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Sample records for neuregulin-1beta improves cardiac

  1. Neuregulin-1/erbB-activation improves cardiac function and survival in models of ischemic, dilated, and viral cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xifu; Gu, Xinhua; Li, Zhaoming; Li, Xinyan; Li, Hui; Chang, Jianjie; Chen, Ping; Jin, Jing; Xi, Bing; Chen, Denghong; Lai, Donna; Graham, Robert M; Zhou, Mingdong

    2006-10-03

    We evaluated the therapeutic potential of a recombinant 61-residue neuregulin-1 (beta2a isoform) receptor-active peptide (rhNRG-1) in multiple animal models of heart disease. Activation of the erbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases by rhNRG-1 could provide a treatment option for heart failure, because neuregulin-stimulated erbB2/erbB4 heterodimerization is not only critical for myocardium formation in early heart development but prevents severe dysfunction of the adult heart and premature death. Disabled erbB-signaling is also implicated in the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to failure, whereas erbB receptor-activation promotes myocardial cell growth and survival and protects against anthracycline-induced cardiomyopathy. rhNRG-1 was administered IV to animal models of ischemic, dilated, and viral cardiomyopathy, and cardiac function and survival were evaluated. Short-term intravenous administration of rhNRG-1 to normal dogs and rats did not alter hemodynamics or cardiac contractility. In contrast, rhNRG-1 improved cardiac performance, attenuated pathological changes, and prolonged survival in rodent models of ischemic, dilated, and viral cardiomyopathy, with the survival benefits in the ischemic model being additive to those of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor therapy. In addition, despite continued pacing, rhNRG-1 produced global improvements in cardiac function in a canine model of pacing-induced heart failure. These beneficial effects make rhNRG-1 promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic for the treatment of heart failure due to a variety of common cardiac diseases.

  2. Localisation of Neuregulin 1-{beta}3 to different sub-nuclear structures alters gene expression

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    Wang, Ming; Trim, Carol M.; Gullick, William J., E-mail: w.j.gullick@kent.ac.uk

    2011-02-15

    Neuregulins are growth factors that signal via the ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors. Here we show using immunohistochemistry that they are often expressed in the nucleus of a range of tumour types including soft tissue and breast. The Neuregulin 1 type I-{beta}3 (NRG1-{beta}3) isoform localises to two sub-nuclear compartments in animal cells, nucleoli and spliceosomes. We used NRG1-{beta}3 tagged with photoactivatable GFP and demonstrated that this re-localised from nucleoli to spliceosomes over 90 min. Tyrosine kinase activity was not required for retaining the NRG1-{beta}3 within the nucleus. Mutation of the lysines 14 and 16 or 15 and 16 together prevented nucleolar uptake while four positively charged residues were identified which were required for spliceosome uptake. Molecular modelling suggests that three of these may form a binding site. We showed using a kinome array that NRG1-{beta}3 and a mutant exclusively localising to spliceosomes increased phosphorylation and/or expression of the HER4 and HER2 receptors. Using a transcriptomic analysis the same two constructs induced expression of several messenger RNAs and we confirmed the increased expression at the protein level of the most highly induced, Heat Shock Protein 70B'. These results suggest that Neuregulin activates receptor signalling in spliceosomes leading to altered gene expression.

  3. Improving cardiac myocytes performance by CNTs platforms

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    Valentina eMartinelli

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of nanotechnology to the cardiovascular system has increasingly caught scientists’ attention as a potentially powerful tool for the development of new generation devices able to interface, repair or boost the performance of cardiac tissue. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered as promising materials for nanomedicine applications in general and have been recently tested towards excitable cell growth. CNTs are cylindrically shaped structures made up of rolled-up graphene sheets, with unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, able to effectively conducting electrical current in electrochemical interfaces. CNTs-based scaffolds have been recently found to support the in vitro growth of cardiac cells: in particular, their ability to improve cardiomyocytes proliferation, maturation and electrical behavior are making CNTs extremely attractive for the development and exploitation of interfaces able to impact on cardiac cells physiology and function.

  4. Defining the Intrinsic Cardiac Risks of Operations to Improve Preoperative Cardiac Risk Assessments.

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    Liu, Jason B; Liu, Yaoming; Cohen, Mark E; Ko, Clifford Y; Sweitzer, Bobbie J

    2018-02-01

    Current preoperative cardiac risk stratification practices group operations into broad categories, which might inadequately consider the intrinsic cardiac risks of individual operations. We sought to define the intrinsic cardiac risks of individual operations and to demonstrate how grouping operations might lead to imprecise estimates of perioperative cardiac risk. Elective operations (based on Common Procedural Terminology codes) performed from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2015 at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program were studied. A composite measure of perioperative adverse cardiac events was defined as either cardiac arrest requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation or acute myocardial infarction. Operations' intrinsic cardiac risks were derived from mixed-effects models while controlling for patient mix. Resultant risks were sorted into low-, intermediate-, and high-risk categories, and the most commonly performed operations within each category were identified. Intrinsic operative risks were also examined using a representative grouping of operations to portray within-group variation. Sixty-six low, 30 intermediate, and 106 high intrinsic cardiac risk operations were identified. Excisional breast biopsy had the lowest intrinsic cardiac risk (overall rate, 0.01%; odds ratio, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.02 to 0.25) relative to the average, whereas aorto-bifemoral bypass grafting had the highest (overall rate, 4.1%; odds ratio, 6.61; 95% CI, 5.54 to 7.90). There was wide variation in the intrinsic cardiac risks of operations within the representative grouping (median odds ratio, 1.40; interquartile range, 0.88 to 2.17). A continuum of intrinsic cardiac risk exists among operations. Grouping operations into broad categories inadequately accounts for the intrinsic cardiac risk of individual operations.

  5. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 9 Reduces Cardiac Fibrosis and Improves Cardiac Function in Heart Failure.

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    Morine, Kevin J; Qiao, Xiaoying; York, Sam; Natov, Peter S; Paruchuri, Vikram; Zhang, Yali; Aronovitz, Mark J; Karas, Richard H; Kapur, Navin K

    2018-02-27

    Background -Heart failure is a growing cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1) promotes cardiac fibrosis, but also activates counter-regulatory pathways that serve to regulate TGF-β1 activity in heart failure. Bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP9) is a member of the TGFβ family of cytokines and signals via the downstream effector protein Smad1. Endoglin is a TGFβ co-receptor that promotes TGF-β1 signaling via Smad3 and binds BMP9 with high affinity. We hypothesized that BMP9 limits cardiac fibrosis by activating Smad1 and attenuating Smad3 and further that neutralizing endoglin activity promotes BMP9 activity. Methods -We examined BMP9 expression and signaling in human cardiac fibroblasts and human subjects with heart failure. We utilized the thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) induced model of heart failure to evaluate the functional effect of BMP9 signaling on cardiac remodeling. Results -BMP9 expression is increased in the circulation and left ventricle (LV) of human subjects with heart failure and is expressed by cardiac fibroblasts. Next, we observed that BMP9 attenuates Type I collagen synthesis in human cardiac fibroblasts using recombinant human BMP9 and an siRNA approach. In BMP9 -/- mice subjected to TAC, loss of BMP9 activity promotes cardiac fibrosis, impairs LV function, and increases LV levels of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3), not pSmad1. In contrast, treatment of wild-type mice subjected to TAC with recombinant BMP9 limits progression of cardiac fibrosis, improves LV function, enhances myocardial capillary density, and increases LV levels of pSmad1, not pSmad3 compared to vehicle treated controls. Since endoglin binds BMP9 with high affinity, we explored the effect of reduced endoglin activity on BMP9 activity. Neutralizing endoglin activity in human cardiac fibroblasts or in wild-type mice subjected to TAC induced heart failure limits collagen production, increases BMP9 protein levels, and increases

  6. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

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    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

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    Bhaarathy, V. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, 138673 (Singapore); Venugopal, J., E-mail: nnijrv@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Gandhimathi, C. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore); Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D. [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, School of Physical Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ramakrishna, S. [Centre for Nanofibers and Nanotechnology, NUSNNI, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 (Singapore)

    2014-11-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  8. Biologically improved nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhaarathy, V.; Venugopal, J.; Gandhimathi, C.; Ponpandian, N.; Mangalaraj, D.; Ramakrishna, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanofibrous structure developed by electrospinning technology provides attractive extracellular matrix conditions for the anchorage, migration and differentiation of stem cells, including those responsible for regenerative medicine. Recently, biocomposite nanofibers consisting of two or more polymeric blends are electrospun more tidily in order to obtain scaffolds with desired functional and mechanical properties depending on their applications. The study focuses on one such an attempt of using copolymer Poly(L-lactic acid)-co-poly (ε-caprolactone) (PLACL), silk fibroin (SF) and Aloe Vera (AV) for fabricating biocomposite nanofibrous scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering. SEM micrographs of fabricated electrospun PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless, uniform nanofibers with interconnected pores and obtained fibre diameter in the range of 459 ± 22 nm, 202 ± 12 nm and 188 ± 16 nm respectively. PLACL, PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV electrospun mats obtained at room temperature with an elastic modulus of 14.1 ± 0.7, 9.96 ± 2.5 and 7.0 ± 0.9 MPa respectively. PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers have more desirable properties to act as flexible cell supporting scaffolds compared to PLACL for the repair of myocardial infarction (MI). The PLACL/SF and PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers had a contact angle of 51 ± 12° compared to that of 133 ± 15° of PLACL alone. Cardiac cell proliferation was increased by 21% in PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers compared to PLACL by day 6 and further increased to 42% by day 9. Confocal analysis for cardiac expression proteins myosin and connexin 43 was observed better by day 9 compared to all other nanofibrous scaffolds. The results proved that the fabricated PLACL/SF/AV nanofibrous scaffolds have good potentiality for the regeneration of infarcted myocardium in cardiac tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Fabricated nanofibrous scaffolds are porous, beadless and uniform structures. • PLACL/SF/AV nanofibers improve the

  9. Evolution of strategies to improve preclinical cardiac safety testing.

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    Gintant, Gary; Sager, Philip T; Stockbridge, Norman

    2016-07-01

    The early and efficient assessment of cardiac safety liabilities is essential to confidently advance novel drug candidates. This article discusses evolving mechanistically based preclinical strategies for detecting drug-induced electrophysiological and structural cardiotoxicity using in vitro human ion channel assays, human-based in silico reconstructions and human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes. These strategies represent a paradigm shift from current approaches, which rely on simplistic in vitro assays that measure blockade of the Kv11.1 current (also known as the hERG current or IKr) and on the use of non-human cells or tissues. These new strategies have the potential to improve sensitivity and specificity in the early detection of genuine cardiotoxicity risks, thereby reducing the likelihood of mistakenly discarding viable drug candidates and speeding the progression of worthy drugs into clinical trials.

