: Constellating Unconscious Imagery in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Lenore

    2017-01-01

    In this article I describe an art-based procedure with a gradual sequence of drawing tasks that guides an art therapy client through graphic stages from point, to line, to plane. The client begins by making random dots, connecting them one to another with an unbroken line that reaches all the dots, perceiving abstract or figurative imagery in the…

  8. A Review of the Principles for Culturally Appropriate Art Therapy Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Donna

    2013-01-01

    In an increasingly diverse society, and with the broadening scope of art therapy, the duty of art therapists to ensure responsible and appropriate assessment is ever more important. This article discusses considerations that are necessary for the successful adaptation and use of drawing-based assessments in cross-cultural and multicultural…

  9. Study on the Effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteder, L.; Kuijpers, N N; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van Horn, J.; Hendriks, J.; Wissink, I.B.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART), a Dutch intervention for 16- to 21-year-old juveniles. Re-ART aims to decrease severe aggressive behavior using a cognitive behavioral approach combined

  10. Within the Box: Cross-Cultural Art Therapy with Survivors of the Rwanda Genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the creative making of boxes as a cross-cultural art therapy intervention in Kigali, Rwanda, with survivors of the 1994 Rwandan genocide. The box as an art form is particularly applicable with young adult survivors, given the nature of their prodigious trauma and the possibility of posttraumatic stress disorder, as well as…

  11. Translating the Essence of Dance: Rendering Meaning in Artistic Inquiry of the Creative Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manders, Elizabeth; Chilton, Gioia

    2013-01-01

    The authors used artistic inquiry to study intersubjectivity in a weekly, stimulated creative arts therapy studio experience for one year. They found that the conversion of meaning from the meta-verbal, imaginal, aesthetic language of dance and visual art into verbal and textual discourse required complex translational processes. Personal…

  12. Beyond "Option B+": Understanding Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence, Retention in Care and Engagement in ART Services Among Pregnant and Postpartum Women Initiating Therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Landon; Phillips, Tamsin K

    2017-06-01

    Several studies from sub-Saharan Africa have highlighted significant challenges in providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to pregnant and postpartum women, with specific concerns around maintaining optimal levels of adherence to ART and/or retaining women in long-term services. However, there are few conceptual frameworks to help understand nonadherence and nonretention, as well as the drivers of these, among HIV-infected women, particularly in the postpartum period. This review provides an overview of the key issues involved in thinking about ART adherence, retention in care and engagement in ART services among pregnant and postpartum women. The related behaviors of adherence and retention may be understood as components of effective engagement of patients in ART services, which share the goal of achieving and maintaining suppressed maternal viral load on ART. Under this framework, the existing literature indicates that disengagement from care is widespread among postpartum women, with strikingly similar data emerging from ART services around the globe and indications that similar challenges may be encountered by postpartum care services outside the context of HIV. However, the drivers of disengagement require further research, and evidence-based intervention strategies are limited. The challenges of engaging women in ART services during pregnancy and the postpartum period seem pervasive, although the determinants of these are poorly understood. Looking forward, a host of innovative intervention approaches are needed to help improve women's engagement, and in turn, promote maternal and child health in the context of HIV.

  13. Art-therapy and Asperger Syndrome: ¿why, and what for?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro José Regis Sansalonis

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to explain the reason and importance of using art-therapy in groups dealing with Asperger Syndrome, through a bibliographic review, specially of secondary sources as a research work. Finally, it is recognized the scarce bibliography found, and the need of continuing to investigate art-therapy in this social group, still unknown by most of the society.

  14. The experience of use of the sand art-therapy with children with autism spectrum disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kotlovanova O.V.; Malinina E.V.

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of effective work to use sand art-therapy for treatment of behavior problems in children with autism spectrum disorder. The article describes the session plan, children's behavior in dynamics and intermediate results of work with children with autism spectrum disorders in the framework of this program. The influence of the sand art-therapy on the children's behavior was analyzed. The clinical case of sessions with the boy K. was described. The overwhelmingly p...

  15. Patient groups in art therapies: A case study of the health care field in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vende K.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to introduce the reader with an example of the arts therapies work in a children hospital in Latvia in order to describe art therapies work similarities and differences in three different specializations. Comparison will take place of patient groups in the work of art therapists in each specialization (art therapy, dance movement therapy and music therapy. The question of the research is: with which patient groups’ a specialist from a particular arts therapies specialization has worked within a year in VSIA BKUS children hospital “Gaiļezers” during the time period from 05.2009 to 05.2010?The results were gained by comparing patient groups at the age from 2,5 to 17 years in the children hospital and they showed that the art therapists and dance movement therapist most frequently were working with patients who have behaviour and emotional disorders. However music therapists are working more frequently with patients who have mental retardation.

  16. Art therapy based on appreciation of famous paintings and its effect on distress among cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeongshim; Choi, Mi Yeon; Kim, Yong Bae; Sun, Jiyu; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kang, Minchul; Koom, Woong Sub

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of art therapy based on appreciation of famous paintings on the distress of cancer patients receiving radiotherapy. In particular, we focused on anxiety, depression, and cancer-related symptoms. Between October 2015 and February 2016, cancer patients receiving radiotherapy were recruited prospectively to participate in the art therapy based on famous painting appreciation. The art therapy took place in two parts comprising 4 sessions of famous painting appreciation and 4 sessions of creative artwork generation; these sessions were performed twice weekly over four weeks. Cancer-related distress was measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) at three points: before the art therapy began, after the fourth session of art therapy, and after the eighth session. Of the 24 enrolled patients, 20 (83%) completed all eight sessions. We observed significant improvements in HADS anxiety and total scores over time according to linear mixed models with Bonferroni corrections (all p Art therapy based on famous painting appreciation significantly improved cancer-related anxiety and depression and reduced the prevalence of severe anxiety and depression during cancer treatment.

  17. Expressive remix therapy: using digital media art in therapeutic group sessions children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamerson, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Stories play a significant role in how we feel about and interact with the world. Narrative therapy and expressive arts therapy are major influences on the creation of expressive remix therapy, a new form of engagement with clients. This article is an exposition of this particular mental health modality. The use of digital media art in therapy in group settings will be discussed, and examples of how to use digital media art and technology in group therapy sessions are provided. The intention of this article is to promote a renewed appreciation for stories as the backdrop for all narrative work; it also seeks to inspire people to look at the practice of mental health differently, particularly the tools used to positively impact clients.

  18. Effects of art and music therapy on depression and cognitive function of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Mi Lim; Lee, Jeong In

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of art and music therapy on depression and cognitive function of the elderly. This was one group pre-test, post-test design. Data were collected from January to March, 2013, from 94 elderly. The results were collected as followers: 1. Art therapy was revealed a statistical significant difference between before and after treatment on the depression of participants. 2. Music therapy was revealed a statistical significant at previous and after treatment on the depression of participants. 3. Treatment according to the severity of depression than the music therapy and art therapy were examined statistically significantly lower. This study will be provided basic information in order to develop program for success healthy life of elderly.

  19. Artfulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemi, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children.......a collage of previously published materials on Artfulness, in this journal targeted teachers for dysfunctional behaviour children....

  20. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy in Reducing Internalizing and Externalizing Problems of Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargan, Yasaman; Pakdaman, Shahla

    2016-01-01

    The internalizing and externalizing problems relating to childhood and adolescent have always been significant. Because there is special considerations in establishing communication with them and hence, the therapeutic methods for these problems must take into account these considerations. As establishing a therapeutic relationship is an important component of effective counseling, it seems that art therapy may help alleviate these problems. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of art therapy in reducing internalizing and externalizing problems of adolescent girls (14 - 18 years old). This is a semi-experimental study carried out in the form of a pre-test/post-test design with control group. The population of this study includes female students of Gole Laleh School of Art in district 3 of Tehran, Iran, out of which 30 students with internalizing problems and 30 individuals with externalizing problems were selected through targeted sampling. Students were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. Experimental groups participated in 6 painting sessions designed based on Art therapy theories and previous studies. The material used for diagnosis of the problems in posttest and pretest was an Achenbach self-assessment form. Data were analyzed using a mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA). Our results showed that Art therapy significantly reduced internalizing problems (F = 17.61, P Art therapy as a practical therapeutic method can be used to improve internalizing problems. To reduce externalizing problems, more sessions may be needed. Thus, future studies are required to insure these findings.

  1. Sensitization of teachers to act in environmental education by means of art therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Stella Ribeiro Medeiros Neves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Both Environmental Education (EE and Art Therapy strive to improve quality of life by making man more aware of his relationship with himself, with other living beings and with the environment. This paper reports on the application of the tools of art therapy as a strategy to raise awareness of municipal school teachers to work in EE with elementary school children. Therefore, five art therapeutic meetings were held, in which an integrated and inclusive reflection on the four nature elements were emphasized, i.e., water, earth, fire and air, with a well thought-out and incorporated content. At the conclusion of the art therapy and after extensive reflection on the relationship with EE, participants were open to experiencing new paradigms, and could thus rethink and reorganize the curriculum, in search of new alternatives for effective EE.

  2. A Brief Evaluation to Identify Level of Satisfaction of Art Therapy with Undergraduate Ukrainian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lith, Theresa; Bullock, Lindsay; Horbal, Iryna; Lvov, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A particular political and social mindset toward mental health support has impacted how and why people seek counseling and therapy in Ukraine. Although a relatively small and developing field, art therapy is beginning to provide a means for assisting cultural and identity development for young adult Ukrainians during a time of civil and political…

  3. Artistic, Therapeutic, and Sexually Informed: A Five-Week Human Sexuality Course for Art Therapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzl, Einat S.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a case study of curriculum development and learning outcomes from a five-week human sexuality course for art therapy and marital and family therapy graduate students. First, course context and intentions are introduced. Second, the course format is presented briefly. Third, students' experiences are illustrated through…

  4. Dance Movement Therapy: A Healing Art. [Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Fran J.

    The concern of this text is the need that many individuals have for nonverbal, primarily physical forms of expression, and how this need has fueled the development of a new psychomotor discipline. The book treats the theory and practice of dance therapy, and examines the entire field from its inception through the present. Dance therapy, the use…

  5. [Patients' experiences and picture processes during the art therapy in a psychosomatic day hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Poetsch, Stephanie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was the examination of the experiences of patients participating in an art therapy during a psychosomatic day hospital. The data basis were 15 transliterated interviews from the end of the treatment, conducted with a presentation of the pictures painted in the art therapy sessions, as well as the digitised pictures. The evaluation was done with a qualitative analysis of the interviews and an analysis of the pictures, using a specially-developed category system. In the art therapy, most part of the pa-tients dealt with own conflicts. Nearly all pa-tients benefitted from the art therapy and indicated an improvement of their feeling. The picture processes are different; at the beginning, wishes and familiar techniques dominated. Pictures of turning points differed in their dimensions. The art therapy was seen as a part of the complete treatment in which several therapies assembled. The final interviews were experienced as helpful for further reflections. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Speech intelligibility in cerebral palsy children attending an art therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Magdalena; Pachalska, Maria; Lipowska, Małgorzata; Herman-Sucharska, Izabela; Makarowski, Ryszard; Mirski, Andrzej; Jastrzebowska, Grazyna

    2010-05-01

    Dysarthia is a common sequela of cerebral palsy (CP), directly affecting both the intelligibility of speech and the child's psycho-social adjustment. Speech therapy focused exclusively on the articulatory organs does not always help CP children to speak more intelligibly. The program of art therapy described here has proven to be helpful for these children. From among all the CP children enrolled in our art therapy program from 2005 to 2009, we selected a group of 14 boys and girls (average age 15.3) with severe dysarthria at baseline but no other language or cognitive disturbances. Our retrospective study was based on results from the Auditory Dysarthria Scale and neuropsychological tests for fluency, administered routinely over the 4 months of art therapy. All 14 children in the study group showed some degree of improvement after art therapy in all tested parameters. On the Auditory Dysarthia Scale, highly significant improvements were noted in overall intelligibility (pArt therapy improves the intelligibility of speech in children with cerebral palsy, even when language functions are not as such the object of therapeutic intervention.

  7. Research Ethics: Institutional Review Board Oversight of Art Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Sarah P.

    2011-01-01

    By having their research proposals reviewed and approved by Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), art therapists meet important ethical principles regarding responsibility to research participants. This article provides an overview of the history of human subjects protections in the United States; underlying ethical principles and their application…

  8. Creative art therapy to enhance rehabilitation for stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkasuwan, Ratcharin; Voraakhom, Kotchakorn; Pisolayabutra, Prim; Maneechai, Pichai; Boonin, Jiraporn; Kuptniratsaikul, Vilai

    2016-10-01

    To examine the efficacy of creative art therapy plus conventional physical therapy, compared with physical therapy only, in increasing cognitive ability, physical functions, psychological status and quality of life of stroke patients. Randomized controlled trial with blinded assessor. An in-patient setting PARTICIPANTS: One hundred and eighteen stroke patients aged ⩾50 years who could communicate verbally. All participants received conventional physical therapy five days per week. An intervention group received additional creative art therapy, twice a week for four weeks, in a rehabilitation ward. Cognitive function, anxiety and depression, physical performance and quality of life were measured with the Abbreviated Mental Test, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the modified Barthel Index scale and the pictorial Thai Quality of Life questionnaire, respectively. Mean differences for the intervention group were significantly greater than the control group for depression (-4.5, 95% CI -6.5, -2.5, part therapy and most reported improved concentration (68.5%), emotion (79.6%), self-confidence (72.2%) and motivation (74.1%). Creative art therapy combined with conventional physical therapy can significantly decrease depression, improve physical functions and increase quality of life compared with physical therapy alone. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Photodynamic therapy for localized infections – state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was discovered over one hundred years ago by observing the killing of microorganisms when harmless dyes and visible light were combined in vitro. Since then it has primarily been developed as a treatment for cancer, ophthalmologic disorders and in dermatology. However in recent years interest in the antimicrobial effects of PDT has revived and it has been proposed as a therapy for a large variety of localized infections. This revival of interest has largely been dri...

  10. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: multicentre pragmatic randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Killaspy, Helen; Barnes, Thomas R E; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Clayton, Katie; Dinsmore, John; Floyd, Siobhan; Hoadley, Angela; Johnson, Tony; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; King, Michael; Leurent, Baptiste; Maratos, Anna; O'Neill, Francis A; Osborn, David P; Patterson, Sue; Soteriou, Tony; Tyrer, Peter; Waller, Diane

    2012-02-28

    To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of group art therapy for people with schizophrenia and to test whether any benefits exceed those of an active control treatment. Three arm, rater blinded, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Secondary care services across 15 sites in the United Kingdom. 417 people aged 18 or over, who had a diagnosis of schizophrenia and provided written informed consent to take part in the study. Participants, stratified by site, were randomised to 12 months of weekly group art therapy plus standard care, 12 months of weekly activity groups plus standard care, or standard care alone. Art therapy and activity groups had up to eight members and lasted for 90 minutes. In art therapy, members were given access to a range of art materials and encouraged to use these to express themselves freely. Members of activity groups were offered various activities that did not involve use of art or craft materials and were encouraged to collectively select those they wanted to pursue. The primary outcomes were global functioning, measured using the global assessment of functioning scale, and mental health symptoms, measured using the positive and negative syndrome scale, 24 months after randomisation. Main secondary outcomes were levels of group attendance, social functioning, and satisfaction with care at 12 and 24 months. 417 participants were assigned to either art therapy (n=140), activity groups (n=140), or standard care alone (n=137). Primary outcomes between the three study arms did not differ. The adjusted mean difference between art therapy and standard care at 24 months on the global assessment of functioning scale was -0.9 (95% confidence interval -3.8 to 2.1), and on the positive and negative syndrome scale was 0.7 (-3.1 to 4.6). Secondary outcomes did not differ between those referred to art therapy or those referred to standard care at 12 or 24 months. Referring people with established schizophrenia to group art therapy as delivered in this

  11. Group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia: a randomised controlled trial (MATISSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, M J; Killaspy, H; Barnes, T R; Barrett, B; Byford, S; Clayton, K; Dinsmore, J; Floyd, S; Hoadley, A; Johnson, T; Kalaitzaki, E; King, M; Leurent, B; Maratos, A; O'Neill, F A; Osborn, D; Patterson, S; Soteriou, T; Tyrer, P; Waller, D

    2012-01-01

    To examine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of referral to group art therapy plus standard care, compared with referral to an activity group plus standard care and standard care alone, among people with schizophrenia. A three-arm, parallel group, single-blind, pragmatic, randomised controlled trial. Participants were randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted blocks, stratified by study centre. Study participants were recruited from secondary care mental health and social services in four UK centres. Potential participants were aged 18 years or over, had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes, and provided written informed consent. We excluded those who were unable to speak sufficient English to complete the baseline assessment, those with severe cognitive impairment and those already receiving arts therapy. Group art therapy was delivered by registered art therapists according to nationally agreed standards. Groups had up to eight members, lasted for 90 minutes and ran for 12 months. Members were given access to a range of art materials and encouraged to use these to express themselves freely. Activity groups were designed to control for the non-specific effects of group art therapy. Group facilitators offered various activities and encouraged participants to collectively select those they wanted to pursue. Standard care involved follow-up from secondary care mental health services and the option of referral to other services, except arts therapies, as required. Our co-primary outcomes were global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale - GAF) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale - PANSS) at 24 months. The main secondary outcomes were level of group attendance, social functioning, well-being, health-related quality of life, service utilisation and other costs measured 12 and 24 months

  12. Hepatitis B Virus Infection and Response to Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in a South African ART Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christopher J. Hoffmann; Salome Charalambous; Desmond J. Martin; Craig Innes; Gavin J. Churchyard; Richard E. Chaisson; Alison D. Grant; Katherine L. Fielding; Chloe L. Thio

    2008-01-01

    .... We evaluated the impact of chronic hepatitis B on HIV virologic response, changes in CD4 cell count, hepatotoxicity, and mortality among Africans receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART...

  13. Survival outcomes for first-line antiretroviral therapy in India's ART program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Rakhi; Rewari, Bharat B; Kumar, G Anil; Tanwar, Sukarma; Kumar, S G Prem; Vishnumolakala, Venkata S; Duber, Herbert C; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-10-11

    Little is known about survival outcomes of HIV patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a large-scale in India, or facility level factors that influence patient survival to guide further improvements in the ART program in India. We examined factors at the facility level in addition to patient factors that influence survival of adult HIV patients on ART in the publicly-funded ART program in a high- and a low-HIV prevalence state. Retrospective chart review in public sector ART facilities in the combined states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana (APT) before these were split in 2014 and in Rajasthan (RAJ), the high- and a low-HIV prevalence states, respectively. Records of adults initiating ART between 2007-12 and 2008-13 in APT and RAJ, respectively, were reviewed and facility-level information collected at all ART centres and a sample of link ART centres. Survival probability was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method, and determinants of mortality explored with facility and patient-level factors using Cox proportional hazard model. Based on data from 6581 patients, the survival probability of ART at 60 months was 76.3 % (95 % CI 73.0-79.2) in APT and 78.3 % (74.4-81.7) in RAJ. The facilities with cumulative ART patient load above the state average had lower mortality in APT (Hazard ratio [HR] 0.74, 0.57-0.95) but higher in RAJ (HR 1.37, 1.01-1.87). Facilities with higher proportion of lost to follow-up patients in APT had higher mortality (HR 1.47, 1.06-2.05), as did those with higher ART to pre-ART patient ratio in RAJ (HR 1.62, 1.14-2.29). In both states, there was higher hazard for mortality in patients with CD4 count 100 cells/mm 3 or less at ART initiation, males, and in patients with TB co-infection. These data from the majority of facilities in a high- and a low-HIV burden state of India over 5 years reveal reasonable and similar survival outcomes in the two states. The facilities with higher ART load in the longer established ART program in

  14. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Choi, Mi Yeon; Lee, Jeongshim; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Materials and Methods: Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Results: Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Conclusion: Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy. PMID:27306778

  15. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Choi, Mi Yeon; Lee, Jeongshim; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy.

  16. A fuller picture: evaluating an art therapy programme in a multidisciplinary mental health service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Catherina; Moss, Hilary; Kelly, Brendan D

    2017-03-01

    Art therapy has a long history in mental healthcare, but requires an enhanced evidence base in order to better identify its precise role in contemporary services. This paper describes an evaluation of an art therapy programme in an acute adult psychiatry admission unit in Ireland. A mixed method research design was used. Quantitative data were collected through a survey of 35 staff members and 11 service users. Qualitative data included free text comments collected in the survey and individual feedback from service users. Both methods aimed to assess the role of art therapy as part of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Thematic content analysis was employed to analyse qualitative data. Staff demonstrated overwhelming support for art therapy as one element within multidisciplinary services available to patients in the acute psychiatry setting, Qualitative feedback associated art therapy with improvements in quality of life and individual support, and emphasised its role as a non-verbal intervention, especially useful for those who find talking therapy difficult. Creative self-expression is valued by staff and service users as part of the recovery process. Recommendations arising from the research include continuing the art therapy service, expanding it to include patients under rehabilitation, provision of information and education sessions to staff, and further research to identify other potential long-term effects. The low response of staff and small sample in this study, however, must be noted as limitations to these findings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jeong Shin; Kim, Yong Bae [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mi Yeon; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun Hyun [Graduate School of Clinical Art Therapy, CHA University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy.

  18. An overview of art therapy interventions for cancer patients and the results of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Goetze, Heide; Buttstaedt, Marianne; Kleinert, Evelyn; Richter, Diana; Singer, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years several offers in- and outpatient creative therapy interventions for cancer patients have been developed, implemented and researched. This article describes the content, concept and structure of art therapy interventions based on painting or drawing as well as some further methodical procedures and research results of art therapy in the field of psycho-oncology. We searched electronic databases for papers published between 1987 and March 2009 on painting or drawing based art therapy interventions in oncology. The papers were selected using the inclusion criteria detailed below. Of 56 retrieved manuscripts, 17 papers reporting 12 research projects were included. The art therapy interventions differ from each other considerably in their content and structure. The variance in the study design of the papers was also high. More females than males participated in the interventions. The papers dealt with a variety of questions. A total of seven quantitative papers focused on mental health. A decrease in anxiety and depression was noted in six of these. Three papers documented an increase in quality of life. Moreover, four qualitative papers indicated positive effects on personal growth, coping, the development of new form of self-expression, and social interaction. Three papers with qualitative methods investigated participants' mechanisms for coping with their disease. Published papers show that art therapy benefits cancer patients in various ways including improving their mental health. Nevertheless, more studies with an evidence-based design are necessary for reaching further conclusions on efficacy of art therapy. This research should include a focus on gender differences, and controlling possible influencing factors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiléia Helena de Morais

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand the significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital. Methodology. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, undertaken with 16 patients in a day hospital in Londrina, in the state of Parana, Brazil, who participated in seven clay therapy sessions. Data collection took place from January to July 2012 through interviews guided by a semi structured questionnaire and the data were submitted to content analysis. Results. Three themes emerged: Becoming familiar with clay art therapy; Feeling clay therapy; and Realizing the effect of clay therapy. Conclusion. The use of clay as a therapeutic method by psychiatric patients promoted creativity, self-consciousness, and benefited those who sought anxiety relief.

  20. Creating Environments Through the Art of Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Royeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dr. Lori Reynolds has an interest in therapeutic gardens and the creation of living spaces that promote wellbeing for older adults. Dr. Reynolds educates various stakeholders on the benefits of occupational therapy, including landscape architects and senior living administrators. Her advocacy to expand occupational therapy beyond its mainstream roles is infectious. She speaks passionately about her work in helping to create therapeutic gardens and how her role as an occupational therapist offers great perspective in this process. She appreciates the environmental impact on an individual’s health and well-being and practices from a personenvironment-occupation theory

  1. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART) program in urban Cameroon, 2003?2005

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Cecile Zoung-Kanyi; Lucienne Assumpta Bella; Carno Tchuani; Helene Epee; Louis Menyeng; Regis Pouillot; Jembia Mosoko; Claudine Essomba; Yacouba Njankouo Mapoure; Madeleine Mbangue; Therese Abong; Mathurin Tejiokem; Charles Kouanfack; Alain Kenfak; Koulla, Sinata S

    2008-01-01

    Background:Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought by ART programs. Methods:Based on existing patient records, we assessed determinants of retention in HIV care among HIV patients enrolled in an urban ART at two urban hospitals in Cameroon...

  2. [Helpful Factors of Ambulant Art Therapy in the Group and Changes of Experiences in Psychosomatic Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Jörg; Moser, Anna Sophie; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the experiences of patients suffering from mostly chronic psychosomatic disorders in an ambulant art therapy in the group. Especially, the focus was on the experienced changes, helpful factors and specifics of the therapy as well as on the experienced benefit. For this, 30 patients were interviewed in a semi-standardized way. Additionally, the symptom-based strain was psychometrically recorded in a part of the patients (21) at the beginning of the therapy and after at least 6 months of participation. The evaluation of those interviews with the qualitative analysis of the therapy subjects surrendered an improvement of the health state in most of the participants. Especially group factors, art as a mean of communication, becoming aware of feelings but also diversion and fun were proved to be beneficial. The art therapy also serves for structuring the week as well as a contact point and a resource in the interpersonal communication of everyday life. Nearly all of the patients referred to some important turning point pictures. Mostly, the benefit was valued as being high. But, in contrast, the psychometric measure did not show any significant change. The results emphasize the stabilizing function of art therapy in the examined patients, whereat the classification of the psychometric result is complicated by the absence of a control group. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Treating women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with a hybrid cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Orly; Cwikel, Julie; Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna; Huss, Ephrat

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of a combined, evaluated protocol, cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART), for the treatment of women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs). The protocol integrates cognitive behavioural interventions and art therapy. CB-ART focuses on changing distressing image, symptom or memory (ISM) that interferes with functioning. The method directs clients to identify compositional elements that characterize their stressful ISM and to alter the element in their imagination, in bodily sensations and on the page. Examples are provided to illustrate the therapeutic process.

  4. The art of HAART: a practical approach to antiretroviral therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    In adults it is rarely used as an antiretroviral in its own right (600 mg twice daily) due to increased adverse events (e.g. diarrhoea). Table II ... antiepileptics, rifampicin, flu- conazole, erythromycin or pep- tic ulcer therapy?) • Keep the daily number of tablets low — remember supple- ments add up too. • The patient's budget is a ...

  5. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    raoul

    2003-03-01

    From March 1, 2003 to June 30, 2004, HAART eligible patients aged 15 years and older, with limited financial resources as defined by a standardized indigence score scale, were initiated on HAART and followed during 18 months in a pilot Antiretroviral Therapy (PART) initiative. This initiative of the Ministry of Public Health ...

  6. State of the art: gene therapy of haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, H T; Riley, B E; Doering, C B

    2016-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been practiced for more than a quarter century and the first products are finally gaining regulatory/marketing approval. As of 2016, there have been 11 haemophilia gene therapy clinical trials of which six are currently open. Each of the ongoing phase 1/2 trials is testing a variation of a liver-directed adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding either factor VIII (FVIII) or factor IX (FIX) . As summarized herein, the clinical results to date have been mixed with some perceived success and a clear recognition of the immune response to AAV as an obstacle to therapeutic success. We also attempt to highlight promising late-stage preclinical activities for AAV-FVIII where, due to inherent challenges with manufacture, delivery and transgene product biosynthesis, more technological development has been necessary to achieve results comparable to what has been observed previously for AAV-FIX. Finally, we describe the development of a stem cell-based lentiviral vector gene therapy product that has the potential to provide lifelong production of FVIII and provide a functional 'cure' for haemophilia A. Integral to this program has been the incorporation of a blood cell-specific gene expression element driving the production of a bioengineered FVIII designed for optimal efficiency. As clearly outlined herein, haemophilia remains at the forefront of the rapidly advancing clinical gene therapy field where there exists a shared expectation that transformational advances are on the horizon. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Art therapy and the promotion of child development in a hospitalization context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ana Cláudia Afonso; da Silva, Mariana Teixeira

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and compare the development of hospitalized children before and after art therapy interventions. Qualitative case studies were undertaken in this descriptive-exploratory research, based on the developmental evaluation of the children. The study participants were five children between seven and ten years old, in the Hospital of Tropical Illnesses (HDT) in the city of Goiânia, state of Goiás, Brazil, in 2006. Results showed that art therapy interventions efficiently promoted children's development. Art therapy is a resource for positively channeling the variables of hospitalized children's development and for neutralizing affective factors that naturally appear, as well as for exposing the child's healthier potentials, which sometimes receive little stimulus in the context of hospitalization.

  8. Weanling piglet cerebellum: a surrogate for tolerance to MRT (microbeam radiation therapy) in pediatric neuro-oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laissue, Jean A.; Blattmann, Hans; Di Michiel, Marco; Slatkin, Daniel N.; Lyubimova, Nadia; Guzman, Raphael; Zimmermann, Werner; Birrer, Stephan; Bley, Tim; Kircher, Patrick; Stettler, Regina; Fatzer, Rosmarie; Jaggy, Andre; Smilowitz, Henry; Brauer, Elke; Bravin, Alberto; Le Duc, Geraldine; Nemoz, Christian; Renier, Michel; Thomlinson, William C.; Stepanek, Jiri; Wagner, Hans-Peter

    2001-12-01

    The cerebellum of the weanling piglet (Yorkshire) was used as a surrogate for the radiosensitive human infant cerebellum in a Swiss-led program of experimental microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) at the ESRF. Five weanlings in a 47 day old litter of seven, and eight weanlings in a 40 day old litter of eleven were irradiated in November, 1999 and June, 2000, respectively. A 1.5 cm-wide x 1.5 xm-high array of equally space approximately equals 20-30 micrometers wide, upright microbeams spaced at 210 micrometers intervals was propagated horizontally, left to right, through the cerebella of the prone, anesthetized piglets. Skin-entrance intra-microbeam peak adsorbed doses were uniform, either 150, 300, 425, or 600 gray (Gy). Peak and inter-microbeam (valley) absorbed doses in the cerebellum were computed with the PSI version of the Monte Carlo code GEANT and benchmarked using Gafchromic and radiochromic film microdosimetry. For approximately equals 66 weeks [first litter; until euthanasia], or approximately equals 57 weeks [second litter; until July 30, 2001] after irradiation, the littermates were developmentally, behaviorally, neurologically and radiologically normal as observed and tested by experienced farmers and veterinary scientists unaware of which piglets were irradiated or sham-irradiated. Morever, MRT implemented at the ESRF with a similar array of microbeams and a uniform skin-entrance peak dose of 625 Gy, followed by immunoprophylaxis, was shown to be palliative or curative in young adult rats bearing intracerebral gliosarcomas. These observations give further credence to MRT's potential as an adjunct therapy for brain tumors in infancy, when seamless therapeutic irradiation of the brain is hazardous.

  9. The MATISSE study: a randomised trial of group art therapy for people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Killaspy, Helen; Kalaitzaki, Eleftheria; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Patterson, Sue; Soteriou, Tony; O'Neill, Francis A; Clayton, Katie; Maratos, Anna; Barnes, Thomas R; Osborn, David; Johnson, Tony; King, Michael; Tyrer, Peter; Waller, Diana

    2010-08-27

    Art Therapy has been promoted as a means of helping people who may find it difficult to express themselves verbally engage in psychological treatment. Group Art Therapy has been widely used as an adjunctive treatment for people with schizophrenia but there have been few attempts to examine its effects and cost effectiveness has not been examined. The MATISSE study aims to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of group Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. The MATISSE study is a three-arm, parallel group, pragmatic, randomised, controlled trial of referral to group Art Therapy plus standard care, referral to an attention control 'activity' group plus standard care, or standard care alone. Study participants were recruited from inpatient and community-based mental health and social care services at four centres in England and Northern Ireland. Participants were aged over 18 years with a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia, confirmed by an examination of case notes using operationalised criteria. Participants were then randomised via an independent and remote telephone randomisation service using permuted stacked blocks, stratified by site. Art Therapy and activity groups were made available to participants once a week for up to 12 months. Outcome measures were assessed by researchers masked to allocation status at 12 and 24 months after randomisation. Participants and care givers were aware which arm of the trial participants were allocated to. The primary outcomes for the study are global functioning (measured using the Global Assessment of Functioning scale) and mental health symptoms (measured using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) assessed at 24 months. Secondary outcomes were assessed at 12 and 24 months and comprise levels of group attendance, social function, satisfaction with care, mental wellbeing, and costs. We believe that this is the first large scale pragmatic trial of Art Therapy for people with schizophrenia. Current Controlled

  10. The experience of use of the sand art-therapy with children with autism spectrum disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotlovanova O.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of effective work to use sand art-therapy for treatment of behavior problems in children with autism spectrum disorder. The article describes the session plan, children's behavior in dynamics and intermediate results of work with children with autism spectrum disorders in the framework of this program. The influence of the sand art-therapy on the children's behavior was analyzed. The clinical case of sessions with the boy K. was described. The overwhelmingly positive influence of such sessions was determined.

