WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuritic amyloid plaques

  1. Early long-term administration of the CSF1R inhibitor PLX3397 ablates microglia and reduces accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid, neuritic plaque deposition and pre-fibrillar oligomers in 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosna, Justyna; Philipp, Stephan; Albay, Ricardo; Reyes-Ruiz, Jorge Mauricio; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M; Glabe, Charles G

    2018-03-01

    Besides the two main classical features of amyloid beta aggregation and tau-containing neurofibrillary tangle deposition, neuroinflammation plays an important yet unclear role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Microglia are believed to be key mediators of neuroinflammation during AD and responsible for the regulation of brain homeostasis by balancing neurotoxicity and neuroprotective events. We have previously reported evidence that neuritic plaques are derived from dead neurons that have accumulated intraneuronal amyloid and further recruit Iba1-positive cells, which play a role in either neuronal demise or neuritic plaque maturation or both. To study the impact of microglia on neuritic plaque development, we treated two-month-old 5XFAD mice with a selective colony stimulation factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibitor, PLX3397, for a period of 3 months, resulting in a significant ablation of microglia. Directly after this treatment, we analyzed the amount of intraneuronal amyloid and neuritic plaques and performed behavioral studies including Y-maze, fear conditioning and elevated plus maze. We found that early long-term PLX3397 administration results in a dramatic reduction of both intraneuronal amyloid as well as neuritic plaque deposition. PLX3397 treated young 5XFAD mice also displayed a significant decrease of soluble fibrillar amyloid oligomers in brain lysates, a depletion of soluble pre-fibrillar oligomers in plasma and an improvement in cognitive function measured by fear conditioning tests. Our findings demonstrate that CSF1R signaling, either directly on neurons or mediated by microglia, is crucial for the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid and formation of neuritic plaques, suggesting that these two events are serially linked in a causal pathway leading to neurodegeneration and neuritic plaque formation. CSF1R inhibitors represent potential preventative or therapeutic approach that target the very earliest stages of the formation of

  2. Genetic susceptibility for Alzheimer disease neuritic plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Joshua M; Chen, Kewei; Keenan, Brendan T; Chibnik, Lori B; Fleisher, Adam; Thiyyagura, Pradeep; Roontiva, Auttawut; McCabe, Cristin; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Corneveaux, Jason J; Yu, Lei; Huentelman, Matthew J; Evans, Denis A; Schneider, Julie A; Reiman, Eric M; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2013-09-01

    While numerous genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for clinical Alzheimer disease (AD), it is important to establish whether these variants are risk factors for the underlying disease pathology, including neuritic plaques. To investigate whether AD susceptibility loci from genome-wide association studies affect neuritic plaque pathology and to additionally identify novel risk loci for this trait. Candidate analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and genome-wide association study in a joint clinicopathologic cohort, including 725 deceased subjects from the Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project (2 prospective, community-based studies), followed by targeted validation in an independent neuroimaging cohort, including 114 subjects from multiple clinical and research centers. A quantitative measure of neuritic plaque pathologic burden, based on assessments of silver-stained tissue averaged from multiple brain regions. Validation based on β-amyloid load by immunocytochemistry, and replication with fibrillar β-amyloid positron emission tomographic imaging with Pittsburgh Compound B or florbetapir. Besides the previously reported APOE and CR1 loci, we found that the ABCA7 (rs3764650; P = .02) and CD2AP (rs9349407; P = .03) AD susceptibility loci are associated with neuritic plaque burden. In addition, among the top results of our genome-wide association study, we discovered a novel variant near the amyloid precursor protein gene (APP, rs2829887) that is associated with neuritic plaques (P = 3.3 × 10-6). This polymorphism was associated with postmortem β-amyloid load as well as fibrillar β-amyloid in 2 independent cohorts of adults with normal cognition. These findings enhance understanding of AD risk factors by relating validated susceptibility alleles to increased neuritic plaque pathology and implicate common genetic variation at the APP locus in the earliest, presymptomatic stages of AD.

  3. Performance of [18F]flutemetamol amyloid imaging against the neuritic plaque component of CERAD and the current (2012) NIA-AA recommendations for the neuropathologic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloway, Stephen; Gamez, Jose E; Singh, Upinder; Sadowsky, Carl H; Villena, Teresa; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Beach, Thomas G; Duara, Ranjan; Fleisher, Adam S; Frey, Kirk A; Walker, Zuzana; Hunjan, Arvinder; Escovar, Yavir M; Agronin, Marc E; Ross, Joel; Bozoki, Andrea; Akinola, Mary; Shi, Jiong; Vandenberghe, Rik; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Sherwin, Paul F; Farrar, Gill; Smith, Adrian P L; Buckley, Christopher J; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Zanette, Michelle; Curtis, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Performance of the amyloid tracer [ 18 F]flutemetamol was evaluated against three pathology standard of truth (SoT) measures including neuritic plaques (CERAD "original" and "modified" and the amyloid component of the 2012 NIA-AA guidelines). After [ 18 F]flutemetamol imaging, 106 end-of-life patients who died underwent postmortem brain examination for amyloid plaque load. Blinded positron emission tomography scan interpretations by five independent electronically trained readers were compared with pathology measures. By SoT, sensitivity and specificity of majority image interpretations were, respectively, 91.9% and 87.5% with "original CERAD," 90.8% and 90.0% with "modified CERAD," and 85.7% and 100% with the 2012 NIA-AA criteria. The high accuracy of either CERAD criteria suggests that [ 18 F]flutemetamol predominantly reflects neuritic amyloid plaque density. However, the use of CERAD criteria as the SoT can result in some false-positive results because of the presence of diffuse plaques, which are accounted for when the positron emission tomography read is compared with the 2012 NIA-AA criteria.

  4. Visualization of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer’s disease by polarization-sensitive optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Bernhard; Woehrer, Adelheid; Ricken, Gerda; Augustin, Marco; Mitter, Christian; Pircher, Michael; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2017-03-01

    One major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is the deposition of extracellular senile plaques and vessel wall deposits composed of amyloid-beta (Aβ). In AD, degeneration of neurons is preceded by the formation of Aβ plaques, which show different morphological forms. Most of them are birefringent owing to the parallel arrangement of amyloid fibrils. Here, we present polarization sensitive optical coherence microscopy (PS-OCM) for imaging mature neuriticplaques based on their birefringent properties. Formalin-fixed, post-mortem brain samples of advanced stage AD patients were investigated. In several cortical brain regions, neuriticplaques were successfully visualized in tomographic and three-dimensional (3D) images. Cortical grey matter appeared polarization preserving, whereas neuritic plaques caused increased phase retardation. Consistent with the results from PS-OCM imaging, the 3D structure of senile Aβ plaques was computationally modelled for different illumination settings and plaque sizes. Furthermore, the birefringent properties of cortical and meningeal vessel walls in CAA were investigated in selected samples. Significantly increased birefringence was found in smaller vessels. Overall, these results provide evidence that PS-OCM is able to assess amyloidosis based on intrinsic birefringent properties.

  5. Formation and maintenance of Alzheimer’s disease β-amyloid plaques in the absence of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grathwohl, Stefan A; Kälin, Roland E; Bolmont, Tristan; Prokop, Stefan; Winkelmann, Georg; Kaeser, Stephan A; Odenthal, Jörg; Radde, Rebecca; Eldh, Therese; Gandy, Sam; Aguzzi, Adriano; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Mathews, Paul M; Wolburg, Hartwig; Heppner, Frank L; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease, microglia cluster around β-amyloid deposits, suggesting that these cells are important for amyloid plaque formation, maintenance and/or clearance. We crossed two distinct APP transgenic mouse strains with CD11b-HSVTK mice, in which nearly complete ablation of microglia was achieved for up to 4 weeks after ganciclovir application. Neither amyloid plaque formation and maintenance nor amyloid-associated neuritic dystrophy depended on the presence of microglia. PMID:19838177

  6. Amyloid plaque formation precedes dendritic spine loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Tobias; Burgold, Steffen; Dorostkar, Mario M; Fuhrmann, Martin; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Schmidt, Boris; Kretzschmar, Hans; Herms, Jochen

    2012-12-01

    Amyloid-beta plaque deposition represents a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. While numerous studies have described dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques, much less is known about the kinetics of these processes. In particular, the question as to whether synapse loss precedes or follows plaque formation remains unanswered. To address this question, and to learn more about the underlying kinetics, we simultaneously imaged amyloid plaque deposition and dendritic spine loss by applying two-photon in vivo microscopy through a cranial window in double transgenic APPPS1 mice. As a result, we first observed that the rate of dendritic spine loss in proximity to plaques is the same in both young and aged animals. However, plaque size only increased significantly in the young cohort, indicating that spine loss persists even many months after initial plaque appearance. Tracking the fate of individual spines revealed that net spine loss is caused by increased spine elimination, with the rate of spine formation remaining constant. Imaging of dendritic spines before and during plaque formation demonstrated that spine loss around plaques commences at least 4 weeks after initial plaque formation. In conclusion, spine loss occurs, shortly but with a significant time delay, after the birth of new plaques, and persists in the vicinity of amyloid plaques over many months. These findings hence give further hope to the possibility that there is a therapeutic window between initial amyloid plaque deposition and the onset of structural damage at spines.

  7. Fibrillar amyloid plaque formation precedes microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian K E; Keppler, Kevin; Steinbach, Sonja; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Herms, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), hallmark β-amyloid deposits are characterized by the presence of activated microglia around them. Despite an extensive characterization of the relation of amyloid plaques with microglia, little is known about the initiation of this interaction. In this study, the detailed investigation of very small plaques in brain slices in AD transgenic mice of the line APP-PS1(dE9) revealed different levels of microglia recruitment. Analysing plaques with a diameter of up to 10 μm we find that only the half are associated with clear morphologically activated microglia. Utilizing in vivo imaging of new appearing amyloid plaques in double-transgenic APP-PS1(dE9)xCX3CR1+/- mice further characterized the dynamic of morphological microglia activation. We observed no correlation of morphological microglia activation and plaque volume or plaque lifetime. Taken together, our results demonstrate a very prominent variation in size as well as in lifetime of new plaques relative to the state of microglia reaction. These observations might question the existing view that amyloid deposits by themselves are sufficient to attract and activate microglia in vivo.

  8. Existing plaques and neuritic abnormalities in APP:PS1 mice are not affected by administration of the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411575

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golde Todd E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The γ-secretase complex is a major therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have shown that treatment of young APP mice with specific inhibitors of γ-secretase prevented formation of new plaques. It has not yet been shown directly whether existing plaques would be affected by γ-secretase inhibitor treatment. Similarly, alterations in neuronal morphology in the immediate vicinity of plaques represent a plaque-specific neurotoxic effect. Reversal of these alterations is an important endpoint of successful therapy whether or not a treatment affects plaque size. In the present study we used longitudinal imaging in vivo with multiphoton microscopy to study the effects of the orally active γ-secretase inhibitor LY-411575 in 10–11 month old APP:PS1 mice with established amyloid pathology and neuritic abnormalities. Neurons expressed YFP allowing fluorescent detection of morphology whereas plaques were labelled with methoxy-XO4. The same identified neurites and plaques were followed in weekly imaging sessions in living mice treated daily (5 mg/kg for 3 weeks with the compound. Although LY-411575 reduced Aβ levels in plasma and brain, it did not have an effect on the size of existing plaques. There was also no effect on the abnormal neuritic curvature near plaques, or the dystrophies in very close proximity to senile plaques. Our results suggest that therapeutics aimed at inhibition of Aβ generation are less effective for reversal of existing plaques than for prevention of new plaque formation and have no effect on the plaque-mediated neuritic abnormalities, at least under these conditions where Aβ production is suppressed but not completely blocked. Therefore, a combination therapy of Aβ suppression with agents that increase clearance of amyloid and/or prevent neurotoxicity might be needed for a more effective treatment in patients with pre-existing pathology.

  9. Presence of Striatal Amyloid Plaques in Parkinson's Disease Dementia Predicts Concomitant Alzheimer's Disease: Usefulness for Amyloid Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Brittany N; Serrano, Geidy E; Sue, Lucia I; Walker, Douglas G; Adler, Charles H; Shill, Holly A; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Caviness, John N; Hidalgo, Jose; Saxon-Labelle, Megan; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Mariner, Monica; Henry-Watson, Jonette; Beach, Thomas G

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer's disease. Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically-confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N =40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III-VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p<0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD.

  10. Murine versus human apolipoprotein E4: differential facilitation of and co-localization in cerebral amyloid angiopathy and amyloid plaques in APP transgenic mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J.; Jiang, Hong; Lefton, Katheryn B; Robinson, Grace O.; Vassar, Robert; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Holtzman, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Amyloid ? (A?) accumulates in the extracellular space as diffuse and neuritic plaques in Alzheimer?s disease (AD). A? also deposits on the walls of arterioles as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in most cases of AD and sometimes independently of AD. Apolipoprotein E (apoE) ?4 is associated with increases in both A? plaques and CAA in humans. Studies in mouse models that develop A? deposition have shown that murine apoE and human apoE4 have different abilities to facilitate plaqu...

  11. Regional brain hypometabolism is unrelated to regional amyloid plaque burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Andre; Ng, Bernard; Landau, Susan M; Jagust, William J; Greicius, Michael D

    2015-12-01

    In its original form, the amyloid cascade hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease holds that fibrillar deposits of amyloid are an early, driving force in pathological events leading ultimately to neuronal death. Early clinicopathological investigations highlighted a number of inconsistencies leading to an updated hypothesis in which amyloid plaques give way to amyloid oligomers as the driving force in pathogenesis. Rather than focusing on the inconsistencies, amyloid imaging studies have tended to highlight the overlap between regions that show early amyloid plaque signal on positron emission tomography and that also happen to be affected early in Alzheimer's disease. Recent imaging studies investigating the regional dependency between metabolism and amyloid plaque deposition have arrived at conflicting results, with some showing regional associations and other not. We extracted multimodal neuroimaging data from the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging database for 227 healthy controls and 434 subjects with mild cognitive impairment. We analysed regional patterns of amyloid deposition, regional glucose metabolism and regional atrophy using florbetapir ((18)F) positron emission tomography, (18)F-fluordeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Specifically, we derived grey matter density and standardized uptake value ratios for both positron emission tomography tracers in 404 functionally defined regions of interest. We examined the relation between regional glucose metabolism and amyloid plaques using linear models. For each region of interest, correcting for regional grey matter density, age, education and disease status, we tested the association of regional glucose metabolism with (i) cortex-wide florbetapir uptake; (ii) regional (i.e. in the same region of interest) florbetapir uptake; and (iii) regional florbetapir uptake while correcting in addition for cortex-wide florbetapir uptake. P-values for each setting

  12. Neuronal activity and amyloid plaque pathology: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepian, Saak V; O'Leary, Valerie B

    2016-01-01

    A breakthrough in Alzheimer's disease (AD) research came with the discovery of the link between activity-dependent release of amyloid-β (Aβ) from neurons and formation of amyloid plaques. Along with elucidating the cellular basis of behavioral-dependent fluctuations in Aβ levels in the brain, insights have been gained toward understanding the mechanisms that warrant selective vulnerability of various forebrain circuits to amyloid pathology. The notion of elevated activity as a source of excessive Aβ production and plaque formation is, however, in conflict with ample electrophysiological data, which demonstrate exceedingly intense activity (both intrinsic and synaptic) of neurons in several brain regions that are spared or marginally affected by amyloid plaques of AD. Thus, the link between the functional load of brain circuits and their vulnerability to amyloidosis, while evident, is also complex and remains poorly understood. Here, we discuss emerging data suggestive of a major role for super-intense synchronous activity of cortical and limbic networks in excessive Aβ production and plaque formation. It is proposed that dense recurrent wiring of associative areas prone to epileptic seizures might be of critical relevance to their higher susceptibility to plaque pathology and related functional impairments.

  13. Amyloid plaque imaging in vivo: current achievement and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Alzheimer Neurobiology, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a very complex neurodegenerative disorder, the exact cause of which is still not known. The major histopathological features, amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, already described by Alois Alzheimer, have been the focus in research for decades. Despite a probable whole cascade of events in the brain leading to impairment of cognition, amyloid is still the target for diagnosis and treatment. The rapid development of molecular imaging techniques now allows imaging of amyloid plaques in vivo in Alzheimer patients by PET amyloid ligands such as Pittsburgh compound B (PIB). Studies so far have revealed high {sup 11}C-PIB retention in brain at prodromal stages of AD and a possibility to discriminate AD from other dementia disorders by {sup 11}C-PIB. Ongoing studies are focussing to understand the relationship between brain and CSF amyloid processes and cognitive processes. In vivo imaging of amyloid will be important for early diagnosis and evaluation of new anti-amyloid therapies in AD. (orig.)

  14. Ultrastructural study of florid plaques in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: a comparison with amyloid plaques in kuru, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, B; Liberski, P P; Sobów, T; Budka, H; Ironside, J W

    2009-02-01

    Although the histological features of the amyloid plaques in variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) are distinct from those in other forms of prion disease [kuru, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (GSS)], their ultrastructural features have only been described in a single case report. To study vCJD plaques systematically and compare them with plaques in kuru, sCJD, GSS and Alzheimer disease (AD). Amyloid plaques were studied by transmission electron microscopy and image analysis in five cases of vCJD, three cases of GSS, two cases of sCJD, one case of kuru and five cases of AD. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections from one case of vCJD, two cases of GSS, one case of kuru and two cases of sCJD. The florid plaques in vCJD were either compact or more diffuse; in both forms, the radiating fibrils were organized into thick 'tongues', in contrast to kuru plaques. Dystrophic neurites (DNs) containing lysosomal electron-dense bodies or vesicles surrounded florid plaques. Microglial cells were found within florid plaques; occasional amyloid fibrils were identified in membrane-bound pockets of microglial cells. In vCJD, there was significant tau immunoreactivity in DNs around florid plaques while, in sCJD, GSS and kuru, minimal tau immunoreactivity was observed around plaques. The ultrastructure of the florid plaques and DNs in vCJD is more reminiscent of neuritic plaques in AD than kuru or multicentric plaques. These findings may reflect differences both in the strains of the transmissible agents responsible for these disorders and in host factors.

  15. SPECT Imaging Agents for Detecting Cerebral β-Amyloid Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Ono

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of radiotracers for use in vivo to image β-amyloid (Aβ plaques in cases of Alzheimer's disease (AD is an important, active area of research. The presence of Aβ aggregates in the brain is generally accepted as a hallmark of AD. Since the only definitive diagnosis of AD is by postmortem staining of affected brain tissue, the development of techniques which enable one to image Aβ plaques in vivo has been strongly desired. Furthermore, the quantitative evaluation of Aβ plaques in the brain could facilitate evaluation of the efficacy of antiamyloid therapies currently under development. This paper reviews the current situation in the development of agents for SPECT-based imaging of Aβ plaques in Alzheimer's brains.

  16. Presence of Striatal Amyloid Plaques in Parkinson’s Disease Dementia Predicts Concomitant Alzheimer’s Disease: Usefulness for Amyloid Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Brittany N.; Serrano, Geidy E.; Sue, Lucia I.; Walker, Douglas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Shill, Holly A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Caviness, John N.; Hidalgo, Jose; Saxon-LaBelle, Megan; Chiarolanza, Glenn; Mariner, Monica; Henry-Watson, Jonette; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a frequent complication of Parkinson’s disease (PD). About half of PD dementia (PDD) is hypothesized to be due to progression of the underlying Lewy body pathology into limbic regions and the cerebral cortex while the other half is thought to be due to coexistent Alzheimer’s disease. Clinically, however, these are indistinguishable. The spread of amyloid plaques to the striatum has been reported to be a sensitive and specific indicator of dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The purpose of the present study was to determine if the presence of striatal plaques might also be a useful indicator of the presence of diagnostic levels of AD pathology within PD subjects. We analyzed neuropathologically-confirmed cases of PD without dementia (PDND, N = 31), PDD without AD (PDD, N = 31) and PD with dementia meeting clinicopathological criteria for AD (PDAD, N =40). The minimum diagnostic criterion for AD was defined as including a clinical history of dementia, moderate or frequent CERAD cortical neuritic plaque density and Braak neurofibrillary stage III–VI. Striatal amyloid plaque densities were determined using Campbell-Switzer and Thioflavine S stains. Striatal plaque densities were significantly higher in PDAD compared to PDD (p<0.001). The presence of striatal plaques was approximately 80% sensitive and 80% specific for predicting AD. In comparison, the presence of cerebral cortex plaques alone was highly sensitive (100%) but had poor specificity (48% to 55%). The results suggest that striatal amyloid imaging may be clinically useful for making the distinction between PDD and PDAD. PMID:22924088

  17. APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer’s dementia and minimal amyloid plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsell, Sarah E.; Kukull, Walter A.; Roher, Alex E.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G.; Caselli, Richard J.; Montine, Thomas J.; Reiman, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques are a cardinal neuropathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), yet over a third of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) non-carriers with the clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia may not meet positron emission tomography (PET) criteria for significant cerebral amyloidosis. Objective This study sought to clarify the percentage of APOE4 carriers and non-carriers with the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia near the end of life and minimal Aβ plaques at autopsy—and the extent to which these cases are associated with appreciable neurofibrillary degeneration or a primary neuropathologic diagnosis other than AD. Design Participants in this study were obtained from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center’s Uniform Data Set (UDS). Setting The UDS comprises longitudinal clinical assessments performed at the Alzheimer's Disease Centers funded by the National Institute on Aging. Neuropathology data is available for the subset of expired participants. Participants Exactly 100 APOE4 non-carriers and 100 carriers had the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia at their last visit, known APOE4 genotype, died within the ensuing 24 months, and underwent neuropathologic evaluation. Main Outcomes and Measures Standardized histopathologic assessments of Alzheimer’s disease neuropathologic changes were the primary measures of interest in this study, specifically CERAD neuritic plaque density score, diffuse plaque density score, and Braak stage for neurofibrillary degeneration. Results 37% of APOE4 non-carriers and 13% of carriers with the primary clinical diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s dementia had nonexistent or sparse neuritic plaques. 44% of the carriers and non-carriers with minimal neuritic plaques had Braak stage III–VI ratings and 38% met neuropathological criteria for other dementia-related diseases. Conclusions and relevance

  18. Stable Size Distribution of Amyloid Plaques Over the Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Mielke, Matthew L.; Muzitansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Bacskai, Brian J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidplaques are a key pathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD), but whether plaque sizes increase or stabilize over the course of AD is unknown. We measured the size distribution of total immunoreactive (10D5-positive) and dense-core (Thioflavine-S-positive) plaques in the temporal neocortex of a large group of AD and plaque-bearing age-matched non-demented subjects to test the hypothesis that amyloid plaques continue to grow along with the progression of the disease. The size of amyloid-β (10D5)-positive plaques did not differ between groups whereas dense-core plaques from the AD group were slightly larger than those in the non-demented group (~25%–30%, p = 0.01). Within the AD group, dense-core plaque size did not independently correlate with duration of clinical disease (from 4 to 21 years, p = 0.68), whereas 10D5-positive plaque size correlated negatively with disease duration (p = 0.01). By contrast, an earlier age of symptom onset strongly predicted a larger postmortem plaque size; this effect was independent of disease duration and the presence of the APOEε4 allele (p = 0.0001). We conclude that plaques vary in size among patients, with larger size distributions correlating with an earlier age of onset, but plaques do not substantially increase in size over the clinical course of the disease. PMID:22805771

  19. [Role of syndecan-2 in amyloid plaque formation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonova, E I; Galzitskaia, O V

    2015-01-01

    The famous phrase of F. Engels "Life is the mode of existence of protein bodies", has deeply insinuated itself in our mind. However at a more profound insight, the form of protein bodies is associaited not only with the fact of their existence, but also with the time changes. What unites all of us in our oldage? The answer is clear: it is the change in the way of existence of protein molecules, and more precisely, their uncontrolled aggregation that can take place in any organ and be associated with any protein. In spite of different clinical presentations, all diseases associated with pathological accumulation of aggregated proteins are combined in a general group called amyloisosis. Depen- dent on the place of formation, it is possible to distinguish an infinite number of pathologies from neurodegen- erative and oncologic ones to arthritis and tuberculosis. There is no doubt that provided all clandestine mechanisms are clarified at which an absolutely normal functioning.protein can transform into a pathological aggregated form, it will give us a chance to prevent protein aggregation and create a new form of drugs for prolongation of life. In this review we considered the function of syndecan-2, the structure of syndecan-2 and its role in the formation of amyloid plaques.

  20. Viscoelasticity of amyloid plaques in transgenic mouse brain studied by Brillouin microspectroscopy and correlative Raman analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mattana

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidopathy is one of the most prominent hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the leading cause of dementia worldwide, and is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the brain parenchyma. The plaques consist of abnormal deposits mainly composed of an aggregation-prone protein fragment, β-amyloid 1-40/1-42, into the extracellular matrix. Brillouin microspectroscopy is an all-optical contactless technique that is based on the interaction between visible light and longitudinal acoustic waves or phonons, giving access to the viscoelasticity of a sample on a subcellular scale. Here, we describe the first application of micromechanical mapping based on Brillouin scattering spectroscopy to probe the stiffness of individual amyloid plaques in the hippocampal part of the brain of a β-amyloid overexpressing transgenic mouse. Correlative analysis based on Brillouin and Raman microspectroscopy showed that amyloid plaques have a complex structure with a rigid core of β-pleated sheet conformation (β-amyloid protein surrounded by a softer ring-shaped region richer in lipids and other protein conformations. These preliminary results give a new insight into the plaque biophysics and biomechanics, and a valuable contrast mechanism for the study and diagnosis of amyloidopathy.

  1. A Novel Liposomal Nanoparticle for the Imaging of Amyloid Plaque by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanifum, Eric A; Ghaghada, Ketan; Vollert, Craig; Head, Elizabeth; Eriksen, Jason L; Annapragada, Ananth

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid binding molecules with greater hydrophilicity than existing ligands were synthesized. The lead candidate ET6-21 bound amyloid fibrils, and amyloid deposits in dog brain and human brain tissue ex vivo. The ligand was used to prepare novel amyloid-targeted liposomal nanoparticles. The preparation was tested in the Tg2576 and TetO/APP mouse models of amyloid deposition. Gd chelates and Indocyanine green were included in the particles for visualization by MRI and near-infrared microscopy. Upon intravenous injection, the particles successfully traversed the blood-brain barrier in these mice, and bound to the plaques. Magnetic resonance imaging (T1-MRI) conducted 4 days after injection demonstrated elevated signal in the brains of mice with amyloid plaques present. No signal was observed in amyloid-negative mice, or in amyloid-positive mice injected with an untargeted version of the same agent. The MRI results were confirmed by immunohistochemical and fluorescent microscopic examination of mouse brain sections, showing colocalization of the fluorescent tags and amyloid deposits.

  2. Icariin improves memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice (5xFAD) and attenuates amyloid β-induced neurite atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Takuya; Tohda, Chihiro

    2010-11-01

    Essential therapeutic drugs for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been developed. Since the neuritic atrophy leading to synaptic losses is one of the critical causes of memory impairment in AD, the effects of several constituents in tonic herbal medicines on neuritic atrophy and memory deficits have been studied. The present study investigated the effects of icariin, a main constituent in Epimedii Herba, a well known tonic crude drug, in an in vitro AD model and transgenic mouse AD model (5xFAD). Amyloid β(1-42)-induced atrophies of axons and dendrites were restored by post-treatment with icariin in rat cortical neurons. Administration of icariin for 8 days (p.o.) improved spatial memory impairment in 5xFAD mice. These novel findings suggest that icariin may improve memory dysfunction in AD and have a potential to extend neurites even when amyloid β-induced neurite atrophy has already occurred. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Soluble amyloid beta levels are elevated in the white matter of Alzheimer's patients, independent of cortical plaque severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Praino, Lyndsey E; Francis, Yitshak I; Griffith, Erica Y; Wiegman, Anne F; Urbach, Jonathan; Lawton, Arlene; Honig, Lawrence S; Cortes, Etty; Vonsattel, Jean Paul G; Canoll, Peter D; Goldman, James E; Brickman, Adam M

    2014-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease and the leading cause of dementia. In addition to grey matter pathology, white matter changes are now recognized as an important pathological feature in the emergence of the disease. Despite growing recognition of the importance of white matter abnormalities in the pathogenesis of AD, the causes of white matter degeneration are still unknown. While multiple studies propose Wallerian-like degeneration as the source of white matter change, others suggest that primary white matter pathology may be due, at least in part, to other mechanisms, including local effects of toxic Aβ peptides. In the current study, we investigated levels of soluble amyloid-beta (Aβ) in white matter of AD patients (n=12) compared with controls (n=10). Fresh frozen white matter samples were obtained from anterior (Brodmann area 9) and posterior (Brodmann area 1, 2 and 3) areas of post-mortem AD and control brains. ELISA was used to examine levels of soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. Total cortical neuritic plaque severity rating was derived from individual ratings in the following areas of cortex: mid-frontal, superior temporal, pre-central, inferior parietal, hippocampus (CA1), subiculum, entorhinal cortex, transentorhinal cortex, inferior temporal, amygdala and basal forebrain. Compared with controls, AD samples had higher white matter levels of both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40. While no regional white matter differences were found in Aβ -40, Aβ -42 levels were higher in anterior regions than in posterior regions across both groups. After statistically controlling for total cortical neuritic plaque severity, differences in both soluble Aβ -42 and Aβ -40 between the groups remained, suggesting that white matter Aβ peptides accumulate independent of overall grey matter fibrillar amyloid pathology and are not simply a reflection of overall amyloid burden. These results shed light on one potential mechanism through which

  4. Peripheral treatment with enoxaparin exacerbates amyloid plaque pathology in Tg2576 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hao; King, Anna E; Jacobson, Glenn A; Small, David H

    2017-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex, progressive neurological disorder characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques composed of β-amyloid protein (Aβ), the key component in pathogenesis of AD. Peripheral administration of enoxaparin (ENO) reportedly reduces the level of Aβ and the amyloid plaques in the cortex of amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice. However, the exact mechanism of these effects is unclear. Our previous studies indicated that ENO can inhibit APP processing to Aβ in primary cortical cells from Tg2576 mice by downregulating BACE1 levels. This study examines whether ENO-induced reduction of amyloid load is due to the decreased APP processing to Aβ in Tg2576 mice. Surprisingly, our results indicated that ENO significantly increases the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio in cortex and enhances the amyloid plaque load in both cortex and hippocampus, although overall APP processing was not influenced by ENO. Moreover, ENO stimulated the aggregation of both Aβ40 and Aβ42 in vitro. Although ENO has been reported to improve cognition in vivo and has potential as a therapeutic agent for AD, the results from our study suggest that ENO can exacerbate the amyloid pathology, and the strategy of using ENO for the treatment of AD may require further assessment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Impaired JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport promotes amyloid plaque pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowrishankar, Swetha; Wu, Yumei; Ferguson, Shawn M

    2017-10-02

    Lysosomes robustly accumulate within axonal swellings at Alzheimer's disease (AD) amyloid plaques. However, the underlying mechanisms and disease relevance of such lysosome accumulations are not well understood. Motivated by these problems, we identified JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3) as an important regulator of axonal lysosome transport and maturation. JIP3 knockout mouse neuron primary cultures accumulate lysosomes within focal axonal swellings that resemble the dystrophic axons at amyloid plaques. These swellings contain high levels of amyloid precursor protein processing enzymes (BACE1 and presenilin 2) and are accompanied by elevated Aβ peptide levels. The in vivo importance of the JIP3-dependent regulation of axonal lysosomes was revealed by the worsening of the amyloid plaque pathology arising from JIP3 haploinsufficiency in a mouse model of AD. These results establish the critical role of JIP3-dependent axonal lysosome transport in regulating amyloidogenic amyloid precursor protein processing and support a model wherein Aβ production is amplified by plaque-induced axonal lysosome transport defects. © 2017 Gowrishankar et al.

  6. Quantitative Comparison of Dense-Core Amyloid Plaque Accumulation in Amyloid-β Precursor Protein Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Reichl, John H.; Rao, Eshaan R.; McNellis, Brittany M.; Huang, Eric S.; Hemmy, Laura S.; Forster, Colleen L.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Borchelt, David R.; Vassar, Robert; Ashe, Karen H.; Zahs, Kathleen R.

    2016-01-01

    There exist several dozen lines of transgenic mice that express human amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) with Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-linked mutations. AβPP transgenic mouse lines differ in the types and amounts of Aβ that they generate and in their spatiotemporal patterns of expression of Aβ assemblies, providing a toolkit to study Aβ amyloidosis and the influence of Aβ aggregation on brain function. More complete quantitative descriptions of the types of Aβ assemblies present in transgenic mice and in humans during disease progression should add to our understanding of how Aβ toxicity in mice relates to the pathogenesis of AD. Here, we provide a direct quantitative comparison of amyloid plaque burdens and plaque sizes in four lines of AβPP transgenic mice. We measured the fraction of cortex and hippocampus occupied by dense-core plaques, visualized by staining with Thioflavin S, in mice from young adulthood through advanced age. We found that the plaque burdens among the transgenic lines varied by an order of magnitude: at 15 months of age, the oldest age studied, the median cortical plaque burden in 5XFAD mice was already ~4.5 times that of 21-month Tg2576 mice and ~15 times that of 21–24-month rTg9191 mice. Plaque-size distributions changed across the lifespan in a line- and region-dependent manner. We also compared the dense-core plaque burdens in the mice to those measured in a set of pathologically-confirmed AD cases from the Nun Study. Cortical plaque burdens in Tg2576, APPSwePS1ΔE9, and 5XFAD mice eventually far exceeded those measured in the human cohort. PMID:28059792

  7. In vivo detection of amyloid plaques by gadolinium-stained MRI can be used to demonstrate the efficacy of an anti-amyloid immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu D. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular deposition of β amyloid plaques is an early event associated to Alzheimer's disease. Here we have used in vivo gadolinium-stained high resolution (29*29*117µm3 MRI to follow-up in a longitudinal way individual amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice and evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy (SAR255952 directed against protofibrillar and fibrillary forms of Aβ. APP/PS1 mice were treated for 5 months between the age of 3.5 and 8.5 months. SAR255952 reduced amyloid load in 8.5-month-old animals, but not in 5.5-month animals compared to mice treated with a control antibody (DM4. Histological evaluation confirmed the reduction of amyloid load and revealed a lower density of amyloid plaques in 8.5-month SAR255952-treated animals. The longitudinal follow-up of individual amyloid plaques by MRI revealed that plaques that were visible at 5.5 months were still visible at 8.5 months in both SAR255952 and DM4-treated mice. This suggests that the amyloid load reduction induced by SAR255952 is related to a slowing down in the formation of new plaques rather than to the clearance of already formed plaques.

  8. Delayed amyloid plaque deposition and behavioral deficits in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Brian A; Kerrisk, Meghan E; Kaufman, Adam C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Koleske, Anthony J

    2013-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative dementia characterized by amyloid plaque accumulation, synapse/dendrite loss, and cognitive impairment. Transgenic mice expressing mutant forms of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) recapitulate several aspects of this disease and provide a useful model system for studying elements of AD progression. AβPP/PS1 mice have been previously shown to exhibit behavioral deficits and amyloid plaque deposition between 4-9 months of age. We crossed AβPP/PS1 animals with mice of a mixed genetic background (C57BL/6 × 129/SvJ) and investigated the development of AD-like features in the resulting outcrossed mice. The onset of memory-based behavioral impairment is delayed considerably in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice relative to inbred mice on a C57BL/6 background. While inbred AβPP/PS1 mice develop deficits in radial-arm water maze performance and novel object recognition as early as 8 months, outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice do not display defects until 18 months. Within the forebrain, we find that inbred AβPP/PS1 mice have significantly higher amyloid plaque burden at 12 months than outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice of the same age. Surprisingly, inbred AβPP/PS1 mice at 8 months have low plaque burden, suggesting that plaque burden alone cannot explain the accompanying behavioral deficits. Analysis of AβPP processing revealed that elevated levels of soluble Aβ correlate with the degree of behavioral impairment in both strains. Taken together, these findings suggest that animal behavior, amyloid plaque deposition, and AβPP processing are sensitive to genetic differences between mouse strains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. An immunohistochemical study on cerebral vascular and senile plaque amyloid in Alzheimer's dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Stam, F. C.

    1984-01-01

    Senile cerebral amyloidosis has been investigated using immunoperoxidase and enzyme histochemical techniques in six unfixed brains. Our findings do not support the opinion that vascular and senile plaque amyloid are immunoglobulin-derived. In contrast with recent reports we did not detect prealbumin

  10. Oral Administration of Thioflavin T Prevents Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Double Transgenic AD Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K; Paule, Merle G; Schmued, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and most common cause of adult-onset dementia. The major hallmarks of AD are the formation of senile amyloid plaques made of beta amyloid and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) which are primarily composed of phosphorylated tau protein. Although numerous agents have been considered as providing protection against AD, identification of potential agents with neuroprotective ability is limited. Thioflavin T has been used in the past to stain amyloid beta plaques in brain. In this study, Thioflavin T (ThT) and vehicle (infant formula) were administered orally by gavage to transgenic (B6C3 APP PS1; AD-Tg) mice beginning at 4 months age and continuing until sacrifice at 9 months of age at 40 mg/kg dose. The number of amyloid plaques was reduced dramatically by ThT treatment in both male and female transgenic mice compared to those in control mice. Additionally, GFAP and Amylo-Glo labeling suggest that astrocytic hypertrophy is minimized in ThT-treated animals. Similarly, CD68 labeling, which detects activated microglia, along with Amylo-Glo labeling, suggests that microglial activation is significantly less in ThT-treated mice. Both Aβ-40 and Aβ-42 concentrations in blood rose significantly in the ThT-treated animals suggesting that ThT may inhibit the deposition, degradation, and/or clearance of Aβ plaques in brain.

  11. Amyloid plaques disrupt resting state default mode network connectivity in cognitively normal elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheline, Yvette I; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Abraham Z; Morris, John C; Head, Denise; Wang, Suzhi; Mintun, Mark A

    2010-03-15

    Important functional connections within the default mode network (DMN) are disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD), likely from amyloid-beta (Abeta) plaque-associated neuronal toxicity. Here, we sought to determine if pathological effects of Abeta amyloid plaques could be seen, even in the absence of a task, by examining functional connectivity in cognitively normal participants with and without preclinical amyloid deposition. Participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n = 35) were compared with 68 cognitively normal participants who were further subdivided by positron emission tomography (PET) Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) imaging into those without evidence of brain amyloid (PIB-) and those with brain amyloid (PIB+) deposition. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) demonstrated that, compared with the PIB- group, the PIB+ group differed significantly in functional connectivity of the precuneus to hippocampus, parahippocampus, anterior cingulate, dorsal cingulate, gyrus rectus, superior precuneus, and visual cortex. These differences were in the same regions and in the same direction as differences found in the AD group. Thus, before any manifestations of cognitive or behavioral changes, there were differences in resting state connectivity in cognitively normal subjects with brain amyloid deposition, suggesting that early manifestation of Abeta toxicity can be detected using resting state fMRI. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhancing astrocytic lysosome biogenesis facilitates Aβ clearance and attenuates amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Burchett, Jack M; Schuler, Dorothy R; Cirrito, John R; Diwan, Abhinav; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2014-07-16

    In sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD), impaired Aβ removal contributes to elevated extracellular Aβ levels that drive amyloid plaque pathogenesis. Extracellular proteolysis, export across the blood-brain barrier, and cellular uptake facilitate physiologic Aβ clearance. Astrocytes can take up and degrade Aβ, but it remains unclear whether this function is insufficient in AD or can be enhanced to accelerate Aβ removal. Additionally, age-related dysfunction of lysosomes, the major degradative organelles wherein Aβ localizes after uptake, has been implicated in amyloid plaque pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that enhancing lysosomal function in astrocytes with transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosome biogenesis, would promote Aβ uptake and catabolism and attenuate plaque pathogenesis. Exogenous TFEB localized to the nucleus with transcriptional induction of lysosomal biogenesis and function in vitro. This resulted in significantly accelerated uptake of exogenously applied Aβ42, with increased localization to and degradation within lysosomes in C17.2 cells and primary astrocytes, indicating that TFEB is sufficient to coordinately enhance uptake, trafficking, and degradation of Aβ. Stereotactic injection of adeno-associated viral particles carrying TFEB driven by a glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter was used to achieve astrocyte-specific expression in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Exogenous TFEB localized to astrocyte nuclei and enhanced lysosome function, resulting in reduced Aβ levels and shortened half-life in the brain interstitial fluid and reduced amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus compared with control virus-injected mice. Therefore, activation of TFEB in astrocytes is an effective strategy to restore adequate Aβ removal and counter amyloid plaque pathogenesis in AD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349607-14$15.00/0.

  13. The Centiloid Project: standardizing quantitative amyloid plaque estimation by PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klunk, William E; Koeppe, Robert A; Price, Julie C; Benzinger, Tammie L; Devous, Michael D; Jagust, William J; Johnson, Keith A; Mathis, Chester A; Minhas, Davneet; Pontecorvo, Michael J; Rowe, Christopher C; Skovronsky, Daniel M; Mintun, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Although amyloid imaging with PiB-PET ([C-11]Pittsburgh Compound-B positron emission tomography), and now with F-18-labeled tracers, has produced remarkably consistent qualitative findings across a large number of centers, there has been considerable variability in the exact numbers reported as quantitative outcome measures of tracer retention. In some cases this is as trivial as the choice of units, in some cases it is scanner dependent, and of course, different tracers yield different numbers. Our working group was formed to standardize quantitative amyloid imaging measures by scaling the outcome of each particular analysis method or tracer to a 0 to 100 scale, anchored by young controls (≤ 45 years) and typical Alzheimer's disease patients. The units of this scale have been named "Centiloids." Basically, we describe a "standard" method of analyzing PiB PET data and then a method for scaling any "nonstandard" method of PiB PET analysis (or any other tracer) to the Centiloid scale. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Combination of Aβ Suppression and Innate Immune Activation in the Brain Significantly Attenuates Amyloid Plaque Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Christophe; Carrano, Anna; Chakrabarty, Paramita; Jankowsky, Joanna L; Das, Pritam

    2017-12-01

    Anti-Aβ clinical trials are currently under way to determine whether preventing amyloid deposition will be beneficial in arresting progression of Alzheimer disease. Both clinical and preclinical studies suggest that antiamyloid strategies are only effective if started at early stages of the disease process in a primary prevention strategy. Because this approach will be difficult to deploy, strategies for secondary prevention aimed at later stages of disease are also needed. In this study, we asked whether combining innate immune activation in the brain with concurrent Aβ suppression could enhance plaque clearance and could improve pathologic outcomes in mice with moderate amyloid pathologic disorder. Starting at 5 months of age, tet-off amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice were treated with doxycycline (dox) to suppress further amyloid precursor protein/Aβ production, and at the same time mice were intracranially injected with adeno-associated virus 1 expressing murine IL-6 (AAV1-mIL-6). Three months later, mice treated with the combination of Aβ suppression and AAV1-mIL-6 showed significantly less plaque pathologic disorder than dox or AAV1-mIL-6 only groups. The combination of AAV1-mIL-6 + dox treatment lowered total plaque burden by >60% versus untreated controls. Treatment with either dox or AAV1-mIL-6 alone was less effective than the combination. Our results suggest a synergistic mechanism by which the up-regulation of mIL-6 was able to improve plaque clearance in the setting of Aβ suppression. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Does oxybutynin alter plaques, amyloid beta peptides and behavior in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, Adam P; Sharma, Seema; Fletcher, Sophie; Neff, Pamela; Yang, Sang-Kuk; Son, Hwancheol; Tuttle, Jeremy B; Steers, William D

    2008-03-01

    In elderly patients oxybutynin (Sigma-Aldrich) is commonly used to treat overactive bladder despite increased prevalence of Alzheimer's disease in this population. We determined whether oxybutynin altered plaque formation, amyloid beta peptide expression and behavior in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease expressing the mutant human presenilin 1 (deltaE9) and a chimeric mouse/human amyloid precursor protein (APPswe). Mice were treated for 30 days in an acute experiment or 5 months in a chronic experiment with oxybutynin (30 mg/kg) or vehicle. Behavioral testing was performed monthly with the elevated plus maze (Med Associates, St. Albans, Vermont) in the chronic experiment. Brains were tested for plaque burden using Hirano silver and thioflavin-S (Sigma-Aldrich) staining. Amyloid beta peptide expression was tested using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for amyloid beta peptides 1-40 and 1-42. Animals treated with chronic oxybutynin had a decreased plaque burden in the hippocampus (mean +/- SEM 2.2 +/- 0.4 vs 4.1 +/- 0.9 plaques, p etag/ml vs 105.6 +/- 5.5 etag/ml, p = 0.05) compared to animals treated with vehicle. Female Alzheimer's disease mice treated with oxybutynin but not males showed improved behavior with a greater percent of time spent in the closed arm or elevated plus maze (95.9% +/- 1.6% vs 35.6% +/- 18.9%, p <0.05). The greatest difference was noted at 3 months of treatment compared to vehicle. These results suggest that oxybutynin may slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease in this model.

  16. The Beta-amyloid protein of Alzheimer's disease: communication breakdown by modifying the neuronal cytoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtar, Sara H; Bakhuraysah, Maha M; Cram, David S; Petratos, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent severe neurological disorders afflicting our aged population. Cognitive decline, a major symptom exhibited by AD patients, is associated with neuritic dystrophy, a degenerative growth state of neurites. The molecular mechanisms governing neuritic dystrophy remain unclear. Mounting evidence indicates that the AD-causative agent, β -amyloid protein (A β ), induces neuritic dystrophy. Indeed, neuritic dystrophy is commonly found decorating A β -rich amyloid plaques (APs) in the AD brain. Furthermore, disruption and degeneration of the neuronal microtubule system in neurons forming dystrophic neurites may occur as a consequence of A β -mediated downstream signaling. This review defines potential molecular pathways, which may be modulated subsequent to A β -dependent interactions with the neuronal membrane as a consequence of increasing amyloid burden in the brain.

  17. [18F]Fluoroazabenzoxazoles as potential amyloid plaque PET tracers: synthesis and in vivo evaluation in rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, Eric D; Sanabria-Bohórquez, Sandra; Fan, Hong; Zeng, Zhizhen; Gammage, Linda; Miller, Patricia; O'Malley, Stacey; Connolly, Brett; Mulhearn, James; Harrison, Scott T; Wolkenberg, Scott E; Barrow, James C; Williams, David L; Hargreaves, Richard J; Sur, Cyrille; Cook, Jacquelynn J

    2011-11-01

    An (18)F-labeled positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for amyloid plaque is desirable for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, particularly to enable preventative treatment once effective therapeutics are available. Similarly, such a tracer would be useful as a biomarker for enrollment of patients in clinical trials for evaluation of antiamyloid therapeutics. Furthermore, changes in the level of plaque burden as quantified by an amyloid plaque PET tracer may provide valuable insights into the effectiveness of amyloid-targeted therapeutics. This work describes our approach to evaluate and select a candidate PET tracer for in vivo quantification of human amyloid plaque. Ligands were evaluated for their in vitro binding to human amyloid plaques, lipophilicity and predicted blood-brain barrier permeability. Candidates with favorable in vitro properties were radiolabeled with (18)F and evaluated in vivo. Baseline PET scans in rhesus monkey were conducted to evaluate the regional distribution and kinetics of each tracer using tracer kinetic modeling methods. High binding potential in cerebral white matter and cortical grey matter was considered an unfavorable feature of the candidate tracers. [(18)F]MK-3328 showed the most favorable combination of low in vivo binding potential in white matter and cortical grey matter in rhesus monkeys, low lipophilicity (Log D=2.91) and high affinity for human amyloid plaques (IC(50)=10.5±1.3 nM). [(18)F]MK-3328 was identified as a promising PET tracer for in vivo quantification of amyloid plaques, and further evaluation in humans is warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) in intracellular amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and amyloid plaque pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-06-15

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism.

  19. Role of Phosphatidylinositol Clathrin Assembly Lymphoid-Myeloid Leukemia (PICALM) in Intracellular Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Gil, So-Chon; Yan, Ping; Wang, Yan; Han, Sharon; Gonzales, Ernie; Perez, Ronaldo; Cirrito, John R.; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2012-01-01

    One of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques in the extracellular space in the brain. Amyloid plaques are primarily composed of aggregated amyloid β peptide (Aβ), a proteolytic fragment of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein (APP). For APP to be proteolytically cleaved into Aβ, it must be internalized into the cell and trafficked to endosomes where specific protease complexes can cleave APP. Several recent genome-wide association studies have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the phosphatidylinositol clathrin assembly lymphoid-myeloid leukemia (PICALM) gene were significantly associated with Alzheimer disease, suggesting a role in APP endocytosis and Aβ generation. Here, we show that PICALM co-localizes with APP in intracellular vesicles of N2a-APP cells after endocytosis is initiated. PICALM knockdown resulted in reduced APP internalization and Aβ generation. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased APP internalization and Aβ production. In vivo, PICALM was found to be expressed in neurons and co-localized with APP throughout the cortex and hippocampus in APP/PS1 mice. PICALM expression was altered using AAV8 gene transfer of PICALM shRNA or PICALM cDNA into the hippocampus of 6-month-old APP/PS1 mice. PICALM knockdown decreased soluble and insoluble Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus. Conversely, PICALM overexpression increased Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load. These data indicate that PICALM, an adaptor protein involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, regulates APP internalization and subsequent Aβ generation. PICALM contributes to amyloid plaque load in brain likely via its effect on Aβ metabolism. PMID:22539346

  20. Neuronal-Targeted TFEB Accelerates Lysosomal Degradation of APP, Reducing Aβ Generation and Amyloid Plaque Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Qingli; Yan, Ping; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Perez, Ronaldo; Zhu, Alec; Gonzales, Ernesto; Tripoli, Danielle L; Czerniewski, Leah; Ballabio, Andrea; Cirrito, John R; Diwan, Abhinav; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2015-09-02

    In AD, an imbalance between Aβ production and removal drives elevated brain Aβ levels and eventual amyloid plaque deposition. APP undergoes nonamyloidogenic processing via α-cleavage at the plasma membrane, amyloidogenic β- and γ-cleavage within endosomes to generate Aβ, or lysosomal degradation in neurons. Considering multiple reports implicating impaired lysosome function as a driver of increased amyloidogenic processing of APP, we explored the efficacy of targeting transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal pathways, to reduce Aβ levels. CMV promoter-driven TFEB, transduced via stereotactic hippocampal injections of adeno-associated virus particles in APP/PS1 mice, localized primarily to neuronal nuclei and upregulated lysosome biogenesis. This resulted in reduction of APP protein, the α and β C-terminal APP fragments (CTFs), and in the steady-state Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid. In aged mice, total Aβ levels and amyloid plaque load were selectively reduced in the TFEB-transduced hippocampi. TFEB transfection in N2a cells stably expressing APP695, stimulated lysosome biogenesis, reduced steady-state levels of APP and α- and β-CTFs, and attenuated Aβ generation by accelerating flux through the endosome-lysosome pathway. Cycloheximide chase assays revealed a shortening of APP half-life with exogenous TFEB expression, which was prevented by concomitant inhibition of lysosomal acidification. These data indicate that TFEB enhances flux through lysosomal degradative pathways to induce APP degradation and reduce Aβ generation. Activation of TFEB in neurons is an effective strategy to attenuate Aβ generation and attenuate amyloid plaque deposition in AD. A key driver for AD pathogenesis is the net balance between production and clearance of Aβ, the major component of amyloid plaques. Here we demonstrate that lysosomal degradation of holo-APP influences Aβ production by limiting the availability of APP for amyloidogenic

  1. Nanoparticulate Radiolabelled Quinolines Detect Amyloid Plaques in Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste A. Roney

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Detecting aggregated amyloid peptides (Aβ plaques presents targets for developing biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Polymeric n-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (PBCA nanoparticles (NPs were encapsulated with radiolabelled amyloid affinity I125-clioquinol (CQ, 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline as in vivo probes. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs crossed the BBB (2.3±0.9 ID/g (P<.05 in the WT mouse (N = 210, compared to I125-CQ (1.0±0.4 ID/g. I125-CQ-PBCA NP brain uptake increased in AD transgenic mice (APP/PS1 versus WT (N = 38; 2.54×105±5.31×104 DLU/mm2; versus 1.98×105±2.22×104 DLU/mm2 and in APP/PS1/Tau. Brain increases were in mice intracranially injected with aggregated Aβ42 peptide (N = 17; 7.19×105±1.25×105 DLU/mm2, versus WT (6.07×105±7.47×104 DLU/mm2. Storage phosphor imaging and histopathological staining of the plaques, Fe2+ and Cu2+, validated results. I125-CQ-PBCA NPs have specificity for Aβ in vitro and in vivo and are promising as in vivo SPECT (I123, or PET (I124 amyloid imaging agents.

  2. A gallium(III) Schiff base-curcumin complex that binds to amyloidplaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Jaclyn L; Hayne, David J; Roselt, Peter; McLean, Catriona A; White, Jonathan M; Donnelly, Paul S

    2016-09-01

    Gallium-68 is a positron-emitting isotope that can be used in positron-emission tomography imaging agents. Alzheimer's disease is associated with the formation of plaques in the brain primarily comprised of aggregates of a 42 amino acid protein called amyloid-β. With the goal of synthesising charge neutral, low molecular weight, lipophilic gallium complexes with the potential to cross the blood-brain barrier and bind to Aβ plaques we have used an ancillary tetradentate N2O2 Schiff base ligand and the β-diketone curcumin as a bidentate ligand to give a six-coordinate Ga3+ complex. The tetradentate Schiff base ligand adopts the cis-β configuration with deprotonated curcumin acting as a bidentate ligand. The complex binds to amyloidplaques in human brain tissue and it is possible that extension of this chemistry to positron-emitting gallium-68 could provide useful imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron Biochemistry is Correlated with Amyloid Plaque Morphology in an Established Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telling, Neil D; Everett, James; Collingwood, Joanna F; Dobson, Jon; van der Laan, Gerrit; Gallagher, Joseph J; Wang, Jian; Hitchcock, Adam P

    2017-10-19

    A signature characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is aggregation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) fibrils in the brain. Nevertheless, the links between Aβ and AD pathology remain incompletely understood. It has been proposed that neurotoxicity arising from aggregation of the Aβ 1-42 peptide can in part be explained by metal ion binding interactions. Using advanced X-ray microscopy techniques at sub-micron resolution, we investigated relationships between iron biochemistry and AD pathology in intact cortex from an established mouse model over-producing Aβ. We found a direct correlation of amyloid plaque morphology with iron, and evidence for the formation of an iron-amyloid complex. We also show that iron biomineral deposits in the cortical tissue contain the mineral magnetite, and provide evidence that Aβ-induced chemical reduction of iron could occur in vivo. Our observations point to the specific role of iron in amyloid deposition and AD pathology, and may impact development of iron-modifying therapeutics for AD. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting β-amyloid plaques and oligomers: development of near-IR fluorescence imaging probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Letian; Xu, Yungen; Zhang, Siyuan; Lv, Jie; Ran, Chongzhao; Li, Yuyan

    2017-02-01

    Evidence indicated that shifting treatment to a presymptomatic stage may produce significant benefits to prevent/alleviate the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD); in particular, early incorporation of noninvasive imaging and biomarker testing will be significantly beneficial for AD drug development. Based on amyloid cascade hypothesis and its revised version, both β-amyloid deposition and soluble oligomeric species could be good diagnostic biomarkers for AD. Near-IR fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, which so far is limited to animal studies, is a promising method for its incomparable advantages such as low cost, high-throughput and easy operation. This review focuses on recent reported NIRF probes that showed excellent binding to plaques and oligomers. We hope that this review will shed light on the future of NIRF probes' discovery.

  5. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tsuboi, Yoshio [Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Fukuoka (Japan); Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki [Institute of Development, Aging, and Cancer, Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Division of Brain Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan); Doh-ura, Katsumi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Prion Research, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [{sup 11}C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  6. Active components from Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) for protection of amyloid β(25-35)-induced neuritic atrophy in cultured rat cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjing; Tohda, Chihiro; Zhu, Shu; Hattori, Masao; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2011-07-01

    Not only neuronal death but also neuritic atrophy and synaptic loss underlie the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease as direct causes of the memory deficit. Extracts of Siberian ginseng (the rhizome of Eleutherococcus senticosus) were shown to have protective effects on the regeneration of neurites and the reconstruction of synapses in rat cultured cortical neurons damaged by amyloid β (Aβ)(25-35), and eleutheroside B was one of the active constituents. In this study, a comprehensive evaluation of constituents was conducted to explore active components from Siberian ginseng which can protect against neuritic atrophy induced by Aβ(25-35) in cultured rat cortical neurons. The ethyl acetate, n-butanol and water fractions from the methanol extract of Siberian ginseng showed protective effects against Aβ-induced neuritic atrophy. Twelve compounds were isolated from the active fractions and identified. Among them, eleutheroside B, eleutheroside E and isofraxidin showed obvious protective effects against Aβ(25-35)-induced atrophies of axons and dendrites at 1 and 10 μM.