  10. Enhanced pyruvate dehydrogenase activity improves cardiac outcomes in a murine model of cardiac arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Piao

    Full Text Available Post-ischemic changes in cellular metabolism alter myocardial and neurological function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH, the limiting step in mitochondrial glucose oxidation, is inhibited by increased expression of PDH kinase (PDK during ischemia/reperfusion injury. This results in decreased utilization of glucose to generate cellular ATP. Post-cardiac arrest (CA hypothermia improves outcomes and alters metabolism, but its influence on PDH and PDK activity following CA are unknown. We hypothesized that therapeutic hypothermia (TH following CA is associated with the inhibition of PDK activity and increased PDH activity. We further hypothesized that an inhibitor of PDK activity, dichloroacetate (DCA, would improve PDH activity and post-CA outcomes.Anesthetized and ventilated adult female C57BL/6 wild-type mice underwent a 12-minute KCl-induced CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Compared to normothermic (37°C CA controls, administering TH (30°C improved overall survival (72-hour survival rate: 62.5% vs. 28.6%, P<0.001, post-resuscitation myocardial function (ejection fraction: 50.9±3.1% vs. 27.2±2.0%, P<0.001; aorta systolic pressure: 132.7±7.3 vs. 72.3±3.0 mmHg, P<0.001, and neurological scores at 72-hour post CA (9.5±1.3 vs. 5.4±1.3, P<0.05. In both heart and brain, CA increased lactate concentrations (1.9-fold and 3.1-fold increase, respectively, P<0.01, decreased PDH enzyme activity (24% and 50% reduction, respectively, P<0.01, and increased PDK protein expressions (1.2-fold and 1.9-fold, respectively, P<0.01. In contrast, post-CA treatment with TH normalized lactate concentrations (P<0.01 and P<0.05 and PDK expressions (P<0.001 and P<0.05, while increasing PDH activity (P<0.01 and P<0.01 in both the heart and brain. Additionally, treatment with DCA (0.2 mg/g body weight 30 min prior to CA improved both myocardial hemodynamics 2 hours post-CA (aortic systolic pressure: 123±3 vs. 96±4 mmHg, P<0.001 and 72-hour survival rates

  11. Spironolactone in chronic hemodialysis patients improves cardiac function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Shahram; Mortazavi, Mojhgan; Shahidi Shahrzad; Seirafian, Shiva; Pourmoghadas, Ali; Garakyaraghi, Mohammad; Eshaghian, Afrooz; Ghassami, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    We performed this study to assess whether low dose spironolactone could be administered in hemodialysis (HD) patients with moderate to severe heart failure to improve cardiovascular function and reduce hospitalization without inducing hyperkalemia. We enrolled 16 chronic HD patients with moderate to severe heart failure and left ventricle ejection fraction :5 45%. In a double blinded randomized placebo controlled study, one group of 8 patients received 25 mg of spironolactone after each dialysis session within six months, and the rest received a placebo. Echocardiography was performed on all the patients to assess ejection fraction and left ventricular mass during 12 hours after completion of hemodialysis at the beginning and the end of study. Serum potassium was measured predialysis every 4 weeks. The mean ejection fraction increased significantly more in spironolactone group during the study period than in the placebo group (6.2 + - 1.64 vs. 0.83 + - 4.9, P0.046). The mean left ventricular mass decreased in the spironolactone group, but increased significantly in the placebo group during the period (-8.4 + - 4.72 vs. 3 + -7.97. 95%, P= 0.021). The incidence of hyperkalemia was not significantly increased in the study or controlled groups. In conclusion, we found in this study that administration of spironolactone in chronic HD patients with moderate to severe heart failure substantially improved their cardiac function and decreases left ventricular mass without development of significant hyperkalemia. (author)

  12. Improved bioavailability of targeted Curcumin delivery efficiently regressed cardiac hypertrophy by modulating apoptotic load within cardiac microenvironment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, Aramita; Rana, Santanu; Banerjee, Durba; Mitra, Arkadeep; Datta, Ritwik; Naskar, Shaon; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyocyte apoptosis acts as a prime modulator of cardiac hypertrophy leading to heart failure, a major cause of human mortality worldwide. Recent therapeutic interventions have focussed on translational applications of diverse pharmaceutical regimes among which, Curcumin (from Curcuma longa) is known to have an anti-hypertrophic potential but with limited pharmacological efficacies due to low aqueous solubility and poor bioavailability. In this study, Curcumin encapsulated by carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) nanoparticle conjugated to a myocyte specific homing peptide was successfully delivered in bioactive form to pathological myocardium for effective regression of cardiac hypertrophy in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model. Targeted nanotization showed higher cardiac bioavailability of Curcumin at a low dose of 5 mg/kg body weight compared to free Curcumin at 35 mg/kg body weight. Moreover, Curcumin/CMC-peptide treatment during hypertrophy significantly improved cardiac function by downregulating expression of hypertrophy marker genes (ANF, β-MHC), apoptotic mediators (Bax, Cytochrome-c) and activity of apoptotic markers (Caspase 3 and PARP); whereas free Curcumin in much higher dose showed minimal improvement during compromised cardiac function. Targeted Curcumin treatment significantly lowered p53 expression and activation in diseased myocardium via inhibited interaction of p53 with p300-HAT. Thus attenuated acetylation of p53 facilitated p53 ubiquitination and reduced the apoptotic load in hypertrophied cardiomyocytes; thereby limiting cardiomyocytes' need to enter the regeneration cycle during hypertrophy. This study elucidates for the first time an efficient targeted delivery regimen for Curcumin and also attributes towards probable mechanistic insight into its therapeutic potential as a cardio-protective agent for regression of cardiac hypertrophy. - Highlights: • Cardiomyocyte targeted Curcumin/CMC-peptide increases bioavailability of the drug.

  13. Combinatorial therapy of exercise-preconditioning and nanocurcumin formulation supplementation improves cardiac adaptation under hypobaric hypoxia.

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    Nehra, Sarita; Bhardwaj, Varun; Bansal, Anju; Saraswat, Deepika

    2017-09-26

    Chronic hypobaric hypoxia (cHH) mediated cardiac insufficiencies are associated with pathological damage. Sustained redox stress and work load are major causative agents of cardiac insufficiencies under cHH. Despite the advancements made in pharmacological (anti-oxidants, vasodilators) and non-pharmacological therapeutics (acclimatization strategies and schedules), only partial success has been achieved in improving cardiac acclimatization to cHH. This necessitates the need for potent combinatorial therapies to improve cardiac acclimatization at high altitudes. We hypothesize that a combinatorial therapy comprising preconditioning to mild aerobic treadmill exercise and supplementation with nanocurcumin formulation (NCF) consisting of nanocurcumin (NC) and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) might improve cardiac adaptation at high altitudes. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats pre-conditioned to treadmill exercise and supplemented with NCF were exposed to cHH (7620 m altitude corresponding to pO2~8% at 28±2°C, relative humidity 55%±1%) for 3 weeks. The rat hearts were analyzed for changes in markers of oxidative stress (free radical leakage, lipid peroxidation, manganese-superoxide dismutase [MnSOD] activity), cardiac injury (circulating cardiac troponin I [TnI] and T [cTnT], myocardial creatine kinase [CK-MB]), metabolic damage (lactate dehydrogenase [LDH] and acetyl-coenzyme A levels, lactate and pyruvate levels) and bio-energetic insufficiency (ATP, p-AMPKα). Significant modulations (p≤0.05) in cardiac redox status, metabolic damage, cardiac injury and bio-energetics were observed in rats receiving both NCF supplementation and treadmill exercise-preconditioning compared with rats receiving only one of the treatments. The combinatorial therapeutic strategy showed a tremendous improvement in cardiac acclimatization to cHH compared to either exercise-preconditioning or NCF supplementation alone which was evident from the effective modulation in redox, metabolic, contractile

  14. Simulation-based Mastery Learning Improves Cardiac Auscultation Skills in Medical Students

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    McGaghie, William C.; Cohen, Elaine R.; Kaye, Marsha; Wayne, Diane B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cardiac auscultation is a core clinical skill. However, prior studies show that trainee skills are often deficient and that clinical experience is not a proxy for competence. Objective To describe a mastery model of cardiac auscultation education and evaluate its effectiveness in improving bedside cardiac auscultation skills. Design Untreated control group design with pretest and posttest. Participants Third-year students who received a cardiac auscultation curriculum and fourth year students who did not. Intervention A cardiac auscultation curriculum consisting of a computer tutorial and a cardiac patient simulator. All third-year students were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) set by an expert panel at posttest. Measurements Diagnostic accuracy with simulated heart sounds and actual patients. Results Trained third-year students (n = 77) demonstrated significantly higher cardiac auscultation accuracy compared to untrained fourth year students (n = 31) in assessment of simulated heart sounds (93.8% vs. 73.9%, p auscultation curriculum consisting of deliberate practice with a computer-based tutorial and a cardiac patient simulator resulted in improved assessment of simulated heart sounds and more accurate examination of actual patients. PMID:20339952

  15. Improving Cardiac Action Potential Measurements: 2D and 3D Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Neil J; Yin, Yue; Kemanli, Pinar; Ip, Brian; Wakatsuki, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Progress in the development of assays for measuring cardiac action potential is crucial for the discovery of drugs for treating cardiac disease and assessing cardiotoxicity. Recently, high-throughput methods for assessing action potential using induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) derived cardiomyocytes in both two-dimensional monolayer cultures and three-dimensional tissues have been developed. We describe an improved method for assessing cardiac action potential using an ultra-fast cost-effective plate reader with commercially available dyes. Our methods improve dramatically the detection of the fluorescence signal from these dyes and make way for the development of more high-throughput methods for cardiac drug discovery and cardiotoxicity.

  16. Carbon nanotube-incorporated collagen hydrogels improve cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HY

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hongyu Sun,* Jing Zhou,* Zhu Huang,* Linlin Qu,* Ning Lin,* Chengxiao Liang, Ruiwu Dai, Lijun Tang, Fuzhou Tian General Surgery Center, Chengdu Military General Hospital, Chengdu, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs provide an essential 2-D microenvironment for cardiomyocyte growth and function. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CNT nanostructures can promote cell–cell integrity and facilitate the formation of functional tissues in 3-D hydrogels. Here, single-walled CNTs were incorporated into collagen hydrogels to fabricate (CNT/Col hydrogels, which improved mechanical and electrical properties. The incorporation of CNTs (up to 1 wt% exhibited no toxicity to cardiomyocytes and enhanced cell adhesion and elongation. Through the use of immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular calcium-transient measurement, the incorporation of CNTs was found to improve cell alignment and assembly remarkably, which led to the formation of engineered cardiac tissues with stronger contraction potential. Importantly, cardiac tissues based on CNT/Col hydrogels were noted to have better functionality. Collectively, the incorporation of CNTs into the Col hydrogels improved cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs. Our study suggests that CNT/Col hydrogels offer a promising tissue scaffold for cardiac constructs, and might serve as injectable biomaterials to deliver cell or drug molecules for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction in the near future. Keywords: carbon nanotubes, collagen hydrogel, cardiac constructs, cell alignment, tissue functionality

  17. Therapeutic Inhibition of miR-208a Improves Cardiac Function and Survival During Heart Failure

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    Montgomery, Rusty L.; Hullinger, Thomas G.; Semus, Hillary M.; Dickinson, Brent A.; Seto, Anita G.; Lynch, Joshua M.; Stack, Christianna; Latimer, Paul A.; Olson, Eric N.; van Rooij, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background Diastolic dysfunction in response to hypertrophy is a major clinical syndrome with few therapeutic options. MicroRNAs act as negative regulators of gene expression by inhibiting translation or promoting degradation of target mRNAs. Previously, we reported that genetic deletion of the cardiac-specific miR-208a prevents pathological cardiac remodeling and upregulation of Myh7 in response to pressure overload. Whether this miRNA might contribute to diastolic dysfunction or other forms of heart disease is currently unknown. Methods and Results Here, we show that systemic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide induces potent and sustained silencing of miR-208a in the heart. Therapeutic inhibition of miR-208a by subcutaneous delivery of antimiR-208a during hypertension-induced heart failure in Dahl hypertensive rats dose-dependently prevents pathological myosin switching and cardiac remodeling while improving cardiac function, overall health, and survival. Transcriptional profiling indicates that antimiR-208a evokes prominent effects on cardiac gene expression; plasma analysis indicates significant changes in circulating levels of miRNAs on antimiR-208a treatment. Conclusions These studies indicate the potential of oligonucleotide-based therapies for modulating cardiac miRNAs and validate miR-208 as a potent therapeutic target for the modulation of cardiac function and remodeling during heart disease progression. PMID:21900086

  18. Journey to top performance: a multipronged quality improvement approach to reducing cardiac surgery mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinerman, S Jacob; Dlugacz, Yosef D; Hartman, Alan R; Moravick, Donna; Nelson, Karen L; Scanlon, Kerri Anne; Stier, Lori

    2015-02-01

    In 2006, leadership at Long Island Jewish Medical Center (New Hyde Park, New York) noted significantly higher cardiac surgery mortality rates for isolated valve and valve/coronary artery bypass graft procedures compared to the New York State Department of Health's Cardiac Surgery Reporting System statewide average. Long Island Jewish Medical Center, a 583-bed nonprofit, tertiary care teaching hospital, is one of the clinical and academic hubs of North Shore-LIJ Health System. Senior leadership launched an evaluation of the cardiac surgery program to determine why cardiac surgery mortality rates were higher than expected. As a result, the cardiac surgery program was redesigned, and interventions were implemented related to preoperative care, intraoperative monitoring, postoperative care, and the cardiac surgery quality management program. According to the most recent New York State Department of Health reporting period (2009-2011), Long Island Jewish Medical Center had the lowest risk-adjusted mortality rate in New York State for adult patients undergoing surgeries to repair or replace heart valves and for adult patients in need of valve/coronary artery bypass graft surgery. The medical center has sustained significantly lower mortality rates compared to the statewide average for the past three cardiac surgery reporting periods. Cardiac surgery mortality rates can be significantly reduced and sustained below comparative norms when the organization is committed to clinical excellence and quality and is involved in continuously assessing organizational performance. The evaluation launched at Long Island Jewish Medical Center led to the redesign of the cardiac surgery program and prompted widespread improvement efforts and cultural change across the entire organization.