  11. The science and art of asking questions in cognitive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Ian Andrew; Morse, Rachel; Howarth, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Questions underpin all aspects of therapeutic assessment and intervention and are a vital component of the clinical process. Over recent years frameworks have started to be applied to obtain a greater understanding of questioning formats and processes. This paper examines the use of questions in cognitive therapy (CT). An overview of the main types of questions identified in the literature is presented. In addition, we examine a range of client and therapist characteristics that may impact on the questioning process. Asking questions in therapy is a complex, yet under-taught, skill. This paper provides a set of frameworks to assist in identifying helpful and unhelpful questioning skills. Thus the article has implications for further training and research.

  12. Social Support and the Mediating Roles of Alcohol Use and Adherence Self-Efficacy on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Adherence Among ART Recipients in Gauteng, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekwaletswe, Connie T; Jordaan, Esmé; Nkosi, Sebenzile; Morojele, Neo K

    2017-07-01

    We sought to (a) replicate and (b) extend (via the addition of alcohol use) Cha et al.'s cross-sectional multi-component model of ART adherence on the relationship between social support, depression, self-efficacy beliefs, and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, among HIV patients in Tshwane, South Africa. Using purposive sampling, 304 male and female ART recipients were recruited. ART adherence was assessed using three manifest indicators: total adherence ratio, the CASE adherence index and 1-month adherence measure. Data were analysed using structural equation modeling. In our replicated model, social support had both direct and indirect relationships with ART adherence, and inclusion of alcohol use improved prediction of ART adherence. Direct and indirect effects of alcohol use on ART adherence emerged: adherence self-efficacy beliefs partially mediated the latter path. Findings highlight the importance of integrating into ART promotion interventions, the reduction of alcohol use, provision of social support, and enhancement of adherence self-efficacy beliefs.

  13. The NeuroDevNet vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowitz, Dan; McArthur, Dawn

    2011-03-01

    The NeuroDevNet Network of Centres of Excellence has created the first trans-Canada effort devoted to the study of brain development from basic to clinical to societal perspectives. NeuroDevNet's vision is to accelerate efforts to (i) understand normal brain development; (ii) enhance our ability to make diagnoses of when normal development goes awry; and (iii) develop interventions to improve or prevent neurodevelopmental disorders. An early diagnosis coupled with the right therapies, The NeuroDevNet Network of Centres of Excellence has created the first trans-Canada effort devoted to the study of brain development from basic to clinical to societal perspectives. NeuroDevNet's vision is to accelerate efforts to (i) understand normal brain development; (ii) enhance our ability to make diagnoses of when normal development goes awry; and (iii) develop interventions to improve or prevent neurodevelopmental disorders. An early diagnosis coupled with the right therapies, Demonstration Projects. Funds were also allocated for an Opportunities Initiative. There is a wide of expertise amongst NeuroDevNet members. Researchers are supported by the management centre, three Platforms (Imaging; Genetics/ Epigenetics; Animal Models) and three Cores (Neuroethics; Neuroinformatics; Knowledge Translation). We emphasize multidisciplinary training of young researchers to advance the understanding of brain disorders that affect children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The impact of art therapy on the intelligibility of speech in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachalska, M; Frańczuk, B; Macqueen, B D; Jastrzebowska, G; Perzanowski, Z; Neldon, K

    2001-01-01

    Background. Children with cerebral palsy (CP) frequently have dysarthria, which reduces the intelligibility of their speech and can seriously impede their psycho-social adjustment. Traditional "bottom-up" rehabilitation oriented directly on the articulatory apparatus is not always successful in helping these children to speak intelligibly. The authors have developed a program of art therapy with elements of logopedic therapy to model and stimulate perception and expression, including linguistic performance, which has proven in clinical to be a helpful "top-down" approach to helping these children to speak more early. Material and methods. Out of the population of CP children treated in the Cracow Rehabilitation Center's Art Therapy Workshop in the period 1994-2001, we identified 14 children, 9 boys and 5 girls, average age 15,3, who showed severe dysarthria at admission without other language or cognitive disturbances. Our retrospective study was based on recorder results from the Auditory Dysarthria Scale and standard neuropsychological tests for fluency of speech, administered routinely once each month during the 4-month art therapy program. Results. All the children in the study group showed some degree of improvement after art therapy in all tested parameters. On the Auditory Dysarthria Scale, the largest improvements were noted in overall intelligibility (p pronunciation of vowels and consonants (the most purely motor of the measured parameters). All the children also exhibited significant improvement in fluency of speech. Conclusions. Art therapy with elements of logopedic therapy improves the ability of children with cerebral palsy to engage in purposeful behavior, including speech and language functions, especially intelligibility.

  15. Is art therapy a reliable tool for rehabilitating people suffering from brain/mental diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabella, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Whether art therapy can be an effective rehabilitative treatment for people with brain or mental diseases (e.g., dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, autism, schizophrenia) is a long-standing and highly debated issue. On the one hand, several observational studies and anecdotal evidence enthusiastically support the effectiveness of arts-based therapy. On the other hand, few rigorous clinical investigations have been performed, and there is too little empirical evidence to allow a full assessment of the risks and benefits of this intervention. Nevertheless, there is a progressively increasing demand for the development of appropriate complementary therapies to improve the personal and social lives of patients with neurodegenerative diseases. This is because conventional medical treatments are aimed at alleviating symptoms but cannot arrest or reverse the degenerative process. Thus, as disease progresses and adverse effects emerge, patients' quality of life dramatically decreases; when this occurs patients seek different forms of intervention. Art therapy is a potentially appealing treatment because of its more holistic approach to healthcare. However, as with any medicine, its effects must be tested by using standard, rigorous scientific approaches. This report describes the current state of research into art therapy and outlines many key factors that future research should consider, all of which are directly or indirectly related to the neural mechanism underlying behavioral changes: brain plasticity. Artistic performance could promote some form of brain plasticity that, to some extent, might compensate for the brain damage caused by the disease.

  16. 10. Utilization of Narrative Approach in Art Therapy in Children with Behavioural Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutyrová Miluše

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the possibilities of applying narrative approach in art therapy context and focuses on the situation of problems in social and cultural contexts, the development of alternative stories, and externalization as one of the basic techniques of narrative therapy. Along with looking for dominant, alternative and preferred stories, externalization develops potential for therapeutic and education intervention in individuals of various target groups. The article focuses, in particular, on children exhibiting problematic behaviour and disordered behaviour. The objective is to find the points interconnecting narrative therapy and art therapy in the creative potential and artistic anchorage, which, along with expression, embody a challenge of new opportunities to find new ways, methods and approaches.

  17. ARTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahadevan, Shankar; Virk, Kashif M.; Madsen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    . We present an abstract system-level modelling and simulation framework (ARTS) which allows for cross-layer modelling and analysis covering the application layer, middleware layer, and hardware layer. ARTS allows MPSoC designers to explore and analyze the network performance under different traffic...... and load conditions, consequences of different task mappings to processors (software or hardware) including memory and power usage, and effects of RTOS selection, including scheduling, synchronization and resource allocation policies. We present the application and platform models of ARTS as well...... as their implementation in SystemC. We present the usage of the ARTS framework as seen from platform developers’ point of view, where new components may be created and integrated into the framework, and from application designers’ point of view, where existing components are used to explore possible implementations...

  18. The art of living in Otto Rank's Will Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadlington, Will

    2012-12-01

    Otto Rank's approach to psychotherapy, developed after his separation from Freud, encourages living life fully in spite of death and limitation. In his emphasis on the here and now, new experience in the therapeutic relationship, and collaboration and creativity in the therapy process, Rank was ahead of his time. As a theorist of personality and of creativity, his work is well known, but his influence on the practices of humanistic, existential, and post-psychoanalytic relational therapists is largely unacknowledged. Rank's creative legacy is an approach to psychotherapy that calls forth artistry and collaboration between therapist and client.

  19. The impact of the Art Therapy Large Group, an educational tool in the training of art therapists, on post-qualification professional practice.

    OpenAIRE

    Skaife, Sally; Jones, Kevin.; Pentaris, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a Likert scale survey that was sent to past graduates of the MA Art Psychotherapy, Goldsmiths, University of London asking them about the relevance of their experience in the Art Therapy Large Group (ATLG) to their subsequent employment as art therapists or work in another capacity. The ATLG comprises all the students and staff in a psychodynamically based experiential group that meets six times during the year. Survey questions were drawn from previously ...

  20. Ceiling art in a radiation therapy department: its effect on patient treatment experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Jotham

    2015-09-01

    A new initiative has been implemented at the Sunshine Hospital Radiation Therapy Centre, to provide a calming and comforting environment for patients attending radiation therapy treatment. As part of this initiative, the department's computed tomography (CT) room and radiation therapy bunkers were designed to incorporate ceiling art that replicates a number of different visual scenes. The study was undertaken to determine if ceiling art in the radiation therapy treatment CT and treatment bunkers had an effect on a patient's experience during treatment at the department. Additionally, the study aimed to identify which of the visuals in the ceiling art were most preferred by patients. Patients were requested to complete a 12-question survey. The survey solicited a patient's opinion/perception on the unit's unique ceiling display with emphasis on aesthetic appeal, patient treatment experience and the patient's engagement due to the ceiling display. The responses were dichotomised to 'positive' or 'negative'. Every sixth patient who completed the survey was invited to have a general face-to-face discussion to provide further information about their thoughts on the displays. The results demonstrate that the ceiling artwork solicited a positive reaction in 89.8% of patients surveyed. This score indicates that ceiling artwork contributed positively to patients' experiences during radiation therapy treatment. The study suggests that ceiling artwork in the department has a positive effect on patient experience during their radiation therapy treatment at the department.

  1. Patterns of HIV-1 Drug Resistance After First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Failure in 6 Sub-Saharan African Countries: Implications for Second-Line ART Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Wensing, Annemarie M.; Wallis, Carole L.; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Schuurman, Rob; Siwale, M.; Njovu, C.; Labib, M.; Menke, J.; Botes, M. E.; Conradie, F.; Ive, P.; Sanne, I.; Wallis, C. L.; Letsoalo, E.; Stevens, W. S.; Hardman, M.; Wellington, M.; Luthy, R.; Mandaliya, K.; Abdallah, S.; Jao, I.; Dolan, M.; Namayanja, G.; Nakatudde, L.; Nankya, I.; Kiconco, M.; Abwola, M.; Mugyenyi, P.; Osibogun, A.; Akanmu, S.; Schuurman, R.; Wensing, A. M.; Straatsma, E.; Wit, F. W.; Dekker, J.; van Vugt, M.; Lange, J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African

  2. The Efficacy of Art Therapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Bree A

    Children undergoing cancer treatment experience detrimental adverse side effects that may be addressed with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such as art therapy. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of art therapy in pediatric patients living with cancer. An integrative literature review was conducted using the CINAHL, OVID Medline, and PsycINFO databases. Studies were included if they were a primary source utilizing an art therapy intervention in children with cancer age birth to 18years old, was published between the year 2000 and 2016, and written in the English language. Seven primary sources met inclusion criteria. Few studies were reported in this review. Findings of this review suggest that children who participated in various forms of drawing interventions exhibited enhanced communication with family members and healthcare providers. Additionally, children were able to better express underlying emotions, developed more effective coping skills, and experienced a reduction in adverse side effects. Implementing a drawing intervention or other forms of art into the holistic care of a pediatric oncology patient may assist in maximizing quality of life and allow for a more tolerable lifestyle. Acquiring a means of proper communication with children through art allows nurses to gain insight on the needs of this special patient population, resulting in a higher quality plan of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The “third space” in art and therapy. dimensions of art in psychosocial work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Schimpf-Herken

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Art provides new ways of healing in psychosocial work. It develops experience in the so-called “third space” by generating a gradual approach to the painful experience in which violence is not placed in the foreground –the person concerned is in charge of his/her own healing process. In the same vein, the ‘places of memory’ with a violent past can be transformed into ‘spaces of transference’ (Winnicott where individuals can become confident as well as empower themselves. ‘Literary metaphor’ allows to experience collective images that strengthen identity and to rebuild the trust or the social relationships violence have destroyed. ‘Scenes of forum theater’ work has to do with the creation of an image of the reality and its transformation into a ‘space of transference’ for real life. The three approaches Paulo Freire Institute has used for its varied experiences between Latin America and Europe show that artistic approaches enable a careful way in which both trust and relationships grow and become a vehicle of social change.

  4. NeuroMorpho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NeuroMorpho.Org is a centrally curated inventory of digitally reconstructed neurons associated with peer-reviewed publications. It contains contributions from over...

  5. State of the Art Antiemetic Therapy for Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Thomas K H; Yip, Claudia H W; Yeo, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are common in cancer patients. The most common cause of nausea and vomiting is the administration of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Apart from chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), biological agents may also cause these symptoms. In this review, discussion will be focused on management of nausea and vomiting due to antineoplastic therapies. The cornerstone of effective management of nausea and vomiting secondary to these antineoplastic drugs is the prevention with the use of appropriate guideline-directed combination antiemetic regimen. Type 3 serotonin receptor antagonists (5HT3RAs), neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists (NK1RAs), and dexamethasone are the backbone antiemetic drugs. In recent years, newer drugs and preparations have been introduced for clinical use and include second-generation 5HT3RA, palonosetron; granisetron transdermal patch; the recently introduced NK1RA rolapitant; and the novel oral combined drug NEPA (netupitant plus palonosetron); and last but not least, the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine.

  6. Photodynamic therapy for localized infections--state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was discovered over 100 years ago by observing the killing of microorganisms when harmless dyes and visible light were combined in vitro. Since then it has primarily been developed as a treatment for cancer, ophthalmologic disorders and in dermatology. However, in recent years interest in the antimicrobial effects of PDT has revived and it has been proposed as a therapy for a large variety of localized infections. This revival of interest has largely been driven by the inexorable increase in drug resistance among many classes of pathogen. Advantages of PDT include equal killing effectiveness regardless of antibiotic resistance, and a lack of induction of PDT resistance. Disadvantages include the cessation of the antimicrobial effect when the light is turned off, and less than perfect selectivity for microbial cells over host tissue. This review will cover the use of PDT to kill or inactivate pathogens in ex vivo tissues and in biological materials such as blood. PDT has been successfully used to kill pathogens and even to save life in several animal models of localized infections such as surface wounds, burns, oral sites, abscesses and the middle ear. A large number of clinical studies of PDT for viral papillomatosis lesions and for acne refer to its antimicrobial effect, but it is unclear how important this microbial killing is to the overall therapeutic outcome. PDT for periodontitis is a rapidly growing clinical application and other dental applications are under investigation. PDT is being clinically studied for other dermatological infections such as leishmaniasis and mycobacteria. Antimicrobial PDT will become more important in the future as antibiotic resistance is only expected to continue to increase.

  7. Blessings in Disguise: Idiomatic Expression as a Stimulus in Group Art Therapy with Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, David R.

    2000-01-01

    Reports on therapeutic outcomes resulting from use of idiomatic expression in group art therapy with children with Attention Deficit Disorder or Hyperactivity and related disorders who are in the latency stage. Major issues emerged related to self-concept, peer socialization, and family relations. Idioms were shown to stimulate affective-laden…

  8. Applying the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale (FEATS) to Adults in an Asian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Joshua Kin-man; Hinz, Lisa D.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment is the foundation for conceptualizing effective interventions. Due to their nonverbal nature, art therapy assessments have an advantage over traditional verbal assessments in some populations and potentially across cultures. This pilot study provides preliminary reliability data to support the cross-cultural use of the Formal Elements…

  9. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  10. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy for Teaching Social Skills to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Miranda; Lalonde, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental research study was to evaluate the effectiveness of art therapy for teaching social skills to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The program we tested was structured to provide a therapeutic setting for children to discuss difficulties they experience in their social interactions, and give them…

  11. Is Cultural Competence Enough? Deepening Social Justice Pedagogy in Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Leah R.

    2015-01-01

    This viewpoint examines the limitations of cultural competency in art therapy education through personal reflection, calling for an immersive engagement with social justice practices of naming difference, asserting counter narratives, and following the leadership of people impacted by systemic violence. The author discusses the impact of…

  12. Empowering Students through Creativity: Art Therapy in Miami-Dade County Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isis, Patricia D.; Bush, Janet; Siegel, Craig A.; Ventura, Yehoshua

    2010-01-01

    Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS) has been at the forefront of integrating art therapy in schools since 1979, helping children with emotional/behavioral disabilities become more receptive to academic involvement while maximizing their social and emotional potential. This article describes the history, development, current configuration,…

  13. Art Therapy Programs with At-Risk Students in Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varallo, Patrick A.

    2012-01-01

    Educating and meeting the multiple needs of students at risk of low academic achievement has been a growing concern for public schools in the United States. Many at-risk students require alternative school-based interventions. This study examined the operation, premise, and objectives of art therapy integrated in 14 school districts across the…

  14. "Walkabout: Looking In, Looking Out": A Mindfulness-Based Art Therapy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This brief report describes a mindfulness-based art therapy (MBAT) intervention, "Walkabout: Looking In, Looking Out," which was piloted in 2010 and has since been offered at the Abramson Cancer Center at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia. The author adapted the original MBAT intervention using a walkabout conceptual model, which was…

  15. The Effect of Art Therapy on Cognitive Performance among Ethnically Diverse Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Amanda Alders

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of art therapy on the cognitive performance of a multisite, ethnically diverse sample ("N" = 91) of older adults. Participants were recruited from several U.S. facilities that included a community center, a retirement center, an adult daycare, an assisted living facility, and a skilled nursing facility.…

  16. Effects of Drawing on Alpha Activity: A Quantitative EEG Study with Implications for Art Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkofer, Christopher M.; Van Hecke, Amy Vaughan; Konopka, Lukasz M.

    2014-01-01

    Little empirical evidence exists as to how materials used in art therapy affect the brain and its neurobiological functioning. This pre/post within-groups study utilized the quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) to measure residual effects in the brain after 20 minutes of drawing. EEG recordings were conducted before and after participants (N =…

  17. The effect of healing gardens and art therapy on older adults with mild to moderate depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of garden walks alone, garden walks with guided imagery, and art therapy on mild to moderate depression in older adults. Focus group interviews at the end of the 6-week intervention suggest that all 3 interventions were helpful to participants with mild to moderate depression.

  18. Mapping the Maze: An Art Therapy Intervention following Disclosure of Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifalo, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Disclosures of child sexual abuse create an immediate crisis within the child's family unit. Reactions of nonoffending caregivers in particular may prevent them from being emotionally available to respond immediately to the needs of the child victim. This article describes an art therapy intervention of visual mapping used in a support group of…

  19. The Creative Journey: A Model for Short-Term Group Art Therapy with Posttreatment Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto, Paola; Gabriel, Bonnie

    2000-01-01

    Cancer patients who have completed medical treatment are often left with unresolved psychological issues. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York offers a group art therapy program for cancer patients to help them regain their self-confidence and readjust their self-identity. The response of 70 participants has been positive and has…

  20. A Child's Use of Transitional Objects in Art Therapy to Cope with Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Courtney

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the use of transitional objects in a case study of a 12-year-old boy, documenting the role of art therapy in helping the boy cope with the trauma of his parents' recent separation and divorce. Transitional objects emerged spontaneously as the boy integrated the transition that the divorce of his parents…

  1. The contribution of art therapy in poorly controlled youth with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Shira; Yanai, Livia; Brooks, Ronit; Bar, Yakira; Bistritzer, Tzvy; Ivgi, Shosh; Rachmiel, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intensive art therapy in youth with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A retrospective report of the characteristics and outcomes of all patients who were offered to receive individual art therapy sessions because of behavioral difficulties. The study population included 29 participants. The main behavioral difficulties were needle phobia and lack of compliance with nutritional recommendations or with insulin administration. The intervention group included 16 patients, with a mean age of 9.3±2.5 years, average intervention length of 0.77±0.41 years, and long-term data of 2.27±1.13 years. The control group included 13 patients, with a mean age of 9.3±3.4 years. Improvement was observed in 56% of the case group and in 23% of the control group. Art therapy was associated with a decrease in hemoglobin A1c in the intervention group compared with a similar control group (-0.79%, ±0.24%; r=0.17, p=0.025). The addition of intensive art therapy for poorly controlled youth with T1DM may improve their glycemic control.

  2. Art therapy as an adjuvant treatment for depression in elderly women: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciasca, Eliana C; Ferreira, Rita C; Santana, Carmen L A; Forlenza, Orestes V; Dos Santos, Glenda D; Brum, Paula S; Nunes, Paula V

    2018-02-01

    There are few quantitative studies on art therapy for the treatment of depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate if art therapy is beneficial as an adjuvant treatment for depression in the elderly. A randomized, controlled, single-blind study was carried out in a sample of elderly women with major depressive disorder (MDD) stable on pharmacotherapy. The experimental group (EG) was assigned to 20 weekly art therapy sessions (90 min/session). The control group (CG) was not subjected to any adjuvant intervention. Patients were evaluated at baseline and after 20 weeks, using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and cognitive measures. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age revealed that women in EG (n=31) had significant improvement in GDS (p = 0.007), BDI (p = 0.025), and BAI (p = 0.032) scores as compared with controls (n=25). No difference was found in the cognitive measures. Art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for MDD in the elderly can improve depressive and anxiety symptoms. RBR-2YXY7Z.

  3. Art therapy as an adjuvant treatment for depression in elderly women: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana C. Ciasca

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are few quantitative studies on art therapy for the treatment of depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate if art therapy is beneficial as an adjuvant treatment for depression in the elderly. Methods: A randomized, controlled, single-blind study was carried out in a sample of elderly women with major depressive disorder (MDD stable on pharmacotherapy. The experimental group (EG was assigned to 20 weekly art therapy sessions (90 min/session. The control group (CG was not subjected to any adjuvant intervention. Patients were evaluated at baseline and after 20 weeks, using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, and cognitive measures. Results: Logistic regression analysis adjusted for age revealed that women in EG (n=31 had significant improvement in GDS (p = 0.007, BDI (p = 0.025, and BAI (p = 0.032 scores as compared with controls (n=25. No difference was found in the cognitive measures. Conclusion: Art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for MDD in the elderly can improve depressive and anxiety symptoms. Clinical trial registration: RBR-2YXY7Z

  4. Treatment of neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohman, Larry P

    2015-03-01

    Because of the rarity of neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis, there are no therapeutic guidelines based on evidence-based medicine for this disorder. Review of literature combined with personal experience. Corticosteroids are the preferred initial therapy for neuro-ophthalmic sarcoidosis. If patients cannot tolerate the requisite dose of corticosteroid needed to control their disease, or if corticosteroids fail to adequately control the disease process, the choices of a second agent are based on the consideration of rapidity of clinical response and the safety profile. Although methotrexate and mycophenolate mofetil are the medications that are often selected after corticosteroid failure, more rapidly acting agents that have been used are infliximab and intravenous cyclophosphamide.

  5. Major clinical outcomes in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive participants and in those not receiving ART at baseline in the SMART study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SMART study randomized 5,472 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/microL to intermittent antiretroviral therapy (ART; the drug conservation [DC] group) versus continuous ART (the viral suppression [VS] group). In the DC group...... clinical outcomes were assessed: (i) opportunistic disease (OD) or death from any cause (OD/death); (ii) OD (fatal or nonfatal); (iii) serious non-AIDS events (cardiovascular, renal, and hepatic disease plus non-AIDS-defining cancers) and non-OD deaths; and (iv) the composite of outcomes (ii) and (iii......, participants started ART when the CD4+ cell count was cells/microL. Clinical outcomes in participants not receiving ART at entry inform the early use of ART. METHODS: Patients who were either ART naive (n=249) or who had not been receiving ART for >or= 6 months (n=228) were analyzed. The following...

  6. Training in Influencing Skills from Neuro-Linguistic Programming (Modelled from Hypnosis and Family Therapy), in Combination with Innovative Maths Pedagogy, Raises Maths Attainment in Adult Numeracy Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, F.; Bourne, J.; Bouch, D.; Churches, R.; Dennison, J.; Evans, J.; Fowler, J.; Jeffers, A.; Prior, E.; Rhodes, L.

    2012-01-01

    Case study research suggests that NLP [neuro-linguistic programming] influencing strategies benefit teacher effectiveness. Maths pedagogy involving higher-order questioning, challenge, problem solving and collaborative working may be a way of improving attainment in adult numeracy learning, however, such strategies may be less effective if the…

  7. Intersections between Music Education and Music Therapy: Education Reform, Arts Education, Exceptionality, and Policy at the Local Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Karen; Pasiali, Varvara

    2017-01-01

    In this article, a music teacher educator and a music therapy clinician and educator discuss special education policy and arts instruction at the district level. To illustrate the gulf between federal and local policies with regard to exceptional learners and arts instruction, we examine the intersections of music therapy and music education with…

  8. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy Interventions in Reducing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms in Pediatric Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Linda M.; Morabito, Diane; Ladakakos, Chris; Schreier, Herbert; Knudson, M. Margaret

    2001-01-01

    Chapman Art Therapy Intervention (CATTI), an art therapy research project at an urban trauma center, was designed to reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pediatric patients. Early analysis does not indicate statistically significant differences in reduction of PTSD symptoms between experimental and control groups. Children…

  9. A State-of-the-Art Review: Personalization of Tinnitus Sound Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searchfield, Grant D; Durai, Mithila; Linford, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are several established, and an increasing number of putative, therapies using sound to treat tinnitus. There appear to be few guidelines for sound therapy selection and application. Aim: To review current approaches to personalizing sound therapy for tinnitus. Methods: A "state-of-the-art" review (Grant and Booth, 2009) was undertaken to answer the question: how do current sound-based therapies for tinnitus adjust for tinnitus heterogeneity? Scopus, Google Scholar, Embase and PubMed were searched for the 10-year period 2006-2016. The search strategy used the following key words: "tinnitus" AND "sound" AND "therapy" AND "guidelines" OR "personalized" OR "customized" OR "individual" OR "questionnaire" OR "selection." The results of the review were cataloged and organized into themes. Results: In total 165 articles were reviewed in full, 83 contained sufficient details to contribute to answering the study question. The key themes identified were hearing compensation, pitched-match therapy, maskability, reaction to sound and psychosocial factors. Although many therapies mentioned customization, few could be classified as being personalized. Several psychoacoustic and questionnaire-based methods for assisting treatment selection were identified. Conclusions: Assessment methods are available to assist clinicians to personalize sound-therapy and empower patients to be active in therapy decision-making. Most current therapies are modified using only one characteristic of the individual and/or their tinnitus.

  10. A Systematic Review of the Efficacy of Creative Arts Therapies in the Treatment of Adults With PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity A; Metcalf, Olivia; Varker, Tracey; O'Donnell, Meaghan

    2017-12-04

    There is a growing body of literature supporting the use of creative arts therapies; however, the efficacy of creative arts therapies in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has not been systematically evaluated. The aim of this systematic review was to examine the efficacy of creative arts therapy including music therapy, art therapy, dance/movement therapy, and drama therapy, in the treatment of PTSD. Ten databases were searched for peer-reviewed literature published from inception to December 2016. Studies were included in the review if they used a randomized controlled trial (RCT), a pseudo RCT, or a controlled study design; tested the efficacy of one of the creative arts therapies described above; and reported changes to PTSD diagnosis or symptomatology. From an initial yield of 1,918 records, 1,653 records were screened on title and abstract and 125 were screened at full-text. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for review, with four studies investigating art therapy, two studies investigating music therapy, and a final study investigating drama therapy. Individual studies were initially rated on a standardized quality and bias checklist, and then GRADE was used to rate the overall evidence for each intervention. The evidence for music therapy, art therapy, and drama therapy was ranked as low to very low, with no studies found for dance/movement therapy. Generally, the quality of the trials was very poor. Future directions for this field of research are to improve the scientific quality of the research trials in this area. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. A profile of patients attending an Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART centre at a tertiary care hospital in South India

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    Sanjeev Badiger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, the Indian government began providing free antiretroviral therapy (ART through established ART centers. Despite the fact that ART is provided free by the government, there are a large number of sero positive people who do not come forward to receive treatment. Non-adherence is further confounds efforts to offer effective treatment. This study reports the profile of patients who attend an ART centres in southern India.

  12. Prediction of higher cost of antiretroviral therapy (ART) according to clinical complexity. A validated clinical index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Cesar; Pérez, Inaki; Podzamczer, Daniel; Llibre, Josep Maria; Domingo, Pere; González-García, Juan; Puig, Inma; Ayala, Pilar; Martín, Mayte; Trilla, Antoni; Lázaro, Pablo; Gatell, Josep Maria

    2016-03-01

    The financing of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is generally determined by the cost incurred in the previous year, the number of patients on treatment, and the evidence-based recommendations, but not the clinical characteristics of the population. To establish a score relating the cost of ART and patient clinical complexity in order to understand the costing differences between hospitals in the region that could be explained by the clinical complexity of their population. Retrospective analysis of patients receiving ART in a tertiary hospital between 2009 and 2011. Factors potentially associated with a higher cost of ART were assessed by bivariate and multivariate analysis. Two predictive models of "high-cost" were developed. The normalized estimated (adjusted for the complexity scores) costs were calculated and compared with the normalized real costs. In the Hospital Index, 631 (16.8%) of the 3758 patients receiving ART were responsible for a "high-cost" subgroup, defined as the highest 25% of spending on ART. Baseline variables that were significant predictors of high cost in the Clinic-B model in the multivariate analysis were: route of transmission of HIV, AIDS criteria, Spanish nationality, year of initiation of ART, CD4+ lymphocyte count nadir, and number of hospital admissions. The Clinic-B score ranged from 0 to 13, and the mean value (5.97) was lower than the overall mean value of the four hospitals (6.16). The clinical complexity of the HIV patient influences the cost of ART. The Clinic-B and Clinic-BF scores predicted patients with high cost of ART and could be used to compare and allocate costs corrected for the patient clinical complexity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Mielopatia neuro-óptica: Artério e arteriolosclerose. Considerações a propósito de um caso anátomo-clínico

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    J. Lamartine de Assis

    1951-06-01

    Full Text Available Os autores fazem uma síntese sobre o problema atual das doenças desmielinizantes do sistema nervoso, salientando o papel da alergia, de acordo com os trabalhos mais modernos, em particular os de Ferraro e col. Assinalam a dificuldade para o estabelecimento de uma classificação, em virtude da falta de conhecimento dos agentes etiológicos desencadeantes na maioria dos casos. Apresentam uma observação anátomo-clínica de mielo-patia neuro-óptica com artério e arteriolosclerose, em que a doença se iniciou pelo acometimento do nervo óptico direito, e, somente dois meses depois, surgiram os primeiros sinais de acometimento da medula espinal. No quarto mês de doença estabeleceu-se, de modo completo, o quadro medular, com uma sindrome motora tetraplégica pirâmido-extrapiramidal, outra motora primária nas extremidades distais dos membros superiores, por acometimento das pontas anteriores e, finalmente, uma sindrome sensitiva de tipo cordonai, abrangendo todas as formas de sensibilidade, a partir de C3. A enfermidade evoluiu em 12 meses, ocorrendo a morte em conseqüência de insuficiência respiratória de origem bulbar provável. O exame anátomo-patológico mostrou atrofia e esclerose total dos nervos ópticos, discretos infiltrados parvicelulares em torno de alguns vasos intracerebrais e piais e, na medula, um quadro histopatológico comparável ao que de regra se encontra na oftalmoneuromielite; apenas, no segmento cervical, onde as lesões eram muito extensas, havia foco de amolecimento mais pronunciado do que aqueles que se observam mais freqüentemente. 0 fato talvez decorra de esclerose arterial concomitante existente neste caso. Havia, também, lesões bulbares discretas.