  7. Calorie restriction attenuates astrogliosis but not amyloid plaque load in aged rhesus macaques: a preliminary quantitative imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Aadhavi; Pehar, Mariana; Salamat, M Shahriar; Pugh, Thomas D; Bendlin, Barbara B; Willette, Auriel A; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Colman, Ricki J; Weindruch, Richard H; Puglielli, Luigi; Johnson, Sterling C

    2013-05-01

    While moderate calorie restriction (CR) in the absence of malnutrition has been consistently shown to have a systemic, beneficial effect against aging in several animals models, its effect on the brain microstructure in a non-human primate model remains to be studied using post-mortem histopathologic techniques. In the present study, we investigated differences in expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus and the adjacent cortical areas of 7 Control (ad libitum)-fed and 6 CR male rhesus macaques using immunostaining methods. CR monkeys expressed significantly lower levels (∼30% on average) of GFAP than Controls in the CA region of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, suggesting a protective effect of CR in limiting astrogliosis. These results recapitulate the neuroprotective effects of CR seen in shorter-lived animal models. There was a significant positive association between age and average amyloid plaque pathology in these animals, but there was no significant difference in amyloid plaque distribution between the two groups. Two of the seven Control animals (28.6%) and one of the six CR animal (16.7%) did not express any amyloid plaques, five of seven Controls (71.4%) and four of six CR animals (66.7%) expressed minimal to moderate amyloid pathology, and one of six CR animals (16.7%) expressed severe amyloid pathology. That CR affects levels of GFAP expression but not amyloid plaque load provides some insight into the means by which CR is beneficial at the microstructural level, potentially by offsetting the increased load of oxidatively damaged proteins, in this non-human primate model of aging. The present study is a preliminary post-mortem histological analysis of the effects of CR on brain health, and further studies using molecular and biochemical techniques are warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Detection of amyloid plaques targeted by bifunctional USPIO in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice using magnetic resonance microimaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youssef Zaim Wadghiri

    Full Text Available Amyloid plaques are a key pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The detection of amyloid plaques in the brain is important for the diagnosis of AD, as well as for following potential amyloid targeting therapeutic interventions. Our group has developed several contrast agents to detect amyloid plaques in vivo using magnetic resonance microimaging (µMRI in AD transgenic mice, where we used mannitol to enhance blood brain barrier (BBB permeability. In the present study, we used bifunctional ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles, chemically coupled with Aβ1-42 peptide to image amyloid plaque deposition in the mouse brain. We coupled the nanoparticles to polyethylene glycol (PEG in order to improve BBB permeability. These USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 nanoparticles were injected intravenously in AD model transgenic mice followed by initial in vivo and subsequent ex vivo μMRI. A 3D gradient multi-echo sequence was used for imaging with a 100 µm isotropic resolution. The amyloid plaques detected by T2*-weighted μMRI were confirmed with matched histological sections. The region of interest-based quantitative measurement of T2* values obtained from the in vivo μMRI showed contrast injected AD Tg mice had significantly reduced T2* values compared to wild-type mice. In addition, the ex vivo scans were examined with voxel-based analysis (VBA using statistical parametric mapping (SPM for comparison of USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic and USPIO alone injected AD transgenic mice. The regional differences seen by VBA in the USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 injected AD transgenic correlated with the amyloid plaque distribution histologically. Our results indicate that USPIO-PEG-Aβ1-42 can be used for amyloid plaque detection in vivo by intravenous injection without the need to co-inject an agent which increases permeability of the BBB. This technique could aid the development of novel amyloid targeting drugs by allowing therapeutic effects

  9. Type II fuzzy systems for amyloid plaque segmentation in transgenic mouse brains for Alzheimer's disease quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, April; Hosseinzadeh, Danoush

    2014-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in the elderly characterized by extracellular deposition of amyloid plaques (AP). Using animal models, AP loads have been manually measured from histological specimens to understand disease etiology, as well as response to treatment. Due to the manual nature of these approaches, obtaining the AP load is labourious, subjective and error prone. Automated algorithms can be designed to alleviate these challenges by objectively segmenting AP. In this paper, we focus on the development of a novel algorithm for AP segmentation based on robust preprocessing and a Type II fuzzy system. Type II fuzzy systems are much more advantageous over the traditional Type I fuzzy systems, since ambiguity in the membership function may be modeled and exploited to generate excellent segmentation results. The ambiguity in the membership function is defined as an adaptively changing parameter that is tuned based on the local contrast characteristics of the image. Using transgenic mouse brains with AP ground truth, validation studies were carried out showing a high degree of overlap and low degree of oversegmentation (0.8233 and 0.0917, respectively). The results highlight that such a framework is able to handle plaques of various types (diffuse, punctate), plaques with varying Aβ concentrations as well as intensity variation caused by treatment effects or staining variability.

  10. Computed tomography of amyloid plaques in a mouse model of Alzheimers disease using diffraction enhanced imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, D.M.; Miller, L.; Benveniste, H.; Dilmanian, A.; Kritzer, M.; Zhong, Z.

    2009-03-19

    Our understanding of early development in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is clouded by the scale at which the disease progresses; amyloid beta (A{beta}) plaques, a hallmark feature of AD, are small ({approx} 50 {micro}m) and low contrast in diagnostic clinical imaging techniques. Diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI), a phase contrast x-ray imaging technique, has greater soft tissue contrast than conventional radiography and generates higher resolution images than magnetic resonance microimaging. Thus, in this proof of principle study, DEI in micro-CT mode was performed on the brains of AD-model mice to determine if DEI can visualize A{beta} plaques. Results revealed small nodules in the cortex and hippocampus of the brain. Histology confirmed that the features seen in the DEI images of the brain were A{beta} plaques. Several anatomical structures, including hippocampal subregions and white matter tracks, were also observed. Thus, DEI has strong promise in early diagnosis of AD, as well as general studies of the mouse brain.

  11. Detection of Alzheimer’s disease amyloid-beta plaque deposition by deep brain impedance profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béduer, Amélie; Joris, Pierre; Mosser, Sébastien; Fraering, Patrick C.; Renaud, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common form of neurodegenerative disease in elderly people. Toxic brain amyloid-beta (Aß) aggregates and ensuing cell death are believed to play a central role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we investigated if we could monitor the presence of these aggregates by performing in situ electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements in AD model mice brains. Approach. In this study, electrical impedance spectroscopy measurements were performed post-mortem in APPPS1 transgenic mice brains. This transgenic model is commonly used to study amyloidogenesis, a pathological hallmark of AD. We used flexible probes with embedded micrometric electrodes array to demonstrate the feasibility of detecting senile plaques composed of Aß peptides by localized impedance measurements. Main results. We particularly focused on deep brain structures, such as the hippocampus. Ex vivo experiments using brains from young and old APPPS1 mice lead us to show that impedance measurements clearly correlate with the percentage of Aβ plaque load in the brain tissues. We could monitor the effects of aging in the AD APPPS1 mice model. Significance. We demonstrated that a localized electrical impedance measurement constitutes a valuable technique to monitor the presence of Aβ-plaques, which is complementary with existing imaging techniques. This method does not require prior Aβ staining, precluding the risk of variations in tissue uptake of dyes or tracers, and consequently ensuring reproducible data collection.

  12. Demonstration of aluminum in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumoto, Sakae; Kakimi, Shigeo; Ohsaki, Akihiro; Ishikawa, Akira

    2009-11-01

    Aluminum (Al) exposure has been reported to be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia of Alzheimer type), although the role of Al in the etiology of Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. We examined the presence of Al in the Alzheimer's brain using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM-EDX). TEM-EDX analysis allows simultaneous imaging of subcellular structures with high spatial resolution and analysis of small quantities of elements contained in the same subcellular structures. We identified senile plaques by observation using TEM and detected Al in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques located in the hippocampus and the temporal lobe by EDX. Phosphorus and calcium were also present in the amyloid fibers. No Al could be detected in the extracellular space in senile plaques or in the cytoplasm of nerve cells. In this study, we demonstrated colocalization of Al and beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptides in amyloid fibers in the cores of senile plaques. The results support the following possibilities in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease: Al could be involved in the aggregation of Abeta peptides to form toxic fibrils; Al might induce Abeta peptides into the beta-sheet structure; and Al might facilitate iron-mediated oxidative reactions, which cause severe damage to brain tissues.

  13. {sup 18}F-labeled styrylpyridines as PET agents for amyloid plaque imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wei [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung Meip ing [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Oya, Shunichi [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Hou, Catherine [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kung, Hank F. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)]. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2007-01-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of {beta}-amyloid (A{beta}) plaques in the brain is a potentially valuable tool for studying the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It may also be applicable for measuring the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs aimed at lowering A{beta} plaques in the brain. We have successfully reported a series of {sup 18}F-labeled fluoropegylated stilbenes for PET imaging studies. Encouraging results clearly demonstrated the usefulness of {sup 18}F-labeled stilbenes as potential A{beta} plaque-imaging agents. In the present study, we applied a similar approach to a styrylpyridine backbone structure. Among all derivatives examined (E)-2-(2-(2-(2-fluoroethoxy)ethoxy)ethoxy)-5-(4-dimethylaminostyryl) -pyridine (2) displayed high binding affinity in postmortem AD brain homogenates (K {sub i}=2.5{+-}0.4 nM, with [{sup 125}I]IMPY as radioligand). No-carrier-added [{sup 18}F]2 was successfully prepared by [{sup 18}F]fluoride displacement of the corresponding tosylate precursor with a high labeling yield (30-40%) and a high radiochemical purity (>99%). Specific activity at the end of synthesis was determined to be 1500-2000 Ci/mmol. The tracer [{sup 18}F]2 showed adequate lipophilicity (log P=3.22). In vivo biodistribution of [{sup 18}F]2 in normal mice exhibited excellent initial brain penetration and rapid washout (7.77% and 1.03% dose/g in the brain at 2 and 30 min after intravenous injection, respectively) - properties that are highly desirable for A{beta}-plaque-specific brain imaging agents. Autoradiography of AD brain sections and homogenate binding with postmortem AD brain tissues confirmed the high binding signal of [{sup 18}F]2 due to the presence of A{beta} plaques. These preliminary results suggest that novel PET tracers may be potentially useful for the imaging of A{beta} plaques in the living human brain.

  14. Delineating Amyloid Plaque Associated Neuronal Sphingolipids in Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice (tgArcSwe) Using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ibrahim; Brinet, Dimitri; Michno, Wojciech; Syvänen, Stina; Sehlin, Dag; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Hanrieder, Jörg

    2017-02-15

    The major pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are the progressive aggregation and accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau protein into neurotoxic deposits. Aβ aggregation has been suggested as the critical early inducer, driving the disease progression. However, the factors that promote neurotoxic Aβ aggregation remain elusive. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique to comprehensively elucidate the spatial distribution patterns of lipids, peptides, and proteins in biological tissue sections. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based imaging was used on transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse (tgArcSwe) brain tissue to investigate the sphingolipid microenvironment of individual Aβ plaques and elucidate plaque-associated sphingolipid alterations. Multivariate data analysis was used to interrogate the IMS data for identifying pathologically relevant, anatomical features based on their lipid chemical profile. This approach revealed sphingolipid species that distinctly located to cortical and hippocampal deposits, whose Aβ identity was further verified using fluorescent amyloid staining and immunohistochemistry. Subsequent multivariate statistical analysis of the spectral data revealed significant localization of gangliosides and ceramides species to Aβ positive plaques, which was accompanied by distinct local reduction of sulfatides. These plaque-associated changes in sphingolipid levels implicate a functional role of sphingolipid metabolism in Aβ plaque pathology and AD pathogenesis. Taken together, the presented data highlight the potential of imaging mass spectrometry as a powerful approach for probing Aβ plaque-associated lipid changes underlying AD pathology.

  15. RNA aptamer probes as optical imaging agents for the detection of amyloid plaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available Optical imaging using multiphoton microscopy and whole body near infrared imaging has become a routine part of biomedical research. However, optical imaging methods rely on the availability of either small molecule reporters or genetically encoded fluorescent proteins, which are challenging and time consuming to develop. While directly labeled antibodies can also be used as imaging agents, antibodies are species specific, can typically not be tagged with multiple fluorescent reporters without interfering with target binding, and are bioactive, almost always eliciting a biological response and thereby influencing the process that is being studied. We examined the possibility of developing highly specific and sensitive optical imaging agents using aptamer technology. We developed a fluorescently tagged anti-Aβ RNA aptamer, β55, which binds amyloid plaques in both ex vivo human Alzheimer's disease brain tissue and in vivo APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Diffuse β55 positive halos, attributed to oligomeric Aβ, were observed surrounding the methoxy-XO4 positive plaque cores. Dot blots of synthetic Aβ aggregates provide further evidence that β55 binds both fibrillar and non-fibrillar Aβ. The high binding affinity, the ease of probe development, and the ability to incorporate multiple and multimodal imaging reporters suggest that RNA aptamers may have complementary and perhaps advantageous properties compared to conventional optical imaging probes and reporters.

  16. Intracellular amyloid-β accumulation in calcium-binding protein-deficient neurons leads to amyloidplaque formation in animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Minho; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Nam, Dong Woo; Baik, Sung Hoon; Song, Hyundong; Kook, Sun-Young; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Jeewoo; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    One of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the extracellular deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) as senile plaques in specific brain regions. Clearly, an understanding of the cellular processes underlying Aβ deposition is a crucial issue in the field of AD research. Recent studies have found that accumulation of intraneuronal Aβ (iAβ) is associated with synaptic deficits, neuronal death, and cognitive dysfunction in AD patients. In this study, we found that Aβ deposits had several shapes and sizes, and that iAβ occurred before the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques in the subiculum of 5XFAD mice, an animal model of AD. We also observed pyroglutamate-modified Aβ (N3pE-Aβ), which has been suggested to be a seeding molecule for senile plaques, inside the Aβ plaques only after iAβ accumulation, which argues against its seeding role. In addition, we found that iAβ accumulates in calcium-binding protein (CBP)-free neurons, induces neuronal death, and then develops into senile plaques in 2-4-month-old 5XFAD mice. These findings suggest that N3pE-Aβ-independent accumulation of Aβ in CBP-free neurons might be an early process that triggers neuronal damage and senile plaque formation in AD patients. Our results provide new insights into several long-standing gaps in AD research, namely how Aβ plaques are formed, what happens to iAβ and how Aβ causes selective neuronal loss in AD patients.

  17. In vivo near-infrared fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques with a dicyanoisophorone-based probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Jia-ying; Zhou, Lin-fu; Li, Yu-kun [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Chen, Shuo-bin [School of Pharmaceutical Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Yan, Jin-wu, E-mail: yjw@scut.edu.cn [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China); Zhang, Lei, E-mail: lzhangce@scut.edu.cn [School of Bioscience and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, 510006 (China)

    2017-04-08

    A dicyanoisophorone-based probe with two-photon absorption and NIR emission was developed for the in vivo fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques, which exhibited high selectivity toward Aβ aggregates over other intracellular proteins. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 109 nM. In vivo imaging studies indicated that the probe could penetrate the blood–brain barrier and label Aβ plaques in the living transgenic mice, and its specific binding to cerebral Aβ plaques was further confirmed by one- and two-photon ex vivo fluorescence imaging. All these results featured its promising application prospects for amyloid-β sensing in basic research and biomedical research. - Highlights: • A two-photon probe (DCIP-1) with NIR emission based on dicyanoisophorone group, for the in vivo fluorescence imaging of amyloidplaques, was reported. • The probe showed turn-on fluorescence (13-fold) with a large Stokes shift upon inserting into the hydrophobic pockets of Aβ aggregates. • The in vivo imaging studies indicated that the probe can penetrate the blood–brain barrier efficiently and discriminate APP/PS1 transgenic mice from WT controls.

  18. [In vitroearly detection of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease by Pittsburgh compound B-modified magnetic nanoparticles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, J Q; Wu, J Q; Li, M H; Wang, P J

    2017-11-07

    Objective: To construct magnetic nanoparticles targeting β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques, the pathological biomarker of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and to study their binding capability in vitro . Methods: Superparamagnetic nanoparticles Mn(0.6)Zn(0.4)Fe(2)O(4) (MZF) were coated with amphiphilic star-block copolymeric micelles and modified with Aβ-specific probe Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) to construct a novel magnetic nanoparticle MZF-PiB, which specifically targeted amyloid plaques. Transmission electron microscope was used to study the morphological features of MZF-PiB. Superparamagnetism of MZF-PiB was assessed by its r(2) relaxation rate by using 3.0 T MRI scanner. Cytotoxic test was applied to determine biosafety of MZF-PiB nanoparticles in differentiated human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK). In vitro binding tests were conducted via immunohistochemistry on 6-month old AD mice brain sections. Differences of cell viability between groups were compared with one-way analysis of variance. Results: MZF-PiB nanoparticles were successfully constructed. Transmission electron microscope images showed that the nanoparticles were about 100 nm in size. The r(2) relaxation rate was 163.11 mMS(-1). No differences were found in cell viability of SH-SY5Y and MDCK incubated with MZF-PiB suspension for 24 h or 48 h when compared with those of untreated cells ( F =2.336, 2.539, 0.293, 1.493, all P >0.05). In vitro binding tests indicated that the MZF-PiB were specifically bound to amyloid plaques. The smallest size of detected plaques was 27 μm. Conclusion: PiB-modified nanoparticles targeting Aβ are biologically safe and highly superparamagnetic, possessing the capability to detect amyloid plaques early in vitro and the potential for early diagnosis of AD.

  19. Amyloid imaging probes are useful for detection of prion plaques and treatment of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kensuke; Doh-ura, Katsumi; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Nishida, Noriyuki; Murakami-Kubo, Ikuko; Ando, Yukio; Sawada, Tohru; Iwaki, Toru

    2004-06-01

    Diagnostic imaging probes have been developed to monitor cerebral amyloid lesions in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. A thioflavin derivative, 2-[4'-(methylamino)phenyl] benzothiazole (BTA-1) and a Congo red derivative, (trans, trans),-1-bromo-2,5-bis-(3-hydroxycarbonyl-4-hydroxy)styrylbenzene (BSB) are representative chemicals of these probes. In this report, the two chemicals were studied in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE). Both BTA-1 and BSB selectively bound to compact plaques of prion protein (PrP), not only in the brain specimens of certain types of human TSE, but also in the brains of TSE-infected mice when the probes were injected intravenously. The chemicals bound to plaques in the brains were stable and could be detected for more than 42 h post-injection. In addition, the chemicals inhibited abnormal PrP formation in a cellular model of TSE with IC(50) values of 4 nM for BTA-1 and 1.4 micro M for BSB. In an experimental mouse model, the intravenous injection of 1 mg BSB prolonged the incubation period by 14 %. This efficacy was only observed against the RML strain and not the other strains examined. These observations suggest that these chemicals bind directly to PrP aggregates and inhibit new formation of abnormal PrP in a strain-dependent manner. Both BTA-1 and BSB can be expected to be lead chemicals not only for imaging probes but also for therapeutic drugs for TSEs caused by certain strains.

  20. Curcumin-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles for detecting amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease mice using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwok Kin; Chan, Pui Shan; Fan, Shujuan; Kwan, Siu Ming; Yeung, King Lun; Wáng, Yì-Xiáng J; Chow, Albert Hee Lum; Wu, Ed X; Baum, Larry

    2015-03-01

    Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be performed with the assistance of amyloid imaging. The current method relies on positron emission tomography (PET), which is expensive and exposes people to radiation, undesirable features for a population screening method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is cheaper and is not radioactive. Our approach uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) made of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) conjugated with curcumin, a natural compound that specifically binds to amyloid plaques. Coating of curcumin-conjugated MNPs with polyethylene glycol-polylactic acid block copolymer and polyvinylpyrrolidone by antisolvent precipitation in a multi-inlet vortex mixer produces stable and biocompatible curcumin magnetic nanoparticles (Cur-MNPs) with mean diameter MRI) of Tg2576 mouse brains after injection of Cur-MNPs, and no plaques could be found in non-transgenic mice. Immunohistochemical examination of the mouse brains revealed that Cur-MNPs were co-localized with amyloid plaques. Thus, Cur-MNPs have the potential for non-invasive diagnosis of AD using MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Resorufin analogs preferentially bind cerebrovascular amyloid: potential use as imaging ligands for cerebral amyloid angiopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Byung

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA is characterized by deposition of fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ within cerebral vessels. It is commonly seen in the elderly and almost universally present in patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD. In both patient populations, CAA is an independent risk factor for lobar hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, and dementia. To date, definitive diagnosis of CAA requires obtaining pathological tissues via brain biopsy (which is rarely clinically indicated or at autopsy. Though amyloid tracers labeled with positron-emitting radioligands such as [11C]PIB have shown promise for non-invasive amyloid imaging in AD patients, to date they have been unable to clarify whether the observed amyloid load represents neuritic plaques versus CAA due in large part to the low resolution of PET imaging and the almost equal affinity of these tracers for both vascular and parenchymal amyloid. Therefore, the development of a precise and specific non-invasive technique for diagnosing CAA in live patients is desired. Results We found that the phenoxazine derivative resorufin preferentially bound cerebrovascular amyloid deposits over neuritic plaques in the aged Tg2576 transgenic mouse model of AD/CAA, whereas the congophilic amyloid dye methoxy-X34 bound both cerebrovascular amyloid deposits and neuritic plaques. Similarly, resorufin-positive staining was predominantly noted in fibrillar Aβ-laden vessels in postmortem AD brain tissues. Fluorescent labeling and multi-photon microscopy further revealed that both resorufin- and methoxy-X34-positive staining is colocalized to the vascular smooth muscle (VSMC layer of vessel segments that have severe disruption of VSMC arrangement, a characteristic feature of CAA. Resorufin also selectively visualized vascular amyloid deposits in live Tg2576 mice when administered topically, though not systemically. Resorufin derivatives with chemical modification at the 7-OH position of resorufin also

  2. Hybrid FMT-CT imaging of amyloid-beta plaques in a murine Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Damon; de Kleine, Ruben; MacLaurin, Sarah A; Miller, Eric; Brooks, Dana H; Krucker, Thomas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-02-15

    The need to study molecular and functional parameters of Alzheimer's disease progression in animal models has led to the development of disease-specific fluorescent markers. However, curved optical interfaces and a highly heterogeneous internal structure make quantitative fluorescence imaging of the murine brain a particularly challenging tomographic problem. We investigated the integration of X-ray computed tomography (CT) information into a state-of-the-art fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) scheme and establish that the dual-modality approach is essential for high fidelity reconstructions of distributed fluorescence within the murine brain, as compared to conventional fluorescence tomography. We employ this method in vivo using a fluorescent oxazine dye to quantify amyloid-beta plaque burden in transgenic APP23 mice modeling Alzheimer's disease. Multi-modal imaging allows for accurate signal localization and correlation of in vivo findings to ex vivo studies. The results point to FMT-CT as an essential tool for in vivo study of neurodegenerative disease in animal models and potentially humans.

  3. Affinity of nat/68Ga-Labelled Curcumin and Curcuminoid Complexes for β-Amyloid Plaques: Towards the Development of New Metal-Curcumin Based Radiotracers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rubagotti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin derivatives labelled with fluorine-18 or technetium-99m have recently shown their potential as diagnostic tools for Alzheimer’s disease. Nevertheless, no study by exploiting the labelling with gallium-68 has been performed so far, in spite of its suitable properties (positron emitter, generator produced radionuclide. Herein, an evaluation of the affinity for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils and for amyloid plaques of three nat/68Ga-labelled curcumin analogues, namely curcumin curcumin (CUR, bis-dehydroxy-curcumin (bDHC and diacetyl-curcumin (DAC, was performed. Affinity and specificity were tested in vitro on amyloid synthetic fibrils by using gallium-68 labelled compounds. Post-mortem brain cryosections from Tg2576 mice were used for the ex vivo visualization of amyloid plaques. The affinity of 68Ga(CUR2+, 68Ga(DAC2+, and 68Ga(bDHC2+ for synthetic β-amyloid fibrils was moderate and their uptake could be observed in vitro. On the other hand, amyloid plaques could not be visualized on brain sections of Tg2576 mice after injection, probably due to the low stability of the complexes in vivo and of a hampered passage through the blood–brain barrier. Like curcumin, all nat/68Ga-curcuminoid complexes maintain a high affinity for β-amyloid plaques. However, structural modifications are still needed to improve their applicability as radiotracers in vivo.

  4. Neuroinflammation in plaque and vascular beta-amyloid disorders: clinical and therapeutic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, Piet; Veerhuis, Rob; Familian, Atoosa; Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; van Gool, Willem A.; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.

    2008-01-01

    The cerebral beta-amyloid (Abeta) disorders show a great variability in the distribution of parenchymal and vascular amyloid deposits. To study the relationship between amyloid deposition and inflammatory responses in three distinct subtypes of cerebral Abeta disorders. The distribution of

  5. Differential Relationships of Reactive Astrocytes and Microglia to Fibrillar Amyloid Deposits in Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Muzikansky, Alona; Gómez-Isla, Teresa; Growdon, John H.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that astrocytes and microglia cluster around dense-core amyloid plaques in Alzheimer disease (AD), whether they are primarily attracted to amyloid deposits or are just reacting to plaque-associated neuritic damage remains elusive. We postulate that astrocytes and microglia may differentially respond to fibrillar amyloid β (Aβ). Therefore, we quantified the size distribution of dense-core Thioflavin-S (ThioS)-positive plaques in the temporal neocortex of 40 AD patients and the microglial and astrocyte responses in their vicinity (≤50 μm), and performed correlations between both measures. As expected, both astrocytes and microglia were clearly spatially associated with ThioS-positive plaques (p = 0.0001, ≤50 μm vs. >50 μm from their edge), but their relationship to ThioS-positive plaque size differed; larger ThioS-positive plaques were associated with more surrounding activated microglia (p = 0.0026), but this effect was not observed with reactive astrocytes. Microglial response to dense-core plaques appears to be proportional to their size, which we postulate reflects a chemotactic effect of Aβ. By contrast, plaque-associated astrocytic response does not correlate with plaque size and seems to parallel the behavior of plaque-associated neuritic damage. PMID:23656989

  6. Synthesis and evaluation of ethyleneoxylated and allyloxylated chalcone derivatives for imaging of amyloid β plaques by SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchigami, Takeshi; Yamashita, Yuki; Haratake, Mamoru; Ono, Masahiro; Yoshida, Sakura; Nakayama, Morio

    2014-05-01

    We report radioiodinated chalcone derivatives as new SPECT imaging probes for amyloid β (Aβ) plaques. The monoethyleneoxy derivative 2 and allyloxy derivative 8 showed a high affinity for Aβ(1-42) aggregates with Ki values of 24 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Fluorescent imaging demonstrated that 2 and 8 clearly stained thioflavin-S positive Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 transgenic mice. In vitro autoradiography revealed that [(125)I]2 displayed no clear accumulation toward Aβ plaques in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice, whereas the accumulation pattern of [(125)I]8 matched with the presence of Aβ plaques both in the brain sections of Tg2576 mice and an AD patient. In biodistribution studies using normal mice, [(125)I]2 showed preferable in vivo pharmacokinetics (4.82%ID/g at 2 min and 0.45%ID/g at 60 min), while [(125)I]8 showed only a modest brain uptake (1.62%ID/g at 2 min) with slow clearance (0.56%ID/g at 60 min). [(125)I]8 showed prospective binding properties for Aβ plaques, although further structural modifications are needed to improve the blood brain barrier permeability and washout from brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Early enriched environment exposure protects spatial memory and accelerates amyloid plaque formation in APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Montarolo

    Full Text Available Enriched environment exposure improves several aspects of cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease patients and in animal models and, although the role of amyloid plaques is questionable, several studies also assessed their response to enriched environment, with contrasting results. Here we report that rearing APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice in an enriched environment since birth rescued the spatial memory impairment otherwise present at 6 months of age. At the same time, the exposure to the enriched environment caused a transient acceleration of plaque formation, while there was no effect on intracellular staining with the 6E10 antibody, which recognizes β-amyloid, full length amyloid precursor protein and its C-terminal fragments. The anticipation of plaque formation required exposure during early development, suggesting an action within critical periods for circuits formation. On the other hand, chronic neuronal activity suppression by tetrodotoxin decreased the number of plaques without affecting intracellular amyloid. These results indicate that enriched environment exposure since early life has a protective effect on cognitive deterioration although transiently accelerates amyloid deposition. In addition, the effects of the enriched environment might be due to increased neuronal activity, because plaques were reduced by suppression of electrical signaling by tetrodotoxin.

  8. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Chalcone Derivatives with 99mTc/Re Complexes as Potential Probes for Detection of β-Amyloid Plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Four 99mTc-labeled chalcone derivatives and their corresponding rhenium analogues were tested as potential probes for imaging β-amyloid plaques. The chalcones showed higher affinity for Aβ(1−42) aggregates than did 99mTc complexes. In sections of brain tissue from an animal model of AD, the four Re chalcones intensely stained β-amyloid plaques. In biodistribution experiments using normal mice, 99mTc-BAT-chalcone ([99mTc]17) displayed high uptake in the brain (1.48% ID/g) at 2 min postinjection. The radioactivity washed out from the brain rapidly (0.17% ID/g at 60 min), a highly desirable feature for an imaging agent. [99mTc]17 may be a potential probe for imaging β-amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s brains. PMID:22778849

  10. Neurobiological pathways to Alzheimer's disease: Amyloid-beta, TAU protein or both?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Jesus R. de Paula

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive cognitive decline, including memory loss, behavioral and psychological symptoms and personality changes. The neuropathological hallmarks of AD are the presence of neuritic (senile plaques (NP and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, along with neuronal loss, dystrophic neurites, and gliosis. Neuritic plaques are extracellular lesions and their main constituent is the amyloid-b42 peptide (Ab42. Neurofibrillary tangles are intracellular lesions that are mainly composed of hyperphosphorylated TAU protein. In this article, we review the major hypotheses concerning the physiopathology of AD, focusing on the b-amyloid cascade as primary events (supported by the "baptists" and cytoskeletal abnormalities secondary to the hyperphosphorylation of protein TAU (as advocated by the "Tauists". We further provide an integrative view of the physiopathology of AD.

  11. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Disaggregation of amyloid plaque in brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice with daily subcutaneous administration of a tetravalent bispecific antibody that targets the transferrin receptor and the Abeta amyloid peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbria, Rachita K; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Boado, Ruben J; Pardridge, William M

    2013-09-03

    Anti-amyloid antibodies (AAA) are under development as new therapeutics that disaggregate the amyloid plaque in brain in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the AAAs are large molecule drugs that do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), in the absence of BBB disruption. In the present study, an AAA was re-engineered for receptor-mediated transport across the BBB via the endogenous BBB transferrin receptor (TfR). A single chain Fv (ScFv) antibody form of an AAA was fused to the carboxyl terminus of each heavy chain of a chimeric monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the mouse TfR, and this produced a tetravalent bispecific antibody designated the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein. Unlike a conventional AAA, which has a plasma half-time of weeks, the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein is cleared from plasma in mice with a mean residence time of about 3 h. Therefore, a novel protocol was developed for the treatment of one year old presenilin (PS)-1/amyloid precursor protein (APP) AD double transgenic PSAPP mice, which were administered daily subcutaneous (sc) injections of 5 mg/kg of the cTfRMAb-ScFv fusion protein for 12 consecutive weeks. At the end of the treatment, brain amyloid plaques were quantified with confocal microscopy using both Thioflavin-S staining and immunostaining with the 6E10 antibody against Abeta amyloid fibrils. Fusion protein treatment caused a 57% and 61% reduction in amyloid plaque in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. No increase in plasma immunoreactive Abeta amyloid peptide, and no cerebral microhemorrhage, was observed. Chronic daily sc treatment of the mice with the fusion protein caused no immune reactions and only a low titer antidrug antibody response. In conclusion, re-engineering AAAs for receptor-mediated BBB transport allows for reduction in brain amyloid plaque without cerebral microhemorrhage following daily sc treatment for 12 weeks.

  13. Thal Amyloid Stages Do Not Significantly Impact the Correlation Between Neuropathological Change and Cognition in the Alzheimer Disease Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Qian, Jing; Muzikansky, Alona; Monsell, Sarah E; Montine, Thomas J; Frosch, Matthew P; Betensky, Rebecca A; Hyman, Bradley T

    2016-06-01

    The 2012 neuropathological criteria for the diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD) summarize the extent of AD neuropathological change with an ABC score, which is a composite of the Thal stage of amyloid deposition (A), the Braak stage of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) (B), and the CERAD neuritic plaque score (C). NFTs and neuritic plaques are well-established contributors to cognitive impairment, but whether the Thal amyloid stage independently predicts antemortem cognition remains unknown. We used the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center autopsy data set to build adjacent-categories logit regression models with CDR-SOB and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores as cognitive outcome variables. Increasing CERAD scores were independently associated with higher CDR-SOB scores, whereas increasing Braak NFT stages predicted both higher CDR-SOB and lower MMSE scores. Increasing Thal amyloid stages were not significantly independently associated with either outcome measure. Increasing ABC scores predicted higher CDR-SOB and lower MMSE scores. These results raise the possibility that Thal amyloid stages do not substantially contribute to predicting antemortem cognition compared to CERAD neuritic plaque scores and Braak NFT stages, and suggest that the diffuse amyloid deposits participating in the assignment of Thal amyloid stages are neutral with respect to clinically detectable cognitive and functional changes. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. BACE1 elevation is involved in amyloid plaque development in the triple transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease: differential Aβ antibody labeling of early-onset axon terminal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Macklin, Lauren N; Cai, Huaibin; Luo, Xue-Gang; Oddo, Salvatore; Laferla, Frank M; Struble, Robert G; Rose, Gregory M; Patrylo, Peter R; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2012-02-01

    β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilins mutations cause early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). Some FAD-based mouse models produce amyloid plaques, others do not. β-Amyloid (Aβ) deposition can manifest as compact and diffuse plaques; it is unclear why the same Aβ molecules aggregate in different patterns. Is there a basic cellular process governing Aβ plaque pathogenesis? We showed in some FAD mouse models that compact plaque formation is associated with a progressive axonal pathology inherent with increased expression of β-secretase (BACE1), the enzyme initiating the amyloidogenic processing of APP. A monoclonal Aβ antibody, 3D6, visualized distinct axon terminal labeling before plaque onset. The present study was set to understand BACE1 and axonal changes relative to diffuse plaque development and to further characterize the novel axonal Aβ antibody immunoreactivity (IR), using triple transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice as experimental model. Diffuse-like plaques existed in the forebrain in aged transgenics and were regionally associated with increased BACE1 labeled swollen/sprouting axon terminals. Increased BACE1/3D6 IR at axon terminals occurred in young animals before plaque onset. These axonal elements were also co-labeled by other antibodies targeting the N-terminal and mid-region of Aβ domain and the C-terminal of APP, but not co-labeled by antibodies against the Aβ C-terminal and APP N-terminal. The results suggest that amyloidogenic axonal pathology precedes diffuse plaque formation in the 3xTg-AD mice, and that the early-onset axonal Aβ antibody IR in transgenic models of AD might relate to a cross-reactivity of putative APP β-carboxyl terminal fragments.

  15. No evidence for involvement of plasma proteins or blood-borne cells in amyloid plaque formation in scrapie-affected mice. An immunohistoperoxidase study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Scott, J. R.; McBride, P. A.; Rozemuller, J. M.; Bruce, M. E.; Fraser, H.

    1987-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate blood-brain permeability and the possible involvement of plasma proteins and blood-borne cells in amyloid plaque formation in scrapie-affected mice. No abnormal extravasation of intravenously injected horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was found and with

  16. Delineating Amyloid Plaque Associated Neuronal Sphingolipids in Transgenic Alzheimer’s Disease Mice (tgArcSwe) Using MALDI Imaging Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The major pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are the progressive aggregation and accumulation of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and hyperphosphorylated tau protein into neurotoxic deposits. Aβ aggregation has been suggested as the critical early inducer, driving the disease progression. However, the factors that promote neurotoxic Aβ aggregation remain elusive. Imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) is a powerful technique to comprehensively elucidate the spatial distribution patterns of lipids, peptides, and proteins in biological tissue sections. In the present study, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS)-based imaging was used on transgenic Alzheimer’s disease mouse (tgArcSwe) brain tissue to investigate the sphingolipid microenvironment of individual Aβ plaques and elucidate plaque-associated sphingolipid alterations. Multivariate data analysis was used to interrogate the IMS data for identifying pathologically relevant, anatomical features based on their lipid chemical profile. This approach revealed sphingolipid species that distinctly located to cortical and hippocampal deposits, whose Aβ identity was further verified using fluorescent amyloid staining and immunohistochemistry. Subsequent multivariate statistical analysis of the spectral data revealed significant localization of gangliosides and ceramides species to Aβ positive plaques, which was accompanied by distinct local reduction of sulfatides. These plaque-associated changes in sphingolipid levels implicate a functional role of sphingolipid metabolism in Aβ plaque pathology and AD pathogenesis. Taken together, the presented data highlight the potential of imaging mass spectrometry as a powerful approach for probing Aβ plaque-associated lipid changes underlying AD pathology. PMID:27984697

  17. Amyloid Plaque in the Human Brain Can Decompose from Aβ(1-40/1-42) by Spontaneous Nonenzymatic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Brian; Friedrich, Michael; Raftery, Mark; Truscott, Roger

    2016-03-01

    The degradation of long-lived proteins in the body is an important aspect of aging, and much of the breakdown is due to the intrinsic instability of particular amino acids. In this study, peptides were examined to discover if spontaneous nonenzymatic reactions could be responsible for the composition of Alzheimer's (AD) plaque in the human brain. The great majority of AD plaque consists of N-terminally truncated versions of Aβ(1-40/1-42), with the most abundant peptide commencing with Glu (residue 3 in Aβ1-40/1-42) that is present as pyroGlu. Several Asp residues are racemized in Aβ plaque, with residue 1 being predominantly l-isoAsp and peptide bond cleavage next to Ser 8 is also evident. In peptides, loss of the two N-terminal amino acids as a diketopiperazine was demonstrated at pH 7. For the Aβ N-terminal hexapeptide, AspAlaGluPheArgHis, this resulted in the removal of AspAla diketopiperazine and the generation of Glu as the new N-terminal residue. The Glu cyclized readily to pyroGlu. This pathway was altered significantly by zinc, which promoted pyroGlu formation but decreased AspAla diketopiperazine release. Zinc also facilitated cleavage on the N-terminal side of Ser 8. Racemization of the original N-terminal Asp to l-isoAsp was also detected and loss of one amino acid from the N-terminus. These data are therefore entirely consistent with plaque in the human brain forming from deposition of Aβ(1-40/1-42) and, over time, decomposing spontaneously. Since amyloid plaque is present in the human brain for years prior to the onset of AD, gradual spontaneous changes to the polypeptides within it will alter its properties and those of the oligomers that can diffuse from it. Such incremental changes in composition may therefore contribute to the origin of AD-associated cytotoxicity.

  18. Synthesis and evaluation of {sup 18}F-fluoroethylated benzothiazole derivatives for in vivo imaging of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Neurological Research, Klaus-Joachim-Zuelch Laboratories of the Max Planck Society and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Cologne, Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: bernd.neumaier@nf.mpg.de; Deisenhofer, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Sommer, C. [Department of Neuropathology, University of Mainz (Germany); Solbach, C.; Reske, S.N. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Mottaghy, F. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm, Ulm (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Amyloid aggregates play a major role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Targeting these aggregates by PET probes enables non-invasively the detection and quantification of amyloid deposit distribution in human brains. Based on benzothiazole core structure a series of amyloid imaging agents were developed. Currently [{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (Pittsburgh Compound-B (PIB) is the most specific and widely used amyloid imaging ligand. But due to the short half life of {sup 11}C, longer lived {sup 18}F-labeled derivatives offer logistic advantages and higher contrast images. In this work, three different [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substituted benzothiazole derivatives ([{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole, [{sup 18}F]2-((2'-(2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole and [{sup 18}F]2-(3'-((2-fluoroethoxy)-4'-amino)phenyl)benzothiazole) were synthesized via [{sup 18}F]fluoroethylation. The latter two derivatives with fluoroethoxy-substitution on the aromatic amino group showed very low binding affinity for amyloid aggregates. In contrast [{sup 18}F]2-(4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-6-(2-fluoroethoxy)benzothiazole with [{sup 18}F]fluoroethoxy-substitution in 6-position showed excellent amyloid imaging properties with respect to lipophilicity, brain entry and brain clearance in normal SCID mice, amyloid plaque binding affinity and specificity.

  19. RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates phospho-cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Minond, Dmitriy; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-01-01

    Loss of synaptic proteins and functional synapses in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as transgenic mouse models expressing amyloid-β protein precursor is now well established. However, the earliest age at which such loss of synapses occurs, and whether known markers of AD progression accelerate functional deficits is completely unknown. We previously showed that RanBP9 overexpression leads to enhanced amyloid plaque burden in a mouse model of AD. In this study, we found significant reductions in the levels of synaptophysin and spinophilin, compared with wild-type controls, in both the cortex and the hippocampus of 5- and 6-month old but not 3- or 4-month old APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice, and not in APΔE9 double transgenic mice, nor in RanBP9 single transgenic mice. Interestingly, amyloid plaque burden was also increased in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5-6 months. Consistent with these results, we found significant deficits in learning and memory in the APΔE9/RanBP9 mice at 5 and 6 month. These data suggest that increased amyloid plaques and accelerated learning and memory deficits and loss of synaptic proteins induced by RanBP9 are correlated. Most importantly, APΔE9/RanBP9 mice also showed significantly reduced levels of the phosphorylated form of cofilin in the hippocampus. Taken together these data suggest that RanBP9 overexpression down-regulates cofilin, causes early synaptic deficits and impaired learning, and accelerates accumulation of amyloid plaques in the mouse brain.

  20. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferretti Maria

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology.

  1. Minocycline corrects early, pre-plaque neuroinflammation and inhibits BACE-1 in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like amyloid pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A growing body of evidence indicates that inflammation is one of the earliest neuropathological events in Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, we have recently shown the occurrence of an early, pro-inflammatory reaction in the hippocampus of young, three-month-old transgenic McGill-Thy1-APP mice in the absence of amyloid plaques but associated with intracellular accumulation of amyloid beta petide oligomers. The role of such a pro-inflammatory process in the progression of the pathology remained to be elucidated. Methods and results To clarify this we administered minocycline, a tetracyclic derivative with anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties, to young, pre-plaque McGill-Thy1-APP mice for one month. The treatment ended at the age of three months, when the mice were still devoid of plaques. Minocycline treatment corrected the up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 observed in young transgenic placebo mice. Furthermore, the down-regulation of inflammatory markers correlated with a reduction in amyloid precursor protein levels and amyloid precursor protein-related products. Beta-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 activity and levels were found to be up-regulated in transgenic placebo mice, while minocycline treatment restored these levels to normality. The anti-inflammatory and beta-secretase 1 effects could be partly explained by the inhibition of the nuclear factor kappa B pathway. Conclusions Our study suggests that the pharmacological modulation of neuroinflammation might represent a promising approach for preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease neuropathology at its initial, pre-clinical stages. The results open new vistas to the interplay between inflammation and amyloid pathology. PMID:22472085

  2. Green-fluorescent protein+ Astrocytes Attach to beta-Amyloid Plaques in an Alzheimer Mouse Model and GFPare Sensitive for Clasmatodendrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eHumpel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is pathologically characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ plaques and Tau pathology. It is well-established that Aβ plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes, highly expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. In order to study the cellular interaction of reactive astrocytes with Aβ plaques, we crossbred mice overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations (APP-SweDI with mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP under the GFAP-promotor. Three-dimensional confocal microscopy revealed a tight association and intense sprouting of astrocytic fine branched processes towards Aβ plaques in 12 month old mice. In order to study phagocytosis, 110 µm thick brain slices from 12 month old crossbred mice were cultured overnight, however, we found that the GFP fluorescence faded away, distal processes degenerated and a complete loss of astrocytic morphology was seen (clasmatodendrosis. In summary, our data show that GFP+ reactive astrocytes make intense contact with Aβ plaques but these cells are highly vulnerable for degeneration.

  3. Conversion of Synthetic Aβ to In Vivo Active Seeds and Amyloid Plaque Formation in a Hippocampal Slice Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Renata; Langer, Franziska; Mahler, Jasmin; Skodras, Angelos; Vlachos, Andreas; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M; Kaeser, Stephan A; Neher, Jonas J; Eisele, Yvonne S; Pietrowski, Marie J; Nilsson, K Peter R; Deller, Thomas; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Heimrich, Bernd; Jucker, Mathias

    2016-05-04

    The aggregation of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in brain is an early event and hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We combined the advantages of in vitro and in vivo approaches to study cerebral β-amyloidosis by establishing a long-term hippocampal slice culture (HSC) model. While no Aβ deposition was noted in untreated HSCs of postnatal Aβ precursor protein transgenic (APP tg) mice, Aβ deposition emerged in HSCs when cultures were treated once with brain extract from aged APP tg mice and the culture medium was continuously supplemented with synthetic Aβ. Seeded Aβ deposition was also observed under the same conditions in HSCs derived from wild-type or App-null mice but in no comparable way when HSCs were fixed before cultivation. Both the nature of the brain extract and the synthetic Aβ species determined the conformational characteristics of HSC Aβ deposition. HSC Aβ deposits induced a microglia response, spine loss, and neuritic dystrophy but no obvious neuron loss. Remarkably, in contrast to in vitro aggregated synthetic Aβ, homogenates of Aβ deposits containing HSCs induced cerebral β-amyloidosis upon intracerebral inoculation into young APP tg mice. Our results demonstrate that a living cellular environment promotes the seeded conversion of synthetic Aβ into a potent in vivo seeding-active form. In this study, we report the seeded induction of Aβ aggregation and deposition in long-term hippocampal slice cultures. Remarkably, we find that the biological activities of the largely synthetic Aβ aggregates in the culture are very similar to those observed in vivo This observation is the first to show that potent in vivo seeding-active Aβ aggregates can be obtained by seeded conversion of synthetic Aβ in a living (wild-type) cellular environment. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/365084-10$15.00/0.

  4. Immunization with the SDPM1 peptide lowers amyloid plaque burden and improves cognitive function in the APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiou-Miin; Devries, Sarah; Camboni, Marybeth; Glass, Matthew; Martin, Paul T

    2010-09-01

    Vaccination has become an important therapeutic approach to the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, immunization with Abeta amyloid can have unwanted, potentially lethal, side effects. Here we demonstrate an alternative peptide-mimotope vaccine strategy using the SDPM1 peptide. SDPM1 is a 20 amino acid peptide bounded by cysteines that binds tetramer forms of Abeta(1-40)- and Abeta(1-42)-amyloids and blocks subsequent Abeta amyloid aggregation. Immunization of mice with SDPM1 induced peptide-mimotope antibodies with the same biological activity as the SDPM1 peptide. When done prior to the onset of amyloid plaque formation, SDPM1 vaccination of APPswePSEN1(A246E) transgenic mice reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40) and Abeta(1-42) levels in the brain, improved cognitive performance in Morris water maze tests, and resulted in no increased T cell responses to immunogenic or Abeta peptides or brain inflammation. When done after plaque burden was already significant, SDPM1 immunization still significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden and Abeta(1-40/1-42) peptide levels in APPswePSEN1(A246E) brain without inducing encephalitogenic T cell responses or brain inflammation, but treatment at this stage did not improve cognitive function. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel vaccine approach for Alzheimer's disease where immunization with an Abeta(1-40/1-42) amyloid-specific binding and blocking peptide is used to inhibit the development of neuropathology and cognitive dysfunction.

  5. Maysin and Its Flavonoid Derivative from Centipedegrass Attenuates Amyloid Plaques by Inducting Humoral Immune Response with Th2 Skewed Cytokine Response in the Tg (APPswe, PS1dE9 Alzheimer's Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Song

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia in the elderly. The etiology of AD and its underlying mechanism are still not clear. In a previous study, we found that an ethyl acetate extract of Centipedegrass (CG (i.e., EA-CG contained 4 types of Maysin derivatives, including Luteolin, Isoorientin, Rhamnosylisoorientin, and Derhamnosylmaysin, and showed protective effects against Amyloid beta (Aβ by inhibiting oligomeric Aβ in cellular and in vitro models. Here, we examined the preventative effects of EA-CG treatment on the Aβ burden in the Tg (Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9 AD mouse model. We have investigated the EA-CG efficacy as novel anti-AD likely preventing amyloid plaques using immunofluorescence staining to visually analyze Aβ40/42 and fibril formation with Thioflavin-S or 6E10 which are the profile of immunoreactivity against epitope Aβ1-16 or neuritic plaque, the quantitation of humoral immune response against Aβ, and the inflammatory cytokine responses (Th1 and Th2 using ELISA and QRT-PCR. To minimize the toxicity of the extracted CG, we addressed the liver toxicity in response to the CG extract treatment in Tg mice using relevant markers, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST/ alanine aminotransferase (ALT measurements in serum. The EA-CG extract significantly reduced the Aβ burden, the concentration of soluble Aβ40/42 protein, and fibril formation in the hippocampus and cortex of the Tg mice treated with EA-CG (50 mg/kg BW/day for 6 months compared with the Tg mice treated with a normal diet. Additionally, the profile of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed that the levels of Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-10 cytokines are more significantly increased than Th1 (interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin-2(IL-2 in the sera. These results suggest that the EA-CG fraction induces IL-4/IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory cytokines (Th2 rather than pro

  6. Radiation dosimetry and biodistribution of the beta-amyloid plaque imaging tracer {sup 11}C-BTA-1 in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thees, S. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Neumaier, B.; Glatting, G.; Deisenhofer, S.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Arnim, C.A.F. von [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Abt. fuer Neurologie

    2007-07-01

    Aim: [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole({sup 11}C-BTA-1)) is a thioflavin-T derivative that has been one of the promising PET tracers for imaging of amyloid plaque distribution in the Alzheimer patients brain in vivo. The biodistribution and dosimetry of this tracer in humans is presented and compared to the results of a previous dosimetry and biodistribution study of another thioflavin-T derivative [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-hydroxy-(4'-(methylaminophenyl)-benzothiazole ({sup 11}C-OH-BTA-1)) in baboons. Methods: Five subjects underwent 2D dynamic PET imaging. Source organs were segmented using a semiautomatic algorithm based on clustering. Residence times for each source organ were determined by analytical integration of an exponential fit of the time activity curves. Finally organ doses were estimated using the software OLINDA/EXM. Results: The administration of 286 {+-} 93 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 was well tolerated by all subjects. Effective radiation dose was 4.3 {mu}Sv/MBq, range 3.6-5.0 {mu}Sv/MBq. In four ofthe five subjects the liver, in one of the subjects the gallbladder was the critical organ. Conclusion: The radiation burden of a single dose of 300 MBq {sup 11}C-BTA-1 is within the accepted limits for research purpose. In contrast to the previous non-human primate study revealing the gallbladder as the critical organ for {sup 11}C-6-OH-BTA-1, we found the liver as the critical organ in humans using {sup 11}C-BTA-1. Possible explanations may be (1) a reduced bile concentration of {sup 11}C-BTA-1 due to the absent OH-group or (2) a different hepatic metabolism of thioflavin derivatives in human and baboon. (orig.)

  7. Distribution of beta/A4 protein and amyloid precursor protein in hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozemuller, A J; Roos, R A; Bots, G T; Kamphorst, W; Eikelenboom, P; Van Nostrand, W E

    1993-05-01

    Brain amyloidosis with abundant beta/A4 protein deposition in plaques and cortical and meningeal vessels is found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type (HCHWA-D). In contrast to AD, no neuritic pathology or classical congophilic plaques are found in HCHWA-D. Unlike most AD cases, the congophilic angiopathy in HCHWA-D is very severe. It is still unknown whether beta/A4 deposits in plaques and vessels have the same origin. In this study, we have used frozen cortical tissue of HCHWA-D and AD patients to investigate the beta/A4 amyloid protein and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in different types of plaques and congophilic angiopathy. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies against synthetic beta/A4 proteins and antibodies against APP including MAbP2-1, a monoclonal antibody against purified protease nexin-2, which is the secreted form of APP. In contrast to immunohistochemical studies on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, frozen tissue of HCHWA-D patients revealed a very high number of beta/A4 plaques resembling AD. All plaques were of the diffuse type. Double-staining with MabP2-1 and beta/A4 antisera revealed: 1) the presence of APP immunoreactivity in classical plaques and transitional forms; 2) the absence of APP immunoreactivity in diffuse plaques in HCHWA-D and AD; and 3) pronounced APP immunoreactivity in congophilic vessels in HCHWA-D in contrast to weak APP staining in congophilic vessels in AD. Together these findings suggest that: a) the presence of APP in plaques is related to neuritic changes; b) different processes occur in amyloid formation in plaques and vessels; and c) differences exist between the process of amyloid formation in HCHWA-D and AD.

  8. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B

    2010-01-01

    Intrahippocampal injections of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta)1-42 in rats result in memory impairment and in reduction of hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor levels. In order to investigate how changes in 5-HT2A levels and functionality relate to the progressive accumulation of Abeta protein, we studied 5......]-PIB autoradiography was performed for measuring 5-HT2A receptor, serotonin transporter (SERT), and Abeta plaque levels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), frontoparietal cortex (FPC), dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and somatosensory cortex. To investigate 5-HT2A receptor functionality......, animals were treated with the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI and head-twitch response (HTR) subsequently recorded. Expression level of the immediate early gene c-fos was measured by in situ hybridization. We found that the age-related increase in Abeta plaque burden was accompanied by a significant decrease...

  9. Bacterial Amyloid and DNA are Important Constituents of Senile Plaques: Further Evidence of the Spirochetal and Biofilm Nature of Senile Plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith

    2016-06-13

    It has long been known that spirochetes form clumps or micro colonies in vitro and in vivo. Cortical spirochetal colonies in syphilitic dementia were considered as reproductive centers for spirochetes. Historic and recent data demonstrate that senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are made up by spirochetes. Spirochetes, are able to form biofilm in vitro. Senile plaques are also reported to contain elements of biofilm constituents. We expected that AβPP and Aβ (the main components of senile plaques) also occur in pure spirochetal biofilms, and bacterial DNA (an important component of biofilm) is also present in senile plaques. Histochemical, immunohistochemical, and in situ hybridization techniques and the TUNEL assay were used to answer these questions. The results obtained demonstrate that Aβ and DNA, including spirochete-specific DNA, are key components of both pure spirochetal biofilms and senile plaques in AD and confirm the biofilm nature of senile plaques. These results validate validate previous observations that AβPP and/or an AβPP-like amyloidogenic protein are an integral part of spirochetes, and indicate that bacterial and host derived Aβ are both constituents of senile plaques. DNA fragmentation in senile plaques further confirms their bacterial nature and provides biochemical evidence for spirochetal cell death. Spirochetes evade host defenses, locate intracellularly, form more resistant atypical forms and notably biofilms, which contribute to sustain chronic infection and inflammation and explain the slowly progressive course of dementia in AD. To consider co-infecting microorganisms is equally important, as multi-species biofilms result in a higher resistance to treatments and a more severe dementia.

  10. Multimodal imaging Gd-nanoparticles functionalized with Pittsburgh compound B or a nanobody for amyloid plaques targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansieri, Jonathan; Plissonneau, Marie; Stransky-Heilkron, Nathalie; Dumoulin, Mireille; Heinrich-Balard, Laurence; Rivory, Pascaline; Morfin, Jean-François; Toth, Eva; Saraiva, Maria Joao; Allémann, Eric; Tillement, Olivier; Forge, Vincent; Lux, François; Marquette, Christel

    2017-07-01

    Gadolinium-based nanoparticles were functionalized with either the Pittsburgh compound B or a nanobody (B10AP) in order to create multimodal tools for an early diagnosis of amyloidoses. The ability of the functionalized nanoparticles to target amyloid fibrils made of β-amyloid peptide, amylin or Val30Met-mutated transthyretin formed in vitro or from pathological tissues was investigated by a range of spectroscopic and biophysics techniques including fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticles functionalized by both probes efficiently interacted with the three types of amyloid fibrils, with K D values in 10 micromolar and 10 nanomolar range for, respectively, Pittsburgh compound B and B10AP nanoparticles. Moreover, they allowed the detection of amyloid deposits on pathological tissues. Such functionalized nanoparticles could represent promising flexible and multimodal imaging tools for the early diagnostic of amyloid diseases, in other words, Alzheimer's disease, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and the familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy.

  11. Alterations in Cerebral Cortical Glucose and Glutamine Metabolism Precedes Amyloid Plaques in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens V; Christensen, Sofie K; Aldana, Blanca I

    2017-01-01

    in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque formation. Acutely isolated cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices of 3-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9 and wild-type control mice were incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose, [1,2-(13)C]acetate or [U-(13)C]glutamine, and tissue extracts were analyzed...... slices of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice incubated in media containing [U-(13)C]glucose. No changes in glial [1,2-(13)C]acetate metabolism were observed. Cerebral cortical slices from APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice exhibited a reduced capacity for uptake and oxidative metabolism of glutamine. Furthermore, the ATP synthesis...... rate tended to be decreased in isolated whole-brain mitochondria of APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Thus, several cerebral metabolic changes are evident in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mouse prior to amyloid plaque deposition, including altered glucose metabolism, hampered glutamine processing and mitochondrial...

  12. Glutamate system, amyloid β peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J.; Baker, Glen B.; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid β and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid β production, but also amyloid β can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness. PMID:22894822

  13. Glutamate system, amyloid ß peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J; Baker, Glen B; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid ß peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid ß and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid ß production, but also amyloid ß can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness.

  14. COPS5 protein overexpression increases amyloid plaque burden, decreases spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta, and exacerbates learning and memory deficits in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruizhi; Wang, Hongjie; Carrera, Ivan; Xu, Shaohua; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2015-04-03

    Brain accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β (Aβ) peptide because of increased processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), resulting in loss of synapses and neurodegeneration, is central to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Therefore, the identification of molecules that regulate Aβ generation and those that cause synaptic damage is crucial for future therapeutic approaches for AD. We demonstrated previously that COPS5 regulates Aβ generation in neuronal cell lines in a RanBP9-dependent manner. Consistent with the data from cell lines, even by 6 months, COPS5 overexpression in APΔE9 mice (APΔE9/COPS5-Tg) significantly increased Aβ40 levels by 32% (p plaque burden both in the cortex (54%, p < 0.01) and hippocampus (64%, p < 0.01). Interestingly, COPS5 overexpression increased RanBP9 levels in the brain, which, in turn, led to increased amyloidogenic processing of APP, as reflected by increased levels of sAPPβ and decreased levels of sAPPα. Furthermore, COPS5 overexpression reduced spinophilin in both the cortex (19%, p < 0.05) and the hippocampus (20%, p < 0.05), leading to significant deficits in learning and memory skills. Therefore, like RanBP9, COPS5 also plays a pivotal role in amyloid pathology in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Plant-based chimeric HPV-virus-like particles bearing amyloid-β epitopes elicit antibodies able to recognize amyloid plaques in APP-tg mouse and Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castro, R; Acero Galindo, G; García Salcedo, Y; Uribe Campero, L; Vazquez Perez, V; Carrillo-Tripp, M; Gevorkian, G; Gomez Lim, M A

    2017-11-01

    The main amyloid-beta (Aβ) variants detected in the human brain are full-length Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides; however, a significant proportion of AD brain Aβ consists also of N-terminal truncated/modified species. The majority of the previous immunotherapeutic strategies targeted the N-terminal immunodominant epitope of the full-length Aβ; however, most of the pathological N-truncated forms of Aβ lack this critical B cell epitope. Recently, virus-like particles (VLPs), self-assembled structures with highly ordered repetitive patterns on their surface and capable of inducing robust immune responses, were applied as a promising platform for various antigen expressions. In this study, we expressed in plants two chimeric HPV16 L1 capsid proteins obtained by introduction of the β-amyloid 11-28 epitope (Aβ 11-28) into the h4 helix or into the coil regions of the L1 protein. The Aβ 11-28 epitope was chosen because it is present in the full-length Aβ 1-42 as well as in the truncated/modified amyloid peptide species. After expression, we assembled the chimerical L1/Aβ 11-28 into a VLP in which the Aβ 11-28 epitope is exposed at very high density (360 times) on the surface of the VLP. The chimeric VLPs elicited in mice Aβ-specific antibodies binding to β-amyloid plaques in APP-tg mouse and AD brains. Our study is the first to demonstrate a successful production in plants and immunogenic properties in mice of chimeric HPV16 L1 VLPs bearing Aβ epitope that may be of potential relevance for the development of multivalent vaccines for a multifactorial disease such as AD.