  19. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao

    2006-01-01

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  20. Carbon nanotube-incorporated collagen hydrogels improve cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongyu; Zhou, Jing; Huang, Zhu; Qu, Linlin; Lin, Ning; Liang, Chengxiao; Dai, Ruiwu; Tang, Lijun; Tian, Fuzhou

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) provide an essential 2-D microenvironment for cardiomyocyte growth and function. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CNT nanostructures can promote cell–cell integrity and facilitate the formation of functional tissues in 3-D hydrogels. Here, single-walled CNTs were incorporated into collagen hydrogels to fabricate (CNT/Col) hydrogels, which improved mechanical and electrical properties. The incorporation of CNTs (up to 1 wt%) exhibited no toxicity to cardiomyocytes and enhanced cell adhesion and elongation. Through the use of immunohistochemical staining, transmission electron microscopy, and intracellular calcium-transient measurement, the incorporation of CNTs was found to improve cell alignment and assembly remarkably, which led to the formation of engineered cardiac tissues with stronger contraction potential. Importantly, cardiac tissues based on CNT/Col hydrogels were noted to have better functionality. Collectively, the incorporation of CNTs into the Col hydrogels improved cell alignment and the performance of cardiac constructs. Our study suggests that CNT/Col hydrogels offer a promising tissue scaffold for cardiac constructs, and might serve as injectable biomaterials to deliver cell or drug molecules for cardiac regeneration following myocardial infarction in the near future. PMID:28450785

  1. Improved cardiac function and exercise capacity following correction of pectus excavatum: a review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maagaard, Marie; Heiberg, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Patients with pectus excavatum (PE) often describe improvements in exercise stamina following corrective surgery. Studies have investigated the surgical effect on physiological parameters; still, no consensus has yet been reached. Therefore, the aim of this literature review was to describe the cardiac outcome after surgical correction, both at rest and during exercise. In February 2016, a detailed search of the databases PubMed, Medline, and EMBASE was performed. We assessed clinical studies that described cardiac outcomes both before and after surgical correction of PE. We only included studies reporting either pre-defined echocardiographic or exercise test parameters. No exclusion criteria or statistical analyses were applied. Twenty-one full-text articles, published between 1972 and 2016, were selected, with cohort-ranges of 3-168 patients, mean age-ranges of 5-33 years, and mean follow-up-ranges from immediately to 4 years after surgery. Twelve studies described resting cardiac parameters. Four studies measured cardiac output, where one described 36% immediate increase after surgery, one reported 15% increase after Nuss-bar removal and two found no difference. Three studies demonstrated improvement in mean stroke volume ranges of 22-34% and two studies found no difference. Fifteen studies investigated exercise capacity, with 11 considering peak O 2 pr. kg, where five studies demonstrated improvements with the mean ranging from 8% to 15% after surgery, five studies demonstrated no difference, and one saw a decrease of 19% 3 months after Nuss-bar implantation. A measurable increase in exercise capacity exists following surgery, which may be caused by multiple factors. This may be owed to the relief of compressed cardiac chambers with the increased anterior-posterior thoracic dimensions, which could facilitate an improved filling of the heart. With these results, the positive physiological impact of the surgery is emphasized and the potential gain in cardiac

  2. Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade Improves Cardiac Indices in Acromegaly Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Julia D J; Dattani, Abhishek; Zemrak, Filip; Burchell, Thomas; Akker, Scott A; Kaplan, Felicity J L; Khoo, Bernard; Aylwin, Simon; Grossman, Ashley B; Davies, L Ceri; Korbonits, Márta

    2017-06-01

    Blockade of the angiotensin-renin system, with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), has been shown to improve cardiac outcomes following myocardial infarction and delay progression of heart failure. Acromegaly is associated with a disease-specific cardiomyopathy, the pathogenesis of which is poorly understood.The cardiac indices of patients with active acromegaly with no hypertension (Group A, n=4), established hypertension not taking ACEi/ARBs (Group B, n=4) and established hypertension taking ACEi/ARBs (Group C, n=4) were compared using cardiac magnetic imaging.Patients taking ACEi/ARBs had lower end diastolic volume index (EDVi) and end systolic volume index (ESVi) than the other 2 groups ([C] 73.24 vs. [A] 97.92 vs. [B] 101.03 ml/m 2 , ANOVA p=0.034, B vs. C pAcromegaly patients on ACEi/ARBs for hypertension demonstrate improved cardiac indices compared to acromegaly patients with hypertension not taking these medications. Further studies are needed to determine if these drugs have a beneficial cardiac effect in acromegaly in the absence of demonstrable hypertension. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Improving Providers' Role Definitions to Decrease Overcrowding and Improve In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, Marion; Schweickert, William; Neefe, Stacie; Tsypenyuk, Boris; Falk, Scott Austin; Holena, Daniel N

    2016-07-01

    How nontechnical factors such as inadequate role definition and overcrowding affect outcomes of in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) is unknown. Using a bundled intervention, we sought to improve providers' role definitions and decrease overcrowding during IHCA events. To determine if a bundled intervention consisting of a nurse/physician leadership dyad, visual cues for provider roles, and a "role check" would lead to reductions in crowding and improve perceptions of communication and team leadership. Baseline data on the number and type of IHCA providers were collected. Providers were asked to complete a postevent survey rating communication and leadership. A bundled intervention was then introduced. Data were then obtained for the subsequent IHCA events. Twenty ICHA events were captured before and 34 after the intervention. The number of physicians present at pulse checks 2 (median [interquartile range]: 6 [5-8] before vs 5 [3-6] after, P = .02) and 3 (7 [5-9] vs 4 [4-5], P = .004) decreased significantly after the intervention. The overall number of providers at the third pulse check (18 [14-22] before vs 14 [12-16] after, P = .04) also decreased after the intervention. On a 10-point Likert scale, ratings of communication (8 [7-8]) and physician leadership (8 [7-9]) did not differ significantly from before to after the intervention. Both the physician leads (90%) and patients' primary nurses (97%) were able to identify clear nurse leaders. A bundled intervention targeted at improving IHCA response led to a decrease in overcrowding at ICHA events without substantial changes in the perceptions of communication or physician leadership. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  4. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation improves medical students' clinical skills: the Pavia pilot experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlini, Stefano; Salinaro, Francesco; Santalucia, Paola; Musca, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Clinical evaluation is the cornerstone of any cardiac diagnosis, although excessive over-specialisation often leads students to disregard the value of clinical skills, and to overemphasize the approach to instrumental cardiac diagnosis. Time restraints, low availability of "typical" cardiac patients on whom to perform effective bedside teaching, patients' respect and the underscoring of the value of clinical skills all lead to a progressive decay in teaching. Simulation-guided cardiac auscultation may improve clinical training in medical students and residents. Harvey(©) is a mannequin encompassing more than 50 cardiac diagnoses that was designed and developed at the University of Miami (Florida, USA). One of the advantages of Harvey(©) simulation resides in the possibility of listening, comparing and discussing "real" murmurs. To objectively assess its teaching performance, the capability to identify five different cardiac diagnoses (atrial septal defect, normal young subject, mitral stenosis with tricuspid regurgitation, chronic mitral regurgitation, and pericarditis) out of more than 50 diagnostic possibilities was assessed in 523 III-year medical students (i.e. at the very beginning of their clinical experience), in 92 VI-year students, and in 42 residents before and after a formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©). None of them had previously experienced simulation-based cardiac auscultation in addition to formal lecturing (all three groups) and bedside teaching (VI-year students and residents). In order to assess the "persistence" of the acquired knowledge over time, the test was repeated after 3 years in 85 students, who did not repeat the formal 10-h teaching session with Harvey(©) after the III year. As expected, the overall response was poor in the "beginners" who correctly identified 11.0 % of the administered cardiac murmurs. After simulation-guided training, the ability to recognise the correct cardiac diagnoses was much better (72.0 %; p

  5. Cardiac Rehabilitation Improves the QRS Fragmentation in Patients With ST Elevatıon Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The existence of the fQRS decreases after CR in patients with STEMI especially in hypertensive individuals, which may be related to improved electrical stability in the myocardium as a predictor of increase in survival and decrease in major cardiac events.

  6. Helping Family Physicians Improve Their Cardiac Auscultation Skills with an Interactive CD-ROM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Douglas; Sargeant, Joan; Gray, Jean; Hoyt, Brian; Allen, Michael; Fleming, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Physicians (n=42) studied cardiac auscultation using a 15-hour CD-ROM program. Nine months later, 21 who completed a posttest showed significant improvement in identifying heart sounds. CDs were valued for opportunities to review material at an individual pace. Lack of computer skills hindered use. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  7. Unstandardized treatment of electroencephalographic status epilepticus does not improve outcome of comatose patients after cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Cloostermans, M.C.; Beishuizen, A.; van Putten, Michel Johannes Antonius Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Electroencephalographic status epilepticus occurs in 9–35% of comatose patients after cardiac arrest. Mortality is 90–100%. It is unclear whether (some) seizure patterns represent a condition in which anti-epileptic treatment may improve outcome, or severe ischemic damage, in which

  8. Cardiac autonomic function in patients with diabetes improves with practice of comprehensive yogic breathing program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka P Jyotsna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to observe the effect comprehensive yogic breathing (Sudarshan Kriya Yoga [SKY] and Pranayam had on cardiac autonomic functions in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 64 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program. Standard therapy included dietary advice, brisk walking for 45 min daily, and administration of oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was introduced to the participants through a course of 12 h spread over 3 days. It was an interactive session in which SKY, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam is taught under the guidance of a certified teacher. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and after 6 months of intervention. Results: In the intervention group, after practicing the breathing techniques for 6 months, the improvement in sympathetic functions was statistically significant (P 0.04. The change in sympathetic functions in the standard therapy group was not significant (P 0.75.Parasympathetic functions did not show any significant change in either group. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P 0.06. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P 0.99. Conclusion: Cardiac autonomic functions improved in patients with diabetes on standard treatment who followed the comprehensive yogic breathing program compared to patients who were on standard therapy alone.

  9. Adaptive servo ventilation improves Cheyne-Stokes respiration, cardiac function, and prognosis in chronic heart failure patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Makiko; Yoshihisa, Akiomi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yamada, Shinya; Kamioka, Masashi; Kamiyama, Yoshiyuki; Yamaki, Takayoshi; Sugimoto, Koichi; Kunii, Hiroyuki; Nakazato, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Saitoh, Shu-ichi; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2012-09-01

    Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR-CSA) is often observed in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Although cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is effective for CHF patients with left ventricular dyssynchrony, it is still unclear whether adaptive servo ventilation (ASV) improves cardiac function and prognosis of CHF patients with CSR-CSA after CRT. Twenty two patients with CHF and CSR-CSA after CRT defibrillator (CRTD) implantation were enrolled in the present study and randomly assigned into two groups: 11 patients treated with ASV (ASV group) and 11 patients treated without ASV (non-ASV group). Measurement of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (before 3, and 6 months later) and echocardiography (before and 6 months) were performed in each group. Patients were followed up to register cardiac events (cardiac death and re-hospitalization) after discharge. In the ASV group, indices for apnea-hypopnea, central apnea, and oxyhemoglobin saturation were improved on ASV. BNP levels, cardiac systolic and diastolic function were improved with ASV treatment for 6 months. Importantly, the event-free rate was significantly higher in the ASV group than in the non-ASV group. ASV improves CSR-CSA, cardiac function, and prognosis in CHF patients with CRTD. Patients with CSR-CSA and post CRTD implantation would get benefits by treatment with ASV. Copyright © 2012 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  11. Witnessed arrest, but not delayed bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves prehospital cardiac arrest survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmir, R B

    2004-05-01

    This study correlated the effect of witnessing a cardiac arrest and instituting bystander CPR (ByCPR), as a secondary end point in a study evaluating the effect of bicarbonate on survival. This prospective, randomised, double blinded clinical intervention trial enrolled 874 prehospital cardiopulmonary arrest patients encountered in a prehospital urban, suburban, and rural regional emergency medical service (EMS) area. This group underwent conventional advanced cardiac life support intervention followed by empiric early administration of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/l), monitoring conventional resuscitation parameters. Survival was measured as presence of vital signs on emergency department (ED) arrival. Data were analysed using chi(2) with Pearson correlation and odds ratio where appropriate. The overall survival rate was 13.9% (110 of 792) of prehospital cardiac arrest patients. The mean (SD) time until provision of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ByCPR) by laymen was 2.08 (2.77) minutes, and basic life support (BLS) by emergency medical technicians was 6.62 (5.73) minutes. There was improved survival noted with witnessed cardiac arrest-a 2.2-fold increase in survival, 18.9% (76 of 402) versus 8.6% (27 of 315) compared with unwitnessed arrests (ptwo minutes (p = 0.3752). Survival after prehospital cardiac arrest is more likely when witnessed, but not necessarily when ByCPR was performed by laymen.