  14. Creative Arts Therapies as Temporary Home for Refugees: Insights from Literature and Practice

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    Rebekka Dieterich-Hartwell

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the frequently overlooked psychosocial problems of refugees is the phenomenon of homesickness. Being forced into exile and unable to return home may cause natural feelings of nostalgia but may also result in emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physical adversities. According to the literature, the creative arts therapies with their attention to preverbal language—music, imagery, dance, role play, and movement—are able to reach individuals through the senses and promote successive integration, which can lead to transformation and therapeutic change. These forms of therapy can be a temporary home for refugees in the acculturation process, by serving as a safe and enactive transitional space. More specifically, working with dance and movement can foster the experience of the body as a home and thus provide a safe starting place, from which to regulate arousal, increase interoception, and symbolize trauma- and resource-related processes. Hearing, playing, and singing music from the home culture may assist individuals in maintaining their cultural and personal individuality. Creating drawings, paintings, or sculpturing around the topics of houses and environments from the past can help refugees to retain their identity through art, creating safe spaces for the future helps to look ahead, retain resources, and regain control. This article provides a literature review related to home and homesickness, and the role the arts therapies can play for refugees in transition. It further reports selected interview data on adverse life events and burdens in the host country from a German study. We propose that the creative arts therapies are not only a container that offers a temporary home, but can also serve as a bridge that gently guides refugees to a stepwise integration in the host country. Several clinical and research examples are presented suggesting that the support and affirmation through the creative arts can strengthen individuals in

  15. Creative Arts Therapies as Temporary Home for Refugees: Insights from Literature and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieterich-Hartwell, Rebekka; Koch, Sabine C

    2017-10-17

    One of the frequently overlooked psychosocial problems of refugees is the phenomenon of homesickness. Being forced into exile and unable to return home may cause natural feelings of nostalgia but may also result in emotional, cognitive, behavioral and physical adversities. According to the literature, the creative arts therapies with their attention to preverbal language-music, imagery, dance, role play, and movement-are able to reach individuals through the senses and promote successive integration, which can lead to transformation and therapeutic change. These forms of therapy can be a temporary home for refugees in the acculturation process, by serving as a safe and enactive transitional space. More specifically, working with dance and movement can foster the experience of the body as a home and thus provide a safe starting place, from which to regulate arousal, increase interoception, and symbolize trauma- and resource-related processes. Hearing, playing, and singing music from the home culture may assist individuals in maintaining their cultural and personal individuality. Creating drawings, paintings, or sculpturing around the topics of houses and environments from the past can help refugees to retain their identity through art, creating safe spaces for the future helps to look ahead, retain resources, and regain control. This article provides a literature review related to home and homesickness, and the role the arts therapies can play for refugees in transition. It further reports selected interview data on adverse life events and burdens in the host country from a German study. We propose that the creative arts therapies are not only a container that offers a temporary home, but can also serve as a bridge that gently guides refugees to a stepwise integration in the host country. Several clinical and research examples are presented suggesting that the support and affirmation through the creative arts can strengthen individuals in their process of moving

  16. Art therapy in psycho-oncology--recruitment of participants and gender differences in usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Richter, Robert; Buttstaedt, Marianne; Braehler, Elmar; Boehler, Ursula; Singer, Susanne

    2012-04-01

    Over the last years, there has been increasing focus on the effect of art therapy for oncological patients. The small sample sizes of these studies show that recruiting participants is difficult and has been poorly investigated. It is also apparent that women participate in art therapy more often than men. The question remains why this difference exists and if participating men benefit from these courses more, less or in a different way than women do. We developed and tested an outpatient art intervention for cancer patients, whereby different recruitment strategies were documented. Participants were questioned about their mental health (HADS), coping strategies (FKV), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) at the beginning and end of the intervention. The recruitment strategies included personal letters, referrals from the "Information Center For Cancer Patients", press releases and leaflets/posters distributed to hospitals and medical practices. About half of the participants (N=35), especially the male ones, took part in response to receiving a personal letter. All in all, 14 men and 60 women took part in the intervention whereby all 18 drop-outs were female. There were no significant gender differences regarding distress and quality of life before and after the intervention (men=14; women=41). A variety of approaches and intense public relations are necessary to recruit patients for art therapy. Describing recruitment strategies more in detail is suggested for upcoming art therapy studies. First gender specific differences were found in recruitment and usage. Exploring further questions in this area referring to quality of life and distress larger and uniformly distributed samples are desirable.

  17. Supervised and dynamic neuro-fuzzy systems to classify physiological responses in robot-assisted neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lledó, Luis D; Badesa, Francisco J; Almonacid, Miguel; Cano-Izquierdo, José M; Sabater-Navarro, José M; Fernández, Eduardo; Garcia-Aracil, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) based on neural networks combined with Fuzzy Logic systems to classify physiological reactions of subjects performing robot-assisted rehabilitation therapies. First, the theoretical background of a neuro-fuzzy classifier called S-dFasArt is presented. Then, the methodology and experimental protocols to perform a robot-assisted neurorehabilitation task are described. Our results show that the combination of the dynamic nature of S-dFasArt classifier with a supervisory module are very robust and suggest that this methodology could be very useful to take into account emotional states in robot-assisted environments and help to enhance and better understand human-robot interactions.

  18. Supervised and Dynamic Neuro-Fuzzy Systems to Classify Physiological Responses in Robot-Assisted Neurorehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonacid, Miguel; Cano-Izquierdo, José M.; Sabater-Navarro, José M.; Fernández, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) based on neural networks combined with Fuzzy Logic systems to classify physiological reactions of subjects performing robot-assisted rehabilitation therapies. First, the theoretical background of a neuro-fuzzy classifier called S-dFasArt is presented. Then, the methodology and experimental protocols to perform a robot-assisted neurorehabilitation task are described. Our results show that the combination of the dynamic nature of S-dFasArt classifier with a supervisory module are very robust and suggest that this methodology could be very useful to take into account emotional states in robot-assisted environments and help to enhance and better understand human-robot interactions. PMID:26001214

  19. Supervised and dynamic neuro-fuzzy systems to classify physiological responses in robot-assisted neurorehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis D Lledó

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of an Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART based on neural networks combined with Fuzzy Logic systems to classify physiological reactions of subjects performing robot-assisted rehabilitation therapies. First, the theoretical background of a neuro-fuzzy classifier called S-dFasArt is presented. Then, the methodology and experimental protocols to perform a robot-assisted neurorehabilitation task are described. Our results show that the combination of the dynamic nature of S-dFasArt classifier with a supervisory module are very robust and suggest that this methodology could be very useful to take into account emotional states in robot-assisted environments and help to enhance and better understand human-robot interactions.

  20. Art therapy may reduce psychopathology in schizophrenia by strengthening the patients' sense of self: a qualitative extended case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teglbjaerg, Hanne Stubbe

    2011-01-01

    Many forms of artistic expression and art therapy are widely used in psychiatric treatment, but we lack an understanding of how artistic expression may interfere with psychopathology. Art therapy inspired by the Expressive Arts was offered for 1 year to two groups of outpatients. One group consisted of patients with severe schizophrenia and the other group of 5 nonpsychotic psychiatric patients with depression and/or personality disorders. The course of therapy was described systematically, and the experience of each patient was examined using interviews and written evaluations before and after therapy and at a 1-year follow-up. A qualitative analysis was done to determine how art therapy affects the psychopathology of the patients. The patients used the art therapy in many different ways. The most important benefit of the art therapy was a strengthening of the patients' sense of self. This was accomplished by engagement in the artistic process and by aesthetic reflections on the painted images. The stronger sense of self diminished the tension arising from interpersonal contact, boosting their self-esteem and thereby improving their social competences. All patients reported a very good outcome, and the qualitative analysis showed that the positive effect of art therapy is mainly due to a strengthening of the patients' minimal sense of self. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. A pilot study assessing art therapy as a mental health intervention for subfertile women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Edward G; da Silva, Alicia Mann

    2011-03-01

    BACKGROUND Subfertility is a common but hidden source of anxiety, depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Counselling reduces this emotional burden and may even enhance the likelihood of pregnancy. Art therapy may be a useful intervention, because it facilitates the expression of feelings, both visually and verbally, and may ease emotional distress. METHODS Weekly 2-h art therapy group courses were held for a total of 21 subfertile women. The impact of subfertile women's support systems and barriers to coping were all explored. The effectiveness of art therapy was assessed using Beck Hopelessness, Depression and Anxiety Inventories, administered before and after participation, as well as a qualitative exit questionnaire. RESULTS The mean age of participants was 35.7 (SD 2.1) years and duration of infertility was 64 (12.0) months. Mean Beck Hopelessness Scale fell from 6.1 (3.8) to 3.5 (3.1, P = 0.01) after therapy. Beck Depression Inventory-II Score fell from 19.8 (11.0) to 12.5 (10.2, P = 0.01) and Beck Anxiety Inventory Score changed from 12.4 (8.4) to 8.4 (5.2, P = 0.3). Based on the exit questionnaire, women felt the course was insightful, powerful and enjoyable. CONCLUSIONS Art therapy is an inexpensive, non-pharmacological intervention, which was associated with decreased levels of hopelessness and depressed mood in subfertile women. It also provides insight into the meaning and emotional implications of subfertility for patients and caregivers. This pilot study highlights the need for further research in this field.

  2. Arts Therapies for Anxiety, Depression, and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Boehm

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer. However, only a few trials assess the effects of arts therapies. Material and Methods. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and Google Scholar from their start date to January 2012. We handsearched reference lists and contacted experts. All randomized controlled trials, quasi-randomized trials, and controlled clinical trials of art interventions in breast cancer patients were included. Data were extracted and risk of bias was assessed. Meta-analyses were performed using standardized mean differences. Results. Thirteen trials with a total of 606 patients were included. Arts therapies comprised music therapy interventions, various types of art therapy, and dance/movement therapies. The methodological quality ranged from poor to high quality with the majority scoring 3 of 4 points on the Jadad scale. Results suggest that arts therapies seem to positively affect patients’ anxiety (standardized mean difference: −1.10; 95%, confidence interval: −1.40 to −0.80 but not depression or quality of life. No conclusion could be drawn regarding the effects of arts therapy on pain, functional assessment, coping, and mood states. Discussion. Our review indicates that arts interventions may have beneficial effects on anxiety in patients with breast cancer.

  3. Effectiveness of art therapy on reduction of hopelessness and solitude in children with hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Faramarzi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Deaf children face many psychological problems due to their inability to hear. The present study investigates the effectiveness of art therapy (painting in reducing the hopelessness and solitude experienced by these children.Methods: An experimental design with pre- and post-testing and a control group was used. Multi-stage method was used for selecting 30 children with hearing impairment (age range: 7-10 years from Isfahan. Subjects were randomly appointed to experimental and control groups. Data was collected using Kazdin hopelessness scale and Asher solitude scale. Analysis of covariance statistical method was used to analyze the data.Results: Findings indicated a significant difference between feelings of hopelessness and solitude of deaf children in experimental and control groups (p<0.001.Conclusion: From these findings it can be concluded that art therapy decreases the rate of hopelessness and solitude in deaf children and can be applied as an educational and therapeutic method.

  4. ART THERAPY MANAGEMENT IN THE PRE-OPERATIVE PERIOD IN PEDIATRICS

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    Ana Cláudia Afonso Valladares

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Every child, particularly those who will be submitted to surgery, needs to express themselves, create and establish relationships with the world. This study was based on qualitative studies which were, in turn, substantiated on the behavioral changes of patients and their images. It was developed in the pediatric clinic of a public hospital in the city of Goiânia/GO in a two years’ period (1998-2000. The target population consisted of hospitalized children in the pre-operative process. It was concluded that great therapeutic benefit was achieved from the use of art therapy for this population as it helped the children to recover their mental balance, thus strengthening a healthier side of the child which had been deadened by the illness, hospitalization and treatment. Key words: art therapy; hospitalized child; mental health.

  5. NeuroQuiz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brent, Mikkel Bo; Emmanuel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    NeuroQuiz er en quiz-app udviklet til neuroanatomi. Den består af mere end 1500 spørgsmål og over 350 anatomiske billeder. Alle spørgsmål tager udgangspunkt i lærebogen Neuroanatomi af Carsten Reidies Bjarkam.......NeuroQuiz er en quiz-app udviklet til neuroanatomi. Den består af mere end 1500 spørgsmål og over 350 anatomiske billeder. Alle spørgsmål tager udgangspunkt i lærebogen Neuroanatomi af Carsten Reidies Bjarkam....

  6. Evaluation of artwork produced by Alzheimer's disease outpatients in a pilot art therapy program

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    Silvia Andreis Witkoski

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of art as therapy for patients with Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the opportunity of art expression and is conducted with therapeutic purposes. Art in the context of dementia provides a unique window into the cognitive processes of various brain regions. Objective: To evaluate association between the severity of cognitive deficit and artwork (type, material, and quality produced by AD patients in a pilot program. Methods: Eleven patients were evaluated in a weekly quasi-experiment study following 125 sessions of art therapy over a period of 31 months. Patients were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (N=11 according to standard criteria. The Mini Mental State Examination and a battery of cognitive tests were used to assess cognitive deficit. Results: Different types of artwork were observed during the sessions for most patients. The selection of drawing or modeling showed significant association with severity of cognitive deficit. Type of material, as well as quality of artwork, also showed a similar association with deficit severity. Conclusion: The significant association between type of work, drawing or modeling, with severity of cognitive impairment could be influenced by a range of damaged cognitive functions (including visuospatial, and by inadequate perception of graphic elements.

  7. A combined intervention of art therapy and clown visits to reduce preoperative anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Alberto; Gremigni, Paola

    2017-03-01

    To test whether a combined intervention of art therapy and clown visits could enhance the efficacy of oral medication in reducing children's anxiety at parental separation prior to induction of anaesthesia. Approximately 50% of children undergoing surgery report high anxiety at anaesthesia induction. Complementary therapies have been used to decrease children's anxiety, but no study has evaluated the efficacy of a combination of such therapies. This is an observational study, which involved allocating different interventions to two groups and measuring their anxiety at two time points. This study assigned 78 children (aged 3-11 years) undergoing general anaesthesia for surgery to two conditions. The control group underwent general anaesthesia following standard practice, and the intervention group received an intervention of integrated art therapy and clown visits upon their arrival at the hospital and throughout their time in the preoperating room. Each child in both groups received 0·5 mg/kg oral midazolam 30 minutes before surgery and had a parent present throughout their time in the preoperating room. Each child's anxiety was evaluated twice using the Modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale: at baseline and at separation from parents. Repeated measures anova was used to test for differences between the time points and the two groups. Children in the intervention group showed a significant (p art therapy and clown visits enhanced the effect of midazolam in reducing children's anxiety at preoperative separation from parents. Paediatric staffs may consider using such a combination of strategies in preparing children for anaesthesia induction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. [The effects of art therapy on the somatic and emotional situation of the patients--a quantitative and qualitative analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plecity, Daniel M; Danner-Weinberger, Alexandra; Szkura, Lubow; von Wietersheim, Jörn

    2009-01-01

    In this pilot study, changes in the patients' current mood during art therapy sessions in a psychosomatic day hospital as well as the meaning of the pictures generated during art therapy are assessed. The sample consisted of 26 patients. The average participant had 16 sessions of art therapy, which was conducted in a group setting. To measure their mood and somatic symptoms, patients were given standardized questionnaires (B-L and ASTS, a German modification of POMS) at the beginning and the end of every art therapy session. In addition, 15 patients were interviewed about the pictures they had created during the art therapy sessions (104 interviews in total). The quantitative evaluations showed a statistically significant reduction in somatic symptoms and a tendency to be in a more positive mood during the course of the day treatment. However, there were no significant differences from the beginning to the end of every therapy session. The evaluation of the interviews showed that the paintings mainly dealt with the patients' own (current, problematic) issues. The colours that were chosen for the painting were particularly important to most patients, and often there is no connection to paintings created during the previous sessions. The patients' problems are often depicted in a symbolic manner. Subjectively, the patients felt better after the art therapy session. They indicated that they mostly use art therapy as a way to express their problems, and only very few also named other goals of art therapy, such as creativity or relaxation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  9. The cost of a combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (cART optimization pathway as maintenance therapy in HIV-1 infected patients

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    Roberto Ravasio

    2017-11-01

    CONCLUSIONS: From the Italian NHS’s perspective, the adoption of a specific cART optimization pathway represents a cost-saving option as maintenance antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 infected patients.

  10. Efficacy of Art Therapy in Individuals With Personality Disorders Cluster B/C: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeyen, Suzanne; van Hooren, Susan; van der Veld, William; Hutschemaekers, Giel

    2017-09-19

    Multidisciplinary treatment programs for patients with personality disorders (PDs) often include art therapy, but the efficacy of this intervention has hardly been evaluated. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of an art therapy intervention on psychological functioning of patients with a PD. In this randomized controlled trial, 57 adult participants diagnosed with a PD cluster B/C (SCID-II) were randomly assigned to either weekly group art therapy (1.5 hours, 10 weeks) or a waiting list group. Outcome measures OQ45, AAQ-II, and SMI were assessed at baseline, at post-test (10 weeks after baseline), and at follow-up (5 weeks after post-test). The results show that art therapy is an effective treatment for PD patients because it not only reduces PD pathology and maladaptive modes but it also helps patients to develop adaptive, positive modes that indicate better mental health and self-regulation.

  11. Comparative effectiveness of initial antiretroviral therapy regimens: ACTG 5095 and 5142 clinical trials relative to ART-CC cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Gulick, Roy M.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Abgrall, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Harris, Ross; Gill, M. John; de Wolf, Frank; Hogg, Robert; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Chêne, Geneviève; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Guest, Jodie L.; Smith, Colette; Murillas, Javier; Berenguer, Juan; Wyen, Christoph; Domingo, Pere; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Saag, Michael S.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Ribaudo, Heather; Lalama, Christina; Klingman, Karin K.; Bastow, Barbara; Kmack, Anne; Meyer, William A.; Kutitzkes, Daniel R.; Acosta, Edward P.; Hughes, Valery; Squires, Kathleen E.; Shackman, Bruce R.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Parrillo, Vincent; Martinez, Ana I.; Fallis, Richard; Storfer, Stephen P.; Giordano, Michael; McDonough, Marita; Rooney, James; Rugh, Lynn; Ryan, Kirk; Tolson, Jerry; van Kempen, Amy S.; Schnizlein Bick, Carol; Webb, Nancy; DiRienzo, A. Gregory; Peeples, Lynne; Powderly, William G.; Klingman, Karin L.; Garren, Kevin W.; George, Tania; Rooney, James F.; Brizz, Barbara; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Murphy, Robert L.; Swindells, Susan; Havlir, Diane; Mellors, John W.

    2011-01-01

    The generalizability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinical trial efficacy findings to routine care settings is not well studied. We compared the relative effectiveness of initial ART regimens estimated in AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) randomized controlled trials with that among patients

  12. The applicability of a seminal professional development theory to creative arts therapies students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkibi, Hod

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to test the extent to which a seminal theory of the professional development of counsellors and therapists is applicable to the particular experiences of creative arts therapies graduate students who learn how to use the arts in psychotherapy. Nevertheless, readers may consider the results of the present study transferable to other healthcare disciplines. Questionnaires for each developmental phase were used for data collection, and analysis included data quantification, assessment of inter-rater agreement and theory derivation procedure. Results indicate that creative arts therapies students were concerned about translating theory into practice, learning how experienced therapists concretely function in practice, and reducing cognitive dissonance upon realization that their pre-training lay conceptions of helping were no longer valid. Stress and anxiety drove students to adopt easily mastered techniques that were implemented creatively in practicum. The results confirm that students who were older and had undergraduate human-service education and/or considerable life experience were less concerned about their suitability to the profession, were more acquainted with a professional working style and searched for their individual way of becoming therapists. Finally, recommendations for future research are suggested, and implications for practice are offered. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Examining the Effects of Art Therapy on Reoccurring Tobacco Use in a Taiwanese Youth Population: A Mixed-Method Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Rei-Mei; Guo, Su-Er; Huang, Chun-Sheng; Yin, Cheng

    2018-03-21

    Cigarette smoking is a primary risk factor affecting mental and physical health worldwide. Many chronic diseases are closely related to smoking. Adolescents in Taiwan are increasingly using tobacco, especially in rural areas. This research project used a mixed-method study to examine the effects of art therapy on smoking cessation in rural Taiwanese youth smokers. Participants from years 10-11, were drawn from three senior high schools in Taiwan. The experimental group participated in a six-week smoking cessation intervention using art therapy. The comparison group participated in typical courses on smoking cessation. Quantitative measures included need for smoking, nicotine dependence, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and smoking cessation status. Qualitative analysis was based on phenomenology. A total of 66 students (n = 40 experimental group; n = 26 comparison group) were the subjects of quantitative analysis. No differences were noted in baseline characteristics of groups. Generalized estimating equation analyses suggested significant between-group differences in change from pre- to follow-up test scores in the "social domain" (B = -5.12, p art therapy on smoking prevention, benefits of art therapy on other outcome measures, and comparison between art therapy and traditional smoking cessation programs. Conclusions/importance: The findings of this study can potentially contribute significantly to existing knowledge regarding the perceptions of art therapy on reoccurring tobacco use in Taiwanese youth.

  14. Promoting Personal Growth through Experiential Learning: The Case of Expressive Arts Therapy for Lecturers in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binson, Bussakorn; Lev-Wiesel, Rachel

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess academic experiential learning in relation to academic lectures' perceived personal and professional growth. Sixteen PhD students (age ranged between 23 and 46, 10 male, 6 females) participated in an introduction to expressive art therapy. Qualitative methods according to phenomenological methodology was used. At the beginning and end of the 48-h course they were asked to draw themselves, and explain the differences between the two drawings. In addition participants were semi-structured interviewed about the course and its personal and professional aspects at the end of the course. The main themes were the carousal of emotional experience, the use of art means for growth, and, professional growth. Findings revealed a perceived growth in terms of family relationships, inter—personal skills, and professional role performance. PMID:29467682

  15. Promoting Personal Growth through Experiential Learning: The Case of Expressive Arts Therapy for Lecturers in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussakorn Binson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to assess academic experiential learning in relation to academic lectures' perceived personal and professional growth. Sixteen PhD students (age ranged between 23 and 46, 10 male, 6 females participated in an introduction to expressive art therapy. Qualitative methods according to phenomenological methodology was used. At the beginning and end of the 48-h course they were asked to draw themselves, and explain the differences between the two drawings. In addition participants were semi-structured interviewed about the course and its personal and professional aspects at the end of the course. The main themes were the carousal of emotional experience, the use of art means for growth, and, professional growth. Findings revealed a perceived growth in terms of family relationships, inter—personal skills, and professional role performance.

  16. Chaotic Neuro-Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horio, Yoshihiko; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    This chapter describes mixed analog/digital circuit implementations of a chaotic neuro-computer system. The chaotic neuron model is implemented with a switched-capacitor (SC) integrated circuit technique. The analog SC circuit can handle real numbers electrically in the sense that the state variables of the analog circuits are continuous. Therefore, chaotic dynamics can be faithfully replicated with the SC chaotic neuron circuit. The synaptic connections, on the other hand, are realized with digital circuits to accommodate a vast number of synapses. We propose a memory-based digital synapse circuit architecture that draws upon the table look-up method to achieve rapid calculation of a large number of weighted summations. The first generation chaotic neuro-computer with 16 SC neurons and 256 synapses is reviewed. Finally, a large-scale system with 10000 neurons and 100002 synapses is described.

  17. Time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy among patients who Are ART eligible in Rwanda: improvement over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Chloe A; Wang, Chunhui; Francois, Uwinkindi; Ndahimana, Jean dʼAmour; Vincent, Mutabazi; Sahabo, Ruben; El-Sadr, Wafaa M; Abrams, Elaine J

    2015-03-01

    Delayed initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in eligible patients is a concern in resource-limited countries. We analyzed data on HIV-positive patients ≥15 years enrolled at 41 ICAP-supported health care facilities in Rwanda, 2005-2010, to determine time to ART initiation among patients eligible at enrollment compared with those ineligible or of indeterminate eligibility who become eligible during follow-up. ART eligibility was based on CD4 cell count (CD4) and WHO staging; patients lacking CD4 and WHO stage were considered indeterminate. Cumulative incidence of reaching ART eligibility and to ART initiation after eligibility was generated using competing risk estimators. A total of 31,033 ART-naive adults were enrolled; 64.2% were female. At enrollment, 10,158 (32.7%) patients were ART eligible, 13,372 (43.1%) were ineligible for ART, and 7503 (24.2%) patients were indeterminate. Among patients retained in care pre-ART eligibility, 17.9% [95% confidence interval (CI): 17.2 to 18.6] of ineligible and 22.8% (95% CI: 21.7 to 23.8) of indeterminate patients at enrollment reached ART eligibility within 12 months. Cumulative incidence of ART initiation within 3 months for patients eligible at enrollment was 77.2% (95% CI: 76.4 to 78.0) compared with 67.9% (95% CI: 66.4 to 69.3) for ineligible and 63.8% (95% CI: 61.9 to 65.8) for patients with indeterminate eligibility at enrollment (P ART initiation for patients who became ART eligible. We found higher rates of ART initiation within 3 months among patients who were ART eligible at enrollment compared with those who reached eligibility during follow-up. From 2006 to 2011, earlier initiation of ART after eligibility was observed likely reflecting improved program quality.

  18. Art-therapy as a method for mobilizing personal resources in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glozman J.M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aging can be viewed as a continuation of development and an active interaction with the environment during which regressive changes are combined with progressive new formations. It is believed that the self-determining nature of subjectivity in the elderly mediates self-awareness and favors self-acceptance as an active agent that determines the outcomes of one’s own life at this age as an autonomous self-regulating subject of one’s own activity. A formative experience proved the efficiency of using art therapy as a method for mobilizing personal resources during aging.

  19. Art therapy improves experienced quality of life among women undergoing treatment for breast cancer: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensk, A-C; Oster, I; Thyme, K E; Magnusson, E; Sjödin, M; Eisemann, M; Aström, S; Lindh, J

    2009-01-01

    Women with breast cancer are naturally exposed to strain related to diagnosis and treatment, and this influences their experienced quality of life (QoL). The present paper reports the effect, with regard to QoL aspects, of an art therapy intervention among 41 women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer. The women were randomized to an intervention group with individual art therapy sessions for 1 h/week (n = 20), or to a control group (n = 21). The WHOQOL-BREF and EORTC Quality of Life Questionnaire-BR23, were used for QoL assessment, and administrated on three measurement occasions, before the start of radiotherapy and 2 and 6 months later. The results indicate an overall improvement in QoL aspects among women in the intervention group. A significant increase in total health, total QoL, physical health and psychological health was observed in the art therapy group. A significant positive difference within the art therapy group was also seen, concerning future perspectives, body image and systemic therapy side effects. The present study provides strong support for the use of art therapy to improve QoL for women undergoing radiotherapy treatment for breast cancer.

  20. Prenatal education through art therapy. A possible way for positive parenting

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    Lucía HERVÁS HERMIDA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in the field of positive parenting advocates the importance of promoting family support, through parental education programs. On the other hand, the importance of the prenatal period for human development is well known, but attention to this stage has traditionally been done from the biomedical point of view, without paying attention to the other educational, emotional, social and gender aspects.In this sense, the aim of this article is to propose a possible way to support positive parenting, which will provide an useful contribution to prenatal pedagogy as an emerging science, through art therapy. By the qualitative analysis of two case studies of two women participants from two different workshops, the possibilities offered by group art therapy as a way of prenatal education, for the exploration of the creative dimension of motherhood are shown, and the deepening of the attachment with both the baby, the couple and the environment. Likewise, the development of parental competences is favored, focusing on awareness and personal development, and on the creation of a group support, in which shared learning takes place. Finally, the conclusions deal with aspects of the methodology that foster an improvement in the well-being and the development of an empowered and resilient attitude, benefiting both mother and child, as well as the whole family and social environment.

  1. Comparative Effectiveness of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy Regimens: ACTG 5095 and 5142 Clinical Trials Relative to ART-CC Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Gulick, Roy M.; Riddler, Sharon A.; Haubrich, Richard; Napravnik, Sonia; Abgrall, Sophie; Phillips, Andrew; Harris, Ross; Gill, M. John; de Wolf, Frank; Hogg, Robert; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Chêne, Geneviève; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Guest, Jodie L.; Smith, Colette; Murillas, Javier; Berenguer, Juan; Wyen, Christoph; Domingo, Pere; Kitahata, Mari M.; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.; Saag, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The generalizability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinical trial efficacy findings to routine care settings is not well studied. We compared the relative effectiveness of initial ART regimens estimated in AIDS Clinical Trial Group (ACTG) randomized controlled trials with that among patients receiving ART at Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) study sites. Methods Treatment-naive HIV-infected patients initiating identical ART regimens in ACTG trials (A5095 and A5142) and at 15 ART-CC cohort study sites were included. Virological failure (HIV-1 RNA >200 copies/ml) at 24- and 48-weeks, incident AIDS-defining events and mortality were measured according to study design (ART-CC cohort vs. ACTG trial) and stratified by 3rd drug [Abacavir (ABC), Efavirenz (EFV), and Lopinavir/r (LPV/r)]. We used logistic regression to estimate and compare odds ratios for virological failure between different regimens and study designs, and used Cox models to estimate and compare hazard ratios for AIDS and death. Results Compared with patients receiving ABC, those receiving EFV had roughly half the odds of 24-week virologic failure (>200 copies/mL) in both ACTG 5095 (OR=0.53, 95% CI 0.36–0.79) and ART-CC (0.46, 0.37–0.57). Virologic superiority of EFV (vs. ABC) appeared comparable in ART-CC and ACTG 5095 (ratio of ORs 0.86, 95% CI 0.54–1.35). Odds ratios for 48-week virologic failure, comparing EFV with LPV/r, were also comparable in ACTG 5142 and ART-CC (ratio of ORs 0.87, 0.45–1.69). Conclusions Between ART regimen virologic efficacy of 3rd drugs ABC, EFV, and LPV/r observed in the ACTG 5095 and 5142 trials appear generalizable to the routine care setting of ART-CC clinical cohorts. PMID:21857357

  2. Randomized controlled trial of accelerated resolution therapy (ART) for symptoms of combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E; Rosenzweig, Laney; Hernandez, Diego F; Shuman, Amy; Sullivan, Kelly L; Long, Christopher J; Taylor, James; McGhee, Stephen; Girling, Sue Ann; Wittenberg, Trudy; Sahebzamani, Frances M; Lengacher, Cecile A; Kadel, Rajendra; Diamond, David M

    2013-12-01

    Therapies for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) endorsed by the Department of Defense and Veterans Administration are relatively lengthy, costly, and yield variable success. We evaluated Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) for the treatment of combat-related psychological trauma. A randomized controlled trial of ART versus an Attention Control (AC) regimen was conducted among 57 U.S. service members/veterans. After random assignment, those assigned to AC were offered crossover to ART, with 3-month follow-up on all participants. Self-report symptoms of PTSD and comorbidities were analyzed among study completers and by the intention-to-treat principle. Mean age was 41 ± 13 years with 19% female, 54% Army, and 68% with prior PTSD treatment. The ART was delivered in 3.7 ± 1.1 sessions with a 94% completion rate. Mean reductions in symptoms of PTSD, depression, anxiety, and trauma-related guilt were significantly greater (p ART compared to AC. Favorable results for those treated with ART persisted at 3 months, including reduction in aggression (p ART appears to be a safe and effective treatment for symptoms of combat-related PTSD, including refractory PTSD, and is delivered in significantly less time than therapies endorsed by the Department of Defense and Veterans Administration. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Antiretroviral therapy (ART management of Low-Level Viremia in Taiwan (ALLEVIATE

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    Chien-Yu Cheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This retrospective study aimed to investigate that if switch of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART would result in viral suppression (20 to 5 log10 (% (59.4% (61.3% (54.3% .480 CD4 at LLV, median (range, cells/uL (63–1092 (63–1092 (134–1010 .156 PVL at enrollment, copies/mL (21–999 (21–939 (21–999 .002 PVL of 20–199 (% (77.0% (84.0% (58.7% .001 PVL of 200–999 (% (23.0% (16.0% (41.3% .001 Duration of cART exposure, median (range, weeks (12–391 (15–321 (12–391 .062 Years of HIV diagnosed, median, (range, years (1–14 (1–14 (2–13 .356 Ever treatment failure (% /165 /119 /46 .111 Current cART NRTIs+nNRTI (23.6% (32.8% (0% <0.001 NRTIs+PI (18.8% (24.4% (4.3% .003 NRTIs+PI/r (51.5% (39.5% (82.6% <0.001 NRTIs+II (4.2% (3.3% (6.5% .967 II+PI/r (1.8% (0% (6.5% .021 Conclusions: According to the clinical guidelines of BHIVA, patients with low-level viremia who switched to cART consisting of 2 NRTIs plus boosted PI or newer mechanisms were more likely to re-establish viral suppression to <40 copies/mL at week 48.