  16. The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica M; King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the effect of such neural damage on the onset and progression of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque pathology is not well understood. This study utilized an in vivo model of focal brain injury to examine how localized damage may acutely affect the onset and progression of Aβ plaque deposition as well as inflammatory and synaptic changes, in the APP/PS1 (APPSWE, PSEN1dE9) transgenic model of AD relative to wild-type (Wt) mice. Acute focal brain injury in 3- and 9-month-old APP/PS1 and Wt mice was induced by insertion of a needle into the somatosensory neocortex, as compared to sham surgery, and examined at 24h and 7d post-injury (PI). Focal brain injury did not induce thioflavine-S stained or (pan-Aβ antibody) MOAB-2-labeled plaques at either 24h or 7d PI in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice or Wt mice. Nine-month-old APP/PS1 mice demonstrate cortical Aβ plaques but focal injury had no statistically significant (p>0.05) effect on thioflavine-S or MOAB-2 plaque load surrounding the injury site at 24h PI or 7d PI. There was a significant (p0.05). For both Wt and APP/PS1 mice alike, synaptophysin puncta near the injury site were significantly reduced 24h PI (compared to sites distant to the injury and the corresponding area in sham mice; p0.05). There was no significant effect of genotype on this response (p>0.05). These results indicate that focal brain injury and the associated microglial response do not acutely alter Aβ plaque deposition in the APP/PS1 mouse model. Furthermore the current study demonstrated that the brains of both Wt and APP/PS1 mice are capable of recovering lost synaptophysin immunoreactivity post-injury, the latter in the presence of Aβ plaque pathology that causes synaptic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The 5XFAD Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Exhibits an Age-Dependent Increase in Anti-Ceramide IgG and Exogenous Administration of Ceramide Further Increases Anti-Ceramide Titers and Amyloid Plaque Burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Michael B; Dasgupta, Somsankar; Wang, Guanghu; Zhu, Gu; He, Qian; Kong, Ji Na; Bieberich, Erhard

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that 5XFAD Alzheimer's disease model mice develop an age-dependent increase in antibodies against ceramide, suggesting involvement of autoimmunity against ceramide in Alzheimer's disease pathology. To test this, we increased serum anti-ceramide IgG (2-fold) by ceramide administration and analyzed amyloid plaque formation in 5XFAD mice. There were no differences in soluble or total amyloid-β levels. However, females receiving ceramide had increased plaque burden (number, area, and size) compared to controls. Ceramide-treated mice showed an increase of serum exosomes (up to 3-fold using Alix as marker), suggesting that systemic anti-ceramide IgG and exosome levels are correlated with enhanced plaque formation.

  18. Plaque-Associated Local Toxicity Increases over the Clinical Course of Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pozo, Alberto; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid (senile) plaques, one of the two pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are associated with dystrophic neurites and glial responses, both astrocytic and microglial. Although plaque burden remains relatively stable through the clinical course of AD, whether these features of local plaque toxicity continue to worsen over the course of the disease is unclear. We performed an unbiased plaque-centered quantification of SMI312+ dystrophic neurites, GFAP+ reactive astrocytes, and IBA1+ and CD68+ activated microglia in randomly selected dense-core (Thioflavin-S+) plaques from the temporal neocortex of 40 AD subjects with a symptom duration ranging from 4 to 20 years, and nine nondemented control subjects with dense-core plaques. Dystrophic neurites (Kendall τ = 0.34, P = 0.001), reactive astrocytes (Kendall τ = 0.30, P = 0.003), and CD68+ (Kendall τ = 0.48, P < 0.0001), but not IBA1 microglia (Kendall τ = 0.045, P = 0.655), exhibited a significant positive correlation with symptom duration. When excluding control subjects, only the positive association between CD68+ microglia and symptom duration remained significant (Kendall τ = 0.39, P = 0.0003). The presence of the APOEε4 allele did not affect these results. We conclude that plaques exert an increasing toxicity in the surrounding neuropil over the clinical course of AD, thereby potentially contributing to cognitive decline. PMID:26687817

  19. Advances in Aβ plaque detection and the value of knowing: overcoming challenges to improving patient outcomes in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovalekic, Aleksandar; Bullich, Santiago; Catafau, Ana; de Santi, Susan

    2016-12-01

    Clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be challenging as numerous diseases mimic the characteristics of AD. In this light, recent guidelines developed by different associations and working groups point out the need for biomarkers to support AD diagnosis. This paper discusses 18F-labeled radiotracers (which are indicated for PET imaging of the brain) and ongoing clinical studies that aim to generate new evidence for the usage of amyloid imaging. In addition to their relatively long half-life, these agents are known for their high sensitivity and high negative predictive values for detection of neuriticplaques. Comparisons with other biomarkers are provided and implications of diagnostic disclosures discussed. Finally, recent data from clinical trials underscore the importance of amyloid PET for detecting, quantifying and monitoring Aβ plaque deposits.

  20. Role of P2X7 and P2Y2 receptors on α-secretase-dependent APP processing: Control of amyloid plaques formation “in vivo” by P2X7 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teresa Miras-Portugal

    2015-01-01

    The in vivo approach was made possible by the use of J20 mice, a transgenic mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD expressing human APP mutant protein. This animal exhibits prominent amyloid plaques by six months of age. In vivo inhibition of the P2X7 receptor induced a significant decrease in the number and size of hippocampal amyloid plaques. This reduction is mediated by an increase in the proteolytic processing of APP through α-secretase activity, which correlates with an increase in the phosphorylated form of GSK-3, a less active form of this enzyme. The in vivo findings corroborate the therapeutic potential of P2X7 antagonists in the treatment of FAD.

  1. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Gulyas, Balazs; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nanyang Technological University, NTU - Imperial College, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Singapore (Singapore); Toth, Miklos; Haeggkvist, Jenny [Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordberg, Agneta [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Translational Alzheimer Neurobiology, Centre for Alzheimer Research, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-04-17

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer {sup 11}C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ({sup 11}C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using {sup 3}H-AZD2184, {sup 3}H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ{sub 42} and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. {sup 11}C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal {sup 11}C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography {sup 3}H-AZD2184 and {sup 3}H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with {sup 11}C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in {sup 3}H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ{sub 42} deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more

  2. Astrocytosis precedes amyloid plaque deposition in Alzheimer APPswe transgenic mouse brain: a correlative positron emission tomography and in vitro imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Ni, Ruiqing; Gulyás, Balázs; Tóth, Miklós; Häggkvist, Jenny; Halldin, Christer; Voytenko, Larysa; Marutle, Amelia; Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-06-01

    Pathological studies suggest that neuroinflammation is exacerbated by increased beta-amyloid (Aβ) levels in the brain early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The time course and relationships between astrocytosis and Aβ deposition were examined using multitracer in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in an AD transgenic mouse model, followed by postmortem autoradiography and immunohistochemistry analysis. PET imaging with the amyloid plaque tracer (11)C-AZD2184 and the astroglial tracer (11)C-deuterium-L-deprenyl ((11)C-DED) was carried out in APPswe mice aged 6, 8-15 and 18-24 months (4-6 animals/group) and in wild-type (wt) mice aged 8-15 and 18-24 months (3-6 animals/group). Tracer uptake was quantified by region of interest analysis using PMOD software and a 3-D digital mouse brain atlas. Postmortem brain tissues from the same APPswe and wt mice in all age groups were analysed for Aβ deposition and astrocytosis by in vitro autoradiography using (3)H-AZD2184, (3)H-Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) and (3)H-L-deprenyl and immunostaining performed with antibodies for Aβ42 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in sagittal brain sections. (11)C-AZD2184 PET retention in the cerebral cortices of APPswe mice was significantly higher at 18-24 months than in age-matched wt mice. Cortical and hippocampal (11)C-DED PET binding was significantly higher at 6 months than at 8-15 months or 18-24 months in APPswe mice, and it was also higher than at 8-15 months in wt mice. In vitro autoradiography (3)H-AZD2184 and (3)H-PIB binding confirmed the in vivo findings with (11)C-AZD2184 and demonstrated age-dependent increases in Aβ deposition in APPswe cortex and hippocampus. There were no significant differences between APPswe and wt mice in (3)H-L-deprenyl autoradiography binding across age groups. Immunohistochemical quantification demonstrated more Aβ42 deposits in the cortex and hippocampus and more GFAP(+) reactive astrocytes in the hippocampus at 18-24 months than

  3. Effects of Hypertension and Anti-Hypertensive Treatment on Amyloid-β (Aβ) Plaque Load and Aβ-Synthesizing and Aβ-Degrading Enzymes in Frontal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Emma L; Miners, James S; Kehoe, Patrick G; Love, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data associate hypertension with a predisposition to Alzheimer's disease (AD), and a number of postmortem and in vivo studies also demonstrate that hypertension increases amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology. In contrast, anti-hypertensive medications reportedly improve cognition and decrease the risk of AD, while certain classes of anti-hypertensive drugs are associated with decreased AD-related pathology. We investigated the effects of hypertension and anti-hypertensive treatment on Aβ plaque load in postmortem frontal cortex in AD. Aβ load was significantly increased in hypertensive (n = 20) relative to normotensive cases (n = 62) and was also significantly higher in treated (n = 9) than untreated hypertensives (n = 11). We then looked into mechanisms by which hypertension and treatment might increase Aβ load, focusing on Aβ-synthesizing enzymes, β- and γ-secretase, and Aβ-degrading enzymes, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) and neprilysin. ACE and IDE protein levels were significantly lower in hypertensive (n = 21) than normotensive cases (n = 64), perhaps translating to decreased Aβ catabolism in hypertensives. ACE level was significantly higher in treated (n = 9) than untreated hypertensives (n = 12), possibly reflecting feedback upregulation of the renin-angiotensin system. Prospective studies in larger cohorts stratified according to anti-hypertensive drug class are needed to confirm these initial findings and to elucidate the interactions between hypertension, anti-hypertensive treatments, and Aβ metabolism.

  4. Amyloid Plaques in Retina for Diagnosis in Alzheimer’s patients: unsatisfactory results from a mata-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangling Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of retinal β-amyloid (Aβ peptide accumulation is a novel diagnostic method for Alzheimer’s disease (AD, but there is, as yet, no conclusive evidence of its accuracy.Aim: To identify the diagnostic accuracy of pathological retinal Aβ detection for AD by a meta-analytic approach.Methods: Electronic and reference searches were conducted to identify studies related to the diagnostic effects of retinal Aβ detection in AD that met pre-defined inclusion criteria. The QUADAS-2 tool was employed to assess the risk of bias, and Review Manager plus the Open Meta-Analyst were used to perform the data analysis.Results: From 493 unduplicated reports, five studies with small sample sizes were included in this review. Six staining methods were employed. The eligible studies showed extremely broad ranges of sensitivity (0 to 1.00 and specificity (0.50 to 1.00 with substantial heterogeneity. The estimates of positive likelihood ratio (PLR, negative likelihood ratio (NLR, diagnostic odds ratio (DOR were also extremely varied (from 0.71 to 11.57 for PLR, from 0.04 to 1.11 for NLR, and from 0.69 to 297.00 for DOR.Conclusions: The limited number of eligible studies and their methodological heterogeneity make it impossible to come to a conclusion whether pathological retinal Aβ detection is an effective diagnostic tool for AD. More studies, especially large surveys investigating retina Aβ load with quantitative methods among consecutive or random samples, are needed to determine the accuracy of Aβ detection for diagnosing AD.

  5. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vascellari, Sarah; Orrù, Christina D; Hughson, Andrew G; King, Declan; Barron, Rona; Wilham, Jason M; Baron, Gerald S; Race, Brent; Pani, Alessandra; Caughey, Byron

    2012-01-01

    Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE)-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc)) can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc) propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C), by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen)) as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc) (PrP(Res)). Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8) and 10(-13) were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res) levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C). Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res), RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res) strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res) levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc) immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  6. Prion seeding activities of mouse scrapie strains with divergent PrPSc protease sensitivities and amyloid plaque content using RT-QuIC and eQuIC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Vascellari

    Full Text Available Different transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE-associated forms of prion protein (e.g. PrP(Sc can vary markedly in ultrastructure and biochemical characteristics, but each is propagated in the host. PrP(Sc propagation involves conversion from its normal isoform, PrP(C, by a seeded or templated polymerization mechanism. Such a mechanism is also the basis of the RT-QuIC and eQuIC prion assays which use recombinant PrP (rPrP(Sen as a substrate. These ultrasensitive detection assays have been developed for TSE prions of several host species and sample tissues, but not for murine models which are central to TSE pathogenesis research. Here we have adapted RT-QuIC and eQuIC to various murine prions and evaluated how seeding activity depends on glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI anchoring and the abundance of amyloid plaques and protease-resistant PrP(Sc (PrP(Res. Scrapie brain dilutions up to 10(-8 and 10(-13 were detected by RT-QuIC and eQuIC, respectively. Comparisons of scrapie-affected wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing GPI anchorless PrP showed that, although similar concentrations of seeding activity accumulated in brain, the heavily amyloid-laden anchorless mouse tissue seeded more rapid reactions. Next we compared seeding activities in the brains of mice with similar infectivity titers, but widely divergent PrP(Res levels. For this purpose we compared the 263K and 139A scrapie strains in transgenic mice expressing P101L PrP(C. Although the brains of 263K-affected mice had little immunoblot-detectable PrP(Res, RT-QuIC indicated that seeding activity was comparable to that associated with a high-PrP(Res strain, 139A. Thus, in this comparison, RT-QuIC seeding activity correlated more closely with infectivity than with PrP(Res levels. We also found that eQuIC, which incorporates a PrP(Sc immunoprecipitation step, detected seeding activity in plasma from wild-type and anchorless PrP transgenic mice inoculated with 22L, 79A and/or RML

  7. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mattsson, Niklas; Bremell, Daniel; Anckarsäter, Rolf; Blennow, Kaj; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Abeta deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis...

  8. {beta} - amyloid imaging probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Imaging distribution of {beta} - amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease is very important for early and accurate diagnosis. Early trial of the {beta} -amyloid plaques includes using radiolabeled peptides which can be only applied for peripheral {beta} - amyloid plaques due to limited penetration through the blood brain barrier (BBB). Congo red or Chrysamine G derivatives were labeled with Tc-99m for imaging {beta} - amyloid plaques of Alzheimer patient's brain without success due to problem with BBB penetration. Thioflavin T derivatives gave breakthrough for {beta} - amyloid imaging in vivo, and a benzothiazole derivative [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 brought a great success. Many other benzothiazole, benzoxazole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine, and styrylbenzene derivatives have been labeled with F-18 and I-123 to improve the imaging quality. However, [C-11]6-OH-BTA-1 still remains as the best. However, short half-life of C-11 is a limitation of wide distribution of this agent. So, it is still required to develop an Tc-99m, F-18 or I-123 labeled agent for {beta} - amyloid imaging agent.

  9. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Anckarsäter Henrik; Blennow Kaj; Bremell Daniel; Anckarsäter Rolf; Mattsson Niklas; Zetterberg Henrik; Hagberg Lars

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-amyloid (Aβ) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Ly...

  10. The Beta-Amyloid Protein of Alzheimer’s Disease: Communication Breakdown by Modifying the Neuronal Cytoskeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtar, Sara H.; Bakhuraysah, Maha M.; Cram, David S.; Steven Petratos

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most prevalent severe neurological disorders afflicting our aged population. Cognitive decline, a major symptom exhibited by AD patients, is associated with neuritic dystrophy, a degenerative growth state of neurites. The molecular mechanisms governing neuritic dystrophy remain unclear. Mounting evidence indicates that the AD-causative agent, β -amyloid protein (A β ), induces neuritic dystrophy. Indeed, neuritic dystrophy is commonly found decorating A ...

  11. Amyloid-β precursor protein facilitates the regulator of calcineurin 1-mediated apoptosis by downregulating proteasome subunit α type-5 and proteasome subunit β type-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yili; Deng, Yu; Zhang, Shuting; Luo, Yawen; Cai, Fang; Zhang, Zhuohua; Zhou, Weihui; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal loss. Amyloid-β protein, the major component of neuritic plaques, is the proteolytic product of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP). APP and the regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) genes on chromosome 21 play a pivotal role in promoting plaque formation and neuronal apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying AD pathogenesis in DS is not well defined. In this study, we demonstrated that APP significantly increased RCAN1 level in both cells and transgenic mice. Overexpression of APP significantly reduced the expression of 2 proteasome subunits, proteasome subunit α type-5 and proteasome subunit β type-7, leading to the inhibition of proteasomal degradation of RCAN1. Furthermore, knockdown of RCAN1 expression attenuated APP-induced neuronal apoptosis. Taken together, the results clearly showed that APP has a previously unknown function in regulating RCAN1-mediated neuronal apoptosis through the proteasome pathway. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which overexpression of APP and RCAN1 causes neurodegeneration and AD pathogenesis in DS, and it provides new insights into the potential of targeting APP-induced proteasomal impairment and RCAN1 accumulation for AD and DS treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H Hansen

    Full Text Available One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP and presenilin-1 (PS1 are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c., or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.. In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  13. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  14. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  15. Neuropep-1 ameliorates learning and memory deficits in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model, increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in the brain, and causes reduction of amyloid beta plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Kyoo; Kim, Hong-Gi; Baek, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Woo-Ram; Park, Dong-Ik; Park, Jong-Sung; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Kil-Lyong

    2014-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits, hyperphosphorylated tau deposition, and cognitive dysfunction. Abnormalities in the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which plays an important role in learning and memory formation, have been reported in the brains of AD patients. A BDNF modulating peptide (Neuropep-1) was previously identified by positional-scanning synthetic peptide combinatorial library. Here we examine the neuroprotective effects of Neuropep-1 on several in vitro neurotoxic insults, and triple-transgenic AD mouse model (3xTg-AD). Neuropep-1 protects cultured neurons against oligomeric Aβ1-42, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, and glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Neuropep-1 injection also significantly rescues the spatial learning and memory deficits of 3xTg-AD mice compared with vehicle-treated control group. Neuropep-1 treatment markedly increases hippocampal and cortical BDNF levels. Furthermore, we found that Neuropep-1-injected 3xTg-AD mice exhibit dramatically reduced Aβ plaque deposition and Aβ levels without affecting tau pathology. Neuropep-1 treatment does not alter the expression or activity of full-length amyloid precursor protein, α-, β-, or γ-secretase, but levels of insulin degrading enzyme, an Aβ degrading enzyme, were increased. These findings suggest Neuropep-1 may be a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Vulnerable Plaque Menu Topics Topics FAQs Vulnerable Plaque Article Info En español Swelling (inflammation) is your ... aging, including coronary artery disease . What is vulnerable plaque? For many years, doctors have thought that the ...

  17. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes increases amyloid plaque deposition in AD transgenic mice through modulating AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Yu, Song; Hu, Jiang-Ping; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Yue; Liu, Hai-Xing; Liu, Yu-Li

    2014-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated of that diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an increased prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms are still obscure. We developed a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic AD transgenic mouse model and evaluated the effect of hyperglycemia on senile plaque formation. Our data showed that administration of STZ increased the level of blood glucose and increased the advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in brain tissue, and further enhanced the expression levels of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the brain, and accelerated the senile plaque formation in the transgenic mice. Our results showed that STZ-induced insulin-deficient hyperglycemia caused the pathophysiology of AD in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by modulating the AGEs/RAGE/NF-κB pathway. Our study suggests that there is a close linkage of DM and cerebral amyloidosis in the pathogenesis of AD.

  18. Amyloid- and FDG-PET in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease: Correlation with pathological prion protein in neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías-Guiu, Jordi A; Guerrero-Márquez, Carmen; Cabrera-Martín, María Nieves; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Romeral, María; Mayo, Diego; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Moreno-Ramos, Teresa; Carreras, José Luis; Matías-Guiu, Jorge

    2017-05-04

    The role of positron emission tomography (PET) in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease is less defined than in other neurodegenerative diseases. We studied the correlation between the uptake of (18)F-florbetaben and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose with pathological prion protein deposition in histopathology in a case. A patient with 80 y old with a rapid neurological deterioration with a confirmed diagnosis of CJD was studied. PET and MRI studies were performed between 13-20 d before the death. A region of interest analysis was performed using Statistical Parametric Mapping. MRI showed atrophy with no other alterations. FDG-PET showed extensive areas of hypometabolism including left frontoparietal lobes as well as bilateral thalamus. Correlation between uptake of (18)F-florbetaben and pathological prion protein deposition was r = 0.786 (p < 0.05). Otherwise, correlation between uptake of (18)F-FDG and pathological prion protein was r = 0.357 (p = 0.385). Immunohistochemistry with β-amyloid did not show amyloid deposition or neuritic plaques. Our study supports the use of FDG-PET in the assessment of CJD. FDG-PET may be especially useful in cases of suspected CJD and negative MRI. Furthermore, this case report provides more evidence about the behavioral of amyloid tracers, and the possibility of a low-affinity binding to other non-amyloid proteins, such as the pathological prion protein, is discussed.

  19. Amyloid Positivity Using [18F]Flutemetamol-PET and Cognitive Deficits in Nondemented Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Dustin B; Atkinson, Taylor J; Dalley, Bonnie C A; Suhrie, Kayla R; Horn, Kevin P; Rasmussen, Kelli M; Beardmore, Britney E; Burrell, Lance D; Duff, Kevin; Hoffman, John M

    2017-09-01

    Little research exists examining the relationship between beta-amyloid neuritic plaque density via [18F]flutemetamol binding and cognition; consequently, the purpose of the current study was to compare cognitive performances among individuals having either increased amyloid deposition (Flute+) or minimal amyloid deposition (Flute-). Twenty-seven nondemented community-dwelling adults over the age of 65 underwent [18F]flutemetamol amyloid-positron emission tomography imaging, along with cognitive testing using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and select behavioral measures. Analysis of variance was used to identify the differences among the cognitive and behavioral measures between Flute+/Flute- groups. Flute+ participants performed significantly worse than Flute- participants on RBANS indexes of immediate memory, language, delayed memory, and total scale score, but no significant group differences in the endorsed level of depression or subjective report of cognitive difficulties were observed. Although these results are preliminary, [18F]flutemetamol accurately tracks cognition in a nondemented elderly sample, which may allow for better prediction of cognitive decline in late life.

  20. Frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 with the MAPT R406W mutation presenting with a broad distribution of abundant senile plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Chiho; Kobayashi, Katsuji; Kitamura, Tatsuru; Ujike, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-02-01

    We report the autopsy results of a patient with familial dementia who was diagnosed as having frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) with an R406W mutation in the microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) gene. This patient showed Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like clinical manifestations from the age of 59, with reduced β-amyloid1-42 (Aβ42 ) and elevated total and phosphorylated tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid. He did not present with any apparent parkinsonism throughout the disease course. His autopsy at age 73 showed atrophy and neurodegeneration in many brain regions, particularly in the antero-medial temporal cortex and hippocampus, followed by the frontal lobes, with abundant neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, a diffuse distribution of Aβ-positive senile plaques, including many neuritic plaques, was observed and classified as stage C according to the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease (CERAD) criteria. These results suggest that analyzing of the MAPT gene is essential for diagnosing familial dementia, even if amyloid markers such as Aβ42 in the cerebrospinal fluid and amyloid imaging are positive, or if neuropathological findings indicate a diagnosis of AD. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  1. Prevalence of amyloid PET positivity in dementia syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Amyloid-β positron emission tomography (PET) imaging allows in vivo detection of fibrillar plaques, a core neuropathological feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). Its diagnostic utility is still unclear because amyloid plaques also occur in patients with non-AD dementia. OBJECTIVE: To us...

  2. Familial influence on plaque formation in the beagle brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, M J; White, R; Patel, E; Markesbery, W R; Watson, C R; Geddes, J W

    1992-12-01

    Aged canines exhibit central neuropathological changes strikingly similar to those seen in patients with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, brain tissue from pure bred beagles raised in a controlled environment were examined for Alzheimer-like pathology. The mean age of the animals was 15.6 years. The incidence of plaques among these 29 dogs was 65.5%. Of the 19 samples that demonstrated Alzheimer-like pathology, 18 were characterized as diffuse and one as neuritic. Plaque density was found to be independent of age. Plaque numbers were highest in the perirhinal cortex and the adjacent temporal cortex. Familial influence on plaque development is supported by congruence within 15 of the 16 litters examined (p < 0.001). In this environmentally controlled group the diffuse plaques were rarely converted to the dense neuritic plaques found in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Radiosynthesis and evaluation of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 and [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 as potential radiotracers for in vivo imaging of {beta}-amyloid plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, B.; Deisenhofer, S.; Fuerst, D.; Thees, S.; Buck, A.K.; Glatting, G.; Landwehrmeyer, G.B.; Krause, B.J.; Reske, S.N.; Mottaghy, F.M. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany); Arnim, C.A.F. von [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany); Mueller, H.D.; Sommer, C. [Dept. of Neuropathology, Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Aim: To evaluate the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(4'-(methylaminophenyl))-benzothiazole ([{sup 11}C]BTA-1) as well as [N-methyl-{sup 11}C]2-(3'-methyl-4'-(methylamino)phenyl)-benzothiazole ([{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1) as diagnostic markers of amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Material, methods: Brain uptake and clearance was determined in wild-type mice. Binding affinities (K{sub i}) of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 and [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 for aggregated A{beta}(1-40) fibrils were assessed. Autoradiography was performed on brain sections of AD patients. To demonstrate binding specificity in vivo BTA-1 was injected i.p. in transgenic mice (Tg2576). Brain sections were analysed consecutively. Additionally, a [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 PET study of an AD patient and a healthy control was performed. Results: In mice brain uptake and clearance of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is compatible with the half life of {sup 11}C (2 min: 12.7% ID/g; 30 min: 4.6% ID/g). In contrast clearance rate of [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 is too slow (2 mm 4% ID/g; 30 min 12% ID/g) to achieve sufficient clearance of free and non specifically bound radioactivity. K{sub i} of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is 11 nmol/l and that of [{sup 11}C]3'-Me-BTA-1 27 nmol/l. Both radioligands label A{beta} selectively and specifically in AD patients and transgenic mice in vitro. The in vivo stained brain sections show a labelling of A{beta} plaques. The AD patient has a higher pre-frontal, parietal and striatal [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 accumulation than the healthy control. Metabolite analysis revealed approximately 75% intact [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 after 30min in plasma. [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 is favourable for in vivo imaging of A{beta} due to its rapid brain entry, sufficient clearance and good binding affinity for A{beta}. Conclusion: The ability to label A{beta} plaques in vivo in human subjects supports the suitability of [{sup 11}C]BTA-1 as a plaque imaging agent. (orig.)

  4. Beta-amyloid deposition in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D; Montenigro, Philip H; Alvarez, Victor E; Xia, Weiming; Crary, John F; Tripodis, Yorghos; Daneshvar, Daniel H; Mez, Jesse; Solomon, Todd; Meng, Gaoyuan; Kubilus, Caroline A; Cormier, Kerry A; Meng, Steven; Babcock, Katharine; Kiernan, Patrick; Murphy, Lauren; Nowinski, Christopher J; Martin, Brett; Dixon, Diane; Stern, Robert A; Cantu, Robert C; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2015-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is defined pathologically by the abnormal accumulation of tau in a unique pattern that is distinct from other tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although trauma has been suggested to increase amyloid β peptide (Aβ) levels, the extent of Aβ deposition in CTE has not been thoroughly characterized. We studied a heterogeneous cohort of deceased athletes and military veterans with neuropathologically diagnosed CTE (n = 114, mean age at death = 60) to test the hypothesis that Aβ deposition is altered in CTE and associated with more severe pathology and worse clinical outcomes. We found that Aβ deposition, either as diffuse or neuritic plaques, was present in 52 % of CTE subjects. Moreover, Aβ deposition in CTE occurred at an accelerated rate and with altered dynamics in CTE compared to a normal aging population (OR = 3.8, p < 0.001). We also found a clear pathological and clinical dichotomy between those CTE cases with Aβ plaques and those without. Aβ deposition was significantly associated with the presence of the APOE ε4 allele (p = 0.035), older age at symptom onset (p < 0.001), and older age at death (p < 0.001). In addition, when controlling for age, neuritic plaques were significantly associated with increased CTE tauopathy stage (β = 2.43, p = 0.018), co-morbid Lewy body disease (OR = 5.01, p = 0.009), and dementia (OR = 4.45, p = 0.012). A subset of subjects met the diagnostic criteria for both CTE and AD, and in these subjects both Aβ plaques and total levels of Aβ1-40 were increased at the depths of the cortical sulcus compared to the gyral crests. Overall, these findings suggest that Aβ deposition is altered and accelerated in a cohort of CTE subjects compared to normal aging and that Aβ is associated with both pathological and clinical progression of CTE independent of age.

  5. Amyloid-β positron emission tomography imaging probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepe, Vladimir; Moghbel, Mateen C; Långström, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly rising prevalence and cost of Alzheimer's disease in recent decades has made the imaging of amyloid-β deposits the focus of intense research. Several amyloid imaging probes with purported specificity for amyloidplaques are currently at various stages of FDA approval. However...

  6. Heat shock proteins and amateur chaperones in amyloid-Beta accumulation and clearance in Alzheimer's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    The pathologic lesions of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are characterized by accumulation of protein aggregates consisting of intracellular or extracellular misfolded proteins. The amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein accumulates extracellularly in senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, whereas the

  7. Caspase-6 Activation in Familial Alzheimer Disease Brains Carrying Amyloid Precursor Protein, Presenilin I or Presenilin II Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Steffen; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Ghetti, Bernardino; Winblad, Bengt; LeBlanc, Andréa C.

    2010-01-01

    We previously demonstrated the activation of Caspase-6 in the hippocampus and cortex in cases of mild, moderate, severe and very severe Alzheimer disease (AD). To determine whether Caspase-6 is also activated in familial AD, we performed an immunohistochemical analysis of active Caspase-6 and Tau cleaved by Caspase-6 in temporal cortex and hippocampal tissue sections from cases of familial AD. The cases included 5 carrying the amyloid precursor protein K670N, M671L Swedish mutation, 1 carrying the amyloid precursor protein E693G Arctic mutation, 2 each carrying the Presenilin I M146V, F105L, A431E, V261F, Y115C mutations, and 1 with the Presenilin II N141I mutation. Active Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was found in all cases. Caspase-6 immunoreactivity was observed in neuritic plaques or cotton wool plaques in some cases, neuropil threads and neurofibrillary tangles. These results indicate that Caspase-6 is activated in familial forms of AD, as previously observed in sporadic forms. Since sporadic and familial AD cases have similar pathological features, these results support a fundamental role of Caspase-6 in the pathophysiology of both familial and sporadic AD. PMID:19915487

  8. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine R Sadleir

    Full Text Available β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ, the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD. BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1 a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2 a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3 a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and

  9. Genetic Inhibition of Phosphorylation of the Translation Initiation Factor eIF2α Does Not Block Aβ-Dependent Elevation of BACE1 and APP Levels or Reduce Amyloid Pathology in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R.; Eimer, William A.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Osten, Pavel; Vassar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ), the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). BACE1 is elevated ∼2–3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ−dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1) a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV) system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2) a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3) a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5′ untranslated region (UTR) required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and APP

  10. Genetic inhibition of phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α does not block Aβ-dependent elevation of BACE1 and APP levels or reduce amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadleir, Katherine R; Eimer, William A; Kaufman, Randal J; Osten, Pavel; Vassar, Robert

    2014-01-01

    β-site amyloid precursor protein (APP) cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) initiates the production of β-amyloid (Aβ), the major constituent of amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). BACE1 is elevated ∼2-3 fold in AD brain and is concentrated in dystrophic neurites near plaques, suggesting BACE1 elevation is Aβ-dependent. Previously, we showed that phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α de-represses translation of BACE1 mRNA following stress such as energy deprivation. We hypothesized that stress induced by Aβ might increase BACE1 levels by the same translational mechanism involving eIF2α phosphorylation. To test this hypothesis, we used three different genetic strategies to determine the effects of reducing eIF2α phosphorylation on Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation in vitro and in vivo: 1) a two-vector adeno-associated virus (AAV) system to express constitutively active GADD34, the regulatory subunit of PP1c eIF2α phosphatase; 2) a non-phosphorylatable eIF2α S51A knockin mutation; 3) a BACE1-YFP transgene lacking the BACE1 mRNA 5' untranslated region (UTR) required for eIF2α translational regulation. The first two strategies were used in primary neurons and 5XFAD transgenic mice, while the third strategy was employed only in 5XFAD mice. Despite very effective reduction of eIF2α phosphorylation in both primary neurons and 5XFAD brains, or elimination of eIF2α-mediated regulation of BACE1-YFP mRNA translation in 5XFAD brains, Aβ-dependent BACE1 elevation was not decreased. Additionally, robust inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation did not block Aβ-dependent APP elevation in primary neurons, nor did it reduce amyloid pathology in 5XFAD mice. We conclude that amyloid-associated BACE1 elevation is not caused by translational de-repression via eIF2α phosphorylation, but instead appears to involve a post-translational mechanism. These definitive genetic results exclude a role for eIF2α phosphorylation in Aβ-dependent BACE1 and APP elevation

  11. Peripheral administration of the soluble TNF inhibitor XPro1595 modifies brain immune cell profiles, decreases beta-amyloid plaque load, and rescues impaired long-term potentiation in 5xFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Kathryn P; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kannarkat, George T; Chang, Jianjun; Sniffen, Lindsey; Wildner, Mary E; Norris, Christopher M; Tansey, Malú G

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and animal model studies have implicated inflammation and peripheral immune cell responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peripheral immune cells including T cells circulate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy adults and are found in the brains of AD patients and AD rodent models. Blocking entry of peripheral macrophages into the CNS was reported to increase amyloid burden in an AD mouse model. To assess inflammation in the 5xFAD (Tg) mouse model, we first quantified central and immune cell profiles in the deep cervical lymph nodes and spleen. In the brains of Tg mice, activated (MHCII + , CD45 high , and Ly6C high ) myeloid-derived CD11b + immune cells are decreased while CD3 + T cells are increased as a function of age relative to non-Tg mice. These immunological changes along with evidence of increased mRNA levels for several cytokines suggest that immune regulation and trafficking patterns are altered in Tg mice. Levels of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (sTNF) modulate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and are increased in CSF and brain parenchyma post-mortem in AD subjects and Tg mice. We report here that in vivo peripheral administration of XPro1595, a novel biologic that sequesters sTNF into inactive heterotrimers, reduced the age-dependent increase in activated immune cells in Tg mice, while decreasing the overall number of CD4 + T cells. In addition, XPro1595 treatment in vivo rescued impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) measured in brain slices in association with decreased Aβ plaques in the subiculum. Selective targeting of sTNF may modulate brain immune cell infiltration, and prevent or delay neuronal dysfunction in AD. Immune cells and cytokines perform specialized functions inside and outside the brain to maintain optimal brain health; but the extent to which their activities change in response to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration is not well understood. Our findings indicate that neutralization of s

  12. Subependymal plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains--why are they so different from compact kuru plaques?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska, Beata; Liberski, Paweł P; Brown, Paul

    2008-01-01

    We report here routine thin-section and immunogold electron microscopic studies on diffuse plaques in scrapie-affected hamster brains. These plaques were not discernible by routine HE staining. Ultrastructurally, plaques were recognized as areas of low electron density containing haphazardly-oriented fibrils, but not as stellate compact structures typical of mouse scrapie models; hence we labelled them "loose plaques". Following immunohistochemistry at the electron microscopy level, fibrils within plaques were heavily decorated with PrP-conjugated gold particles. Loose plaques were located beneath the basal border of the ependymal cells and around blood vessels in the adjacent subependymal neuropil. When dystrophic neurites containing electron-dense inclusion bodies, some of them autophagic vacuoles [59], were seen within the plaque perimeter, they always remained PrP-negative. Some microglial cells were observed in close contact with PrP-positive plaques, and secondary lysosomes within these cells were heavily decorated with gold particles.

  13. Plaques of Alzheimer's disease originate from cysts of Borrelia burgdorferi, the Lyme disease spirochete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Alan B

    2006-01-01

    Here is hypothesized a truly revolutionary notion that rounded cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi are the root cause of the rounded structures called plaques in the Alzheimer brain. Rounded "plaques' in high density in brain tissue are emblematic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Plaques may be conceptualized as rounded "pock mark-like" areas of brain tissue injury. In this century, in brain tissue of AD, plaques are Amyloid Plaques according to the most up to date textbooks. In the last century, however, Dr. Alois Alzheimer did not require amyloid as the pathogenesis for either the disease or for the origin of its plaques. Surely, amyloid is an event in AD, but it may not be the primal cause of AD. Indeed in plaques, amyloid is regularly represented by the "congophilic core" structure which is so named because the waxy amyloid material binds the congo red stain and is congophilic. However an accepted subset of plaques in AD is devoid of a congophilic amyloid core region (these plaques "cotton wool" type plaques, lack a central congophilic core structure). Furthermore, there is "plaque diversity" in Alzheimer's; small, medium and large plaques parallel variable cystic diameters for Borrelia burgdorferi. Perturbations of AD plaque structure (i.e. young plaques devoid of a central core and older plaques with or without a central core structure) offer room for an alternate pathway for explanation of ontogeny of the plaque structures. If amyloid is not required to initiate all of the possible plaques in Alzheimer's, is it possible that amyloid just a by product of a more fundamental primal path to dementia? If a byproduct status is assigned to amyloid in the realm of plaque formation, then is amyloid also an epiphenomenon rather than a primary pathogenesis for Alzheimer's disease. In the "anatomy is destiny" model, cysts of borrelia are always round. Why then not accept roundness as a fundamental "structure determines function" argument for the answer to the mystery of

  14. Minocycline does not affect amyloid beta phagocytosis by human microglial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Familian, Atoosa; Eikelenboom, Piet; Veerhuis, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Activated microglia accumulate in amyloid beta (Abeta) plaques containing amyloid associated factors SAP and C1q in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Microglia are involved in AD pathogenesis by promoting Abeta plaque formation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand,

  15. Regional correlations between [11C]PIB PET and post-mortem burden of amyloid-beta pathology in a diverse neuropathological cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Imaging-pathological correlation studies show that in vivo amyloid-β (Aβ positron emission tomography (PET strongly predicts the presence of significant Aβ pathology at autopsy. We sought to determine whether regional PiB-PET uptake would improve sensitivity for amyloid detection in comparison with global measures (experiment 1, and to estimate the relative contributions of different Aβ aggregates to in vivo PET signal (experiment 2. In experiment 1, 54 subjects with [11C] PiB-PET during life and postmortem neuropathologic examination (85.2% with dementia, interval from PET to autopsy 3.1 ± 1.9 years were included. We assessed Thal amyloid phase (N = 36 and CERAD score (N = 54 versus both global and regional PiB SUVRs. In experiment 2 (N = 42, PiB SUVR and post-mortem amyloid β burden was analyzed in five customized regions of interest matching regions sampled at autopsy. We assessed the relative contribution of neuritic plaques (NPs, diffuse plaques (DPs and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA to regional PIB SUVR using multi-linear regression. In experiment 1, there were no differences in Area Under the Curve for amyloid phase ≥ A2 and CERAD score ≥ C2 between global and highest regional PiB SUVR (p = 0.186 and 0.230. In experiment 2, when NPs, DPs, and/or CAA were included in the same model, moderate to severe NPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in all regions except for the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.414–0.804, p < 0.05, whereas DPs were independently correlated with PiB SUVR in the angular gyrus ROI (β = 0.446, p = 0.010. CAA was also associated with PiB SUVR in the inferior temporal and calcarine ROI (β = 0.222–0.355, p < 0.05. In conclusion, global PiB-PET SUVR performed as well as regional values for amyloid detection in our cohort. The substrate-specific binding of PiB might differ among the brain specific regions.

  16. Specific Triazine Herbicides Induce Amyloid-beta(42) Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portelius, Erik; Durieu, Emilie; Bodin, Marion; Cam, Morgane; Pannee, Josef; Leuxe, Charlotte; Mabondzo, Aloise; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Herve; Lee, Jung Yeol; Chang, Young-Tae; Stuber, Kathrin; Koch, Philipp; Fontaine, Gaelle; Potier, Marie-Claude; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Garbis, Spiros D.; Covaci, Adrian; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter; Karg, Frank; Flajolet, Marc; Omori, Chiori; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Meijer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid-beta protein precursor (A beta PP) ecretases leads to extracellular release of amyloid-beta (A beta) peptides. Increased production of A beta(42) over A beta(40) and aggregation into oligomers and plaques constitute an Alzheimer's disease (AD) hallmark.

  17. FKBP12 regulates the localization and processing of amyloid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These plaques are mainly constituted of amyloid beta peptide (A), a proteolytic product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). APP processing also generates the APP intracellular domain (AICD). We have previously demonstrated that AICD interacts with FKBP12, a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) ubiquitous in ...

  18. Positron Emission Tomography and Neuropathologic Estimates of Fibrillar Amyloid-β in a Patient With Down Syndrome and Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Fleisher, Adam; Chen, Kewei; Rogers, Joseph; Berk, Camryn; Reiman, Eric; Pontecorvo, Michael; Mintun, Mark; Skovronsky, Daniel; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sue, Lucia I.; Liebsack, Carolyn; Charney, Albert S.; Cole, Lauren; Belden, Christine; Beach, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Down syndrome appears to be associated with a virtually certain risk of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology by the age of 40 and a very high risk of dementia at older ages. The positron emission tomography (PET) ligand florbetapir F18 has been shown to characterize fibrillar Aβ in the living human brain and to provide a close correlation with subsequent Aβ neuropathology in individuals proximate to and after the end of life. The extent to which the most frequently used PET ligands can be used to detect fibrillar Aβ in patients with Down syndrome remains to be determined. Objectives To characterize PET estimates of fibrillar Aβ burden in a Down syndrome patient very close to the end of life and to compare them with neuropathologic assessment made after his death. Design/Methods With the family’s informed consent, florbetapir PET was used to study a 55-year-old Down syndrome patient with Alzheimer disease near the end of life; his brain was donated for neuropathologic assessment when he died 14 days later. Visual ratings of cerebral florbetapir uptake were performed by trained readers who were masked to the patient’s diagnosis as part of a larger study, and an automated algorithm was used to characterize regional-to-cerebellar standard uptake value ratios in 6 cerebral regions of interest. Neuropathologic assessments were performed masked to the patient’s diagnosis or PET measurements. Results Visual ratings and automated analyses of the PET image revealed a heavy fibrillar Aβ burden in cortical, striatal, and thalamic regions, similar to that reported for patients with late-onset Alzheimer disease. This matched neuropathologic findings of frequent neuritic and diffuse plaques, as well as frequent amyloid angiopathy, except for neuropathologically demonstrated frequent cerebellar diffuse plaques and amyloid angiopathy that were not detected by the PET scan. Conclusions Florbetapir PET can be used to detect increased cerebral

  19. The role of amyloid-beta in the regulation of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, John E; Farr, Susan A

    2014-04-15

    In this review there is evidence that amyloid-beta peptide is a memory enhancer at physiological (picomolar) concentrations. Pathological overproduction of amyloid-beta leads to impaired memory, oxidative damage, damage to the blood brain barrier, neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaque formation. Antisenses to amyloid precursor protein (APP) can reverse these effects in mice when they lower amyloid-beta protein to physiological levels. Data suggests that overproduction of APP leads to oxidative stress producing a vicious cycle of neuronal damage. For these reasons we have revised the "amyloid cascade hypothesis" removing emphasis from the plaque to amyloid-beta overproduction and suggest that an "amyloid-beta mitochondrial vicious cycle" hypothesis may be a better pathophysiological model for understanding Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of BASP1-mediated neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korshunova, Irina; Caroni, Pico; Kolkova, Kateryna

    2008-01-01

    The brain acid-soluble protein BASP1 (CAP-23, NAP-22) belongs to the family of growth-associated proteins, which also includes GAP-43, a protein recently shown to regulate neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, the effects of BASP1 overexpression were investigated...... in PC12E2 cells and primary hippocampal neurons. BASP1 overexpression stimulated neurite outgrowth in both cell types. The effects of BASP1 and trans-homophilic NCAM interactions were additive, and BASP1-induced neurite outgrowth was not inhibited by ectopic expression of cytoplasmic NCAM domains...... on neurite outgrowth. Finally, coexpression experiments with dominant negative and wild-type versions of GAP-43 and BASP1 demonstrated that the two proteins could substitute for each other with respect to induction of NCAM-independent neurite outgrowth, whereas BASP1 was unable to replace the stimulatory...

  1. Small heat shock protein HspB8: its distribution in Alzheimer's disease brains and its inhibition of amyloid-beta protein aggregation and cerebrovascular amyloid-beta toxicity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.; Boelens, W.C.; Otte-Holler, I.; Kamps, B.; Kusters, B.; Maat-Schieman, M.L.; Waal, R.M.W. de; Verbeek, M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by pathological lesions, such as senile plaques (SPs) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), both predominantly consisting of a proteolytic cleavage product of the amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP), the amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta). CAA is also the major

  2. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  3. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Middeldorp, J.; Kooijman, L.; Sluijs, J.A; Kooi, E.J.; Moeton, M.; Freriks, M.; Mizee, M.R.; Hol, E.M.

    2014-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of

  4. Glial fibrillary acidic protein isoform expression in plaque related astrogliosis in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Middeldorp, Jinte; Kooijman, Lieneke; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Kooi, Evert-Jan; Moeton, Martina; Freriks, Michel; Mizee, Mark R; Hol, Elly M

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid plaques are surrounded by reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Different GFAP isoforms have been identified that are differentially expressed by specific subpopulations of

  5. Imbalance in Fatty-Acid-Chain Length of Gangliosides Triggers Alzheimer Amyloid Deposition in the Precuneus

    OpenAIRE

    Naoto Oikawa; Teruhiko Matsubara; Ryoto Fukuda; Hanaki Yasumori; Hiroyuki Hatsuta; Shigeo Murayama; Toshinori Sato; Akemi Suzuki; Katsuhiko Yanagisawa

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer's disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autops...

  6. [Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlit, P; Keyvani, K; Krämer, M; Weber, R

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is one of the most frequent causes of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The deposition of beta amyloid leads to vascular fragility due to degeneration of vessel walls, formation of microaneurysms particularly in cortical blood vessels and fibrinoid vessel wall necrosis. The Congo red positive amyloid deposits are biochemically similar to the material comprising senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Recurrent or multiple simultaneous hemorrhages particularly in older patients should raise the suspicion of CAA. Gradient echo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive, non-invasive technique for identifying even very small hemorrhages and superficial siderosis, which may cause transient symptoms in CAA. There is also a correlation between CAA, microbleeding and cognitive decline. Inflammatory variants of CAA must be suspected whenever patients present with progressive dementia, headache and multifocal symptoms in association with CAA findings in MRI. Histopathologically, a distinction is made between CAA-related inflammation (CAA-ri) with perivascular inflammatory infiltrates and amyloid beta-related angiitis (ABRA) with histological detection of transmural vasculitis. Inflammatory variants should be treated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressants.

  7. Formation of soluble amyloid oligomers and amyloid fibrils by the multifunctional protein vitronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langen Ralf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multifunctional protein vitronectin is present within the deposits associated with Alzheimer disease (AD, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, atherosclerosis, systemic amyloidoses, and glomerulonephritis. The extent to which vitronectin contributes to amyloid formation within these plaques, which contain misfolded, amyloidogenic proteins, and the role of vitronectin in the pathophysiology of the aforementioned diseases is currently unknown. The investigation of vitronectin aggregation is significant since the formation of oligomeric and fibrillar structures are common features of amyloid proteins. Results We observed vitronectin immunoreactivity in senile plaques of AD brain, which exhibited overlap with the amyloid fibril-specific OC antibody, suggesting that vitronectin is deposited at sites of amyloid formation. Of particular interest is the growing body of evidence indicating that soluble nonfibrillar oligomers may be responsible for the development and progression of amyloid diseases. In this study we demonstrate that both plasma-purified and recombinant human vitronectin readily form spherical oligomers and typical amyloid fibrils. Vitronectin oligomers are toxic to cultured neuroblastoma and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE cells, possibly via a membrane-dependent mechanism, as they cause leakage of synthetic vesicles. Oligomer toxicity was attenuated in RPE cells by the anti-oligomer A11 antibody. Vitronectin fibrils contain a C-terminal protease-resistant fragment, which may approximate the core region of residues essential to amyloid formation. Conclusion These data reveal the propensity of vitronectin to behave as an amyloid protein and put forth the possibilities that accumulation of misfolded vitronectin may contribute to aggregate formation seen in age-related amyloid diseases.

  8. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  9. The effect of amyloid associated proteins on the expression of genes involved in amyloid-beta clearance by adult human astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Veerhuis, R.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Nielsen, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes appear to be important mediators in the clearance of amyloid beta1-42 (Aβ), the key component of senile plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, we found the amyloid associated proteins (AAPs) α1-antichymotrypsin (ACT), apolipoprotein J and E (ApoJ and ApoE) and a

  10. Dense-core senile plaques in the Flemish variant of Alzheimer's disease are vasocentric

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kumar-Singh (Samir); U. Lubke; C. Ceuterick; S. Serneels (Sally); K. Vennekens; C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.P. Timmermans; J-J. Martin (Jean-Jacques); E.A. van Marck (Eric); P. Cras (Patrick); R. Wang (Rong); J.M. Kros (Johan); J.C. van Swieten (John); C. van Broeckhoven (Christine)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractAlzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by deposition of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in diffuse and senile plaques, and variably in vessels. Mutations in the Abeta-encoding region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene are frequently associated with very severe forms of vascular Abeta

  11. Mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species lead to enhanced amyloid beta formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuner, K.; Schutt, T.; Kurz, C.; Eckert, S.H.; Schiller, C.; Occhipinti, A.; Mai, S.; Jendrach, M.; Eckert, G.P.; Kruse, S.E.; Palmiter, R.D.; Brandt, U.; Drose, S.; Wittig, I.; Willem, M.; Haass, C.; Reichert, A.S.; Muller, W.E.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Intracellular amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers and extracellular Abeta plaques are key players in the progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Still, the molecular signals triggering Abeta production are largely unclear. We asked whether mitochondrion-derived reactive oxygen species

  12. [Amyloid goiter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrívó, A; Péter, I; Bánkúti, B; Péley, G; Baska, F; Besznyák, I

    1999-03-21

    Amyloid goitre is at an extremely rare occurrence. Authors review the origin of disease and its symptoms, diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The disease may be due to either primary or secondary systemic or local amyloidosis. Diagnosis may be made even before surgery on anamnestic data, on very rapid growth of thyroid glands, on diffuse appearance, on other symptoms of systemic amyloidosis, on findings of iconographic procedures and on detection of amyloid in aspirates. Final diagnosis is based on histology. Surgical therapy is aiming at avoidance of the existing and the threatening consequences of expanding mass. The outcome is independent from thyroid surgery, it is related to other manifestations of amyloidosis. Concerning with the present case the chronic superior vena cava syndrome and chylous pleural effusion as first described symptoms and asymptomatic hyperthyroxinaemia is emphasised. Neither other organ involvement, nor primary amyloidogenous molecula was found during the 18 months follow up, so patient has secondary and localised amyloidosis.

  13. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Niklas; Bremell, Daniel; Anckarsäter, Rolf; Blennow, Kaj; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hagberg, Lars

    2010-06-22

    The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and beta-amyloid (Abeta) is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Abeta deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB). The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy) and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the beta-amyloid peptides Abeta38, Abeta40 and Abeta42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP) isoforms alpha-sAPP and beta-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated tau (P-tau) and neurofilament protein (NFL) were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of alpha-sAPP, beta-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  14. Neuroinflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis affects amyloid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anckarsäter Henrik

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP and β-amyloid (Aβ is widely studied in Alzheimer's disease, where Aβ deposition and plaque development are essential components of the pathogenesis. However, the physiological role of amyloid in the adult nervous system remains largely unknown. We have previously found altered cerebral amyloid metabolism in other neuroinflammatory conditions. To further elucidate this, we investigated amyloid metabolism in patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB. Methods The first part of the study was a cross-sectional cohort study in 61 patients with acute facial palsy (19 with LNB and 42 with idiopathic facial paresis, Bell's palsy and 22 healthy controls. CSF was analysed for the β-amyloid peptides Aβ38, Aβ40 and Aβ42, and the amyloid precursor protein (APP isoforms α-sAPP and β-sAPP. CSF total-tau (T-tau, phosphorylated tau (P-tau and neurofilament protein (NFL were measured to monitor neural cell damage. The second part of the study was a prospective cohort-study in 26 LNB patients undergoing consecutive lumbar punctures before and after antibiotic treatment to study time-dependent dynamics of the biomarkers. Results In the cross-sectional study, LNB patients had lower levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau, and higher levels of CSF NFL than healthy controls and patients with Bell's palsy. In the prospective study, LNB patients had low levels of CSF α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau at baseline, which all increased towards normal at follow-up. Conclusions Amyloid metabolism is altered in LNB. CSF levels of α-sAPP, β-sAPP and P-tau are decreased in acute infection and increase after treatment. In combination with earlier findings in multiple sclerosis, cerebral SLE and HIV with cerebral engagement, this points to an influence of neuroinflammation on amyloid metabolism.

  15. TREM2 deficiency reduces the efficacy of immunotherapeutic amyloid clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xianyuan; Werner, Georg; Bohrmann, Bernd; Liesz, Arthur; Mazaheri, Fargol; Capell, Anja; Feederle, Regina; Knuesel, Irene; Kleinberger, Gernot; Haass, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches are currently the most advanced treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antibodies against amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) bind to amyloid plaques and induce their clearance by microglia via Fc receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Dysfunctions of microglia may play a pivotal role in AD pathogenesis and could result in reduced efficacy of antibody-mediated Aβ clearance. Recently, heterozygous mutations in the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), a microglial gene involved in phagocytosis, were genetically linked to late onset AD Loss of TREM2 reduces the ability of microglia to engulf Aβ. We have now investigated whether loss of TREM2 affects the efficacy of immunotherapeutic approaches. We show that anti-Aβ antibodies stimulate Aβ uptake and amyloid plaque clearance in a dose-dependent manner in the presence or absence of TREM2. However, TREM2-deficient N9 microglial cell lines, macrophages as well as primary microglia showed significantly reduced uptake of antibody-bound Aβ and as a consequence reduced clearance of amyloid plaques. Titration experiments revealed that reduced efficacy of amyloid plaque clearance by Trem2 knockout cells can be compensated by elevating the concentration of therapeutic antibodies. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  16. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  17. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Narasimha Rao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients.

  18. Interaction of the amyloid β peptide with sodium dodecyl sulfate as a membrane-mimicking detergent.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemi, Shabestari M.; Meeuwenoord, N.J.; Filippov, D.V.; Huber, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    The amyloid β (A β) peptide is important in the context of Alzheimer's disease, since it is one of the major components of the fibrils that constitute amyloid plaques. Agents that can influence fibril formation are important, and of those, membrane mimics are particularly relevant, because the

  19. Plaque complement activation and cognitive loss in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, David A; Camp, Dianne M; Bennett, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background Complement activation is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but its significance is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between complement activation and cognition during the development of AD. Methods iC3b, C9, Bielschowsky, and Gallyas staining was performed on aged normal (n = 17), mild cognitively impaired (n = 12), and AD (n = 17–18) inferior temporal gyrus specimens. Plaques were counted in 10× fields with high numbers of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. One-way ANOVA was used to determine between-group differences for plaque counts and measures of cognitive function, and linear regression was used to evaluate global cognition as a function of Bielschowsky-stained plaques. Terms for iC3b- and C9-stained plaques were then added sequentially as additional predictors in a "mediation analysis" model. Results Complement was detected on plaques in all groups, and on neurofibrillary tangles only in AD specimens. iC3b, C9, and Bielschowsky-stained plaque counts increased 2.5- to 3-fold in AD vs. other groups (all p ≤ 0.01). C9 staining was present on some diffuse plaques, as well as on neuritic plaques. Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts were highly correlated, and were negatively correlated with cognitive measures. When the Bielschowsky plaque count was used as a predictor, its correlations with cognitive measures were statistically significant, but when iC3b and C9 plaque counts were added as additional predictors, these correlations were no longer significant. This loss of significance was attributed to multicollinearity, i.e., high correlations between Bielschowsky-stained and complement-stained plaque counts. Conclusion Both early-stage (iC3b) and late-stage (C9) complement activation occurs on neocortical plaques in subjects across the cognitive spectrum; contrary to previous reports, C9 is present on some diffuse plaques. Because of high correlations between complement-stained and

  20. Characterization of the beta amyloid precursor protein-like gene in the central nervous system of the crab Chasmagnathus. Expression during memory consolidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fustiñana Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human β-amyloid, the main component in the neuritic plaques found in patients with Alzheimer's disease, is generated by cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein. Beyond the role in pathology, members of this protein family are synaptic proteins and have been associated with synaptogenesis, neuronal plasticity and memory, both in vertebrates and in invertebrates. Consolidation is necessary to convert a short-term labile memory to a long-term and stable form. During consolidation, gene expression and de novo protein synthesis are regulated in order to produce key proteins for the maintenance of plastic changes produced during the acquisition of new information. Results Here we partially cloned and sequenced the beta-amyloid precursor protein like gene homologue in the crab Chasmagnathus (cappl, showing a 37% of identity with the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster homologue and 23% with Homo sapiens but with much higher degree of sequence similarity in certain regions. We observed a wide distribution of cappl mRNA in the nervous system as well as in muscle and gills. The protein localized in all tissues analyzed with the exception of muscle. Immunofluorescence revealed localization of cAPPL in associative and sensory brain areas. We studied gene and protein expression during long-term memory consolidation using a well characterized memory model: the context-signal associative memory in this crab species. mRNA levels varied at different time points during long-term memory consolidation and correlated with cAPPL protein levels Conclusions cAPPL mRNA and protein is widely distributed in the central nervous system of the crab and the time course of expression suggests a role of cAPPL during long-term memory formation.

  1. Acyl peptide hydrolase degrades monomeric and oligomeric amyloid-beta peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor Peter B

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-beta peptide is believed to cause malfunctioning of neurons in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Amyloid-beta exists in different assembly forms in the aging mammalian brain including monomers, oligomers, and aggregates, and in senile plaques, fibrils. Recent findings suggest that soluble amyloid-beta oligomers may represent the primary pathological species in Alzheimer's disease and the most toxic form that impairs synaptic and thus neuronal function. We previously reported the isolation of a novel amyloid-beta-degrading enzyme, acyl peptide hydrolase, a serine protease that degrades amyloid-beta, and is different in structure and activity from other amyloid-beta-degrading enzymes. Results Here we report the further characterization of acyl peptide hydrolase activity using mass spectrometry. Acyl peptide hydrolase cleaves the amyloid-beta peptide at amino acids 13, 14 and 19. In addition, by real-time PCR we found elevated acyl peptide hydrolase expression in brain areas rich in amyloid plaques suggesting that this enzyme's levels are responsive to increases in amyloid-beta levels. Lastly, tissue culture experiments using transfected CHO cells expressing APP751 bearing the V717F mutation indicate that acyl peptide hydrolase preferentially degrades dimeric and trimeric forms of amyloid-beta. Conclusion These data suggest that acyl peptide hydrolase is involved in the degradation of oligomeric amyloid-beta, an activity that, if induced, might present a new tool for therapy aimed at reducing neurodegeneration in the Alzheimer's brain.