  12. Improving Interpretation of Cardiac Phenotypes and Enhancing Discovery With Expanded Knowledge in the Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovering, Ruth C; Roncaglia, Paola; Howe, Douglas G; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Khodiyar, Varsha K; Berardini, Tanya Z; Tweedie, Susan; Foulger, Rebecca E; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Campbell, Nancy H; Huntley, Rachael P; Talmud, Philippa J; Blake, Judith A; Breckenridge, Ross; Riley, Paul R; Lambiase, Pier D; Elliott, Perry M; Clapp, Lucie; Tinker, Andrew; Hill, David P

    2018-02-01

    A systems biology approach to cardiac physiology requires a comprehensive representation of how coordinated processes operate in the heart, as well as the ability to interpret relevant transcriptomic and proteomic experiments. The Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium provides structured, controlled vocabularies of biological terms that can be used to summarize and analyze functional knowledge for gene products. In this study, we created a computational resource to facilitate genetic studies of cardiac physiology by integrating literature curation with attention to an improved and expanded ontological representation of heart processes in the Gene Ontology. As a result, the Gene Ontology now contains terms that comprehensively describe the roles of proteins in cardiac muscle cell action potential, electrical coupling, and the transmission of the electrical impulse from the sinoatrial node to the ventricles. Evaluating the effectiveness of this approach to inform data analysis demonstrated that Gene Ontology annotations, analyzed within an expanded ontological context of heart processes, can help to identify candidate genes associated with arrhythmic disease risk loci. We determined that a combination of curation and ontology development for heart-specific genes and processes supports the identification and downstream analysis of genes responsible for the spread of the cardiac action potential through the heart. Annotating these genes and processes in a structured format facilitates data analysis and supports effective retrieval of gene-centric information about cardiac defects. © 2018 The Authors.

  13. Does Lifestyle Exercise After a Cardiac Event Improve Metabolic Syndrome Profile in Older Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kathy D; Moore-Schiltz, Laura; Sattar, Abdus; Josephson, Richard; Moore, Shirley M

    Exercise is a common recommendation to reduce the risk factors of metabolic syndrome, yet there are limited data on the influence of lifestyle exercise after cardiac events on metabolic syndrome factors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lifestyle exercise improves metabolic syndrome profile in older adults after a cardiac event. Participants were from a post-cardiac-event lifestyle exercise study. Five metabolic syndrome factors were assessed: waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipids, glucose, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Objective measures of exercise were obtained from heart rate monitors over a year. Logistic regression was used to determine whether participants who engaged in the minimum recommendation of 130 hours of exercise or greater during the 12-month period improved their metabolic syndrome profile by improving at least 1 metabolic syndrome factor. In the sample of 116 participants (74% men; average age, 67.5 years), 43% exercised at the recommended amount (≥130 h/y) and 28% (n = 33) improved their metabolic syndrome profile. After controlling for confounding factors of age, gender, race, diabetes, functional ability, and employment, subjects who exercised at least 130 hours a year were 3.6 times more likely to improve at least 1 metabolic syndrome factor (95% confidence interval, 1.24-10.49). Of the 28% who improved their metabolic syndrome profile, 72% increased their high-density lipoprotein and 60.6% reduced their waist circumference and glucose. After a cardiac event, older patients who engage in lifestyle exercise at the recommended amount have improvement in their metabolic syndrome profile.

  14. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension-Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  15. Modifying risks to improve outcome in cardiac surgery: An anesthesiologist's perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Chakravarthy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Challenging times are here for cardiac surgical and anesthesia team. The interventional cardiologist seem to have closed the flow of 'good cases' coming up for any of the surgery,; successful percutaneous interventions seem to be offering reasonable results in these patients, who therefore do not knock on the doors of the surgeons any more . It is a common experience among the cardiac anesthesiologists and surgeons that the type of the cases that come by now are high risk. That may be presence of comorbidities, ongoing medical therapies, unstable angina, uncontrolled heart failure and rhythm disturbances; and in patients with ischemic heart disease, the target coronaries are far from ideal. Several activities such as institution of preoperative supportive circulatory, ventilatory, and systemic disease control maneuvers seem to have helped improving the outcome of these 'high risk ' patients. This review attempts to look at various interventions and the resulting improvement in outcomes. Several changes have happened in the realm of cardiac surgery and several more are en route. At times, for want of evidence, maximal optimization may not take place and the patient may encounter unfavorable outcomes.. This review is an attempt to bring the focus of the members of the cardiac surgical team on the value of preoperative optimization of risks to improve the outcome. The cardiac surgical patients may broadly be divided into adults undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery, valve surgery and pediatric patients undergoing repair/ palliation of congenital heart ailments. Optimization of risks appear to be different in each genre of patients. This review also brings less often discussed issues such as anemia, nutritional issues and endocrine problems. The review is an attempt to data on ameliorating modifiable risk factors and altering non modifiable ones.

  16. Cardiac lipid content is unresponsive to a physical activity training intervention in type 2 diabetic patients, despite improved ejection fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leiner Tim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increased cardiac lipid content has been associated with diabetic cardiomyopathy. We recently showed that cardiac lipid content is reduced after 12 weeks of physical activity training in healthy overweight subjects. The beneficial effect of exercise training on cardiovascular risk is well established and the decrease in cardiac lipid content with exercise training in healthy overweight subjects was accompanied by improved ejection fraction. It is yet unclear whether diabetic patients respond similarly to physical activity training and whether a lowered lipid content in the heart is necessary for improvements in cardiac function. Here, we investigated whether exercise training is able to lower cardiac lipid content and improve cardiac function in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods Eleven overweight-to-obese male patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (age: 58.4 ± 0.9 years, BMI: 29.9 ± 0.01 kg/m2 followed a 12-week training program (combination endurance/strength training, three sessions/week. Before and after training, maximal whole body oxygen uptake (VO2max and insulin sensitivity (by hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp was determined. Systolic function was determined under resting conditions by CINE-MRI and cardiac lipid content in the septum of the heart by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy. Results VO2max increased (from 27.1 ± 1.5 to 30.1 ± 1.6 ml/min/kg, p = 0.001 and insulin sensitivity improved upon training (insulin stimulated glucose disposal (delta Rd of glucose improved from 5.8 ± 1.9 to 10.3 ± 2.0 μmol/kg/min, p = 0.02. Left-ventricular ejection fraction improved after training (from 50.5 ± 2.0 to 55.6 ± 1.5%, p = 0.01 as well as cardiac index and cardiac output. Unexpectedly, cardiac lipid content in the septum remained unchanged (from 0.80 ± 0.22% to 0.95 ± 0.21%, p = 0.15. Conclusions Twelve weeks of progressive endurance/strength training was effective in improving VO2max, insulin sensitivity

  17. Cardiac Sarcoidosis or Giant Cell Myocarditis? On Treatment Improvement of Fulminant Myocarditis as Demonstrated by Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Bogabathina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell myocarditis, but not cardiac sarcoidosis, is known to cause fulminant myocarditis resulting in severe heart failure. However, giant cell myocarditis and cardiac sarcoidosis are pathologically similar, and attempts at pathological differentiation between the two remain difficult. We are presenting a case of fulminant myocarditis that has pathological features suggestive of cardiac sarcoidosis, but clinically mimicking giant cell myocarditis. This patient was treated with cyclosporine and prednisone and recovered well. This case we believe challenges our current understanding of these intertwined conditions. By obtaining a sense of severity of cardiac involvement via delayed hyperenhancement of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we were more inclined to treat this patient as giant cell myocarditis with cyclosporine. This resulted in excellent improvement of patient’s cardiac function as shown by delayed hyperenhancement images, early perfusion images, and SSFP videos.

  18. Identifying non-technical skills and barriers for improvement of teamwork in cardiac arrest teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.O.; Jensen, Michael Kammer; Lippert, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The application of non-technical skills (NTSs) in health care has previously been described in other health-care educational programmes. NTSs are behavioural principles such as leadership, task distribution and communication. The aim of this study was to identify NTSs suitable...... for improving team performance in multi-professional cardiac arrest teams, and to describe barriers to the use and implementation of such NTSs by using a qualitative method. Methods: Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 Danish Advanced Life Support instructors during the period April...... 2006 to November 2006. Interviews were focussed on barriers and recommendations for teamwork in the cardiac arrest team, optimal policy for improvement of resuscitation training and clinical practice, use of cognitive aids and adoption of European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines 2005. Interviews...

  19. Targeting the Innate Immune Response to Improve Cardiac Graft Recovery after Heart Transplantation: Implications for the Donation after Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Toldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Heart transplantation (HTx is the ultimate treatment for end-stage heart failure. The number of patients on waiting lists for heart transplants, however, is much higher than the number of available organs. The shortage of donor hearts is a serious concern since the population affected by heart failure is constantly increasing. Furthermore, the long-term success of HTx poses some challenges despite the improvement in the management of the short-term complications and in the methods to limit graft rejection. Myocardial injury occurs during transplantation. Injury initiated in the donor as result of brain or cardiac death is exacerbated by organ procurement and storage, and is ultimately amplified by reperfusion injury at the time of transplantation. The innate immune system is a mechanism of first-line defense against pathogens and cell injury. Innate immunity is activated during myocardial injury and produces deleterious effects on the heart structure and function. Here, we briefly discuss the role of the innate immunity in the initiation of myocardial injury, with particular focus on the Toll-like receptors and inflammasome, and how to potentially expand the donor population by targeting the innate immune response.

  20. Anti-tachycardia therapy can improve altered cardiac adrenergic function in tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkusu, Yasuo; Takahashi, Nobukazu; Ishikawa, Toshiyuki [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine] [and others

    2002-11-01

    We investigated whether anti-tachycardia therapy might improve the altered cardiac adrenergic and systolic function in tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy (TC) in contrast to dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The subjects were 23 patients with heart failure, consisting of 8 patients with TC (43.6{+-}10.0 yrs) and 15 with DCM (45.3{+-}8.2 yrs). TC was determined as impairment of left ventricular function secondary to chronic or very frequent arrhythmia during more than 10% of the day. All patients were receiving anti-tachycardia treatment. Cardiac {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake was assessed as the heart/mediastinum activity ratio (H/M) before and after treatment. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was also assessed. In the baseline study, H/M and LVEF showed no difference between TC and DCM (2.21{+-}0.44 vs. 2.10{+-}0.42, 35.3{+-}13.1 vs. 36.0{+-}10.9%, respectively). After treatment, the degree of change in H/M and LVEF differed significantly (0.41{+-}0.34 vs. 0.08{+-}0.20, 20.5{+-}14.4 vs. -2.1{+-}9.6%, p<0.01). In TC, heart failure improved after a shorter duration of treatment (p<0.05). In conclusion, anti-tachycardia therapy can improve altered cardiac adrenergic function and systolic function in patients with TC over a shorter period than in those with DCM. (author)

  1. Improved performance of maternal-fetal medicine staff after maternal cardiac arrest simulation-based training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nelli; Eisen, Lewis A; Bayya, Jyothshna V; Dulu, Alina; Bernstein, Peter S; Merkatz, Irwin R; Goffman, Dena