  4. Psychosocial and behavioural correlates of attitudes towards antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a sample of South African mineworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Kaymarlin; Akintola, Olagoke; George, Gavin; Petersen, Inge; Bhagwanjee, Anil; Reardon, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Despite being one of the worst affected sectors in South Africa, the mining sector has proven to be one of the most active in intervention efforts in the fight against HIV and AIDS (Ellis, 2007). Owing to low uptake rates of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in mining companies in recent years (Connelly & Rosen, 2006) and the positive relationship between attitudes towards ART and ART uptake (Cooper et al., 2002; Horne, Cooper, Gellaitry, Leake, & Fisher, 2007), this study sought to describe and investigate the psychosocial and behavioural correlates of attitudes towards ART in a sample of South African mineworkers. A total of 806 mineworkers from a large South African mine participated in this quantitative study. Despite a high rate of HIV testing behaviour (83.0%) as well as favourable attitudes towards ART, analysis indicated that temporary employees and contractors were more vulnerable in terms of HIV risk, HIV testing behaviours and ART knowledge and attitudes. Employees who had more positive attitudes towards ART were more knowledgeable of ART and, importantly, had a more favourable attitude towards the mine's HIV/AIDS treatment programme. These findings are discussed in relation to the low ART uptake rates in this context and recommendations for the improvement of ART uptake amongst employees at this mining site.

  5. Two doses of candidate TB vaccine MVA85A in antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve subjects gives comparable immunogenicity to one dose in ART+ subjects.

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    Tandakha N Dieye

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a global public health problem exacerbated by the HIV epidemic. Here we evaluate a candidate TB vaccine, MVA85A, in a Phase I study in HIV-infected adults in Senegal. 24 patients were enrolled: Group 1∶12, antiretroviral therapy (ART naïve, adults, with CD4 counts >300 and HIV RNA load 300, and an undetectable HIV RNA load. Safety was evaluated by occurrence of local and systemic adverse events (AEs and by monitoring of CD4 count, HIV RNA load, haematology and biochemistry. Immunogenicity was evaluated by ex-vivo interferon-gamma ELISpot assay. 87.7% of AEs were mild; 11.6% were moderate; and 0.7% were severe. 29.2% of AEs were systemic; 70.8% were expected local AEs. There were no vaccine-related Serious Adverse Events (SAEs or clinically significant effects on HIV RNA load or CD4 count. In ART naive subjects, the first MVA85A immunisation induced a significant immune response at 1 and 4 weeks post-immunisation, which contracted to baseline by 12 weeks. Durability of immunogenicity in subjects on ART persisted out to 24 weeks post-vaccination. A second dose of MVA85A at 12 months enhanced immunogenicity in ART naïve subjects. Subjects on ART had higher responses after the first vaccination compared with ART naïve subjects; responses were comparable after 2 immunisations. In conclusion, MVA85A is well-tolerated and immunogenic in HIV-infected subjects in Senegal. A two dose regimen in ART naïve subjects is comparable in immunogenicity to a single dose in subjects on ART. Clinicaltrials.gov trial identifier NCT00731471.

  6. Las Bellas Artes como Terapia en Aristóteles The Fine Arts as Therapy in Aristotle

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    Sergio González A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde Homero en adelante, los textos griegos abundan en menciones a la función terapéutica de las bellas artes. En los diálogos platónicos se encuentra el sistema más acabado respecto a este tema en sus diversas manifestaciones, sin embargo los múltiples análisis aristotélicos se encuentran dispersos y aislados. Para empezar, se expone la visión de la salud como armonía en el pensamiento de Aristóteles, a continuación se describen y comparan los conceptos de tékhne y phrónesis, se demuestra la necesidad del arte para la paideía, y se detalla el uso terapéutico de diferentes artes para preservar o restaurar la salud.From Homer onwards, Greek texts show abundant references to the therapeutic applications of the fine arts. The most complete system dealing with this issue in its diverse manifestations is to be found in the Platonic dialogues. However, Aristotle's manifold analyses are scattered and isolated. First, the view of health as harmony in Aristotle's thought is expounded, then the concepts of tékhne and phrónesis are described and compared, the necessity of art to paideía is demonstrated, and finally the therapeutic use of the different arts in order to preserve or restore health is examined'm detall.

  7. Virtual reality exposure and neuro-bio feedback to help coping with traumatic events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neerincx, M.A.; Kallen, V.L.; Brouwer, A.-M.; Leer, L. van der; Brinke, M. ten

    2010-01-01

    Recent research shows that Virtual Reality (VR) exposure or bio-neuro feedback can help professionals to cope with possibly traumatic events. This paper presents a neuro-bio VR system that combines both methods in order to further improve the prevention and therapy of trauma-related disorders. This

  8. Feasibility Study Combining Art Therapy or Cognitive Remediation Therapy with Family-based Treatment for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, James; Fitzpatrick, Kathleen Kara; Agras, William S; Weinbach, Noam; Jo, Booil

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents with anorexia nervosa who have obsessive-compulsive (OC) features respond poorly to family-based treatment (FBT). This study evaluated the feasibility of combining FBT with either cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) or art therapy (AT) to improve treatment response in this at-risk group. Thirty adolescents with anorexia nervosa and OC features were randomized to 15 sessions of FBT + CRT or AT. Recruitment rate was 1 per month, and treatment attrition was 16.6% with no differences between groups. Suitability, expectancy and therapeutic relationships were acceptable for both combinations. Correlations between changes in OC traits and changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found for both combinations. Moderate changes in cognitive inefficiencies were found in both groups but were larger in the FBT + AT combination. This study suggests that an RCT for poor responders to FBT because of OC traits combining FBT with either CRT or AT is feasible to conduct. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  9. Urgences en neuro-ophtalmologie

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caignard, A.; Leruez, S.; Milea, D.

    2017-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmic emergencies can cause life-threatening or sight-threatening complications. Various conditions may have acute neuro-ophthalmic manifestations, including inflammatory or ischemic processes, as well as tumoral, aneurysmal compression or metabolic and systemic diseases. Diplopia rela...

  10. Territory and diversity: paths of Occupational Therapy in art and culture experiences

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    Eliane Dias de Castro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a view of territorial actions marked by social movements related to the de-institutionalization of insanity and the development of rights of physically-and mentally handicapped people, which configures a new field of occupational therapy practices oriented towards the complex demands of assisted population and targeted on increasing sociocultural participation. Those are actions and strategies, implemented by the participants of the Laboratory of Studies and Research Art, Body and Occupational Therapy of the University of São Paulo, which are articulated with the public policies of mental health, humanization and culture set up in in Brazil as of 2000. They involve teaching, research and extension; contribute to the quality of services offered to the community and strengthen the assistance and social participation networks. The main follow up and interventions assessment methods are related to qualitative research, development of an intensive reflection in that seek to build up local knowledge of occupational therapy guided by creative actions and by crossed clinical, artistic and cultural references. The projects implemented have broaden the access of the population assisted to artistic and cultural experiments in the territory, they have contributed to the construction of life policies enabling ways of participation, of living together and subjectivity producing. Thus, sociocultural technologies are configured in agreement with the importance of strengthening and supporting new proposals for populations expropriated from their life networks, supported by significant intervention of occupational therapists.

  11. Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: State of the art and advanced cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchetti, Giorgio; Petrella, Francesco; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Rimoldi, Isabella

    2017-12-15

    Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive malignancy highly resistant to chemotherapy, with a response rate of 20% of patients and for this reason an efficient treatment is still a challenge. Platinum-based chemotherapy in association with a third-generation antifolate is the front-line standard of care whereas any second-line treatment was approved for MPM thus making it a pathology that evokes the need for new therapeutic agents. Different platinum-drugs were synthesised and tested as an option for patients who are not candidates to cisplatin-based therapy. Among these, monofunctional cationic antineoplastic platinum compounds received a special attention in the last decade. Alternative strategies to the commonly used combination-therapy resulted from the use of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSC) widely used in the field of regenerative medicine and recently proposed as natural carriers for a selective delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and from the use of immune checkpoint and kinase inhibitors. The present short review shed light on the recent state of art and the future perspectives relative to MPM therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Neuro-robotics from brain machine interfaces to rehabilitation robotics

    CERN Document Server

    Artemiadis

    2014-01-01

    Neuro-robotics is one of the most multidisciplinary fields of the last decades, fusing information and knowledge from neuroscience, engineering and computer science. This book focuses on the results from the strategic alliance between Neuroscience and Robotics that help the scientific community to better understand the brain as well as design robotic devices and algorithms for interfacing humans and robots. The first part of the book introduces the idea of neuro-robotics, by presenting state-of-the-art bio-inspired devices. The second part of the book focuses on human-machine interfaces for pe

  13. [An art therapy project day to promote health for clients from burnout self-help groups--an exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oepen, Renate; Gruber, Harald

    2014-07-01

    The present exploratory study dealt with the question whether a specialized concept of art therapy interventions could increase the current and habitual well-being for participants of burnout self-help groups. Quantitative: pre-post: Current well-being: list of discomforts (Beschwerdenliste: B-L); current mood scale (Aktuelle Stimmungsskala: ASTS); Habitual well-being: quality of life (SF-36); qualitative: post: semi-structured interviews with open key questions; evaluation: structured content analysis of Mayring. Quantitative: significant increase of current and habitual well-being; qualitative: generation of 3 general and 8 specific art therapy work factors. Specialized resource-activating concepts of art therapy interventions can effectively complement existing programs for burnout prevention and health promotion. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Psycho-neuro-endocrine-immunology and low dose cytokines therapy: principles and evidences for an innovative medical approach in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T; Hercogova, J; Wollina, U; Chokoeva, A A; Zarrab, Z; Gianfaldoni, S; Roccia, M G; Fioranelli, M; Tchernev, G

    2015-01-01

    The development of the Psycho-Neuro-Endocrine-Immunology (P.N.E.I.), induced a fundamental paradigm shift in the interpretation of the biological functions of the body; from a separatist point of view to an unifying one, centered on the recognized importance of the cross-talk between cells, organs and systems. This interplay is regulated by a great number of messenger molecules and their circulating levels are key parameters for the definition of both physiological and pathological conditions; indeed, the pathological phenomenon can be described as an imbalance in intercellular signaling. The restoration of the impaired signalling molecules balance is the goal of Low Dose Medicine (LDM), a new medical approach based on the administration of low physiological doses of messenger molecules (which act as homeostatic modulating agents). The validity of the Low Dose Medicine conceptual approach in terms of efficacy and safety is assessed by five years of scientific research in this field. In particular the role of low dose Sequential Kinetic Activation (SKA) signalling molecules oral administration in inflammatory status management is demonstrated.

  15. Individual brief art therapy can be helpful for women with breast cancer: a randomized controlled clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyme, Karin Egberg; Sundin, Eva C; Wiberg, Britt; Oster, Inger; Aström, Sture; Lindh, Jack

    2009-03-01

    Recent research shows that almost every second woman with breast cancer is depressed or has anxiety; the risk for younger women is even higher. Moreover, research shows that women are at risk for developing depression, also a threat for women with breast cancer. The aim of this randomized controlled clinical trial was to study the outcome of five sessions of art therapy given at a 5-week period of postoperative radiotherapy. The participants were between 37 and 69 years old; six participants in each group were below 50 years of age. Half of the participants (n = 20) received art therapy and the other half (n = 21) were assigned to a control group. At the first measurement, at least 17% (n = 7) of the participants medicated with antidepressants. Data were collected before and after art therapy and at a 4-month follow-up using self-rating scales that measure self-image (the Structural Analysis of Social Behaviour) and psychiatric symptoms (the Symptom Check List-90). At follow-up, significant lower ratings of depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms and less general symptoms were reported for the art therapy group compared to the control group. The regression analysis showed that art therapy relates to lower ratings of depression, anxiety, and general symptoms; chemotherapeutic treatment predicts lower depressive symptoms; in contrast to axillary surgery and hormonal treatment as well as being a parent predicts higher ratings of anxiety and general symptoms. The conclusion suggests that art therapy has a long-term effect on the crisis following the breast cancer and its consequences.

  16. Viewing and engaging in an art therapy exhibit by people living with mental illness: implications for empathy and social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, J S; Ho, R T H; Chick, J K Y; Au Yeung, F S W

    2013-08-01

    To determine how healthcare professionals, family members and community members responded to an art exhibit created by people living with mental illness. Phenomenological study with qualitative analysis. Forty-six participants with various relationships with people living with mental illness attended an art therapy exhibit and art making workshop. Surveys, response art, reflective writing and discussion groups were used in this qualitative research study. Responses were categorized into four cluster themes: empathic, self-oriented, other-oriented and world-oriented. Each response category has strengths and weaknesses, indicating implications for increasing awareness and understanding of the artists and mental illness. They also inform educational interventions that can be utilized when using art exhibits for the purpose of confronting bias and stigma towards people living with mental illness. Copyright © 2013 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ART THERAPY MANAGEMENT IN THE PRE-OPERATIVE PERIOD IN PEDIATRICS

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    Ana Cláudia Afonso Valladares

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Every child, particularly those who will be submitted to surgery, needs to express themselves, createand establish relationships with the world. This study was based on qualitative studies which were, in turn,substantiated on the behavioral changes of patients and their images. It was developed in the pediatric clinic of apublic hospital in the city of Goiânia/GO in a two years’ period (1998-2000. The target population consisted ofhospitalized children in the pre-operative process. It was concluded that great therapeutic benefit was achievedfrom the use of art therapy for this population as it helped the children to recover their mental balance, thusstrengthening a healthier side of the child which had been deadened by the illness, hospitalization and treatment.

  18. A Model for Art Therapy-Based Supervision for End-of-Life Care Workers in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potash, Jordan S; Chan, Faye; Ho, Andy H Y; Wang, Xiao Lu; Cheng, Carol

    2015-01-01

    End-of-life care workers and volunteers are particularly prone to burnout given the intense emotional and existential nature of their work. Supervision is one important way to provide adequate support that focuses on both professional and personal competencies. The inclusion of art therapy principles and practices within supervision further creates a dynamic platform for sustained self-reflection. A 6-week art therapy-based supervision group provided opportunities for developing emotional awareness, recognizing professional strengths, securing collegial relationships, and reflecting on death-related memories. The structure, rationale, and feedback are discussed.

  19. 8. Therapeutic and Educational Potential of Combining Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Art – Qualitative Analysis of a Case Study

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    Růžička Michal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive behavioural psychotherapy is, just like other psychotherapeutic systems, of an eclectic nature. Should a therapist be successful across a wide range of issues, he/she needs to be adaptable, flexible and eclectic in terms of the techniques applied. Eclectically oriented therapists use a wide range of interventions; however, they adhere to individual theoretical structures. The aim of the paper is to point out the application of a combination of artistic activities within the system of the Cognitive behavioural therapy. For this purpose the paper presents a qualitative analysis of two case studies. We formulated the following research questions. Can the methods of combining the cognitive behavioural therapy and art accelerate the course of therapy? Can the methods of combining the cognitive behavioural therapy and art be perceived by the client as effective? The phenomenon investigated in the case study is a functional analysis of a client’s case and subsequent application of therapeutic and educational techniques of the Cognitive behavioural therapy and art. In both case studies it was demonstrated that the involvement of therapeutic elements accelerated the course of therapy. The clients in the research sample assessed the therapy as beneficial.

  20. Why do Patients in Pre-Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) Care Default: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Kansal, Sangeeta; Tiwary, Narendra; Sundar, Shyam

    2016-01-01

    Approximately, 40% of the patients registered in the National AIDS Control Program in India are not on antiretroviral therapy (ART), i.e., are in pre-ART care. However, there are scarce data regarding the retention of pre-ART patients under routine program conditions. The main objective of this study was to find out the reasons for default among patients in pre-ART care. Patients enrolled in the ART Centre, Banaras Hindu University (BHU) between January and December 2009 and in pre-ART care were included in the study. Defaulters were those pre-ART patients who missed their last appointment of CD4 count by more than 1 month. Defaulters were traced telephonically in 2011 and those who returned and gave their consent for the study were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Out of 620 patients in pre-ART care, 384 (68.2%) were defaulters. One hundred forty-four of the defaulters were traced and only 83 reached the ART center for interview. Among defaulters who did not reach the ART center, illiterate and unmarried were significantly more and mean duration from registration to default was also significantly less as compared to those who came back for the interview. Most defaulters gave more than one reason for defaulting that were as follows: Inconvenient clinic timings (98%), need for multiple mode of transport (92%), perceived improved health (65%), distance of center from home (61%), lack of social support (62%), and financial difficulty (59%). Active tracing of pre-ART patients through outreach and strengthening of the Link ART centers will improve the retention of patients in the program.

  1. Core Themes in Music Therapy Clinical Improvisation: An Arts-Informed Qualitative Research Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Anthony; Wimpenny, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Although clinical improvisation continues to be an important focus of music therapy research and practice, less attention has been given to integrating qualitative research in this area. As a result, this knowledge base tends to be contained within specific areas of practice rather than integrated across practices and approaches. This qualitative research synthesis profiles, integrates, and re-presents qualitative research focused on the ways music therapists and clients engage in, and make meaning from, clinical improvisation. Further, as a conduit for broadening dialogues, opening up this landscape fully, and sharing our response to the analysis and interpretation process, we present an arts-informed re-presentation of this synthesis. Following an eight-step methodological sequence, 13 qualitative studies were synthesized. This included reciprocal and refutational processes associated with synthesizing the primary studies, and additional steps associated with an arts-informed representation. Three themes, professional artistry, performing self, and meaning-making, are presented. Each theme is explored and exemplified through the selected articles, and discussed within a larger theoretical framework. An artistic re-presentation of the data is also presented. Music therapists use complex frameworks through which to engage clients in, and make meaning from, improvisational experiences. Artistic representation of the findings offers an added dimension to the synthesis process, challenging our understanding of representation, and thereby advancing synthesis methodology.

  2. [The impact of an art therapy programme for cancer patients--an analysis from different points of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Singer, Susanne; Kleinert, Evelyn; Richter, Robert; Götze, Heide; Böhler, Ursula; Becker, Cornelia; Brähler, Elmar

    2011-01-01

    Art therapy is used in the whole field of psycho-oncological maintenance to support coping mechanisms with creative techniques. Previous studies stated effects of art therapy just by referring to the participants' ratings. This study wants to extend the perspective by including the views of all involved parties--participating patients, dropouts, art therapist and supervisor. We developed and tested an art therapy programme for cancer patients. The participants' and dropouts' ratings were documented by using a questionnaire with open and closed questions upon completion of the intervention. The art therapist and the supervisor described their personal point of view. 74 patients took part in the intervention whereof 18 dropped out. Of these, 8 could be interviewed regarding the reasons for not participating further in the study. The dropouts evaluated the intervention positively(4/8) or could not make a final statement (3/8). 55 questionnaires were available from the 56 participants. They described the importance of the programme in several ways. Most of all, they reported of: stimulation of imagination (50/55), emotional stabilisation(48/55), enlargement of means of expression (45/55) and contact with other patients (42/55). The dropouts named several reasons for their decision to cancel: too intense focus on the disease(N = 3), modern drawing (N = 1), too much talks (N = 1) and too much sketching (N = 1) were some points of criticism. The art therapist as well as the supervisor emphasized activation as a main outcome for the participants. Positive effects of the intervention programme highlight the importance of establishing an art therapy in ambulant care. It enlarges the range of psychosocial maintenance and enables oncological patients to cope with the disease and its consequences with artistic means.

  3. The clinical and cost effectiveness of group art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders: a systematic review and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, Lesley; Stevenson, Matt; Scope, Alison; Rawdin, Andrew; Sutton, Anthea

    2015-07-07

    The majority of mental health problems are non-psychotic (e.g., depression, anxiety, and phobias). For some people, art therapy may be a more acceptable alternative form of psychological therapy than standard forms of treatment, such as talking therapies. This study was part of a health technology assessment commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research, UK and aimed to systematically appraise the clinical and cost-effective evidence for art therapy for people with non-psychotic mental health disorders. Comprehensive literature searches for studies examining art therapy in populations with non-psychotic mental health disorders were performed in May 2013. A quantitative systematic review of clinical effectiveness and a systematic review of studies evaluating the cost-effectiveness of group art therapy were conducted. Eleven randomised controlled trials were included (533 patients). Meta-analysis was not possible due to clinical heterogeneity and insufficient comparable data on outcome measures across studies. The control groups varied between studies but included: no treatment/wait-list, attention placebo controls and psychological therapy comparators. Art therapy was associated with significant positive changes relative to the control group in mental health symptoms in 7 of the 11 studies. A de novo model was constructed and populated with data identified from the clinical review. Scenario analyses were conducted allowing comparisons of group art therapy with wait-list control and group art therapy with group verbal therapy. Group art-therapy appeared cost-effective compared with wait-list control with high certainty although generalisability to the target population was unclear; group verbal therapy appeared more cost-effective than art therapy but there was considerable uncertainty and a sizeable probability that art therapy was more cost effective. From the limited available evidence art therapy was associated with positive effects compared with

  4. Case report and theoretical description of accelerated resolution therapy (ART) for military-related post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F; Diamond, David M; Rosenzweig, Laney

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a new, brief exposure-based psychotherapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART) that is currently being evaluated as a treatment for combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We describe a case report of an Army veteran with combat-related PTSD who was treated with 2 sessions of ART and experienced significant clinical improvement. We then discuss the theoretical basis and major components of the ART protocol, including use of lateral left-right eye movements, and differentiate ART with evidence-based psychotherapies currently endorsed by the Department of Defense and Veterans Administration. The number of military personnel who have served in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and are afflicted with PTSD is likely in the hundreds of thousands. The ART protocol, which is delivered in 2 to 5 sessions and without homework, uses the psychotherapeutic practices of imaginal exposure and imagery rescripting (IR) facilitated through sets of eye movements. In addition to its brevity, a novel component of ART is use of IR to "replace" negative imagery (and other sensations) with positive imagery. This theoretical description of ART and single case report provide a rationale for future formal evaluation of ART for treatment of military-related PTSD. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Neuro-ophthalmology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Konrad P; Straumann, Dominik

    2014-07-01

    This review summarizes the most relevant articles from the field of neuro-ophthalmology published in the Journal of Neurology from January 2012 to July 2013. With the advent of video-oculography, several articles describe new applications for eye movement recordings as a diagnostic tool for a wide range of disorders. In myasthenia gravis, anti-Kv1.4 and anti-Lrp4 have been characterized as promising novel autoantibodies for the diagnosis of hitherto 'seronegative' myasthenia gravis. Several articles address new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to neuromyelitis optica, which further sharpen its profile as a distinct entity. Additionally, 4-aminopyridine has become a standard therapeutic for patients with cerebellar downbeat nystagmus. Finally, revised diagnostic criteria have been proposed for chronic relapsing inflammatory optic neuropathy based on a careful literature review over the last decade.

  6. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abossie A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ashenafi Abossie, Tsegaye Yohanes Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Arba Minch University, Arba Minch, Ethiopia Background: Tuberculosis (TB is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. Methods: The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants’ available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20.0. Results: TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%] compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]. The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49 in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4+ T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups (P<0.05 in this study. Conclusion: IPT had significant contributions to reduce the burden of TB in ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals. Keywords: IPT prophylaxis, ART patients, tuberculosis, CD4+ T-cell count, opportunistic disease

  7. Patterns of HIV-1 drug resistance after first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure in 6 sub-Saharan African countries: implications for second-line ART strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Raph L; Sigaloff, Kim C E; Wensing, Annemarie M; Wallis, Carole L; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Stevens, Wendy S; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Schuurman, Rob

    2012-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance may limit the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). This cohort study examined patterns of drug-resistance mutations (DRMs) in individuals with virological failure on first-line ART at 13 clinical sites in 6 African countries and predicted their impact on second-line drug susceptibility. A total of 2588 antiretroviral-naive individuals initiated ART consisting of different nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) backbones (zidovudine, stavudine, tenofovir, or abacavir, plus lamivudine or emtricitabine) with either efavirenz or nevirapine. Population sequencing after 12 months of ART was retrospectively performed if HIV RNA was >1000 copies/mL. The 2010 International Antiviral Society-USA list was used to score major DRMs. The Stanford algorithm was used to predict drug susceptibility. HIV-1 sequences were generated for 142 participants who virologically failed ART, of whom 70% carried ≥1 DRM and 49% had dual-class resistance, with an average of 2.4 DRMs per sequence (range, 1-8). The most common DRMs were M184V (53.5%), K103N (28.9%), Y181C (15.5%), and G190A (14.1%). Thymidine analogue mutations were present in 8.5%. K65R was frequently selected by stavudine (15.0%) or tenofovir (27.7%). Among participants with ≥1 DRM, HIV-1 susceptibility was reduced in 93% for efavirenz/nevirapine, in 81% for lamivudine/emtricitabine, in 59% for etravirine/rilpivirine, in 27% for tenofovir, in 18% for stavudine, and in 10% for zidovudine. Early failure detection limited the accumulation of resistance. After stavudine failure in African populations, zidovudine rather than tenofovir may be preferred in second-line ART. Strategies to prevent HIV-1 resistance are a global priority.

  8. Neuro-ophthalmology as a career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitze, Arielle; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Lam, Peter; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    This essay was written to discuss the reasoning behind the personal decisions made by 2 current neuro-ophthalmology fellows to pursue neuro-ophthalmology as a career. It is meant to enlighten the reader about what role neuro-ophthalmologists play in clinical practice, what makes neuro-ophthalmology unique to all other sub-specialties, and how this contributes to making neuro-ophthalmology not only one of the most medically interesting, yet rewarding sub-specialties in ophthalmology. PMID:25449937

  9. Neuro-ophthalmology as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitze, Arielle; Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Lam, Peter; Yalamanchili, Sushma; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-10-01

    This essay was written to discuss the reasoning behind the personal decisions made by 2 current neuro-ophthalmology fellows to pursue neuro-ophthalmology as a career. It is meant to enlighten the reader about what role neuro-ophthalmologists play in clinical practice, what makes neuro-ophthalmology unique to all other sub-specialties, and how this contributes to making neuro-ophthalmology not only one of the most medically interesting, yet rewarding sub-specialties in ophthalmology.

  10. Perceived effects of art therapy in the treatment of personalitydisorders, cluster B/C: A qualitative studySuzanne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haeyen, S.W.; Hooren, S. van; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Art therapy (AT) is frequently used in the treatment of patients diagnosed with cluster B/C personality disorders, but there is little evidence for its efficacy. This study aimed to provide insight into the perceived effects of AT. We interviewed 29 adult patients in individual and focus-group

  11. Can art therapy reduce death anxiety and burnout in end-of-life care workers? a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S Potash, Jordan; Hy Ho, Andy; Chan, Faye; Lu Wang, Xiao; Cheng, Carol

    2014-05-01

    The need for empathy and the difficulties of coping with mortality when caring for the dying and the bereaved can cause psychological, emotional, and spiritual strain. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of art-therapy-based supervision in reducing burnout and death anxiety among end-of-life care workers in Hong Kong. Through a quasi-experimental design, 69 participants enrolled in a 6-week, 18-hour art-therapy-based supervision group, and another 63 enrolled in a 3-day, 18-hour standard skills-based supervision group (n=132). Pre- and post-intervention assessments were carried out with three outcome measures: the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire, and the Death Attitude Profile-Revised. The data was analysed using paired sample t-tests. Significant reductions in exhaustion and death anxiety and significant increases in emotional awareness were observed for participants in the art-therapy-based supervision group. This study provides preliminary evidence that art-therapy-based supervision for end-of-life care workers can reduce burnout by enhancing emotional awareness and regulation, fostering meaning-making, and promoting reflection on death.

  12. Simplifying ART cohort monitoring: Can pharmacy stocks provide accurate estimates of patients retained on antiretroviral therapy in Malawi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tweya Hannock

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART is crucial for measuring program success and accurate drug forecasting. However, compiling data from patient registers to measure retention in ART is labour-intensive. To address this challenge, we conducted a pilot study in Malawi to assess whether patient ART retention could be determined using pharmacy records as compared to estimates of retention based on standardized paper- or electronic based cohort reports. Methods Twelve ART facilities were included in the study: six used paper-based registers and six used electronic data systems. One ART facility implemented an electronic data system in quarter three and was included as a paper-based system facility in quarter two only. Routine patient retention cohort reports, paper or electronic, were collected from facilities for both quarter two [April–June] and quarter three [July–September], 2010. Pharmacy stock data were also collected from the 12 ART facilities over the same period. Numbers of ART continuation bottles recorded on pharmacy stock cards at the beginning and end of each quarter were documented. These pharmacy data were used to calculate the total bottles dispensed to patients in each quarter with intent to estimate the number of patients retained on ART. Information for time required to determine ART retention was gathered through interviews with clinicians tasked with compiling the data. Results Among ART clinics with paper-based systems, three of six facilities in quarter two and four of five facilities in quarter three had similar numbers of patients retained on ART comparing cohort reports to pharmacy stock records. In ART clinics with electronic systems, five of six facilities in quarter two and five of seven facilities in quarter three had similar numbers of patients retained on ART when comparing retention numbers from electronically generated cohort reports to pharmacy stock records. Among

  13. NIH NeuroBioBank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH NeuroBioBank (NBB), supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and the Eunice Kennedy...