  2. Metastable Amyloid Phases and their Conversion to Mature Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschol, Martin; Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in both functional biological responses and pathogenic disorders which include Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Amyloid fibril assembly frequently generates compact oligomeric and curvilinear polymeric intermediates which are implicated to be toxic to cells. Yet, the relation between these early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. Our measurements indicate that lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after crossing a salt and protein concentration dependent threshold. These oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. Our experimental transition boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions accounting for salt-modulated charge repulsion. We also report our preliminary findings on the mechanism by which these metastable oligomeric phases are converted into stable amyloid fibrils.

  3. Hydrogel Design for Supporting Neurite Outgrowth and Promoting Gene Delivery to Maximize Neurite Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Jaclyn A.; Stevans, Alyson C.; Holland, Samantha; Wang, Christine E.; Shikanov, Ariella; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels capable of gene delivery provide a combinatorial approach for nerve regeneration, with the hydrogel supporting neurite outgrowth and gene delivery inducing the expression of inductive factors. This report investigates the design of hydrogels that balance the requirements for supporting neurite growth with those requirements for promoting gene delivery. Enzymatically-degradable PEG hydrogels encapsulating dorsal root ganglia explants, fibroblasts, and lipoplexes encoding nerve growth factor were gelled within channels that can physically guide neurite outgrowth. Transfection of fibroblasts increased with increasing concentration of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell adhesion sites and decreasing PEG content. The neurite length increased with increasing RGD concentration within 10% PEG hydrogels, yet was maximal within 7.5% PEG hydrogels at intermediate RGD levels. Delivering lipoplexes within the gel produced longer neurites than culture in NGF-supplemented media or co-culture with cells exposed to DNA prior to encapsulation. Hydrogels designed to support neurite outgrowth and deliver gene therapy vectors locally may ultimately be employed to address multiple barriers that limit regeneration. PMID:22038654

  4. Amyloid accomplices and enforcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2005-01-01

    Amyloid-related diseases are often ascribed to protein "misfolding." Yet in the absence of high-resolution structures for mature fibrils or intermediates, the connection between the mechanism of amyloid formation and protein folding remains tenuous. The simplistic view of amyloid fibrillogenesis as a homogeneous self-assembly process is being increasingly challenged by observations that amyloids interact with a variety of cofactors including metals, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins such as serum amyloid P and apolipo-protein E, and constituents of basement membranes such as perlecan, laminin, and agrin. These "pathological chaperones" have effects that range from mediating the rate of amyloid fibril formation to increasing the stability of amyloid deposits, and may contribute to amyloid toxicity. An increasing appreciation of the role of accessory molecules in amyloid etiology has paved the way to novel diagnostics and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Protective properties of lysozyme on β-amyloid pathology: implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmfors, Linda; Boman, Andrea; Civitelli, Livia; Nath, Sangeeta; Sandin, Linnea; Janefjord, Camilla; McCann, Heather; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Halliday, Glenda; Brorsson, Ann-Christin; Kågedal, Katarina

    2015-11-01

    The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are amyloidplaques and neurofibrillary tangles accompanied by signs of neuroinflammation. Lysozyme is a major player in the innate immune system and has recently been shown to prevent the aggregation of amyloid-β1-40 in vitro. In this study we found that patients with Alzheimer disease have increased lysozyme levels in the cerebrospinal fluid and lysozyme co-localized with amyloid-β in plaques. In Drosophila neuronal co-expression of lysozyme and amyloid-β1-42 reduced the formation of soluble and insoluble amyloid-β species, prolonged survival and improved the activity of amyloid-β1-42 transgenic flies. This suggests that lysozyme levels rise in Alzheimer disease as a compensatory response to amyloid-β increases and aggregation. In support of this, in vitro aggregation assays revealed that lysozyme associates with amyloid-β1-42 and alters its aggregation pathway to counteract the formation of toxic amyloid-β species. Overall, these studies establish a protective role for lysozyme against amyloid-β associated toxicities and identify increased lysozyme in patients with Alzheimer disease. Therefore, lysozyme has potential as a new biomarker as well as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Clinical and cost implications of amyloid beta detection with amyloid beta positron emission tomography imaging in early Alzheimer's disease - the case of florbetapir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, John; Bae, Jay; Watson, Ian; Johnston, Joe; Happich, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging helps estimate Aβ neuritic plaque density in patients with cognitive impairment who are under evaluation for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the Aβ-PET scan as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment for diagnosis of AD in France, using florbetapir as an example. A state-transition probability analysis was developed adopting the French Health Technology Assessment (HTA) perspective per guidance. Parameters included test characteristics, rate of cognitive decline, treatment effect, costs, and quality of life. Additional scenarios assessed the validity of the analytical framework, including: (1) earlier evaluation/treatment; (2) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as a comparator; and (3) use of other diagnostic procedures. Outputs included differences in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). All benefits and costs were discounted for time preferences. Sensitivity analyses were performed to assess the robustness of findings and key influencers of outcomes. Aβ-PET used as an adjunct to standard diagnostic assessment increased QALYs by 0.021 years and 10 year costs by €470 per patient. The ICER was €21,888 per QALY gained compared to standard diagnostic assessment alone. When compared with CSF, Aβ-PET costs €24,084 per QALY gained. In other scenarios, Aβ-PET was consistently cost-effective relative to the commonly used affordability threshold (€40,000 per QALY). Over 95% of simulations in the sensitivity analysis were cost-effective. Aβ-PET is projected to affordably increase QALYs from the French HTA perspective per guidance over a range of clinical scenarios, comparators, and input parameters.

  7. Intracellular Cleavage of Amyloid β by a Viral Protease NIa Prevents Amyloid β-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Baehyun; Oh, Hyejin; Park, Sang Min; Han, Hye-Eun; Ye, Michael; Song, Woo Keun; Park, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear inclusion a (NIa) of turnip mosaic virus is a cytosolic protease that cleaves amyloid β (Aβ) when heterologously overexpressed. Lentivirus-mediated expression of NIa in the brains of APP(sw)/PS1 mice significantly reduces cerebral Aβ levels and plaque depositions, and improves behavioral deficits. Here, the effects of NIa and neprilysin (NEP), a well-known Aβ-cleaving protease, on oligomeric Aβ-induced cell death were evaluated. NIa cleaved monomeric and oligomeric Aβ at a similar rat...

  8. Within-patient correspondence of amyloid-β and intrinsic network connectivity in Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Lorenzo; Göttler, Jens; Grimmer, Timo; Koch, Kathrin; Ortner, Marion; Neitzel, Julia; Mühlau, Mark; Förster, Stefan; Kurz, Alexander; Förstl, Hans; Zimmer, Claus; Wohlschläger, Afra M.; Riedl, Valentin; Drzezga, Alexander; Sorg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    There is striking overlap between the spatial distribution of amyloid-β pathology in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and the spatial distribution of high intrinsic functional connectivity in healthy persons. This overlap suggests a mechanistic link between amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity, and indeed there is evidence in patients for the detrimental effects of amyloidplaque accumulation on intrinsic connectivity in areas of high connectivity in heteromodal hubs, and particularly in the default mode network. However, the observed spatial extent of amyloid-β exceeds these tightly circumscribed areas, suggesting that previous studies may have underestimated the negative impact of amyloid-β on intrinsic connectivity. We hypothesized that the known positive baseline correlation between patterns of amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity may mask the larger extent of the negative effects of amyloid-β on connectivity. Crucially, a test of this hypothesis requires the within-patient comparison of intrinsic connectivity and amyloid-β distributions. Here we compared spatial patterns of amyloid-β-plaques (measured by Pittsburgh compound B positron emission tomography) and intrinsic functional connectivity (measured by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging) in patients with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease via spatial correlations in intrinsic networks covering fronto-parietal heteromodal cortices. At the global network level, we found that amyloid-β and intrinsic connectivity patterns were positively correlated in the default mode and several fronto-parietal attention networks, confirming that amyloid-β aggregates in areas of high intrinsic connectivity on a within-network basis. Further, we saw an internetwork gradient of the magnitude of correlation that depended on network plaque-load. After accounting for this globally positive correlation, local amyloid-β-plaque concentration in regions of high connectivity co-varied negatively with

  9. Plaque mineralisation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, L

    1998-03-01

    Dental calculus is plaque mineralised by deposition of calcium and phosphate resulting from interactions between the oral microbial plaque flora and components of oral fluids. An artificial-mouth microcosm dental plaque culture system has been developed to study aspects of plaque mineralisation, including pH control. Five plaques were grown from saliva under simulated oral conditions in a mucin-containing medium, and sucrose was applied to mimic meals. The plaques were mineralised with a urea-based, calcium-phosphate-monofluorophosphate-urea (CPMU) mineralising solution. Alkaline pH oscillations were generated by the plaques in response to CPMU applications, and an acidic oscillation followed sucrose applications. Plaque mineralisation by the CPMU procedure was almost totally dependent on the urea present in the mineralising solution, but total mineralisation also increased as the resting pH increased as a result of urea in the medium. Following four CPMU applications with a sucrose application every 12 hours improved plaque viability and mineralisation. The plaque mineral formed resembled a carbonated hydroxyapatite; other potential calcium phosphate minerals were undetectable except for calcium carbonate. A wide range of mineral deposition patterns in plaque were seen by electron microscopy.

  10. Neuritic Patient at Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Putu Dita-Rinjani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Treatment of optic neuritic as recommended by the Optic Neuritic Treatment Trial (ONTT was intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone. This study aims to describe  characteristics and response to intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone treatment of optic neuritic patient in Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar. Method: This report is an analytical cross sectional study. Data were collected retrospectively from medical report of optic neuritic patient who came to Sanglah General Hospital during a period of January 1st 2010 until December 31st 2011. Patient characteristics were analyzed with descriptive analyses and presented as frequency, percentage, mean and standar deviation. Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity improvement after intravenous methylprednisolon followed by oral prednisone treatment were statistically analyzed with Wilcoxon test Results:  Optic neuritic were found in twenty-three patients (33 eyes, majority was in age group of 15-40 years (56.5% with female predominance (65.2% and unilateral involvement was 56.3%. Mean onset patient presented to the hospital was 21.7±2.21 days and the most common symptom was decreasing vision (87.9%.  The majority of patient presented with papillitis (54.5%, totally color blindness found in 39.4% eyes, and the type of visual field defect at presentation was central scotoma (18.2%. All cases show lesion of optic nerve from visual evoked potential (VEP examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI shows normal results (39.1% patient. The mean of pretreatment logMAR visual acuity and contrast sensitivity were significant improve after treatment from 1.59±0.47 to 0.59±0.62 (p=0.0001 and 0.31±0.56 to 1.25±0.56 (p=0.0001, respectively. All cases in this study were idiopathic. Recurrences were seen in 2 eyes and none of patient had clinical features suggestive of multiple sclerosis. Conclusions: Visual acuity and contrast sensitivity improvement

  11. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-10-16

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and consequent deaths among the subjects. Hence, it is important to note that amyloid positively participates in maintaining immune homeostasis and contributes to irreversible inflammatory response. In this review, we will focus on the interactive relationship between amyloid and the immune system, discussing the potential functional roles of amyloid in immune tolerance and homeostasis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. The combinatorics of neurite self-avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Elizabeth M; Hunt, Jonathan J; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2011-11-01

    During neural development in Drosophila, the ability of neurite branches to recognize whether they are from the same or different neurons depends crucially on the molecule Dscam1. In particular, this recognition depends on the stochastic acquisition of a unique combination of Dscam1 isoforms out of a large set of possible isoforms. To properly interpret these findings, it is crucial to understand the combinatorics involved, which has previously been attempted only using stochastic simulations for some specific parameter combinations. Here we present closed-form solutions for the general case. These reveal the relationships among the key variables and how these constrain possible biological scenarios.

  13. Pea3 transcription factor promotes neurite outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BASAK eKANDEMIR

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pea3 subfamily of ETS transcription factors consist of three major proteins, Pea3, ERM and ER81. Although important for many different tissues that exhibit branching morphogenesis, the function of Pea3 family in nervous system development and regeneration is only beginning to unfold. In this study, we provide evidence that Pea3 can directs neurite extension and axonal outgrowth in different model systems, and that Serine 90 is important for this function. We have also identified neurofilament-L and neurofilament-M as two putative novel targets for Pea3.

  14. Augmenting Amyloid PET Interpretations With Quantitative Information Improves Consistency of Early Amyloid Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harn, Nicholas R; Hunt, Suzanne L; Hill, Jacqueline; Vidoni, Eric; Perry, Mark; Burns, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    Establishing reliable methods for interpreting elevated cerebral amyloidplaque on PET scans is increasingly important for radiologists, as availability of PET imaging in clinical practice increases. We examined a 3-step method to detect plaque in cognitively normal older adults, focusing on the additive value of quantitative information during the PET scan interpretation process. Fifty-five F-florbetapir PET scans were evaluated by 3 experienced raters. Scans were first visually interpreted as having "elevated" or "nonelevated" plaque burden ("Visual Read"). Images were then processed using a standardized quantitative analysis software (MIMneuro) to generate whole brain and region of interest SUV ratios. This "Quantitative Read" was considered elevated if at least 2 of 6 regions of interest had an SUV ratio of more than 1.1. The final interpretation combined both visual and quantitative data together ("VisQ Read"). Cohen kappa values were assessed as a measure of interpretation agreement. Plaque was elevated in 25.5% to 29.1% of the 165 total Visual Reads. Interrater agreement was strong (kappa = 0.73-0.82) and consistent with reported values. Quantitative Reads were elevated in 45.5% of participants. Final VisQ Reads changed from initial Visual Reads in 16 interpretations (9.7%), with most changing from "nonelevated" Visual Reads to "elevated." These changed interpretations demonstrated lower plaque quantification than those initially read as "elevated" that remained unchanged. Interrater variability improved for VisQ Reads with the addition of quantitative information (kappa = 0.88-0.96). Inclusion of quantitative information increases consistency of PET scan interpretations for early detection of cerebral amyloidplaque accumulation.

  15. Stable, metastable, and kinetically trapped amyloid aggregate phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miti, Tatiana; Mulaj, Mentor; Schmit, Jeremy D; Muschol, Martin

    2015-01-12

    Self-assembly of proteins into amyloid fibrils plays a key role in a multitude of human disorders that range from Alzheimer's disease to type II diabetes. Compact oligomeric species, observed early during amyloid formation, are reported as the molecular entities responsible for the toxic effects of amyloid self-assembly. However, the relation between early-stage oligomeric aggregates and late-stage rigid fibrils, which are the hallmark structure of amyloid plaques, has remained unclear. We show that these different structures occupy well-defined regions in a peculiar phase diagram. Lysozyme amyloid oligomers and their curvilinear fibrils only form after they cross a salt and protein concentration-dependent threshold. We also determine a boundary for the onset of amyloid oligomer precipitation. The oligomeric aggregates are structurally distinct from rigid fibrils and are metastable against nucleation and growth of rigid fibrils. These experimentally determined boundaries match well with colloidal model predictions that account for salt-modulated charge repulsion. The model also incorporates the metastable and kinetic character of oligomer phases. Similarities and differences of amyloid oligomer assembly to metastable liquid-liquid phase separation of proteins and to surfactant aggregation are discussed.

  16. Using bacterial inclusion bodies to screen for amyloid aggregation inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The amyloid-β peptide (Aβ42) is the main component of the inter-neuronal amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The mechanism by which Aβ42 and other amyloid peptides assemble into insoluble neurotoxic deposits is still not completely understood and multiple factors have been reported to trigger their formation. In particular, the presence of endogenous metal ions has been linked to the pathogenesis of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. Results Here we describe a rapid and high-throughput screening method to identify molecules able to modulate amyloid aggregation. The approach exploits the inclusion bodies (IBs) formed by Aβ42 when expressed in bacteria. We have shown previously that these aggregates retain amyloid structural and functional properties. In the present work, we demonstrate that their in vitro refolding is selectively sensitive to the presence of aggregation-promoting metal ions, allowing the detection of inhibitors of metal-promoted amyloid aggregation with potential therapeutic interest. Conclusions Because IBs can be produced at high levels and easily purified, the method overcomes one of the main limitations in screens to detect amyloid modulators: the use of expensive and usually highly insoluble synthetic peptides. PMID:22553999

  17. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  18. Parametric imaging and quantitative analysis of the PET amyloid ligand [(18)F]flutemetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heurling, Kerstin; Buckley, Chris; Van Laere, Koen; Vandenberghe, Rik; Lubberink, Mark

    2015-11-01

    The amyloid imaging PET tracer [(18)F]flutemetamol was recently approved by regulatory authorities in the US and EU for estimation of β-amyloid neuritic plaque density in cognitively impaired patients. While the clinical assessment in line with the label is a qualitative visual assessment of 20 min summation images, the aim of this work was to assess the performance of various parametric analysis methods and standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR), in comparison with arterial input based compartment modeling. The cerebellar cortex was used as reference region in the generation of parametric images of binding potential (BPND) using multilinear reference tissue methods (MRTMo, MRTM, MRTM2), basis function implementations of the simplified reference tissue model (here called RPM) and the two-parameter version of SRTM (here called RPM2) and reference region based Logan graphical analysis. Regionally averaged values of parametric results were compared with the BPND of corresponding regions from arterial input compartment modeling. Dynamic PET data were also pre-filtered using a 3D Gaussian smoothing of 5mm FWHM and the effect of the filtering on the correlation was investigated. In addition, the use of SUVR images was evaluated. The accuracy of several kinetic models were also assessed through simulations of time-activity curves based on clinical data for low and high binding adding different levels of statistical noise representing regions and individual voxels. The highest correlation was observed for pre-filtered reference Logan, with correction for individual reference region efflux rate constant k2' (R(2)=0.98), or using a cohort mean k2' (R(2)=0.97). Pre-processing filtered MRTM2, unfiltered SUVR over the scanning window 70-90 min and unfiltered RPM also demonstrated high correlations with arterial input compartment modeling (MRTM2 R(2)=0.97, RPM R(2)=0.96 and SUVR R(2)=0.95) Poorest agreement was seen with MRTM without pre-filtering (R(2)=0.68). Parametric

  19. Plaque Type Eryrhema Nodosum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Mittal

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Three young females developed plaque type erythema nodosum. The underlying causes in them were tuberculosis chest, recurrent furunculosis and malaria respectively. All the three cases were under treatment at the time of development of erythema nodosum plaques and the onset was acute.

  20. Amyloid-β Annular Protofibrils Evade Fibrillar Fate in Alzheimer Disease Brain*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A.; Glabe, Charles G.; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-01-01

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a new and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, evidence for their formation and relevance in vivo is lacking. Herein, we report that APFs are in a distinct pathway from fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. In human Alzheimer disease brain samples, amyloid-β APFs were associated with diffuse plaques, but not compact plaques; moreover, we show the formation of intracellular APFs. Our results together with previous studies suggest that the prevention of amyloid-β annular protofibril formation could be a relevant target for the prevention of amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer disease. PMID:21507938

  1. Amyloid-β annular protofibrils evade fibrillar fate in Alzheimer disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Glabe, Charles G; Kayed, Rakez

    2011-06-24

    Annular protofibrils (APFs) represent a new and distinct class of amyloid structures formed by disease-associated proteins. In vitro, these pore-like structures have been implicated in membrane permeabilization and ion homeostasis via pore formation. Still, evidence for their formation and relevance in vivo is lacking. Herein, we report that APFs are in a distinct pathway from fibril formation in vitro and in vivo. In human Alzheimer disease brain samples, amyloid-β APFs were associated with diffuse plaques, but not compact plaques; moreover, we show the formation of intracellular APFs. Our results together with previous studies suggest that the prevention of amyloid-β annular protofibril formation could be a relevant target for the prevention of amyloid-β toxicity in Alzheimer disease.

  2. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kosicka, Iga

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type II is a metabolic disease affecting millions of people worldwide. The disease is associated with occurence of insoluble, fibrillar, protein aggregates in islets of Langerhans in the pancreas - islet amyloid. The main constituent of these protein fibers is the human islet...... amyloid polypeptide, which has a propensity to form oligomeric and fibrillar aggregates consisting of stable beta-sheets. These aggregates are toxic to the pancreatic cells. In-depth knowledge of the mechanisms of islet amyloid formation is an important step towards better understanding of the etiology...... of diabetes type II, while revealing the structure(s) of islet amyloid fibrils is necessary for potential design of therapeutic agents....

  3. <Symposium IV>Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ghiso, Jorge; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Revez, Tamas; Frangione, Blas; Rostagno, Agueda

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is increasingly recognized as a major contributor of Alzheimer’sdisease( AD) pathogenesis. To date, vascular deposits and not parenchymal plaques appear more sensitive predictorsof dementia. Amyloid deposition in and around cerebral blood vessels plays a central role in a series of responsemechanisms that lead to changes in the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, extravasations of plasma proteins,edema formation, release of inflammatory mediators and matrix...

  4. Mechanical stress activates neurites and somata of myenteric neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Kugler

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The particular location of myenteric neurons, sandwiched between the 2 muscle layers of the gut, implies that their somata and neurites undergo mechanical stress during gastrointestinal motility. Existence of mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN is undoubted but many of their basic features remain to be studied. In this study, we used ultra-fast neuroimaging to record activity of primary cultured myenteric neurons of guinea pig and human intestine after von Frey hair evoked deformation of neurites and somata. Independent component analysis was applied to reconstruct neuronal morphology and follow neuronal signals. Of the cultured neurons 45% (114 out of 256, 30 guinea pigs responded to neurite probing with a burst spike frequency of 13.4 Hz. Action potentials generated at the stimulation site invaded the soma and other neurites. Mechanosensitive sites were expressed across large areas of neurites. Many mechanosensitive neurites appeared to have afferent and efferent functions as those that responded to deformation also conducted spikes coming from the soma. Mechanosensitive neurites were also activated by nicotine application. This supported the concept of multifunctional MEN. 14% of the neurons (13 out of 96, 18 guinea pigs responded to soma deformation with burst spike discharge of 17.9 Hz. Firing of MEN adapted rapidly (RAMEN, slowly (SAMEN or ultra-slowly (USAMEN. The majority of MEN showed SAMEN behavior although significantly more RAMEN occurred after neurite probing. Cultured myenteric neurons from human intestine had similar properties. Compared to MEN, dorsal root ganglion neurons were activated by neurite but not by soma deformation with slow adaptation of firing. We demonstrated that MEN exhibit specific features very likely reflecting adaptation to their specialized functions in the gut.

  5. Beta-secretase-cleaved amyloid precursor protein in Alzheimer brain: a morphologic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennvik, Kristina; Bogdanovic, N; Volkmann, Inga

    2004-01-01

    beta-amyloid (Abeta) is the main constituent of senile plaques seen in Alzheimer's disease. Abeta is derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) via proteolytic cleavage by proteases beta- and gamma-secretase. In this study, we examined content and localization of beta-secretase-cleaved APP...... the beta-sAPP immunostaining to be stronger and more extensive in gray matter in Alzheimer disease (AD) cases than controls. The axonal beta-sAPP staining was patchy and unevenly distributed for the AD cases, indicating impaired axonal transport. beta-sAPP was also found surrounding senile plaques...

  6. Immunohistochemical detection of the delayed formation of nonfibrillar large amyloid-β aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiishi, Tomoyo; Itakura, Akira; Liu, Lei; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Kohno, Hideki; Nishimura, Masaki; Yoshimune, Kazuaki

    2016-02-01

    The occurrence of senile plaques consisting of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is a major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously developed and characterized monoclonal antibodies 31-2 and 75-2 that specifically bind to nonfibrillar Aβ1-42 aggregates with diameters of more than 220 and 50 nm, respectively. Here, we report the use of these antibodies to examine the aggregation of exogenous Aβ1-42 in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. From 6 to 24 h after transfection of Aβ1-42, antibody 75-2 immunolabeled almost all transfected neurons, whereas 31-2-positive cells were restricted to a part of the transfected neurons and gradually increased in number. Expression of the F19S/L34P-mutant Aβ1-42, which showed less of a tendency to aggregate, resulted in clearly reduced immunoreactivity to both antibodies. We also immunohistochemically investigated the temporal cortices of patients with AD and found that 31-2 preferentially labeled the cores of a subpopulation of large amyloid plaques. The relative number of 31-2-immunoreactive plaques was found to correlate with the Braak stages of neurofibrillary tangles, but not with that of amyloid plaques. These results suggest that 31-2-reactive Aβ aggregates develop with a delayed time course in cultured neurons and amyloid plaques of AD brains. © 2016 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Amyloid PET Imaging in Lewy body disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Paul; Thomas, Alan J; O'Brien, John T

    2015-01-01

    Lewy body (LB) disorders, including Parkinson disease (PD), Parkinson disease dementia (PDD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), are the second most common type of neurodegenerative dementia. Although the pathological hallmarks of LB disorders are Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, cortical amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposition is also often seen. The relationship between Aβ pathology and dementia in LB disorders is unclear. Recently, positron emission tomography Aβ ligands have been developed that enable in vivo imaging of Aβ. In this paper we review amyloid imaging studies in LB disorders. LB disorders are associated with lower mean cortical Aβ ligand binding compared with Alzheimer disease. In DLB and PDD many subjects have normal levels of cortical Aβ, though a subset show increased Aβ ligand binding. Those with DLB show greater ligand binding than PDD; binding does not appear to be increased in PD without dementia. Cortical Aβ deposition may be a factor in the development of cognitive impairment in some cases of dementia in LB disorders. Amyloid imaging is of limited use in the diagnosis of LB disorders but Aβ deposition may predict the future development of dementia in PD. Reports of correlation between Aβ deposition and symptom profile, severity, and progression have been inconsistent. Some results suggest a synergistic interaction between Aβ and α-synuclein. Interpretation of the current evidence is hampered by differing methodologies across studies and small sample sizes. Large, prospective longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the association of Aβ with symptom development, progression, severity, and treatment response in LB disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2016-01-13

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360632-10$15.00/0.

  9. Extracellular matrix modulator lysyl oxidase colocalizes with amyloid-beta pathology in Alzheimer's disease and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis-Dutch type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilhelmus, M.M.M.; Bol, J.G.J.M.; van Duinen, S.G.; Drukarch, B.

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) in brain vessel walls and parenchyma, known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and senile plaques (SPs), respectively, plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis of the Dutch type (HCHWA-D) pathogenesis.

  10. Neprilysin activity in cerebrospinal fluid is associated with dementia and amyloid-β42 levels in Lewy body disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, Walter; Stoycheva, Velichka; Schmid, Benjamin; Schulte, Claudia; Hauser, Ann-Kathrin; Brockmann, Kathrin; Melms, Arthur; Gasser, Thomas; Berg, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Lewy body disease, defined by the occurrence of α-synuclein aggregates as fibrils in Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites, is associated with increased probabilities for both co-occurrence of dementia, and co-occurrence of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology, in particular amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and lowered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 levels. Not surprisingly, in patients with Lewy body disease patients, there is a strong association between dementia and Aβ pathology. Neprilysin (NEP) is an Aβ-degrading protein found at presynaptic terminals and in body fluids. Reduced CSF NEP activity levels have been shown to occur in early AD, suggesting that altered CSF NEP activity levels may also be associated with dementia and lowered CSF Aβ42 levels in Lewy body disease. Hypothesizing a relation between CSF NEP activity and dementia in Lewy body disease, we determined CSF and serum NEP activity, and Aβ42 levels of 41 demented Lewy body disease patients, 38 non-demented Lewy body disease patients, and of 23 elderly controls. Demented Lewy body disease patients had lowered CSF NEP activity levels (0.3 pmol/min*ml, 0.2-81.5), compared to both non-demented Lewy body disease subjects (8.5 pmol/min*ml, 0.2-87.2; p=0.004) and controls (21.5 pmol/ml*min, 0.15-413.4; p=0.02). In addition, CSF NEP activity levels correlated positively with CSF Aβ42 levels (Rho=0.28, p=0.008) which was not explained by the presence or absence of ApoE4. Serum NEP activity levels were not significantly different between the groups. We conclude that, in Lewy body disease, CSF NEP activity levels are associated with dementia, probably via the Aβ pathway.

  11. Investigation of Amyloid Structures at Nanoscale via AFM based Dynamic Nanomechncial Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid structures are one important kind of protein aggregations. They are a group of stable misfolded species, other than native states, which have been found to accumulate as plaques on neuron cells. This behavior is considered to associate with tens of human neurodegenerative diseases...... nanomechnical microscopy (DNM) provides the availability to link topography and corresponding nanomechnical properties. This nanomechnical mapping improves the understanding of amyloid self-assembly mechanisms, and it also assists to design the amyloid structure based nanomaterials. In my PhD thesis, I...

  12. High Field Atherosclerotic Plaque MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Chun; Wang, Jinnan; Balu, Niranjan

    2012-01-01

    Manifestations of atherosclerotic plaque in different arterial beds range from perfusion deficits to overt ischemia such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Atherosclerotic plaque composition is known to be associated with its propensity to rupture and cause vascular events. MRI of atherosclerotic plaque using clinical 1.5T scanners can detect plaque composition. Plaque MRI at higher field strengths offers both opportunities and challenges to improving the high spatial-resolution and contras...

  13. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Nadishka; Kaur, Manmeet; Nair, Smitha; Malmstrom, Jenny; Goldstone, David; Negron, Leonardo; Gerrard, Juliet A; Domigan, Laura J

    2017-04-11

    Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (-20 to 80 °C) and pHs (2-10), and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products.

  14. Amyloid Fibrils from Hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadishka Jayawardena

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibrils are a class of insoluble protein nanofibers that are formed via the self-assembly of a wide range of peptides and proteins. They are increasingly exploited for a broad range of applications in bionanotechnology, such as biosensing and drug delivery, as nanowires, hydrogels, and thin films. Amyloid fibrils have been prepared from many proteins, but there has been no definitive characterization of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin to date. Here, nanofiber formation was carried out under denaturing conditions using solutions of apo-hemoglobin extracted from bovine waste blood. A characteristic amyloid fibril morphology was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM, with mean fibril dimensions of approximately 5 nm diameter and up to several microns in length. The thioflavin T assay confirmed the presence of β-sheet structures in apo-hemoglobin fibrils, and X-ray fiber diffraction showed the characteristic amyloid cross-β quaternary structure. Apo-hemoglobin nanofibers demonstrated high stability over a range of temperatures (−20 to 80 °C and pHs (2–10, and were stable in the presence of organic solvents and trypsin, confirming their potential as nanomaterials with versatile applications. This study conclusively demonstrates the formation of amyloid fibrils from hemoglobin for the first time, and also introduces a cost-effective method for amyloid fibril manufacture using meat industry by-products.

  15. Merlin inhibits neurite outgrowth in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Alexander; Geissler, Katja J; Kumar, Sujeet; Leichsenring, Gregor; Morrison, Helen; Baader, Stephan L

    2010-07-28

    The neurofibromatosis type 2 gene product merlin is known to provoke gliogenic tumors as a result of its mutagenic loss. Merlin's physiological anti-mitogenic function makes it unique among its ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) family members. Although ERM proteins and merlin are known to be expressed in glial cells of the peripheral nervous system and CNS, the neuronal expression pattern and function of merlin have been less well investigated. We report here expression of merlin in developing and mature neurons of the murine CNS. Within cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs), merlin was localized in the soma, sprouting dendrites and axons. Merlin expression in PCs was high during the period of initial dendrite regression and declined during later phases of dendrite elongation. Consistently, merlin expression in vivo was increased in Engrailed-2-overexpressing PCs, which are characterized by a reduced dendritic extension. Furthermore, overexpression of merlin in dissociated cerebellar cultures and in neurogenic P19 cells caused a significant decline in neurite outgrowth, while, conversely, inhibition of merlin expression increased process formation. This effect was dependent on phosphorylation of serine 518 and involved the inactivation of the growth-promoting GTPase Rac. We thus provide evidence that merlin plays a pivotal role in controlling the neuronal wiring in the developing CNS.

  16. Neurite, a finite difference large scale parallel program for the simulation of electrical signal propagation in neurites under mechanical loading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián A García-Grajales

    Full Text Available With the growing body of research on traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury, computational neuroscience has recently focused its modeling efforts on neuronal functional deficits following mechanical loading. However, in most of these efforts, cell damage is generally only characterized by purely mechanistic criteria, functions of quantities such as stress, strain or their corresponding rates. The modeling of functional deficits in neurites as a consequence of macroscopic mechanical insults has been rarely explored. In particular, a quantitative mechanically based model of electrophysiological impairment in neuronal cells, Neurite, has only very recently been proposed. In this paper, we present the implementation details of this model: a finite difference parallel program for simulating electrical signal propagation along neurites under mechanical loading. Following the application of a macroscopic strain at a given strain rate produced by a mechanical insult, Neurite is able to simulate the resulting neuronal electrical signal propagation, and thus the corresponding functional deficits. The simulation of the coupled mechanical and electrophysiological behaviors requires computational expensive calculations that increase in complexity as the network of the simulated cells grows. The solvers implemented in Neurite--explicit and implicit--were therefore parallelized using graphics processing units in order to reduce the burden of the simulation costs of large scale scenarios. Cable Theory and Hodgkin-Huxley models were implemented to account for the electrophysiological passive and active regions of a neurite, respectively, whereas a coupled mechanical model accounting for the neurite mechanical behavior within its surrounding medium was adopted as a link between electrophysiology and mechanics. This paper provides the details of the parallel implementation of Neurite, along with three different application examples: a long myelinated axon

  17. Sleep in Alzheimer's Disease–Beyond Amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrah K. Holth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep disorders are prevalent in Alzheimer's disease (AD and a major cause of institutionalization. Like AD pathology, sleep abnormalities can appear years before cognitive decline and may be predictive of dementia. A bidirectional relationship between sleep and amyloid β (Aβ has been well established with disturbed sleep and increased wakefulness leading to increased Aβ production and decreased Aβ clearance; whereas Aβ deposition is associated with increased wakefulness and sleep disturbances. Aβ fluctuates with the sleep-wake cycle and is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. This fluctuation is lost with Aβ deposition, likely due to its sequestration into amyloid plaques. As such, Aβ is believed to play a significant role in the development of sleep disturbances in the preclinical and clinical phases of AD. In addition to Aβ, the influence of tau AD pathology is likely important to the sleep disturbances observed in AD. Abnormal tau is the earliest observable AD-like pathology in the brain with abnormal tau phosphorylation in many sleep regulating regions such as the locus coeruleus, dorsal raphe, tuberomammillary nucleus, parabrachial nucleus, and basal forebrain prior to the appearance of amyloid or cortical tau pathology. Furthermore, human tau mouse models exhibit AD-like sleep disturbances and sleep changes are common in other tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia and progressive supranuclear palsy. Together these observations suggest that tau pathology can induce sleep disturbances and may play a large role in the sleep disruption seen in AD. To elucidate the relationship between sleep and AD it will be necessary to not only understand the role of amyloid but also tau and how these two pathologies, together with comorbid pathology such as alpha-synuclein, interact and affect sleep regulation in the brain.

  18. The vulnerable plaque: From plaque instability towards thrombus instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, X.

    2014-01-01

    Acuut coronair syndroom wordt meestal veroorzaakt door het scheuren van een atherosclerotische plaque in combinatie met (afsluitende) trombusvorming in de kransslagader. Plaque ruptuur en trombotische occlusie treden vaak niet gelijktijdig op, en het tijdstip van het ontstaan van klinische klachten

  19. The Diagnostic Value of CSF Amyloid-beta43 in Differentiation of Dementia Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, K.A.; Kuiperij, H.B.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Verbeek, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) is known as the most prominent core protein in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) senile plaques. Although research has focused mainly on Abeta40 and Abeta42 as potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, a range of Abeta peptides with variable lengths has been demonstrated in the

  20. Will PET amyloid imaging lead to overdiagnosis of Alzheimer dementia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroff, Jacob G; Nasrallah, Ilya M

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease that causes dementia, affects millions of elderly Americans and represents a growing problem with the aging of the population. There has been an increasing effort for improved and earlier diagnosis for AD. Several newly developed radiolabeled compounds targeting β-amyloid plaques, one of the major pathologic biomarkers of AD, have recently become available for clinical use. These radiopharmaceuticals allow for in vivo noninvasive visualization of abnormal β-amyloid deposits in the brain using positron emission tomography (PET). Amyloid PET imaging has demonstrated high sensitivity for pathologic cerebral amyloid deposition in multiple studies. Principal drawbacks to this new diagnostic test are declining specificity in older age groups and uncertain clinical role given lack of disease-modifying therapy for AD. Although there is strong evidence for the utility of amyloid PET in certain situations, detailed in a set of guidelines for appropriate use from the Alzheimer's Association and the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, the question of overdiagnosis, the diagnosis of a disease that would result in neither symptoms nor deaths, using this new medical tool needs to be carefully considered in light of efforts to secure reimbursement for the new technology that is already widely available for use as a clinical tool. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dental plaque identification at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003426.htm Dental plaque identification at home To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Plaque is a sticky substance that collects around and ...

  2. High-content neurite development study using optically patterned substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M Bélisle

    Full Text Available The study of neurite guidance in vitro relies on the ability to reproduce the distribution of attractive and repulsive guidance molecules normally expressed in vivo. The identification of subtle variations in the neurite response to changes in the spatial distribution of extracellular molecules can be achieved by monitoring the behavior of cells on protein gradients. To do this, automated high-content screening assays are needed to quantify the morphological changes resulting from growth on gradients of guidance molecules. Here, we present the use of laser-assisted protein adsorption by photobleaching (LAPAP to allow the fabrication of large-scale substrate-bound laminin-1 gradients to study neurite extension. We produced thousands of gradients of different slopes and analyzed the variations in neurite attraction of neuron-like cells (RGC-5. An image analysis algorithm processed bright field microscopy images, detecting each cell and quantifying the soma centroid and the initiation, terminal and turning angles of the longest neurite.

  3. Revisiting Randall's plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Abrol

    Abstract. Kidney stones have probably affected mankind for ages with early reports in an Egyptian mummy. While prevalence of stone disease is increasing, its pathogenesis remains elusive. Randall, after his study on more than 1100 cadaver kidneys, gave hypothesis of subepithelial plaque acting as a nucleation site for ...

  4. EAMJ March- Plaque

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iMac User

    2008-03-01

    Mar 1, 2008 ... 3 March 2008. PLAQUE AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF DIFFERENT POLIOVIRUSES ISOLATED FROM ACUTE FLACCID. PARALYSIS IN NORTHERN NIGERIA. W. F. Sule, DVM, MSc, Lecturer, O. I. Oyedele, PhD, ..... John, T.J., Vaccine-associated paralytic polio in India. Bull. WHO. 2002; 80: 917.

  5. Shoc2/Sur8 protein regulates neurite outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Leon

    Full Text Available The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth.

  6. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bipin Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy is a chronic infection affecting mainly the skin and peripheral nerve. Pure neuritic form of this disease manifests by involvement of the nerve in the absence of skin lesions. Therefore, it can sometimes create a diagnostic problem. It often requires a nerve biopsy for diagnosis, which is an invasive procedure and may lead to neural deficit. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC of an affected nerve can be a valuable and less invasive procedure for the diagnosis of such cases. We report five suspected cases of pure neuritic Hansen's disease involving the common and superficial peroneal, ulnar, and median nerve, who underwent FNAC. Smears revealed nerve fibers infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells in all cases, presence of epithelioid cells granulomas, and Langhans giant cells in three cases, and acid fast bacilli in two cases. In conclusion, FNAC is a safe, less invasive, and time saving procedure for the diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy.

  7. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology in Diagnosis of Pure Neuritic Leprosy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Bipin; Pradhan, Anju

    2011-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infection affecting mainly the skin and peripheral nerve. Pure neuritic form of this disease manifests by involvement of the nerve in the absence of skin lesions. Therefore, it can sometimes create a diagnostic problem. It often requires a nerve biopsy for diagnosis, which is an invasive procedure and may lead to neural deficit. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of an affected nerve can be a valuable and less invasive procedure for the diagnosis of such cases. We report five suspected cases of pure neuritic Hansen's disease involving the common and superficial peroneal, ulnar, and median nerve, who underwent FNAC. Smears revealed nerve fibers infiltrated by chronic inflammatory cells in all cases, presence of epithelioid cells granulomas, and Langhans giant cells in three cases, and acid fast bacilli in two cases. In conclusion, FNAC is a safe, less invasive, and time saving procedure for the diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy. PMID:21660285

  8. Expression and purification of 15N- and 13C-isotope labeled 40-residue human Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide for NMR-based structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Fei; Cho, Wonhwa; Ishii, Yoshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer’s β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) are a primary component of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Enormous attention has been given to the structural features and functions of Aβ in amyloid fibrils and other type of aggregates in associated with development of AD. This report describes an efficient protocol to express and purify high-quality 40-residue Aβ(1–40), the most abundant Aβ in brains, for structural studies by NMR spectroscopy. Over-expression ...

  9. Neuroprotective copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complexes promote neurite elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Bica

    Full Text Available Abnormal biometal homeostasis is a central feature of many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD, Parkinson's disease (PD, and motor neuron disease. Recent studies have shown that metal complexing compounds behaving as ionophores such as clioquinol and PBT2 have robust therapeutic activity in animal models of neurodegenerative disease; however, the mechanism of neuroprotective action remains unclear. These neuroprotective or neurogenerative processes may be related to the delivery or redistribution of biometals, such as copper and zinc, by metal ionophores. To investigate this further, we examined the effect of the bis(thiosemicarbazonato-copper complex, Cu(II(gtsm on neuritogenesis and neurite elongation (neurogenerative outcomes in PC12 neuronal-related cultures. We found that Cu(II(gtsm induced robust neurite elongation in PC12 cells when delivered at concentrations of 25 or 50 nM overnight. Analogous effects were observed with an alternative copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato complex, Cu(II(atsm, but at a higher concentration. Induction of neurite elongation by Cu(II(gtsm was restricted to neurites within the length range of 75-99 µm with a 2.3-fold increase in numbers of neurites in this length range with 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm treatment. The mechanism of neurogenerative action was investigated and revealed that Cu(II(gtsm inhibited cellular phosphatase activity. Treatment of cultures with 5 nM FK506 (calcineurin phosphatase inhibitor resulted in analogous elongation of neurites compared to 50 nM Cu(II(gtsm, suggesting a potential link between Cu(II(gtsm-mediated phosphatase inhibition and neurogenerative outcomes.

  10. Atherosclerotic plaque rupture: local or systemic process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutgens, Esther; van Suylen, Robert-Jan; Faber, Birgit C.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Eurlings, Petra M.; Bijnens, Ann-Pascale; Cleutjens, Kitty B.; Heeneman, Sylvia; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2003-01-01

    It is generally established that the unstable plaque is the major cause of acute clinical sequelae of atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, terms indicating lesions prone to plaque instability, such as "vulnerable plaque," and the different phenotypes of unstable plaques, such as plaque rupture, plaque

  11. Glial membranes at the node of Ranvier prevent neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Phillips, Greg R; Roth, Alejandro D

    2005-01-01

    Nodes of Ranvier are regularly placed, nonmyelinated axon segments along myelinated nerves. Here we show that nodal membranes isolated from the central nervous system (CNS) of mammals restricted neurite outgrowth of cultured neurons. Proteomic analysis of these membranes revealed several inhibitors...... of neurite outgrowth, including the oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein (OMgp). In rat spinal cord, OMgp was not localized to compact myelin, as previously thought, but to oligodendroglia-like cells, whose processes converge to form a ring that completely encircles the nodes. In OMgp-null mice, CNS nodes...

  12. Amyloid Fibril Solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, L G; Auer, S

    2015-11-19

    It is well established that amyloid fibril solubility is protein specific, but how solubility depends on the interactions between the fibril building blocks is not clear. Here we use a simple protein model and perform Monte Carlo simulations to directly measure the solubility of amyloid fibrils as a function of the interaction between the fibril building blocks. Our simulations confirms that the fibril solubility depends on the fibril thickness and that the relationship between the interactions and the solubility can be described by a simple analytical formula. The results presented in this study reveal general rules how side-chain-side-chain interactions, backbone hydrogen bonding, and temperature affect amyloid fibril solubility, which might prove to be a powerful tool to design protein fibrils with desired solubility and aggregation properties in general.

  13. Psoriasis (chronic plaque).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naldi, Luigi; Rzany, Berthold

    2009-01-09

    Psoriasis affects 1-3% of the population, in some people causing changes to the nails and joints in addition to skin lesions. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of systemic drug treatments, topical drug treatments, and non-drug treatments (other than ultraviolet light) for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of ultraviolet light treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of combined treatment with drugs plus ultraviolet light on chronic plaque psoriasis? What are the effects of combined systemic plus topical drug treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 122 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, adding calcipotriol (topical) to psoralen plus ultraviolet light A or ultraviolet light B, adding oral retinoids to psoralen plus ultraviolet A (PUVA), alefacept, balneotherapy, ciclosporin, dithranol, T cell-targeted therapies, cytokine blocking agents, emollients (alone or plus ultraviolet light B), etanercept, fish oil supplementation, fumaric acid derivatives, Goeckerman treatment, heliotherapy, infliximab, Ingram regimen, keratolytics (salicylic acid, urea), leflunomide, methotrexate, oral pimecrolimus, phototherapy plus balneotherapy, psoralen plus ultraviolet A, psychotherapy, oral retinoids (alone or with

  14. Development of Tc-99m Imaging Agents for Abeta Plaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhi-Ping, Zhuang; Mei-Ping Kung; Catherihne Hou; Hank F. Kung

    2008-09-26

    Development of SPECT imaging agents based on Tc-99m targeting Aβ plaques is useful for diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A stilbene derivative, [11C]SB-13, showing promise in detecting senile plaques present in AD patients has been reported previously1,2. Based on the 4’-amino-stilbene core structure we have added substituted groups through which a chelating group, N2S2, was conjugated. We report herein a series of Tc-99m labeled stilbene derivative conjugated with a TcO[N2S2] core. The syntheses of stilbenes containing a N2S2 chelating ligand are achieved by a scheme shown. Lipophilic 99mTc stilbene complexes were successfully prepared and purified through HPLC. Preliminary results of in vitro labeling of brain sections from transgenic mice showed very promising plaque labeling. These 99mTc stilbene derivatives are warranted for further evaluations as potential imaging agents targeting amyloid plaques.

  15. Does aluminium bind to histidine? An NMR investigation of amyloid β12 and amyloid β16 fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priya; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Vishwanathan, Vinaya; Jagadeesh Kumar, Dasappa; Babu, Sudhir; Ramanathan, Krishna Venkatachala; Easwaran, Kalpathy Ramaier Katchap; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao; Raghothama, Srinivasarao

    2013-07-01

    Aluminium and zinc are known to be the major triggering agents for aggregation of amyloid peptides leading to plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. While zinc binding to histidine in Aβ (amyloid β) fragments has been implicated as responsible for aggregation, not much information is available on the interaction of aluminium with histidine. In the NMR study of the N-terminal Aβ fragments, DAEFRHDSGYEV (Aβ12) and DAEFRHDSGYEVHHQK (Aβ16) presented here, the interactions of the fragments with aluminium have been investigated. Significant chemical shifts were observed for few residues near the C-terminus when aluminium chloride was titrated with Aβ12 and Aβ16 peptides. Surprisingly, it is nonhistidine residues which seem to be involved in aluminium binding. Based on NMR constrained structure obtained by molecular modelling, aluminium-binding pockets in Aβ12 were around charged residues such as Asp, Glu. The results are discussed in terms of native structure propagation, and the relevance of histidine residues in the sequences for metal-binding interactions. We expect that the study of such short amyloid peptide fragments will not only provide clues for plaque formation in aggregated conditions but also facilitate design of potential drugs for these targets. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Modeling familial Danish dementia in mice supports the concept of the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomaraswamy, Janaky; Kilger, Ellen; Wölfing, Heidrun; Schäfer, Claudia; Kaeser, Stephan A.; Wegenast-Braun, Bettina M.; Hefendehl, Jasmin K.; Wolburg, Hartwig; Mazzella, Matthew; Ghiso, Jorge; Goedert, Michel; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Garcia-Sierra, Francisco; Wolfer, David P.; Mathews, Paul M.; Jucker, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Familial Danish dementia (FDD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with cerebral deposition of Dan-amyloid (ADan), neuroinflammation, and neurofibrillary tangles, hallmark characteristics remarkably similar to those in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have generated transgenic (tg) mouse models of familial Danish dementia that exhibit the age-dependent deposition of ADan throughout the brain with associated amyloid angiopathy, microhemorrhage, neuritic dystrophy, and neuroinflammation. Tg mice are impaired in the Morris water maze and exhibit increased anxiety in the open field. When crossed with TauP301S tg mice, ADan accumulation promotes neurofibrillary lesions, in all aspects similar to the Tau lesions observed in crosses between β-amyloid (Aβ)-depositing tg mice and TauP301S tg mice. Although these observations argue for shared mechanisms of downstream pathophysiology for the sequence-unrelated ADan and Aβ peptides, the lack of codeposition of the two peptides in crosses between ADan- and Aβ-depositing mice points also to distinguishing properties of the peptides. Our results support the concept of the amyloid hypothesis for AD and related dementias, and suggest that different proteins prone to amyloid formation can drive strikingly similar pathogenic pathways in the brain. PMID:20385796

  17. The effects of hematopoietic growth factors on neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ye; Cui, Lili; Piao, Chunshu; Li, Bin; Zhao, Li-Ru

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) are initially discovered as the essential hematopoietic growth factors regulating bone marrow stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCF in combination with G-CSF (SCF+G-CSF) has synergistic effects on bone marrow stem cell mobilization. In this study we have determined the effect of SCF and G-CSF on neurite outgrowth in rat cortical neurons. Using molecular and cellular biology and live cell imaging approaches, we have revealed that receptors for SCF and G-CSF are expressed on the growth core of cortical neurons, and that SCF+G-CSF synergistically enhances neurite extension through PI3K/AKT and NFκB signaling pathways. Moreover, SCF+G-CSF induces much greater NFκB activation, NFκB transcriptional binding and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production than SCF or G-CSF alone. In addition, we have also observed that BDNF, the target gene of NFκB, is required for SCF+G-CSF-induced neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects to promote neurite growth. This study provides new insights into the contribution of hematopoietic growth factors in neuronal plasticity.

  18. The effects of hematopoietic growth factors on neurite outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Su

    Full Text Available Stem cell factor (SCF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF are initially discovered as the essential hematopoietic growth factors regulating bone marrow stem cell proliferation and differentiation, and SCF in combination with G-CSF (SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects on bone marrow stem cell mobilization. In this study we have determined the effect of SCF and G-CSF on neurite outgrowth in rat cortical neurons. Using molecular and cellular biology and live cell imaging approaches, we have revealed that receptors for SCF and G-CSF are expressed on the growth core of cortical neurons, and that SCF+G-CSF synergistically enhances neurite extension through PI3K/AKT and NFκB signaling pathways. Moreover, SCF+G-CSF induces much greater NFκB activation, NFκB transcriptional binding and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF production than SCF or G-CSF alone. In addition, we have also observed that BDNF, the target gene of NFκB, is required for SCF+G-CSF-induced neurite outgrowth. These data suggest that SCF+G-CSF has synergistic effects to promote neurite growth. This study provides new insights into the contribution of hematopoietic growth factors in neuronal plasticity.

  19. Discovery of pyrroloimidazoles as agents stimulating neurite outgrowth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, Barbara; Leppert, Christian A.; Mueller, Bernhard K.; Dömling, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    A diverse library of substituted pyrroloimidazoles was assembled by a multicomponent reaction (MCR) of tosylmethyl isocyanides (TOSMIC), indole carbaldehydes and primary amines in a van Leusen reaction. A library of this scaffold was screened in a phenotypic assay for neurite outgrowth. Several

  20. The Deacetylase HDAC6 Mediates Endogenous Neuritic Tau Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Heng Tseng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The initiating events that promote tau mislocalization and pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD are not well defined, partly because of the lack of endogenous models that recapitulate tau dysfunction. We exposed wild-type neurons to a neuroinflammatory trigger and examined the effect on endogenous tau. We found that tau re-localized and accumulated within pathological neuritic foci, or beads, comprised of mostly hypo-phosphorylated, acetylated, and oligomeric tau. These structures were detected in aged wild-type mice and were enhanced in response to neuroinflammation in vivo, highlighting a previously undescribed endogenous age-related tau pathology. Strikingly, deletion or inhibition of the cytoplasmic shuttling factor HDAC6 suppressed neuritic tau bead formation in neurons and mice. Using mass spectrometry-based profiling, we identified a single neuroinflammatory factor, the metalloproteinase MMP-9, as a mediator of neuritic tau beading. Thus, our study uncovers a link between neuroinflammation and neuritic tau beading as a potential early-stage pathogenic mechanism in AD.

  1. TERAHERTZ RADIATION INFLUENCE ON THE GROWING OF NEURITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tsurkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Our research was devoted to the impact of broadband pulsed THz radiation in the frequency range of 0.05 to 2 THz on the neurite growth in the sensory ganglia of 10-12-day chicken embryos. Dependence of changes in functional responses of cells on the average output power has been found.

  2. Animal models of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, Lieke; Van Nostrand, William E; Nicoll, James A R; Werring, David J; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2017-10-15

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), due to vascular amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, is a risk factor for intracerebral haemorrhage and dementia. CAA can occur in sporadic or rare hereditary forms, and is almost invariably associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Experimental (animal) models are of great interest in studying mechanisms and potential treatments for CAA. Naturally occurring animal models of CAA exist, including cats, dogs and non-human primates, which can be used for longitudinal studies. However, due to ethical considerations and low throughput of these models, other animal models are more favourable for research. In the past two decades, a variety of transgenic mouse models expressing the human Aβ precursor protein (APP) has been developed. Many of these mouse models develop CAA in addition to senile plaques, whereas some of these models were generated specifically to study CAA. In addition, other animal models make use of a second stimulus, such as hypoperfusion or hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), to accelerate CAA. In this manuscript, we provide a comprehensive review of existing animal models for CAA, which can aid in understanding the pathophysiology of CAA and explore the response to potential therapies. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  3. Dual Induction of TREM2 and Tolerance-Related Transcript, Tmem176b, in Amyloid Transgenic Mice: Implications for Vaccine-Based Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Melchior

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine-based autoimmune (anti-amyloid treatments are currently being examined for their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer's disease. In the present study we examined, in a transgenic model of amyloid pathology, the expression of two molecules previously implicated in decreasing the severity of autoimmune responses: TREM2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 and the intracellular tolerance-associated transcript, Tmem176b (transmembrane domain protein 176b. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that both molecules were highly expressed in plaque-associated microglia, but their expression defined two different zones of plaque-associated activation. Tmem176b expression was highest in the inner zone of amyloid plaques, whereas TREM2 expression was highest in the outer zone. Induced expression of TREM2 occurred coincident with detection of thioflavine-S-positive amyloid deposits. Transfection studies revealed that expression of TREM2 correlated negatively with motility, but correlated positively with the ability of microglia to stimulate CD4+ T-cell proliferation, TNF (tumour necrosis factor and CCL2 (chemokine ligand 2 production, but not IFNγ (interferon γ production. TREM2 expression also showed a positive correlation with amyloid phagocytosis in unactivated cells. However, activating cells with LPS (lipopolysaccharide, but not IFNγ, reduced the correlation between TREM2 expression and phagocytosis. Transfection of Tmem176b into both microglial and macrophage cell lines increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that, in vivo, Tmem176b+ cells in closest apposition to amyloid may be the least able to clear amyloid. Conversely, the phagocytic TREM2+ microglia on the plaque outer zones are positioned to capture and present self-antigens to CNS (central nervous system-infiltrating lymphocytes without promoting pro-inflammatory lymphocyte responses. Instead, plaque-associated TREM2+ microglia have the potential to evoke

  4. Hippocampal Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Pathway Deregulation Profiles at Early and Late Stages in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's-Like Amyloid Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo, Sonia; Crynen, Gogce; Paradis, Tiffany; Reed, Jon; Iulita, M Florencia; Ducatenzeiler, Adriana; Crawford, Fiona; Cuello, A Claudio

    2017-05-13

    The cerebral accumulation and cytotoxicity of amyloid beta (Aβ) is central to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. However, little is known about how the amyloid pathology affects the global expression of brain proteins at different disease stages. In order to identify genotype and time-dependent significant changes in protein expression, we employed quantitative proteomics analysis of hippocampal tissue from the McGill-R-Thy1-APP rat model of Alzheimer-like amyloid pathology. McGill transgenic rats were compared to wild-type rats at early and late pathology stages, i.e., when intraneuronal Aβ amyloid burden is conspicuous and when extracellular amyloid plaques are abundant with more pronounced cognitive deficits. After correction for multiple testing, the expression levels of 64 proteins were found to be considerably different in transgenic versus wild-type rats at the pre-plaque stage (3 months), and 86 proteins in the post-plaque group (12 months), with only 9 differentially regulated proteins common to the 2 time-points. This minimal overlap supports the hypothesis that different molecular pathways are affected in the hippocampus at early and late stages of the amyloid pathology throughout its continuum. At early stages, disturbances in pathways related to cellular responses to stress, protein homeostasis, and neuronal structure are predominant, while disturbances in metabolic energy generation dominate at later stages. These results shed new light on the molecular pathways affected by the early accumulation of Aβ and how the evolving amyloid pathology impacts other complex metabolic pathways.

  5. Relationship between genetic risk factors and markers for Alzheimer's disease pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias-Sonnenschein, L.S.; Bertram, L.; Visser, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimers disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by neuritic plaques (main constituent: -amyloid [A]) and neurofibrillary tangles (hyperphosphorylated tau protein) in the brain. Abnormalities in A and tau can be measured upon neuropathological examination, in cerebrospinal fluid

  6. Autophagy: A double-edged sword in Alzheimer's disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    induced and constitutive protein turnover. Accumulated evidence has demonstrated that amyloid- (A) protein can be generated in autophagic vacuoles, promoting its extracellular deposition in neuritic plaques as the pathological hallmark of ...

  7. A preclinical assessment of neural stem cells as delivery vehicles for anti-amyloid therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eMalick G Njie

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stems cells (NSCs could be a useful means to deliver biologic therapeutics for late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this study, we conducted a small preclinical investigation of whether NSCs could be modified to express metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, a secreted protease reported to degrade aggregated Aβ peptides that are the major constituents of the senile plaques. Our findings illuminated three issues with using NSCs as delivery vehicles for this particular application. First, transplanted NSCs generally failed to migrate to amyloid plaques, instead tending to colonize white matter tracts. Second, the final destination of these cells was highly influenced by how they were delivered. We found that our injection methods led to cells largely distributing to white matter tracts, which are anisotropic conduits for fluids that facilitate rapid distribution within the CNS. Third, with regard to MMP9 as a therapeutic to remove senile plaques, we observed high concentrations of endogenous metalloproteinases around amyloid plaques in the mouse models used for these preclinical tests with no evidence that the NSC-delivered enzymes elevated these activities or had any impact. Interestingly, MMP9-expressing NSCs formed substantially larger grafts. Overall, we observed long-term survival of NSCs in the brains of mice with high amyloid burden. Therefore, we conclude that such cells may have potential in therapeutic applications in AD but improved targeting of these cells to disease-specific lesions may be required to enhance efficacy.