    2011-09-01

    To determine the impact of simulation-based maternal cardiac arrest training on performance, knowledge, and confidence among Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff (n = 19) participated in a maternal arrest simulation program. Based on evaluation of performance during initial simulations, an intervention was designed including: basic life support course, advanced cardiac life support pregnancy modification lecture, and simulation practice. Postintervention evaluative simulations were performed. All simulations included a knowledge test, confidence survey, and debriefing. A checklist with 9 pregnancy modification (maternal) and 16 critical care (25 total) tasks was used for scoring. Postintervention scores reflected statistically significant improvement. Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff demonstrated statistically significant improvement in timely initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (120 vs 32 seconds, P = .042) and cesarean delivery (240 vs 159 seconds, P = .017). Prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation initiation and pregnancy modifications application are critical in maternal and fetal survival during cardiac arrest. Simulation is a useful tool for Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff to improve skills, knowledge, and confidence in the management of this catastrophic event. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  2. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Adriana de Oliveira; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Trombetta, Ivani Credidio; Dantas, Marciano Moacir; Oliveira Marques, Ana Cristina; do Nascimento, Leone Severino; Barbosa, Bruno Teixeira; Dos Santos, Marcelo Rodrigues; Andrade, Maria do Amparo; Jaguaribe-Lima, Anna Myrna; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do Socorro

    2017-01-01

    regular physical activity improves neurovascular control of muscle blood flow and cardiac autonomic response during isometric handgrip exercise in healthy older adult subjects. PMID:28721030

  3. Improving Communication During Cardiac ICU Multidisciplinary Rounds Through Visual Display of Patient Daily Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Lindsey B; Cooper, David S; Henderson, Carla; Brown, James; Simon, Katherine; Clark, Lindsey; Fleckenstein, Elizabeth; Benscoter, Alexis; Nelson, David P

    2016-07-01

    To improve communication during daily cardiac ICU multidisciplinary rounds. Quality improvement methodology. Twenty-five-bed cardiac ICUs in an academic free-standing pediatric hospital. All patients admitted to the cardiac ICU. Implementation of visual display of patient daily goals through a write-down and read-back process. The Rounds Effectiveness Assessment and Communication Tool was developed based on the previously validated Patient Knowledge Assessment Tool to evaluate comprehension of patient daily goals. Rounds were assessed for each patient by the bedside nurse, nurse practitioner or fellow, and attending physician, and answers were compared to determine percent agreement per day. At baseline, percent agreement for patient goals was only 62%. After initial implementation of the daily goal write-down/read-back process, which was written on paper by the bedside nurse, the Rounds Effectiveness Assessment and Communication Tool survey revealed no improvement. With adaptation of the intervention so goals were written on whiteboards for visual display during rounds, the percent agreement improved to 85%. Families were also asked to complete a survey (1-6 Likert scale) of their satisfaction with rounds and understanding of daily goals before and after the intervention. Family survey results improved from a mean of 4.6-5.7. Parent selection of the best possible score for each question was 19% at baseline and 75% after the intervention. Visual display of patient daily goals via a write-down/read-back process improves comprehension of goals by all team members and improves parent satisfaction. The daily goal whiteboard facilitates consistent development of a comprehensive plan of care for each patient, fosters goal-directed care, and provides a checklist for providers and parents to review throughout the day.

  4. Pioglitazone improves cardiac function and alters myocardial substrate metabolism without affecting cardiac triglyceride accumulation and high-energy phosphate metabolism in patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Rutger W.; Rijzewijk, Luuk J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.; Lamb, Hildo J.; Lubberink, Mark; Romijn, Johannes A.; Bax, Jeroen J.; de Roos, Albert; Kamp, Otto; Paulus, Walter J.; Heine, Robert J.; Lammertsma, Adriaan A.; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Diamant, Michaela

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac disease is the leading cause of mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Pioglitazone has been associated with improved cardiac outcome but also with an elevated risk of heart failure. We determined the effects of pioglitazone on myocardial function in relation to cardiac high-energy

  5. Pravastatin But Not Simvastatin Improves Survival and Neurofunctional Outcome After Cardiac Arrest and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bergt, MD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Cardiac arrest (CA followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is associated with high mortality and poor neurological outcome. We compared the effects of pravastatin and simvastatin on survival and neurofunction in a murine model of CA/CPR. Pravastatin, a hydrophilic statin, increased survival and neurofunction during a 28-day follow-up period. This therapy was associated with improved pulmonary function, reduced pulmonary edema, and increased endothelial cell function in vitro. In contrast, lipophilic simvastatin did not modulate survival but increased pulmonary edema and impaired endothelial cell function. Although pravastatin may display a therapeutic option for post-CA syndrome, the application of simvastatin may require re-evaluation. Key Words: cardiac arrest, endothelial cell function, ischemia and reperfusion injury, pravastatin, resuscitation, simvastatin

  6. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Siemensstrasse 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Eberhard Karls University, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  7. Improving best-phase image quality in cardiac CT by motion correction with MAM optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohkohl, Christopher; Bruder, Herbert; Stierstorfer, Karl; Flohr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Research in image reconstruction for cardiac CT aims at using motion correction algorithms to improve the image quality of the coronary arteries. The key to those algorithms is motion estimation, which is currently based on 3-D/3-D registration to align the structures of interest in images acquired in multiple heart phases. The need for an extended scan data range covering several heart phases is critical in terms of radiation dose to the patient and limits the clinical potential of the method. Furthermore, literature reports only slight quality improvements of the motion corrected images when compared to the most quiet phase (best-phase) that was actually used for motion estimation. In this paper a motion estimation algorithm is proposed which does not require an extended scan range but works with a short scan data interval, and which markedly improves the best-phase image quality. Methods: Motion estimation is based on the definition of motion artifact metrics (MAM) to quantify motion artifacts in a 3-D reconstructed image volume. The authors use two different MAMs, entropy, and positivity. By adjusting the motion field parameters, the MAM of the resulting motion-compensated reconstruction is optimized using a gradient descent procedure. In this way motion artifacts are minimized. For a fast and practical implementation, only analytical methods are used for motion estimation and compensation. Both the MAM-optimization and a 3-D/3-D registration-based motion estimation algorithm were investigated by means of a computer-simulated vessel with a cardiac motion profile. Image quality was evaluated using normalized cross-correlation (NCC) with the ground truth template and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD). Four coronary CT angiography patient cases were reconstructed to evaluate the clinical performance of the proposed method. Results: For the MAM-approach, the best-phase image quality could be improved for all investigated heart phases, with a maximum

  8. Innovative web-based multimedia curriculum improves cardiac examination competency of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criley, Jasminka M; Keiner, Jennifer; Boker, John R; Criley, Stuart R; Warde, Carole M

    2008-03-01

    Proper diagnosis of cardiac disorders is a core competency of internists. Yet numerous studies have documented that the cardiac examination (CE) skills of physicians have declined compared with those of previous generations of physicians, attributed variously to inadequate exposure to cardiac patients and lack of skilled bedside teaching. With growing concerns about ensuring patient safety and quality of care, public and professional organizations are calling for a renewed emphasis on the teaching and evaluation of clinical skills in residency training. The objective of the study was to determine whether Web training improves CE competency, whether residents retain what they learn, and whether a Web-based curriculum plus clinical training is better than clinical training alone. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2008;3:124-133. (c) 2008 Society of Hospital Medicine. This was a controlled intervention study. The intervention group (34 internal and family medicine interns) participated in self-directed use of a Web-based tutorial and three 1-hour teaching sessions taught by a hospitalist. Twenty-five interns from the prior year served as controls. We assessed overall CE competency and 4 subcategories of CE competency: knowledge, audio skills, visual skills, and audio-visual integration. The over mean score of the intervention group significantly improved, from 54 to 66 (P = .002). This improvement was retained (63.5, P = .05). When compared with end-of-year controls, the intervention group had significantly higher end-of-year CE scores (57 vs. 63.5, P = .05), knowledge (P = .04), and audio skills (P = .01). At the end of the academic year, all improvements were retained (P better than clinical training alone. (c) 2008 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  9. Improvement in cardiac function and free fatty acid metabolism in a case of dilated cardiomyopathy with CD36 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirooka, K; Yasumura, Y; Ishida, Y; Komamura, K; Hanatani, A; Nakatani, S; Yamagishi, M; Miyatake, K

    2000-09-01

    A 27-year-old man diagnosed as having dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) without myocardial accumulation of 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid, and he was found to have type I CD36 deficiency. This abnormality of cardiac free fatty acid metabolism was also confirmed by other methods: 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography, measurements of myocardial respiratory quotient and cardiac fatty acid uptake. Although the type I CD36 deficiency was reconfirmed after 3 months, the abnormal free fatty acid metabolism improved after carvedilol therapy and was accompanied by improved cardiac function. Apart from a cause-and-effect relationship, carvedilol can improve cardiac function and increase free fatty acid metabolism in patients with both DCM and CD36 deficiency.

  10. Improving cardiovascular care through outpatient cardiac rehabilitation: an analysis of payment models that would improve quality and promote use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Holly; Grantham, Sarah; Siegel, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to improving the care of patients with cardiovascular disease by focusing attention on delivery system redesign and payment reforms that encompass the healthcare spectrum, from an acute episode to maintenance of care. However, 1 area of cardiovascular disease care that has received little attention in the advancement of quality is cardiac rehabilitation (CR), a comprehensive secondary prevention program that is significantly underused despite evidence-based guidelines that recommending its use. The purpose of this article was to analyze the applicability of 2 payment and reimbursement models-pay-for-performance and bundled payments for episodes of care--that can promote the use of CR. We conclude that a payment model combining elements of both pay-for-performance and episodes of care would increase the use of CR, which would both improve quality and increase efficiency in cardiac care. Specific elements would need to be clearly defined, however, including: (a) how an episode is defined, (b) how to hold providers accountable for the care they provider, (c) how to encourage participation among CR providers, and (d) how to determine an equitable distribution of payment. Demonstrations testing new payment models must be implemented to generate empirical evidence that a melded pay-for-performance and episode-based care payment model will improve quality and efficiency.

  11. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengwei [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Huang, Chenglin [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu [Key Laboratory of State General Administration of Sport, Shanghai Research Institute of Sports Science, Shanghai 200031 (China); Chen, Hong, E-mail: hchen100@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Shen, Weili, E-mail: weili_shen@hotmail.com [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Vascular Biology, Department of Hypertension and Pharmacology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria.

  12. Ginsenoside Rg3 improves cardiac mitochondrial population quality: Mimetic exercise training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mengwei; Huang, Chenglin; Wang, Cheng; Zheng, Jianheng; Zhang, Peng; Xu, Yangshu; Chen, Hong; Shen, Weili

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Rg3 is an ergogenic aid. •Rg3 improves mitochondrial antioxidant capacity. •Rg3 regulates mitochondria dynamic remodeling. •Rg3 alone matches some the benefits of aerobic exercise. -- Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates exercise training could mediate mitochondrial quality control through the improvement of mitochondrial dynamics. Ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), one of the active ingredients in Panax ginseng, is well known in herbal medicine as a tonic and restorative agent. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of Rg3 has been elusive. In the present study, we compared the effects of Rg3 administration with aerobic exercise on mitochondrial adaptation in cardiac muscle tissue of Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats. Three groups of SD rats were studied: (1) sedentary control, (2) Rg3-treated and (3) aerobic exercise trained. Both aerobic exercise training and Rg3 supplementation enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels in cardiac muscle. The activation of PGC-1α led to increased mRNA levels of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) and nuclear related factor 1(Nrf1), these changes were accompanied by increases in mitochondrial DNA copy number and complex protein levels, while activation of Nrf2 increased levels of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate:quinone oxidoreductase 1(NQO1), superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase. Aerobic exercise also enhanced mitochondrial autophagy pathway activity, including increased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II and greater expression of beclin1 and autophagy-related protein 7 (ATG7), these effects of aerobic exercise are comparable to that of Rg3. These results demonstrate that Rg3 mimics improved cardiac adaptations to exercise by regulating mitochondria dynamic remodeling and enhancing the quantity and quality of mitochondria

  13. Traditional Chinese Medicine Tongxinluo Improves Cardiac Function of Rats with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-Fang Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed at testing the hypothesis that tongxinluo capsule might exert its cardioprotective effect by preventing ventricular remodeling and improving coronary microvascular function in a rat model of doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Rats that survived DCM induction were randomly divided into three groups to be given 1.5 g·kg−1·day−1 (TXL-H, n=9 or 0.15 g·kg−1·day−1 (TXL-L, n=10 of tongxinluo, or normal saline at the same volume (DCM-C, n=10 intragastrically. Age matched normal rats treated with normal saline were used as normal controls (NOR-C, n=9. After four weeks of treatment, the DCM-C, TXL-H, and TXL-L groups exhibited significant cardiac dysfunction, left ventricular remodeling, and coronary microvascular dysfunction, compared with the NOR-C rats. However, myocardial functional parameters were significantly improved and microvascular density (MVD increased in the TXL-H group compared with the DCM-C group (all P<0.01. Left ventricular remodeling was prevented. There were close linear relationships between CVF and LVEF (r=-0.683, P<0.05, MVD and LVEF (r=0.895, P<0.05, and MVD and CVF (r=-0.798, P<0.05. It was indicated that high-dose tongxinluo effectively improved cardiac function in rat model of DCM.