  14. The neuro-ophthalmological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Janet C; Kennard, Christopher; Leigh, R John

    2011-01-01

    The neuro-ophthalmological examination constitutes one of the most refined and exact components of the clinical examination, often allowing precise diagnosis and formulation of a treatment plan even within the compass of the first visit. This chapter briefly highlights important features in the neuro-ophthalmological history and then presents detailed information on the important components of a comprehensive neuro-ophthalmological examination. Covered examination topics include visual acuity, visual field testing, color vision, external eye exam, pupils, ophthalmoscopy, and eye movements. The final section discusses ancillary tests that supplement the bedside neuro-ophthalmological examination, including formal visual field analysis, electroretinography, fluorescein angiography, ocular coherence tomography, visual-evoked potentials, neuroimaging, and quantitative eye movement recordings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Neuro-Ophthalmological History Taking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Helmut

    2017-11-01

    Neuro-ophthalmological history may be very complex and difficult. This article provides 14 hints about how to construct history taking efficiently and how to avoid collecting unnecessary information. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Effects of clay art therapy on adults outpatients with major depressive disorder: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Joshua K M; Ho, Rainbow T H

    2017-08-01

    Depression has become a critical global health problem, affecting millions of people. Cost-effective nonpharmacological treatment in community settings has been proposed to complement medical treatment. Short-term clay art therapy (CAT) is an alternative treatment that promotes the enhancement of various aspects of mental health for depressed individuals. One-hundred and six adults with depression were randomized into a CAT group or visual art (VA) control group for six 2.5-h weekly sessions. Intervention effects were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory, 12-Item General Health Questionnaire (Chinese version), Body-Mind-Spirit Well-Being Inventory, and 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (Chinese version) at baseline, immediately postintervention (T1), and 3-weeks postintervention (T2). Multivariate analysis of covariance results indicated a more significant time × group effect for CAT than for VA on depressive signs, general health, and body-mind-spirit well-being (all p<0.05). Significant within-groups changes were observed in these three aspects after treatment and at T2 (all p<0.001) and in alexithymia at T2 (p<0.01) in the CAT group, but the change was nonsignificant in the VA group at T1 and T2. The homogeneity of the participants affected the generalizability of the study findings. The short-term postintervention follow-up (3 weeks) presented difficulties in demonstrating the long-term effects of CAT. CAT can aid emotion regulation and benefit various aspects of mental health in adults. The short duration of the intervention suggests additional application value in treating depression. Further investigation is warranted regarding the potential effect of CAT on alleviating physical symptoms and improving social function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Depressive Symptoms and Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Among HIV-infected Russian Drinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodness, Tracie M.; Palfai, Tibor P.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Coleman, Sharon M.; Bridden, Carly; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of depressive symptoms on ART initiation among Russian HIV-infected heavy drinkers enrolled in a secondary HIV prevention trial (HERMITAGE) was examined. We assessed 133 participants eligible for ART initiation (i.e., CD4 count ART at baseline. Depressive symptom severity and ART use were measured at baseline, 6- and 12-months. Association between depressive symptoms and subsequent ART initiation was evaluated using GEE logistic regression adjusting for gender, past ART use, injection drug use and heavy drinking. Depressive symptom severity was not significantly associated with lower odds of initiating ART. Cognitive depression symptoms were not statistically significant (global p=0.05); however, those with the highest level of severity had an AOR of 0.25 (95% CI: 0.09–0.71) for delayed ART initiation. Although the effect of depression severity was not significant, findings suggest a potential role of cognitive depression symptoms in decisions to initiate ART in this population. PMID:24337725

  18. Assessment of isoniazid preventive therapy in the reduction of tuberculosis among ART patients in Arba Minch Hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abossie, Ashenafi; Yohanes, Tsegaye

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the most frequent life-threatening opportunistic disease among people living with HIV and remains a leading cause of mortality, even among persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and cotrimoxazole prophylaxis have been recommended for the benefit of HIV/AIDS-infected individuals to prevent opportunistic infections. The aim of this study was to assess IPT prophylaxis in the reduction of TB among ART patients. The study was a hospital-based retrospective study. A total of 271 study participants' available information such as demographic data, the type of prophylaxis used, and TB/HIV coinfection status as well as other variables were collected from clinical laboratory and HIV care/ART follow-up clinic. Data analysis was performed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20.0. TB-infected ART patients were higher among non-IPT group (37 [27.8%]) compared to IPT group (12 [8.7%]). The finding showed that IPT prophylaxis significantly reduces acquiring TB with the relative risk =0.31 (95% confidence interval =0.122, 0.49) in ART patients of this study site where the tuberculosis prevalence is prominent. ART had significant contribution for CD4 + T-cell lymphocyte count improvement in both IPT and non-IPT groups ( P ART patients than non-IPT group. This result highlights the use of IPT for the prevention of TB, especially for all ART patients. Other longitudinal studies are needed to observe the benefits and side effects of IPT prophylaxis in tuberculin skin test-positive individuals.

  19. Cognitive Training for Dementia Patients in the Community & Art Therapy Programs of 'Goyang Centenarian's Good Memory School'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wang-jun

    2016-01-01

    Myong Ji Hospital has launched the 'public health Service project team' for the first time in Korea as a private institution to carry forward and administer public health projects and services in a more structured way. Notably, Goyang Centenarian's Good Memory School has deliberately provided various art therapy programs to those who have a high risk of dementia in pursuit of promoting dementia prevention, and maintaining a positive mind and healthy body for any required daily activities for senior living. Participating patients have expressed remarkable satisfaction, and the art therapy programs have not only shown the effectiveness of strengthening the mental status of the cognitively-impaired patients but have also proposed a feasible non-pharmacological therapy option, which promotes the quality of their daily living and lowers the burden for their caregivers.

  20. Healing Arts Therapies and Person-Centred Dementia Care Healing Arts Therapies and Person-Centred Dementia Care Anthea Innes and Hatfield Karen (editors) Jessica Kingsley 137pp £13.95 1 84310 038X 184310038X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Reading this digestible good practice guide, one is struck by the sheer enthusiasm of the contributors both on paper and in the descriptions of their 'therapies'. The authors are absolutely committed to their own specialties, and desire that we are as persuaded as they by the psychotherapeutic impact of the healing arts in dementia care. This evangelism becomes a little wearing after a while and the case studies that flesh out the meaning of what is observed feel a little too neat. The book suffers a little for its American influences and expectations. One feels that all environments are assumed to have daily access to music/drama/art therapists.

  1. Effects of art therapy using color on purpose in life in patients with stroke and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kang, Sung Don

    2013-01-01

    Patients with stroke suffer from physical disabilities, followed by mental instability. Their caregivers also suffer from mental instability. The present study attempted to address the degree and the change of the level of Purpose in Life (PIL) in patients with stroke and caregivers by applying art therapy using colors. Twenty-eight stroke patients with a good functional recovery or a moderate disability and their 28 caregivers were selected and evaluated. The period of the study between the stroke and color therapy was more than 6 months. Patients and caregivers were divided into the color therapy (28) and control groups (28). A questionnaire, which measures the level of PIL was conducted separately for patients and caregivers prior to the first session of color therapy (2 hours per week, total 16 sessions). The final examination was performed 5 months after the last color therapy session. There was significant difference between before and after color therapy when the level of PIL was measured both in patients and caregivers (p<0.01). These were the same between the color therapy group, compared with the control group (p<0.01). As color therapy progressed to the late phase, patients and caregivers applied increasing number of colors and color intensity. These results prove that color therapy will improve PIL of the patients with post-stroke disability and caregivers. Furthermore, color therapy would be a useful adjuvant for improving the quality of life of the patients with stroke and their caregivers.

  2. Systematic review and economic modelling of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of art therapy among people with non-psychotic mental health disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, Lesley; Scope, Alison; Stevenson, Matt; Rawdin, Andrew; Taylor Buck, Elizabeth; Sutton, Anthea; Stevens, John; Kaltenthaler, Eva; Dent-Brown, Kim; Wood, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Mental health problems account for almost half of all ill health in people under 65 years. The majority are non-psychotic (e.g. depression, anxiety and phobias). For some people, art therapy may provide more profound and long-lasting healing than more standard forms of treatment, perhaps because it can provide an alternative means of expression and release from trauma. As yet, no formal evaluation of art therapy for non-psychotic mental health disorders has been conducted. This review aimed to evaluate evidence for the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of art therapy for non-psychotic mental health disorders. Comprehensive literature searches for studies examining art therapy in populations with non-psychotic mental health disorders were performed in major health-related and social science bibliographic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED) and Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts (ASSIA) from inception up to May 2013. A quantitative systematic review of clinical effectiveness, a qualitative review to explore the acceptability, relative benefits and potential harms, and a cost-utility analysis of studies evaluating cost-effectiveness of art therapy were conducted. In the quantitative review, 15 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included (n = 777). Meta-analysis was not possible because of clinical heterogeneity and insufficient comparable data on outcome measures across studies. A narrative synthesis reports that art therapy was associated with significant positive changes relative to the control group in mental health symptoms in 10 out of the 15 studies. The control groups varied between studies but included wait-list/no treatment, attention placebo controls and psychological therapy comparators. Four studies reported improvement from baseline but no significant difference between groups

  3. Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing) and Nature Therapy: A State-of-the-Art Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Margaret M; Jones, Reo; Tocchini, Kirsten

    2017-07-28

    Current literature supports the comprehensive health benefits of exposure to nature and green environments on human systems. The aim of this state-of-the-art review is to elucidate empirical research conducted on the physiological and psychological effects of Shinrin-Yoku (or Forest Bathing) in transcontinental Japan and China. Furthermore, we aim to encourage healthcare professionals to conduct longitudinal research in Western cultures regarding the clinically therapeutic effects of Shinrin-Yoku and, for healthcare providers/students to consider practicing Shinrin-Yoku to decrease undue stress and potential burnout. A thorough review was conducted to identify research published with an initial open date range and then narrowing the collection to include papers published from 2007 to 2017. Electronic databases (PubMed, PubMed Central, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Scopus) and snowball references were used to cull papers that evaluated the use of Shinrin-Yoku for various populations in diverse settings. From the 127 papers initially culled using the Boolean phrases: "Shinrin-yoku" AND/OR "forest bathing" AND/OR "nature therapy", 64 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this summary review and then divided into "physiological," "psychological," "sensory metrics" and "frameworks" sub-groups. Human health benefits associated with the immersion in nature continue to be currently researched. Longitudinal research, conducted worldwide, is needed to produce new evidence of the relationships associated with Shinrin-Yoku and clinical therapeutic effects. Nature therapy as a health-promotion method and potential universal health model is implicated for the reduction of reported modern-day "stress-state" and "technostress.".

  4. Posttraumatic stress disorder and art group therapy: Self-expression of traumatic inner world of war veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić-Gajić, Gordana; Špirić, Željko

    2016-08-01

    Art therapy and drawings may serve as alternative means of expression and release from trauma among veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The retrospective clinical study of drawings of war veterans was performed. A total of 89 war veterans met the Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) PTSD criteria and were consecutively admitted to the Day Hospital during 5 years. Art group therapy as part of integrative treatment was performed once a week. The group was open and heterogeneous. Qualitative analysis of drawings content and group protocols were obtained. The drawings were made by free associations. War related themes were explored and descriptive statistics were applied. The most frequent type of common themes of combat stress presented battle and witnessing wounded and killed combatants. Less frequent were themes of graves, destroyed cities and broken trees. The veterans preferred black and red colors with association to death, blood, wounds and destroyed objects. Drawing could provide a unique, complex, visual illustration of war traumatic experiences and memories of posttraumatic stress disorder veterans. Art group discussion might enhance war veterans’ verbal expression due to group support in safe setting. As adjuvant psychotherapy, art group therapy could enrich awareness and the ability of clinicians to treat hard posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms related to uncovered war trauma.

  5. Posttraumatic stress disorder and art group therapy: Self-expression of traumatic inner world of war veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Art therapy and drawings may serve as alternative means of expression and release from trauma among veterans diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Methods. The retrospective clinical study of drawings of war veterans was performed. A total of 89 war veterans met the Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV PTSD criteria and were consecutively admitted to the Day Hospital during 5 years. Art group therapy as part of integrative treatment was performed once a week. The group was open and heterogeneous. Qualitative analysis of drawings content and group protocols were obtained. The drawings were made by free associations. War related themes were explored and descriptive statistics were applied. Results. The most frequent type of common themes of combat stress presented battle and witnessing wounded and killed combatants. Less frequent were themes of graves, destroyed cities and broken trees. The veterans preferred black and red colors with association to death, blood, wounds and destroyed objects. Conclusion. Drawing could provide a unique, complex, visual illustration of war traumatic experiences and memories of posttraumatic stress disorder veterans. Art group discussion might enhance war veterans’ verbal expression due to group support in safe setting. As adjuvant psychotherapy, art group therapy could enrich awareness and the ability of clinicians to treat hard posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms related to uncovered war trauma.

  6. Randomized trial of time-limited interruptions of protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy (ART vs. continuous therapy for HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Firnhaber

    Full Text Available The clinical outcomes of short interruptions of PI-based ART regimens remains undefined.A 2-arm non-inferiority trial was conducted on 53 HIV-1 infected South African participants with viral load 450 cells/µl on stavudine (or zidovudine, lamivudine and lopinavir/ritonavir. Subjects were randomized to a sequential 2, 4 and 8-week ART interruptions or b continuous ART (cART. Primary analysis was based on the proportion of CD4 count >350 cells(c/ml over 72 weeks. Adherence, HIV-1 drug resistance, and CD4 count rise over time were analyzed as secondary endpoints.The proportions of CD4 counts >350 cells/µl were 82.12% for the intermittent arm and 93.73 for the cART arm; the difference of 11.95% was above the defined 10% threshold for non-inferiority (upper limit of 97.5% CI, 24.1%; 2-sided CI: -0.16, 23.1. No clinically significant differences in opportunistic infections, adverse events, adherence or viral resistance were noted; after randomization, long-term CD4 rise was observed only in the cART arm.We are unable to conclude that short PI-based ART interruptions are non-inferior to cART in retention of immune reconstitution; however, short interruptions did not lead to a greater rate of resistance mutations or adverse events than cART suggesting that this regimen may be more forgiving than NNRTIs if interruptions in therapy occur.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00100646.

  7. Relationship Between Time to Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy and Treatment Outcomes: A Cohort Analysis of ART Eligible Adolescents in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Florian; Rehman, Andrea M; Kranzer, Katharina; Nyathi, Mary; Van Griensven, Johan; Dixon, Mark; Ndebele, Wedu; Gunguwo, Hilary; Colebunders, Robert; Ndlovu, Mbongeni; Apollo, Tsitsi; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2017-04-01

    Age-specific retention challenges make antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in adolescents difficult, often requiring a lengthy preparation process. This needs to be balanced against the benefits of starting treatment quickly. The optimal time to initiation duration in adolescents is currently unknown. To assess the effect of time to ART initiation on mortality and loss to follow-up (LTFU) among treatment eligible adolescents. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis among 1499 ART eligible adolescents aged ≥10 to ART durations using multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up duration was 1.6 years. Mortality HRs of patients who initiated at 0 to ≤7 days, >14 days to ≤1 month, >1 to ≤2 months, >2 months, and before initiation were 1.59, 1.19, 1.56, 1.08, and 0.94, respectively, compared with the reference group of >7 to ≤14 days. LTFU HRs were 1.02, 1.07, 0.85, 0.97, and 3.96, respectively. Among patients not on ART, 88% of deaths and 85% of LTFU occurred during the first 3 months after becoming ART eligible, but only 37% and 29% among adolescents on ART, respectively. Neither mortality or LTFU was associated with varying time to ART. The initiation process can be tailored to the adolescents' needs and individual life situations without risking to increase poor treatment outcomes. Early mortality was high despite rapid ART initiation, calling for earlier rather than faster initiation through HIV testing scale-up.

  8. Neuro Linguistic Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Padežanin

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is in fact an introduction to the field known as neuro-linguistic programming or NLP. It describes the origins of thi s method and funda­ mental assumptions about NLP -current perception of reality, establishment of rapport, and  development of our unique potential in order to understand the world. The paper furthermore provides insight into how we use our inner senses for reflection , how language and thought interact, and how we can determine the way other people think. The NLP method simultaneousl y takes into consideration all of the personality signals - bod y a nd speech signals, and visua l pattems. NLP assumes tha t the usual framework of interpretation and criticism needs to be transcended in order for us to be able to see matters ina different light, and thus develop better al ternatives for achieving our original goals. The paper emphasizes the inner processing of information, which is captured by certain NLP diagnostic models, thus providing the starting point for change.

  9. Neurofeedback therapy for enhancing visual attention: state-of-the-art and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ordikhani-Seyedlar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We have witnessed a rapid development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs linking the brain to external devices. BCIs can be utilized to treat neurological conditions and even to augment brain functions. BCIs offer a promising treatment for mental disorders, including disorders of attention. Here we review the current state of the art and challenges of attention-based BCIs, with a focus on visual attention. Attention-based BCIs utilize electroencephalograms (EEGs or other recording techniques to generate neurofeedback, which patients use to improve their attention, a complex cognitive function. Although progress has been made in the studies of neural mechanisms of attention, extraction of attention-related neural signals needed for BCI operations is a difficult problem. To attain good BCI performance, it is important to select the features of neural activity that represent attentional signals. BCI decoding of attention-related activity may be hindered by the presence of different neural signals. Therefore, BCI accuracy can be improved by signal processing algorithms that dissociate signals of interest from irrelevant activities. Notwithstanding recent progress, optimal processing of attentional neural signals remains a fundamental challenge for the development of efficient therapies for disorders of attention.

  10. Garden walking and art therapy for depression in older adults: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Liehr, Patricia; Gregersen, Thomas; Nishioka, Reiko

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare garden walking (either alone or guided) with art therapy in older adults with depression. Depression was measured using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and stories of sadness/joy. Prior to the intervention, 47% of participants had depression scores in the severe range and 53% in the mild range. At the end of the intervention, none of the participants had scores in the severe range, 89% had scores in the mild range, and 11% had scores in the normal range. Results of the GDS data using repeated measures analysis of variance indicated significant decreases in depression for all three groups from pretest to posttest. All participants, regardless of group assignment, had a lower percentage of negative-emotion word use and a higher percentage of positive-emotion word use over time. This study provides evidence for nurses wishing to guide older adults in safe, easy, and inexpensive ways to reduce depression. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Criterion validity of the ARthritis Treatment Satisfaction (ARTS) questionnaire: patient satisfaction with treatment and need for switching therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejas, Javier; Monfort, Jordi; Campillo, Miguel A; Ruiz, Miguel A; Pardo, Antonio; Soto, Javier

    2009-01-01

    The ARthritis Treatment Satisfaction (ARTS) questionnaire specifically assesses patients' satisfaction with osteoarthritis treatment. However, its usefulness is limited since its criterion validity is unknown. The goal of this research was to analyse the criterion validity of the questionnaire in order to identify a cut-off value able to differentiate patients who are satisfied and those who are unsatisfied with osteoarthritis treatment and to establish the possible need for switching therapy. We used responses to the ARTS questionnaire from outpatients with osteoarthritis included in an open-label, non-controlled, naturalistic, prospective switching therapy study. In addition, patients' responses to two questions on satisfaction with treatment and osteoarthritis-related health status were recorded. Receiver operative characteristic (ROC) curve analyses with estimators of validity were determined. The correlation between responses to the ARTS questionnaire, the question regarding satisfaction with treatment, and the osteoarthritis-related health status assessment were also analysed. A total of 1756 male and female subjects were enrolled in the study. ROC curve analysis identified a cut-off point of >or=61 points as optimal for the criterion validity estimators of sensitivity (0.86), specificity (0.83), and positive (0.87) and negative (0.81) predictive values. This threshold value was used to identify patients satisfied with treatment and patients with a need to switch therapy (kappa coefficient of agreement 0.68 and 0.66, respectively). ARTS questionnaire scoring correlated with satisfaction with treatment (p < 0.0001), and with patient (r = 0.655, p < 0.0001) and investigator (r = 0.565, p < 0.0001) health status assessments. The ARTS questionnaire was able to identify patients satisfied with treatment and those with a need to switch their osteoarthritis therapy.

  12. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E; Elk, Carrie A; Sullivan, Kelly L; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A; Long, Christopher J; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F; Street, Jennifer D; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M

    2012-06-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1-5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21-60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants' mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD.

  13. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) restores HIV-1 infection-mediated impairment of JAK-STAT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Man-Qing; Zhao, Min; Kong, Wen-Hua; Tang, Li; Wang, Fang; Zhu, Ze-Rong; Wang, Xia; Qiu, Hong-Yan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe; Zhou, Wang

    2017-04-04

    JAK-STAT signaling pathway has a crucial role in host innate immunity against viral infections, including HIV-1. We therefore examined the impact of HIV-1 infection and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on JAK-STAT signaling pathway. Compared to age-matched healthy donors (n = 18), HIV-1-infected subjects (n = 18) prior to cART had significantly lower expression of toll-like receptors (TLR-1/4/6/7/8/9), the IFN regulatory factors (IRF-3/7/9), and the antiviral factors (OAS-1, MxA, A3G, PKR, and Tetherin). Three months' cART partially restores the impaired functions of JAK-STAT-mediated antiviral immunity. We also found most factors had significantly positive correlations (p HIV-1-infected subjects (43.86%, 75/171), and stably increased during the cART (57.31%, 98/171 after 6 months' cART). With regard to the restoration of some HIV-1 restriction factors, HIV-1-infected subjects who had CD4+ T cell counts > 350//μl responded better to cART than those with the counts HIV-1 disease.

  14. WE-E-17A-07: Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology: Biologically-Informed Radiation Therapy and Imaging Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, K; Corwin, D [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Rockne, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a method of generating patient-specific, biologically-guided radiation therapy (RT) plans and to quantify and predict response to RT in glioblastoma. We investigate the biological correlates and imaging physics driving T2-MRI based response to radiation therapy using an MRI simulator. Methods: We have integrated a patient-specific biomathematical model of glioblastoma proliferation, invasion and radiotherapy with a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm for intensity-modulated RT optimization to construct individualized, biologically-guided plans. Patient-individualized simulations of the standard-of-care and optimized plans are compared in terms of several biological metrics quantified on MRI. An extension of the PI model is used to investigate the role of angiogenesis and its correlates in glioma response to therapy with the Proliferation-Invasion-Hypoxia- Necrosis-Angiogenesis model (PIHNA). The PIHNA model is used with a brain tissue phantom to predict tumor-induced vasogenic edema, tumor and tissue density that is used in a multi-compartmental MRI signal equation for generation of simulated T2- weighted MRIs. Results: Applying a novel metric of treatment response (Days Gained) to the patient-individualized simulation results predicted that the optimized RT plans would have a significant impact on delaying tumor progression, with Days Gained increases from 21% to 105%. For the T2- MRI simulations, initial validation tests compared average simulated T2 values for white matter, tumor, and peripheral edema to values cited in the literature. Simulated results closely match the characteristic T2 value for each tissue. Conclusion: Patient-individualized simulations using the combination of a biomathematical model with an optimization algorithm for RT generated biologically-guided doses that decreased normal tissue dose and increased therapeutic ratio with the potential to improve survival outcomes for treatment of glioblastoma. Simulated T2-MRI

  15. Update on triple therapy for eradication of Helicobacter pylori: current status of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urgesi R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Riccardo Urgesi,1 Rossella Cianci,2 Maria Elena Riccioni31Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Viterbo, 2Institute of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Rome, 3Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, ItalyAbstract: With the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, the treatment success of standard triple therapy has recently declined to unacceptable levels (ie, 80% or less. Following the failure of conventional triple therapy, novel eradication regimens have been developed including sequential therapy, concomitant quadruple therapy, hybrid (dual-concomitant therapy, bismuth-containing quadruple therapy, and a therapy with administration of N-acetylcysteine before a culture-guided antibiotic regimen. This article reviews the literature published on Helicobacter pylori eradication in the last year, focusing on the development of alternative strategies for first-, second-, and third-line rescue therapy for the eradication of H. pylori.Keywords: sequential therapy, quadruple therapy, concomitant therapy, hybrid therapy, N-acetylcysteine

  16. Gene Therapy-Induced Antigen-Specific Tregs Inhibit Neuro-inflammation and Reverse Disease in a Mouse Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Geoffrey D; Kumar, Sandeep; Palaschak, Brett; Silverberg, Emily L; Markusic, David M; Jones, Noah T; Hoffman, Brad E

    2018-01-03

    The devastating neurodegenerative disease multiple sclerosis (MS) could substantially benefit from an adeno-associated virus (AAV) immunotherapy designed to restore a robust and durable antigen-specific tolerance. However, developing a sufficiently potent and lasting immune-regulatory therapy that can intervene in ongoing disease is a major challenge and has thus been elusive. We addressed this problem by developing a highly effective and robust tolerance-inducing in vivo gene therapy. Using a pre-clinical animal model, we designed a liver-targeting gene transfer vector that expresses full-length myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) in hepatocytes. We show that by harnessing the tolerogenic nature of the liver, this powerful gene immunotherapy restores immune tolerance by inducing functional MOG-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo, independent of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restrictions. We demonstrate that mice treated prophylactically are protected from developing disease and neurological deficits. More importantly, we demonstrate that when given to mice with preexisting disease, ranging from mild neurological deficits to severe paralysis, the gene immunotherapy abrogated CNS inflammation and significantly reversed clinical symptoms of disease. This specialized approach for inducing antigen-specific immune tolerance has significant therapeutic potential for treating MS and other autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Bringing antiretroviral therapy (ART) closer to the end-user through mobile clinics and home-based ART: systematic review shows more evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness is needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdege, Noreen Dadirai; Chindove, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Home-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) and ART through mobile clinics can potentially increase access to ART for large numbers of people, including hard-to-reach populations. We reviewed literature on the effectiveness and cost implications of the home-based ART and mobile clinic ART models. We searched Medline, Embase, PsycInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge and Current Controlled Trials Register for articles published up to March 2012. We included non-randomised and randomised controlled clinical trials that recruited HIV/AIDS positive adults with or without prior exposure to ART. Six studies were included in the review, with only four effectiveness studies (all evaluating home-based ART and none for mobile clinic ART) and four studies reporting on the cost implications. The evidence suggests home-based ART is as effective as health facility-based ART, including on clinical outcomes, viral load and CD4+ count. However, three of these studies were very small. Studies suggest health facility-based ART is the most cost-effective, followed by mobile-clinic ART, with home-based ART being the least cost-effective. Evidence on the effectiveness and cost implications of mobile clinic and home-based ART is currently limited. Although the few available studies suggest home-based ART can potentially be as effective as health facility-based ART, there is need for more research before robust conclusions can be made. Results from the few available studies also suggest that health facility-based ART is the most cost-effective. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Effect of an art brut therapy program called go beyond the schizophrenia (GBTS) on prison inmates with schizophrenia in mainland China-A randomized, longitudinal, and controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hong-Zhong; Ye, Zeng-Jie; Liang, Mu-Zi; Huang, Yue-Qun; Liu, Wei; Lu, Zhi-Dong

    2017-09-01

    Creative arts therapies are proven to promote an interconnection between body and mind, but there are major obstacles for providing therapeutic services in prisons due to inmates' inherent mistrust for verbal disclosure and rigid self-defenses, especially among inmates with schizophrenia. Thus, we developed a structured and quantitative art brut therapy program called go beyond the schizophrenia to actually measure the benefits of art therapy on prison inmates in mainland China. Upon completion of the program, the intervention group reported a decrease in anxiety, depression, anger, and negative psychiatric symptoms and showed better compliance with rules, socialization with peers, compliance with medications, and regular sleeping patterns after 16 weekly sessions of go beyond the schizophrenia. This article concludes that the art brut therapy was effective for the inmates with schizophrenia in mainland China and provides encouraging data on how to enhance mental health for inmates with schizophrenia. Art brut therapy can reduce emotional distress and negative psychiatric symptoms among Chinese inmates. Arts brut therapy can enhance Chinese inmates' compliance with rules, socialization with peers, compliance with medicines, and regular sleeping patterns. Arts brut therapy in conjunction with medication is highly recommended for recovery of Chinese inmates with schizophrenia, especially for patients with negative symptoms. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The Use of Expressive Therapies and Social Support with Youth in Foster Care: The Performing Arts Troupe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audra Holmes Greene

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Performing Arts Troupe is a program that provides youth in foster care and youth from low income neighborhoods with expressive therapies and social support. The program is designed to assist youth in addressing the effects of trauma and developing competencies as they prepare to transition to adulthood. The article discusses the literature base for the program, the program activities and describes the impact of the program on youth through preliminary evaluations and case studies. The program offers an innovative combination of expressive therapies and social supports that has effectively met the needs of vulnerable youth.

  20. Expressive Arts Therapy with Hospitalized Children: A Pilot Study of Co-Creating Healing Sock Creatures©.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jane; Iida, Haruka; Rachlin, Kenneth; Yount, Garret

    2016-01-01

    A novel form of expressive arts therapy was developed in a pediatric unit and received enthusiastic support from hospital staff and family members because of their impressions that the children were calmer following therapy, as well as throughout the remainder of the hospital stay. A pilot study was conducted to assess the feasibility of quantifying such impressions by measuring changes in the children's mood by self-report. Twenty-five children (mean age 8.34 years, SD 3.77) were recruited for the study, coming from diverse social-economic backgrounds, ethnicities, and an array of medical diagnoses. The results document improvements in mood for children following therapy sessions, compared to children in a wait-list control group. Additionally, a meta-analysis examining external influences and changes in salivary cortisol levels measured before and after therapy sessions illustrates the importance of considering aspects of the clinical setting when assessing the effectiveness of this and other expressive arts therapies for reducing stress during hospitalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Risk factors associated with increased mortality among HIV infected children initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART in South Africa.

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    Brian C Zanoni

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify demographic and clinical risk factors associated with mortality after initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART in a cohort of human immunodeficiency (HIV infected children in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 537 children initiating antiretroviral therapy at McCord Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Data were extracted from electronic medical records and risk factors associated with mortality were assessed using Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Overall there were 47 deaths from the cohort of 537 children initiating ART with over 991 child-years of follow-up (median 22 months on ART, yielding a mortality rate of 4.7 deaths per 100 child years on ART. Univariate analysis indicated that mortality was significantly associated with lower weight-for-age Z-score (p<0.0001, chronic diarrhea (p = 0.0002, lower hemoglobin (p = 0.002, age <3 years (p = 0.003, and CD4% <10% (p = 0.005. The final multivariable Cox proportional hazards mortality model found age less than 3 years (p = 0.004, CD4 <10% (p = 0.01, chronic diarrhea (p = 0.03, weight-for-age Z-score (<0.0001 and female gender as a covariate varying with time (p = 0.03 all significantly associated with mortality. CONCLUSION: In addition to recognized risk factors such as young age and advanced immunosuppression, we found female gender to be significantly associated with mortality in this pediatric ART cohort. Future studies are needed to determine whether intrinsic biologic differences or socio-cultural factors place female children with HIV at increased risk of death following initiation of ART.

  2. Moderating factors for the effectiveness of group art therapy for schizophrenia: secondary analysis of data from the MATISSE randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leurent, Baptiste; Killaspy, Helen; Osborn, David P; Crawford, Mike J; Hoadley, Angela; Waller, Diane; King, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Although some studies suggest that art therapy may be useful in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, a recent large trial of group art therapy found no clinical advantage over standard care, but the study population was heterogeneous and uptake of the intervention was poor. This study aimed to investigate whether art therapy was more effective for specific subgroups of patients. Secondary analysis of data from a randomised controlled trial of group art therapy as an adjunctive treatment for schizophrenia (n = 140) versus standard care alone (n = 137). Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale scores at 12 months were compared between trial arms. Interaction between intervention effect and different subgroups, including those with more severe negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and those who expressed a preference for art therapy prior to randomisation, was tested using a linear mixed model. The clinical effectiveness of group art therapy did not significantly differ between participants with more or less severe negative symptoms [interaction for difference in PANSS = 1.7, 95 % CI (-8.6 to 12.1), P = 0.741], or between those who did and did not express a preference for art therapy [interaction = 3.9, 95 % CI (-6.7 to 14.5), P = 0.473]. None of the other exploratory subgroups suggested differences in intervention effect. There was no evidence of greater improvement in clinical symptoms of schizophrenia for those with more severe negative symptoms or those with a preference for art therapy. Identification of patients with schizophrenia who may benefit most from group art therapy remains elusive.