  8. Amyloid beta 1-42 and phoshorylated tau threonin 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Shalahudin Darusman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, which are the plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of the study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease, had brain lesions similar to human patients suffering from senile dementia. Generating immunohistochemistry technique to biomarkers of Amyloid beta 1-42 and the phosphorylated tau 231, our study assessed the amyloidopathy, such as indicative to the senile plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and the tauopathy, to possible neurofibrillary tangles. Six aged monkeys were selected based on their spatial memory performance and profile of biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease, divided equally to affected aged subject - with Memory-affected and low amyloid level, and aged with higher performance in memory and amyloid, as the age-matched subjects. Using immunohistochemistry, plaques of Amyloid Beta 1-42 were observed in two out of three brains of aged subjects with memory impairment and biomarkers indicative of Alzheimer’s disease. The cerebral amyloid angiopathy was observed in both aged monkey groups, and unlike in the human, the amyloids were found to deposit in the small veins and capillaries. In one of the affected individuals, phosphorylated tau was positively stained intracellularly of the neurons, indicating a possibility of an early stage of the formation of tangles. These findings add to the body of evidence of the utility of the aged cynomolgus monkeys as a spontaneous model for Alzheimer-related disease.

  9. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  10. Amyloid-β and tau: the trigger and bullet in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, George S

    2014-04-01

    The defining features of Alzheimer disease (AD) include conspicuous changes in both brain histology and behavior. The AD brain is characterized microscopically by the combined presence of 2 classes of abnormal structures, extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, both of which comprise highly insoluble, densely packed filaments. The soluble building blocks of these structures are amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides for plaques and tau for tangles. Amyloid-β peptides are proteolytic fragments of the transmembrane amyloid precursor protein, whereas tau is a brain-specific, axon-enriched microtubule-associated protein. The behavioral symptoms of AD correlate with the accumulation of plaques and tangles, and they are a direct consequence of the damage and destruction of synapses that mediate memory and cognition. Synapse loss can be caused by the failure of live neurons to maintain functional axons and dendrites or by neuron death. During the past dozen years, a steadily accumulating body of evidence has indicated that soluble forms of Aβ and tau work together, independently of their accumulation into plaques and tangles, to drive healthy neurons into the diseased state and that hallmark toxic properties of Aβ require tau. For instance, acute neuron death, delayed neuron death following ectopic cell cycle reentry, and synaptic dysfunction are triggered by soluble, extracellular Aβ species and depend on soluble, cytoplasmic tau. Therefore, Aβ is upstream of tau in AD pathogenesis and triggers the conversion of tau from a normal to a toxic state, but there is also evidence that toxic tau enhances Aβ toxicity via a feedback loop. Because soluble toxic aggregates of both Aβ and tau can self-propagate and spread throughout the brain by prionlike mechanisms, successful therapeutic intervention for AD would benefit from detecting these species before plaques, tangles, and cognitive impairment become evident and from interfering with the destructive

  11. Increased plasma concentration of serum amyloid P component in centenarians with impaired cognitive performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, M; Olsen, H; Jeune, B

    1998-01-01

    higher SAP concentration (60.2 microg/ml), while the subgroup of cognitive intact centenarians (MMSE score >24) showed a normal SAP concentration (38.4+/-9.3 microg/ml). No dehydration or hepatic dysfunction was demonstrable in the centenarians. We conclude that the centenarians with impaired cognitive......Serum amyloid P component (SAP) binds to all amyloid fibrils including those in the plaques and tangles of Alzheimer patients. To investigate whether the plasma SAP concentration correlated to cognitive impairment, we measured SAP levels in blood samples from 41 centenarians and compared...... these to the cognitive performance evaluated by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). We observed a significantly (p

  12. Porcine prion protein amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Hammarstr?m, Per; Nystr?m, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat...

  13. Intracellular cleavage of amyloid β by a viral protease NIa prevents amyloid β-mediated cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Baehyun; Oh, Hyejin; Park, Sang Min; Han, Hye-Eun; Ye, Michael; Song, Woo Keun; Park, Woo Jin

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear inclusion a (NIa) of turnip mosaic virus is a cytosolic protease that cleaves amyloid β (Aβ) when heterologously overexpressed. Lentivirus-mediated expression of NIa in the brains of APP(sw)/PS1 mice significantly reduces cerebral Aβ levels and plaque depositions, and improves behavioral deficits. Here, the effects of NIa and neprilysin (NEP), a well-known Aβ-cleaving protease, on oligomeric Aβ-induced cell death were evaluated. NIa cleaved monomeric and oligomeric Aβ at a similar rate, whereas NEP only cleaved monomeric Aβ. Oligomeric Aβ-induced cytotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly ameliorated by NIa, but not by NEP. Endocytosed fluorescently-labeled Aβ localized to mitochondria, and this was significantly reduced by NIa, but not by NEP. These data suggest that NIa may exerts its protective roles by degrading Aβ and thus preventing mitochondrial deposition of Aβ.

  14. Neurite outgrowth in human iPSC-derived neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data on morphology of rat and human neurons in cell cultureThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Druwe, I., T. Freudenrich , K. Wallace , T. Shafer , and W. Mundy. Comparison of Human Induced PluripotentStem Cell-Derived Neurons and Rat Primary CorticalNeurons as In Vitro Models of Neurite Outgrowth. Applied In vitro Toxicology. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Larchmont, NY, USA, 2(1): 26-36, (2016).

  15. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases.

  16. Neurite outgrowth on fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, Y.; Sato, M.; Nagaoka, S.; Kawakami, H. E-mail: kawakami-hiroyoshi@c.metro-u.ac.jp; Suzuki, Y.; Iwaki, M

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we investigated neurite outgrowth on a fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation. We used the fluorinated polyimide because of its excellent thermal and mechanical properties and biocompatibility. Rattus norvegicus chromaphin (PC12) cells were used for in vitro studies. The polyimide films were irradiated with He{sup +}, Ne{sup +} or Kr{sup +} at 1 x 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} using an ion-beam mask. The lines in the mask were 120 and 160 {mu}m wide and 120-160 {mu}m apart. PC12 cells were selectively adhered on the polyimide film micropatterned by Kr{sup +}-irradiation. However, the neurite length on the film irradiated by Kr{sup +} was shorter than that determined in the film irradiated by He{sup +}. On the other hand, neurite outgrowth on the polyimide film micropatterned by He{sup +}-irradiation was at least 100 {mu}m in length. This initial study indicated the enhanced outgrowth of PC12 cells on the fluorinated polyimide film micropatterned by ion irradiation.

  17. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  18. Model Hirano Bodies Protect against Tau-Independent and Tau-Dependent Cell Death Initiated by the Amyloid Precursor Protein Intracellular Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Furgerson, Matthew; Fechheimer, Marcus; Furukawa, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    The main pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, which are primarily composed of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and tau, respectively. These proteins and their role in the mechanism of neurodegeneration have been extensively studied. Hirano bodies are a frequently occurring pathology in Alzheimer's disease as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the physiological role of Hirano bodies in neurodegenerative diseases has ...

  19. Roles of Amyloid β-Peptide-Associated Oxidative Stress and Brain Protein Modifications in the Pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Reed, Tanea; Newman, Shelley F.; Sultana, Rukhsana

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, and ischemia just to name a few. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disorder that is recognized as the most common form of dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, the presence of oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and ...

  20. Discovery of a Novel Fluorescent Probe for the Sensitive Detection of β-Amyloid Deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Wenming; Xu, Mingming; Liang, Steven H.; Xiang, Huaijiang; Tang, Li; Zhang, Minkui; Ding, Dejun; Li, Xin; Zhang, Haiyan; Hu, Youhong

    2015-01-01

    Here we reported the development of the first photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) probe (1) to directly locate β-amyloid aggregates (Aβ plaques) in the brain without the need of post-washing procedures. The probe showed a high affinity for Aβ aggregates with a Kd value of 3.5 nM. It is weakly emissive by itself with its fluorescence quenched by electron transfer from PeT donor to the excited fluorophore. But selective binding to Aβ plaques would attenuate the PeT process and restore the fluo...

  1. Large-scale analysis of neurite growth dynamics on micropatterned substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Wissner-Gross, Zachary D.; Scott, Mark Andrew; Ku, David L.; Ramaswamy, Priya

    2010-01-01

    During both development and regeneration of the nervous system, neurons display complex growth dynamics, and several neurites compete to become the neuron's single axon. Numerous mathematical and biophysical models have been proposed to explain this competition, which remain experimentally unverified. Large-scale, precise, and repeatable measurements of neurite dynamics have been difficult to perform, since neurons have varying numbers of neurites, which themselves have complex morphologies. ...

  2. Time-Course and Regional Analyses of the Physiopathological Changes Induced after Cerebral Injection of an Amyloid β Fragment in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zussy, Charleine; Brureau, Anthony; Delair, Brice; Marchal, Stephane; Keller, Emeline; Ixart, Guy; Naert, Gaelle; Meunier, Johann; Chevallier, Nathalie; Maurice, Tangui; Givalois, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative pathology characterized by the presence of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, accompanied by synaptic and neuronal loss. The major component of senile plaques is an amyloid β protein (Aβ) formed by pathological processing of the Aβ precursor protein. We assessed the time-course and regional effects of a single intracerebroventricular injection of aggregated Aβ fragment 25–35 (Aβ25-35) in rats. Using a combined biochemical, behavioral, a...

  3. Accumulation of amyloid-? by astrocytes result in enlarged endosomes and microvesicle-induced apoptosis of neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Söllvander, Sofia; Nikitidou, Elisabeth; Brolin, Robin; Soderberg, Linda; Sehlin, Dag; Lannfelt, Lars; Erlandsson, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the clear physical association between activated astrocytes and amyloid-? (A?) plaques, the importance of astrocytes and their therapeutic potential in Alzheimer?s disease remain elusive. Soluble A? aggregates, such as protofibrils, have been suggested to be responsible for the widespread neuronal cell death in Alzheimer?s disease, but the mechanisms behind this remain unclear. Moreover, ineffective degradation is of great interest when it comes to the development and progr...

  4. Beta-Amyloid Deposition and Alzheimer's Type Changes Induced by Borrelia Spirochetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miklossy,J.; Kis, A.; Radenovic, A.; Miller, L.; Forro, L.; Martins, R.; Reiss, K.; Darbinian, N.; Darekar, P.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    The pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) consist of {beta}-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in affected brain areas. The processes, which drive this host reaction are unknown. To determine whether an analogous host reaction to that occurring in AD could be induced by infectious agents, we exposed mammalian glial and neuronal cells in vitro to Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes and to the inflammatory bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Morphological changes analogous to the amyloid deposits of AD brain were observed following 2-8 weeks of exposure to the spirochetes. Increased levels of {beta}-amyloid presursor protein (A{beta}PP) and hyperphosphorylated tau were also detected by Western blots of extracts of cultured cells that had been treated with spirochetes or LPS. These observations indicate that, by exposure to bacteria or to their toxic products, host responses similar in nature to those observed in AD may be induced.

  5. Stimulation of Neurite Outgrowth Using an Electrically Conducting Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christine E.; Shastri, Venkatram R.; Vacanti, Joseph P.; Langer, Robert

    1997-08-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves often cannot be repaired by the juxtaposition of the severed nerve ends. Surgeons have typically used autologous nerve grafts, which have several drawbacks including the need for multiple surgical procedures and loss of function at the donor site. As an alternative, the use of nerve guidance channels to bridge the gap between severed nerve ends is being explored. In this paper, the electrically conductive polymer--oxidized polypyrrole (PP)--has been evaluated for use as a substrate to enhance nerve cell interactions in culture as a first step toward potentially using such polymers to stimulate in vivo nerve regeneration. Image analysis demonstrates that PC-12 cells and primary chicken sciatic nerve explants attached and extended neurites equally well on both PP films and tissue culture polystyrene in the absence of electrical stimulation. In contrast, PC-12 cells interacted poorly with indium tin oxide (ITO), poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA), and poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid) surfaces. However, PC-12 cells cultured on PP films and subjected to an electrical stimulus through the film showed a significant increase in neurite lengths compared with ones that were not subjected to electrical stimulation through the film and tissue culture polystyrene controls. The median neurite length for PC-12 cells grown on PP and subjected to an electrical stimulus was 18.14 μ m (n = 5643) compared with 9.5 μ m (n = 4440) for controls. Furthermore, animal implantation studies reveal that PP invokes little adverse tissue response compared with poly(lactic acid-coglycolic acid).

  6. Intraplaque Hemorrhage and the Plaque Surface in Carotid Atherosclerosis: The Plaque At RISK Study (PARISK)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, A. C.; Truijman, M. T. B.; Hussain, B.; Zadi, T.; Saiedie, G.; de Rotte, A. A. J.; Liem, M. I.; van der Steen, A. F. W.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Nederkoorn, P. J.; Hendrikse, J.; Kooi, M. E.; van der Lugt, A.

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic of vulnerable plaque, intraplaque hemorrhage, may predict plaque rupture. Plaque rupture can be visible on noninvasive imaging as a disruption of the plaque surface. We investigated the association between intraplaque hemorrhage and disruption of the plaque surface. We

  7. Degradation of amyloid beta protein by purified myelin basic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mei-Chen; Ahmed, Mahiuddin; Smith, Steven O; Van Nostrand, William E

    2009-10-16

    The progressive accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in senile plaques and in the cerebral vasculature is the hallmark of Alzheimer disease and related disorders. Impaired clearance of Abeta from the brain likely contributes to the prevalent sporadic form of Alzheimer disease. Several major pathways for Abeta clearance include receptor-mediated cellular uptake, blood-brain barrier transport, and direct proteolytic degradation. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is the major structural protein component of myelin and plays a functional role in the formation and maintenance of the myelin sheath. MBP possesses endogenous serine proteinase activity and can undergo autocatalytic cleavage liberating distinct fragments. Recently, we showed that MBP binds Abeta and inhibits Abeta fibril formation (Hoos, M. D., Ahmed, M., Smith, S. O., and Van Nostrand, W. E. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 9952-9961; Hoos, M. D., Ahmed, M., Smith, S. O., and Van Nostrand, W. E. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 4720-4727). Here we show that Abeta40 and Abeta42 peptides are degraded by purified human brain MBP and recombinant human MBP, but not an MBP fragment that lacks autolytic activity. MBP-mediated Abeta degradation is inhibited by serine proteinase inhibitors. Similarly, Cos-1 cells expressing MBP degrade exogenous Abeta40 and Abeta42. In addition, we demonstrate that purified MBP also degrades assembled fibrillar Abeta in vitro. Mass spectrometry analysis identified distinct degradation products generated from Abeta digestion by MBP. Lastly, we demonstrate in situ that purified MBP can degrade parenchymal amyloid plaques as well as cerebral vascular amyloid that form in brain tissue of Abeta precursor protein transgenic mice. Together, these findings indicate that purified MBP possesses Abeta degrading activity in vitro.

  8. Detection of β-amyloid oligomers as a predictor of neurological outcome after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatson, Joshua Wayne; Warren, Victoria; Abdelfattah, Kareem; Wolf, Steven; Hynan, Linda S; Moore, Carol; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Minei, Joseph P; Madden, Christopher; Wigginton, Jane G

    2013-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to be a risk factor for Alzheimer-like dementia. In previous studies, an increase in β-amyloid (Aβ) monomers, such as β-amyloid 42 (Aβ42), in the CSF of patients with TBI has been shown to correlate with a decrease in amyloid plaques in the brain and improved neurological outcomes. In this study, the authors hypothesized that the levels of toxic high-molecular-weight β-amyloid oligomers are increased in the brain and are detectable within the CSF of TBI patients with poor neurological outcomes. Samples of CSF were collected from 18 patients with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale Scores 3-8) and a ventriculostomy. In all cases the CSF was collected within 72 hours of injury. The CSF levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and Aβ42 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The levels of high-molecular-weight β-amyloid oligomers were measured using Western blot analysis. Patients with good outcomes showed an increase in the levels of CSF Aβ42 (p = 0.003). Those with bad outcomes exhibited an increase in CSF levels of β-amyloid oligomers (p = 0.009) and NSE (p = 0.001). In addition, the CSF oligomer levels correlated with the scores on the extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (r = -0.89, p = 0.0001), disability rating scale scores (r = 0.77, p = 0.005), CSF Aβ42 levels (r = -0.42, p = 0.12), and CSF NSE levels (r = 0.70, p = 0.004). Additionally, the receiver operating characteristic curve yielded an area under the curve for β-amyloid oligomers of 0.8750 ± 0.09. Detection of β-amyloid oligomers may someday become a useful clinical tool for determining injury severity and neurological outcomes in patients with TBI.

  9. Sequence Determinants of Bacterial Amyloid Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xuan; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2008-01-01

    Amyloids are proteinaceous fibers commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases and prion-based encephalopathies. Many different polypeptides can form amyloid fibers, leading to the suggestion that amyloid is a primitive main-chain-dominated structure. A growing body of evidence suggests that amino acid side chains dramatically influence amyloid formation. The specific role fulfilled by side chains in amyloid formation, especially in vivo, remains poorly understood. Here, we determined ...

  10. Tyrosine kinase inhibition increases functional parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and enhances amyloid clearance and cognitive performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonskaya, Irina; Hebron, Michaeline L; Desforges, Nicole M; Franjie, Alexander; Moussa, Charbel E-H

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective therapies for leukaemia. Alzheimer is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by accumulation of β-amyloid (plaques) and hyper-phosphorylated Tau (tangles). Here we show that AD animals have high levels of insoluble parkin and decreased parkin-Beclin-1 interaction, while peripheral administration of TKIs, including Nilotinib and Bosutinib, increases soluble parkin leading to amyloid clearance and cognitive improvement. Blocking Beclin-1 expression with shRNA or parkin deletion prevents tyrosine kinase (TK) inhibition-induced amyloid clearance, suggesting that functional parkin-Beclin-1 interaction mediates amyloid degradation. Isolation of autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in AD mouse brain shows accumulation of parkin and amyloid, consistent with previous results in AD brains, while Bosutinib and Nilotinib increase parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and result in protein deposition in the lysosome. These data suggest that decreased parkin solubility impedes parkin-Beclin-1 interaction and amyloid clearance. We identified two FDA-approved anti-cancer drugs as potential treatment for AD. Two FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs, Bosutinib and Nilotinib, are shown to ameliorate Alzheimer's disease pathology in mouse models by increasing soluble parkin and leading to amyloid clearance and cognitive improvement. PMID:23737459

  11. Toothbrush efficacy for plaque removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, K J; Chinta, S K; Agarwal, P; Nemelivsky, M; Frisina, A C; Cao, Z; Norman, R G; Fisch, G S; Corby, P

    2014-11-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a novel sonic toothbrush in reducing plaque and in maintenance of gingival health when compared to a standard manual brush. This study was a block-randomized, examiner-blind, two-treatment, parallel group, single centre clinical investigation. A total of 84 subjects were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either the Panasonic EW-DL90 or an American Dental Association-endorsed manual toothbrush. Subjects were instructed to follow a twice-daily brushing regimen without flossing. Plaque levels and gingival health were assessed at baseline and after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment using the Turesky Modification of the Quigley-Hein Plaque Index and the Papillary Bleeding Score. Subjects assigned to the EW-DL90 group had significantly lower plaque levels after 1 and 3 weeks of treatment than those in the manual group (P = 0.003 and 0.0035, respectively). Both groups showed a reduction in plaque levels at Week 3 relative to baseline. The EW-DL90 group had significantly lower gingival inflammation scores after 1 week of treatment (P = 0.0293), but there was no difference between groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The EW-DL90 toothbrush safely and effectively removes more plaque than a standard manual toothbrush. Improvement in gingival inflammation was observed after 1 week of treatment. There was no difference in Papillary Bleeding Score between the two groups after 3 weeks of treatment. The newly developed sonic brush (Panasonic EW-DL90) tested in this study was found to be more effective than a manual toothbrush at plaque removal. The papillary bleeding scores were significantly lower in the sonic brush group after 1 week of product use. After 3 weeks of product use, both treatment groups had similar papillary bleeding scores almost returning to baseline values. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Cloning of a Gene Whose Expression is Increased in Scrapie and in Senile Plaques in Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wietgrefe, S.; Zupancic, M.; Haase, A.; Chesebro, B.; Race, R.; Frey, W.; Rustan, T.; Friedman, R. L.

    1985-12-01

    A complementary DNA library was constructed from messenger RNA's extracted from the brains of mice infected with the scrapie agent. The library was differentially screened with the objectives of finding clones that might be used as markers of infection and finding clones of genes whose increased expression might be correlated with the pathological changes common to scrapie and Alzheimer's disease. A gene was identified whose expression is increased in scrapie. The complementary DNA corresponding to this gene hybridized preferentially and focally to cells in the brains of scrapie-infected animals. The cloned DNA also hybridized to the neuritic plaques found with increased frequency in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease.

  13. Denitrification in human dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verstraete Willy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial denitrification is not considered important in human-associated microbial communities. Accordingly, metabolic investigations of the microbial biofilm communities of human dental plaque have focused on aerobic respiration and acid fermentation of carbohydrates, even though it is known that the oral habitat is constantly exposed to nitrate (NO3- concentrations in the millimolar range and that dental plaque houses bacteria that can reduce this NO3- to nitrite (NO2-. Results We show that dental plaque mediates denitrification of NO3- to nitric oxide (NO, nitrous oxide (N2O, and dinitrogen (N2 using microsensor measurements, 15N isotopic labelling and molecular detection of denitrification genes. In vivo N2O accumulation rates in the mouth depended on the presence of dental plaque and on salivary NO3- concentrations. NO and N2O production by denitrification occurred under aerobic conditions and was regulated by plaque pH. Conclusions Increases of NO concentrations were in the range of effective concentrations for NO signalling to human host cells and, thus, may locally affect blood flow, signalling between nerves and inflammatory processes in the gum. This is specifically significant for the understanding of periodontal diseases, where NO has been shown to play a key role, but where gingival cells are believed to be the only source of NO. More generally, this study establishes denitrification by human-associated microbial communities as a significant metabolic pathway which, due to concurrent NO formation, provides a basis for symbiotic interactions.

  14. The effect of amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism on cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriaanse, Sofie M. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, P.O. Box 7057, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Van Dijk, Koene R.A. [Harvard University, Department of Psychology, Center for Brain Science, Cambridge, MA (United States); Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Zwan, Marissa D.; Barkhof, Frederik; Berckel, Bart N.M. van [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reuter, Martin [Massachusetts General Hospital, Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, MA (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Division of Health Sciences and Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Yaqub, Maqsood; Boellaard, Ronald; Windhorst, Albert D.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Flier, Wiesje M. van der; Scheltens, Philip [VU University Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Alzheimer Center, Neuroscience Campus Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-06-15

    The present multimodal neuroimaging study examined whether amyloid pathology and glucose metabolism are related to cortical volume loss over time in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and healthy elderly controls. Structural MRI scans of eleven AD patients and ten controls were available at baseline and follow-up (mean interval 2.5 years). Change in brain structure over time was defined as percent change of cortical volume within seven a-priori defined regions that typically show the strongest structural loss in AD. In addition, two PET scans were performed at baseline: [{sup 11}C]PIB to assess amyloidplaque load and [{sup 18}F]FDG to assess glucose metabolism. [{sup 11}C]PIB binding and [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake were measured in the precuneus, a region in which both amyloid deposition and glucose hypometabolism occur early in the course of AD. While amyloidplaque load at baseline was not related to cortical volume loss over time in either group, glucose metabolism within the group of AD patients was significantly related to volume loss over time (rho = 0.56, p < 0.05). The present study shows that in a group of AD patients amyloidplaque load as measured by [{sup 11}C]PIB behaves as a trait marker (i.e., all AD patients showed elevated levels of amyloid, not related to subsequent disease course), whilst hypometabolism as measured by [{sup 18}F]FDG changed over time indicating that it could serve as a state marker that is predictive of neurodegeneration. (orig.)

  15. ADF/cofilin-mediated actin retrograde flow directs neurite formation in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kevin C; Hellal, Farida; Neukirchen, Dorothee; Jacob, Sonja; Tahirovic, Sabina; Dupraz, Sebastian; Stern, Sina; Garvalov, Boyan K; Gurniak, Christine; Shaw, Alisa E; Meyn, Liane; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Bamburg, James R; Small, J Victor; Witke, Walter; Bradke, Frank

    2012-12-20

    Neurites are the characteristic structural element of neurons that will initiate brain connectivity and elaborate information. Early in development, neurons are spherical cells but this symmetry is broken through the initial formation of neurites. This fundamental step is thought to rely on actin and microtubule dynamics. However, it is unclear which aspects of the complex actin behavior control neuritogenesis and which molecular mechanisms are involved. Here, we demonstrate that augmented actin retrograde flow and protrusion dynamics facilitate neurite formation. Our data indicate that a single family of actin regulatory proteins, ADF/Cofilin, provides the required control of actin retrograde flow and dynamics to form neurites. In particular, the F-actin severing activity of ADF/Cofilin organizes space for the protrusion and bundling of microtubules, the backbone of neurites. Our data reveal how ADF/Cofilin organizes the cytoskeleton to drive actin retrograde flow and thus break the spherical shape of neurons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Growth, collapse, and stalling in a mechanical model for neurite motility

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre; Goriely, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Neurites, the long cellular protrusions that form the routes of the neuronal network are capable to actively extend during early morphogenesis or to regenerate after trauma. To perform this task, they rely on their cytoskeleton for mechanical support. In this paper, we present a three-component active gel model that describes neurites in the three robust mechanical states observed experimentally: collapsed, static, and motile. These states arise from an interplay between the physical forces driven by growth of the microtubule-rich inner core of the neurite and the acto-myosin contractility of its surrounding cortical membrane. In particular, static states appear as a mechanical traction/compression balance of these two parallel structures. The model predicts how the response of a neurite to a towing force depends on the force magnitude and recovers the response of neurites to several drug treatments that modulate the cytoskeleton active and passive properties.

  17. Mapping dynamic branch displacements: A versatile method to quantify spatiotemporal neurite dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki eHiramoto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractQuantification of the movement of axons and dendrites is essential to study circuit formation. Several methods have been developed to quantify the movement of neurites in simplified systems, however these quantification methods are specialized for a limited type of predicted movements in the particular assay systems. The movement of neurites in vivo includes many unexpected rearrangements. Establishment of a method that can detect and quantify a variety of patterning events will reveal novel phenomena in circuit formation and make it possible to conduct deeper investigation of the molecular and cellular bases of these events. Here we present a versatile method that represents a quantitative analysis of the integrated movement of neurites on a spatial map. We show that the method is useful to analyze several types of neurite behaviors, such as changes in the directionality of neurite movements, fasciculation of axons or changes in territories of dendritic fields.

  18. The novel beta-secretase inhibitor KMI-429 reduces amyloid beta peptide production in amyloid precursor protein transgenic and wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Masashi; Hattori, Chinatsu; Iwata, Nobuhisa; Saido, Takaomi C; Sasagawa, Noboru; Szabó, Beáta; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Maruyama, Kei; Tanuma, Sei-ichi; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the accumulation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. The major component of the plaques, amyloid beta peptide (Abeta), is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretase-mediated cleavage. Because beta-secretase/beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) knockout mice produce much less Abeta and grow normally, a beta-secretase inhibitor is thought to be one of the most attractive targets for the development of therapeutic interventions for AD without apparent side-effects. Here, we report the in vivo inhibitory effects of a novel beta-secretase inhibitor, KMI-429, a transition-state mimic, which effectively inhibits beta-secretase activity in cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. We injected KMI-429 into the hippocampus of APP transgenic mice. KMI-429 significantly reduced Abeta production in vivo in the soluble fraction compared with vehicle, but the level of Abeta in the insoluble fraction was unaffected. In contrast, an intrahippocampal injection of KMI-429 in wild-type mice remarkably reduced Abeta production in both the soluble and insoluble fractions. Our results indicate that the beta-secretase inhibitor KMI-429 is a promising candidate for the treatment of AD.

  19. Iron, Copper, and Zinc Concentration in Aβ Plaques in the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Correlates with Metal Levels in the Surrounding Neuropil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Simon A; Churches, Quentin I; de Jonge, Martin D; Birchall, Ian E; Streltsov, Victor; McColl, Gawain; Adlard, Paul A; Hare, Dominic J

    2017-03-15

    The metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc have long been associated with the aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease; an interaction that has been suggested to promote increased oxidative stress and neuronal dysfunction. We examined plaque metal load in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice using X-ray fluorescence microscopy to assess how the anatomical location of Aβ plaques was influenced by the metal content of surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemical staining of Aβ plaques colocalized with areas of increased X-ray scattering power in unstained tissue sections, allowing direct X-ray based-assessment of plaque metal levels in sections subjected to minimal chemical fixation. We identified and mapped 48 individual plaques in four subregions of the hippocampus from four biological replicates. Iron, Cu, and Zn areal concentrations (ng cm-2) were increased in plaques compared to the surrounding neuropil. However, this elevation in metal load reflected the local metal makeup of the surrounding neuropil, where different brain regions are enriched for different metal ions. After correcting for tissue density, only Zn levels remained elevated in plaques. This study suggests that the in vivo binding of Zn to plaques is not simply due to increased protein deposition.

  20. Angiogenesis in the atherosclerotic plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Camaré

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a multifocal alteration of the vascular wall of medium and large arteries characterized by a local accumulation of cholesterol and non-resolving inflammation. Atherothrombotic complications are the leading cause of disability and mortality in western countries. Neovascularization in atherosclerotic lesions plays a major role in plaque growth and instability. The angiogenic process is mediated by classical angiogenic factors and by additional factors specific to atherosclerotic angiogenesis. In addition to its role in plaque progression, neovascularization may take part in plaque destabilization and thromboembolic events. Anti-angiogenic agents are effective to reduce atherosclerosis progression in various animal models. However, clinical trials with anti-angiogenic drugs, mainly anti-VEGF/VEGFR, used in anti-cancer therapy show cardiovascular adverse effects, and require additional investigations.

  1. Fibril fragmentation enhances amyloid cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L; Gosal, Walraj S; Homans, Steve W; Hewitt, Eric W; Radford, Sheena E

    2009-12-04

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity.

  2. Amyloid beta1–42 and the phoshorylated tau threonine 231 in brains of aged cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darusman, Huda Shalahudin; Gjedde, Albert; Sajuthi, Dondin

    2014-01-01

    Pathological hallmarks indicative of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which are the plaques of amyloid beta1-42 and neurofibrillary tangles, were found in brain of aged cynomolgus monkey. The aim of this study was to investigate if aged monkeys exhibiting spatial memory impairment and levels of biomarke...

  3. beta-amyloid excitotoxicity in rat magnocellular nucleus basalis - Effect of cortical deafferentation on cerebral blood flow regulation and implications for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, T.; Penke, B; Luiten, P.G.M.; Kalaria, RN; Ince, P

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common type of dementia with a still largely unclear etiopathology, One of the factors that may directly contribute to the development and progression of the disorder Is the abundant accumulation of beta-amyloid peptides (A beta) in senile plaques. In the present

  4. β-Amyloid Excitotoxicity in Rat Magnocellular Nucleus Basalis. Effect of Cortical Deafferentation on Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation and Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkany, Tibor; Penke, Botond; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    2000-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia with a still largely unclear etiopathology. One of the factors that may directly contribute to the development and progression of the disorder is the abundant accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) in senile plaques. In the present account we

  5. Plaque control and oral hygiene methods

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harrison, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The experimental gingivitis study of Löe et al.1 demonstrated a cause and effect relationship between plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation, and helped to establish plaque\\/biofilm as the primary risk factor for gingivitis. When healthy individuals withdrew oral hygiene efforts, gingival inflammation ensued within 21 days in all subjects. Once effective plaque removal was recommenced, clinical gingival health was quickly re-established – indicating that plaque-associated inflammation is modifiable by plaque control. As current consensus confirms that gingivitis and periodontitis may be viewed as a continuum of disease,2 the rationale for achieving effective plaque control is clear.

  6. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Risk factors for amyloid positivity in older people reporting significant memory concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Wenjun; Cassidy, Ryan M; Su, Hang; Su, Yindan; Zhang, Xiangyang

    2017-10-06

    The goal of this study is to identify risk factors for the presence of amyloid accumulation in the brains of patients reporting subjective cognitive decline (SCD). Identifying such risk factors will help better identify patients who ought to receive neuroimaging studies to confirm plaque presence and begin intervention, as well as enhancing the study of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Ninety-nine SCD participants (72.2±5.6years, 57.6% female) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) underwent florbetapir PET. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between the presence of an increased amyloid signal (amyloid positivity) and several potential risk factors, including: demographics, APOE ε4 genotype, family history of dementia, history of hypertension, history of cigarettes smoking, cognitive function and depressive symptoms. Being female was a significant risk factor for amyloid positivity (OR=4.915, 95% CI=1.709-14.139), as was being an APOE ε4 carrier (OR=2.985, 95% CI=1.084-8.219) and having a history of cigarette smoking (OR=4.091, 95% CI=1.483-11.285). Our study demonstrates that female gender, APOE ε4 genotype, and history of cigarettes smoking are associated with amyloid positivity in patients with SCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nilotinib and bosutinib modulate pre-plaque alterations of blood immune markers and neuro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonskaya, I; Hebron, M L; Selby, S T; Turner, R S; Moussa, C E-H

    2015-09-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains exhibit plaques and tangles in association with inflammation. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abl is linked to neuro-inflammation in AD. Abl inhibition by nilotinib or bosutinib facilitates amyloid clearance and may decrease inflammation. Transgenic mice that express Dutch, Iowa and Swedish APP mutations (TgAPP) and display progressive Aβ plaque deposition were treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to determine pre-plaque effects on systemic and CNS inflammation using milliplex® ELISA. Plaque Aβ was detected at 4months in TgAPP and pre-plaque intracellular Aβ accumulation (2.5months) was associated with changes of cytokines and chemokines prior to detection of glial changes. Plaque formation correlated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, IL-1β) and markers of immunosuppressive and adaptive immunity, including, IL-4, IL-10, IL-2, IL-3, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and IFN-γ. An inverse relationship of chemokines was observed as CCL2 and CCL5 were lower than WT mice at 2months and significantly increased after plaque appearance, while soluble CX3CL1 decreased. A change in glial profile was only robustly detected at 6months in Tg-APP mice and TKIs reduced astrocyte and dendritic cell number with no effects on microglia, suggesting alteration of brain immunity. Nilotinib decreased blood and brain cytokines and chemokines and increased CX3CL1. Bosutinib increased brain and blood IL-10 and CX3CL1, suggesting a protective role for soluble CX3CL1. Taken together these data suggest that TKIs regulate systemic and CNS immunity and may be useful treatments in early AD through dual effects on amyloid clearance and immune modulation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Towards a Pharmacophore for Amyloid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, Meytal; Sawaya, Michael R.; Faull, Kym F.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Jiang, Lin; Sievers, Stuart A.; Liu, Jie; Barrio, Jorge R.; Eisenberg, David (UCLA)

    2011-09-16

    Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer's and other diseases associated with amyloid fibers remains a great challenge despite intensive research. To aid in this effort, we present atomic structures of fiber-forming segments of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease in complex with small molecule binders, determined by X-ray microcrystallography. The fiber-like complexes consist of pairs of {beta}-sheets, with small molecules binding between the sheets, roughly parallel to the fiber axis. The structures suggest that apolar molecules drift along the fiber, consistent with the observation of nonspecific binding to a variety of amyloid proteins. In contrast, negatively charged orange-G binds specifically to lysine side chains of adjacent sheets. These structures provide molecular frameworks for the design of diagnostics and drugs for protein aggregation diseases. The devastating and incurable dementia known as Alzheimer's disease affects the thinking, memory, and behavior of dozens of millions of people worldwide. Although amyloid fibers and oligomers of two proteins, tau and amyloid-{beta}, have been identified in association with this disease, the development of diagnostics and therapeutics has proceeded to date in a near vacuum of information about their structures. Here we report the first atomic structures of small molecules bound to amyloid. These are of the dye orange-G, the natural compound curcumin, and the Alzheimer's diagnostic compound DDNP bound to amyloid-like segments of tau and amyloid-{beta}. The structures reveal the molecular framework of small-molecule binding, within cylindrical cavities running along the {beta}-spines of the fibers. Negatively charged orange-G wedges into a specific binding site between two sheets of the fiber, combining apolar binding with electrostatic interactions, whereas uncharged compounds slide along the cavity. We observed that different amyloid polymorphs bind different small molecules, revealing that a

  10. Expression of endogenous mouse APP modulates β-amyloid deposition in hAPP-transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Johannes; Krohn, Markus; Schwitlick, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Paarmann, Kristin; Pietrzik, Claus U; Biverstål, Henrik; Jansone, Baiba; Langer, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2017-06-20

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is one of the hallmarks of the amyloid hypothesis in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mouse models using APP-transgene overexpression to generate amyloid plaques have shown to model only certain parts of the disease. The extent to which the data from mice can be transferred to man remains controversial. Several studies have shown convincing treatment results in reducing Aβ and enhancing cognition in mice but failed totally in human. One model-dependent factor has so far been almost completely neglected: the endogenous expression of mouse APP and its effects on the transgenic models and the readout for therapeutic approaches.Here, we report that hAPP-transgenic models of amyloidosis devoid of endogenous mouse APP expression (mAPP-knockout / mAPPko) show increased amounts and higher speed of Aβ deposition than controls with mAPP. The number of senile plaques and the level of aggregated hAβ were elevated in mAPPko mice, while the deposition in cortical blood vessels was delayed, indicating an alteration in the general aggregation propensity of hAβ together with endogenous mAβ. Furthermore, the cellular response to Aβ deposition was modulated: mAPPko mice developed a pronounced and age-dependent astrogliosis, while microglial association to amyloid plaques was diminished. The expression of human and murine aggregation-prone proteins with differing amino acid sequences within the same mouse model might not only alter the extent of deposition but also modulate the route of pathogenesis, and thus, decisively influence the study outcome, especially in translational research.

  11. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carboxystyryl)benzene as a probe for β-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M; Fazio, Robert C; Watt, David S; LeVine, Harry

    2014-12-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[(3)H]-2,5-bis(4'-hydroxy-3'-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-2,5-Bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carboxystyryl)benzene as a Probe for β-Amyloid Fibrils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Sergey V.; Kwiatkowski, Stefan; Sviripa, Vitaliy M.; Fazio, Robert C.; Watt, David S.; LeVine, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of Aβ in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients reflects an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from their brains. Alternative cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by processing proteases generates soluble APP fragments including the neurotoxic amyloid Aβ40 and Aβ42 peptides that assemble into fibrils and form plaques. Plaque-buildup occurs over an extended time-frame, and the early detection and modulation of plaque formation are areas of active research. Radiolabeled probes for the detection of amyloid plaques and fibrils in living subjects are important for noninvasive evaluation of AD diagnosis, progression, and differentiation of AD from other neurodegenerative diseases and age-related cognitive decline. Tritium-labeled (E,E)-1-[3H]-2,5-bis(4’-hydroxy-3’-carbomethoxystyryl)benzene possesses an improved level of chemical stability relative to a previously reported radioiodinated analog for radiometric quantification of Aβ plaque and tau pathology in brain tissue and in vitro studies with synthetic Aβ and tau fibrils. PMID:25452000

  13. Dual pathways regulate neurite outgrowth in enteric ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, D M; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1994-10-01

    Primary cultures of guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia were used to examine the ability of agents that activate adenylate cyclase or mimic intracellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) to stimulate morphological growth. Dose-dependent increases in neurite length and density were produced in enteric neuronal cultures by forskolin (212% of control), cholera toxin (356% of control), or the permeant cAMP analogues 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and dibutyryl cAMP. (R)-p-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent kinases, blocked the growth-promoting effects of cAMP analogues but not of nerve growth factor (NGF). Activation of cAMP-dependent signaling pathways also increased production of mRNA for alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2. Dual pathways, regulated by NGF and cAMP-dependent protein kinases, influence growth signaling in enteric ganglia.

  14. Characterizing vulnerable plaque features with intravascular elastography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, J.A.; Korte, C.L. de; Mastik, F.; Strijder, C.; Pasterkamp, G.; Boersma, E.; Serruys, P.W.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In vivo detection of vulnerable plaques is presently limited by a lack of diagnostic tools. Intravascular ultrasound elastography is a new technique based on intravascular ultrasound and has the potential to differentiate between different plaques phenotypes. However, the predictive

  15. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Gu

    2013-12-01

    Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions. During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO, stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation.

  16. Microelectrode array-induced neuronal alignment directs neurite outgrowth: analysis using a fast Fourier transform (FFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radotić, Viktorija; Braeken, Dries; Kovačić, Damir

    2017-12-01

    Many studies have shown that the topography of the substrate on which neurons are cultured can promote neuronal adhesion and guide neurite outgrowth in the same direction as the underlying topography. To investigate this effect, isotropic substrate-complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) chips were used as one example of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) for directing neurite growth of spiral ganglion neurons. Neurons were isolated from 5 to 7-day-old rat pups, cultured 1 day in vitro (DIV) and 4 DIV, and then fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde. For analysis of neurite alignment and orientation, fast Fourier transformation (FFT) was used. Results revealed that on the micro-patterned surface of a CMOS chip, neurons orient their neurites along three directional axes at 30, 90, and 150° and that neurites aligned in straight lines between adjacent pillars and mostly followed a single direction while occasionally branching perpendicularly. We conclude that the CMOS substrate guides neurites towards electrodes by means of their structured pillar organization and can produce electrical stimulation of aligned neurons as well as monitoring their neural activities once neurites are in the vicinity of electrodes. These findings are of particular interest for neural tissue engineering with the ultimate goal of developing a new generation of MEA essential for improved electrical stimulation of auditory neurons.

  17. CHLORHEXIDINE INHIBITS L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE MEDIATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milstone, Aaron M.; Bamford, Penny; Aucott, Susan W.; Tang, Ningfeng; White, Kimberly R.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chlorhexidine is a skin disinfectant that reduces skin and mucous membrane bacterial colonization and inhibits organism growth. Despite numerous studies assessing chlorhexidine safety in term infants, residual concerns have limited its use in hospitalized neonates, especially low birth weight preterm infants. The aim of this study was to assess the potential neurotoxicity of chlorhexidine on the developing central nervous system using a well-established in vitro model of neurite outgrowth that includes laminin and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1) as neurite outgrowth promoting substrates. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons are plated on either poly L-lysine, L1 or laminin. Chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene or their excipients are added to the media. Neurons are grown for 24 h, then fixed and neurite length measured. Results Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the length of neurites grown on L1 but not laminin. Chlorhexidine concentrations as low as 125 ng/ml statistically significantly reduced neurite length on L1. Hexachlorophene did not affect neurite length. Conclusion Chlorhexidine at concentrations detected in the blood following topical applications in preterm infants specifically inhibited L1 mediated neurite outgrowth of cerebellar granule neurons. It is now vital to determine whether the blood brain barrier is permeable to chlorhexidine in preterm infants. PMID:24126818

  18. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-04

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. © 2016 Fusco et al.

  19. Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuel, Samuel Alberg

    simulationer, som tillod beregning af longitudinelle stress-niveauer i den fibrøse kappe. Afhandlingen indeholder tre artikler, som beskriver denne metode. Den første; “Mechanical Stresses in Carotid Plaques using MRI-Based Fluid Structure Interaction Models”, beskriver i detaljer metoden til at danne de...

  20. Mechanistic insights into mode of action of potent natural antagonists of BACE-1 for checking Alzheimer’s plaque pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanjal, Jaspreet Kaur [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Goyal, Sukriti [Apaji Institute of Mathematics and Applied Computer Technology, Banasthali University, Tonk 304022, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Sudhanshu [Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, New Delhi 110042 (India); Hamid, Rabia [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190006 (India); Grover, Abhinav, E-mail: abhinavgr@gmail.com [School of Biotechnology, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Accumulation of Aβ plaques is one of the major pathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease. •Inhibition of β-Secretase or BACE-1 offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. •A large virtual dataset of natural compounds was screened against BACE-1. •Top two hits were analyzed for thermodynamic and structural stability using MD simulations. •Their detailed binding mode of actions were elucidated. -- Abstract: Alzheimer’s is a neurodegenerative disorder resulting in memory loss and decline in cognitive abilities. Accumulation of extracellular beta amyloidal plaques is one of the major pathology associated with this disease. β-Secretase or BACE-1 performs the initial and rate limiting step of amyloidic pathway in which 37–43 amino acid long peptides are generated which aggregate to form plaques. Inhibition of this enzyme offers a viable prospect to check the growth of these plaques. Numerous efforts have been made in recent years for the generation of BACE-1 inhibitors but many of them failed during the preclinical or clinical trials due to drug related or drug induced toxicity. In the present work, we have used computational methods to screen a large dataset of natural compounds to search for small molecules having BACE-1 inhibitory activity with low toxicity to normal cells. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to analyze molecular interactions between the screened compounds and the active residues of the enzyme. Herein, we report two natural compounds of inhibitory nature active against β-secretase enzyme of amyloidic pathway and are potent lead molecules against Alzheimer’s disease.

  1. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  2. Porcine prion protein amyloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Nyström, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions are composed of misfolded aggregated prion protein (PrP) with amyloid-like features. Prions are zoonotic disease agents that infect a wide variety of mammalian species including humans. Mammals and by-products thereof which are frequently encountered in daily life are most important for human health. It is established that bovine prions (BSE) can infect humans while there is no such evidence for any other prion susceptible species in the human food chain (sheep, goat, elk, deer) and largely prion resistant species (pig) or susceptible and resistant pets (cat and dogs, respectively). PrPs from these species have been characterized using biochemistry, biophysics and neurobiology. Recently we studied PrPs from several mammals in vitro and found evidence for generic amyloidogenicity as well as cross-seeding fibril formation activity of all PrPs on the human PrP sequence regardless if the original species was resistant or susceptible to prion disease. Porcine PrP amyloidogenicity was among the studied. Experimentally inoculated pigs as well as transgenic mouse lines overexpressing porcine PrP have, in the past, been used to investigate the possibility of prion transmission in pigs. The pig is a species with extraordinarily wide use within human daily life with over a billion pigs harvested for human consumption each year. Here we discuss the possibility that the largely prion disease resistant pig can be a clinically silent carrier of replicating prions.

  3. Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy: A Systematic Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Biffi, Alessandro; Greenberg, Steven M

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a disorder characterized by amyloid deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal and cortical arteries, arterioles, and less often capillaries and veins of the central nervous system...

  4. Red autofluorescence of dental plaque bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M. H.; Thomas, R. Z.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.; de Soet, J. J.

    2006-01-01

    Red autofluorescence of plaque and its relation to fluorescence of a single species in the biofilm was studied. Fluorescence images of non-disclosed and disclosed plaque of 28 first-year students were captured. The plaque samples were assessed by culture methods and studied for red autofluorescence.

  5. Signaling mechanisms of neurite outgrowth induced by the cell adhesion molecules NCAM and N-cadherin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S M; Berezin, V; Bock, E

    2008-01-01

    extracellular guidance cues to intracellular events and thereby regulating neurite outgrowth. In this review, we focus on two CAMs, the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and N-cadherin, and their ability to mediate signaling associated with a neurite outgrowth response. In particular, we will focus on direct......Formation of appropriate neural circuits depends on a complex interplay between extracellular guiding cues and intracellular signaling events that result in alterations of cytoskeletal dynamics and a neurite growth response. Surface-expressed cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) interact...

  6. Sequence determinants of amyloid fibril formation

    OpenAIRE

    López de la Paz, Manuela; Serrano, Luis

    2003-01-01

    The establishment of rules that link sequence and amyloid feature is critical for our understanding of misfolding diseases. To this end, we have performed a saturation mutagenesis analysis on the de novo-designed amyloid peptide STVIIE (1). The positional scanning mutagenesis has revealed that there is a position dependence on mutation of amyloid fibril formation and that both very tolerant and restrictive positions to mutation can be found within an amyloid sequence. In this system, mutation...

  7. Progranulin gene delivery reduces plaque burden and synaptic atrophy in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kampen, Jackalina M; Kay, Denis G

    2017-01-01

    Progranulin (PGRN) is a multifunctional protein that is widely expressed throughout the brain, where it has been shown to act as a critical regulator of CNS inflammation and also functions as an autocrine neuronal growth factor, important for long-term neuronal survival. PGRN has been shown to activate cell signaling pathways regulating excitoxicity, oxidative stress, and synaptogenesis, as well as amyloidogenesis. Together, these critical roles in the CNS suggest that PGRN has the potential to be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is the leading cause of dementia and is marked by the appearance of extracellular plaques consisting of aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ), as well as neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, neuronal loss and synaptic atrophy. The ability of PGRN to target multiple key features of AD pathophysiology suggests that enhancing its expression may benefit this disease. Here, we describe the application of PGRN gene transfer using in vivo delivery of lentiviral expression vectors in a transgenic mouse model of AD. Viral vector delivery of the PGRN gene effectively enhanced PGRN expression in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. This elevated PGRN expression significantly reduced amyloid plaque burden in these mice, accompanied by reductions in markers of inflammation and synaptic atrophy. The overexpression of PGRN was also found to increase activity of neprilysin, a key amyloid beta degrading enzyme. PGRN regulation of neprilysin activity could play a major role in the observed alterations in plaque burden. Thus, PGRN may be an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  8. Lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation reduces amyloid burden and mitigates memory deficits in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Robert J; Fernandez, Celia G; Stanley, Molly; Jiang, Hong; Nguyen, Phuong; Rice, Richard C; Buggia-Prévot, Virginie; De Rossi, Pierre; Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S; Lamb, Raza; Argemi, Arnau; Allaert, Emilie S; Rathbun, Elle M; Krause, Sofia V; Wagner, Steven L; Parent, Angèle T; Holtzman, David M; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2017-11-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by pathological brain lesions and a decline in cognitive function. β-Amyloid peptides (Aβ), derived from proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), play a central role in AD pathogenesis. β-Site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), the transmembrane aspartyl protease which initiates Aβ production, is axonally transported in neurons and accumulates in dystrophic neurites near cerebral amyloid deposits in AD. BACE1 is modified by S-palmitoylation at four juxtamembrane cysteine residues. S-palmitoylation is a dynamic posttranslational modification that is important for trafficking and function of several synaptic proteins. Here, we investigated the in vivo significance of BACE1 S-palmitoylation through the analysis of knock-in mice with cysteine-to-alanine substitution at the palmitoylated residues (4CA mice). BACE1 expression, as well as processing of APP and other neuronal substrates, was unaltered in 4CA mice despite the lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation and reduced lipid raft association. Whereas steady-state Aβ levels were similar, synaptic activity-induced endogenous Aβ production was not observed in 4CA mice. Furthermore, we report a significant reduction of cerebral amyloid burden and BACE1 accumulation in dystrophic neurites in the absence of BACE1 S-palmitoylation in mouse models of AD amyloidosis. Studies in cultured neurons suggest that S-palmitoylation is required for dendritic spine localization and axonal targeting of BACE1. Finally, the lack of BACE1 S-palmitoylation mitigates cognitive deficits in 5XFAD mice. Using transgenic mouse models, these results demonstrate that intrinsic posttranslational S-palmitoylation of BACE1 has a significant impact on amyloid pathogenesis and the consequent cognitive decline. Published under the PNAS license.

  9. MicroRNA-339-5p down-regulates protein expression of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) in human primary brain cultures and is reduced in brain tissue specimens of Alzheimer disease subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Justin M; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2014-02-21

    Alzheimer disease (AD) results, in part, from the excess accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide as neuritic plaques in the brain. The short Aβ peptide is derived from the large transmembrane Aβ precursor protein (APP). The rate-limiting step in the production of Aβ from APP is mediated by the β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1). Dysregulation of BACE1 levels leading to excess Aβ deposition is implicated in sporadic AD. Thus, elucidating the full complement of regulatory pathways that control BACE1 expression is key to identifying novel drug targets central to the Aβ-generating process. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are expected to participate in this molecular network. Here, we identified a known miRNA, miR-339-5p, as a key contributor to this regulatory network. Two distinct miR-339-5p target sites were predicted in the BACE1 3'-UTR by in silico analyses. Co-transfection of miR-339-5p with a BACE1 3'-UTR reporter construct resulted in significant reduction in reporter expression. Mutation of both target sites eliminated this effect. Delivery of the miR-339-5p mimic also significantly inhibited expression of BACE1 protein in human glioblastoma cells and human primary brain cultures. Delivery of target protectors designed against the miR-339-5p BACE1 3'-UTR target sites in primary human brain cultures significantly elevated BACE1 expression. Finally, miR-339-5p levels were found to be significantly reduced in brain specimens isolated from AD patients as compared with age-matched controls. Therefore, miR-339-5p regulates BACE1 expression in human brain cells and is most likely dysregulated in at least a subset of AD patients making this miRNA a novel drug target.

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  11. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment.Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients.Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region.The present studies

  12. Stickland reactions of dental plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M A; Kemp, C W; Robrish, S A; Bowen, W H

    1983-01-01

    Dental plaque samples from monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were shown to contain proline reduction activity in coupled Stickland reactions with other amino acids and also with certain end products of bacterial glucose metabolism. The unusually high concentration of bound and free proline in the oral environment may be of importance in both the production of base and in the removal of acid from the tooth surface after dietary carbohydrate ingestion. PMID:6618673

  13. Proliferation in the Alzheimer Hippocampus Is due to Microglia, Not Astroglia, and Occurs at Sites of Amyloid Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael W. Marlatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes contribute to Alzheimer’s disease (AD etiology and may mediate early neuroinflammatory responses. Despite their possible role in disease progression and despite the fact that they can respond to amyloid deposition in model systems, little is known about whether astro- or microglia can undergo proliferation in AD and whether this is related to the clinical symptoms or to local neuropathological changes. Previously, proliferation was found to be increased in glia-rich regions of the presenile hippocampus. Since their phenotype was unknown, we here used two novel triple-immunohistochemical protocols to study proliferation in astro- or microglia in relation to amyloid pathology. We selected different age-matched cohorts to study whether proliferative changes relate to clinical severity or to neuropathological changes. Proliferating cells were found across the hippocampus but never in mature neurons or astrocytes. Almost all proliferating cells were colabeled with Iba1+, indicating that particularly microglia contribute to proliferation in AD. Proliferating Iba1+ cells was specifically seen within the borders of amyloid plaques, indicative of an active involvement in, or response to, plaque accumulation. Thus, consistent with animal studies, proliferation in the AD hippocampus is due to microglia, occurs in close proximity of plaque pathology, and may contribute to the neuroinflammation common in AD.

  14. Bacterial sex in dental plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes are transferred between bacteria in dental plaque by transduction, conjugation, and transformation. Membrane vesicles can also provide a mechanism for horizontal gene transfer. DNA transfer is considered bacterial sex, but the transfer is not parallel to processes that we associate with sex in higher organisms. Several examples of bacterial gene transfer in the oral cavity are given in this review. How frequently this occurs in dental plaque is not clear, but evidence suggests that it affects a number of the major genera present. It has been estimated that new sequences in genomes established through horizontal gene transfer can constitute up to 30% of bacterial genomes. Gene transfer can be both inter- and intrageneric, and it can also affect transient organisms. The transferred DNA can be integrated or recombined in the recipient's chromosome or remain as an extrachromosomal inheritable element. This can make dental plaque a reservoir for antimicrobial resistance genes. The ability to transfer DNA is important for bacteria, making them better adapted to the harsh environment of the human mouth, and promoting their survival, virulence, and pathogenicity.

  15. Aspects of structural landscape of human islet amyloid polypeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jianfeng, E-mail: hjf@bit.edu.cn; Dai, Jin, E-mail: daijing491@gmail.com [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Li, Jing, E-mail: jinglichina@139.com [Institute of Biopharmaceutical Research, Yangtze River Pharmaceutical Group Beijing Haiyan Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd, Beijing 102206 (China); Peng, Xubiao, E-mail: xubiaopeng@gmail.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Niemi, Antti J., E-mail: Antti.Niemi@physics.uu.se [School of Physics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 803, S-75108 Uppsala (Sweden); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS UMR 6083, Fédération Denis Poisson, Université de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, F37200 Tours (France)

    2015-01-28

    The human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) co-operates with insulin to maintain glycemic balance. It also constitutes the amyloid plaques that aggregate in the pancreas of type-II diabetic patients. We have performed extensive in silico investigations to analyse the structural landscape of monomeric hIAPP, which is presumed to be intrinsically disordered. For this, we construct from first principles a highly predictive energy function that describes a monomeric hIAPP observed in a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment, as a local energy minimum. We subject our theoretical model of hIAPP to repeated heating and cooling simulations, back and forth between a high temperature regime where the conformation resembles a random walker and a low temperature limit where no thermal motions prevail. We find that the final low temperature conformations display a high level of degeneracy, in a manner which is fully in line with the presumed intrinsically disordered character of hIAPP. In particular, we identify an isolated family of α-helical conformations that might cause the transition to amyloidosis, by nucleation.