  14. The second phase in creating the cardiac center for the next generation: beyond structure to process improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J

    2001-01-01

    The third generation cardiac institute will build on the successes of the past in structuring the service line, re-organizing to assimilate specialist interests, and re-positioning to expand cardiac services into cardiovascular services. To meet the challenges of an increasingly competitive marketplace and complex delivery system, the focus for this new model will shift away from improved structures, and toward improved processes. This shift will require a sound methodology for statistically measuring and sustaining process changes related to the optimization of cardiovascular care. In recent years, GE Medical Systems has successfully applied Six Sigma methodologies to enable cardiac centers to control key clinical and market development processes through its DMADV, DMAIC and Change Acceleration processes. Data indicates Six Sigma is having a positive impact within organizations across the United States, and when appropriately implemented, this approach can serve as a solid foundation for building the next generation cardiac institute.

  15. Improving outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in young children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Dianne L; Berger, Stuart

    2012-03-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an unusual but devastating occurrence in a young person. Years of life-lost are substantial and long-term health care costs of survivors can be high. However, there have been noteworthy improvements in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) standards, out-of hospital care, and postcardiac arrest therapies that have resulted in a several-fold improvement in resuscitation outcomes. Recent interest and research in resuscitation of children has the promise of generating improvements in the outcomes of these patients. Integrated and coordinated care in the out-of-hospital and hospital settings are required. This article will review the epidemiology of OHCA, the 2010 CPR guidelines, and developments in public access defibrillation for children.

  16. Testosterone receptor blockade after trauma-hemorrhage improves cardiac and hepatic functions in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, D E; Wang, P; Cioffi, W G; Bland, K I; Chaudry, I H

    1997-12-01

    Although studies have shown that testosterone receptor blockade with flutamide after hemorrhage restores the depressed immune function, it remains unknown whether administration of flutamide following trauma and hemorrhage and resuscitation has any salutary effects on the depressed cardiovascular and hepatocellular functions. To study this, male rats underwent a laparotomy (representing trauma) and were then bled and maintained at a mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 40 mmHg until the animals could not maintain this pressure. Ringer lactate was given to maintain a MAP of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximal shed blood volume was returned in the form of Ringer lactate. The rats were then resuscitated with four times the shed blood volume in the form of Ringer lactate over 60 min. Flutamide (25 mg/kg) or an equal volume of the vehicle propanediol was injected subcutaneously 15 min before the end of resuscitation. Various in vivo heart performance parameters (e.g., maximal rate of the pressure increase or decrease), cardiac output, and hepatocellular function (i.e., the maximum velocity and the overall efficiency of indocyanine green clearance) were determined at 20 h after resuscitation. Additionally, hepatic microvascular blood flow (HMBF) was determined using a laser Doppler flowmeter. The results indicate that left ventricular performance, cardiac output, HMBF, and hepatocellular function decreased significantly at 20 h after the completion of trauma, hemorrhage, and resuscitation. Administration of the testosterone receptor blocker flutamide, however, significantly improved cardiac performance, HMBF, and hepatocellular function. Thus flutamide appears to be a novel and useful adjunct for improving cardiovascular and hepatocellular functions in males following trauma and hemorrhagic shock.

  17. Genetic modification of embryonic stem cells with VEGF enhances cell survival and improves cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoyan; Cao, Feng; Sheikh, Ahmad Y; Li, Zongjin; Connolly, Andrew J; Pei, Xuetao; Li, Ren-Ke; Robbins, Robert C; Wu, Joseph C

    2007-01-01

    Cardiac stem cell therapy remains hampered by acute donor cell death posttransplantation and the lack of reliable methods for tracking cell survival in vivo. We hypothesize that cells transfected with inducible vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) can improve their survival as monitored by novel molecular imaging techniques. Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were transfected with an inducible, bidirectional tetracycline (Bi-Tet) promoter driving VEGF(165) and renilla luciferase (Rluc). Addition of doxycycline induced Bi-Tet expression of VEGF(165) and Rluc significantly compared to baseline (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF(165) enhanced ES cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis as determined by Annexin-V staining. For noninvasive imaging, ES cells were transduced with a double fusion (DF) reporter gene consisting of firefly luciferase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (Fluc-eGFP). There was a robust correlation between cell number and Fluc activity (R(2)=0.99). Analysis by immunostaining, histology, and RT-PCR confirmed that expression of Bi-Tet and DF systems did not affect ES cell self-renewal or pluripotency. ES cells were differentiated into beating embryoid bodies expressing cardiac markers such as troponin, Nkx2.5, and beta-MHC. Afterward, 5 x 10(5) cells obtained from these beating embryoid bodies or saline were injected into the myocardium of SV129 mice (n=36) following ligation of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and echocardiography showed that VEGF(165) induction led to significant improvements in both transplanted cell survival and cardiac function (p<0.05). This is the first study to demonstrate imaging of embryonic stem cell-mediated gene therapy targeting cardiovascular disease. With further validation, this platform may have broad applications for current basic research and further clinical studies.

  18. Regular physical exercise improves cardiac autonomic and muscle vasodilatory responses to isometric exercise in healthy elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmento AO

    2017-06-01

    sympathetic activity compared to physically active older adult subjects at baseline (63.13±3.31 vs 50.45±3.55 nu, P=0.02. The variance (heart rate variability index was increased in active older adults (1,438.64±448.90 vs 1,402.92±385.14 ms, P=0.02, and cardiac sympathetic activity (symbolic analysis was increased in sedentary older adults (5,660.91±1,626.72 vs 4,381.35±1,852.87, P=0.03 during isometric handgrip exercise. Sedentary older adults showed higher cardiac sympathetic activity (spectral analysis (71.29±4.40 vs 58.30±3.50 nu, P=0.03 and lower parasympathetic modulation (28.79±4.37 vs 41.77±3.47 nu, P=0.03 compared to physically active older adult subjects during isometric handgrip exercise. Regarding muscle vasodilation response, there was an increase in the skeletal muscle blood flow in the second (4.1±0.5 vs 3.7±0.4 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.01 and third minute (4.4±0.4 vs 3.9±0.3 mL/min per 100 mL, P=0.03 of handgrip exercise in active older adults. The results indicate that regular physical activity improves neurovascular control of muscle blood flow and cardiac autonomic response during isometric handgrip exercise in healthy older adult subjects. Keywords: forearm blood flow, handgrip exercise, heart rate variability, sympathetic, parasympathetic, aging

  19. Amlodipine and Atorvastatin Improved Hypertensive Cardiac Remodeling through Regulation of MMPs/TIMPs in SHR Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchao Lu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: MMPs/TIMPs system is well known to play important roles in pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling, and Amlodipine and Atorvastatin have been showed to exert favourable protective effects on cardiovascular disease, however, it is not clear whether Amlodipine and Atorvastatin can improve hypertensive cardiac remodeling and whether the MMPs/TIMPs system is involved. The present study aims to answer these questions. Methods: 36 weeks old male spontaneous hypertension (SHR rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1. SHR control group, 2. Amlodipine alone (10 mg/kg/d group, 3. Atorvastatin alone (10 mg/kg/d group, 4.Combination of Amlodipine and Atorvastatin (10 mg/kg/d for each group. Same gender, weight and age of Wistar-Kyoto (WKY rats with normal blood pressure were used as normal control. Drugs were administered by oral gavage over 12 weeks. The blood pressure and left ventricle mass index were measured. Enzyme activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 was assessed with Gelatin zymography. MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 mRNA and protein expression was studied by RT-PCR and Western blot. Single factor ANOVA and LSD-t test were used in statistical analysis. Results: Treatment with Amlodipine alone or combination with atorvastatin significantly decreased blood pressure, left ventricle mass index in SHR rats (P Conclusion: Amlodipine and Atorvastatin could improve ventricular remodeling in SHR rats through intervention with the imbalance of MMP-2/TIMP-2 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 system.

  20. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Yu; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-09-22

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight / body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions.

  1. Apocynin improving cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease is associated with up-regulation of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Cai, Qingqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is one of the most common cardiac abnormalities and associated with a high mortality in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Apocynin, a nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor, has been showed cardio-protective effects. However, whether apocynin can improve cardiac remodeling in CRF and what is the underlying mechanism are unclear. In the present study, we enrolled 94 participants. In addition, we used 5/6 nephrectomized rats to mimic cardiac remodeling in CRF. Serum levels of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) and its mainly metabolic enzyme-soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were measured. The results showed that the serum levels of EETs were significantly decreased in renocardiac syndrome participants (P < 0.05). In 5/6 nephrectomized CRF model, the ratio of left ventricular weight /body weight, left ventricular posterior wall thickness, and cardiac interstitial fibrosis were significantly increased while ejection fraction significantly decreased (P < 0.05). All these effects could partly be reversed by apocynin. Meanwhile, we found during the process of cardiac remodeling in CRF, apocynin significantly increased the reduced serum levels of EETs and decreased the mRNA and protein expressions of sEH in the heart (P < 0.05). Our findings indicated that the protective effect of apocynin on cardiac remodeling in CRF was associated with the up-regulation of EETs. EETs may be a new mediator for the injury of kidney-heart interactions. PMID:26322503

  2. Heme oxygenase-1 induction improves cardiac function following myocardial ischemia by reducing oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossi Issan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation.In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured.HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine phospho kinase (CK, decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05. CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01, reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively. CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05. The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05. CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05 in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects.HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by the increased levels of pAKT with

  3. Operational Efficiency and Productivity Improvement Initiatives in a Large Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Grant W; Hantz, Scott; Cunningham, Rebecca; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Ellis, Stephen G; Khot, Umesh; Rak, Joe; Kapadia, Samir R

    2018-02-26

    This study sought to report outcomes from an efficiency improvement project in a large cardiac cath lab. Operational inefficiencies are common in the cath lab, yet solutions are challenging. A detailed report describing and providing solutions for these inefficiencies may be valuable in guiding improvements in productivity. In this observational study, the authors report metrics of efficiency before and after a cath lab quality improvement program in June 2014. Main outcomes included lab room start times, room turnaround times, laboratory use, and employee satisfaction. Time series analysis was used to assess trend over time. Chi-square testing and analysis of variance were used to assess change before and after the initiative. The principal changes included implementation of a pyramidal nursing schedule, increased use of an electronic scheduling system, and increased utilization of a preparation and recovery area. Comparing before with after the program, start times improved an average of 17 min, and on-time starts improved from 61.8% to 81.7% (p = 0.0024). Turnaround times improved from 20.5 min to 16.4 min (trend p productivity. This knowledge may be helpful in assisting other cath labs in similar efficiency improvement initiatives. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Leonurine (SCM-198) improves cardiac recovery in rat during chronic infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, XinHua; Pan, LiLong; Gong, QiHai; Zhu, YiZhun

    2010-12-15

    Leonurine, an alkaloid typically found in Herba leonuri, is known to have both antioxidant and cardioprotective properties. In the present study, we investigated the cardioprotective mechanism of leonurine the in vivo rat model of chronic myocardial ischemia and in vitro H9c2 cardiac myocyte model of oxidative stress. Myocardial ischemia was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Rats were divided into sham, myocardial ischemia+saline, and myocardial ischemia+leonurine (15 mg/kg/day). Cardiac function was recorded by catheterization. Apoptosis-related factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), survivin, Bcl-2 and Bax and pro-survival signaling pathways Akt, hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α were measured by Western blotting or RT-PCR. Our results showed leonurine significantly improved myocardial function as evidenced by the decreased left ventricle end-diastolic pressure and the increased +dP/dt. Interestingly, leonurine increased the phosphorylation of Akt, the protein and gene expression of Bcl-2, but it reduced the protein and gene expression of Bax in vivo. Meanwhile leonurine significantly increased Akt phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in H9c2 cardiac myocyte induced by oxidative stress in vitro, which was abolished by a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, leonurine not only increased the expression of HIF-1α but also the expression of survivin and VEGF. The results of present study demonstrated, for the first time that leonurine has potent anti-apoptotic effects after chronic myocardial ischemia mediated by activating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Angiogenic mechanisms may be partially responsible for such an effect, which needs to be studied further. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Nutrition Therapy in Critically Ill Patients Following Cardiac Surgery: Defining and Improving Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adam; Agarwala, Ravi; Martin, Claudio; Nagpal, Dave; Teitelbaum, Michael; Heyland, Daren K

    2017-09-01

    Malnutrition is a predictor of poor outcome following cardiac surgery. We define nutrition therapy after cardiac surgery to identify opportunities for improvement. International prospective studies in 2007-2009, 2011, and 2013 were combined. Sites provided institutional and patient characteristics from intensive care unit (ICU) admission to ICU discharge for a maximum of 12 days. Patients had valvular, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, or combined procedures and were mechanically ventilated and staying in the ICU for ≥3 days. There were 787 patients from 144 ICUs. In total, 120 patients (15.2%) had valvular surgery, 145 patients (18.4%) had CABG, and 522 patients (66.3%) underwent a combined procedure. Overall, 60.1% of patients received artificial nutrition support. For these patients, 78% received enteral nutrition (EN) alone, 17% received a combination of EN and parenteral nutrition (PN), and 5% received PN alone. The remaining 314 patients (40%) received no nutrition. The mean (SD) time from ICU admission to EN initiation was 2.3 (1.8) days. The adequacy of calories was 32.4% ± 31.9% from EN and PN and 25.5% ± 27.9% for patients receiving only EN. In EN patients, 57% received promotility agents and 20% received small bowel feeding. There was no significant relationship between increased energy or protein provision and 60-day mortality. Postoperative cardiac surgery patients who stay in the ICU for 3 or more days are at high risk for inadequate nutrition therapy. Further studies are required to determine if targeted nutrition therapy may alter clinical outcomes.