  3. A comparative study of art therapy in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and improvement in quality of life by watercolor painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozcuk, H; Ozcan, K; Erdogan, C; Mutlu, H; Demir, M; Coskun, S

    2017-02-01

    There is limited data on the role of art therapy used in cancer patients. We wanted to test the effect of painting art therapy provided by a dedicated professional painting artist on quality of life and anxiety and depression levels in patients having chemotherapy. Cancer patients having chemotherapy in the day unit of a medical oncology department of a university hospital were offered to take part in a painting art therapy program (PATP). This program consisted of a professional painting artist facilitating and helping patients to perform painting during their chemotherapy sessions while they were in the day unit, as well as supplying them painting material for home practice. The changes in quality of life domains of EORTC-QLQ-C30 questionnaire and in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scores (HADS) were assessed before and after the PATP. These results were contrasted with a reference group of cancer patients on chemotherapy but not taking part in the PATP. In order to adjust for multiple comparisons of quality of life parameters between patient groups, we utilized the Bonferroni correction. A total of 48 patients, of which 26 patients did and 22 did not have prior exposure to PATP, were enrolled in the PATP. A control group of 24 patients who did not have any PATP activity during the study period also took part in the study. With PATP, there was significant improvement in global quality of life (F=7.87, P=0.001), and depression scores (F=7.80, P=0.001). To our knowledge, this is the largest comparative PATP experience in cancer patients on chemotherapy and show that PATP is feasible in the clinics. Our results confirm that art therapy in the form of painting improves quality of life and depression in cancer patients having chemotherapy. This effect was more pronounced in patients without any previous experience of PATP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Shinrin-Yoku (Forest Bathing and Nature Therapy: A State-of-the-Art Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M. Hansen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current literature supports the comprehensive health benefits of exposure to nature and green environments on human systems. The aim of this state-of-the-art review is to elucidate empirical research conducted on the physiological and psychological effects of Shinrin-Yoku (or Forest Bathing in transcontinental Japan and China. Furthermore, we aim to encourage healthcare professionals to conduct longitudinal research in Western cultures regarding the clinically therapeutic effects of Shinrin-Yoku and, for healthcare providers/students to consider practicing Shinrin-Yoku to decrease undue stress and potential burnout. Methods: A thorough review was conducted to identify research published with an initial open date range and then narrowing the collection to include papers published from 2007 to 2017. Electronic databases (PubMed, PubMed Central, CINAHL, PsycINFO and Scopus and snowball references were used to cull papers that evaluated the use of Shinrin-Yoku for various populations in diverse settings. Results: From the 127 papers initially culled using the Boolean phrases: “Shinrin-yoku” AND/OR “forest bathing” AND/OR “nature therapy”, 64 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this summary review and then divided into “physiological,” “psychological,” “sensory metrics” and “frameworks” sub-groups. Conclusions: Human health benefits associated with the immersion in nature continue to be currently researched. Longitudinal research, conducted worldwide, is needed to produce new evidence of the relationships associated with Shinrin-Yoku and clinical therapeutic effects. Nature therapy as a health-promotion method and potential universal health model is implicated for the reduction of reported modern-day “stress-state” and “technostress.”.

  5. Memristive Neuro-Fuzzy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrikh-Bayat, Farnood; Shouraki, Saeed Bagheri

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, a novel neuro-fuzzy computing system is proposed where its learning is based on the creation of fuzzy relations by using a new implication method without utilizing any exact mathematical techniques. Then, a simple memristor crossbar-based analog circuit is designed to implement this neuro-fuzzy system which offers very interesting properties. In addition to high connectivity between neurons and being fault tolerant, all synaptic weights in our proposed method are always non-negative, and there is no need to adjust them precisely. Finally, this structure is hierarchically expandable, and it can do fuzzy operations in real time since it is implemented through analog circuits. Simulation results confirm the efficiency and applicability of our neuro-fuzzy computing system. They also indicate that this system can be a good candidate to be used for creating artificial brain.

  6. Bridging psychological barriers between the child and the father after his returning from the war: Could group art therapy help?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. War veterans with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD have poorer family and parenting functioning, but little research has focused on these impairments. Case re-port. This paper presented how the series of drawings and the group art therapy process enhanced bridging the psychological barriers of a 33-year-old male PTSD war veteran to engagement with the child. After two years of deployment he returned home and suffered mostly from PTSD numbness and avoidance symptoms. The veteran had the family readjustment difficulties and felt guilty for being detached from his 3-year-old son. He under-went integrative treatment in the Day Unit Program. The drawings series were made by free associations. Clinical observations and group discussions were recorded in the group art therapy protocols. The presented patient got gratifications and support from the group members for his illustration of popular cartoon heroes, and decided to draw Mickey Mouse at home. On the next session he shared his satisfaction for bridging the gap between him and his son, having done the same drawings with his son at home. Beck's depression inventory (BDI was used for self-rating of depression and a reduction of BDI score from 18 to 6 during the treatment course was recorded. Conclusions. Series of drawings illustrated shift from war related past toward current family life of the war veteran. Group art therapy gave him gratification and support with hope and a sense of belonging, thus facilitated his parenting readjustment.

  7. Adaptive radiation therapy in head and neck cancer for clinical practice: state of the art and practical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veresezan, Ovidiu; Troussier, Idriss; Lacout, Alexis; Kreps, Sarah; Maillard, Sophie; Toulemonde, Aude; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Huguet, Florence; Thariat, Juliette

    2017-02-01

    Modern radiation therapy techniques are characterized by high conformality to tumor volumes and steep dose gradients to spare normal organs. These techniques require accurate clinical target volume definitions and rigorous assessment of set up uncertainties using image guidance, a concept called image-guided radiation therapy. Due to alteration of patient anatomy, changes in tissue density/volumes and tumor shrinkage over the course of treatment, treatment accuracy may be challenged. This may result in excessive irradiation of organs at risk/healthy tissues and undercoverage of target volumes with a significant risk of locoregional failure. Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is a concept allowing the clinician to reconsider the planned dose based on potential changes to accurately delivering the remaining radiation dose to the tumor while optimally minimizing irradiation of healthy tissues. There is little consensus on how to apply this concept in clinical practice. The current review investigates the current ART issues, including patient selection, clinical/dosimetric criteria and timing for re-planning, and practical technical issues. A practical algorithm is proposed for patient management in cases where ART is required.

  8. An art therapy intervention for cancer patients in the ambulant aftercare - results from a non-randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, K; Richter, R; Buttstädt, M; Brähler, E; Singer, S

    2013-05-01

    Art therapy in psycho-oncology is gaining increasing importance, but systematic evaluations of its effects are rare. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of an art therapy intervention for cancer patients in ambulant aftercare on psychological distress and coping. The intervention consisted of 22 sessions. At three points of measurement (t1: before intervention, t2: following intervention, t3: 6 months after t2), participants responded to questionnaires (Freiburg Questionnaire on Coping with Illness, Perceived Adjustment to Chronic Illness Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). A group of haemato-oncological patients served as the comparison group (CG). Pre-post comparisons and analyses of variance were applied for statistical analysis. Relevant confounders were controlled. Fifty-four patients (intervention group, IG) with various cancer diagnoses completed the intervention. One hundred and twenty-nine data sets were available for the CG. Analyses of variance included group membership (IG vs. CG) and the following factors: gender, other psychosocial help and major life events. None of these variables was a predictor for changes in depression, anxiety and coping. Therefore, we could not prove intervention effects over time. Our results contradict those of preliminary studies and raise important questions. Further work on evaluating art therapy is necessary to explore which intervention concepts in which setting at which treatment stage show significant effects. Therefore, controlling for relevant confounders is needed. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Bridging psychological barriers between the child and the father after his returning from the war: Could group art therapy help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandić-Gajić, Gordana

    2016-07-01

    War veterans with chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have poorer family and parenting functioning, but little research has focused on these impairments. This paper presented how the series of drawings and the group art therapy process enhanced bridging the psychological barriers of a 33-year-old male PTSD war veteran to engagement with the child. After two years of deployment he returned home and suffered mostly from PTSD numbness and avoidance symptoms. The veteran had the family readjustment difficulties and felt guilty for being detached from his 3-year-old son. He under-went integrative treatment in the Day Unit Program. The drawings series were made by free associations. Clinical observations and group discussions were recorded in the group art therapy protocols. The presented patient got gratifications and support from the group members for his illustration of popular cartoon heroes, and decided to draw Mickey Mouse at home. On the next session he shared his satisfaction for bridging the gap between him and his son, having done the same drawings with his son at home. Beck's depression inventory (BDI) was used for self-rating of depression and a reduction of BDI score from 18 to 6 during the treatment course was recorded. Series of drawings illustrated shift from war related past toward current family life of the war veteran. Group art therapy gave him gratification and support with hope and a sense of belonging, thus facilitated his parenting readjustment.

  10. A non-randomised trial of an art therapy intervention for patients with haematological malignancies to support post-traumatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susanne; Götze, Heide; Buttstädt, Marianne; Ziegler, Corinna; Richter, Robert; Brown, Anna; Niederwieser, Dietger; Dorst, Jana; Jäkel, Nadja; Geue, Kristina

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of art therapy on post-traumatic growth in patients with haematological malignancies in a non-randomised trial (n = 36, intervention group; n = 129, control group). Art therapy was administered over a period of 22 weeks in small groups. Post-traumatic growth was measured with the Stress-Related Growth Scale. After controlling for the effect of potential confounders, no difference in post-traumatic growth was observed between the intervention and control groups after 22 weeks. There was no evidence for an effect of weekly group sessions with art therapy on post-traumatic growth in patients with haematological malignancies.

  11. Producing access for the elderly to territories of culture: an experience of occupational therapy in an art museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tereza Costa Galvanese

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available From 1996 to 2009, the Laboratory for Studies and Research in Art, Body and Occupational Therapy established a cooperation with the Museum of Contemporary Art of USP (MAC USP, working in partnership with the Leisure and Art to the Elderly Program of the Education and Technical-Scientific Division of MAC USP. The program offers an introduction in contemporary artistic practice to the elderly. This paper presents the interdisciplinary experience developed in this partnership in 2006. The method adopted in the program is referenced in the Triangular Approach to Teaching Art. Therefore, the appreciation of works of art and the contextualization of selected artists formed the basis on which participants developed their own poetics. The preparatory work was developed in group dynamics, including activities of body awareness and conversation circles coordinated by occupational therapists and students. They also accompanied the participants in their demands related to the challenges of constructing access to socio-cultural territories. The relevance of this living process was evident in the topics proposed by participants in conversations, or arisen during the body work. The aesthetic quality of the participants’ production resulted in personal and collective satisfaction and provoked admiration of the public who visited the workshop and exhibition, organized from this production.

  12. Late Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Initiation Is Associated with Long-Term Persistence of Systemic Inflammation and Metabolic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghislain, Mathilde; Bastard, Jean-Philippe; Meyer, Laurence; Capeau, Jacqueline; Fellahi, Soraya; Gérard, Laurence; May, Thierry; Simon, Anne; Vigouroux, Corinne; Goujard, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    HIV-induced immunodeficiency is associated with metabolic abnormalities and systemic inflammation. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on restoration of insulin sensitivity, markers of immune activation and inflammation. Immunological, metabolic and inflammatory status was assessed at antiretroviral therapy initiation and three years later in 208 patients from the ANRS-COPANA cohort. Patients were compared according to their pre-ART CD4+ cell count (group 1: ≤ 200/mm3, n = 66 vs. group 2: > 200/mm3, n = 142). Median CD4+ cell count increased in both groups after 3 years of successful ART but remained significantly lower in group 1 than in group 2 (404 vs 572 cells/mm3). Triglyceride and insulin levels were higher or tended to be higher in group 1 than in group 2 at ART initiation (median: 1.32 vs 0.97 mmol/l, p = 0.04 and 7.6 vs 6.8 IU, p = 0.09, respectively) and remained higher after three years of ART (1.42 vs 1.16 mmol/L, p = 0.0009 and 8.9 vs 7.2 IU, p = 0.01). After adjustment for individual characteristics and antiretroviral therapy regimens (protease inhibitor (PI), zidovudine), insulin levels remained significantly higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count. Baseline IL-6, sCD14 and sTNFR2 levels were higher in group 1 than in group 2. Most biomarkers of immune activation/inflammation declined during ART, but IL-6 and hsCRP levels remained higher in patients with low baseline CD4+ cell count than in the other patients (median are respectively 1.4 vs 1.1 pg/ml, p = 0.03 and 2.1 vs 1.3 mg/ml, p = 0.07). After three years of successful ART, low pretreatment CD4+ T cell count remained associated with elevated insulin, triglyceride, IL-6 and hsCRP levels. These persistent metabolic and inflammatory abnormalities could contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular and metabolic disease.

  13. Sociopolitical Oppression, Trauma, and Healing: Moving toward a Social Justice Art Therapy Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Owen Paul

    2017-01-01

    Art therapists hold a unique position to facilitate healing during a time of intense sociopolitical trauma. The current U.S. political climate is causing harm to marginalized groups, which necessitates an intentional exploration of how art therapists hold and wield power and privilege and how this can affect client outcomes. In this article, I…

  14. Talking to neuro-baby; Onsei de Ningen to komyunikeshon dekiru robotikusu ato:nyuro beibi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosa, N. [Musashino Art Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Formative

    1995-04-10

    Neuro-baby is an electronic living being having a face of a human baby and can communicate with the human being with a voice. Irrespective to human, one can talk with neuro-baby by switching on the button whenever you like to talk. If one does not like to talk with the baby you can make the switch off. It is a digital living being that can die anytime and can back to life always. The artistic concept of neuro-baby, interactive function, design method of the nature of neuro-baby and study of the relation of the voice and feelings are described. Again, network neuro-baby, neuro-baby that responses to anybody beyond the language barrier developed by joint collaboration with Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., is introduced. Birth of such kind of neuro-baby is a media art with a system itself as a artistic work, and in future it may expand to the development of common language which can be understood by the people of the world. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The electrophysiology of neuroHIV: A systematic review of EEG and MEG studies in people with HIV infection since the advent of highly-active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cruz, Ana Lucia; Fellows, Lesley K

    2017-06-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) has an impact on the brain, even when the infection is well-controlled with modern highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). While dementia is rare in those on HAART, milder cognitive impairment is common. The causes, patterns, and evolution of brain dysfunction in people living with HIV remain uncertain. We evaluate whether electrophysiological methods provide informative measures of brain dysfunction in this population. A systematic literature search identified studies that used EEG or MEG to evaluate persons living with HIV published between 1996 (when HAART became available) and 2016. Twenty-eight studies were identified. Most involved small samples, and all but four were cross-sectional. Reduced amplitude of Event Related Potentials and decreased power in the alpha band at rest were the most frequent differences between people with and without HIV infection. Of the 16 studies that also assessed cognitive ability, 13 found a significant relationship between cognition and electrophysiological changes in the HIV+ groups. Five of those studies also reported a significant relationship with current immunosuppression, suggesting a direct effect of HIV on the brain. There were few longitudinal studies; whether these electrophysiological changes progress over time, or respond to treatment, remains unclear. EEG and MEG can provide useful information about brain dysfunction in people with HIV infection, but more consistent assessments of both cognition and EEG patterns, as well as longitudinal studies with larger, better characterized samples are needed. This is the first systematic review of electrophysiological findings in HIV since the availability of HAART. EEG and MEG measures are sensitive to brain dysfunction in this population, and could complement other approaches in improving the assessment, understanding and treatment of neurocognitive disorders in HIV. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical

  16. Using Routine Data for Quality Assessment in NeuroNet Telestroke Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theiss, Stephan; Günzel, Franziska; Storm, Anna

    2013-01-01

    : Routine clinical data from the HELIOS hospital information system were compared before and after implementation of the NeuroNet concept, including neurologic acute stroke teleconsultations, standard operating procedures, and peer review quality management in 3 hospital cohorts: 5 comprehensive stroke...... for thrombolytic therapy in comprehensive stroke centers compared to NeuroNet hospitals was reduced from 3.7 to 1.3 between 2006 and 2009. Comprehensive stroke care coding according to German Diagnosis Related Groups definitions increased by 45% in NeuroNet (P ...: Routine clinical data on in-hospital mortality, the rate of thrombolytic therapy, and comprehensive stroke care coding reflect different aspects of acute stroke care improvement related to the implementation of the telemedical NeuroNet concept and unified quality management (standard operating procedure...

  17. A histomorphometric study on the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) combined with a high-calorie diet (HCD) on aortic perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, S; Strijdom, H; Genis, A; Everson, F; Van Wijk, R; Kotzé, S H

    2017-06-01

    Perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT), surrounding arteries is metabolically active. Obesity and antiretroviral therapy (ART) may cause pathophysiological conditions in the aortic wall and surrounding PVAT. The aim of the study was to determine the histological effects on the aortic wall, aortic PVAT adipocyte morphology and leptin staining intensity in obese rats treated with ART. Wistar rats (N=36) were divided into four groups; a lean control (C/ART-), ART control (C/ART+), high-calorie diet (HCD) untreated (HCD/ART-) and HCD and ART experimental (HCD/ART+). The aorta and surrounding PVAT were stained with haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and anti-leptin antibodies for immunohistochemistry (IHC). The C/ART+ group had a thinner tunica media compared to the HCD/ART- group. The tunica adventitia was thicker in the ART groups (C/ART+ and HCD/ART+) compared to the lean control group. White adipocytes in the HCD/ART- group was larger in size compared to the other three groups. The high-calorie diet groups (HCD/ART- and HCD/ART+) had increased adipocyte sizes, for both brown and differentiating adipocytes, compared to the control groups (C/ART- and C/ART+). The unilocular and differentiating adipocytes in the C/ART+ group showed intense leptin staining. Unilocular and differentiating adipocytes in the HCD/ART- and HCD/ART+ groups showed weak to no leptin staining intensity. The present study indicated that ART and a HCD, separately and combined, altered both the tunica media and adventitia of the aortic wall, whereas the HCD alone caused adipocytes to increase in size. The leptin staining intensity suggested that ART alone may lead to increased leptin expression, whereas ART combined with a HCD may cause leptin deficiency. Changes seen with ART in a rat model suggest that aortic wall thickness and PVAT adipocyte morphology alterations should be considered by clinicians in obese individuals receiving ART. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuro-ophthalmology as a career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arielle Spitze

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay was written to discuss the reasoning behind the personal decisions made by 2 current neuro-ophthalmology fellows to pursue neuro-ophthalmology as a career. It is meant to enlighten the reader about what role neuro-ophthalmologists play in clinical practice, what makes neuro-ophthalmology unique to all other sub-specialties, and how this contributes to making neuro-ophthalmology not only one of the most medically interesting, yet rewarding sub-specialties in ophthalmology.

  19. The Meaning of Poetry Therapy as Art and Science: Its Essence, Religious Quality, and Spiritual Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Hirsch Lazaar

    1997-01-01

    Examines poetry therapy as a healing force for the individual. Discusses poetry therapy as a conduit to draw out inner emotions and feelings of spirit with an emphasis on spiritual and religious values. Argues that personal growth and development of a values system can be enhanced through poetry therapy. (SR)

  20. Comparing the PPAT Drawings of Boys with AD/HD and Age-Matched Controls Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munley, Maripat

    2002-01-01

    Explores whether children with AD/HD respond differently to a specific art directive. Using the Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale to evaluate the drawings, results indicate three elements that would most accurately predict the artists into the AD/HD group: color prominence, details of objects and environments, and line quality. (Contains 29…

  1. FROM THE PRACTICE OF ART THERAPY IN THE DAILY HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTHS WITH ABNORMAL DEVELOP-MENT IN BLAGOEVGRAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darina PEEVA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of art therapy in everyday practice with handicap children, especially during the time dedicated to practical art, represents the basic of this report. By that most important are hand made activity, drawing, and music, and their positive influence on children emotional life.

  2. Use of semiconductor diodes for dosimetry TomoTherapy Hi-Art unit; Utilizacion de diodos de semiconductor para la dosimetria de una unidad Tomotherapy Hi-Art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez Rodriguez, J.; Garcia Repiso, S.; Martin Rincon, C.; Ramos Pacho, J. A.; Verde Velasco, J. M.; Montes Fuentes, C.; Dena Espinel, E. de; Gomez Llorente, P. L.; Fernandez Bordes, M.

    2011-07-01

    The radiotherapy unit TIT-Art TomoTherapy allows the realization of intensity modulated treatments in a helical manner through design, consisting of a linear accelerator installed on a rotating gantry in combination with the longitudinal movement of the treatment table and a multi leaf collimator (MLC) binary. The acceptance tests include, among other things, the acquisition of a set of dosimetric data (profiles and PDD), for later comparison with a reference set of measures taken at the factory, called the gold standard. Being pre commissioning from the factory, the unit will be accepted provided that the measured data meet the gold standard within preset tolerances. The dosimetric equipment used in the test of acceptance is provided by the manufacturer and so far is done with water tank, camera, software electrometer and associate of Standard Imaging and marketed by TomoTherapy Inc. The objective of this study is to compare the measures obtained with a semiconductor diode with the gold standard. (Author)

  3. Industry progress report on neuro-oncology: a biotech update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Jessica S; Banu, Matei A; Ray, Ashley; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John A

    2013-04-01

    With steadily rising revenue and large numbers of clinical trials utilizing novel treatment strategies, the field of neuro-oncology is at the core of the growing cancer therapy industry. In June 2012, the Weill Cornell Brain and Tumor Center hosted the first Brain Tumor Biotech Summit as a forum for fostering and encouraging collaboration between researches and investors to accelerate novel treatments for brain cancer. This event brought together neuro-oncologists, neurosurgeons, academicians, entrepreneurs, non-profits, CEOs and investors in an attempt to bring innovative treatments and concepts to the fore. Specific subjects presented at the meeting included new surgical devices and delivery techniques, targeted therapeutics, immunotherapy, and stem cell biology. The mission of the summit was to provide opportunities for researchers in neuro-oncology to directly interact with leaders from the investment community with insight into the commercial aspects of our work. Our shared goal is to shorten the time for basic science ideas to be translated into the clinical setting. The following serves as a progress report on the biotech industry in neuro-oncology, as presented at the Brain Tumor Biotech Summit.

  4. Neuro-inspired computing using resistive synaptic devices

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the recent breakthroughs in hardware implementation of neuro-inspired computing using resistive synaptic devices. The authors describe how two-terminal solid-state resistive memories can emulate synaptic weights in a neural network. Readers will benefit from state-of-the-art summaries of resistive synaptic devices, from the individual cell characteristics to the large-scale array integration. This book also discusses peripheral neuron circuits design challenges and design strategies. Finally, the authors describe the impact of device non-ideal properties (e.g. noise, variation, yield) and their impact on the learning performance at the system-level, using a device-algorithm co-design methodology. • Provides single-source reference to recent breakthroughs in resistive synaptic devices, not only at individual cell-level, but also at integrated array-level; • Includes detailed discussion of the peripheral circuits and array architecture design of the neuro-crossbar system; • Focuses on...

  5. e-Therapy to reduce emotional distress in women undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART): a feasibility randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Angelique J C M; Nelen, Willianne L D M; IntHout, Joanna; Kremer, Jan A M; Verhaak, Christianne M

    2016-05-01

    Is it feasible to evaluate a personalized e-therapy program (Internet based) for women during fertility treatment aimed to reduce the chance of having clinically relevant symptoms of anxiety and/or depression after unsuccessful assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment within a randomized controlled trial (RCT)? The evaluation of a personalized e-therapy program is feasible, reflected by good acceptability and integration within current guidelines, but adjustments to the e-therapy program and study design of the RCT have to be made to enhance demand, practicality and efficacy. Internet-based interventions are promising in reducing psychological distress, especially when treatment is personalized to specific risk profiles of patients. However in fertility care, the beneficial effects of personalized e-therapy on psychological distress and its implementation in daily clinical care still have to be evaluated. To evaluate the feasibility of a personalized e-therapy program, we conducted a two-arm, parallel group, single-blind feasibility randomized controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation. Feasibility was assessed in terms of demand, acceptability, practicality, implementation, integration and limited efficacy. Women were included between 1 February 2011 and 1 June 2013. Women in the control group received care as usual, whereas women in the intervention group received in addition to their usual care access to a personalized e-therapy program. Women were monitored until 3 months after the start of their first ART cycle. In a university hospital in the Netherlands women who were screened as at risk for emotional adjustment problems and intended to start their first ART cycle were invited, and of them 120 were randomized. Of these women, 48% in the intervention group were compliant to the intervention. Outcome measures associated with the feasibility to analyse this e-therapy program within an RCT were assessed. It is feasible to evaluate a personalized e-therapy

  6. Neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Daniel R; Zee, David S

    2015-12-01

    This review summarizes topical papers from the fields of neuro-ophthalmology and neuro-otology published from August 2013 to February 2015. The main findings are: (1) diagnostic criteria for pseudotumor cerebri have been updated, and the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial evaluated the efficacy of acetazolamide in patients with mild vision loss, (2) categorization of vestibular disorders through history and ocular motor examination is particularly important in the acute vestibular syndrome, where timely distinction between a central or peripheral localization is essential, (3) the newly described "sagging eye syndrome" provides a mechanical explanation for an isolated esodeviation that increases at distance in the aging population and (4) eye movement recordings better define how cerebellar dysfunction and/or sixth nerve palsy may play a role in other patients with esodeviations that increase at distance.

  7. Determinants of retention in care in an antiretroviral therapy (ART program in urban Cameroon, 2003-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Cecile Zoung-Kanyi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:Retention in long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART program remains a major challenge for effective management of HIV infected people in sub-Saharan Africa. Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (ART discontinuation raises concerns about drug resistance and could negate much of the benefit sought by ART programs. Methods:Based on existing patient records, we assessed determinants of retention in HIV care among HIV patients enrolled in an urban ART at two urban hospitals in Cameroon. Extended Cox regression procedures were used to identify significant predictors of retention in HIV care. Results:Of 455 patients, 314 (69% were women, median (IQR age and baseline CD4 cell count were respectively 36 years (30 – 43 and 110 cells/µL (39 – 177. Forty patients (9% had active tuberculosis (TB at enrollment. After a median (IQR follow-up of 18 months (10–18, 346 (75% were still in care, 8 (2% were known dead, and 101 (22% were lost to follow-up (LFU. Severe immunosuppression (CD4 cell count ≤ 50 cells/µL at baseline (aHR 2.3; 95% CI 1.4 - 3.7 and active tuberculosis upon enrollment (aHR 1.8; 95% CI 1.0 - 3.6 were independent predictors of cohort losses to follow-up within the first 6 months after HAART initiation. Conclusion:These data suggest that three-quarter of HIV patients initiated on HAART remained in care and on HAART by 18 months; however, those with compromised immunologic status at treatment initiation, and those co-infected with TB were at increased risk for being lost to follow-up within the first 6 months on treatment.

  8. [Antenatal Steroid Therapy in Threatened Premature Birth - State of the Art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulou, Dimitra; Hentschel, Roland

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the recommendations in the current literature for the induction of lung maturation therapy. In particular, special attention is focused on specific situations, such as chorioamnionitis, intrauterine growth retardation and preeclampsia, which often lead to premature birth. Additionally, some aspects of antenatal steroid therapy, despite its widespread use, still require clarification. Among them is the repetitive administration of steroid therapy. On the basis of the Cochrane analysis of 2015, advantages and disadvantages for children and pregnant women are explained. Furthermore, the data on the use of antenatal steroid therapy in multiple pregnancies remain insufficient. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. A State-of-the-Art Review: Personalization of Tinnitus Sound Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant D. Searchfield

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several established, and an increasing number of putative, therapies using sound to treat tinnitus. There appear to be few guidelines for sound therapy selection and application.Aim: To review current approaches to personalizing sound therapy for tinnitus.Methods: A “state-of-the-art” review (Grant and Booth, 2009 was undertaken to answer the question: how do current sound-based therapies for tinnitus adjust for tinnitus heterogeneity? Scopus, Google Scholar, Embase and PubMed were searched for the 10-year period 2006–2016. The search strategy used the following key words: “tinnitus” AND “sound” AND “therapy” AND “guidelines” OR “personalized” OR “customized” OR “individual” OR “questionnaire” OR “selection.” The results of the review were cataloged and organized into themes.Results: In total 165 articles were reviewed in full, 83 contained sufficient details to contribute to answering the study question. The key themes identified were hearing compensation, pitched-match therapy, maskability, reaction to sound and psychosocial factors. Although many therapies mentioned customization, few could be classified as being personalized. Several psychoacoustic and questionnaire-based methods for assisting treatment selection were identified.Conclusions: Assessment methods are available to assist clinicians to personalize sound-therapy and empower patients to be active in therapy decision-making. Most current therapies are modified using only one characteristic of the individual and/or their tinnitus.

  10. A State-of-the-Art Review: Personalization of Tinnitus Sound Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searchfield, Grant D.; Durai, Mithila; Linford, Tania

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are several established, and an increasing number of putative, therapies using sound to treat tinnitus. There appear to be few guidelines for sound therapy selection and application. Aim: To review current approaches to personalizing sound therapy for tinnitus. Methods: A “state-of-the-art” review (Grant and Booth, 2009) was undertaken to answer the question: how do current sound-based therapies for tinnitus adjust for tinnitus heterogeneity? Scopus, Google Scholar, Embase and PubMed were searched for the 10-year period 2006–2016. The search strategy used the following key words: “tinnitus” AND “sound” AND “therapy” AND “guidelines” OR “personalized” OR “customized” OR “individual” OR “questionnaire” OR “selection.” The results of the review were cataloged and organized into themes. Results: In total 165 articles were reviewed in full, 83 contained sufficient details to contribute to answering the study question. The key themes identified were hearing compensation, pitched-match therapy, maskability, reaction to sound and psychosocial factors. Although many therapies mentioned customization, few could be classified as being personalized. Several psychoacoustic and questionnaire-based methods for assisting treatment selection were identified. Conclusions: Assessment methods are available to assist clinicians to personalize sound-therapy and empower patients to be active in therapy decision-making. Most current therapies are modified using only one characteristic of the individual and/or their tinnitus. PMID:28970812

  11. Do cancer patients with high levels of distress benefit more than less distressed patients from outpatient art therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Rieckhof, Sophia; Buttstaedt, Marianne; Singer, Susanne

    2017-10-01

    Several studies have evaluated the effectiveness of art therapy for cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the effects of outpatient art therapy on the quality of life (QoL) of highly vs. less distressed cancer patients. Participants completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 to measure QoL and the HADS to measure distress level before the intervention (t1), after completing the intervention (t2), and 6-months after t2 (t3). We performed analyses of covariance with repeated measures to test for group differences (highly vs. less distressed). We determined clinically relevant change scores and effect sizes in QoL domains (t1-t2; t1-t3) in patients with low vs. high levels of distress. 53 patient's participated at all three measuring points. Less (N = 22) vs. highly distressed patients (N = 31) differed at baseline and follow-up in their global QoL (mean t1:64.0 > 44.6; t2:65.5 > 55.6; t3:66.0 > 51.6; p = 0.01), emotional functioning (t1:65.2 > 37.4; t2:69.3 > 44.6; t3:57.8 > 48.5; p = 0.01), social functioning (t1:65.2 > 41.9; t2:77.3 > 52.7; t3:73.5 > 54.3; p = 0.01), cognitive functioning (t1:76.5 > 57.5; t2:74.4 > 62.4; t3:77.3 > 62.9; p = 0.02). There was no evidence of changes in physical functioning, role functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. Interactions between distress, QoL, and time were not found. Effect sizes for clinical changes in QoL were medium regarding role functioning (Diff t1-t3  = -14.4), fatigue (Diff t1-t3  = -12.6) in the total group as well as in highly and less distressed patients. No evidence of outpatient art therapy having an effect on QoL in cancer patients over time was found, in patients with either high or low levels of distress at baseline. Consequently, it remains unclear which patients benefit the most from art therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of the Impact of Art Therapy Methodology Applied to the Elderly Individuals with Dementia on Cognitive State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serap Bulduk

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The average age of the participants is 73.0±7.70. The mean score of the elderly from the SMMT before art therapy implementation is 21, while this figure is 20 three months after the implementation. These scores are in the reference interval of slight dementia For the SMMT and no significant change was observed following the implementation. Considering the progressive feature of the disease, the fact that the SMMT scores of the elderly did not regularly in small groups of elderly individuals with dementia, it becomes a significant acquisition for their socialization. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 36-41

  13. Virtual reality exposure therapy for anxiety disorders: the state of the art

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Brahnam, S.; Jain, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    In the past 10 years virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) has become a viable alternative for exposure in vivo, the gold standard for the treatment of anxiety disorders. VRET is often regarded as a natural extension of the systematic exposure component of (cognitive) behavior therapy. The

  14. HIV-1 persistence following extremely early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) during acute HIV-1 infection: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hatano, Hiroyu; Bacon, Oliver; Hogan, Louise E; Rutishauser, Rachel; Hill, Alison; Kearney, Mary F; Anderson, Elizabeth M; Buchbinder, Susan P; Cohen, Stephanie E; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Fromentin, Remi; Hoh, Rebecca; Liu, Albert Y; McCune, Joseph M; Spindler, Jonathan; Metcalf-Pate, Kelly; Hobbs, Kristen S; Thanh, Cassandra; Gibson, Erica A; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Siliciano, Robert F; Price, Richard W; Richman, Douglas D; Chomont, Nicolas; Siliciano, Janet D; Mellors, John W; Yukl, Steven A; Blankson, Joel N; Liegler, Teri; Deeks, Steven G

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown if extremely early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) may lead to long-term ART-free HIV remission or cure. As a result, we studied 2 individuals recruited from a pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) program who started prophylactic ART an estimated 10 days (Participant A; 54-year-old male) and 12 days (Participant B; 31-year-old male) after infection with peak plasma HIV RNA of 220 copies/mL and 3,343 copies/mL, respectively. Extensive testing of blood and tissue for HIV persistence was performed, and PrEP Participant A underwent analytical treatment interruption (ATI) following 32 weeks of continuous ART. Colorectal and lymph node tissues, bone marrow, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), plasma, and very large numbers of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained longitudinally from both participants and were studied for HIV persistence in several laboratories using molecular and culture-based detection methods, including a murine viral outgrowth assay (mVOA). Both participants initiated PrEP with tenofovir/emtricitabine during very early Fiebig stage I (detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA, antibody negative) followed by 4-drug ART intensification. Following peak viral loads, both participants experienced full suppression of HIV-1 plasma viremia. Over the following 2 years, no further HIV could be detected in blood or tissue from PrEP Participant A despite extensive sampling from ileum, rectum, lymph nodes, bone marrow, CSF, circulating CD4+ T cell subsets, and plasma. No HIV was detected from tissues obtained from PrEP Participant B, but low-level HIV RNA or DNA was intermittently detected from various CD4+ T cell subsets. Over 500 million CD4+ T cells were assayed from both participants in a humanized mouse outgrowth assay. Three of 8 mice infused with CD4+ T cells from PrEP Participant B developed viremia (50 million input cells/surviving mouse), but only 1 of 10 mice infused with CD4+ T cells from PrEP Participant A (53 million input cells

  15. [Art therapy as a stimulation in the process of social adjustment of schizophrenia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszkiewicz, M

    1994-01-01

    The author presents the stimulation effect of arttherapy offered to schizophrenic patients, professional and amateurs painters--members of The Art Club of the Outpatients Clinic in Gdynia. The author shows the progress of arttherapy in the medical care not only for the psychiatric patients, but also for the chronically and terminally ill and for other people staying on long term basis in care houses, e.g. suffering from AIDS. The aim of the paper is to illustrate the positive changes in condition, familial and social status among schizophrenic patients--amateurs and professionals painters, members of "The Art Club" of the Outpatients Clinic in Gdynia. They were encouraged by therapists having the possibility of exposing their work in 9 public painting exhibition and by the collaboration with similar clubs in Poland and Belgium. One very interesting example of artist creator--whose work was exhibited at the Art Gallery in Brussels was discussed. The author observed an influence of this type of rehabilitation on club members in their private life, and stresses the very positive influence of art therapeutic stimulation on the family and social life of the chosen patients.