  16. Neurite outgrowth in cultured mouse pelvic ganglia - Effects of neurotrophins and bladder tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Mari; Zhu, Baoyi; Swärd, Karl; Uvelius, Bengt

    2017-07-01

    Neurotrophic factors regulate survival and growth of neurons. The urinary bladder is innervated via both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurons located in the major pelvic ganglion. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of the neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) on the sprouting rate of sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites from the female mouse ganglion. The pelvic ganglion was dissected out and attached to a petri dish and cultured in vitro. All three factors (BDNF, NT-3 and NGF) stimulated neurite outgrowth of both sympathetic and parasympathetic neurites although BDNF and NT-3 had a higher stimulatory effect on parasympathetic ganglion cells. The neurotrophin receptors TrkA, TrkB and TrkC were all expressed in neurons of the ganglia. Co-culture of ganglia with urinary bladder tissue, but not diaphragm tissue, increased the sprouting rate of neurites. Active forms of BDNF and NT-3 were detected in urinary bladder tissue using western blotting whereas tissue from the diaphragm expressed NGF. Neurite outgrowth from the pelvic ganglion was inhibited by a TrkB receptor antagonist. We therefore suggest that the urinary bladder releases trophic factors, including BDNF and NT-3, which regulate neurite outgrowth via activation of neuronal Trk-receptors. These findings could influence future strategies for developing pharmaceuticals to improve re-innervation due to bladder pathologies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  18. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  19. Rapamycin promotes β-amyloid production via ADAM-10 inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheqing; Salemi, Jon; Hou, Huayan; Zhu, Yuyan; Mori, Takashi; Giunta, Brian; Obregon, Demian; Tan, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Rapamycin is a well known immunosuppressant drug for rejection prevention in organ transplantation. Numerous clinical trials using rapamycin analogs, involving both children and adults with various disorders are currently ongoing worldwide. Most recently, rapamycin gained much attention for what appears to be life-span extending properties when administered to mice. The risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) is strongly and positively correlated with advancing age and is characterized by deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) as senile plaques in the brain. We report that rapamycin (2.5 μM), significantly increases Aβ generation in murine neuron-like cells (N2a) transfected with the human “Swedish” mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP). In concert with these observations, we found rapamycin significantly decreases the neuroprotective amino-terminal APP (amyloid precursor protein) cleavage product, soluble APP-α (sAPP-α) while increasing production of the β-carboxyl-terminal fragment of APP (β-CTF). These cleavage events are associated with decreased activation of a disintegrin and metallopeptidase domain-10 (ADAM-10), an important candidate α-secretase which opposes Aβ generation. To validate these findings in vivo, we intraperitoneal (i.p.) injected Tg2576 Aβ-overproducing transgenic mice with rapamycin (3 mg/kg/day) for 2 weeks. We found increased Aβ levels associated with decreased sAPP-α at an average rapamycin plasma concentration of 169.7 ± 23.5 ng/mL by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These data suggest that although rapamycin may increase the lifespan in some mouse models, it may not decrease the risk for age-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. PMID:20542014

  20. Induction of murine AA amyloidosis by various homogeneous amyloid fibrils and amyloid-like synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Cui, D; Hoshii, Y; Kawano, H; Une, Y; Gondo, T; Ishihara, T

    2007-11-01

    We investigated amyloid-enhancing factor (AEF) activity of amyloid fibrils extracted from amyloid-laden livers of mice, cow, cheetah, cat and swan. All amyloid fibrils were confirmed to be amyloid protein A (AA) by an immunohistochemical analysis. We found that these fibrils accelerated the deposition of amyloid in an experimental mouse model of AA amyloidosis. Furthermore, the degree of deposition was dependent on the concentration of fibrils. When we compared the minimal concentration of amyloid fibrils needed to induce deposition, we found that these fibrils showed different efficiencies. Murine amyloid fibril induced amyloid deposition more efficiently than cow, cat, cheetah or swan amyloid fibrils. These data suggest that amyloid deposition is preferentially induced by amyloid fibrils with the same primary sequence as the endogenous amyloid protein. We then analysed the AEF activity of synthetic peptides, synthesized corresponding to amino acids 1-15 of mouse SAA (mSAA), 2-15 of cow SAA (bSAA), 1-15 of cat SAA (cSAA), which was the same as cheetah, and the common amino acids 33-45 of these four SAA (aSAA). We found that mSAA, bSAA and cSAA formed amyloid-like fibrils in morphology and showed similar AEF properties to those of native amyloid fibrils. Although aSAA also formed highly ordered amyloid-like fibrils, it showed weaker AEF activity than the other synthetic fibrils. Our results indicate that amyloidosis is transmissible between species under certain conditions; however, the efficiency of amyloid deposition is species-specific and appears to be related to the primary amino acid sequence, especially the N-terminal segment of the amyloid protein.

  1. Vulnerable Plaques, Inflammation and Newer Imaging Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia V

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, inflammation is considered to be the central player in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. It leads to the formation of multiple plaques in the arterial beds including coronary vasculature. Recent studies using the latest imaging techniques have shown that in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS multiple plaques are ruptured and have thrombus formation on them. Various factors make these plaques unstable, these include structural components of plaque like thin fibrous cap, high lipid content of the plaque core and inflammation, both localized and generalized. It has been shown that most of the ACS are caused by plaques causing non-critical stenosis as seen on traditional X-ray angiography. Also, the phenomenon of remodelling makes angiography a poor technique for plaque visualization. Hence newer modalities are required to identify these 'vulnerable plaques'. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS, thermography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI are a few such promising techniques. Here we review the invasive and non-invasive modalities that can be helpful in the identification of these plaques before they become unstable and cause ACS, and also the available therapies to stabilize these plaques.

  2. Cannabinoid receptor 1 deficiency in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease leads to enhanced cognitive impairment despite of a reduction in amyloid deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumm, Christoph; Hiebel, Christof; Hanstein, Regina; Purrio, Martin; Nagel, Heike; Conrad, Andrea; Lutz, Beat; Behl, Christian; Clement, Angela B

    2013-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by amyloid-β deposition in amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation, neuronal loss, and cognitive deficits. Cannabinoids display neuromodulatory and neuroprotective effects and affect memory acquisition. Here, we studied the impact of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) deficiency on the development of AD pathology by breeding amyloid precursor protein (APP) Swedish mutant mice (APP23), an AD animal model, with CB1-deficient mice. In addition to the lower body weight of APP23/CB1(-/-) mice, most of these mice died at an age before typical AD-associated changes become apparent. The surviving mice showed a reduced amount of APP and its fragments suggesting a regulatory influence of CB1 on APP processing, which was confirmed by modulating CB1 expression in vitro. Reduced APP levels were accompanied by a reduced plaque load and less inflammation in APP23/CB1(-/-) mice. Nevertheless, compared to APP23 mice with an intact CB1, APP23/CB1(-/-) mice showed impaired learning and memory deficits. These data argue against a direct correlation of amyloid plaque load with cognitive abilities in this AD mouse model lacking CB1. Furthermore, the findings indicate that CB1 deficiency can worsen AD-related cognitive deficits and support a potential role of CB1 as a pharmacologic target. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy platform based on nanoshells for detection of β-amyloid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Hope T.; Cowan, Christopher B.; Good, Theresa A.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2008-02-01

    A major limitation of many surfaced enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) approaches is the dependence of the Raman enhancement on the local nanostructure. While these local "hot spots" may provide areas of extremely strong enhancement, which make trace analyte detection possible, they also make quantitative measurements problematic. Gold nanoshells however, with the ratio of the radius of their silica core to gold shell tuned to the near infrared excitation wavelength, have been used as a platform for uniform SERS enhancement. By using nanoshells, the SERS enhancement is dependent on the resonance of single nanoshells, without relying on the uncontrolled contribution from localized "hot spots". The nanoshell platform is functionalized with sialic acid to mimic neuronal cells surfaces to allow for the specific binding of β-amyloid, the primary protein component of the senile plaques found in Alzheimer's disease patients. We ultimately hope that this mechanism will provide insight into the relationship between the progression of Alzheimer's disease and β-amyloid through detection of the toxic form of the protein with structural and concentration information. With this approach, we have obtained concentration dependent spectra, consistent across the platform surface, which indicate the feasibility of detecting β-amyloid oligomers into the picomolar range. Additionally, by monitoring SERS spectra as β-amyloid changes its structural conformation from monomer to fibril, we have demonstrated conformational dependence of the SERS signals.

  4. Clinicopathologic and 11C-Pittsburgh compound B implications of Thal amyloid phase across the Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Melissa E; Lowe, Val J; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Liesinger, Amanda M; Cannon, Ashley; Przybelski, Scott A; Rawal, Bhupendra; Parisi, Joseph E; Petersen, Ronald C; Kantarci, Kejal; Ross, Owen A; Duara, Ranjan; Knopman, David S; Jack, Clifford R; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-05-01

    Thal amyloid phase, which describes the pattern of progressive amyloidplaque deposition in Alzheimer's disease, was incorporated into the latest National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association neuropathologic assessment guidelines. Amyloid biomarkers (positron emission tomography and cerebrospinal fluid) were included in clinical diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer's disease dementia published by the National Institute of Ageing - Alzheimer's Association and the International Work group. Our first goal was to evaluate the correspondence of Thal amyloid phase to Braak tangle stage and ante-mortem clinical characteristics in a large autopsy cohort. Second, we examined the relevance of Thal amyloid phase in a prospectively-followed autopsied cohort who underwent ante-mortem (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B imaging; using the large autopsy cohort to broaden our perspective of (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B results. The Mayo Clinic Jacksonville Brain Bank case series (n = 3618) was selected regardless of ante-mortem clinical diagnosis and neuropathologic co-morbidities, and all assigned Thal amyloid phase and Braak tangle stage using thioflavin-S fluorescent microscopy. (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B studies from Mayo Clinic Rochester were available for 35 participants scanned within 2 years of death. Cortical (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B values were calculated as a standard uptake value ratio normalized to cerebellum grey/white matter. In the high likelihood Alzheimer's disease brain bank cohort (n = 1375), cases with lower Thal amyloid phases were older at death, had a lower Braak tangle stage, and were less frequently APOE-ε4 positive. Regression modelling in these Alzheimer's disease cases, showed that Braak tangle stage, but not Thal amyloid phase predicted age at onset, disease duration, and final Mini-Mental State Examination score. In contrast, Thal amyloid phase, but not Braak tangle stage or cerebral amyloid angiopathy predicted (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B

  5. Charged surfactants induce a non-fibrillar aggregation pathway of amyloid-beta peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Joana A; Rocha, Sandra; Pereira, Maria do Carmo

    2013-09-01

    The amyloid β-peptide with a sequence of 42 amino acids is the major constituent of extracellular amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease plaques. The control of the peptide self-assembly is difficult to achieve because the process is fast and is affected by many variables. In this paper, we describe the effect of different charged and non-charged surfactants on Aβ(₁₋₄₂) fibrillation to define common alternate aggregation pathways. The characterization of the peptide-surfactant interactions by ultra-structural analysis, thioflavin T assay and secondary structure analysis, suggested that charged surfactants interact with Aβ(₁₋₄₂) through electrostatic interactions. Charged micelles slow down the aggregation process and stabilize the peptide in the oligomeric state, whereas non-charged surfactants promote the Aβ(₁₋₄₂) fibril formation. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Computed Tomography Biomarkers of Vulnerable Coronary Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyulas Tiberiu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An unstable plaque has a high risk of thrombosis and at the same time for a fast progression of the stenosis degree. Also, “high-risk plaque” and “thrombosis-prone plaque” are used as synonym terms for characterization of a vulnerable plaque. The imaging biomarkers for vulnerable coronary plaques are considered to be spotty calcifications, active remodeling, low-density atheroma and the presence of a ring-like attenuation pattern, also known as the napkin-ring sign. Computed cardiac tomography can determine the plaque composition by assessing the plaque density, which is measured in Hounsfield units (HU. The aim of this manuscript was to provide an update about the most frequently used biomarkers of vulnerability in a vulnerable plaque with the help of computed cardiac tomography.

  7. Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0608 TITLE: Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Vince, David Geoffrey...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Vascular Plaque Determination for Stroke Risk Assessment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0608 5c. PROGRAM... plaques at high risk for initiating a cerebrovascular accident. The core of the current research project is a pilot clinical study to enroll 100 subjects

  8. Accuracy of coronary plaque detection and assessment of interobserver agreement for plaque quantification using automatic coronary plaque analysis software on coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laqmani, A.; Quitzke, M.; Creder, D.D.; Adam, G.; Lund, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Nuclearmedicine; Klink, T. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-10-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of automatic plaque detection and the interobserver agreement of automatic versus manually adjusted quantification of coronary plaques on coronary CT angiography (cCTA) using commercially available software. 10 cCTA datasets were evaluated using plaque software. First, the automatically detected plaques were verified. Second, two observers independently performed plaque quantification without revising the automatically constructed plaque contours (automatic approach). Then, each observer adjusted the plaque contours according to plaque delineation (adjusted approach). The interobserver agreement of both approaches was analyzed. 32 of 114 automatically identified findings were true-positive plaques, while 82 (72 %) were false-positive. 20 of 52 plaques (38 %) were missed by the software (false-negative). The automatic approach provided good interobserver agreement with relative differences of 0.9 ± 16.0 % for plaque area and -3.3 ± 33.8 % for plaque volume. Both observers independently adjusted all contours because they did not represent the plaque delineation. Interobserver agreement decreased for the adjusted approach with relative differences of 25.0 ± 24.8 % for plaque area and 20.0 ± 40.4 % for plaque volume. The automatic plaque analysis software is of limited value due to high numbers of false-positive and false-negative plaque findings. The automatic approach was reproducible but it necessitated adjustment of all constructed plaque contours resulting in deterioration of the interobserver agreement.

  9. Noninvasive characterization of carotid plaque strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amir A; Sikdar, Siddhartha; Hatsukami, Thomas; Cebral, Juan; Jones, Michael; Huston, John; Howard, George; Lal, Brajesh K

    2017-06-01

    Current risk stratification of internal carotid artery plaques based on diameter-reducing percentage stenosis may be unreliable because ischemic stroke results from plaque disruption with atheroembolization. Biomechanical forces acting on the plaque may render it vulnerable to rupture. The feasibility of ultrasound-based quantification of plaque displacement and strain induced by hemodynamic forces and their relationship to high-risk plaques have not been determined. We studied the feasibility and reliability of carotid plaque strain measurement from clinical B-mode ultrasound images and the relationship of strain to high-risk plaque morphology. We analyzed carotid ultrasound B-mode cine loops obtained in patients with asymptomatic ≥50% stenosis during routine clinical scanning. Optical flow methods were used to quantify plaque motion and shear strain during the cardiac cycle. The magnitude (maximum absolute shear strain rate [MASSR]) and variability (entropy of shear strain rate [ESSR] and variance of shear strain rate [VSSR]) of strain were combined into a composite shear strain index (SSI), which was assessed for interscan repeatability and correlated with plaque echolucency. Nineteen patients (mean age, 70 years) constituting 36 plaques underwent imaging; 37% of patients (n = 7) showed high strain (SSI ≥0.5; MASSR, 2.2; ESSR, 39.7; VSSR, 0.03) in their plaques; the remaining clustered into a low-strain group (SSI <0.5; MASSR, 0.58; ESSR, 21.2; VSSR, 0.002). The area of echolucent morphology was greater in high-strain plaques vs low-strain plaques (28% vs 17%; P = .018). Strain measurements showed low variability on Bland-Altman plots with cluster assignment agreement of 76% on repeated scanning. Two patients developed a stroke during 2 years of follow-up; both demonstrated high SSI (≥0.5) at baseline. Carotid plaque strain is reliably computed from routine B-mode imaging using clinical ultrasound machines. High plaque strain correlates with known

  10. Micropatterned coumarin polyester thin films direct neurite orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Aleesha M; Maddipatla, Murthy V S N; Shi, Shuojia; Chamsaz, Elaheh A; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Joy, Abraham; Leipzig, Nic D

    2014-11-26

    Guidance and migration of cells in the nervous system is imperative for proper development, maturation, and regeneration. In the peripheral nervous system (PNS), it is challenging for axons to bridge critical-sized injury defects to achieve repair and the central nervous system (CNS) has a very limited ability to regenerate after injury because of its innate injury response. The photoreactivity of the coumarin polyester used in this study enables efficient micropatterning using a custom digital micromirror device (DMD) and has been previously shown to be biodegradable, making these thin films ideal for cell guidance substrates with potential for future in vivo applications. With DMD, we fabricated coumarin polyester thin films into 10×20 μm and 15×50 μm micropatterns with depths ranging from 15 to 20 nm to enhance nervous system cell alignment. Adult primary neurons, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes were isolated from rat brain tissue and seeded onto the polymer surfaces. After 24 h, cell type and neurite alignment were analyzed using phase contrast and fluorescence imaging. There was a significant difference (pdistribution for both emergence angle (from the body of the cell) and orientation angle (at the tip of the growth cone) confirming alignment on patterned surfaces compared to control substrates (unpatterned polymer and glass surfaces). The expected frequency distribution for parallel alignment (≤15°) is 14% and the two micropatterned groups ranged from 42 to 49% alignment for emergence and orientation angle measurements, where the control groups range from 12 to 22% for parallel alignment. Despite depths being 15 to 20 nm, cell processes could sense these topographical changes and preferred to align to certain features of the micropatterns like the plateau/channel interface. As a result this initial study in utilizing these new DMD micropatterned coumarin polyester thin films has proven beneficial as an axon guidance platform for future nervous system

  11. OSA and coronary plaque characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Adeline; Hau, William; Ho, Hee-Hwa; Ghaem Maralani, Haleh; Loo, Germaine; Khoo, See-Meng; Tai, Bee-Choo; Richards, A Mark; Ong, Paul; Lee, Chi-Hang

    2014-02-01

    Virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS) is an intravascular imaging technique that enables the characterization of coronary plaques. We sought to determine the association between OSA and coronary plaque characteristics in patients presenting with coronary artery disease. We prospectively recruited patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease for a VH-IVUS examination and home-based sleep study. The total atheroma volume of the entire target coronary artery and the incidence of thin cap fibroatheroma of patients with no to mild and moderate to severe OSA were compared. One hundred eighteen patients were recruited from two university-affiliated centers. Among the 93 patients who completed the study, 32 (34.4%) had newly diagnosed moderate to severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index > 15). Compared with patients with no to mild OSA, those with moderate to severe OSA had a larger total atheroma volume (461.3 ± 250.4 mm³ vs 299.2 ± 135.6 mm³, P OSA and no to mild OSA regarding the prevalence of thin cap fibroatheroma in the culprit lesion (53.1% vs 54.2%, P = .919). In patients presenting with coronary artery disease, moderate to severe OSA was independently associated with a larger total atheroma volume in the target coronary artery. Further studies on the effects of CPAP on total atheroma volume are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT01306526; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  12. Conformational Abs Recognizing a Generic Amyloid Fibril Epitope

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brian O'Nuallain; Ronald Wetzel

    2002-01-01

    ...) but not to its soluble, monomeric state. Surprisingly, these Abs also bind to other disease-related amyloid fibrils and amyloid-like aggregates derived from other proteins of unrelated sequence, such as transthyretin, islet amyloid polypeptide, β...

  13. Effects of organophosphates on cholinesterase activity and neurite regeneration in Aplysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivatsan, M

    1999-05-14

    In Aplysia, a marine mollusc, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is present in cholinergic and non-cholinergic neurons and in hemolymph. Aplysia hemolymph has a very high level of AChE which promotes neurite growth in primary cultures of dopaminergic neurons via a non-catalytic mechanism. In contrast, AChE is known to facilitate neurite growth in cholinoceptive neurons by hydrolyzing ACh which inhibits neurite growth. In order to test whether AChE's site-specific neurotrophic action varies with the neuronal phenotype, we investigated the effects of active-site inhibited hemolymph AChE on neurite growth of cholinergic neurons of Aplysia in primary culture. Organophosphates being long-acting active site inhibitors of AChE were chosen for this study. The effects of active site inhibited hemolymph AChE was tested on large cholinergic neurons, R2 (abdominal ganglion) and LPL1 (left pleural ganglion) as well as small cholinergic neurons (buccal ganglion) of Aplysia, maintained in culture. Partially purified hemolymph AChE was inhibited by either 10 microM of echothiophate or 5 microM of paraoxon. Neurons were maintained in (1) L15 (defined medium) alone; (2) L15 + echothiophate; (3) L-15 + paraoxon; (4) L-15 + hemolymph AChE; (5) L15 + hemolymph AChE + echothiophate; and (6) L-15 + hemolymph AChE + paraoxon. Addition of uninhibited hemolymph AChE significantly increased neurite growth of cultured neurons compared to L15 alone. In the presence of echothiophate-inhibited or praoxon-inhibited AChE, neurite growth was significantly reduced when compared to L15 + uninhibited AChE. While the presence of echothiophate by itself did not reduce survival or neurite growth when compared to L-15 alone, the presence of paraoxon by itself markedly reduced survival and neurite growth of cultured neurons. The results show that AChE's catalytic action contributes to enhance neurite growth in cholinergic neurons and the effects of paraoxon appears to differ from that of echothiophate on

  14. Inducing autophagy by rapamycin before, but not after, the formation of plaques and tangles ameliorates cognitive deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Majumder

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that inducing autophagy ameliorates early cognitive deficits associated with the build-up of soluble amyloid-β (Aβ. However, the effects of inducing autophagy on plaques and tangles are yet to be determined. While soluble Aβ and tau represent toxic species in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis, there is well documented evidence that plaques and tangles also are detrimental to normal brain function. Thus, it is critical to assess the effects of inducing autophagy in an animal model with established plaques and tangles. Here we show that rapamycin, when given prophylactically to 2-month-old 3xTg-AD mice throughout their life, induces autophagy and significantly reduces plaques, tangles and cognitive deficits. In contrast, inducing autophagy in 15-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, which have established plaques and tangles, has no effects on AD-like pathology and cognitive deficits. In conclusion, we show that autophagy induction via rapamycin may represent a valid therapeutic strategy in AD when administered early in the disease progression.

  15. Amyloid myopathy: a diagnostic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heli Tuomaala

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid myopathy (AM is a rare manifestation of primary systemic amyloidosis (AL. Like inflammatory myopathies, it presents with proximal muscle weakness and an increased creatine kinase level. We describe a case of AL with severe, rapidly progressive myopathy as the initial symptom. The clinical manifestation and muscle biopsy were suggestive of inclusion body myositis. AM was not suspected until amyloidosis was seen in the gastric mucosal biopsy. The muscle biopsy was then re-examined more specifically, and Congo red staining eventually showed vascular and interstitial amyloid accumulation, which led to a diagnosis of AM. The present case illustrates the fact that the clinical picture of AM can mimic that of inclusion body myositis.

  16. Current status of vulnerable plaque detection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sharif, Faisal

    2012-02-01

    Critical coronary stenoses have been shown to contribute to only a minority of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and sudden cardiac death. Autopsy studies have identified a subgroup of high-risk patients with disrupted vulnerable plaque and modest stenosis. Consequently, a clinical need exists to develop methods to identify these plaques prospectively before disruption and clinical expression of disease. Recent advances in invasive and noninvasive imaging techniques have shown the potential to identify these high-risk plaques. The anatomical characteristics of the vulnerable plaque such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid pool can be identified with angioscopy, high frequency intravascular ultrasound, intravascular MRI, and optical coherence tomography. Efforts have also been made to recognize active inflammation in high-risk plaques using intravascular thermography. Plaque chemical composition by measuring electromagnetic radiation using spectroscopy is also an emerging technology to detect vulnerable plaques. Noninvasive imaging with MRI, CT, and PET also holds the potential to differentiate between low and high-risk plaques. However, at present none of these imaging modalities are able to detect vulnerable plaque neither has been shown to definitively predict outcome. Nevertheless in contrast, there has been a parallel development in the physiological assessment of advanced atherosclerotic coronary artery disease. Thus recent trials using fractional flow reserve in patients with modest non flow-limiting stenoses have shown that deferral of PCI with optimal medical therapy in these patients is superior to coronary intervention. Further trials are needed to provide more information regarding the natural history of high-risk but non flow-limiting plaque to establish patient-specific targeted therapy and to refine plaque stabilizing strategies in the future.

  17. Plaquing procedure for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J.A.; Mulcahy, D.

    1980-01-01

    A single overlay plaque assay was designed and evaluated for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus. Epithelioma papillosum carpio cells were grown in normal atmosphere with tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane- or HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid)-buffered media. Plaques were larger and formed more quickly on 1- to 3-day-old cell monolayers than on older monolayers. Cell culture medium with a 10% addition of fetal calf serum (MEM 10) or without serum (MEM 0) were the most efficient virus diluents. Dilution with phosphate-buffered saline, saline, normal broth, or deionized water reduced plaque numbers. Variations in the pH (7.0 to 8.0) of a MEM 0 diluent did not affect plaque numbers. Increasing the volume of viral inoculum above 0.15 ml (15- by 60-mm plate) decreased plaquing efficiency. Significantly more plaques occurred under gum tragacanth and methylcellulose than under agar or agarose overlays. Varying the pH (6.8 to 7.4) of methylcellulose overlays did not significantly change plaque numbers. More plaques formed under the thicker overlays of both methylcellulose and gum tragacanth. Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and HEPES performed equally well, buffering either medium or overlay. Plaque numbers were reduced when cells were rinsed after virus adsorption or less than 1 h was allowed for adsorption. Variation in adsorption time between 60 and 180 min did not change plaque numbers. The mean plaque formation time was 7 days at 16 degrees C. The viral dose response was linear when the standardized assay was used.

  18. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China); Feng, Xudong, E-mail: xudong.feng@childrens.harvard.edu [Department of Medicine, Children' s Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Xia, Qing, E-mail: xqing@hsc.pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural and Biomimetic Drugs, Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  19. Lignosus rhinocerus (Cooke Ryvarden: A Medicinal Mushroom That Stimulates Neurite Outgrowth in PC-12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee-Fang Eik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A national treasure mushroom, Lignosus rhinocerus, has been used to treat variety of ailments by local and indigenous communities in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of the most valuable part of L. rhinocerus, the sclerotium, on neurite outgrowth activity by using PC-12Adh cell line. Differentiated cells with one thin extension at least double the length of the cell diameter were scored positive. Our results showed that aqueous sclerotium L. rhinocerus extract induced neurite outgrowths of 24.4% and 42.1% at 20 μg/mL (w/v of aqueous extract alone and a combination of 20 μg/mL (w/v aqueous extract and 30 ng/mL (w/v of NGF, respectively. Combination of NGF and sclerotium extract had additive effects and enhanced neurite outgrowth. Neuronal differentiation was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence of neurofilament protein. Aqueous sclerotium extract contained neuroactive compounds that stimulated neurite outgrowth in vitro. To our knowledge this is the first report on neurite-stimulating activities of L. rhinocerus.

  20. Association of Amyloid Pathology With Myelin Alteration in Preclinical Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Douglas C; Hurley, Samuel A; Kecskemeti, Steven R; O'Grady, J Patrick; Canda, Cristybelle; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Asthana, Sanjay; Sager, Mark A; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2017-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated β-amyloid and tau proteins into plaques and tangles is a central feature of Alzheimer disease (AD). While plaque and tangle accumulation likely contributes to neuron and synapse loss, disease-related changes to oligodendrocytes and myelin are also suspected of playing a role in development of AD dementia. Still, to our knowledge, little is known about AD-related myelin changes, and even when present, they are often regarded as secondary to concomitant arteriosclerosis or related to aging. To assess associations between hallmark AD pathology and novel quantitative neuroimaging markers while being sensitive to white matter myelin content. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at an academic research neuroimaging center on a cohort of 71 cognitively asymptomatic adults enriched for AD risk. Lumbar punctures were performed and assayed for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD pathology, including β-amyloid 42, total tau protein, phosphorylated tau 181, and soluble amyloid precursor protein. We measured whole-brain longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates as well as the myelin water fraction from each of these individuals. Automated brain mapping algorithms and statistical models were used to evaluate the relationships between age, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology, and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging relaxometry measures, including the longitudinal and transverse relaxation rates and the myelin water fraction. The mean (SD) age for the 19 male participants and 52 female participants in the study was 61.6 (6.4) years. Widespread age-related changes to myelin were observed across the brain, particularly in late myelinating brain regions such as frontal white matter and the genu of the corpus callosum. Quantitative relaxometry measures were negatively associated with levels of CSF biomarkers across brain white matter and in areas preferentially affected in AD. Furthermore, significant age-by-biomarker interactions were

  1. Discovery of a novel fluorescent probe for the sensitive detection of β-amyloid deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wenming; Xu, Mingming; Liang, Steven H; Xiang, Huaijiang; Tang, Li; Zhang, Minkui; Ding, Dejun; Li, Xin; Zhang, Haiyan; Hu, Youhong

    2016-01-15

    Here we reported the development of the first photoinduced electron transfer (PeT) probe (1) to directly locate β-amyloid aggregates (Aβ plaques) in the brain without the need of post-washing procedures. The probe showed a high affinity for Aβ aggregates with a Kd value of 3.5nM. It is weakly emissive by itself with its fluorescence quenched by electron transfer from PeT donor to the excited fluorophore. But selective binding to Aβ plaques would attenuate the PeT process and restore the fluorescence, therefore facilitating the tracking of Aβ plaques. The probe is advantageous in that its fluorescence is environment-less-sensitive and no washing procedure is required to provide high contrast fluorescent signal when applied to stain brain tissues. As a proof of concept, its application has been exemplified by staining Aβ plaques in slices of brain tissue from double transgenic (APP/PS1) mice of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Janus faces of amyloid proteins in neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B; Kurnellas, Michael P

    2014-07-01

    Amyloid forming molecules are generally considered harmful. In Alzheimer's Disease two amyloid molecules Aβ A4 and tau vie for consideration as the main pathogenic culprit. But molecules obey the laws of chemistry and defy the way we categorize them as humans with our well-known proclivities to bias in our reasoning. We have been exploring the brains of multiple sclerosis patients to identify molecules that are associated with protection from inflammation and degeneration. In 2001 we noted that aB crystallin (cryab) was the most abundant transcript found in MS lesions, but not in healthy brains. Cryab can reverse paralysis and attenuate inflammation in several models of inflammation including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and various models of ischemia. Cryab is an amyloid forming molecule. We have identified a core structure common to many amyloids including amyloid protein Aβ A4, tau, amylin, prion protein, serum amyloid protein P, and cryab. The core hexapeptide structure is highly immune suppressive and can reverse paralysis in EAE when administered systemically. Administration of this amyloid forming hexapeptide quickly lowers inflammatory cytokines in plasma like IL-6 and IL-2. The hexapeptide bind a set of proinflammatory mediators in plasma, including acute phase reactants and complement components. The beneficial properties of amyloid forming hexapeptides provide a potential new therapeutic direction. These experiments indicate that amyloid forming molecules have Janus faces, providing unexpected benefit for neuroinflammatory conditions.

  3. Additive toxicity of β-amyloid by a novel bioactive peptide in vitro: possible implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Garcia-Ratés

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: β-amyloid is regarded as a significant factor in Alzheimer's disease: but inefficient therapies based on this rationale suggests that additional signalling molecules or intermediary mechanisms must be involved in the actual initiation of the characteristic degeneration of neurons. One clue could be that acetylcholinesterase, also present in amyloid plaques, is aberrant in peripheral tissues such as blood and adrenal medulla that can be implicated in Alzheimer's disease. The aim of this study was to assess the bioactivity of a fragment of acetylcholinesterase responsible for its non-enzymatic functions, a thirty amino acid peptide ("T30" which has homologies with β-amyloid. METHODS: Cell viability was measured by sulforhodamine B assay and also lactate dehydrogenase assay: meanwhile, changes in the status of living cells was monitored by measuring release of acetylcholinesterase in cell perfusates using the Ellman reagent. FINDINGS: T30 peptide and β-amyloid each have toxic effects on PC12 cells, comparable to hydrogen peroxide(. However only the two peptides selectively then evoke a subsequent, enhanced release in acetylcholinesterase that could only be derived from the extant cells. Moreover, unlike hydrogen peroxide, the T30 peptide selectively shifted a sub-threshold dose of β-amyloid to a toxic effect, which also resulted in a comparable enhanced release of acetylcholinesterase. INTERPRETATION: This is the first study comparing directly the bioactivity of β-amyloid with a peptide derived from acetylcholinesterase: the similarity in action suggests that the sequence homology between the two compounds might have a functional and/or pathological relevance. The subsequent enhanced release of acetylcholinesterase from the extant cells could reflect a primary 'compensatory' response of cells prone to degeneration, paradoxically providing further availability of the toxic C-terminal peptide to modulate the potency of β-amyloid

  4. The polyphenol oleuropein aglycone protects TgCRND8 mice against Aß plaque pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Grossi

    Full Text Available The claimed beneficial effects of the Mediterranean diet include prevention of several age-related dysfunctions including neurodegenerative diseases and Alzheimer-like pathology. These effects have been related to the protection against cognitive decline associated with aging and disease by a number of polyphenols found in red wine and extra virgin olive oil. The double transgenic TgCRND8 mice (overexpressing the Swedish and Indiana mutations in the human amyloid precursor protein, aged 1.5 and 4, and age-matched wild type control mice were used to examine in vivo the effects of 8 weeks dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone (50 mg/kg of diet, the main polyphenol found in extra virgin olive oil. We report here that dietary supplementation of oleuropein aglycone strongly improves the cognitive performance of young/middle-aged TgCRND8 mice, a model of amyloid-ß deposition, respect to age-matched littermates with un-supplemented diet. Immunofluorescence analysis of cerebral tissue in oleuropein aglycone-fed transgenic mice showed remarkably reduced ß-amyloid levels and plaque deposits, which appeared less compact and "fluffy"; moreover, microglia migration to the plaques for phagocytosis and a remarkable reduction of the astrocyte reaction were evident. Finally, oleuropein aglycone-fed mice brain displayed an astonishingly intense autophagic reaction, as shown by the increase of autophagic markers expression and of lysosomal activity. Data obtained with cultured cells confirmed the latter evidence, suggesting mTOR regulation by oleuropein aglycone. Our results support, and provide mechanistic insights into, the beneficial effects against Alzheimer-associated neurodegeneration of a polyphenol enriched in the extra virgin olive oil, a major component of the Mediterranean diet.

  5. Carotid plaque thickness and carotid plaque burden predict future cardiovascular events in asymptomatic adult Americans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Henrik; Sartori, Samantha; Sandholt, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Prediction of cardiovascular events improves using imaging, i.e. coronary calcium score and ultrasound assessment of carotid plaque. This study analysed the predictive value of two ultrasound measures of carotid plaque size: carotid plaque thickness and carotid and intima......-media thickness (IMT). Methods and results: A total of 6102 asymptomatic persons underwent assessment of conventional risk factors and imaging by carotid ultrasound. Carotid plaque burden (cPB) and maximum carotid plaque thickness (cPTmax) were measured from 'cross-sectional sweep' video acquisition...

  6. Oral biofilm models for mechanical plaque removal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaik, Martinus J.; Busscher, Henk J.; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Slomp, Anje M.; Abbas, Frank; van der Mei, Henny C.

    In vitro plaque removal studies require biofilm models that resemble in vivo dental plaque. Here, we compare contact and non-contact removal of single and dual-species biofilms as well as of biofilms grown from human whole saliva in vitro using different biofilm models. Bacteria were adhered to a

  7. Microvasculature of carotid atheromatous plaques: hemorrhagic plaques have dense microvessels with fenestrations to the arterial lumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Mie; Nose, Masato; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Kohada, Yuki; Yorioka, Soichiro; Suehiro, Satomi; Fukuoka, Erina; Matsumoto, Shirabe; Watanabe, Hideaki; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Okura, Takafumi; Higaki, Jitsuo; Masumoto, Junya

    2014-07-01

    Microvessels in atheromatous plaques are well known to play a role in plaque vulnerability associated with intraplaque hemorrhage, but their architecture remains unclear. The morphometry of the microvasculature and hemorrhage of human carotid atheromatous plaques (CAPs) were evaluated, and 3-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the microvessels was performed. CAPs were obtained by endarterectomy in 42 patients. The specimens were analyzed using light microscopy. Plaque hemorrhage was defined as an area-containing red blood cells (>1 mm2). To determine the histopathologic features of plaque hemorrhage, the plaque area was divided into 4 regions: cap, shoulder, lipid/necrotic core, and media. Then, the density of microvessels and macrophages in each region was quantified. Two representative lesions with either hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic plaque were cut into 90 serial sections. The sections were double stained with anti-CD34 and anti-α smooth muscle actin antibodies, scanned using a digital microscope, and reconstructed using TRI-SRF2 software. The hemorrhagic plaques showed a higher density of microvessels than nonhemorrhagic plaques in the shoulder, cap, and lipid/necrotic core (P=.03, .009, and .001, respectively), and there was positive correlations between its density and macrophages in each regions (Pmicrovasculature of plaques with intraplaque hemorrhage was dense, some of which fenestrated to the arterial lumen. The pathologic 3D imaging revealed precise architecture of microvasculature of plaques. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of the cytoskeleton in volume regulation and beading transitions in PC12 neurites

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    We present investigations on volume regulation and beading shape transitions in PC12 neurites conducted using a flow-chamber technique. By disrupting the cell cytoskeleton with specific drugs we investigate the role of its individual components in the volume regulation response. We find that microtubule disruption increases both swelling rate and maximum volume attained, but does not affect the ability of the neurite to recover its initial volume. In addition, investigation of axonal beading --also known as pearling instability-- provides additional clues on the mechanical state of the neurite. We conclude that the initial swelling phase is mechanically slowed down by microtubules, while the volume recovery is driven by passive diffusion of osmolites. Our experiments provide a framework to investigate the role of cytoskeletal mechanics in volume homeostasis.

  9. Nonculprit Plaque Characteristics in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome Caused by Plaque Erosion vs Plaque Rupture: A 3-Vessel Optical Coherence Tomography Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Tomoyo; Yamamoto, Erika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Xing, Lei; Lee, Hang; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Libby, Peter; Jang, Ik-Kyung

    2018-02-07

    Patients with culprit plaque rupture are known to have pancoronary plaque vulnerability. However, the characteristics of nonculprit plaques in patients with acute coronary syndromes caused by plaque erosion are unknown. To investigate the nonculprit plaque phenotype in patients with acute coronary syndrome according to culprit plaque pathology (erosion vs rupture) by 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. In this observational cohort study, between August 2010 and May 2014, 82 patients with ACS who underwent preintervention optical coherence tomography imaging of all 3 major epicardial coronary arteries were enrolled at the Massachusetts General Hospital Optical Coherence Tomography Registry database. Analysis of the data was conducted between November 2016 and July 2017. Patients were classified into 2 groups based on the culprit lesion pathology: 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion and 34 patients with culprit plaque rupture. Thirty-one patients with the absence of culprit rupture or erosion were excluded from further analysis. Preintervention 3-vessel optical coherence tomography imaging. Plaque characteristics at the culprit and nonculprit lesions evaluated by optical coherence tomography. In 51 patients (37 men; mean age, 58.7 years), the characteristics of 51 culprit plaques and 216 nonculprit plaques were analyzed. In patients with culprit erosion, the mean (SD) number of nonculprit plaques per patient was smaller (3.4 [1.9] in erosion vs 4.7 [2.1] in rupture, P = .05). Patient-based analysis showed that none of 17 patients with culprit plaque erosion had nonculprit plaque rupture, whereas 26% of the patients (9 of 34) with culprit plaque rupture had nonculprit plaque rupture (P = .02). Plaque-based analysis showed that, compared with the culprit rupture group (n = 158), the culprit erosion group (n = 58) had lower prevalence of plaque rupture (0% vs 8%; P erosion had a smaller number of nonculprit plaques and the lower levels

  10. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Deok-Jin [Department of Applied Biology, College of Ecology and Environment, Kyungpook National University, 386, Gajang-dong, Sangju-si, Kyungbuk 742-711 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin-A, E-mail: leeja@hnu.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Nanotechnology, Hannam University, Dajeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  11. Diazinon and diazoxon impair the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzurro, Daniella M.; Dao, Khoi [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Costa, Lucio G. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Neuroscience, University of Parma, Parma (Italy)

    2014-02-01

    Evidence from in vivo and epidemiological studies suggests that organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) are developmental neurotoxicants, but possible underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Astrocytes are increasingly recognized for their active role in normal neuronal development. This study sought to investigate whether the widely-used OP diazinon (DZ), and its oxygen metabolite diazoxon (DZO), would affect glial–neuronal interactions as a potential mechanism of developmental neurotoxicity. Specifically, we investigated the effects of DZ and DZO on the ability of astrocytes to foster neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neurons. The results show that both DZ and DZO adversely affect astrocyte function, resulting in inhibited neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. This effect appears to be mediated by oxidative stress, as indicated by OP-induced increased reactive oxygen species production in astrocytes and prevention of neurite outgrowth inhibition by antioxidants. The concentrations of OPs were devoid of cytotoxicity, and cause limited acetylcholinesterase inhibition in astrocytes (18 and 25% for DZ and DZO, respectively). Among astrocytic neuritogenic factors, the most important one is the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. DZ and DZO decreased levels of fibronectin in astrocytes, and this effect was also attenuated by antioxidants. Underscoring the importance of fibronectin in this context, adding exogenous fibronectin to the co-culture system successfully prevented inhibition of neurite outgrowth caused by DZ and DZO. These results indicate that DZ and DZO increase oxidative stress in astrocytes, and this in turn modulates astrocytic fibronectin, leading to impaired neurite outgrowth in hippocampal neurons. - Highlights: • DZ and DZO inhibit astrocyte-mediated neurite outgrowth in rat hippocampal neurons. • Oxidative stress is involved in inhibition of neuritogenesis by DZ and DZO. • DZ and DZO decrease expression of the neuritogenic

  12. Attenuation of lysozyme amyloid cytotoxicity by SPION-mediated modulation of amyloid aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Aafreen; Kambli, Priyanka; Borana, Mohanish; Mohanpuria, Neha; Ahmad, Basir; Kelkar-Mane, Varsha; Ladiwala, Uma

    2015-03-01

    The formation and deposition of proteinaceous aggregates of amyloid fibrils characterize diverse degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and systemic amyloidosis. The presence of these aggregates is associated with clinical manifestations, and various forms of amyloid aggregates have been identified to be cytotoxic. Although the exact mechanism of amyloid toxicity remains to be elucidated, prevention of amyloid fibril formation and aggregation forms a possible therapeutic approach. Nanomaterials possess the potential for such a strategy. Using hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) as a prototypic amyloid-forming protein, we found a reduction in the aggregation rate of HEWL in the presence of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with slowing of nucleation and amyloid fibril elongation. HEWL-amyloid had a predominantly fibrillar structure and was toxic to various cells. A significant attenuation of cytotoxicity was observed when cells were treated with SPION-interacted HEWL-amyloid. Ultra-structural differences were observed between the native and SPION-interacted HEWL-amyloids by SEM and TEM imaging. Our findings confirm that SPIONs perturb amyloid fibrillation, thereby reducing the cytotoxicity of amyloid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neurite outgrowth and branching of PC12 cells on very soft substrates sharply decreases below a threshold of substrate rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Jennie B.; Brown, Xin Q.; Jacot, Jeffrey G.; Di Milla, Paul A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2007-06-01

    Rationally designed matrices for nerve tissue engineering and encapsulated cell therapies critically rely on a comprehensive understanding of neural response to biochemical as well as biophysical cues. Whereas biochemical cues are established mediators of neuronal behavior (e.g., outgrowth), physical cues such as substrate stiffness have only recently been recognized to influence cell behavior. In this work, we examine the response of PC12 neurites to substrate stiffness. We quantified and controlled fibronectin density on the substrates and measured multiple neurite behaviors (e.g., growth, branching, neurites per cell, per cent cells expressing neurites) in a large sample population. We found that PC12 neurons display a threshold response to substrate stiffness. On the softest substrates tested (shear modulus ~10 Pa), neurites were relatively few, short in length and unbranched. On stiffer substrates (shear modulus ~102-104 Pa), neurites were longer and more branched and a greater percentage of cells expressed neurites; significant differences in these measures were not found on substrates with a shear modulus >102 Pa. Based on these data and comparisons with published neurobiology and neuroengineering reports of neurite mechanotransduction, we hypothesize that results from studies of neuronal response to compliant substrates are cell-type dependent and sensitive to ligand density, sample size and the range of stiffness investigated.

  14. proBDNF Accelerates Brain Amyloid-β Deposition and Learning and Memory Impairment in APPswePS1dE9 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shusheng; Zhou, Xinfu; Zhong, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjiang; Liu, Juan; Deng, Juan; Wang, Shuiping; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is pathologically known for the amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal loss in the brain. The precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) before proteolysis has opposing functions to its mature form in neuronal survival and neurite growth. However, the role of proBDNF in the pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. To investigate the effects of proBDNF on neurons in vitro, and on learning and memory impairment and brain Aβ production in a transgenic AD mouse model (APPswePS1dE9). We here examined the effects of proBDNF on the viability (MTT assay) and neurite growth (morphologic measurement) of the primary neurons in vitro. After the intracerebroventricular injection of adeno-associated virus-proBDNF (AAV-proBDNF), we then investigated the learning and memory impairment (Morris water maze) and Aβ deposition in the brains of the AD mice. The results showed that proBDNF could inhibit neuronal viability and neurite growth in vitro, enhance Aβ levels, and accelerate its deposition in the brain, which was consistent with the learning and memory impairment of AD mice, likely dependent on the membrane receptor of p75NTR. Our findings suggest that proBDNF may exert a crucially negative effect during AD pathogenesis andprogression.

  15. Early Detection of Amyloid Plaque in Alzheimer’s Disease via X-ray Phase CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    12 10. References…………………………………………………………… 13 1 1. INTRODUCTION: As the elderly population increases, dementia due to Alzheimer’s...termed in the literature) and image presentation or display.20, 27, 28 Such a separation is straightforward in digital imaging modal- ities, e.g., the...optional imaging method may degrade with decreasing detector cell dimension. Inclusively , all the imaging mech- anisms existing in the x-ray phase contrast

  16. Oleuropein aglycone protects transgenic C. elegans strains expressing Aβ42 by reducing plaque load and motor deficit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Diomede

    Full Text Available The presence of amyloid aggregates of the 42 amino acid peptide of amyloid beta (Aβ42 in the brain is the characteristic feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Amyloid beta (Aβ deposition is also found in muscle fibers of individuals affected by inclusion body myositis (sIBM, a rare muscular degenerative disease affecting people over 50. Both conditions are presently lacking an effective therapeutic treatment. There is increasing evidence to suggest that natural polyphenols may prevent the formation of toxic amyloid aggregates; this applies also to oleuropein aglycone (OLE, the most abundant polyphenol in extra virgin olive oil, previously shown to hinder amylin and Aβ aggregation. Here we evaluated the ability of OLE to interfere with Aβ proteotoxicity in vivo by using the transgenic CL2006 and CL4176 strains of Caenorhabditis elegans, simplified models of AD and of sIBM, which express human Aβ in the cytoplasm of body wall muscle cells. OLE-fed CL2006 worms displayed reduced Aβ plaque deposition, less abundant toxic Aβ oligomers, remarkably decreased paralysis and increased lifespan with respect to untreated animals. A protective effect was also observed in CL4176 worms but only when OLE was administered before the induction of the Aβ transgene expression. These effects were specific, dose-related, and not mediated by the known polyphenolic anti-oxidant activity, suggesting that, in this model organism, OLE interferes with the Aβ aggregation skipping the appearance of toxic species, as already shown in vitro for Aβ42.

  17. A simple immunoperoxidase plaque assay to detect and quantitate Marek's disease virus plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R F; Calvert, J G; Lee, L F

    1997-01-01

    We report an immunoperoxidase-based staining technique that can be used to rapidly and accurately detect and quantitate Marek's disease virus (MDV) plaques. Monolayer cultures were fixed and incubated with a monoclonal antibody specific for MDV. After washing, a second antibody of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG was applied, incubated for 1 hr, and washed with phosphate-buffered saline. After the cultures were incubated with diaminobenzidine, CoCl2, and H2O2, the plaques appeared as black spots and were easily seen and counted. Significantly more immunoperoxidase-stained serotype 1 MDV plaques could be counted at 4 days postinoculation than were seen in unstained cultures. With serotype 2 MDV-infected cells, the difference in plaque counts was less dramatic. Nevertheless, at 3 days postinoculation, significantly more stained serotype 2 plaques were seen than unstained plaques. Immunoperoxidase staining of turkey herpesvirus plaques did not increase the sensitivity of viewing plaques. Similar numbers of stained and unstained plaques were seen at 2 days postinoculation. We also demonstrated that we could count serotype-specific MDV plaques in a mixed infection that contained all three serotypes.

  18. Immunotherapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: amyloid-β or tau, which is the right target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castillo-Carranza DL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Diana L Castillo-Carranza,1,2 Marcos J Guerrero-Muñoz,1,2 Rakez Kayed1–31Mitchell Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, 2Departments of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Cell Biology, 3Sealy Center for Vaccine Development, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USAAbstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques composed mainly of amyloid-β (Aβ protein. Overproduction or slow clearance of Aβ initiates a cascade of pathologic events that may lead to formation of neurofibrillary tangles, neuronal cell death, and dementia. Although immunotherapy in animal models has been demonstrated to be successful at removing plaques or prefibrillar forms of Aβ, clinical trials have yielded disappointing results. The lack of substantial cognitive improvement obtained by targeting Aβ raises the question of whether or not this is the correct target. Another important pathologic process in the AD brain is tau aggregation, which seems to become independent once initiated. Recent studies targeting tau in AD mouse models have displayed evidence of cognitive improvement, providing a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of AD. In this review, we describe new advances in immunotherapy targeting Aβ peptide and tau protein, as well as future directions.Keywords: immunotherapy, Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid, tau

  19. Coenzyme Q10 Decreases Amyloid Pathology and Improves Behavior in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Magali; Kipiani, Khatuna; Yu, Fangmin; Wille, Elizabeth; Katz, Maya; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Gouras, Gunnar K.; Lin, Michael T.; Beal, M. Flint

    2012-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). A large body of evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction and increased reactive oxygen species occur prior to amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), a component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, is well characterized as a neuroprotective antioxidant in animal models and human trials of Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, and reduces plaque burden in AβPP/PS1 mice. We now show that CoQ10 reduces oxidative stress and amyloid pathology and improves behavioral performance in the Tg19959 mouse model of AD. CoQ10 treatment decreased brain levels of protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. CoQ10 treatment resulted in decreased plaque area and number in hippocampus and in overlying cortex immunostained with an Aβ42-specific antibody. Brain Aβ42 levels were also decreased by CoQ10 supplementation. Levels of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) β-carboxyterminal fragments were decreased. Importantly, CoQ10-treated mice showed improved cognitive performance during Morris water maze testing. Our results show decreased pathology and improved behavior in transgenic AD mice treated with the naturally occurring antioxidant compound CoQ10. CoQ10 is well tolerated in humans and may be promising for therapeutic trials in AD. PMID:21799249

  20. Sequence determinants of bacterial amyloid formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Chapman, Matthew R

    2008-07-11

    Amyloids are proteinaceous fibers commonly associated with neurodegenerative diseases and prion-based encephalopathies. Many different polypeptides can form amyloid fibers, leading to the suggestion that amyloid is a primitive main chain-dominated structure. A growing body of evidence suggests that amino acid side chains dramatically influence amyloid formation. The specific role fulfilled by side chains in amyloid formation, especially in vivo, remains poorly understood. Here, we determined the role of internally conserved polar and aromatic residues in promoting amyloidogenesis of the functional amyloid protein CsgA, which is the major protein component of curli fibers assembled by enteric bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. In vivo CsgA polymerization into an amyloid fiber requires the CsgB nucleator protein. The CsgA amyloid core region is composed of five repeating units, defined by regularly spaced Ser, Gln and Asn residues. The results of a comprehensive alanine scan mutagenesis screen showed that Gln and Asn residues at positions 49, 54, 139 and 144 were critical for curli assembly. Alanine substitution of Q49 or N144 impeded the ability of CsgA to respond to CsgB-mediated heteronucleation, and the ability of CsgA to self-polymerize in vitro. However, CsgA proteins harboring these mutations were still seeded by preformed wild-type CsgA fibers in vitro. This suggests that CsgA-fibril-mediated seeding and CsgB-mediated heteronucleation have distinguishable mechanisms. Remarkably, Gln residues at positions 49 and 139 could not be replaced by Asn residues without interfering with curli assembly, suggesting that the side chain requirements were especially stringent at these positions. This analysis demonstrates that bacterial amyloid formation is driven by specific side chain contacts, and provides a clear illustration of the essential roles of specific side chains in promoting amyloid formation.

  1. Cholinergic neurodegeneration in an Alzheimer mouse model overexpressing amyloid-precursor protein with the Swedish-Dutch-Iowa mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foidl, Bettina Maria; Do-Dinh, Patricia; Hutter-Schmid, Bianca; Bliem, Harald R; Humpel, Christian

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that is mainly characterized by beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque deposition, Tau pathology and dysfunction of the cholinergic system causing memory impairment. The aim of the present study was to examine (1) anxiety and cognition, (2) Aβ plaque deposition and (3) degeneration of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) and cortical cholinergic innervation in an Alzheimer mouse model (APP_SweDI; overexpressing amyloid precursor protein (APP) with the Swedish K670N/M671L, Dutch E693Q, and Iowa D694N mutations). Our results show that 12-month-old APP_SweDI mice were more anxious and had more memory impairment. A large number of Aβ plaques were already visible at the age of 6 months and increased with age. A significant decrease in cholinergic neurons was seen in the transgenic mouse model in comparison to the wild-type mice, identified by immunohistochemistry against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and p75 neurotrophin receptor as well as by in situ hybridization. Moreover, a significant decrease in cortical cholinergic fiber density was found in the transgenic mice as compared to the wild-type. In the cerebral cortex of APP_SweDI mice, swollen cholinergic varicosities were seen in the vicinity of Aβ plaques. In conclusion, the present study shows that in an AD mouse model (APP_SweDI mice) a high Aβ plaque load in the cortex causes damage to cholinergic axons in the cortex, followed by subsequent retrograde-induced cell death of cholinergic neurons and some forms of compensatory processes. This degeneration was accompanied by enhanced anxiety and impaired cognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Kretzschmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid precursor protein (APP has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s disease due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called Amyloid Precursor Protein-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioural deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation.

  3. General amyloid inhibitors? A critical examination of the inhibition of IAPP amyloid formation by inositol stereoisomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP or amylin forms amyloid deposits in the islets of Langerhans; a process that is believed to contribute to the progression of type 2 diabetes and to the failure of islet transplants. An emerging theme in amyloid research is the hypothesis that the toxic species produced during amyloid formation by different polypeptides share common features and exert their effects by common mechanisms. If correct, this suggests that inhibitors of amyloid formation by one polypeptide might be effective against other amyloidogenic sequences. IAPP and Aβ, the peptide responsible for amyloid formation in Alzheimer's disease, are particularly interesting in this regard as they are both natively unfolded in their monomeric states and share some common characteristics. Comparatively little effort has been expended on the design of IAPP amyloid inhibitors, thus it is natural to inquire if Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP, especially since no IAPP inhibitors have been clinically approved. A range of compounds inhibit Aβ amyloid formation, including various stereoisomers of inositol. Myo-, scyllo-, and epi-inositol have been shown to induce conformational changes in Aβ and prevent Aβ amyloid fibril formation by stabilizing non-fibrillar β-sheet structures. We investigate the ability of inositol stereoisomers to inhibit amyloid formation by IAPP. The compounds do not induce a conformational change in IAPP and are ineffective inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation, although some do lead to modest apparent changes in IAPP amyloid fibril morphology. Thus not all classes of Aβ inhibitors are effective against IAPP. This work provides a basis of comparison to work on polyphenol based inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and helps provide clues as to the features which render them effective. The study also helps provide information for further efforts in rational inhibitor design.

  4. White matter microstructure pathology in classic galactosemia revealed by neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmers, Inge; Zhang, Hui; Bastiani, Matteo; Jansma, Bernadette M; Roebroeck, Alard; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-03-01

    White matter abnormalities have been observed in patients with classic galactosemia, an inborn error of galactose metabolism. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data collected in the past were generally qualitative in nature. Our objective was to investigate white matter microstructure pathology and examine correlations with outcome and behaviour in this disease, by using multi-shell diffusion weighted imaging. In addition to standard diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging (NODDI) was used to estimate density and orientation dispersion of neurites in a group of eight patients (aged 16-21 years) and eight healthy controls (aged 15-20 years). Extensive white matter abnormalities were found: neurite density index (NDI) was lower in the patient group in bilateral anterior areas, and orientation dispersion index (ODI) was increased mainly in the left hemisphere. These specific regional profiles are in agreement with the cognitive profile observed in galactosemia, showing higher order cognitive impairments, and language and motor impairments, respectively. Less favourable white matter properties correlated positively with age and age at onset of diet, and negatively with behavioural outcome (e.g. visual working memory). To conclude, this study provides evidence of white matter pathology regarding density and dispersion of neurites in these patients. The results are discussed in light of suggested pathophysiological mechanisms.

  5. Adhesion and neurite development of cortical neurons on micropatterns of polyethylenimine and fluorcarbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruardij, T.G.; Goedbloed, M.H.; Rutten, Wim

    2000-01-01

    This study aims on the preparation of isolated islands of cortical neurons on modified glass surfaces. Isolated islands of cortical neurons were obtained with a combination of neuron-adhesive polyethylenimine (PEI) and neuron-repellent plasma-deposited fluorocarbon (FC). Neurite development and

  6. Mechanosensitivity of Embryonic Neurites Promotes Their Directional Extension and Schwann Cells Progenitors Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Rosso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Migration of Schwann cells (SCs progenitors and neurite outgrowth from embryonic dorsal root ganglions (DRGs are two central events during the development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS. How these two enthralling events preceding myelination are promoted is of great relevance from basic research and clinical aspects alike. Recent evidence demonstrates that biophysical cues (extracellular matrix stiffness and biochemical signaling act in concert to regulate PNS myelination. Microenvironment stiffness of SCs progenitors and embryonic neurites dynamically changes during development. Methods: DRG explants were isolated from day 12.5 to 13.5 mice embryos and plated on laminin-coated substrates with varied stiffness values. After 4 days in culture and immunostaining with specific markers, neurite outgrowth pattern, SCs progenitors migration, and growth cone shape and advance were analyzed with confocal fluorescence microscopy. Results: We found out that growing substrate stiffness promotes directional neurite outgrowth, SCs progenitors migration, growth cone advance and presumably axons fasciculation. Conclusions: DRG explants are in vitro models for the research of PNS development, myelination and regeneration. Consequently, we conclude the following: Our observations point out the importance of mechanosensitivity for the PNS. At the same time, they prompt the investigation of the important yet unclear links between PNS biomechanics and inherited neuropathies with myelination disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. Finally, they encourage the consideration of mechanosensitivity in bioengineering of scaffolds to aid nerve regeneration after injury.

  7. Nerve growth factor promotes neurite outgrowth in guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, M W; Romanchuk, G; Lally, K; Simeone, D M

    1994-10-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has important developmental actions in both central and peripheral nervous systems. Primary cultures of neonatal guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia were used to examine the ability of NGF to stimulate morphological development in enteric neurons. NGF, in the presence of a serum-free medium, produced dose-dependent increases in neurite density, significant at 1 ng/ml and maximal at 100 ng/ml (4.5-fold increase vs. control). Maximum neurite length was also significantly increased at 1 ng/ml, with maximal effects at 100 ng/ml. Coincubation of NGF (50 ng/ml) with monoclonal NGF antibodies abolished increases in both neurite density (128 +/- 19 processes/mm for control, 369 +/- 19 for NGF, 183 +/- 28 for NGF+monoclonal antibodies) and neurite length. Exposure of enteric neurons to low concentrations of NGF (1 ng/ml) was also associated with increased mRNA levels for cytoskeletal genes. alpha-Tubulin mRNA levels were increased 3.9 +/- 0.7 times basal at 48 h. mRNA levels for microtubule-associated protein 2 were increased threefold at 48 h of NGF incubation. NGF demonstrates activities in cultured enteric ganglia that stimulate morphological development.