  6. Face-to-face handoff: improving transfer to the pediatric intensive care unit after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergales, Jeffrey; Addison, Nancy; Vendittelli, Analise; Nicholson, Evelyn; Carver, D Jeannean; Stemland, Christopher; Hoke, Tracey; Gangemi, James

    2015-01-01

    The goal was to develop and implement a comprehensive, primarily face-to-face handoff process that begins in the operating room and concludes at the bedside in the intensive care unit (ICU) for pediatric patients undergoing congenital heart surgery. Involving all stakeholders in the planning phase, the framework of the handoff system encompassed a combination of a formalized handoff tool, focused process steps that occurred prior to patient arrival in the ICU, and an emphasis on face-to-face communication at the conclusion of the handoff. The final process was evaluated by the use of observer checklists to examine quality metrics and timing for all patients admitted to the ICU following cardiac surgery. The process was found to improve how various providers view the efficiency of handoff, the ease of asking questions at each step, and the overall capability to improve patient care regardless of overall surgical complexity. © 2014 by the American College of Medical Quality.

  7. Improved survival after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using new guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, Jacob; Barnung, S.; Nielsen, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is associated with a poor prognosis. We hypothesized that the implementations of 2005 European Resuscitation Council resuscitation guidelines were associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA. METHODS: We prospectively recorded data on all....... Treatment after implementation was confirmed as a significant predictor of better 30-day survival in a logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION: The implementation of new resuscitation guidelines was associated with improved 30-day survival after OHCA Udgivelsesdato: 2008/8...... patients with OHCA treated by the Mobile Emergency Care Unit of Copenhagen in two periods: 1 June 2004 until 31 August 2005 (before implementation) and 1 January 2006 until 31 March 2007 (after implementation), separated by a 4-month period in which the above-mentioned change took place. RESULTS: We found...

  8. Sca-1+ cardiosphere-derived cells are enriched for Isl1-expressing cardiac precursors and improve cardiac function after myocardial injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqin Ye

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endogenous cardiac progenitor cells are a promising option for cell-therapy for myocardial infarction (MI. However, obtaining adequate numbers of cardiac progenitors after MI remains a challenge. Cardiospheres (CSs have been proposed to have cardiac regenerative properties; however, their cellular composition and how they may be influenced by the tissue milieu remains unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using "middle aged" mice as CSs donors, we found that acute MI induced a dramatic increase in the number of CSs in a mouse model of MI, and this increase was attenuated back to baseline over time. We also observed that CSs from post-MI hearts engrafted in ischemic myocardium induced angiogenesis and restored cardiac function. To determine the role of Sca-1(+CD45(- cells within CSs, we cloned these from single cell isolates. Expression of Islet-1 (Isl1 in Sca-1(+CD45(- cells from CSs was 3-fold higher than in whole CSs. Cloned Sca-1(+CD45(- cells had the ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells in vitro. We also observed that cloned cells engrafted in ischemic myocardium induced angiogenesis, differentiated into endothelial and smooth muscle cells and improved cardiac function in post-MI hearts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies demonstrate that cloned Sca-1(+CD45(- cells derived from CSs from infarcted "middle aged" hearts are enriched for second heart field (i.e., Isl-1(+ precursors that give rise to both myocardial and vascular tissues, and may be an appropriate source of progenitor cells for autologous cell-therapy post-MI.

  9. Improved Imaging in Cardiac Patients: echocardiography and CT-coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. Galema (Tjebbe)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractDiff erent non-invasive imaging modalities are used for to assess cardiac anatomy and function. Echocardiography and MRI allow assessment of cardiac structures and function of the cardiac chambers and valves as well as perfusion of the left ventricular wall while CT-angiography in

  10. Improvement of cardiac function persists long term with medical therapy for left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Chang, Richard; Umakanthan, Branavan; Stoletniy, Liset N; Heywood, J Thomas

    2007-09-01

    In certain patients with left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction, improvements in cardiac function are seen after initiation of medical therapy; however, the long-term stability of ventricular function in such patients is not well described. We retrospectively analyzed 171 patients who had a baseline ejection fraction of 45% or less, a follow-up echocardiogram at 2 to 12 months after initiation of medical therapy, and a final echocardiogram. We found that 48.5% of the patients demonstrated initial improvements in LV function after initiation of medical therapy, and the improvements appear to be sustained (88% of patients) at 44 +/- 21 months follow-up. A nonischemic etiology and younger age were the only independent predictors of change of LV ejection fraction of 10 or more at a mean 8.4 +/- 3.4 months after optimal medical therapy. Our study revealed a trend toward improved long-term survival in individuals with an early improvement in LV ejection fraction with medical therapy, especially in those with sustained improvement.

  11. [Sodium hydrosulfide improves cardiac functions and structures in rats with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Chao-ying; Zhang, Ting

    2011-11-22

    .05). H(2)S may improve cardiac functions and ameliorate cardiac structures in rats with chronic heart failure probably through dilating the blood vessels and affecting the extracellular collagen metabolism.

  12. Prospective randomized controlled intervention trial: Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Improves Cardiac autonomic functions and Quality of life in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Jyotsna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: To assess the effect of Comprehensive Yogic Breathing Program on glycemic control, quality of life, and cardiac autonomic functions in diabetes. Material and Methods: This is a prospective randomized controlled intervention trial. Cardiac autonomic functions were assessed in 120 diabetics. Patients were randomized into two groups, one group receiving standard therapy for diabetes (n = 56 and the other group receiving standard therapy for diabetes and comprehensive yogic breathing program (n = 64. Standard therapy included advice on diet, walk, and oral antidiabetic drugs. Comprehensive yogic breathing program was an interactive session in which Sudarshan kriya yoga, a rhythmic cyclical breathing, preceded by Pranayam was taught under guidance of a certified teacher. Change in fasting, post prandial blood sugars, glycated hemoglobin, and quality of life were assessed. Cardiac autonomic function tests were done before and six months after intervention. Results: There was significant improvement in psychological (P = 0.006 and social domains (P = 0.04 and total quality of life (P = 0.02 in the group practicing comprehensive yogic breathing program as compared to the group following standard therapy alone. In the group following breathing program, the improvement in sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions was statistically significant (P = 0.01, while the change in the standard group was not significant (P = 0.17. When both parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac autonomic functions were considered, there was a trend toward improvement in patients following comprehensive yogic breathing program (P = 0.07. In the standard therapy group, no change in cardiac autonomic functions was noted (P = 0.76. The parameters of glycemic control were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: There was significant improvement in quality of life and cardiac autonomic functions in the diabetes patients practicing comprehensive yogic breathing

  13. Improvements in logistics could increase survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömsöe, A; Afzelius, S; Axelsson, C; Södersved Källestedt, M L; Enlund, M; Svensson, L; Herlitz, J

    2013-06-01

    In a review based on estimations and assumptions, to report the estimated number of survivors after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was started and to speculate about possible future improvements in Sweden. An observational study. All ambulance organisations in Sweden. Patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry who suffered an OHCA between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Approximately 80% of OHCA cases in Sweden in which CPR was started are included. None In 11 005 patients, the 1-month survival rate was 9.4%. There are approximately 5000 OHCA cases annually in which CPR is started and 30-day survival is achieved in up to 500 patients yearly (6 per 100 000 inhabitants). Based on findings on survival in relation to the time to calling for the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) and the start of CPR and defibrillation, it was estimated that, if the delay from collapse to (i) calling EMS, (ii) the start of CPR, and (iii) the time to defibrillation were reduced to <2 min, <2 min, and <8 min, respectively, 300-400 additional lives could be saved. Based on findings relating to the delay to calling for the EMS and the start of CPR and defibrillation, we speculate that 300-400 additional OHCA patients yearly (4 per 100 000 inhabitants) could be saved in Sweden. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  14. Improved approach to quantitative cardiac volumetrics using automatic thresholding and manual trimming: a cardiovascular MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayarao, Geetha; Biederman, Robert W W; Williams, Ronald B; Yamrozik, June A; Lombardi, Richard; Doyle, Mark

    2018-01-01

    To establish the clinical validity and accuracy of automatic thresholding and manual trimming (ATMT) by comparing the method with the conventional contouring method for in vivo cardiac volume measurements. CMR was performed on 40 subjects (30 patients and 10 controls) using steady-state free precession cine sequences with slices oriented in the short-axis and acquired contiguously from base to apex. Left ventricular (LV) volumes, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and stroke volume (SV) were obtained with ATMT and with the conventional contouring method. Additionally, SV was measured independently using CMR phase velocity mapping (PVM) of the aorta for validation. Three methods of calculating SV were compared by applying Bland-Altman analysis. The Bland-Altman standard deviation of variation (SD) and offset bias for LV SV for the three sets of data were: ATMT-PVM (7.65, [Formula: see text]), ATMT-contours (7.85, [Formula: see text]), and contour-PVM (11.01, 4.97), respectively. Equating the observed range to the error contribution of each approach, the error magnitude of ATMT:PVM:contours was in the ratio 1:2.4:2.5. Use of ATMT for measuring ventricular volumes accommodates trabeculae and papillary structures more intuitively than contemporary contouring methods. This results in lower variation when analyzing cardiac structure and function and consequently improved accuracy in assessing chamber volumes.

  15. Edaravone Improves Septic Cardiac Function by Inducing an HIF-1α/HO-1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao He

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic myocardial dysfunction remains prevalent and raises mortality rate in patients with sepsis. During sepsis, tissues undergo tremendous oxidative stress which contributes critically to organ dysfunction. Edaravone, a potent radical scavenger, has been proved beneficial in ischemic injuries involving hypoxia-inducible factor- (HIF- 1, a key regulator of a prominent antioxidative protein heme oxygenase- (HO- 1. However, its effect in septic myocardial dysfunction remains unclarified. We hypothesized that edaravone may prevent septic myocardial dysfunction by inducing the HIF-1/HO-1 pathway. Rats were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP with or without edaravone infusion at three doses (50, 100, or 200 mg/kg, resp. before CLP and intraperitoneal injection of the HIF-1α antagonist, ME (15 mg/kg, after CLP. After CLP, rats had cardiac dysfunction, which was associated with deformed myocardium, augmented lipid peroxidation, and increased myocardial apoptosis and inflammation, along with decreased activities of catalase, HIF-1α, and HO-1 in the myocardium. Edaravone pretreatment dose-dependently reversed the changes, of which high dose most effectively improved cardiac function and survival rate of septic rats. However, inhibition of HIF-1α by ME demolished the beneficial effects of edaravone at high dose, reducing the survival rate of the septic rats without treatments. Taken together, edaravone, by inducing the HIF-1α/HO-1 pathway, suppressed oxidative stress and protected the heart against septic myocardial injury and dysfunction.