  16. Art Therapy Services to Support Veterans' Transition to Civilian Life: The Studio and the Gallery

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLucia, Jennifer Marie

    2016-01-01

    Beyond having knowledge of the treatment of combat-related trauma, art therapists need to understand veterans' experiences of transition from military to civilian life in order to offer effective interventions. This article reviews the literature on veteran transition and the challenges common to transition difficulty and describes two major…

  17. Role Development Applied to Art Therapy Treatment of an Artist Diagnosed with Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Victoria P.; Pletnick, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Role Development is a theory-based, individualized intervention developed for health care practitioners, including art therapists, to assist individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia to learn roles and their underlying task and interpersonal skills. The role of artist is particularly suited to this intervention. This paper describes the role…

  18. Inspired by "El Duende": One-Canvas Process Painting in Art Therapy Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Abbe

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an art-based approach to supervision that combines clinical insights with archetypal awareness arising from painting on a single canvas throughout the internship semester. Supervision is comprised of three main components: (a) spontaneous painting, (b) complex reflective processing, and (c) aesthetically focused attention to…

  19. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Christiane; Haase, Laura; Seidel, Dorothea; Bayerl, Martin; Gallinat, Jürgen; Herrmann, Uwe; Dannecker, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic episodes and justify

  20. A pilot RCT of psychodynamic group art therapy for patients in acute psychotic episodes: feasibility, impact on symptoms and mentalising capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Montag

    Full Text Available This pilot study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of an assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial of psychodynamic art therapy for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia, and to generate preliminary data on the efficacy of this intervention during acute psychotic episodes. Fifty-eight inpatients with DSM-diagnoses of schizophrenia were randomised to either 12 twice-weekly sessions of psychodynamic group art therapy plus treatment as usual or to standard treatment alone. Primary outcome criteria were positive and negative psychotic and depressive symptoms as well as global assessment of functioning. Secondary outcomes were mentalising function, estimated with the Reading the mind in the eyes test and the Levels of emotional awareness scale, self-efficacy, locus of control, quality of life and satisfaction with care. Assessments were made at baseline, at post-treatment and at 12 weeks' follow-up. At 12 weeks, 55% of patients randomised to art therapy, and 66% of patients receiving treatment as usual were examined. In the per-protocol sample, art therapy was associated with a significantly greater mean reduction of positive symptoms and improved psychosocial functioning at post-treatment and follow-up, and with a greater mean reduction of negative symptoms at follow-up compared to standard treatment. The significant reduction of positive symptoms at post-treatment was maintained in an attempted intention-to-treat analysis. There were no group differences regarding depressive symptoms. Of secondary outcome parameters, patients in the art therapy group showed a significant improvement in levels of emotional awareness, and particularly in their ability to reflect about others' emotional mental states. This is one of the first randomised controlled trials on psychodynamic group art therapy for patients with acute psychotic episodes receiving hospital treatment. Results prove the feasibility of trials on art therapy during acute psychotic

  1. Efficacy of a dual therapy based on darunavir/ritonavir and etravirine in ART-experienced patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ignacio Bernardino

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI-sparing regimens have been studied in antiretroviral therapy (ART-naïve patients but data with ART-experienced are scarce. NRTI-sparing regimens may be an option in patients with toxicities and for simplification reasons. Methods: Retrospective multicentre analysis including ART-experienced patients starting treatment with darunavir/ritonavir and etravirine (DRV/r 800 mg/100 mg QD or 600 mg/100 mg BID and ETV 400 mg QD or 200 mg BID with at least six months of follow-up. Primary endpoint was proportion of patients with VL<50 copies/mL at 48 weeks with an ITT analysis (missing or switch equals failure. Secondary endpoints were safety, CD4 count and lipid changes over 48 weeks. Results: Seventy-five patients were included of whom 44 (58.6% had HIV RNA<50 copies/mL. Baseline characteristics: median age 50 years (IQR 34–65, 72% males, 93% Caucasians, 38.6% hepatitis C, and 45.4% with CDC C stage. Median HIV duration and time on ART were 20 (IQR 7–28 and 14 years (IQR 5–21 respectively. Reasons for switching were virologic failure in 27 (36%, simplification in 25 (33.3%, toxicity in 20 (26.6% and other 3 (4.1%. Most of them received DRV/r and ETV QD. Thirty-nine patients had NNRTI resistance mutations [28 K103N (37.3%, 6 Y181I/C (8%, 3 G190A (4%] and 29 patients had ≥1 primary PI mutations. Main analysis (ITT showed that 67 (89.3% had a VL undetectable at 24 weeks (95% CI 83.1–95.5 and 57 (76% at 48 weeks (95% CI 68.4–83.6. On treatment analysis showed that 94.3% and 89% had a viral load<50 copies at 24 and 48 weeks, respectively. 11 (14.6% patients discontinued the regimen (three virologic failures, three switching to darunavir/ritonavir monotherapy, two to salvage regimen and three due to toxicity. No significant changes in CD4+ count and lipid changes were observed at 48 weeks. Conclusions: Dual therapy with Darunavir/ritonavir and etravirine is an efficacious and safety

  2. INFLUENCE OF PATIENTS EMOTIONAL DISORDERS AND THEIR POSSIBLE CORRECTION USING ART-THERAPY DURING REHABILITATION AFTER NEUROSURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sinbukhova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays neurosurgery has come to an absolutely new level. Modern techniques allow to perform complex operations on the brain, spinal cord and spine. Despite the possibilities of neurosurgery the rehabilitation questions remain significant in the postoperative period. Personality features of patients play a direct role in the manifestation of spinal cord disease, and spinal somatic diseases. Stress, previous illness and injury contribute to the formation of pain behavior habits. Experienced pain is fixed in our emotions causing fear which is fixed and reproduced in the future. Because of past events consequence expectation of the future events are formed. Not adequate fixation of negative emotions, in its turn, leads to obsessions, phobias, mania. Various studies confirm the reduction of patients anxiety using art therapy. A new component of this research is to study the use of art therapy (projective drawing technique to raise the paitients autopsychology competence level.In this analysis were examined 45 patients of spinal department (21 women and 24 men, medium age 39,22, with diagnoses: spondylolisthesis, spinal stenosis, hernia, tumors.

  3. ["About me and my disease" - the making of an individual book within an art therapy course for cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, K; Götze, H; Buttstädt, M; Kleinert, E; Singer, S

    2011-02-01

    Art therapy is increasingly gaining in importance in psychooncological care. At the university of Leipzig an art therapy intervention was developed for cancer patients in ambulant aftercare and was tested in retrospect. The aim of the course was making an individual book-object, in which the cancer could be a central topic. Before and after the intervention the participants were questioned using semi-structured interviews. Beside the qualitative analysis of the interviews the process of the course and the making of the book were demonstrated using the example of a breast cancer patient. The participants reported various effects of the intervention. In all, 17 of 23 participants have created her own book. More than 75 % of the books created pick out their own cancer disease as a central theme. The participants deal with the subject in different ways. All participants placed themselves at the center and the majority created the book for themselves. The results show that the making of an individual book permits a constructive analysis with the cancer disease in a protected framework and can have a supportive effect on the participants in dealing with their disease. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The Effectiveness of Mindfulness Based Art Therapy on Depression, Anxiety, Stress and Quality of Life Among Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Habibi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this research was to study the effect of mindfulness-based art therapy (MBAT, as a new group intervention in recent psychotherapy, inreducing depression, anxiety, stress and improving the quality of life among postmenopausal women. Methods & Materials: Using semi-experimental pre-test post-test with control group design, the number of 17 postmenopausal women, between 47 to 60 years old, were selected using voluntary sampling method, and short version of the depression, anxiety, stress scales, and world health organization quality of life questionnaire were administrated in two experimental (n=9 and control groups (n=8. The experimental group attended in ten sessions MBAT protocol. One month after the intervention, both groups were assessed again using the same tools. Data were evaluated by MANCOVA. Results: Implementation of the MBAT in experimental group decreases depression, and stress. It also increases the quality of life, but has not significant effects on the anxiety. Conclusion: The MBAT, as a new intervention method which combines art therapy and psychotherapy, seems to decrease depression, stress, and improve quality of life in postmenopausal women. So, using MBAT is recommended in large scale in the population of postmenopausal women.

  5. Art therapy may be benefitial for reducing stress--related behaviours in people with dementia--case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimica, Ninoslav; Kalinić, Dubravka

    2011-03-01

    Communication with person with dementia (PWD) is becoming worse and worse during the course of illness, and at the end may be totally lost. Non-pharmacological interventions may be beneficial in increasing the behavioural disturbances which appears frequently during the progression of dementia, and combination of non-pharmacological techniques and drugs is usually more efficacy than psychopharmacs alone. Mr. Zvonko, the PWD diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease of moderate stage, is presented in this case report. Although Mr. Zvonko was treated with antidementia drugs, the behavioural disturbances were present. The introduction of low doses of conventional antipsychotic was accompanied with extrapiramidal side-effects, and atypical antipsychotics were not used due to the FDA warning and non-willingness of caregiver and family to take that risk. After his individual and family status was evaluated, he was advised to attend the daily care centre and to start with art therapy. Despite he was never drawing pictures before developing AD, everybody, including his wife who is also a caregiver, was surprised with his talent and creativity. While drawing the pictures he was calm and satisfied and his behaviour in the daily care centre, but also at home, became much more adequate. There was no need to add psychopharmacs for behavioural disturbances. In this case the art therapy was shown to be an excellent add-on non-pharmacological intervention, beneficial for reducing stress-related behaviours in PWD taking antidementia drugs.

  6. Does gender or mode of HIV acquisition affect virological response to modern antiretroviral therapy (ART)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, P; Goodman, A L; Smith, C J; Marshall, N; O'Connor, J L; Lampe, F C; Johnson, M A

    2016-01-01

    Previous UK studies have reported disparities in HIV treatment outcomes for women. We investigated whether these differences persist in the modern antiretroviral treatment (ART) era. A single-centre cohort analysis was carried out. We included in the study all previously ART-naïve individuals at our clinic starting triple ART from 1 January 2006 onwards with at least one follow-up viral load (VL). Time to viral suppression (VS; first viral load  200 copies/mL more than 6 months post-ART) and treatment modification were estimated using standard survival methods. Of 1086 individuals, 563 (52%) were men whose risk for HIV acquisition was sex with other men (MSM), 207 (19%) were men whose risk for HIV acquisition was sex with women (MSW) and 316 (29%) were women. Median pre-ART CD4 count and time since HIV diagnosis in these groups were 298, 215 and 219 cells/μL, and 2.3, 0.3 and 0.3 years, respectively. Time to VS was comparable between groups, but women [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 2.32; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28-4.22] and MSW (aHR 3.28; 95% CI 1.91-5.64) were at considerably higher risk of VF than MSM. Treatment switches and complete discontinuation were also more common among MSW [aHR 1.38 (95% CI 1.04-1.81) and aHR 1.73 (95% CI 0.97-3.16), respectively] and women [aHR 1.87 (95% CI 1.43-2.46) and aHR 3.20 (95% CI 2.03-5.03), respectively] than MSM. Although response rates were good in all groups, poorer virological outcomes for women and MSW have persisted into the modern ART era. Factors that might influence the differences include socioeconomic status and mental health disorders. Further interventions to ensure excellent response rates in women and MSW are required. © 2015 British HIV Association.

  7. Fight like a ferret: a novel approach of using art therapy to reduce anxiety in stroke patients undergoing hospital rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khalid; Gammidge, Tony; Waller, Diane

    2014-06-01

    The holistic aspect of stroke rehabilitation to include psychological well-being is currently neglected, with more emphasis placed on physical recovery despite anxiety and depression being common poststroke. From the limited amount of current literature, it seems that creative strategies such as art therapy (AT) can be beneficial in reducing isolation and anxiety among stroke patients. Stroke patients (able to consent) in a hospital rehabilitation unit were invited to participate in two weekly AT sessions for 6 weeks, facilitated by an art psychotherapist using paints, crayons, clay, a camera and an iPad. Hospital anxiety and depression scales (HAD) and therapy outcome measures (TOM) were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Six male patients were recruited, average age 69 years (38-85). Group discussions allowed patients to express openly feelings of frustration as well as hope for physical and emotional recovery: 'fight like a ferret', an expression used by a group member. The group produced several art objects and photographic images that were collated using stop-frame animation to produce a 10 min film. Median HAD score for the group was eight points upon entering the study and six points on finishing the study. There is little attention to the emotional needs of stroke patients in rehabilitation. Properly designed research studies exploring the role of AT in addressing anxiety and depression poststroke are needed. Our study showed that AT was a feasible intervention that helped patients explore the sequel of stroke in an open supportive environment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. [Music therapy and "brain music": state of the art, problems and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Recent literature on the problem of interaction between music and the brain is reviewed and summarized. Mechanisms and effects of two most popular music therapy applications are picked out, including music listening and music making. Special attention is paid to relatively new line of investigations that is called "music of the brain" and deals with transformation of bioelectric processes of human organism into music. Unresolved questions of music therapy are identified and some promising lines of future investigations are delineated.

  9. Neuro-Sweet Disease Causing Orbital Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taravati, Parisa

    2015-02-01

    Neuro-Sweet disease is a rare condition causing encephalitis or meningitis in addition to the erythematous skin plaques of Sweet syndrome. Neuro-Sweet disease has been associated with several ocular manifestations, including ocular movement disorders, episcleritis, conjunctivitis, uveitis, and optic disc oedema. The author reports a patient with orbital inflammation, cranial neuropathies, and a skin rash in the setting of myelodysplastic syndrome. Biopsy of her skin lesion confirmed the diagnosis of neuro-Sweet disease. To the author's knowledge, this is the first reported case of neuro-Sweet disease causing orbital inflammation. Her ocular inflammation resolved with the use of systemic corticosteroid treatment.

  10. [State of the art in fluid and volume therapy : A user-friendly staged concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, M; Hulde, N; Kammerer, T; Meidert, A S; Hofmann-Kiefer, K

    2017-03-01

    Adequate fluid therapy is highly important for the perioperative outcome of our patients. Both, hypovolemia and hypervolemia can lead to an increase in perioperative complications and can impair the outcome. Therefore, perioperative infusion therapy should be target-oriented. The main target is to maintain the patient's preoperative normovolemia by using a sophisticated, rational infusion strategy.Perioperative fluid losses should be discriminated from volume losses (surgical blood loss or interstitial volume losses containing protein). Fluid losses as urine or perspiratio insensibilis (0.5-1.0 ml/kg/h) should be replaced by balanced crystalloids in a ratio of 1:1. Volume therapy step 1: Blood loss up to a maximum value of 20% of the patient's blood volume should be replaced by balanced crystalloids in a ratio of 4(-5):1. Volume therapy step 2: Higher blood losses should be treated by using iso-oncotic, preferential balanced colloids in a ratio of 1:1. For this purpose hydroxyethyl starch can also be used perioperatively if there is no respective contraindication, such as sepsis, burn injuries, critically ill patients, renal impairment or renal replacement therapy, and severe coagulopathy. Volume therapy step 3: If there is an indication for red cell concentrates or coagulation factors, a differentiated application of blood and blood products should be performed.

  11. Neuro-epistemology: A Post-modernist Analysis of the Neuro-sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    support

    Keywords: neuro-epistemology; neuro-sciences; mental health; discourse; epistemology. ABSTRACT. This paper ... of neuro-science, including the assumptive framework upon which the dominant discourse in this field is based, which ultimately ...... human language, “attack” on Piaget's sensory-motor theory, and the focus ...

  12. Trends in and correlates of CD4+ cell count at antiretroviral therapy initiation after changes in national ART guidelines in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutimura, Eugene; Addison, Diane; Anastos, Kathryn; Hoover, Donald; Dusingize, Jean Claude; Karenzie, Ben; Izimukwiye, Isabelle; Mutesa, Leo; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Nash, Denis

    2015-01-02

    Initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the advanced stages of HIV infection remains a major challenge in sub-Saharan Africa. This study was conducted to better understand barriers and enablers to timely ART initiation in Rwanda where ART coverage is high and national ART eligibility guidelines first expanded in 2007-2008. Using data on 6326 patients (≥15 years) at five Rwandan clinics, we assessed trends and correlates of CD4 cell count at ART initiation and the proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease (CD4 ART with median CD4 cell count of 211 cells/μl [interquartile range: 131-300]. Median CD4 cell counts at ART initiation increased from 183 cells/μl in 2007 to 293 cells/μl in 2011-2012, and the proportion with advanced HIV disease decreased from 66.2 to 29.4%. Factors associated with a higher odds of advanced HIV disease at ART initiation were male sex [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) = 1.7; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.3-2.1] and older age (AOR46-55+vs.ART more than 1 year after enrollment in care, those who had a gap in care of 12 or more months prior to ART initiation had higher odds of advanced HIV disease (AOR = 5.2; 95% CI: 1.2-21.1). Marked improvements in the median CD4 cell count at ART initiation and proportion initiating ART with advanced HIV disease were observed following the expansion of ART eligibility criteria in Rwanda. However, sex disparities in late treatment initiation persisted through 2011-2012, and appeared to be driven by later diagnosis and/or delayed linkage to care among men.

  13. Massage, Music, and Art Therapy in Hospice: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Aleksandra S; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Hurzeler, Rosemary; Aldridge, Melissa D

    2015-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) provides clinical benefits to hospice patients, including decreased pain and improved quality of life. Yet little is known about the extent to which U.S. hospices employ CAM therapists. To report the most recent national data regarding the inclusion of art, massage, and music therapists on hospice interdisciplinary teams and how CAM therapist staffing varies by hospice characteristics. A national cross-sectional survey of a random sample of hospices (n = 591; 84% response rate) from September 2008 to November 2009. Twenty-nine percent of hospices (169 of 591) reported employing an art, massage, or music therapist. Of those hospices, 74% employed a massage therapist, 53% a music therapist, and 22% an art therapist, and 42% expected the therapist to attend interdisciplinary staff meetings, indicating a significant role for these therapists on the patient's care team. In adjusted analyses, larger hospices compared with smaller hospices had significantly higher odds of employing a CAM therapist (adjusted odds ratio 6.38; 95% CI 3.40, 11.99) and for-profit hospices had lower odds of employing a CAM therapist compared with nonprofit hospices (adjusted odds ratio 0.52; 95% CI 0.32, 0.85). Forty-four percent of hospices in the Mountain/Pacific region reported employing a CAM therapist vs. 17% in the South Central region. Less than one-third of U.S. hospices employ art, massage, or music therapists despite the benefits these services may provide to patients and families. A higher proportion of large hospices, nonprofit hospices, and hospices in the Mountain/Pacific region employ CAM therapists, indicating differential access to these important services. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Sequential Vacc-4x and romidepsin during combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapia, G; Højen, J F; Ökvist, M

    2017-01-01

    -cell responses following Vacc-4x/rhuGM-CSF immunotherapy in relation to virological outcomes on the HIV reservoir. METHODS: This study, conducted in Aarhus, Denmark, enrolled participants (n = 20) with CD4>500 cells/mm(3) on cART. Six Vacc-4x (1.2 mg) intradermal immunizations using rhuGM-CSF (60 μg) as adjuvant...

  15. Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Supportive Art and Sport Interventions on Bam Earthquake Related Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: A Field Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Joshaghani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: "n "nThe main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of psychological therapies and art/sport supportive interventions separately,and in combination on post traumatic stress symptoms in children and compare them with a control group . "nMethods: In a field trial, we evaluated the efficacy of group behavioral therapy, art and sport supportive interventions in Bam earthquake children survivors with PTSD symptoms and compared it with a control group. Before and after interventions we evaluated the PTSD symptoms using K-SADS-PL semi-structural interview for each group and compared them using appropriate statistical methods. "nResults: The participants were 200 individuals who were randomized in four groups according to an intervention program including: Group behavioral therapy; Group behavioral therapy plus art and sport interventions; Art and sport interventions; and control group. During the interventions, 39 individuals were excluded. None of the participants had severed PTSD or other psychiatry disorders that needed pharmacological interventions. In interventional groups, the reduction of total PTSD symptoms and the symptoms of re-experience, avoidance and hyper arousal was not statistically significant. However, in the control group, the PTSD symptoms increased during the study which was statistically significant. "nConclusion: Group behavior therapy and supportive interventions (art and sport may have preventive effects on PTSD symptoms.

  16. Old Friends, Bookends: Art Educators and Art Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This viewpoint presents a reflection on a meaningful relationship that developed between a university art education department and a local art therapy studio. Such partnerships are desirable and mutually beneficial because of the significant interest many art educators have in the field of art therapy. The author, an art educator, describes the…

  17. The art of gene therapy for glioma: a review of the challenging road to the bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Alex; Ahmed, Atique; Moon, Kyung-Sub; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumour that is unvaryingly fatal in humans despite even aggressive therapeutic approaches such as surgical resection followed by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Unconventional treatment options such as gene therapy provide an intriguing option for curbing glioma related deaths. To date, gene therapy has yielded encouraging results in preclinical animal models as well as promising safety profiles in phase I clinical trials, but has failed to demonstrate significant therapeutic efficacy in phase III clinical trials. The most widely studied antiglioma gene therapy strategies are suicide gene therapy, genetic immunotherapy and oncolytic virotherapy, and we have attributed the challenging transition of these modalities into the clinic to four major roadblocks: (1) anatomical features of the central nervous system, (2) the host immune system, (3) heterogeneity and invasiveness of GBM and (4) limitations in current GBM animal models. In this review, we discuss possible ways to jump these hurdles and develop new gene therapies that may be used alone or in synergy with other modalities to provide a powerful treatment option for patients with GBM. PMID:22993449

  18. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation: the current state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolvos, Tom A

    2014-03-01

    Traditional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has revolutionized the treatment of complex wounds for nearly 20 years. A decade ago, a modification of the original system added intermittent automated instillation of topical wound irrigation solutions to traditional negative pressure wound therapy. This combined therapy, termed negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi), has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a variety of complex wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation has been shown to reduce bioburden and biofilms present in wounds helping heal clinically infected wounds. It has also been used with success to jump-start stalled wounds, in relieving wound pain and treating infected foreign bodies including infected orthopedic hardware and some types of exposed abdominal wall mesh. The system includes a foam dressing placed in the wound covered by a semi-occlusive drape. A tubing placed over a hole cut in the drape connects the foam dressing to a pump run by a computerized microprocessor that delivers negative pressure to the dressing and wound. A preset volume of instillation fluid is automatically delivered via the instillation tubing to the wound. The fluid is held in the foam to bathe the wound for a predetermined time period. Negative pressure is then re-started draining the irrigation fluid and any wound exudate into a collection canister. The entire sequence is automated and consists of three phases: (1) fluid instillation; (2) holding for a period of time in the wound, which is fully expanded since the negative pressure is off during this phase; and then (3) a cycle of continuous negative pressure. The entire sequence repeats itself automatically. Typically the dressing is changed three times a week. The variables involved in treating patients with negative pressure wound therapy with instillation included: the indicated wound types; the system settings; the choice of the irrigation solution and the duration

  19. The Neuro-Ophthalmology of Mitochondrial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, J. Alexander; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases frequently manifest neuro-ophthalmologic symptoms and signs. Because of the predilection of mitochondrial disorders to involve the optic nerves, extraocular muscles, retina, and even the retrochiasmal visual pathways, the ophthalmologist is often the first physician to be consulted. Disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction can result from abnormalities in either the mitochondrial DNA or in nuclear genes which encode mitochondrial proteins. Inheritance of these mutations will follow patterns specific to their somatic or mitochondrial genetics. Genotype-phenotype correlations are inconstant, and considerable overlap may occur among these syndromes. The diagnostic approach to the patient with suspected mitochondrial disease entails a detailed personal and family history, careful ophthalmic, neurologic, and systemic examination, directed investigations, and attention to potentially life-threatening sequelae. Although curative treatments for mitochondrial disorders are currently lacking, exciting research advances are being made, particularly in the area of gene therapy. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy, with its window of opportunity for timely intervention and its accessibility to directed therapy, offers a unique model to study future therapeutic interventions. Most patients and their relatives benefit from informed genetic counseling. PMID:20471050

  20. [Neuro-rehabilitation for neurological disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Yukihiro

    2011-11-01

    Our understanding of motor learning, neuro-plasticity and functional recovery after the occurrence of brain lesion has grown significantly. New findings in basic neuroscience provided stimuli for research in motor rehabilitation. Electrical stimulation can be applied in a variety of ways to the neurological impairment. Especially, electromyography (EMG) initiated electrical muscle stimulation improves motor dysfunction of the hemiparetic arm and hand. Triggered electrical stimulation is reported to be more effective than non-triggered electrical stimulation in facilitating upper extremity motor recovery. Power-assisted FES induces greater muscle contraction by electrical stimulation in proportion to the voluntary integrated EMG signal picked up. Daily power-assisted FES home program therapy with the novel equipment has been able to improve wrist, finger extension and shoulder flexion effectively. Combined modulation of voluntary movement, proprioceptional sensory feedback and electrical stimulation might play an important role to facilitate impaired sensory-motor integration in power-assisted FES therapy. It is recognized that increased cerebral blood flow in the sensory-motor cortex area on the injured side during power-assisted FES session compared to simple active movement or simple electrical stimulation in a multi-channels Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) study to non-invasively and dynamically measure hemoglobin levels in the brain during functional activity.

  1. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  2. CD4 + Cell Response to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ARTS) In Routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Untreated HIV/AIDS leads to severe immune depletion with opportunistic infections and other co-morbidities. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) enhances immunity by sustained HIV- viral suppression, increase in CD4+ cell count and immune restoration. HAART reduces risk of neutropaenia, ...

  3. Practicum Learnings for Counseling and Art Therapy Students: The Shared and the Particular

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lith, Theresa; Voronin, Lorelei

    2016-01-01

    Practicum experience in counseling and therapy training can be an anxiety-inducing time as students begin to apply their acquired theoretical knowledge. On-site supervisors closely monitor students' development by making use of example-based involvements to provide valuable insights and learning opportunities. This paper examines the findings from…

  4. Rediscovering the Art of Developmental Therapy: An Interview with Mary M. Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teagarden, James M.; Kaff, Marilyn S.; Zabel, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Mary Margaret Wood is best known for developing psychoeducational programs that integrate mental health and special education interventions for children with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Developmental Therapy (DT) includes comprehensive assessment of student behavior, communication, social, and cognitive development,…

  5. Neuro-ophthalmology in the Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrna, Kathern E

    2017-12-01

    This article provides a brief, clinically relevant review of neurologic disorders of the eye. A description of the neuro-ophthalmic examination is provided. Stepwise descriptions of the most common neuro-ophthalmic abnormalities are provided along with common rule outs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. What research evidence is there for the use of art therapy in the management of symptoms in adults with cancer? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michele J M; Molassiotis, Alexander; Payne, Sheila

    2011-02-01

    Common psychosocial difficulties experienced by cancer patients are fatigue, depression, anxiety, and existential and relational concerns. Art therapy is one intervention being developed to address these difficulties. The purpose of this research was to assess and synthesize the available research evidence for the use of art therapy in the management of symptoms in adults with cancer. A literature search of electronic databases, 'grey' literature, hand searching of key journals, and personal contacts was undertaken. Keywords searched were 'art therapy' and 'cancer' or 'neoplasm'. The inclusion criteria were: research studies of any design; adult cancer population; and art therapy intervention. There were no language or date restrictions. Data extraction occurred and quality appraisal was undertaken. Data were analyzed using narrative synthesis. Fourteen papers reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria. Symptoms investigated spanned emotional, physical, social and global functioning, and existential/spiritual concerns. Measures used were questionnaires, in-depth interviews, patients' artwork, therapists' narratives of sessions, and stress markers in salivary samples. No overall effect size was determined owing to heterogeneity of studies. Narrative synthesis of the studies shows art therapy is used at all stages of the cancer trajectory, most frequently by women, the most common cancer site in participants being breast. Art therapy is a psychotherapeutic approach that is being used by adults with cancer to manage a spectrum of treatment-related symptoms and facilitate the process of psychological readjustment to the loss, change, and uncertainty characteristic of cancer survivorship. Research in this area is still in its infancy. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) - Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated...... the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared...... to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined...

  8. Gaining hope and self-confidence-An interview study of women's experience of treatment by art therapy for severe fear of childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlbeck, Helén; Kvist, Linda J; Landgren, Kajsa

    2017-10-31

    Fear of childbirth is a serious problem that can have negative effects on both women and babies and to date treatment options are limited. The aim of this study was to elucidate the experience of undergoing art therapy in women with severe fear of childbirth. Nineteen women residing in Sweden, who had undergone art therapy for severe fear of childbirth, were interviewed during 2011-2013 about their experiences of the treatment. All women had received both support from a specialist team of midwives and treatment by an art therapist who was also a midwife. The women were interviewed three months after giving birth. The transcribed interviews were analysed with a phenomenological hermeneutical method. A main theme and three themes emerged from the analysis. The main theme was Gaining hope and self confidence. The three themes were; Carrying heavy baggage, Creating images as a catalyst for healing and Gaining new insights and abilities. Through the use of images and colours the women gained access to difficult emotions and the act of painting helped them visualize these emotions and acted as a catalyst for the healing process. Art therapy was well accepted by the women. Through sharing their burden of fear by creating visible images, they gained hope and self-confidence in the face of their impending childbirth. The results may contribute to knowledge about the feasibility of treating fear of childbirth by art therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. DESARROLLO DE UN SISTEMA DE NEURO-MERCADOTECNIA USANDO EL DISPOSITIVO EMOTIV-EPOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Ángela Moreno

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta los avances concebidos en la realización de un sistema de neuro-mercadotecnia. El objetivo del sistema es permitir evaluar las emociones que presentan los televidentes al observar comerciales publicitarios. Se hace uso de la interfaz cerebro-computador Emotiv-EPOC para la adquisición de las neuro-señales. Se describen los algoritmos empleados para el análisis de las pautas publicitarias. Se presentan unas pruebas experimentales donde se comparan los resultados obtenidos por métodos tradicionales con las propuestas.