  8. Stochastic continuous time neurite branching models with tree and segment dependent rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, Ronald A. J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a continuous time stochastic neurite branching model closely related to the discrete time stochastic BES-model. The discrete time BES-model is underlying current attempts to simulate cortical development, but is difficult to analyze. The new continuous time formulation

  9. Luteolin induces microRNA-132 expression and modulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lian-Fang Lin

    Full Text Available Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone, a food-derived flavonoid, has been reported to exert neurotrophic properties that are associated with its capacity to promote neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. In this study, we report for the first time that luteolin induces the persistent expression of microRNA-132 (miR-132 in PC12 cells. The correlation between miR-132 knockdown and a decrease in luteolin-mediated neurite outgrowth may indicate a mechanistic link by which miR-132 functions as a mediator for neuritogenesis. Furthermore, we find that luteolin led to the phosphorylation and activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB, which is associated with the up-regulation of miR-132 and neurite outgrowth. Moreover, luteolin-induced CREB activation, miR-132 expression and neurite outgrowth were inhibited by adenylate cyclase, protein kinase A (PKA and MAPK/ERK kinase 1/2 (MEK1/2 inhibitors but not by protein kinase C (PKC or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II inhibitors. Consistently, we find that luteolin treatment increases ERK phosphorylation and PKA activity in PC12 cells. These results show that luteolin induces the up-regulation of miR-132, which serves as an important regulator for neurotrophic actions, mainly acting through the activation of cAMP/PKA- and ERK-dependent CREB signaling pathways in PC12 cells.

  10. Tiam1 as a signaling mediator of nerve growth factor-dependent neurite outgrowth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrzad Shirazi Fard

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF-induced neuronal differentiation requires the activation of members of the Rho family of small GTPases. However, the molecular mechanisms through which NGF regulates cytoskeletal changes and neurite outgrowth are not totally understood. In this work, we identify the Rac1-specific guanine exchange factor (GEF Tiam1 as a novel mediator of NGF/TrkA-dependent neurite elongation. In particular, we report that knockdown of Tiam1 causes a significant reduction in Rac1 activity and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF. Physical interaction between Tiam1 and active Ras (Ras-GTP, but not tyrosine phosphorylation of Tiam1, plays a central role in Rac1 activation by NGF. In addition, our findings indicate that Ras is required to associate Tiam1 with Rac1 and promote Rac1 activation upon NGF stimulation. Taken together, these findings define a novel molecular mechanism through which Tiam1 mediates TrkA signaling and neurite outgrowth induced by NGF.

  11. Patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds in three-dimensional hydrogel constructs enhance neurite outgrowth and directional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, Richard J

    2014-12-01

    Neural tissue engineering holds incredible potential to restore functional capabilities to damaged neural tissue. It was hypothesized that patterned and functionalized nanofiber scaffolds could control neurite direction and enhance neurite outgrowth. A method of creating aligned electrospun nanofibers was implemented and fiber characteristics were analyzed using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Nanofibers were composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer, PCL mixed with gelatin, or PCL with a laminin coating. Three-dimensional hydrogels were then integrated with embedded aligned nanofibers to support neuronal cell cultures. Microscopic images were captured at high-resolution in single and multi-focal planes with eGFP-expressing neuronal SH-SY5Y cells in a fluorescent channel and nanofiber scaffolding in another channel. Neuronal morphology and neurite tracking of nanofibers were then analyzed in detail. Aligned nanofibers were shown to enable significant control over the direction of neurite outgrowth in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) neuronal cultures. Laminin-functionalized nanofibers in 3D hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels enabled significant alignment of neurites with nanofibers, enabled significant neurite tracking of nanofibers, and significantly increased the distance over which neurites could extend. Specifically, the average length of neurites per cell in 3D HA constructs with laminin-functionalized nanofibers increased by 66% compared to the same laminin fibers on 2D laminin surfaces, increased by 59% compared to 2D laminin-coated surface without fibers, and increased by 1052% compared to HA constructs without fibers. Laminin functionalization of fibers also doubled average neurite length over plain PCL fibers in the same 3D HA constructs. In addition, neurites also demonstrated tracking directly along the fibers, with 66% of neurite lengths directly tracking laminin-coated fibers in 3D HA constructs, which was a 65% relative

  12. Self-Assembly of Large Amyloid Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgley, Devin M.

    Functional amyloids found throughout nature have demonstrated that amyloid fibers are potential industrial biomaterials. This work introduces a new "template plus adder" cooperative mechanism for the spontaneous self-assembly of micrometer sized amyloid fibers. A short hydrophobic template peptide induces a conformation change within a highly alpha-helical adder protein to form beta-sheets that continue to assemble into micrometer sized amyloid fibers. This study utilizes a variety of proteins that have template or adder characteristics which suggests that this mechanism may be employed throughout nature. Depending on the amino acid composition of the proteins used the mixtures form amyloid fibers of a cylindrical ( 10 mum diameter, 2 GPa Young's modulus) or tape (5- 10 mum height, 10-20 mum width and 100-200 MPa Young's modulus) morphology. Processing conditions are altered to manipulate the morphology and structural characteristics of the fibers. Spectroscopy is utilized to identify certain amino acid groups that contribute to the self-assembly process. Aliphatic amino acids (A, I, V and L) are responsible for initiating conformation change of the adder proteins to assemble into amyloid tapes. Additional polyglutamine segments (Q-blocks) within the protein mixtures will form Q hydrogen bonds to reinforce the amyloid structure and form a cylindrical fiber of higher modulus. Atomic force microscopy is utilized to delineate the self-assembly of amyloid tapes and cylindrical fibers from protofibrils (15-30 nm width) to fibers (10-20 mum width) spanning three orders of magnitude. The aliphatic amino acid content of the adder proteins' alpha-helices is a good predictor of high density beta-sheet formation within the protein mixture. Thus, it is possible to predict the propensity of a protein to undergo conformation change into amyloid structures. Finally, Escherichia coli is genetically engineered to express a template protein which self-assembles into large amyloid

  13. Amyloid-β oligomers are sequestered by both intracellular and extracellular chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Priyanka; Meehan, Sarah; Carver, John A; Wilson, Mark R; Dobson, Christopher M; Klenerman, David

    2012-11-20

    The aberrant aggregation of the amyloid-β peptide into β-sheet rich, fibrillar structures proceeds via a heterogeneous ensemble of oligomeric intermediates that have been associated with neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular interest in this context are the mechanisms by which molecular chaperones, part of the primary biological defenses against protein misfolding, influence Aβ aggregation. We have used single-molecule fluorescence techniques to compare the interactions between distinct aggregation states (monomers, oligomers, and amyloid fibrils) of the AD-associated amyloid-β(1-40) peptide, and two molecular chaperones, both of which are upregulated in the brains of patients with AD and have been found colocalized with Aβ in senile plaques. One of the chaperones, αB-crystallin, is primarily found inside cells, while the other, clusterin, is predominantly located in the extracellular environment. We find that both chaperones bind to misfolded oligomeric species and form long-lived complexes, thereby preventing both their further growth into fibrils and their dissociation. From these studies, we conclude that these chaperones have a common mechanism of action based on sequestering Aβ oligomers. This conclusion suggests that these chaperones, both of which are ATP-independent, are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic Aβ oligomer-associated processes whether they occur in the extracellular or intracellular environment.

  14. Oxidative stress and the amyloid beta peptide in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cheignon

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. In particular, it is linked to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, an age-related neurodegenerative disease and the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. Histopathological hallmarks of AD are intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular formation of senile plaques composed of the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ in aggregated form along with metal-ions such as copper, iron or zinc. Redox active metal ions, as for example copper, can catalyze the production of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS when bound to the amyloid-β (Aβ. The ROS thus produced, in particular the hydroxyl radical which is the most reactive one, may contribute to oxidative damage on both the Aβ peptide itself and on surrounding molecule (proteins, lipids, …. This review highlights the existing link between oxidative stress and AD, and the consequences towards the Aβ peptide and surrounding molecules in terms of oxidative damage. In addition, the implication of metal ions in AD, their interaction with the Aβ peptide and redox properties leading to ROS production are discussed, along with both in vitro and in vivo oxidation of the Aβ peptide, at the molecular level. Keywords: Oxidative stress, Amyloid beta peptide, Metal-ions, Reactive oxygen species, Oxidative damages

  15. Mechanism of IAPP amyloid fibril formation involves an intermediate with a transient  -sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, L. E.; Dunkelberger, E. B.; Tran, H. Q.; Cheng, P. -N.; Chiu, C. -C.; Cao, P.; Raleigh, D. P.; de Pablo, J. J.; Nowick, J. S.; Zanni, M. T.

    2013-11-11

    Amyloid formation is implicated in more than 20 human diseases, yet the mechanism by which fibrils form is not well understood. We use 2D infrared spectroscopy and isotope labeling to monitor the kinetics of fibril formation by human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) that is associated with type 2 diabetes. We find that an oligomeric intermediate forms during the lag phase with parallel β-sheet structure in a region that is ultimately a partially disordered loop in the fibril. We confirm the presence of this intermediate, using a set of homologous macrocyclic peptides designed to recognize β-sheets. Mutations and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the intermediate is on pathway. Disrupting the oligomeric β-sheet to form the partially disordered loop of the fibrils creates a free energy barrier that is the origin of the lag phase during aggregation. These results help rationalize a wide range of previous fragment and mutation studies including mutations in other species that prevent the formation of amyloid plaques.

  16. Haemodynamical stress in mouse aortic arch with atherosclerotic plaques: Preliminary study of plaque progression

    OpenAIRE

    Assemat, P.; Siu, K.K.; Armitage, J.A.; Hokke, S.N.; Dart, A; Chin-Dusting, J; Hourigan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic plaques develop at particular sites in the arterial tree, and this regional localisation depends largely on haemodynamic parameters (such as wall shear stress; WSS) as described in the literature. Plaque rupture can result in heart attack or stroke and hence understanding the development and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques is critically important. The purpose of this study is to characterise the haemodynamics of blood flow in the mouse aortic arch using numerical mode...

  17. Sticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's Again

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_166550.html Sticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's Again Researchers believe these substances form in early ... in the brain signals an early stage of Alzheimer's disease. It's been known for years that in ...

  18. Magnetic force microscopy of atherosclerotic plaque

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T A Alexeeva; S V Gorobets; O Yu Gorobets; I V Demianenko; O M Lazarenko

    2014-01-01

    In this work by methods of scanning probe microscopy, namely by atomic force microscopy and magnetic force microscopy the fragments of atherosclerotic plaque section of different nature were investigated...

  19. Evaluation of the Navy Plaque Control Program, at Great Lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    I 0 Individual clinicians who practice plaque control with their patients receive great reward and sense of accomplishment when dental caries is...Navy Dental Corps (43). The program requirements included plaque control instruction given through individual or small group sessions. The sessions... plaque removal techniques; demonstration of sulcular methods of tooth cleansing with the toothbrush ; and instruction in the use of plaque disclosing

  20. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Deficits in Neurite Density Underlie White Matter Structure Abnormalities in First-Episode Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Charlotte L; Davies, Geoff; Garfinkel, Sarah N; Gabel, Matt C; Dowell, Nicholas G; Cercignani, Mara; Seth, Anil K; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Medford, Nick; Critchley, Hugo D

    2017-11-15

    Structural abnormalities across multiple white matter tracts are recognized in people with early psychosis, consistent with dysconnectivity as a neuropathological account of symptom expression. We applied advanced neuroimaging techniques to characterize microstructural white matter abnormalities for a deeper understanding of the developmental etiology of psychosis. Thirty-five first-episode psychosis patients, and 19 healthy controls, participated in a quantitative neuroimaging study using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, a multishell diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging technique that distinguishes white matter fiber arrangement and geometry from changes in neurite density. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity images were also derived. Tract-based spatial statistics compared white matter structure between patients and control subjects and tested associations with age, symptom severity, and medication. Patients with first-episode psychosis had lower regional FA in multiple commissural, corticospinal, and association tracts. These abnormalities predominantly colocalized with regions of reduced neurite density, rather than aberrant fiber bundle arrangement (orientation dispersion index). There was no direct relationship with active symptoms. FA decreased and orientation dispersion index increased with age in patients, but not control subjects, suggesting accelerated effects of white matter geometry change. Deficits in neurite density appear fundamental to abnormalities in white matter integrity in early psychosis. In the first application of neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging in psychosis, we found that processes compromising axonal fiber number, density, and myelination, rather than processes leading to spatial disruption of fiber organization, are implicated in the etiology of psychosis. This accords with a neurodevelopmental origin of aberrant brain-wide structural connectivity predisposing individuals to

  2. Sequence determinants of amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de la Paz, Manuela; Serrano, Luis

    2004-01-06

    The establishment of rules that link sequence and amyloid feature is critical for our understanding of misfolding diseases. To this end, we have performed a saturation mutagenesis analysis on the de novo-designed amyloid peptide STVIIE (1). The positional scanning mutagenesis has revealed that there is a position dependence on mutation of amyloid fibril formation and that both very tolerant and restrictive positions to mutation can be found within an amyloid sequence. In this system, mutations that accelerate beta-sheet polymerization do not always lead to an increase of amyloid products. On the contrary, abundant fibrils are typically found for mutants that polymerize slowly. From these experiments, we have extracted a sequence pattern to identify amyloidogenic stretches in proteins. The pattern has been validated experimentally. In silico sequence scanning of amyloid proteins also supports the pattern. Analysis of protein databases has shown that highly amyloidogenic sequences matching the pattern are less frequent in proteins than innocuous amino acid combinations and that, if present, they are surrounded by amino acids that disrupt their aggregating capability (amyloid breakers). This study provides the potential for a proteome-wide scanning to detect fibril-forming regions in proteins, from which molecules can be designed to prevent and/or disrupt this process.

  3. Catalpol protects synaptic proteins from beta-amyloid induced neuron injury and improves cognitive functions in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhiming; Wang, Fengfei; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Fushun; Huang, Jason H; Wu, Erxi; Zhang, Yongfang; Hu, Yaer

    2017-09-19

    Synapse loss is one of the common factors contributing to cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is manifested by the impairment of basic cognitive functions including memory processing, perception, problem solving, and language. The current therapies for patients with cognitive disorders are mainly palliative; thus, regimens preventing and/or delaying dementia progression are urgently needed. In this study, we evaluated the effects of catalpol, isolated from traditional Chinese medicine Rehmannia glutinosa, on synaptic plasticity in aged rat models. We found that catalpol markedly improved the cognitive function of aged male Sprague-Dawley rats and simultaneously increased the expression of synaptic proteins (dynamin 1, PSD-95, and synaptophysin) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, respectively. In beta-amyloid (Aβ) injured primary rat's cortical neuron, catalpol did not increase the viability of neuron but extended the length of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) positive neurites and reversed the suppressive effects on expression of synaptic proteins induced by Aβ. Additionally, the effects of catalpol on stimulating the growth of MAP-2 positive neurites and the expression of synaptic proteins were diminished by a PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, suggesting that PKC may be implicated in catalpol's function of preventing the neurodegeneration induced by Aβ. Altogether, our study indicates that catalpol could be a potential disease-modifying drug for cognitive disorders such as AD.

  4. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Chi-Fai; Ho, Yuen-Shan; Hung, Clara Hiu-Ling; Poon, Chun-Hei; Chiu, Kin; Yang, Xifei

    2014-01-01

    Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ), but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD. PMID:25045655

  5. Protective Effects of Testosterone on Presynaptic Terminals against Oligomeric β-Amyloid Peptide in Primary Culture of Hippocampal Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Fai Lau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing lines of evidence support that testosterone may have neuroprotective effects. While observational studies reported an association between higher bioavailable testosterone or brain testosterone levels and reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, there is limited understanding of the underlying neuroprotective mechanisms. Previous studies demonstrated that testosterone could alleviate neurotoxicity induced by β-amyloid (Aβ, but these findings mainly focused on neuronal apoptosis. Since synaptic dysfunction and degeneration are early events during the pathogenesis of AD, we aim to investigate the effects of testosterone on oligomeric Aβ-induced synaptic changes. Our data suggested that exposure of primary cultured hippocampal neurons to oligomeric Aβ could reduce the length of neurites and decrease the expression of presynaptic proteins including synaptophysin, synaptotagmin, and synapsin-1. Aβ also disrupted synaptic vesicle recycling and protein folding machinery. Testosterone preserved the integrity of neurites and the expression of presynaptic proteins. It also attenuated Aβ-induced impairment of synaptic exocytosis. By using letrozole as an aromatase antagonist, we further demonstrated that the effects of testosterone on exocytosis were unlikely to be mediated through the estrogen receptor pathway. Furthermore, we showed that testosterone could attenuate Aβ-induced reduction of HSP70, which suggests a novel mechanism that links testosterone and its protective function on Aβ-induced synaptic damage. Taken together, our data provide further evidence on the beneficial effects of testosterone, which may be useful for future drug development for AD.

  6. [Is regression of atherosclerotic plaque possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páramo, José A; Civeira, Fernando

    As it is well-known, a thrombus evolving into a disrupted/eroded atherosclerotic plaque causes most acute coronary syndromes. Plaque stabilization via reduction of the lipid core and/or thickening of the fibrous cap is one of the possible mechanisms accounted for the clinical benefits displayed by different anti-atherosclerotic strategies. The concept of plaque stabilization was developed to explain how lipid-lowering agents could decrease adverse coronary events without substantial modifications of the atherosclerotic lesion ('angiographic paradox'). A number of imaging modalities (vascular ultrasound and virtual histology, MRI, optical coherence tomography, positron tomography, etc.) are used for non-invasive assessment of atherosclerosis; most of them can identify plaque volume and composition beyond lumen stenosis. An 'aggressive' lipid-lowering strategy is able to reduce the plaque burden and the incidence of cardiovascular events; this may be attributable, at least in part, to plaque-stabilizing effects. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Waves of actin and microtubule polymerization drive microtubule-based transport and neurite growth before single axon formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Amy M; Collins, Sean R; Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Many developing neurons transition through a multi-polar state with many competing neurites before assuming a unipolar state with one axon and multiple dendrites. Hallmarks of the multi-polar state are large fluctuations in microtubule-based transport into and outgrowth of different neurites, although what drives these fluctuations remains elusive. We show that actin waves, which stochastically migrate from the cell body towards neurite tips, direct microtubule-based transport during the multi-polar state. Our data argue for a mechanical control system whereby actin waves transiently widen the neurite shaft to allow increased microtubule polymerization to direct Kinesin-based transport and create bursts of neurite extension. Actin waves also require microtubule polymerization, arguing that positive feedback links these two components. We propose that actin waves create large stochastic fluctuations in microtubule-based transport and neurite outgrowth, promoting competition between neurites as they explore the environment until sufficient external cues can direct one to become the axon. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12387.001 PMID:26836307

  8. Extracellular vesicles from human pancreatic islets suppress human islet amyloid polypeptide amyloid formation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Diana; Horvath, Istvan; Heath, Nikki; Hicks, Ryan; Forslöw, Anna; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2017-01-01

    Protein assembly into amyloid fibers underlies such neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) also involves amyloid formation, although in the pancreas. Because there are no cures for amyloid diseases and T2D is on the rise due to an increasing prevalence of obesity, identifying involved mechanisms and control processes is of utmost importance. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) can mediate physiological and pathological communication both loc...

  9. Physical Activity and Amyloid-β Brain Levels in Elderly Adults with Intact Cognition and Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souto Barreto, Philipe; Andrieu, Sandrine; Payoux, Pierre; Demougeot, Laurent; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2015-08-01

    To examine the associations between amyloid-β brain deposition and physical activity (PA) in elderly adults without dementia and to investigate whether the association has a dose-response relationship. Cross-sectional study. French community-dwelling people. Elderly adults with normal or mildly impaired cognition (mean age 74.7 ± 4.2; 60.4% female) with available information on current self-reported PA and amyloid-β brain deposition measured using positron emission tomography (PET) using the PET-ligand florbetapir F 18 (n = 268). A standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) was obtained for each subject. Participants were divided according to amyloid plaque cortical retention defined according to a SUVR cutoff of 1.10 (SUVR+ vs SUVR-). Bivariate and multivariate analyses showed that PA was not significantly associated with SUVR. SUVR+ and SUVR- participants did not differ in terms of volume (continuous PA variables) and levels (categorical PA variables) of PA. PA was not correlated with SUVR in apolipoprotein E ε4 carriers or noncarriers. PA was not associated with cognitive function. Although PA protects against dementia, there is no solid evidence that this protection involves a reduction in amyloid-β brain deposition. Further studies are needed to determine whether PA (ideally measured at several time-points using objective measures) is involved in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  10. Clearance of beta-amyloid is facilitated by apolipoprotein E and circulating high-density lipoproteins in bioengineered human vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Emily B; Yuen, Brian; Gilmour, Megan; Kang, Kevin; Bahrabadi, Arvin; Stukas, Sophie; Zhao, Wenchen; Kulic, Iva

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid plaques, consisting of deposited beta-amyloid (Aβ), are a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Cerebral vessels play a major role in AD, as Aβ is cleared from the brain by pathways involving the cerebrovasculature, most AD patients have cerebrovascular amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), and cardiovascular risk factors increase dementia risk. Here we present a notable advance in vascular tissue engineering by generating the first functional 3-dimensioinal model of CAA in bioengineered human vessels. We show that lipoproteins including brain (apoE) and circulating (high-density lipoprotein, HDL) synergize to facilitate Aβ transport across bioengineered human cerebral vessels. These lipoproteins facilitate Aβ42 transport more efficiently than Aβ40, consistent with Aβ40 being the primary species that accumulates in CAA. Moreover, apoE4 is less effective than apoE2 in promoting Aβ transport, also consistent with the well-established role of apoE4 in Aβ deposition in AD. PMID:28994390

  11. Aggregation of plaque disclosing agent in a dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Débora Dias da; Gonçalo, Camila da Silva; Sousa, Maria da Luz Rosário de; Wada,Ronaldo Seichi

    2004-01-01

    Dental plaque removal is an important issue in health promotion. Toothbrushing is one of the main methods employed for such purpose, since it can prevent dental caries by means of the fluoride present in the dentifrice. Dentifrices might contain plaque disclosing agents and thus allow dental plaque observation. The aim of this study was to assess whether utilization of a plaque disclosing agent interfered with plaque removal among adolescents, as well as the difference between utilization of ...

  12. Arctigenin effectively ameliorates memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease model mice targeting both β-amyloid production and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; Yan, Jianming; Jiang, Wei; Yao, Xin-gang; Chen, Jing; Chen, Lili; Li, Chenjing; Hu, Lihong; Jiang, Hualiang; Shen, Xu

    2013-08-07

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) chiefly characterizes a progressively neurodegenerative disorder of the brain, and eventually leads to irreversible loss of intellectual abilities. The β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration is believed to be the main pathological mechanism of AD, and Aβ production inhibition or its clearance promotion is one of the promising therapeutic strategies for anti-AD research. Here, we report that the natural product arctigenin from Arctium lappa (L.) can both inhibit Aβ production by suppressing β-site amyloid precursor protein cleavage enzyme 1 expression and promote Aβ clearance by enhancing autophagy through AKT/mTOR signaling inhibition and AMPK/Raptor pathway activation as investigated in cells and APP/PS1 transgenic AD model mice. Moreover, the results showing that treatment of arctigenin in mice highly decreased Aβ formation and senile plaques and efficiently ameliorated AD mouse memory impairment strongly highlight the potential of arctigenin in anti-AD drug discovery.

  13. Amyloid Imaging in Aging and Dementia: Testing the Amyloid Hypothesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Rabinovici

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid imaging represents a major advance in neuroscience, enabling the detection and quantification of pathologic protein aggregations in the brain. In this review we survey current amyloid imaging techniques, focusing on positron emission tomography (PET with ^{11}carbon-labelled Pittsburgh Compound-B (11C-PIB, the most extensively studied and best validated tracer. PIB binds specifically to fibrillar beta-amyloid (Aβ deposits, and is a sensitive marker for Aβ pathology in cognitively normal older individuals and patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. PIB-PET provides us with a powerful tool to examine in vivo the relationship between amyloid deposition, clinical symptoms, and structural and functional brain changes in the continuum between normal aging and AD. Amyloid imaging studies support a model in which amyloid deposition is an early event on the path to dementia, beginning insidiously in cognitively normal individuals, and accompanied by subtle cognitive decline and functional and structural brain changes suggestive of incipient AD. As patients progress to dementia, clinical decline and neurodegeneration accelerate and proceed independently of amyloid accumulation. In the future, amyloid imaging is likely to supplement clinical evaluation in selecting patients for anti-amyloid therapies, while MRI and FDG-PET may be more appropriate markers of clinical progression.

  14. In vivo amyloid-β imaging in the APPPS1-21 transgenic mouse model with a 89Zr- labeled monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie eWaldron

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The accumulation of amyloid-β is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and is a target for molecular imaging probes to aid in diagnosis and disease monitoring. This study evaluated the feasibility of using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid-β antibody (JRF/AβN/25 to non-invasively assess amyloid-β burden in aged transgenic mice (APPPS1-21 with μPET imaging.Methods: We investigated the antibody JRF/AβN/25 that binds to full-length Aβ. JRF/AβN/25 was radiolabeled with a [89Zr]-desferal chelate and intravenously injected into 12-13 month aged APPPS1-21 mice and their wild-type (WT controls. Mice underwent in vivo μPET imaging at 2, 4 and 7 days post injection and were sacrificed at the end of each time point to assess brain penetrance, plaque labeling, biodistribution and tracer stability. To confirm imaging specificity we also evaluated brain uptake of a non-amyloid targeting [89Zr]-labeled antibody (Trastuzumab as a negative control, additionally we performed a competitive blocking study with non-radiolabeled Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 and finally we assessed the possible confounding effects of blood retention. Results: Voxel-wise analysis of μPET data demonstrated significant [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 retention in APPPS1-21 mice at all time points investigated. With ex vivo measures of radioactivity, significantly higher retention of [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 was found at 4 and 7 day pi in APPPS1-21 mice. Despite the observed genotypic differences, comparisons with immunohistochemistry revealed that in vivo plaque labeling was low. Furthermore, pre-treatment with Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 only partially blocked [89Zr]-Df-Bz-JRF/AβN/25 uptake indicative of a high contribution of non-specific binding. Conclusion: Amyloid plaques were detected in vivo with a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-amyloid antibody. The low brain penetrance of the antibodies in addition to non-specific binding prevented an accurate estimation of plaque

  15. Chemical agents for the control of plaque and plaque microflora: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, A; Afflitto, J; Nabi, N

    1997-10-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the technologies available for the chemical control of plaque. It is generally accepted that the formation of dental plaque at the interfaces of tooth/gingiva is one of the major causes of gingival inflammation and dental caries. Several therapeutic approaches have been used to control dental plaque and supragingival infections. These include fluoride preparations such as stannous fluoride, oxygenating agents, anti-attachment agents, and cationic and non-cationic antibacterial agents. Among the fluoride preparations, stable stannous fluoride pastes and gels have been shown to reduce supragingival plaque, gingivitis, hypersensitivity and caries. The effect of the oxygenating agents on the supragingival plaque has been equivocal, but recent data indicate that a stable agent which provides sustained active oxygen release is effective in controlling plaque. A polymer, PVPA, which reduced attachment of bacteria to teeth was shown to significantly reduce plaque formation in humans. A new generation of antibacterials includes non-ionics such as triclosan, which in combination with a special polymer delivery system, has been shown to reduce plaque, gingivitis, supragingival calculus and dental caries in long-term studies conducted around the world. Unlike the first generation of agents, the triclosan/copolymer/sodium fluoride system is effective in long-term clinicals and does not cause staining of teeth, increase in calculus, or disturbance in the oral microbial ecology.

  16. Decreased cathepsin K levels in human atherosclerotic plaques are associated with plaque instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Qin, Xiujiao; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Xiwei; Dong, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the determinants and dynamics of atherosclerotic plaque instability is a key area of current cardiovascular research. Extracellular matrix degradation from excessive proteolysis induced by enzymes such as cathepsin K (Cat K) is implicated in the pathogenesis of unstable plaques. The current study assessed the expression of Cat K in human unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Specimens of popliteal arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were classified as stable (K and cystatin C (Cys C) were assessed by immunohistochemical examination and levels of Cat K mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Morphological changes including a larger lipid core, endothelial proliferation with foam cells and destruction of internal elastic lamina were observed in unstable atherosclerotic plaques. In unstable plaques, the expression of Cat K protein and mRNA was upregulated, whereas Cys C protein expression was downregulated. The interplay between Cat K and Cys C may underlie the progression of plaques from stable to unstable and the current study indicated that Cat K and Cys C are potential targets for preventing and treating vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque ruptures.

  17. Spatially controlled amyloid reactions using organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Hammarström, Per; Berggren, Magnus; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2010-10-04

    Abnormal protein aggregates, so called amyloid fibrils, are mainly known as pathological hallmarks of a wide range of diseases, but in addition these robust well-ordered self-assembled natural nanostructures can also be utilized for creating distinct nanomaterials for bioelectronic devices. However, current methods for producing amyloid fibrils in vitro offer no spatial control. Herein, we demonstrate a new way to produce and spatially control the assembly of amyloid-like structures using an organic electronic ion pump (OEIP) to pump distinct cations to a reservoir containing a negatively charged polypeptide. The morphology and kinetics of the created proteinaceous nanomaterials depends on the ion and current used, which we leveraged to create layers incorporating different conjugated thiophene derivatives, one fluorescent (p-FTAA) and one conducting (PEDOT-S). We anticipate that this new application for the OEIP will be useful for both biological studies of amyloid assembly and fibrillogenesis as well as for creating new bioelectronic nanomaterials and devices.

  18. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  19. DECT evaluation of noncalcified coronary artery plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravanfar Haghighi, Rezvan [Medical Imaging Research Center and Colorectal Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz 719 363 5899 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chatterjee, S. [BGVS Chemical Engineering Building (Old), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Tabin, Milo; Singh, Rishi P.; Sharma, Munish; Krishna, Karthik [Department of Forensic Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Sharma, Sanjiv; Jagia, Priya [Department of Cardiac-Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Ray, Ruma; Arava, Sudhir [Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Yadav, Rakesh [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Vani, V. C. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Lakshmi, R.; Kumar, Pratik, E-mail: drpratikkumar@gmail.com [Department of Cardiac-Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India); Mandal, Susama R. [Department of Medical Physics Unit IRCH, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Composition of the coronary artery plaque is known to have critical role in heart attack. While calcified plaque can easily be diagnosed by conventional CT, it fails to distinguish between fibrous and lipid rich plaques. In the present paper, the authors discuss the experimental techniques and obtain a numerical algorithm by which the electron density (ρ{sub e}) and the effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) can be obtained from the dual energy computed tomography (DECT) data. The idea is to use this inversion method to characterize and distinguish between the lipid and fibrous coronary artery plaques. Methods: For the purpose of calibration of the CT machine, the authors prepare aqueous samples whose calculated values of (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) lie in the range of (2.65 × 10{sup 23} ≤ ρ{sub e} ≤ 3.64 × 10{sup 23}/cm{sup 3}) and (6.80 ≤ Z{sub eff} ≤ 8.90). The authors fill the phantom with these known samples and experimentally determine HU(V{sub 1}) and HU(V{sub 2}), with V{sub 1},V{sub 2} = 100 and 140 kVp, for the same pixels and thus determine the coefficients of inversion that allow us to determine (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) from the DECT data. The HU(100) and HU(140) for the coronary artery plaque are obtained by filling the channel of the coronary artery with a viscous solution of methyl cellulose in water, containing 2% contrast. These (ρ{sub e}, Z{sub eff}) values of the coronary artery plaque are used for their characterization on the basis of theoretical models of atomic compositions of the plaque materials. These results are compared with histopathological report. Results: The authors find that the calibration gives ρ{sub e} with an accuracy of ±3.5% while Z{sub eff} is found within ±1% of the actual value, the confidence being 95%. The HU(100) and HU(140) are found to be considerably different for the same plaque at the same position and there is a linear trend between these two HU values. It is noted that pure lipid type plaques

  20. Islet Amyloid Polypeptide: Structure, Function, and Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehana Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hormone islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, or amylin plays a role in glucose homeostasis but aggregates to form islet amyloid in type-2 diabetes. Islet amyloid formation contributes to β-cell dysfunction and death in the disease and to the failure of islet transplants. Recent work suggests a role for IAPP aggregation in cardiovascular complications of type-2 diabetes and hints at a possible role in type-1 diabetes. The mechanisms of IAPP amyloid formation in vivo or in vitro are not understood and the mechanisms of IAPP induced β-cell death are not fully defined. Activation of the inflammasome, defects in autophagy, ER stress, generation of reactive oxygen species, membrane disruption, and receptor mediated mechanisms have all been proposed to play a role. Open questions in the field include the relative importance of the various mechanisms of β-cell death, the relevance of reductionist biophysical studies to the situation in vivo, the molecular mechanism of amyloid formation in vitro and in vivo, the factors which trigger amyloid formation in type-2 diabetes, the potential role of IAPP in type-1 diabetes, the development of clinically relevant inhibitors of islet amyloidosis toxicity, and the design of soluble, bioactive variants of IAPP for use as adjuncts to insulin therapy.

  1. Hybrid Amyloid Membranes for Continuous Flow Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolisetty, Sreenath; Arcari, Mario; Adamcik, Jozef; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2015-12-29

    Amyloid fibrils are promising nanomaterials for technological applications such as biosensors, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and optoelectronics. Here we show that amyloid-metal nanoparticle hybrids can be used both as efficient active materials for wet catalysis and as membranes for continuous flow catalysis applications. Initially, amyloid fibrils generated in vitro from the nontoxic β-lactoglobulin protein act as templates for the synthesis of gold and palladium metal nanoparticles from salt precursors. The resulting hybrids possess catalytic features as demonstrated by evaluating their activity in a model catalytic reaction in water, e.g., the reduction of 4-nitrophenol into 4-aminophenol, with the rate constant of the reduction increasing with the concentration of amyloid-nanoparticle hybrids. Importantly, the same nanoparticles adsorbed onto fibrils surface show improved catalytic efficiency compared to the same unattached particles, pointing at the important role played by the amyloid fibril templates. Then, filter membranes are prepared from the metal nanoparticle-decorated amyloid fibrils by vacuum filtration. The resulting membranes serve as efficient flow catalysis active materials, with a complete catalytic conversion achieved within a single flow passage of a feeding solution through the membrane.

  2. Fibril Fragmentation Enhances Amyloid Cytotoxicity*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei-Feng; Hellewell, Andrew L.; Gosal, Walraj S.; Homans, Steve W.; Hewitt, Eric W.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2009-01-01

    Fibrils associated with amyloid disease are molecular assemblies of key biological importance, yet how cells respond to the presence of amyloid remains unclear. Cellular responses may not only depend on the chemical composition or molecular properties of the amyloid fibrils, but their physical attributes such as length, width, or surface area may also play important roles. Here, we report a systematic investigation of the effect of fragmentation on the structural and biological properties of amyloid fibrils. In addition to the expected relationship between fragmentation and the ability to seed, we show a striking finding that fibril length correlates with the ability to disrupt membranes and to reduce cell viability. Thus, despite otherwise unchanged molecular architecture, shorter fibrillar samples show enhanced cytotoxic potential than their longer counterparts. The results highlight the importance of fibril length in amyloid disease, with fragmentation not only providing a mechanism by which fibril load can be rapidly increased but also creating fibrillar species of different dimensions that can endow new or enhanced biological properties such as amyloid cytotoxicity. PMID:19808677

  3. Simulation of human atherosclerotic femoral plaque tissue: the influence of plaque material model on numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to the limited number of experimental studies that mechanically characterise human atherosclerotic plaque tissue from the femoral arteries, a recent trend has emerged in current literature whereby one set of material data based on aortic plaque tissue is employed to numerically represent diseased femoral artery tissue. This study aims to generate novel vessel-appropriate material models for femoral plaque tissue and assess the influence of using material models based on experimental data generated from aortic plaque testing to represent diseased femoral arterial tissue. Methods Novel material models based on experimental data generated from testing of atherosclerotic femoral artery tissue are developed and a computational analysis of the revascularisation of a quarter model idealised diseased femoral artery from a 90% diameter stenosis to a 10% diameter stenosis is performed using these novel material models. The simulation is also performed using material models based on experimental data obtained from aortic plaque testing in order to examine the effect of employing vessel appropriate material models versus those currently employed in literature to represent femoral plaque tissue. Results Simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic aortic tissue exhibit much higher maximum principal stresses within the plaque than simulations that employ material models based on atherosclerotic femoral tissue. Specifically, employing a material model based on calcified aortic tissue, instead of one based on heavily calcified femoral tissue, to represent diseased femoral arterial vessels results in a 487 fold increase in maximum principal stress within the plaque at a depth of 0.8 mm from the lumen. Conclusions Large differences are induced on numerical results as a consequence of employing material models based on aortic plaque, in place of material models based on femoral plaque, to represent a diseased femoral vessel. Due to these large

  4. Growth of Necrotic Cores in Vulnerable Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Pak-Wing

    2011-03-01

    Plaques are fatty deposits that grow mainly in arteries and develop as a result of a chronic inflammatory response. Plaques are called vulnerable when they are prone to mechanical rupture. Vulnerable Plaques (VPs) are characterized by lipid-rich, necrotic cores that are heavily infiltrated with macrophages. The rupture of VPs releases thrombogenic agents into the bloodstream, usually resulting in myocardial infarctions. We propose a quantitative model to predict the development of a plaque's necrotic core. By solving coupled reaction-diffusion equations for macrophages and dead cells, we explore the joint effects of hypoxic cell death and chemo-attraction to Ox-LDL, a molecule that is strongly linked to atherosclerosis. Our model predicts cores that have approximately the right size and shape. Normal mode analysis and subsequent calculation of the smallest eigenvalues allow us to compute the times required for the system to reach its steady state. This study allows us to make quantitative predictions for how quickly vulnerable plaques develop and how their growth depends on system parameters such as chemotactic coefficients and cell death rates.

  5. Functional Expression of Dental Plaque Microbiota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Norman Peterson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota’s transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  6. Corneal plaque containing levofloxacin in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Woo; Kang, Byung-Jae; Lim, Jae Hyun; Ahn, Jung-Mo; Lim, Hyun Sook

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier developed a corneal ulcer 2 weeks after intracapsular lens extraction (ICLE) in the right eye. The corneal ulcer was treated with levofloxacin eye drops. A plaque with a white luster developed in the central cornea 2 weeks after treatment with levofloxacin eye drops. The corneal plaque was surgically removed under inhalant anesthesia. The corneal plaque displayed antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli. Furthermore, levofloxacin content in the plaque was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). The corneal ulcer completely resolved 2 weeks after the surgical removal of the corneal lesion and replacement of levofloxacin eye drops with tobramycin eye drops. Although the topical use of levofloxacin is unlikely to lead to corneal chemical deposits due to the high water solubility of the drug compared to other topical fluoroquinolones, this patient developed corneal plaque of the antibiotic drop. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. Functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Scott N; Meissner, Tobias; Su, Andrew I; Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C; Schork, Nicholas J; Bretz, Walter A

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries remains a significant public health problem and is considered pandemic worldwide. The prediction of dental caries based on profiling of microbial species involved in disease and equally important, the identification of species conferring dental health has proven more difficult than anticipated due to high interpersonal and geographical variability of dental plaque microbiota. We have used RNA-Seq to perform global gene expression analysis of dental plaque microbiota derived from 19 twin pairs that were either concordant (caries-active or caries-free) or discordant for dental caries. The transcription profiling allowed us to define a functional core microbiota consisting of nearly 60 species. Similarities in gene expression patterns allowed a preliminary assessment of the relative contribution of human genetics, environmental factors and caries phenotype on the microbiota's transcriptome. Correlation analysis of transcription allowed the identification of numerous functional networks, suggesting that inter-personal environmental variables may co-select for groups of genera and species. Analysis of functional role categories allowed the identification of dominant functions expressed by dental plaque biofilm communities, that highlight the biochemical priorities of dental plaque microbes to metabolize diverse sugars and cope with the acid and oxidative stress resulting from sugar fermentation. The wealth of data generated by deep sequencing of expressed transcripts enables a greatly expanded perspective concerning the functional expression of dental plaque microbiota.

  8. Approach To Unstable Plaque In Carotid Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Ghabaee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Risk of cerebral infarction due to thrombo emboli originating  from carotid artery disease estimated to be near 15%, and this risk  is closely associated with the severity of luminal stenosis. But at the same time characteristics  of the plaque should be taken into account for therapeutic planning when the patient is asymptomatic and the diameter of the stenosis does not reach the threshold of 70%. Search for markers of plaque vulnerability, instability, or thromboembolic potential as complementary to the degree of the luminal stenosis in stroke risk prediction should be considered .These morphologic features of carotid plaques are increasingly believed to be one of those markers that could carry further prognostic information, and early recognition of these plaques features may identify a high-risk subgroup of patients who might particularly benefit from aggressive interventions with aggressive medical treatment. Color and duplex Doppler sonography  evaluates both  morphologic and hemodynamic   abnormalitie of carotid. Echogensity, degree of stenosis and plaque surface features are essential parameters of morphological abnormality.

  9. Cross-interactions between the Alzheimer Disease Amyloid-β Peptide and Other Amyloid Proteins: A Further Aspect of the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jinghui; Wärmländer, Sebastian K T S; Gräslund, Astrid; Abrahams, Jan Pieter

    2016-08-05

    Many protein folding diseases are intimately associated with accumulation of amyloid aggregates. The amyloid materials formed by different proteins/peptides share many structural similarities, despite sometimes large amino acid sequence differences. Some amyloid diseases constitute risk factors for others, and the progression of one amyloid disease may affect the progression of another. These connections are arguably related to amyloid aggregates of one protein being able to directly nucleate amyloid formation of another, different protein: the amyloid cross-interaction. Here, we discuss such cross-interactions between the Alzheimer disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and other amyloid proteins in the context of what is known from in vitro and in vivo experiments, and of what might be learned from clinical studies. The aim is to clarify potential molecular associations between different amyloid diseases. We argue that the amyloid cascade hypothesis in Alzheimer disease should be expanded to include cross-interactions between Aβ and other amyloid proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) enhances sympathetic neurite growth in rat hearts at early developmental stages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miwa, Keiko; Lee, Jong-Kook; Takagishi, Yoshiko; Opthof, Tobias; Fu, Xianming; Kodama, Itsuo

    2010-01-01

    Molecular signaling of sympathetic innervation of myocardium is an unresolved issue. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of neurotrophic factors on sympathetic neurite growth towards cardiomyocytes. Cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs) were isolated from neonatal

  11. CB2 receptor deficiency increases amyloid pathology and alters tau processing in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Jeremy; Vingtdeux, Valerie; Marambaud, Philippe; d'Abramo, Cristina; Jimenez, Heidy; Stauber, Mark; Friedman, Rachel; Davies, Peter

    2014-03-14

    The endocannabinoid CB2 receptor system has been implicated in the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to investigate the impact of the CB2 receptor system on AD pathology, a colony of mice with a deleted CB2 receptor gene, CNR2, was established on a transgenic human mutant APP background for pathological comparison with CB2 receptor-sufficient transgenic mice. J20 APP (PDGFB-APPSwInd) mice were bred over two generations with CNR2(-/-) (Cnr2(tm1Dgen)/J) mice to produce a colony of J20 CNR2(+/+) and J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Seventeen J20 CNR2(+/+) mice (12 females, 5 males) and 16 J20 CNR2(-/-) mice (11 females, 5 males) were killed at 12 months, and their brains were interrogated for AD-related pathology with both biochemistry and immunocytochemistry (ICC). In addition to amyloid-dependent endpoints such as soluble Aβ production and plaque deposition quantified with 6E10 staining, the effect of CB2 receptor deletion on total soluble mouse tau production was assayed by using a recently developed high-sensitivity assay. Results revealed that soluble Aβ42 and plaque deposition were significantly increased in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to CNR2(+/+) mice. Microgliosis, quantified with ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) staining, did not differ between groups, whereas plaque associated microglia was more abundant in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice. Total tau was significantly suppressed in J20 CNR2(-/-) mice relative to J20 CNR2(+/+) mice. The results confirm the constitutive role of the CB2 receptor system both in reducing amyloid plaque pathology in AD and also support tehpotential of cannabinoid therapies targeting CB2 to reduce Aβ; however, the results suggest that interventions may have a divergent effect on tau pathology.

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide stimulates neurite growth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A; Kimball, B; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1995-01-01

    The ability of PACAP-38 to stimulate morphological development was studied using rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. PACAP-38 produced concentration-dependent increases in percentage of cells exhibiting neurite extension. Similar increases were produced by forskolin (28 +/- 2% at 96 h) and 8-bromo cAMP (30 +/- 2%). Vasoactive intestinal peptide and alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide were without effect. PACAP-38 produced significant increases in PC12 cell cAMP content and inositol phosphate turnover. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased from 169 +/- 14 nM to 560 +/- 58 nM in response to 1 microM PACAP-38. PACAP-stimulated neurite outgrowth was abolished by RpcAMPS, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent kinases but was unaffected by the protein kinase C antagonist H7.

  13. Large enhancement in neurite outgrowth on a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo; Luo, Shyh-Chyang; Zhao, Haichao; Lin, Hsing-An; Sekine, Jun; Nakao, Aiko; Chen, Chi; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2014-07-01

    Although electrically stimulated neurite outgrowth on bioelectronic devices is a promising means of nerve regeneration, immunogenic scar formation can insulate electrodes from targeted cells and tissues, thereby reducing the lifetime of the device. Ideally, an electrode material capable of electrically interfacing with neurons selectively and efficiently would be integrated without being recognized by the immune system and minimize its response. Here we develop a cell membrane-mimicking conducting polymer possessing several attractive features. This polymer displays high resistance towards nonspecific enzyme/cell binding and recognizes targeted cells specifically to allow intimate electrical communication over long periods of time. Its low electrical impedance relays electrical signals efficiently. This material is capable to integrate biochemical and electrical stimulation to promote neural cellular behaviour. Neurite outgrowth is enhanced greatly on this new conducting polymer; in addition, electrically stimulated secretion of proteins from primary Schwann cells can also occur on it.

  14. Terpenoids with neurite outgrowth-promoting activity from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin-Hui; Yue, Rong-Cai; Fang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guo-Wei; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Shen, Yun-Heng

    2016-05-01

    Eighteen terpenoids (1-18) were isolated from Illicium merrillianum. Compound 1 was identified as new compound, and its structure was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. All compounds were evaluated for nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated neurite outgrowth activity using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model system of neuronal differentiation. Compounds 1, 3, 18 showed significant neurite outgrowth-promoting activity in the presence of 20 ng/ml NGF in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations of 1-100 μM after 24-h treatment. Subtle difference of functional groups at C-2 position in hopane-type triterpene resulted in enormous bioactivity difference, compound 1 was neurotrophic but 2 was cytotoxic.

  15. Mechanisms involved in the regulation of neuropeptide-mediated neurite outgrowth: a minireview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestanova Z.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The present knowledge, regarding the neuronal growth and neurite extension, includes neuropeptide action in the central nervous system. Research reports have brought much information about the multiple intracellular signaling pathways of neuropeptides. However, regardless of the differences in the local responses elicited by neuropeptides, there exist certain functional similarities in the effects of neuropeptides, mediated by their receptors. In the present review, data of the relevant studies, focused on G protein-coupled receptors activated by neuropeptides, are summarized. Particularly, receptors that activate phosphatidylinositol-calcium system and protein kinase C pathways, resulting in the reorganization of the neuronal cytoskeleton and changes in the neuronal morphology, are discussed. Based on our data received, we are showing that oxytocin increases the gene expression of GTPase cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42, implicated in many aspects of the neuronal growth and morphology. We are also paying a special attention to neurite extension and retraction in the context of neuropeptide regulation.

  16. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  17. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  18. The role of mutated amyloid beta 1-42 stimulating dendritic cells in a PDAPP transgenic mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Jia-lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Amyloid plaque is one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD. Anti-beta-amyloid (Aβ immunotherapy is effective in removing brain Aβ, but has shown to be associated with detrimental effects. To avoid severe adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis induced by amyloid beta vaccine with adjuvant, and take advantage of amyloid beta antibody's therapeutic effect on Alzheimer's disease sufficiently, our group has developed a new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating dendritic cells (DC. Our previous work has confirmed that DC vaccine can induce adequate anti-amyloid beta antibody in PDAPP Tg mice safely and efficiently. The DC vaccine can improve impaired learning and memory in the Alzheimer's animal model, and did not cause microvasculitis, microhemorrhage or meningoencephalitis in the animal model. However, the exact mechanism of immunotherapy which reduces Aβ deposition remains unknown. In this report, we studied the mechanism of the vaccine, thinking that this may have implications for better understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Methods A new Alzheimer vaccine with mutated amyloid beta 1-42 peptide stimulating DC which were obtained from C57/B6 mouse bone marrow was developed. Amyloid beta with Freund's adjuvant was inoculated at the same time to act as positive control. After the treatment was done, the samples of brains were collected, fixed, cut. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to observe the expression of the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR, membrane-bound protein tyrosine phosphatase (CD45, the ATP-binding cassette family of active transporters (ABCA1, receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE, β-site APP-cleaving enzyme (BACE and Aβ in mouse brain tissue. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to defect CA1, CA2, CA3, DG, Rad in hippocampus region and positive neuron in cortex region. Results Aβ was significantly reduced in the

  19. Plaque rupture in humans and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Stephen M; Galis, Zorina S; Rosenfeld, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Despite the many studies of murine atherosclerosis, we do not yet know the relevance of the natural history of this model to the final events precipitated by plaque disruption of human atherosclerotic lesions. The literature has become particularly confused because of the common use of terms...... such as "instability", "vulnerable", "rupture", or even "thrombosis" for features of plaques in murine model systems not yet shown to rupture spontaneously and in an animal surprisingly resistant to formation of thrombi at sites of atherosclerosis. We suggest that use of conclusory terms like "vulnerable" and "stable...... that various forms of data have implicated in plaque progression. For example, formation of the fibrous cap, protease activation, and cell death in the necrotic core can be well described and have all been modeled in well-defined experiments. The relevance of such well-defined, objective, descriptive...

  20. Rewiring Neuronal Circuits: A New Method for Fast Neurite Extension and Functional Neuronal Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdesian, Margaret H; Anthonisen, Madeleine; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Chua, Xue Ying; Rigby, Matthew; Grütter, Peter

    2017-06-13

    Brain and spinal cord injury may lead to permanent disability and death because it is still not possible to regenerate neurons over long distances and accurately reconnect them with an appropriate target. Here a procedure is described to rapidly initiate, elongate, and precisely connect new functional neuronal circuits over long distances. The extension rates achieved reach over 1.2 mm/h, 30-60 times faster than the in vivo rates of the fastest growing axons from the peripheral nervous system (0.02 to 0.04 mm/h)(28) and 10 times faster than previously reported for the same neuronal type at an earlier stage of development(4). First, isolated populations of rat hippocampal neurons are grown for 2-3 weeks in microfluidic devices to precisely position the cells, enabling easy micromanipulation and experimental reproducibility. Next, beads coated with poly-D-lysine (PDL) are placed on neurites to form adhesive contacts and pipette micromanipulation is used to move the resulting bead-neurite complex. As the bead is moved, it pulls out a new neurite that can be extended over hundreds of micrometers and functionally connected to a target cell in less than 1 h. This process enables experimental reproducibility and ease of manipulation while bypassing slower chemical strategies to induce neurite growth. Preliminary measurements presented here demonstrate a neuronal growth rate far exceeding physiological ones. Combining these innovations allows for the precise establishment of neuronal networks in culture with an unprecedented degree of control. It is a novel method that opens the door to a plethora of information and insights into signal transmission and communication within the neuronal network as well as being a playground in which to explore the limits of neuronal growth. The potential applications and experiments are widespread with direct implications for therapies that aim to reconnect neuronal circuits after trauma or in neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Influence of micro-patterned PLLA membranes on outgrowth and orientation of hippocampal neurites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Sabrina; Salerno, Simona; Piscioneri, Antonella; Papenburg, Bernke J; Di Vito, Anna; Giusi, Giuseppina; Canonaco, Marcello; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Drioli, Enrico; De Bartolo, Loredana

    2010-09-01

    In neuronal tissue engineering many efforts are focused on creating biomaterials with physical and chemical pathways for controlling cellular proliferation and orientation. Neurons have the ability to respond to topographical features in their microenvironment causing among others, axons to proliferate along surface features such as substrate grooves in micro-and nanoscales. As a consequence these neuronal elements are able to correctly adhere, migrate and orient within their new environment during growth. Here we explored the polarization and orientation of hippocampal neuronal cells on nonpatterned and micro-patterned biodegradable poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) membranes with highly selective permeable properties. Dense and porous nonpatterned and micro-patterned membranes were prepared from PLLA by Phase Separation Micromolding. The micro-patterned membranes have a three-dimensional structure consisting of channels and ridges and of bricks of different widths. Nonpatterned and patterned membranes were used for hippocampal neuronal cultures isolated from postnatal days 1-3 hamsters and the neurite length, orientation and specific functions of cells were investigated up to 12 days of culture. Neurite outgrowth, length plus orientation tightly overlapped the pattern of the membrane surface. Cell distribution occurred only in correspondence to membrane grooves characterized by continuous channels whereas on membranes with interconnected channels, cells not only adhered to and elongated their cellular processes in the grooves but also in the breaking points. High orientation degrees of cells were determined particularly on the patterned porous membranes with channel width of 20 mum and ridges of 17 mum whereas on dense nonpatterned membranes as well as on polystyrene culture dish (PSCD) controls, a larger number of primary developed neurites were distributed. Based on these results, PLLA patterned membranes may directly improve the guidance of neurite extension and

  2. NIR-responsive upconversion nanoparticles stimulate neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yijia; Li, Meng; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-24

    Nerve regeneration is of diagnostic importance in neuroscience in regards to the treatment of degenerative disease. Owing to the ability to release rare-earth ions and produce ROS during upconversion process, upconversion nanoparticles are first reported for promoting neurite outgrowth. Different charged coating materials which play a critical role in cell attachment, can further lead to different effects on cell differentiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The flavanol (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate inhibits amyloid formation by islet amyloid polypeptide, disaggregates amyloid fibrils, and protects cultured cells against IAPP-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fanling; Abedini, Andisheh; Plesner, Annette; Verchere, C Bruce; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2010-09-21

    Islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, amylin) is the major protein component of the islet amyloid deposits associated with type 2 diabetes. The polypeptide lacks a well-defined structure in its monomeric state but readily assembles to form amyloid. Amyloid fibrils formed from IAPP, intermediates generated in the assembly of IAPP amyloid, or both are toxic to β-cells, suggesting that islet amyloid formation may contribute to the pathology of type 2 diabetes. There are relatively few reported inhibitors of amyloid formation by IAPP. Here we show that the tea-derived flavanol, (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate [(2R,3R)-5,7-dihydroxy-2-(3,4,5-trihydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-3-yl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate] (EGCG), is an effective inhibitor of in vitro IAPP amyloid formation and disaggregates preformed amyloid fibrils derived from IAPP. The compound is thus one of a very small set of molecules which have been shown to disaggregate IAPP amyloid fibrils. Fluorescence-detected thioflavin-T binding assays and transmission electron microscopy confirm that the compound inhibits unseeded amyloid fibril formation as well as disaggregates IAPP amyloid. Seeding studies show that the complex formed by IAPP and EGCG does not seed amyloid formation by IAPP. In this regard, the behavior of IAPP is similar to the reported interactions of Aβ and α-synuclein with EGCG. Alamar blue assays and light microscopy indicate that the compound protects cultured rat INS-1 cells against IAPP-induced toxicity. Thus, EGCG offers an interesting lead structure for further development of inhibitors of IAPP amyloid formation and compounds that disaggregate IAPP amyloid.

  4. Ethanol-induced disruption of Golgi apparatus morphology, primary neurite number and cellular orientation in developing cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powrozek, Teresa A; Olson, Eric C

    2012-11-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure disrupts cortical neurite initiation and outgrowth, but prior studies have reported both ethanol-dependent growth promotion and inhibition. To resolve this ambiguity and better approximate in vivo conditions, we quantitatively analyzed neuronal morphology using a new, whole hemisphere explant model. In this model, Layer 6 (L6) cortical neurons migrate, laminate and extend neurites in an organotypic fashion. To selectively label L6 neurons, we performed ex utero electroporation of a GFP expression construct at embryonic day 13 and allowed the explants to develop for 2 days in vitro. Explants were exposed to (400 mg/dL) ethanol for either 4 or 24 h prior to fixation. Complete 3-D reconstructions were made of >80 GFP-positive neurons in each experimental condition. Acute responses to ethanol exposure included compaction of the Golgi apparatus accompanied by elaboration of supernumerary primary apical neurites, as well as a modest (∼15%) increase in higher order apical neurite length. With longer exposure time, ethanol exposure leads to a consistent, significant disorientation of the cell (cell body, primary apical neurite, and Golgi) with respect to the pial surface. The effects on cellular orientation were accompanied by decreased expression of cytoskeletal elements, microtubule-associated protein 2 and F-actin. These findings indicate that upon exposure to ethanol, developing L6 neurons manifest disruptions in Golgi apparatus and cytoskeletal elements which may in turn trigger selective and significant perturbations to primary neurite formation and neuronal polarity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of the 14–20 Domain of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Amyloid Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gilead

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanism of amyloid formation by the islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP has been intensively studied since its identification in the late 1980s. The IAPP(20–29 region is considered to be the central amyloidogenic module of the polypeptide. This assumption is mainly based on the amyloidogenic properties of the region and on the large sequence diversity within this region between the human and mouse IAPP, as the mouse IAPP does not form amyloids. A few years ago, another region within IAPP was identified that seems to be at least as important as IAPP(20–29 in facilitation of molecular recognition that leads to amyloid formation. Here, we reinforce our and others' previous findings by analyzing supporting evidence from the recent literature. Moreover, we provide new proofs to our hypothesis by comparing between the amyloidogenic properties of the two regions derived from the IAPP of cats, which is also known to form amyloid fibrils.

  6. Cobalt60 plaques in recurrent retinoblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fass, D.; McCormick, B.; Abramson, D.; Ellsworth, R. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Cobalt60 plaque irradiation is one treatment option for patients with recurrent retinoblastoma following conventional external beam irradiation (ERT). Tumorocidal doses can be delivered without excessive risk of normal tissue injury. In patients not considered candidates for xenon arc or cryotherapy, 60Co is an alternative to enucleation. Between 1968 and 1987, 85 patients were treated with 60Co plaques, 72 of whom had failed prior ERT. Age at diagnosis ranged from 1 week to 4 years. There are 37 males and 35 females. Seventy-one patients had bilateral disease and one had unilateral. Three patients had both eyes plaqued. Prior ERT ranged from 30 to 70 Gy (mean 4200 Gy). Time from initial therapy to failure ranged from 13 to 60 months. Cobalt plaques of 10 mm, 15 mm, or 10 {times} 15 mm were used depending on tumor size and location. Dose prescribed to the apex of the tumor ranged from 30 to 50 Gy (median 40 Gy) given over 3 to 8 days. Twelve patients had two plaque applications; three patients had three plaque applications. All patients were followed with routine ophthalmoscopic examinations. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 22 years (mean 8.7). Seven patients died of metastatic disease; 10 patients developed non-ocular second tumors. Thirty patients required enucleation. Twenty-two patients had clear tumor progression, two patients had radiation complications, and six patients had a combination of tumor growth and complications. Cobalt60 can salvage eyes in retinoblastoma patients failing ERT. Currently, the authors are using I125 in an attempt to spare normal ocular tissue and reduce subsequent complications.