  10. Herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and in neonate: status of art of epidemiology, diagnosis, therapy and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barucca Valentina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is one of the most common viral sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. The first time infection of the mother may lead to severe illness in pregnancy and may be associated with virus transmission from mother to foetus/newborn. Since the incidence of this sexually transmitted infection continues to rise and because the greatest incidence of herpes simplex virus infections occur in women of reproductive age, the risk of maternal transmission of the virus to the foetus or neonate has become a major health concern. On these purposes the Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications to define the status of art regarding the epidemiology, the diagnosis, the therapy and the prevention of HSV in pregnant women and neonate. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of genital herpes simplex virus infection in pregnancy and on the its prevention to avoid neonatal HSV infections.

  11. Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and Supportive Art and Sport Interventions on Bam Earthquake Related Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: A Field Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Narges Joshaghani; Mohammad Taghi Yasami; Mohammad Reza Mohammadi; Javad Mahmoudi-Gharaei; Fatemeh Naderi

    2009-01-01

    "n Objective: "n "nThe main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of psychological therapies and art/sport supportive interventions separately,and in combination on post traumatic stress symptoms in children and compare them with a control group . "nMethods: In a field trial, we evaluated the efficacy of group behavioral therapy, art and sport supportive interventions in Bam earthquake children survivors with PTSD symptoms and compared it with a control group. Before and afte...

  12. Genetic polymorphisms associated with fatty liver disease and fibrosis in HIV positive patients receiving combined antiretroviral therapy (cART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, Leona; Luda, Carolin; Schwarze-Zander, Carolynne; Boesecke, Christoph; Hansel, Cordula; Nischalke, Hans-Dieter; Lutz, Philipp; Mohr, Raphael; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Strassburg, Christian P; Trebicka, Jonel; Rockstroh, Jürgen Kurt; Spengler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis can occur with any antiretroviral therapy (cART). Although single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been identified to predispose to alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, their role for treatment-associated steatosis in HIV-positive patients remains unclear. We determined the frequency of PNPLA3 (rs738409), CSPG3/NCAN (rs2228603), GCKR (rs780094), PPP1R3B (rs4240624), TM6SF (rs8542926), LYPLAL1 (rs12137855) and MBOAT7 (rs626283) by RT-PCR in 117 HIV-positive patients on cART and stratified participants based on their "controlled attenuation parameter" (CAP) into probable (CAP: 215-300 dB/m) and definite (CAP >300 dB/m) hepatic steatosis. We analyzed CAP values and routine metabolic parameters according to the allele frequencies. Sixty-five (55.6%) and 13 (11.1%) patients were allocated to probable and definite steatosis. CAP values (p = 0.012) and serum triglycerides (p = 0.043) were increased in carriers of the GCKR (rs780094) A allele. Cox logistic regression identified triglycerides (p = 0.006), bilirubin (p = 0.021) and BMI (p = 0.068), but not the genetic parameters as risk factors for the occurrence of hepatic steatosis. Taken together, according to the limited sample size, this exploratory study generates the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms seem to exert minor effects on the risk for fatty liver disease in HIV-positive patients on cART. Nevertheless, SNPs may modify metabolic complications once metabolic abnormalities have developed. Hence, subsequent analysis of a larger cohort is needed.

  13. NeuroAIDS in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kevin; Liner, Jeff; Hakim, James; Sankalé, Jean-Louis; Grant, Igor; Letendre, Scott; Clifford, David; Diop, Amadou Gallo; Jaye, Assan; Kanmogne, Georgette; Njamnshi, Alfred; Langford, T Dianne; Weyessa, Tufa Gemechu; Wood, Charles; Banda, Mwanza; Hosseinipour, Mina; Sacktor, Ned; Nakasuja, Noeline; Bangirana, Paul; Paul, Robert; Joska, John; Wong, Joseph; Boivin, Michael; Holding, Penny; Kammerer, Betsy; Van Rie, Annelies; Ive, Prudence; Nath, Avindra; Lawler, Kathy; Adebamowo, Clement; Royal, Walter; Joseph, Jeymohan

    2010-05-01

    In July 2009, the Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS at the National Institute of Mental Health organized and supported the meeting "NeuroAIDS in Africa." This meeting was held in Cape Town, South Africa, and was affiliated with the 5th IAS Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention. Presentations began with an overview of the epidemiology of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the molecular epidemiology of HIV, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HANDs), and HAND treatment. These introductory talks were followed by presentations on HAND research and clinical care in Botswana, Cameroon, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Kenya, Malawi, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Uganda, and Zambia. Topics discussed included best practices for assessing neurocognitive disorders, patterns of central nervous system (CNS) involvement in the region, subtype-associated risk for HAND, pediatric HIV assessments and neurodevelopment, HIV-associated CNS opportunistic infections and immune reconstitution syndrome, the evolving changes in treatment implementation, and various opportunities and strategies for NeuroAIDS research and capacity building in the region.

  14. [Therapy of dyslipidemia in post-infarction: state of the art].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, M C; Nardi, M; Da Ros, S; Castellano, V

    2007-01-01

    Between the risks factors involved in the atherogenesis LDL-cholesterol is determinant because highly associated to cardiovascular events. The primary target for the prevention of coronary diseases is a reduction of LDL-cholesterol because that reduces the cardiovascular mortality and the total mortality. The NCEP ATP III 2004 guide-lines propose as therapeutic target for the high-risk patients the reduction of plasma levels of LDL-cholesterol under 100 mg/dl and according to new trials under 70 mg/dl. The dyslipidaemia treatments are based on two approaches, i.e., the therapeutic lifestyle change and the pharmacological therapy. The available drugs are statins, fibrates, anion exchange resins, nicotinic acid. In the acute coronary syndrome patients is desirable to start immediately a therapy with statins since the hospital phase and direct the treatment to aggressive therapy. Unfortunately, the statin doses used in the most secondary prevention trials allow to get LDL-cholesterol under 100 mg/dl in the only half high-risk patients. The innovative therapeutic approach to hypercholesterolemia today is based on a double inhibition of cholesterol synthesis and absorption combining a statin with ezetimibe.

  15. Radiotherapy combined with hormonal therapy in prostate cancer: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Milecki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Piotr Milecki1,2, Piotr Martenka1, Andrzej Antczak3, Zbigniew Kwias31Department of Radiotherapy, Greater Poland Cancer Center, Poznan, Poland; 2Department of Electroradiology, Medical University, Poznan, Poland; 3Chair of Urology, Medical University, Poznan, PolandAbstract: Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT is used routinely in combination with definitive external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in patients with high-risk clinically localized or locally advanced disease. The combined treatment (ADT–EBRT also seems to play a significant role in improving treatment results in the intermediate-risk group of prostate cancer patients. On the other hand, there is a growing body of evidence that treatment with ADT can be associated with serious and lifelong adverse events including osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and many others. Almost all ADT adverse events are time dependant and tend to increase in severity with prolongation of hormonal manipulation. Therefore, it is crucial to clearly state the optimal schedule for ADT in combination with EBRT, that maintaining the positive effect on treatment efficacy would keep the adverse events risk at reasonable level. To achieve this goal, treatment schedule may have to be highly individualized on the basis of the patient-specific potential vulnerability to adverse events. In this study, the concise and evidence-based review of current literature concerning the general rationales for combining radiotherapy and hormonal therapy, its mechanism, treatment results, and toxicity profile is presented.Keywords: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, androgen deprivation, combined treatment

  16. Mobile Phones and Psychosocial Therapies with Vulnerable People: a First State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexto, Carlos Ferrás; Rocha, Álvaro; Aguilera, Adrián

    2017-01-01

    Mobile phones are becoming a communication tool commonly used by people all over the world; and they are started to be adopted in psychosocial therapies involving vulnerable people. We are herein presenting the results of an academic literature review. We identified scientific papers published between 2006 and 2015 resorting to academic databases available on the Internet, applying a systematic selection method based on quality criteria. Secondly, we analysed contents, highlighting the scarcity of research involving vulnerable people. The available literature specialized in psychosocial therapies offers investigation results which involve mobile phones and patients in general, focusing particularly on the clinical psychology field and, to a lesser extent, on the social work field. Particularly significant are the investigation works developed in the United States. In the present paper we introduce a first “state of the art”, identifying opportunities and also the limitations surrounding the use of mobile phones in psychosocial therapies targeting the vulnerable. Issues concerning privacy and data confidentiality, and the access of vulnerable people to mobile phones and how they use them, pose significant challenges; but they offer the opportunity to reach isolated or impoverished populations, or even to facilitate access to social and healthcare services. We close this paper formulating possible orientations, hypotheses and goals to design new investigation works involving vulnerable populations. PMID:27194134

  17. Potentials of speech disorders correction in 4-6 yrs children by means of ergo and art therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Petrenko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out methodic of speech disorders correction in 4-6 yrs children by ergo and art therapy means. Material: during academic year three groups of children (n=97 were being observed: two groups - with speech disorders (control and main and one group of healthy children. Psycho-motor and cognitive functions were assessed with the help of tests for motor coordination (speed of their fulfillment, verbal thinking. Results: it was found that characteristic feature of such children is critical estimation of own speech insufficiency and conscious avoiding oral answers. By cluster analysis results increase of homogeneity in psycho-physical condition’s positive changes, cognitive functions and dance abilities resulted from dance-correction training program were shown. Conclusions: the worked out dance-correction choreographic trainings helps in the following: developing rhythm sense; strengthening of skeleton and muscles; memory, attention, thinking and imagination simulation. Acquiring of such experience will help a child to further successfully train different art-creative and sports kinds of activities; to master choreography and gymnastic as well as different musical instruments.

  18. ART THERAPY AS A STRATEGY FOR SOCIAL INCLUSION AND EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENT IN EDUCATIONAL CONTEXTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David López Ruiz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the rhythm of life of people and the constant sense of anxiety or stress produced by a society that really know, can sometimes cause a vacuum that does not always know to give a clear and comfortable response. In certain cases, it is more usual to see people defend themselves from the society around them to enjoy herself. So, life in society "tries to explain how we perceive, learn, remember, solve problems, communicate, feel and relate to other people, from birth to death, in private and in groups" (Morris & Maisto 2005: 4. Working from art and use it as a tool for self-expression through their media, manages a wide range of possibilities are for educational contexts, an open window of possibilities able to achieve greater social cohesion and progress in education.

  19. The Impact of Non-Antiretroviral Polypharmacy on the Continuity of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Among HIV Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krentz, Hartmut B; Gill, M John

    2016-01-01

    Improved survival achieved by many patients with HIV/AIDS has complicated their medical care as increasing numbers of co-morbidities leads to polypharmacy, increased pill burdens, and greater risks of drug-drug interactions potentially compromising antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the impact of non-antiretroviral polypharmacy on ART for all adults followed at the Southern Alberta Clinic, Calgary, Canada. Polypharmacy was defined as ≥5 daily medications. We compared the impact of polypharmacy on continuous (i.e., remaining on same ART for ≥6 months) vs. non-continuous (i.e., discontinuing or switching ART) ART dosing frequency, number of ART pills, number of non-ART medications, and age. Of 1190 (89.5%) patients on ART, 95% were on three-drug regimens, 63.9% on QD ART, and 62% ≥3 ART pills daily; 32.2% were experiencing polypharmacy. Polypharmacy was associated with lower CD4, AIDS, >180 months living with HIV, higher numbers of ART pills, and older age (all p ART. Polypharmacy increased the risk for non-continuous ART (36.8% vs. 30.0%; p ART increased with daily ART pill count but not increased age. Non-adherence and adverse effects accounted for the majority of non-continuous ART. We found a strong association between polypharmacy and non-continuous ART, potentially leading to effective ART being compromised. Collaborative approaches are needed to anticipate the negative impacts of polypharmacy.

  20. From Patient-Specific Mathematical Neuro-Oncology to Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eBaldock

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliomas are notoriously aggressive, malignant brain tumors that have variable response to treatment. These patients often have poor prognosis, informed primarily by histopathology. Mathematical neuro-oncology (MNO is a young and burgeoning field that leverages mathematical models to predict and quantify response to therapies. These mathematical models can form the basis of modern precision medicine approaches to tailor therapy in a patient-specific manner. Patient specific models (PSMs can be used to overcome imaging limitations, improve prognostic predictions, stratify patients and assess treatment response in silico. The information gleaned from such models can aid in the construction and efficacy of clinical trials and treatment protocols, accelerating the pace of clinical research in the war on cancer. This review focuses on the growing translation of PSM to clinical neuro-oncology. It will also provide a forward-looking view on a new era of patient-specific mathematical neuro-oncology.

  1. Religious Experience from a Neuro-Psychological View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Vakili

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The search for the basis of religious experience among neurological processes in the brain has resulted in a widespread debate within, as well as outside the academic world. The aim of this paper is to analyze to what extent a neuro-psychological theory could explain the phenomenon of  religious experience. To clarify what the neuro-psychological studies of  the present paper mean by the concept of  religious experience, the concept has been divided into three different types: The Erlebnis or RErl type, the Erfahrung or RErf type and the ideological type of religious experience or RIT type. Furthermore, the present paper is focused on the work of neuro-psychologist M. A. Persinger [1997, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1987, 1985, and 1984]. In his studies, Persinger indicates that mystical experience (RErl has its seat in the right hemisphere of the human brain, whereas (religious ideology (RIT is related to the left hemisphere. Consequently, the hemisphere in which the (religious experience is taking place seems to label the type of experience. Persinger, interested in the powerful effects of religious experience (of the RErf type on human beings, asserts that if we could understand the neuro-cognitive processes involved in experiencing religiously, such processes might be copied for clinical use in order to improve psychiatric therapy for curing depression. Thus, Persinger studied and compared people practicing religious meditation with people who did not, and also studied the results of PET scanning on the experiences of schizophrenic and epileptic patients. PET scanning measures the metabolic activity in the hemispheres, ranging it on a scale from under normal to over normal activity. This paper will account for the relevance of comparing these two apparently different studies and for the problem arising the experience of pain because, neurologically, pain, like religious experience,is said to be caused by processes in the human brain.

  2. HIV-Specific Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) -Mediating Antibodies Decline while NK Cell Function Increases during Antiretroviral Therapy (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Borggren, Marie; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Rasmussen, Line Dahlerup; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Understanding alterations in HIV-specific immune responses during antiretroviral therapy (ART), such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is important in the development of novel strategies to control HIV-1 infection. This study included 53 HIV-1 positive individuals. We evaluated the ability of effector cells and antibodies to mediate ADCC separately and in combination using the ADCC-PanToxiLux assay. The ability of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to mediate ADCC was significantly higher in individuals who had been treated with ART before seroconversion, compared to the individuals initiating ART at a low CD4+ T cell count (ART-naïve individuals. The frequency of CD16 expressing natural killer (NK) cells correlated with both the duration of ART and Granzyme B (GzB) activity. In contrast, the plasma titer of antibodies mediating ADCC declined during ART. These findings suggest improved cytotoxic function of the NK cells if initiating ART early during infection, while the levels of ADCC mediating antibodies declined during ART.

  3. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) at Different Stages of HIV-1 Disease Is Not Associated with the Proportion of Exhausted CD8+ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cell-restricted immunity is important in the control of HIV-1 infection, but continued immune activation results in CD8+ T cell dysfunction. Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and the duration of ART have been associated with immune reconstitution. Here, we evaluated whether restoration of CD8+ T cell function in HIV-1-infected individuals was dependent on early initiation of ART. HIV-specific CD107a, IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα and MIP-1β expression by CD8+ T cells and the frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 were measured by flow cytometry. The frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing the inhibitory markers PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 was lower in ART-treated individuals compared with ART-naïve individuals and similar to the frequency in HIV-uninfected controls. The expression of the three markers was similarly independent of when therapy was initiated. Individuals treated before seroconversion displayed an HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response that included all five functional markers; this was not observed in individuals treated after seroconversion or in ART-naïve individuals. In summary, ART appears to restore the total CD8+ T cell population to a less exhausted phenotype, independent of the time point of initiation. However, to preserve multifunctional, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, ART might have to be initiated before seroconversion.

  4. From 'Hard' Neuro-Tools to 'Soft' Neuro-Toys? Refocussing the Neuro-Enhancement Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenninkmeijer, Jonna; Zwart, Hub

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1990's, the debate concerning the ethical, legal and societal aspects of 'neuro-enhancement' has evolved into a massive discourse, both in the public realm and in the academic arena. This ethical debate, however, tends to repeat the same sets of arguments over and over again. Normative disagreements between transhumanists and bioconservatives on invasive or radical brain stimulators, and uncertainties regarding the use and effectivity of nootropic pharmaceuticals dominate the field. Building on the results of an extensive European project on responsible research and innovation in neuro-enhancement (NERRI), we observe and encourage that the debate is now entering a new and, as we will argue, more realistic and societally relevant stage. This new stage concerns those technologies that enter the market as ostensibly harmless contrivances that consumers may use for self-care or entertainment. We use the examples and arguments of participants in NERRI debates to describe three case studies of such purportedly innocent 'toys'. Based upon this empirical material, we argue that these 'soft' enhancement gadgets are situated somewhere in the boundary zone between the internal and the external, between the intimate and the intrusive, between the familiar and the unfamiliar, between the friendly and the scary and, in Foucauldian terms, between technologies of the self and technologies of control. Therefore, we describe their physiognomy with the help of a term borrowed from Jacques Lacan, namely as "extimate" technologies.

  5. Evidence-based Neuro Linguistic Psychotherapy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, Cătălin; Reiner, Melita; Schütz, Peter

    2015-12-01

    meta-analysis evaluating the effectiveness of NLP therapy for individuals with social/psychological problems. The overall meta-analysis found that the NLP therapy may add an overall standardized mean difference of 0.54 with a confidence interval of CI=[0.20; 0.88]. Neuro-Linguistic Psychotherapy as a psychotherapeutic modality grounded in theoretical frameworks, methodologies and interventions scientifically developed, including models developed by NLP, shows results that can hold its ground in comparison with other psychotherapeutic methods.

  6. The evolution of neuroArm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Garnette R; Wolfsberger, Stefan; Lama, Sanju; Zarei-nia, Kourosh

    2013-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging disrupts the rhythm of surgery despite providing an excellent opportunity for surgical monitoring and assessment. To allow surgery within real-time images, neuroArm, a teleoperated surgical robotic system, was conceptualized. The objective was to design and manufacture a magnetic resonance-compatible robot with a human-machine interface that could reproduce some of the sight, sound, and touch of surgery at a remote workstation. University of Calgary researchers worked with MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates engineers to produce a requirements document, preliminary design review, and critical design review, followed by the manufacture, preclinical testing, and clinical integration of neuroArm. During the preliminary design review, the scope of the neuroArm project changed to performing microsurgery outside the magnet and stereotaxy inside the bore. neuroArm was successfully manufactured and installed in an intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging operating room. neuroArm was clinically integrated into 35 cases in a graded fashion. As a result of this experience, neuroArm II is in development, and advances in technology will allow microsurgery within the bore of the magnet. neuroArm represents a successful interdisciplinary collaboration. It has positive implications for the future of robotic technology in neurosurgery in that the precision and accuracy of robots will continue to augment human capability.

  7. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Antiplatelet therapy in acute coronary syndromes: state of the art and new perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Letizia; Di Pasquale, Giuseppe; Casella, Gianni; Calabrese, Daniela; Zagnoni, Silvia; Pallotti, Maria Giovanna

    2010-12-01

    Antiplatelet therapy plays a pivotal role in the treatment of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), inducing a significant reduction of ischemic events. Aspirin treatment is associated with a substantial 50% reduction of death or myocardial infarction in patients with ACS, but it is usually combined with other antiplatelet agents in order to achieve a more profound inhibition of platelet aggregation. Ticlopidine was initially used in association with aspirin in patients treated with percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), demonstrating a dramatic reduction of the risk of stent thrombosis. Later on it has been replaced by clopidogrel, which now represents in combination with aspirin the standard treatment of patients with ACS treated either medically or invasively, with a 20% risk reduction in comparison with aspirin alone. The limitation of clopidogrel resistance, documented in about 30% of patients because of genetic factors, clinical factors, and pharmacokinetic factors (i.e., poor absorption and drug-drug interactions), has promoted the development of third generation thienopiridines. Prasugrel, which is a more potent and faster inhibitor of platelet aggregation, in comparison with clopidogrel is associated with a further 20% reduction of ischemic events with an increase of major bleedings in patients with ACS undergoing PCI. It is therefore recommended for patients with ACS at high ischemic risk and at non-high hemorrhagic risk. Ticagrelor, a reversible antagonist of P2Y12 platelet receptor, in comparison with clopidogrel is associated with a 16% reduction of ischemic events, including a significant reduction of death from vascular causes, without increasing the rate of overall major bleeding. Intravenous cangrelor, which has been compared with clopidogrel in patients with ACS undergoing PCI, yielded negative results. The use of glycoproteins IIb/IIIa inhibitors (abciximab, eptifibatide, tirofiban) is no longer recommended as upstream therapy in

  9. The Influence of Art on children´s art expression in school practice

    OpenAIRE

    VÁŇOVÁ, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Diploma Thesis ?The Influence of Art on Children´s Art Expression in School Practice? Deals with Evaluation of Possibilities Arttherapeutic Elements of Roznov Art Therapy and the Ways of Use Receptive Art Therapy in Art Lessons at Secondary School. There is Described Children´s Art Expression in the Age between 12 and 15 and Possible Impact of Art Form on Shaping Children´s Art Expression. It Evaluates the Importance of Methodical Intervention of Roznov Art Therapy Elements.

  10. Nurse-initiation and maintenance of patients on antiretroviral therapy: are nurses in primary care clinics initiating ART after attending NIMART training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David; Gerber, Amor; Mbatha, Melusi; Mutyabule, Judith; Swart, Helga

    2012-01-27

    To determine the percentage of nurses initiating new HIV-positive patients on therapy within 2 months of attending the Nurse Initiation and Maintenance of Antiretroviral Therapy(NIMART) course, and to identify possible barriers to nurse initiation. A brief telephonic interview using a structured questionnaire of a randomly selected sample (126/1736) of primary care nurses who had attended the NIMART course facilitated by the Foundation for Professional Development (FPD) between October 2010 and 31 March 2011 at primary care clinics in 7 provinces. Outcome measures were the number of nurses initiating ART within 2 months of attending the FPD-facilitated NIMART course. Of the nurses surveyed, 62% (79/126) had started initiating new adult patients on ART, but only 7% (9/126) were initiating ART in children. The main barrier to initiation was allocation to other tasks in the clinic as a result of staff shortages. Despite numerous challenges, many primary care nurses working in the 7 provinces surveyed have taken on the responsibility of sharing the task of initiating HIV-positive patients on ART. The barriers preventing more nurses initiating ART include the shortage of primary care nurses and the lack of sufficient consulting rooms. Expanding clinical mentoring and further training in clinical skills and pharmacology would assist in reaching the target of initiating a further 1.2 million HIV-positive patients on ART by 2012.

  11. Neurofeedback Therapy for Enhancing Visual Attention: State-of-the-Art and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordikhani-Seyedlar, Mehdi; Lebedev, Mikhail A; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2016-01-01

    We have witnessed a rapid development of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) linking the brain to external devices. BCIs can be utilized to treat neurological conditions and even to augment brain functions. BCIs offer a promising treatment for mental disorders, including disorders of attention. Here...... of attentional neural signals remains a fundamental challenge for the development of efficient therapies for disorders of attention....... function. Although progress has been made in the studies of neural mechanisms of attention, extraction of attention-related neural signals needed for BCI operations is a difficult problem. To attain good BCI performance, it is important to select the features of neural activity that represent attentional...... signals. BCI decoding of attention-related activity may be hindered by the presence of different neural signals. Therefore, BCI accuracy can be improved by signal processing algorithms that dissociate signals of interest from irrelevant activities. Notwithstanding recent progress, optimal processing...

  12. [State of the art of classification, diagnostics and therapy for cervicofacial hemangiomas and vascular malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, J A; Eivazi, B; Folz, B J; Dünne, A-A

    2006-12-01

    The successful treatment of vascular anomalies depends on profound knowledge of the biologic behavior of vascular lesions and their correct classification. On the base of the clinical course Mulliken and Glowacki developed a biologic classification that was accepted as official classification by the ISSVA (International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies). Based on an extended literature research, this manuscript will give an overview of different internationally accepted treatment concepts. Even if a wait-and-see strategy can be recommended in many cases of uneventful hemangiomas in infants the proliferative growth of such lesions requires an adequate treatment indication. Vascular malformations that persist lifelong require treatment in the majority of the cases, especially when clinical symptoms occur. Based on individual parameters such as the diameter, location or growth behavior, different therapeutic options as cryotherapy, corticosteroids, laser therapy, sclerotherapy, surgical intervention and/or embolisation can be performed successfully. None of those treatment concepts, however, represents the only treatment method of choice.

  13. The relationship between the level of program integrity and pre- and post-test changes of Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteder, L.M.; van Horn, J.E.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; Wissink, I.B.; Hendriks, J.

    2016-01-01

    Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient is a cognitive behavioral-based intervention for adolescents and young adults (16-24 years) with severe aggressive behavioral problems. This pilot study (N = 26) examined the level of program integrity (PI; that is, the delivery of the

  14. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine for initial ART in HIV infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatell Artigas, Josep María; Arribas López, José Ramón; Lázaro Y de Mercado, Pablo; Blasco Bravo, Antonio Javier

    2016-01-01

    The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA) proposes "preferred regimens" (PR) of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients. In 2013, the recommended regimens were all triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy of a dual therapy (DT) combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus lamivudine (3TC). Our objective is to evaluate the GESIDA PR and the DT regimen LPV/r+3TC cost/efficacy ratios. Decision tree models were built. probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48. ART regime cost: costs of ART, adverse effects, and drug resistance tests during the first 48 weeks. Cost/efficacy ratios varied between 5,817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for the DT of LPV/r+3TC and tenofovir DF/emtricitabine+raltegravir, respectively. Taking into account the official Spanish prices of ART, the most efficient regimen was DT of LPV/r+3TC, followed by the triple therapy with non-nucleoside containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. "Check, Change What You Need to Change and/or Keep What You Want": An Art Therapy Neurobiological-Based Trauma Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass-Cohen, Noah; Clyde Findlay, Joanna; Carr, Richard; Vanderlan, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    The Check ("Check, Change What You Need To Change and/or Keep What You Want") art therapy protocol is a sequence of directives for treating trauma that is grounded in neurobiological theory and designed to facilitate trauma narrative processing, autobiographical coherency, and the rebalancing of dysregulated responses to psychosocial…

  16. Clinical and Economic Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Percutaneous and Surgical Treatment of Multivessel Coronary Disease Patients : Insights From the Arterial Revascularization Therapy Study (ARTS) Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.E. Sousa (Eduardo); M.A. Costa (Marco); M. Centemero; A.S. Abizaid (Andrea); V.M.G. Legrand (Victor); R.V. Limet (Robert); G. Schuler (Gerhard); F. Unger (Felix); F.W. Mohr (Friedrich); W.K. Lindeboom (Wietze); P.G. Hugenholtz (Paul); A.G.M.R. Sousa (Amanda); B.A. van Hout (Ben); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); A.C. Abizaid (Alexandre)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Our aims were to compare coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and stenting for the treatment of diabetic patients with multivessel coronary disease enrolled in the Arterial Revascularization Therapy Study (ARTS) trial and to determine the costs of these 2 treatment

  17. Reaching the Hard to Reach: Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation of School-Based Arts Therapies with Young People with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbett, Steve

    2016-01-01

    The arts therapies are becoming more commonplace as psychotherapeutic interventions for young people with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) and associated mental health conditions in educational settings and are now used in many educational provisions. The justification for their use would seem to be largely based on the…

  18. [Actively promote the development of neuro-ophthalmology in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shi-hui; Zhao, Jia-liang

    2010-12-01

    Neuro-ophthalmology is a medical subspecialty concerned on the nervous system diseases with ocular manifestations, this could be both sensory and motor, including ocular movements, papillary responses, and the structure changes of the brain and nervous system with ocular manifestations. Although neuro-ophthalmology in China has achieved some progress, certain problems still exist, such as the professional neuro-ophthalmology team and related academic organization are still absent in China; neuro-ophthalmology knowledge has not been popularized; the new technologies for diagnosis and treatment in neuro-ophthalmology have not been absorbed and applied; the coordination and cooperation with other related disciplines are not enough. We should actively promote the development of neuro-ophthalmology in China, including organization of a professional team of neuro-ophthalmology, popularization of neuro-ophthalmology knowledge to the ophthalmologists, development of research work in neuro-ophthalmology and the collaboration with international neuro-ophthalmologists.

  19. A Systematic Review of Health System Barriers and Enablers for Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) for HIV-Infected Pregnant and Postpartum Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J.; Konopka, Sarah; Chalker, John C.; Jonas, Edna; Albertini, Jennifer; Amzel, Anouk; Fogg, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite global progress in the fight to reduce maternal mortality, HIV-related maternal deaths remain persistently high, particularly in much of Africa. Lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) appears to be the most effective way to prevent these deaths, but the rates of three key outcomes—ART initiation, retention in care, and long-term ART adherence—remain low. This systematic review synthesized evidence on health systems factors affecting these outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women living with HIV. Methods Searches were conducted for studies addressing the population of interest (HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women), the intervention of interest (ART), and the outcomes of interest (initiation, adherence, and retention). Quantitative and qualitative studies published in English since January 2008 were included. A four-stage narrative synthesis design was used to analyze findings. Review findings from 42 included studies were categorized according to five themes: 1) models of care, 2) service delivery, 3) resource constraints and governance challenges, 4) patient-health system engagement, and 5) maternal ART interventions. Results Low prioritization of maternal ART and persistent dropout along the maternal ART cascade were key findings. Service delivery barriers included poor communication and coordination among health system actors, poor clinical practices, and gaps in provider training. The few studies that assessed maternal ART interventions demonstrated the importance of multi-pronged, multi-leveled interventions. Conclusions There has been a lack of emphasis on the experiences, needs and vulnerabilities particular to HIV-infected pregnant and postpartum women. Supporting these women to successfully traverse the maternal ART cascade requires carefully designed and targeted interventions throughout the steps. Careful design of integrated service delivery models is of critical importance in this effort. Key knowledge gaps and research

  20. State of the art in the delivery of photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konan, Yvette Niamien; Gurny, Robert; Allémann, Eric

    2002-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy, one of the problems limiting the use of many photosensitizers (PS) is the difficulty in preparing pharmaceutical formulations that enable their parenteral administration. Due to their low water solubility, the hydrophobic PS cannot be simply injected intravenously. Different strategies, including polymer-PS conjugation or encapsulation of the drug in colloidal carriers such as oil-dispersions, liposomes and polymeric particles, have been investigated. Although these colloidal carriers tend to accumulate selectively in tumour tissues, they are rapidly taken up by the mononuclear phagocytic system. In order to reduce this undesirable uptake by phagocytic cells, long-circulating carriers that consist of surface modified carriers have been developed. Moreover, considerable effort has been directed towards using other types of carriers to improve tumour targeting and to minimize the side effects. One of the approaches is to entrap PS into the lipophilic core of low-density lipoproteins (LDL) without altering their biological properties. The LDL receptor pathway is an important factor in the selective accumulation of PS in tumour tissue owing to the increased number of LDL receptors on the proliferating cell surface. Specific targeting can also be achieved by binding of monoclonal antibodies or specific tumour-seeking molecules to PS or by the coating of PS loaded carriers.