  7. The effects of enhanced zinc on spatial memory and plaque formation in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkous, D.H.; Adlard, P.A.; Wanschura, P.B.; Conko, K.M.; Flinn, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable evidence suggesting that metals play a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Reports suggest that elevated dietary metals may both precipitate and potentiate an Alzheimer's disease phenotype. Despite this, there remain few studies that have examined the behavioral consequences of elevated dietary metals in wild type and Alzheimer's disease animals. To further investigate this in the current study, two separate transgenic models of AD (Tg2576 and TgCRND8), together with wild type littermates were administered 10 ppm (0.153 mM) Zn. Tg2576 animals were maintained on a zinc-enriched diet both pre- and postnatally until 11 months of age, while TgCRND8 animals were treated for five months following weaning. Behavioral testing, consisting of "Atlantis" and "moving" platform versions of the Morris water maze, were conducted at the end of the study, and tissues were collected for immunohistochemical analysis of amyloid-β burden. Our data demonstrate that the provision of a zinc-enriched diet potentiated Alzheimer-like spatial memory impairments in the transgenic animals and was associated with reduced hippocampal amyloidplaque deposits. Zinc-related behavioral deficits were also demonstrated in wild type mice, which were sometimes as great as those present in the transgenic animals. However, zinc-related cognitive impairments in transgenic mice were greater than the summation of zinc effects in the wild type mice and the transgene effects.

  8. Styrylbenzoazole derivatives for imaging of prion plaques and treatment of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kensuke; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Nishida, Noriyuki; Suemoto, Takahiro; Sawada, Tohru; Iwaki, Toru; Doh-ura, Katsumi

    2006-10-01

    Recent prevalence of acquired forms of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) has urged the development of early diagnostic measures as well as therapeutic interventions. To extend our previous findings on the value of amyloid imaging probes for these purposes, styrylbenzoazole derivatives with better permeability of blood-brain barrier (BBB) were developed and analyzed in this study. The new styrylbenzoazole compounds clearly labeled prion protein (PrP) plaques in brain specimens from human TSE in a manner irrespective of pathogen strain, and a representative compound BF-168 detected abnormal PrP aggregates in the brain of TSE-infected mice when the probe was injected intravenously. On the other hand, most of the compounds inhibited abnormal PrP formation in TSE-infected cells with IC50 values in the nanomolar range, indicating that they represent one of the most potent classes of inhibitor ever reported. BF-168 prolonged the lives of mice infected intracerebrally with TSE when the compound was given intravenously at the preclinical stage. The new compounds, however, failed to detect synaptic PrP deposition and to show pathogen-independent therapeutic efficacy, similar to the amyloid imaging probes we previously reported. The compounds were BBB permeable and non-toxic at doses for imaging and treatment; therefore, they are expected to be of practical use in human TSE.

  9. Directional neurite growth using carbon nanotube patterned substrates as a biomimetic cue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Namgung, Seon; Hong, Seunghun, E-mail: seunghun@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: ynam@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-11

    Researchers have made extensive efforts to mimic or reverse-engineer in vivo neural circuits using micropatterning technology. Various surface chemical cues or topographical structures have been proposed to design neuronal networks in vitro. In this paper, we propose a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based network engineering method which naturally mimics the structure of extracellular matrix (ECM). On CNT patterned substrates, poly-L-lysine (PLL) was coated, and E18 rat hippocampal neurons were cultured. In the early developmental stage, soma adhesion and neurite extension occurred in disregard of the surface CNT patterns. However, later the majority of neurites selectively grew along CNT patterns and extended further than other neurites that originally did not follow the patterns. Long-term cultured neuronal networks had a strong resemblance to the in vivo neural circuit structures. The selective guidance is possibly attributed to higher PLL adsorption on CNT patterns and the nanomesh structure of the CNT patterns. The results showed that CNT patterned substrates can be used as novel neuronal patterning substrates for in vitro neural engineering.

  10. Age-dependent differences in brain tissue microstructure assessed with neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Andrew P; Dean, Douglas C; Adluru, Nagesh; Suryawanshi, Gaurav S; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Oh, Jennifer M; Hermann, Bruce P; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Zhang, Hui; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2016-07-01

    Human aging is accompanied by progressive changes in executive function and memory, but the biological mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not fully understood. Using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, we sought to examine the relationship between age, cellular microstructure, and neuropsychological scores in 116 late middle-aged, cognitively asymptomatic participants. Results revealed widespread increases in the volume fraction of isotropic diffusion and localized decreases in neurite density in frontal white matter regions with increasing age. In addition, several of these microstructural alterations were associated with poorer performance on tests of memory and executive function. These results suggest that neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging is capable of measuring age-related brain changes and the neural correlates of poorer performance on tests of cognitive functioning, largely in accordance with published histological findings and brain-imaging studies of people of this age range. Ultimately, this study sheds light on the processes underlying normal brain development in adulthood, knowledge that is critical for differentiating healthy aging from changes associated with dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway regulates neurite outgrowth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Song

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges to understand the organization of the nervous system has been to determine how axon guidance molecules govern axon outgrowth. Through an unbiased genetic screen, we identified a conserved Wnt pathway which is crucial for anterior-posterior (A/P outgrowth of neurites from RME head motor neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. The pathway is composed of the Wnt ligand CWN-2, the Frizzled receptors CFZ-2 and MIG-1, the co-receptor CAM-1/Ror, and the downstream component Dishevelled/DSH-1. Among these, CWN-2 acts as a local attractive cue for neurite outgrowth, and its activity can be partially substituted with other Wnts, suggesting that spatial distribution plays a role in the functional specificity of Wnts. As a co-receptor, CAM-1 functions cell-autonomously in neurons and, together with CFZ-2 and MIG-1, transmits the Wnt signal to downstream effectors. Yeast two-hybrid screening identified DSH-1 as a binding partner for CAM-1, indicating that CAM-1 could facilitate CWN-2/Wnt signaling by its physical association with DSH-1. Our study reveals an important role of a Wnt-Frz/Ror-Dsh pathway in regulating neurite A/P outgrowth.

  12. Non-Obese Diabetic Mice Rapidly Develop Dramatic Sympathetic Neuritic Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Robert E.; Dorsey, Denise A.; Beaudet, Lucie N.; Frederick, Kathy E.; Parvin, Curtis A.; Plurad, Santiago B.; Levisetti, Matteo G.

    2003-01-01

    To address the pathogenesis of diabetic autonomic neuropathy, we have examined the sympathetic nervous system in non-obese diabetic (NOD) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, two models of type 1 diabetes, and the db/db mouse, a model of type 2 diabetes. After only 3 to 5 weeks of diabetes, NOD mice developed markedly swollen axons and dendrites (“neuritic dystrophy”) in the prevertebral superior mesenteric and celiac ganglia (SMG-CG), similar to the pathology described in diabetic STZ- and BBW-rat and man. Comparable changes failed to develop in the superior cervical ganglia of the NOD mouse or in the SMG-CG of non-diabetic NOD siblings. STZ-induced diabetic mice develop identical changes, although at a much slower pace and to a lesser degree than NOD mice. NOD-SCID mice, which are genetically identical to NOD mice except for the absence of T and B cells, do not develop diabetes or neuropathology comparable to diabetic NOD mice. However, STZ-treated NOD-SCID mice develop severe neuritic dystrophy, evidence against an exclusively autoimmune pathogenesis for autonomic neuropathy in this model. Chronically diabetic type 2 db/db mice fail to develop neuritic dystrophy, suggesting that hyperglycemia alone may not be the critical and sufficient element. The NOD mouse appears to be a valuable model of diabetic sympathetic autonomic neuropathy with unambiguous, rapidly developing neuropathology which corresponds closely to the characteristic pathology of other rodent models and man. PMID:14578206

  13. Target deletion of the cytoskeleton-associated protein palladin does not impair neurite outgrowth in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Run-Zhe Shu

    Full Text Available Palladin is an actin cytoskeleton-associated protein which is crucial for cell morphogenesis and motility. Previous studies have shown that palladin is localized to the axonal growth cone in neurons and may play an important role in axonal extension. Previously, we have generated palladin knockout mice which display cranial neural tube closure defect and embryonic lethality before embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5. To further study the role of palladin in the developing nervous system, we examined the innervation of palladin-deficient mouse embryos since the 200 kd, 140 kd, 90-92 kd and 50 kd palladin isoforms were undetectable in the mutant mouse embryo brain. Contrary to the results of previous studies, we found no inhibition of the axonal extension in palladin-deficient mouse embryos. The cortical neurons derived from palladin-deficient mice also showed no significant difference in neurite outgrowth as compared with those from wild-type mice. Moreover, no difference was found in neurite outgrowth of neural stem cell derived-neurons between palladin-deficient mice and wild-type mice. In conclusion, these results suggest that palladin is dispensable for normal neurite outgrowth in mice.

  14. LINGO-1 Interacts with WNK1 to Regulate Nogo-induced Inhibition of Neurite Extension*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Yu, Zhongwang; He, Cheng

    2009-01-01

    LINGO-1 is a component of the tripartite receptor complexes, which act as a convergent mediator of the intracellular signaling in response to myelin-associated inhibitors and lead to collapse of growth cone and inhibition of neurite extension. Although the function of LINGO-1 has been intensively studied, its downstream signaling remains elusive. In the present study, a novel interaction between LINGO-1 and a serine-threonine kinase WNK1 was identified by yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction was further validated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation, and this interaction was intensified by Nogo66 treatment. Morphological evidences showed that WNK1 and LINGO-1 were co-localized in cortical neurons. Furthermore, either suppressing WNK1 expression by RNA interference or overexpression of WNK1-(123–510) attenuated Nogo66-induced inhibition of neurite extension and inhibited the activation of RhoA. Moreover, WNK1 was identified to interact with Rho-GDI1, and this interaction was attenuated by Nogo66 treatment, further indicating its regulatory effect on RhoA activation. Taken together, our results suggest that WNK1 is a novel signaling molecule involved in regulation of LINGO-1 mediated inhibition of neurite extension. PMID:19363035

  15. LINGO-1 interacts with WNK1 to regulate nogo-induced inhibition of neurite extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Jianfeng; Yu, Zhongwang; He, Cheng

    2009-06-05

    LINGO-1 is a component of the tripartite receptor complexes, which act as a convergent mediator of the intracellular signaling in response to myelin-associated inhibitors and lead to collapse of growth cone and inhibition of neurite extension. Although the function of LINGO-1 has been intensively studied, its downstream signaling remains elusive. In the present study, a novel interaction between LINGO-1 and a serine-threonine kinase WNK1 was identified by yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction was further validated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation, and this interaction was intensified by Nogo66 treatment. Morphological evidences showed that WNK1 and LINGO-1 were co-localized in cortical neurons. Furthermore, either suppressing WNK1 expression by RNA interference or overexpression of WNK1-(123-510) attenuated Nogo66-induced inhibition of neurite extension and inhibited the activation of RhoA. Moreover, WNK1 was identified to interact with Rho-GDI1, and this interaction was attenuated by Nogo66 treatment, further indicating its regulatory effect on RhoA activation. Taken together, our results suggest that WNK1 is a novel signaling molecule involved in regulation of LINGO-1 mediated inhibition of neurite extension.

  16. Dobesilate in the treatment of plaque psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Pedro; Arrazola, Jose M

    2005-09-12

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-mediated pathways participate in many of the cellular events implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Thus, targeting FGF signals may be potentially therapeutic in the treatment of psoriasis. We report for the first time on a 43-year-old man with chronic-type plaque psoriasis with a daily topical treatment of dobesilate, a new FGF inhibitor. As early as at day 14, the patient had cleared or achieved excellent improvement of psoriatic skin lesions. Topical dobesilate offers the potential for treatment of plaque psoriasis without atrophy or other local side effects associated with the use of topical corticosteroids.

  17. A modified COMS plaque for iris melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Scanderbeg

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma of the iris is a rare condition compared to posterior ocular tumors and in this case report we presenta 51-year-old female patient with diffuse iris melanoma. Traditional COMS (Collaborative Ocular Melanoma Studyplaques are used at our institution for radiation therapy, so a novel modification of the traditional plaque was requiredto allow better conformance with placement on the cornea. The usual silastic insert was machined to dimensions incompliance with the cornea, placed without incident, and treatment delivered with excellent patient tolerance of themodified plaque.

  18. Effectiveness of Electric Toothbrushes on Plaque Removal

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 悦子; 高見沢, 恵; 奥田, 一博; 原, 耕二; 新井, 文子; 藤野, 仁; Satoh, Etsuko; Takamizawa, Megumi; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Hara, Kohji; Arai, Humiko; Fujino, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the plaque removal efficiency of two types of toothbrushes, one with a rotary combined with horizontal movement (brush 1) and the other with a rotary movement (brush 2) on 13 volunteers. They stopped all oral hygiene procedures for 48 houres, after which the subjects were instructed to brush their teeth for two minutes with each of the respective electric toothbrushes using the split-mouth technique twice a day and continued to brush for 1week. Plaque ...

  19. Atypical neuropathological sCJD-MM phenotype with abundant white matter Kuru-type plaques sparing the cerebellar cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ellen; Soler Insa, Josep Ma; Parchi, Piero; Saverioni, Daniela; Yagüe, Jordi; Nos, Carlos; Martínez-Saez, Elena; Ribalta, Teresa; Ferrer, Isidre; Sanchez-Valle, Raquel

    2013-04-01

    We describe an atypical neuropatholgical phenotype of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) in a 64-year-old man presenting with a 5-month history of rapidly progressive dementia, comprising behavioral disturbances, memory complaints, disorientation and language alterations. MRI showed diffuse atrophy and hyperintensities in parietal, occipital, temporal and frontal cortices and left caudate nucleus on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. No typical EEG alterations were observed. Repeated 14-3-3 assay was positive after a first negative test. Neuropathology showed classical CJD changes with small cortical foci of large confluent vacuoles and relatively well-preserved cerebellar cortex. The most striking feature was the presence of abundant Kuru-type plaques in both cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. Sparse Kuru-type plaques were also seen in cerebellum, although only in white matter. Immunohistochemistry showed, in addition to unicentric plaques, diffuse synaptic and patchy perivacuolar, as well as plaque-like and periaxonal pathological prion protein deposits (PrP(res) ). Western blot studies demonstrated the co-occurrence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2 in frontal cortex and a relatively weak type 2 signal in cerebellum. PRNP genotyping revealed methionine homozygosity at codon 129 and excluded mutations. This case shows a previously undescribed combination of histopathological features which preclude its classification according to the current phenotypic and molecular sCJD classification. The observation demonstrates that Kuru-type amyloid plaques mainly involving the cerebral white matter may also occur in sCJD cases with short clinical course and the co-existence of PrP(res) types 1 and 2. This case further highlights the complexity of the correlations between histopathological phenotype and PrP(res) isotype in prion diseases. © 2012 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  20. Extravascular CD3+ T Cells in Brains of Alzheimer Disease Patients Correlate with Tau but Not with Amyloid Pathology: An Immunohistochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Mario; Kirabali, Tunahan; Kulic, Luka; Nitsch, Roger M; Ferretti, Maria Teresa

    2018-02-07

    Strong genetic and epidemiological evidence points to a crucial role of the immune system in the development of Alzheimer disease (AD). CD3+ T lymphocytes have been described in brains of postmortem AD patients and in transgenic models of AD-like cerebral amyloidosis and tau pathology. However, the occurrence of T cells in AD brains is still controversial; furthermore, the relationship between T cells and hallmarks of AD pathology (amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles) remains to be established. We have studied the occurrence of T cells in postmortem hippocampi and mid frontal gyrus (MFG) samples of AD patients (Braak stage V-VI) and nondemented control subjects and correlated it with amyloid and tau pathology burden. Confocal microscopy and bright-field immunohistochemistry were used to identify brain-associated T cells. Extravascular CD3+ T cells were quantified and compared to nondemented controls. In addition, numbers of extravascular CD3+ T cells were correlated with amyloid (6E10 staining) and tau pathology (AT8 staining) in the same sections. Several CD3+, extravascular T cells were observed in the brains of AD patients, mostly of the CD8+ subtype. AD hippocampi harbored significantly increased numbers of extravascular CD3+ T cells compared to nondemented controls. CD3+ T cells significantly correlated with tau pathology but not with amyloid plaques in AD samples. Our data support the notion of T-cell occurrence in AD brains and suggest that, in advanced stages of AD, T-cell extravasation is driven by tau-related neurodegenerative changes rather than by cerebral amyloidosis. T cells could be crucial for driving the amyloid-independent phase of the AD pathology. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Regional brain amyloid-β accumulation associates with domain-specific cognitive performance in Parkinson disease without dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Rizwan S; Xie, Sharon X; Chen, Yin J; Rick, Jacqueline; Gross, Rachel G; Nasrallah, Ilya M; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Trojanowski, John Q; Chen-Plotkin, Alice S; Hurtig, Howard I; Siderowf, Andrew D; Dubroff, Jacob G; Weintraub, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease patients develop clinically significant cognitive impairment at variable times over their disease course, which is often preceded by milder deficits in memory, visuo-spatial, and executive domains. The significance of amyloid-β accumulation to these problems is unclear. We hypothesized that amyloid-β PET imaging by 18F-florbetapir, a radiotracer that detects fibrillar amyloidplaque deposits, would identify subjects with global cognitive impairment or poor performance in individual cognitive domains in non-demented Parkinson disease patients. We assessed 61 non-demented Parkinson disease patients with detailed cognitive assessments and 18F-florbetapir PET brain imaging. Scans were interpreted qualitatively (positive or negative) by two independent nuclear medicine physicians blinded to clinical data, and quantitatively by a novel volume-weighted method. The presence of mild cognitive impairment was determined through an expert consensus process using Level 1 criteria from the Movement Disorder Society. Nineteen participants (31.2%) were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment and the remainder had normal cognition. Qualitative 18F-florbetapir PET imaging was positive in 15 participants (24.6%). Increasing age and presence of an APOE ε4 allele were associated with higher composite 18F-florbetapir binding. In multivariable models, an abnormal 18F-florbetapir scan by expert rating was not associated with a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment. However, 18F-florbetapir retention values in the posterior cingulate gyrus inversely correlated with verbal memory performance. Retention values in the frontal cortex, precuneus, and anterior cingulate gyrus retention values inversely correlated with naming performance. Regional cortical amyloidamyloid, as measured by 18F-florbetapir PET, may be a biomarker of specific cognitive deficits in non-demented Parkinson disease patients.

  2. Robust neurite extension following exogenous electrical stimulation within single walled carbon nanotube-composite hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppes, A N; Keating, K W; McGregor, A L; Koppes, R A; Kearns, K R; Ziemba, A M; McKay, C A; Zuidema, J M; Rivet, C J; Gilbert, R J; Thompson, D M

    2016-07-15

    The use of exogenous electrical stimulation to promote nerve regeneration has achieved only limited success. Conditions impeding optimized outgrowth may arise from inadequate stimulus presentation due to differences in injury geometry or signal attenuation. Implantation of an electrically-conductive biomaterial may mitigate this attenuation and provide a more reproducible signal. In this study, a conductive nanofiller (single-walled carbon nanotubes [SWCNT]) was selected as one possible material to manipulate the bulk electrical properties of a collagen type I-10% Matrigel™ composite hydrogel. Neurite outgrowth within hydrogels (SWCNT or nanofiller-free controls) was characterized to determine if: (1) nanofillers influence neurite extension and (2) electrical stimulation of the nanofiller composite hydrogel enhances neurite outgrowth. Increased SWCNT loading (10-100-μg/mL) resulted in greater bulk conductivity (up to 1.7-fold) with no significant changes to elastic modulus. Neurite outgrowth increased 3.3-fold in 20-μg/mL SWCNT loaded biomaterials relative to the nanofiller-free control. Electrical stimulation promoted greater outgrowth (2.9-fold) within SWCNT-free control. The concurrent presentation of electrical stimulation and SWCNT-loaded biomaterials resulted in a 7.0-fold increase in outgrowth relative to the unstimulated, nanofiller-free controls. Local glia residing within the DRG likely contribute, in part, to the observed increases in outgrowth; but it is unknown which specific nanofiller properties influence neurite extension. Characterization of neuronal behavior in model systems, such as those described here, will aid the rational development of biomaterials as well as the appropriate delivery of electrical stimuli to support nerve repair. Novel biomedical devices delivering electrical stimulation are being developed to mitigate symptoms of Parkinson's, treat drug-resistant depression, control movement or enhance verve regeneration. Carbon

  3. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  4. Apolipoprotein E Regulates Amyloid Formation within Endosomes of Pigment Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume van Niel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of toxic amyloid oligomers is a key feature in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases. Formation of mature amyloid fibrils is one defense mechanism to neutralize toxic prefibrillar oligomers. This mechanism is notably influenced by apolipoprotein E variants. Cells that produce mature amyloid fibrils to serve physiological functions must exploit specific mechanisms to avoid potential accumulation of toxic species. Pigment cells have tuned their endosomes to maximize the formation of functional amyloid from the protein PMEL. Here, we show that ApoE is associated with intraluminal vesicles (ILV within endosomes and remain associated with ILVs when they are secreted as exosomes. ApoE functions in the ESCRT-independent sorting mechanism of PMEL onto ILVs and regulates the endosomal formation of PMEL amyloid fibrils in vitro and in vivo. This process secures the physiological formation of amyloid fibrils by exploiting ILVs as amyloid nucleating platforms.

  5. Cell Adhesion on Amyloid Fibrils Lacking Integrin Recognition Motif*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Reeba S.; George, Edna; Singh, Pradeep K.; Salot, Shimul; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Sen, Shamik; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are highly ordered, cross-β-sheet-rich protein/peptide aggregates associated with both human diseases and native functions. Given the well established ability of amyloids in interacting with cell membranes, we hypothesize that amyloids can serve as universal cell-adhesive substrates. Here, we show that, similar to the extracellular matrix protein collagen, amyloids of various proteins/peptides support attachment and spreading of cells via robust stimulation of integrin expression and formation of integrin-based focal adhesions. Additionally, amyloid fibrils are also capable of immobilizing non-adherent red blood cells through charge-based interactions. Together, our results indicate that both active and passive mechanisms contribute to adhesion on amyloid fibrils. The present data may delineate the functional aspect of cell adhesion on amyloids by various organisms and its involvement in human diseases. Our results also raise the exciting possibility that cell adhesivity might be a generic property of amyloids. PMID:26742841

  6. Amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ruei-Lin; Lee, Kung-Ta; Wang, Jung-Hao; Lee, Lily Y-L; Chen, Rita P-Y

    2009-01-28

    More than 20 unrelated proteins can form amyloid fibrils in vivo which are related to various diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, prion disease, and systematic amyloidosis. Amyloid fibrils are an ordered protein aggregate with a lamellar cross-beta structure. Enhancing amyloid clearance is one of the targets of the therapy of these amyloid-related diseases. Although there is debate on whether the toxicity is due to amyloids or their precursors, research on the degradation of amyloids may help prevent or alleviate these diseases. In this study, we explored the amyloid-degrading ability of nattokinase, a fibrinolytic subtilisin-like serine protease, and determined the optimal conditions for amyloid hydrolysis. This ability is shared by proteinase K and subtilisin Carlsberg, but not by trypsin or plasmin.

  7. is plaque removal efficacy of toothbrush related to bristle flaring?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2013-11-03

    Nov 3, 2013 ... subsequently they brought the habit back home which gave momentum for ... of microbial plaque on teeth and supporting .... plaque assessment, the toothbrushes were ..... toothbrush (23,24) decreasing the functional ability of ...

  8. The clinical value of histological femoral artery plaque analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, W.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis showed that the dissected femoral atherosclerotic plaque contains a predictive value for clinical outcome after femoral endarterectomy. Plaque histology analysis should be incorporated in clinical practice to help predict the patient at risk for restenosis or secondary cardiovascular

  9. Image Analysis for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Carotid Plaque Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Akkus (Zeynettin)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) has been presented as an important biomarker for progressive atherosclerotic disease and plaque vulnerability in several pathological studies. Therefore, quantification of IPN may allow early prediction of plaque at risk of rupture

  10. Mathematical models for atherosclerotic plaque evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulelzai, M.A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease in which low density lipoproteins (LDL) accumulate in the arterial wall due to an inflammatory response, which is triggered by the oxidation of LDL molecules that are already present in the arterial wall. Progression of atherosclerotic plaques involves many components

  11. Modulography: elasticity imaging of atherosclerotic plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Baldewsing (Radj)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractModulography is an experimental elasticity imaging method. It has potential to become an all-in-one in vivo tool (a) for detecting vulnerable atherosclerotic coronary plaques, (b) for assessing information related to their rupture-proneness and (c) for imaging their elastic material

  12. Vaporization of atherosclerotic plaques by spark erosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Slager (Cornelis); C.E. Essed; J.C.H. Schuurbiers (Johan); N. Bom (Klaas); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); G.T. Meester (Geert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractAn alternative to the laser irradiation of atherosclerotic lesions has been developed. A pulsed electrocardiogram R wave-triggered electrical spark erosion technique is described. Controlled vaporization of fibrous and lipid plaques with minimal thermal side effects was achieved and

  13. The high-risk plaque initiative

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Erling; Sillesen, Henrik; Muntendam, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    The High-Risk Plaque (HRP) Initiative is a research and development effort to advance the understanding, recognition, and management of asymptomatic individuals at risk for a near-term atherothrombotic event such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Clinical studies using the newest technologies...

  14. Intracoronary Thermography: a vulnerable Plaque Detection Technique?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. ten Have (Anna)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe studies reported in this thesis were performed to answer the central question: can intracoronary thermography be used for vulnerable plaque detection? To answer this question, we have identified parameters that influence intracoronary thermography measurements, and have studied to

  15. Halogenation dictates the architecture of amyloid peptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Andrea; Pigliacelli, Claudia; Gori, Alessandro; Nonappa; Ikkala, Olli; Demitri, Nicola; Terraneo, Giancarlo; Castelletto, Valeria; Hamley, Ian W; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca; Metrangolo, Pierangelo

    2017-07-20

    Amyloid peptides yield a plethora of interesting nanostructures though difficult to control. Here we report that depending on the number, position, and nature of the halogen atoms introduced into either one or both phenylalanine benzene rings of the amyloid β peptide-derived core-sequence KLVFF, four different architectures were obtained in a controlled manner. Our findings demonstrate that halogenation may develop as a general strategy to engineer amyloidal peptide self-assembly and obtain new amyloidal nanostructures.

  16. 3.0 T plaque imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton-Yates, Denise P; Cury, Ricardo C; Wald, Lawrence L; Wiggins, Graham C; Keil, Boris; Seethmaraju, Ravi; Gangadharamurthy, Dakshinamurthy; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Dai, Guangping; Houser, Stuart L; Stone, James R; Furie, Karen L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of vessel morphology and plaque composition. Emphasis is placed on early and moderate stages of carotid atherosclerosis, where increases in signal-to-noise (SNR) and contrast-to-noise (CNR) ratios compared with 1.5 T are sought. Comparison of in vivo 3.0 T imaging to histopathology is performed for validation. Parallel acceleration methods applied with an 8-channel carotid array are investigated as well as higher field ex vivo imaging to explore even further gains. The overall endeavor is to improve prospective assessment of atherosclerosis stage and stability for reduction of atherothrombotic event risk. A total of 10 male and female subjects ranging in age from 22 to 72 years (5 healthy and 5 with cardiovascular disease) participated. Custom-built array coils were used with endogenous and exogenous multicontrast bright and black-blood protocols for 3.0 T carotid imaging. Comparisons were performed to 1.5 T, and ex vivo plaque was stained with hematoxylin and eosin for histology. Imaging (9.4 T) was also performed on intact specimens. The factor of 2 gain in signal-to-noise SNR is realized compared with 1.5 T along with improved wall-lumen and plaque component CNR. Post-contrast black-blood imaging within 5-10 minutes of gadolinium injection is optimal for detection of the necrotic lipid component. In a preliminary 18-month follow-up study, this method provided measurement of a 50% reduction in lipid content with minimal change in plaque size in a subject receiving aggressive statin therapy. Parallel imaging applied with signal averaging further improves 3.0 T black-blood vessel wall imaging. The use of 3.0 T for carotid plaque imaging has demonstrated increases in SNR and CNR compared with 1.5 T. Quantitative prospective studies of moderate and early plaques are feasible at 3.0 T. Continued improvements in coil arrays, 3-dimensional pulse sequences, and the use of novel

  17. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  18. The prion protein as a receptor for amyloid-beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Nguyen, Louis N.; Nabavi, Sadegh; Malinow, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Increased levels of brain amyloid-beta, a secreted peptide cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP), is believed to be critical in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. Increased amyloid-beta can cause synaptic depression, reduce the number of spine protrusions (that is, sites of synaptic

  19. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  20. Review: Mechanical Characterization of Carotid Arteries and Atherosclerotic Plaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Fekkes, S.; Nederveen, A.J.; Manniesing, R.; Hansen, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a leading cause of death and is in the majority of cases due to the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in arteries. Initially, thickening of the inner layer of the arterial wall occurs. Continuation of this process leads to plaque formation. The risk of a plaque to

  1. Detection of six novel papillomavirus sequences within canine pigmented plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Jennifer A.; Affolter, Verena K.; Yeargan, Bret; Moore, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    In dogs, papillomaviruses are thought to cause oral and cutaneous papillomas and pigmented plaques. Eight canine papillomaviruses have been fully sequenced to date. Four of these canine papillomaviruses, including Canis familiaris papillomavirus (CPV)-3, CPV-4, CPV-5, and CPV-8, were amplified from pigmented plaques. Given this recent identification of several different canine papillomaviruses within pigmented plaques, it is likely that there are additional papillomavirus sequences that have not been previously identified. The aim of this study was to detect papillomavirus DNA sequences from pigmented plaques and identify potentially novel PV sequences through nucleotide sequence analysis. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify DNA sequences of the papillomavirus L1 gene from 27 pigmented plaques. Identification of novel papillomavirus sequences was based upon less than 90% shared DNA homology to any known papillomavirus. Ten different papillomaviruses were detected within the pigmented plaques, including 6 novel PV sequences. CPV-4 was detected within 41% (11/27) of the pigmented plaques, while CPV-5 was identified within 2 pigmented plaques and CPV-3 within a single pigmented plaque. A previously identified novel papillomavirus sequence was identified within 2 pigmented plaques in this study. The remaining 11 pigmented plaques contained 6 papillomavirus DNA sequences that have not been previously reported. These novel PV sequences were most similar to papillomaviruses that have been detected within canine pigmented plaques. PMID:22529129

  2. Determining carotid plaque vulnerability using ultrasound center frequency shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlöv, Tobias; Cinthio, Magnus; Edsfeldt, Andreas; Segstedt, Simon; Dias, Nuno; Nilsson, Jan; Gonçalves, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    The leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide is atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, most commonly caused by rupture of a high-risk plaque and subsequent thrombosis resulting in stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death depending on the affected arterial territory. Accurate, non-invasive methods to identify such lesions known as vulnerable or high-risk plaques are currently sub-optimal. Our aim was to validate a new non-invasive ultrasound method to identify high-risk carotid plaques. We evaluated a new method based on the center frequency shift (CFS) of the ultrasound radio frequency data obtained from carotid plaques compared to a reference phantom. We evaluated the method both ex vivo, on 157 sections from 18 plaques, and in vivo, in 39 patients 1-day prior to carotid plaque removal, and correlated the data with histology. The CFS correlated with a plaque vulnerability index based on histological areas stained for lipids, macrophages, hemorrhage, smooth muscle cells and collagen (r = -0.726, P = 1.7 × 10(-8)). Plaques with CFS below median had larger cores, more macrophages and were less rich in collagen in agreement with the definition of rupture-prone plaques. The accuracy to detect plaques with high vulnerability index was 78% (confidence interval (CI) 61-89%), with sensitivity 77% (CI 61-89%) and specificity 78% (CI 62-89%). Our method is the first to characterize atherosclerotic plaque components that affect plaque vulnerability using CFS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Animal models for plaque rupture: a biomechanical assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heiden, Kim; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Daemen, Mat J.; Gijsen, Frank J. H.

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques is the main cause of acute cardiovascular events. Animal models of plaque rupture are rare but essential for testing new imaging modalities to enable diagnosis of the patient at risk. Moreover, they enable the design of new treatment strategies to prevent plaque

  4. Inhibitory effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor precursor on viability and neurite growth of murine hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia CHEN

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the mediation effect of p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR in the effect of brainderived neurotrophic factor precursor (proBDNF on viability and neurite growth of murine hippocampal neurons. Methods  Hippocampal neurons were obtained from p75NTR+/+ and p75NTR-/- 18-day mice and primarily cultured. For p75NTR+/+ neurons, three experimental groups were set, i.e. control, proBDNF (30ng/ml, and proBDNF (30ng/ml+p75/Fc (30µg/ml groups. For p75NTR-/- neurons, two experimental groups were set, i.e. control and proBDNF (30ng/ml groups. MTT assays were performed after 24h to examine the viability of neonatal primary neurons. Immunofluorescent staining was conducted after 72h to investigate the neurite length. Results With MAP2 and DAPI double fluorescent staining it was identified that the neonatal hippocampal neurons were successfully cultured in vitro with high purity. For viability assay of p75NTR+/+ neurons, it was found that the absorbance value at 570nm (A570 in proBDNF group was significantly lower than that in control group (P0.05. With neurite growth assay of p75NTR+/+ neurons, it was found that the neurite length in proBDNF group was significantly shorter than that in control group (P0.05. With neurite growth assay of p75NTR-/- neurons, no difference in neurite length was observed between proBDNF group and control group. Conclusion proBDNF may inhibit the neuronal viability and neurite growth via p75NTR. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.09.03

  5. Enhanced neurite outgrowth of human model (NT2) neurons by small-molecule inhibitors of Rho/ROCK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roloff, Frank; Scheiblich, Hannah; Dewitz, Carola; Dempewolf, Silke; Stern, Michael; Bicker, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase) activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored.

  6. Enhanced neurite outgrowth of human model (NT2 neurons by small-molecule inhibitors of Rho/ROCK signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Roloff

    Full Text Available Axonal injury in the adult human central nervous system often results in loss of sensation and motor functions. Promoting regeneration of severed axons requires the inactivation of growth inhibitory influences from the tissue environment and stimulation of the neuron intrinsic growth potential. Especially glial cell derived factors, such as chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, Nogo-A, myelin-associated glycoprotein, and myelin in general, prevent axon regeneration. Most of the glial growth inhibiting factors converge onto the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway in neurons. Although conditions in the injured nervous system are clearly different from those during neurite outgrowth in vitro, here we use a chemical approach to manipulate Rho/ROCK signalling with small-molecule agents to encourage neurite outgrowth in cell culture. The development of therapeutic treatments requires drug testing not only on neurons of experimental animals, but also on human neurons. Using human NT2 model neurons, we demonstrate that the pain reliever Ibuprofen decreases RhoA (Ras homolog gene family, member A GTPase activation and promotes neurite growth. Inhibition of the downstream effector Rho kinase by the drug Y-27632 results in a strong increase in neurite outgrowth. Conversely, activation of the Rho pathway by lysophosphatidic acid results in growth cone collapse and eventually to neurite retraction. Finally, we show that blocking of Rho kinase, but not RhoA results in an increase in neurons bearing neurites. Due to its anti-inflammatory and neurite growth promoting action, the use of a pharmacological treatment of damaged neural tissue with Ibuprofen should be explored.

  7. Biofilm inhibitors that target amyloid proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Vlamakis, Hera; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-24

    Bacteria establish stable communities, known as biofilms, that are resistant to antimicrobials. Biofilm robustness is due to the presence of an extracellular matrix, which for several species-among them Bacillus subtilis-includes amyloid-like protein fibers. In this work, we show that B. subtilis biofilms can be a simple and reliable tool for screening of molecules with antiamyloid activity. We identified two molecules, AA-861 and parthenolide, which efficiently inhibited biofilms by preventing the formation of amyloid-like fibers. Parthenolide also disrupted pre-established biofilms. These molecules also impeded the formation of biofilms of other bacterial species that secrete amyloid proteins, such as Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the identified molecules decreased the conversion of the yeast protein New1 to the prion state in a heterologous host, indicating the broad range of activity of the molecules. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resveratrol and Amyloid-Beta: Mechanistic Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Jia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid-beta (Aβ hypothesis that dyshomeostasis between Aβ production and clearance is a very early, key molecular factor in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD has been proposed and examined in the AD research field. Scientists have focused on seeking natural products or drugs to influence the dynamic equilibrium of Aβ, targeting production and clearance of Aβ. There is emerging evidence that resveratrol (Res, a naturally occurring polyphenol mainly found in grapes and red wine, acts on AD in numerous in vivo and in vitro models. Res decreases the amyloidogenic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, enhances clearance of amyloid beta-peptides, and reduces Aβ aggregation. Moreover, Res also protects neuronal functions through its antioxidant properties. This review discusses the action of Res on Aβ production, clearance and aggregation and multiple potential mechanisms, providing evidence of the useful of Res for AD treatment.

  9. Fibrillar dimer formation of islet amyloid polypeptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Chi-cheng [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); de Pablo, Juan J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-08

    Amyloid deposits of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), a 37-residue hormone co-produced with insulin, have been implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes. Residues 20 – 29 of hIAPP have been proposed to constitute the amyloidogenic core for the aggregation process, yet the segment is mostly unstructured in the mature fibril, according to solid-state NMR data. Here we use molecular simulations combined with bias-exchange metadynamics to characterize the conformational free energies of hIAPP fibrillar dimer and its derivative, pramlintide. We show that residues 20 – 29 are involved in an intermediate that exhibits transient β-sheets, consistent with recent experimental and simulation results. By comparing the aggregation of hIAPP and pramlintide, we illustrate the effects of proline residues on inhibition of the dimerization of IAPP. The mechanistic insights presented here could be useful for development of therapeutic inhibitors of hIAPP amyloid formation.

  10. Alzheimer's disease 2012: the great amyloid gamble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Vincent T

    2012-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease threatens to become the scourge of the 21st century. Hundreds of millions of aging people throughout the world are at risk, but it is clear that the disease encompasses more than just the natural aging process. Deposits of amyloid β peptides in the brains of demented individuals are a defining feature of the disease, yet two decades of intensive investigation, focusing on reducing or removing amyloid deposits, have failed to produce any meaningful therapeutic interventions. Some researchers question whether amyloid is the appropriate target. Others maintain that early, presymptomatic intervention would be a more informative test, and propose large-scale clinical trials in patients who are believed to be in the earliest, and potentially reversible, stages of the disease. This review explores the wisdom of that approach. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Sleep Restriction Induces Cognitive Deficits and Cortical Beta-Amyloid Deposition in Mice via BACE1-Antisense Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Yi; Wu, Hui-Juan; He, Jia-Lin; Zhuang, Jian-Hua; Liu, Zhen-Yu; Huang, Liu-Qing; Zhao, Zhong-Xin

    2017-03-01

    To clarify the correlation between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD), we determined in wild-type mice the impact of CSR, on cognitive performance, beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, and its feed-forward regulators regarding AD pathogenesis. Sixteen nine-month-old C57BL/6 male mice were equally divided into the CSR and control groups. CSR was achieved by application of a slowly rotating drum for 2 months. The Morris water maze test was used to assess cognitive impairment. The concentrations of Aβ peptides, amyloid precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase 1 (BACE1), and the mRNA levels of BACE1 and BACE1-antisense (BACE1-AS) were measured. Following CSR, impairments of spatial learning and memory consolidation were observed in the mice, accompanied by Aβ plaque deposition and an increased Aβ concentration in the prefrontal and temporal lobe cortex. CSR also upregulated the β-secretase-induced cleavage of APP by increasing the protein and mRNA levels of BACE1, particularly the BACE1-AS. This study shows that a CSR accelerates AD pathogenesis in wild-type mice. An upregulation of the BACE1 pathway appears to participate in both cortical Aβ plaque deposition and memory impairment caused by CSR. BACE1-AS is likely activated to initiate a cascade of events that lead to AD pathogenesis. Our study provides, therefore, a molecular mechanism that links CSR to sporadic AD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The Role of Oxidative Stress-Induced Epigenetic Alterations in Amyloid-β Production in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies have proposed a strong correlation between reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced oxidative stress (OS and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. With over five million people diagnosed in the United States alone, AD is the most common type of dementia worldwide. AD includes progressive neurodegeneration, followed by memory loss and reduced cognitive ability. Characterized by the formation of amyloid-beta (Aβ plaques as a hallmark, the connection between ROS and AD is compelling. Analyzing the ROS response of essential proteins in the amyloidogenic pathway, such as amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP and beta-secretase (BACE1, along with influential signaling programs of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, has helped visualize the path between OS and Aβ overproduction. In this review, attention will be paid to significant advances in the area of OS, epigenetics, and their influence on Aβ plaque assembly. Additionally, we aim to discuss available treatment options for AD that include antioxidant supplements, Asian traditional medicines, metal-protein-attenuating compounds, and histone modifying inhibitors.

  13. Neuroinflammation and neuronal loss precede Aβ plaque deposition in the hAPP-J20 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Wright

    Full Text Available Recent human trials of treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD have been largely unsuccessful, raising the idea that treatment may need to be started earlier in the disease, well before cognitive symptoms appear. An early marker of AD pathology is therefore needed and it is debated as to whether amyloid-βAβ? plaque load may serve this purpose. We investigated this in the hAPP-J20 AD mouse model by studying disease pathology at 6, 12, 24 and 36 weeks. Using robust stereological methods, we found there is no neuron loss in the hippocampal CA3 region at any age. However loss of neurons from the hippocampal CA1 region begins as early as 12 weeks of age. The extent of neuron loss increases with age, correlating with the number of activated microglia. Gliosis was also present, but plateaued during aging. Increased hyperactivity and spatial memory deficits occurred at 16 and 24 weeks. Meanwhile, the appearance of plaques and oligomeric Aβ were essentially the last pathological changes, with significant changes only observed at 36 weeks of age. This is surprising given that the hAPP-J20 AD mouse model is engineered to over-expresses Aβ. Our data raises the possibility that plaque load may not be the best marker for early AD and suggests that activated microglia could be a valuable marker to track disease progression.

  14. Ginsenoside-Rd Promotes Neurite Outgrowth of PC12 Cells through MAPK/ERK- and PI3K/AKT-Dependent Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Song-Di; Xia, Feng; Lin, Xue-Mei; Duan, Kang-Li; Wang, Fang; Lu, Qing-Li; Cao, Huan; Qian, Yi-Hua; Shi, Ming

    2016-01-29

    Panax ginseng is a famous herbal medicine widely used in Asia. Ginsenosides have been identified as the principle active ingredients for Panax ginseng's biological activity, among which ginsenoside Rd (Rd) attracts extensive attention for its obvious neuroprotective activities. Here we investigated the effect of Rd on neurite outgrowth, a crucial process associated with neuronal repair. PC12 cells, which respond to nerve growth factor (NGF) and serve as a model for neuronal cells, were treated with different concentrations of Rd, and then their neurite outgrowth was evaluated. Our results showed that 10 μM Rd significantly increased the percentages of long neurite- and branching neurite-bearing cells, compared with respective controls. The length of the longest neurites and the total length of neurites in Rd-treated PC12 cells were much longer than that of respective controls. We also showed that Rd activated ERK1/2 and AKT but not PKC signalings, and inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059 or/and AKT by LY294002 effectively attenuated Rd-induced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, Rd upregulated the expression of GAP-43, a neuron-specific protein involved in neurite outgrowth, while PD98059 or/and LY294002 decreased Rd-induced increased GAP-43 expression. Taken together, our results provided the first evidence that Rd may promote the neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells by upregulating GAP-43 expression via ERK- and ARK-dependent signaling pathways.

  15. A novel phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitor: Yonkenafil modulates neurogenesis, gliosis to improve cognitive function and ameliorates amyloid burden in an APP/PS1 transgenic mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Jing-yu; Xue, Xue; Dong, Ying-xu; Liu, Yang; Miao, Feng-rong; Wang, Yong-feng; Xue, Hong; Wu, Chun-fu

    2015-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), activated microglia invade and surround β-amyloid plaques, possibly contributing to the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ), which affect the survival of neurons and lead to memory loss. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have recently been shown a potential therapeutic effect on AD. In this study, the effects of yonkenafil (yonk), a novel PDE-5 inhibitor, on cognitive behaviors as well as the pathological features in transgenic AD mice were investigated. Seven-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice were treated with yonk (2, 6, or 18 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)) or sildenafil (sild) (6 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3 months and then behavioral tests were performed. The results demonstrated that yonk improved nesting-building ability, ameliorated working memory deficits in the Y-maze tasks, and significantly improved learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. In addition, yonk reduced the area of Aβ plaques, and inhibited over-activation of microglia and astrocytes. Furthermore, yonk increased neurogenesis in the dentate granule brain region of APP/PS1 mice, indicated by increased BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells compared to vehicle-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that yonk could rescue cognitive deficits by ameliorated amyloid burden through regulating APP processing, inhibited the over-activation of microglia and astrocytes as well as restored neurogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Topographic association of angioscopic yellow plaques with coronary atherosclerotic plaque: assessment with quantitative colorimetry in human coronary artery autopsy specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Fumiyuki; Lisauskas, Jennifer B; Kawamura, Akio; Waxman, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    Yellow plaques seen during coronary angioscopy are thought to be the surrogates for superficial intimal lipids in coronary plaque. Given diffuse and heterogeneous nature of atherosclerosis, yellow plaques in coronaries may be seen as several yellow spots on diffuse coronary plaque. We examined the topographic association of yellow plaques with coronary plaque. In 40 non-severely stenotic ex-vivo coronary segments (average length: 52.2 +/- 3.1 mm), yellow plaques were examined by angioscopy with quantitative colorimetry. The segments were cut perpendicular to the long axis of the vessel at 2 mm intervals, and 1045 slides with 5 microm thick tissue for whole segments were prepared. To construct the plaque surface, each tissue slice was considered to be representative of the adjacent 2 mm. The circumference of the lumen and the lumen border of plaque were measured in each slide, and the plaque surface region was constructed. Coronary plaque was in 37 (93%) of 40 segments, and consisted of a single mass [39.9 +/- 3.9 (0-100) mm, 311.3 +/- 47.4 (0.0-1336.2) mm2]. In 30 (75%) segments, multiple (2-9) yellow plaques were detected on a mass of coronary plaque. The number of yellow plaques correlated positively with coronary plaque surface area (r = 0.77, P colorimetry, some of them are associated with lipid cores underneath thin fibrous caps, may be used to assess the extent of coronary plaque. Further research using angioscopy could be of value to study the association of high-risk coronaries with acute coronary syndromes.

  17. Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors and Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Are Selectively Overexpressed in Neuritic Plaque-Associated Glia in Alzheimer's Disease Brains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benito, Cristina; Nunez, Estefania; Tolon, Rosa M; Carrier, Erica J; Rabano, Alberto; Hillard, Cecilia J; Romero, Julian

    2003-01-01

    .... We have studied the status of some of the components of the endocannabinoid system, fatty acid amide hydrolase and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, in postmortem brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease...

  18. Amyloid myopathy: clinicopathologic study of 16 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prayson, R A

    1998-05-01

    Amyloid deposition in skeletal muscle is a well-recognized but rare occurrence. Sixteen such cases seen in a 17-year period (1979 to 1996) out of a total of 3,937 muscle biopsy specimens (0.004%) form this study group. Either Congo red or sulfated alcian blue stains were routinely performed in each biopsy to screen for amyloid. Patients in this study (eight men, eight women) ranged in age from 42 to 90 years (mean, 61 years) at initial presentation. The most common symptoms at presentation included weakness/fatigue (n = 10), autonomic symptoms (n = 8), and weight loss/decreased appetite (n = 7). Five patients had a concomitant malignancy (myeloma, n = 3; malignant carcinoid tumor, n = 1; melanoma, n = 1). Two patients had known hereditary forms of amyloidosis. Five patients had amyloid diagnosed on another organ biopsy (excluding peripheral nerve). Histologically, amyloid was deposited in the interstitium or perivascular region in 14 muscles and endomysial region in seven muscles. All cases were confirmed with Congo red staining (apple green birefringence) or by electron microscopic identification of fibrillary amyloid material. Scattered angular atrophic esterase-positive muscle myofibers indicative of acute denervation atrophy were seen in 14 muscles. Eight muscles showed small group atrophy, and seven showed myofiber type grouping. Scattered regenerating muscle fibers were seen in nine cases, degenerating myofibers in six, and foci of chronic endomysial and perivascular inflammation in two. Four muscles showed type II muscle fiber atrophy. A concomitant sural nerve biopsy specimen was evaluated in seven patients; all seven contained amyloid, confirmed either by Congo red staining or electron microscopic examination. In two nerves, there was a mild loss of myelinated axons; four had a moderate loss, and one, severe loss. Six of seven nerves showed predominantly axonopathic changes. In conclusion, (1) the prevalence rate of amyloid myopathy in muscle biopsy

  19. Quantitative coronary plaque analysis predicts high-risk plaque morphology on coronary computed tomography angiography: results from the ROMICAT II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting; Maurovich-Horvat, Pál; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Puchner, Stefan B; Lu, Michael T; Ghemigian, Khristine; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Broersen, Alexander; Pursnani, Amit; Hoffmann, Udo; Ferencik, Maros

    2018-02-01

    Semi-automated software can provide quantitative assessment of atherosclerotic plaques on coronary CT angiography (CTA). The relationship between established qualitative high-risk plaque features and quantitative plaque measurements has not been studied. We analyzed the association between quantitative plaque measurements and qualitative high-risk plaque features on coronary CTA. We included 260 patients with plaque who underwent coronary CTA in the Rule Out Myocardial Infarction/Ischemia Using Computer Assisted Tomography (ROMICAT) II trial. Quantitative plaque assessment and qualitative plaque characterization were performed on a per coronary segment basis. Quantitative coronary plaque measurements included plaque volume, plaque burden, remodeling index, and diameter stenosis. In qualitative analysis, high-risk plaque was present if positive remodeling, low CT attenuation plaque, napkin-ring sign or spotty calcium were detected. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the association between quantitative and qualitative high-risk plaque assessment. Among 888 segments with coronary plaque, high-risk plaque was present in 391 (44.0%) segments by qualitative analysis. In quantitative analysis, segments with high-risk plaque had higher total plaque volume, low CT attenuation plaque volume, plaque burden and remodeling index. Quantitatively assessed low CT attenuation plaque volume (odds ratio 1.12 per 1 mm 3 , 95% CI 1.04-1.21), positive remodeling (odds ratio 1.25 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.10-1.41) and plaque burden (odds ratio 1.53 per 0.1, 95% CI 1.08-2.16) were associated with high-risk plaque. Quantitative coronary plaque characteristics (low CT attenuation plaque volume, positive remodeling and plaque burden) measured by semi-automated software correlated with qualitative assessment of high-risk plaque features.

  20. Divalent copper ion bound amyloid-β(40) and amyloid-β(42) alloforms are less preferred than divalent zinc ion bound amyloid-β(40) and amyloid-β(42) alloforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskuner, Orkid

    2016-12-01

    Divalent copper and zinc ions bind to the amyloid-β(40) and amyloid-β(42) alloforms and affect their structural stability as well as their chemical and physical properties. Current literature debates the impact of copper ions on amyloid-β alloforms. Recently, we reported the structural and thermodynamic properties of apo amyloid-β and divalent zinc ion bound amyloid-β alloforms (see, Wise-Scira et al. in J Biol Inorg Chem 17:927-938, 2012 and Coskuner et al. in ACS Chem Neurosci 4: 310-320, 2013). In our search for understanding the impacts of transition metal ions on disordered amyloid-β, we also developed and reported new potential functions using quantum mechanics, which are required for high-quality molecular dynamics simulations of divalent copper ion bound amyloid-β alloforms (see, Wise and Coskuner in J Comput Chem 35:1278-1289, 2014). The structures and thermodynamic properties of the divalent copper ion bound amyloid-β(40) and amyloid-β(42) alloforms in an aqueous medium are studied. The secondary and tertiary structures of divalent copper ion bound amyloid-β(40) and amyloid-β(42) along with their thermodynamic properties including enthalpy, entropy, Gibbs free energy and potential of mean force surface are investigated. Results are compared to those for apo amyloid-β and divalent zinc ion bound amyloid-β alloforms. Results demonstrate that copper binding to Aβ alloforms is thermodynamically less preferred rather than zinc binding. Less compact structures of copper ion bound amyloid-β alloforms possess reduced stability in comparison to zinc ion bound amyloid-β alloforms. Cu(II) binding impacts the thermodynamic properties, secondary and tertiary structural properties of Aβ40 and Aβ42.

  1. Light-triggered dissociation of self-assembled β-amyloid aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments by ruthenium (II) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Giyeong; Lee, Byung Il; Chung, You Jung; Park, Chan Beum

    2018-02-01

    The self-assembly of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides into highly stable plaques is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Here, we report visible light-driven dissociation of β-sheet-rich Aβ aggregates into small, nontoxic fragments using ruthenium (II) complex {[Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ } that functions as a highly sensitive, biocompatible, photoresponsive anti-Aβ agent. According to our multiple analyses using thioflavin T, bicinchoninic acid, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ successfully disassembled Aβ aggregates by destabilizing the β-sheet secondary structure under illumination of white light-emitting diode light. We validated that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ causes oxidative damages of Aβ peptides, resulting in the dissociation of Aβ aggregates. The efficacy of [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ is attributed to reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen, generated from [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ that absorbed photon energy in the visible range. Furthermore, photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ strongly inhibited the self-assembly of Aβ monomers even at concentrations as low as 1 nM and reduced the cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Alzheimer's disease is the most common progressive neurodegenerative disease, affecting more than 13% of the population over age 65. Over the last decades, researchers have focused on understanding the mechanism of amyloid formation, the hallmark of various amyloid diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. In this paper, we successfully demonstrate the dissociation of β-Amyloid (Aβ) aggregates into small, less-amyloidic fragments by photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ through destabilization of β-sheet secondary structure. We validated the light-triggered dissociation of amyloid structure using multiple analytical tools. Furthermore, we confirmed that photoexcited [Ru(bpy) 3 ] 2+ reduces cytotoxicity of Aβ aggregates. Our work should open a new horizon in the study of

  2. Inhibitors of cathepsin B improve memory and reduce beta-amyloid in transgenic Alzheimer disease mice expressing the wild-type, but not the Swedish mutant, beta-secretase site of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Vivian Y H; Kindy, Mark; Hook, Gregory

    2008-03-21

    Elucidation of Abeta-lowering agents that inhibit processing of the wild-type (WT) beta-secretase amyloid precursor protein (APP) site, present in most Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, is a logical approach for improving memory deficit in AD. The cysteine protease inhibitors CA074Me and E64d were selected by inhibition of beta-secretase activity in regulated secretory vesicles that produce beta-amyloid (Abeta). The regulated secretory vesicle activity, represented by cathepsin B, selectively cleaves the WT beta-secretase site but not the rare Swedish mutant beta-secretase site. In vivo treatment of London APP mice, expressing the WT beta-secretase site, with these inhibitors resulted in substantial improvement in memory deficit assessed by the Morris water maze test. After inhibitor treatment, the improved memory function was accompanied by reduced amyloid plaque load, decreased Abeta40 and Abeta42, and reduced C-terminal beta-secretase fragment derived from APP by beta-secretase. However, the inhibitors had no effects on any of these parameters in mice expressing the Swedish mutant beta-secretase site of APP. The notable efficacy of these inhibitors to improve memory and reduce Abeta in an AD animal model expressing the WT beta-secretase APP site present in the majority of AD patients provides support for CA074Me and E64d inhibitors as potential AD therapeutic agents.

  3. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, James K; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Harada, Tomoyuki; Tsuboi, Masaya; Sato, Masumi; Kubo, Masahito; Kawaguchi, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Noriaki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Beta amyloid (Aβ) deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus) that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  4. Neurofibrillary tangles and the deposition of a beta amyloid peptide with a novel N-terminal epitope in the brains of wild Tsushima leopard cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K Chambers

    Full Text Available Beta amyloid (Aβ deposits are seen in aged individuals in many of the mammalian species that possess the same Aβ amino acid sequence as humans. Conversely, neurofibrillary tangles (NFT, the other hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD, are extremely rare in these animals. We detected Aβ deposits in the brains of Tsushima leopard cats (Prionailurus bengalensis euptilurus that live exclusively on Tsushima Island, Japan. Aβ42 was deposited in a granular pattern in the neuropil of the pyramidal cell layer, but did not form argyrophilic senile plaques. These Aβ deposits were not immunolabeled with antibodies to the N-terminal of human Aβ. Sequence analysis of the amyloid precursor protein revealed an amino acid substitution at the 7th residue of the Aβ peptide. In a comparison with other mammalian animals that do develop argyrophilic senile plaques, we concluded that the alternative Aβ amino acid sequence displayed by leopard cats is likely to be related to its distinctive deposition pattern. Interestingly, most of the animals with these Aβ deposits also developed NFTs. The distributions of hyperphosphorylated tau-positive cells and the two major isoforms of aggregated tau proteins were quite similar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. In addition, the unphosphorylated form of GSK-3β colocalized with hyperphosphorylated tau within the affected neurons. In conclusion, this animal species develops AD-type NFTs without argyrophilic senile plaques.

  5. Amyloid in basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K E; Westermark, Per

    1994-01-01

    The frequency of amyloid substance was studied in two different types of skin tumours: basal cell carcinoma and seborrheic keratosis. In 9 out of 49 cases of seborrheic keratosis amyloid substance was found. In the basal cell carcinomas, 194 out of 260 cases showed amyloid deposits, a rate...... that is higher than that previously reported. The basal cell carcinoma material was further studied regarding the amount of amyloid, mitotic rate, degree of apoptosis and the age of the patients. There was no correlation between the amount of amyloid and the mitotic rate, or the degree of apoptosis...

  6. The interaction of sleep and amyloid deposition on cognitive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molano, Jennifer R V; Roe, Catherine M; Ju, Yo-El S

    2017-06-01

    Sleep difficulties are emerging as a risk factor for dementia. This study examined the effect of sleep and amyloid deposition on cognitive performance in cognitively normal adults. Sleep efficiency was determined by actigraphy. Cerebrospinal fluid Aβ42 levels sleep efficiency and amyloid deposition status was a significant predictor of memory performance as measured by total Selective Reminding Test scores. While Trail Making Test B performance was worse in those with amyloid deposition, sleep measures did not have an additive effect. In this study, amyloid deposition was associated with worse cognitive performance, and