  16. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion

  17. Patient-centric Blood Pressure–targeted Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improves Survival from Cardiac Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Stuart H.; Naim, Maryam Y.; Lampe, Joshua W.; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R.; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Becker, Lance B.; Berg, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. Objectives: To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods: After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure–targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. Measurements and Main Results: The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9–13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0–12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0–3] vs. 2 [range, 2–2]; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Blood pressure–targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest. PMID:25321490

  18. Patient-centric blood pressure-targeted cardiopulmonary resuscitation improves survival from cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Friess, Stuart H; Naim, Maryam Y; Lampe, Joshua W; Bratinov, George; Weiland, Theodore R; Garuccio, Mia; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Becker, Lance B; Berg, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Although current resuscitation guidelines are rescuer focused, the opportunity exists to develop patient-centered resuscitation strategies that optimize the hemodynamic response of the individual in the hopes to improve survival. To determine if titrating cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to blood pressure would improve 24-hour survival compared with traditional CPR in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated ventricular fibrillation (VF). After 7 minutes of asphyxia, followed by VF, 20 female 3-month-old swine randomly received either blood pressure-targeted care consisting of titration of compression depth to a systolic blood pressure of 100 mm Hg and vasopressors to a coronary perfusion pressure greater than 20 mm Hg (BP care); or optimal American Heart Association Guideline care consisting of depth of 51 mm with standard advanced cardiac life support epinephrine dosing (Guideline care). All animals received manual CPR for 10 minutes before first shock. Primary outcome was 24-hour survival. The 24-hour survival was higher in the BP care group (8 of 10) compared with Guideline care (0 of 10); P = 0.001. Coronary perfusion pressure was higher in the BP care group (point estimate +8.5 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-13.0 mm Hg; P < 0.01); however, depth was higher in Guideline care (point estimate +9.3 mm; 95% confidence interval, 6.0-12.5 mm; P < 0.01). Number of vasopressor doses before first shock was higher in the BP care group versus Guideline care (median, 3 [range, 0-3] vs. 2 [range, 2-2]; P = 0.003). Blood pressure-targeted CPR improves 24-hour survival compared with optimal American Heart Association care in a porcine model of asphyxia-associated VF cardiac arrest.

  19. Missing Value Imputation Improves Mortality Risk Prediction Following Cardiac Surgery: An Investigation of an Australian Patient Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Md Nazmul; Reid, Christopher M; Tran, Lavinia; Cochrane, Andrew; Billah, Baki

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of missing values on the prediction performance of the model predicting 30-day mortality following cardiac surgery as an example. Information from 83,309 eligible patients, who underwent cardiac surgery, recorded in the Australia and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) database registry between 2001 and 2014, was used. An existing 30-day mortality risk prediction model developed from ANZSCTS database was re-estimated using the complete cases (CC) analysis and using multiple imputation (MI) analysis. Agreement between the risks generated by the CC and MI analysis approaches was assessed by the Bland-Altman method. Performances of the two models were compared. One or more missing predictor variables were present in 15.8% of the patients in the dataset. The Bland-Altman plot demonstrated significant disagreement between the risk scores (prisk of mortality. Compared to CC analysis, MI analysis resulted in an average of 8.5% decrease in standard error, a measure of uncertainty. The MI model provided better prediction of mortality risk (observed: 2.69%; MI: 2.63% versus CC: 2.37%, Pvalues improved the 30-day mortality risk prediction following cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition improves cardiac fatty acid metabolism in patients with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, S; Takeishi, Y; Minamihaba, O; Arimoto, T; Hirono, O; Takahashi, H; Miyamoto, T; Nitobe, J; Nozaki, N; Tachibana, H; Watanabe, T; Fukui, A; Kubota, I

    2003-08-01

    This study aimed to examine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition improved cardiac fatty acid metabolism in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Myocardial 123I-beta-methyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (123I-BMIPP) imaging was performed in 25 patients with CHF and in 10 control subjects. Myocardial 123I-BMIPP images were obtained 30 min and 4 h after tracer injection. The heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) ratio of 123I-BMIPP uptake and the washout rate of 123I-BMIPP from the myocardium were calculated. Patients were given enalapril for 6 months, and 123I-BMIPP imaging was repeated. H/M ratios on early and delayed images were lower in CHF patients than in normal controls (Pacid metabolism by ACE inhibition may represent a new mechanism for the beneficial effect of this therapy in heart failure.

  1. Impact of lean six sigma process improvement methodology on cardiac catheterization laboratory efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shikhar; Gallo, Justin J; Parashar, Akhil; Agarwal, Kanika K; Ellis, Stephen G; Khot, Umesh N; Spooner, Robin; Murat Tuzcu, Emin; Kapadia, Samir R

    2016-03-01

    Operational inefficiencies are ubiquitous in several healthcare processes. To improve the operational efficiency of our catheterization laboratory (Cath Lab), we implemented a lean six sigma process improvement initiative, starting in June 2010. We aimed to study the impact of lean six sigma implementation on improving the efficiency and the patient throughput in our Cath Lab. All elective and urgent cardiac catheterization procedures including diagnostic coronary angiography, percutaneous coronary interventions, structural interventions and peripheral interventions performed between June 2009 and December 2012 were included in the study. Performance metrics utilized for analysis included turn-time, physician downtime, on-time patient arrival, on-time physician arrival, on-time start and manual sheath-pulls inside the Cath Lab. After implementation of lean six sigma in the Cath Lab, we observed a significant improvement in turn-time, physician downtime, on-time patient arrival, on-time physician arrival, on-time start as well as sheath-pulls inside the Cath Lab. The percentage of cases with optimal turn-time increased from 43.6% in 2009 to 56.6% in 2012 (p-trendprocess improvement initiative, lean six sigma, on improving and sustaining efficiency of our Cath Lab operation. After the successful implementation of this continuous quality improvement initiative, there was a significant improvement in the selected performance metrics namely turn-time, physician downtime, on-time patient arrival, on-time physician arrival, on-time start as well as sheath-pulls inside the Cath Lab. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Improving patient care in cardiac surgery using Toyota production system based methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Michael H; Kunkle, Richard F; Frndak, Diane C; Grunden, Naida; Maher, Thomas D; Magovern, George J

    2011-02-01

    A new cardiac surgery program was developed in a community hospital setting using the operational excellence (OE) method, which is based on the principles of the Toyota production system. The initial results of the first 409 heart operations, performed over the 28 months between March 1, 2008, and June 30, 2010, are presented. Operational excellence methodology was taught to the cardiac surgery team. Coaching started 2 months before the opening of the program and continued for 24 months. Of the 409 cases presented, 253 were isolated coronary artery bypass graft operations. One operative death occurred. According to the database maintained by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons, the risk-adjusted operative mortality rate was 61% lower than the regional rate. Likewise, the risk-adjusted rate of major complications was 57% lower than The Society of Thoracic Surgeons regional rate. Daily solution to determine cause was attempted on 923 distinct perioperative problems by all team members. Using the cost of complications as described by Speir and coworkers, avoiding predicted complications resulted in a savings of at least $884,900 as compared with the regional average. By the systematic use of a real time, highly formatted problem-solving methodology, processes of care improved daily. Using carefully disciplined teamwork, reliable implementation of evidence-based protocols was realized by empowering the front line to make improvements. Low rates of complications were observed, and a cost savings of $3,497 per each case of isolated coronary artery bypass graft was realized. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga improves cardiac autonomic control in patients with anxiety-depression disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Tobaldini, Eleonora; Solbiati, Monica; Costantino, Giorgio; Sanlorenzo, Roberto; Doria, Stefania; Irtelli, Floriana; Mencacci, Claudio; Montano, Nicola

    2017-05-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that adjuvant therapies as exercise and breathing training are effective in improving cardiac autonomic control (CAC) in patients with affective spectrum disorders. However, the effects of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) on autonomic function in this population is unknown. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that SKY training improves CAC and cardiorespiratory coupling in patients with anxiety and/or depression disorders. Forty-six patients with a diagnosis of anxiety and/or depression disorders (DSM-IV) were consecutively enrolled and divided in two groups: 1) conventional therapy (Control) and 2) conventional therapy associated with SKY (Treatment) for 15 days. Anxiety and depression levels were determined using quantitative questionnaires. For the assessment of CAC and cardiorespiratory coupling, cardiorespiratory traces were analyzed using monovariate and bivariate autoregressive spectral analysis, respectively. After 15-days, we observed a reduction of anxiety and depression levels only in Treatment group. Moreover, sympathetic modulation and CAC were significantly lower while parasympathetic modulation and cardiorespiratory coupling were significantly higher in the Treatment compared to Control group. Intensive breathing training using SKY approach improves anxiety and/or depressive disorders as well as CAC and cardiorespiratory coupling. These finding suggest that the SKY training may be a useful non-pharmacological intervention to improve symptoms and reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with anxiety/depression disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Szot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL. According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA.Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were introduced only recently. Another problematic issue is that scientists describing the pathophysiology of both CSX and MA stress a lack of a deeper insight into the multifactorial etiology of the source of pain associated with this disease. In the presented article we have attempted to study the influence of cardiac rehabilitation (3 months programme on the QoL of patients recognized as suffering from MA, as well as to check if changes in myocardial perfusion in these patients at baseline and after completion of cardiac rehabilitation match changes in their QoL. Therefore, after screening 436 women for MA, we studied 55 of them who were confirmed as having MA and who agreed to participate in the study. Exercise tests, Myocardial Perfusion Imaging, and QoL questionnaires were studied at baseline and after completing 3 months period of cardiac rehabilitation. Results were subsequently compared, which showed a link between improved perfusion score in SPECT study and improved overall physical capacity, on one hand, and improved QoL score on the other. These results confirm that cardiac rehabilitation is a very useful treatment option for MA patients. It seems that training during cardiac rehabilitation is a very important factor (improved physical efficiency –> increase in self-belief, and that taking into consideration the multifactor pathophysiology of pain, it is connected with a better quality of life for MA patients.

  6. Improved Outcome of Cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Infants and Children Using Magnetic Levitation Centrifugal Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciani, Giovanni Battista; Hoxha, Stiljan; Torre, Salvatore; Rungatscher, Alessio; Menon, Tiziano; Barozzi, Luca; Faggian, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has traditionally been and, for the most part, still is being performed using roller pumps. Use of first-generation centrifugal pumps has yielded controversial outcomes, perhaps due to mechanical properties of the same and the ensuing risk of hemolysis and renal morbidity. Latest-generation centrifugal pumps, using magnetic levitation (ML), exhibit mechanical properties which may have overcome limitations of first-generation devices. This retrospective study aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of veno-arterial (V-A) ECMO for cardiac indications in neonates, infants, and children, using standard (SP) and latest-generation ML centrifugal pumps. Between 2002 and 2014, 33 consecutive neonates, infants, and young children were supported using V-A ECMO for cardiac indications. There were 21 males and 12 females, with median age of 29 days (4 days-5 years) and a median body weight of 3.2 kg (1.9-18 kg). Indication for V-A ECMO were acute circulatory collapse in ICU or ward after cardiac repair in 16 (49%) patients, failure to wean after repair of complex congenital heart disease in 9 (27%), fulminant myocarditis in 4 (12%), preoperative sepsis in 2 (6%), and refractory tachy-arrhythmias in 2 (6%). Central cannulation was used in 27 (81%) patients and peripheral in 6. Seven (21%) patients were supported with SP and 26 (79%) with ML centrifugal pumps. Median duration of support was 82 h (range 24-672 h), with 26 (79%) patients weaned from support. Three patients required a second ECMO run but died on support. Seventeen (51%) patients required peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure. Overall survival to discharge was 39% (13/33 patients). All patients with fulminant myocarditis and with refractory arrhythmias were weaned, and five (83%) survived, whereas no patient supported for sepsis survived. Risk factors for hospital mortality included lower (pumps in infants and children yields outcomes absolutely comparable to

  7. Multicenter Quality Improvement Project to Prevent Sternal Wound Infections in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Cathy; Taylor, Richard; Son, Minnette; Taeed, Roozbeh; Jacobs, Marshall L; Kane, Lauren; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Husain, S Adil

    2017-07-01

    Children undergoing cardiac surgery are at risk for sternal wound infections (SWIs) leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Single-center quality improvement (QI) initiatives have demonstrated decreased infection rates utilizing a bundled approach. This multicenter project was designed to assess the efficacy of a protocolized approach to decrease SWI. Pediatric cardiac programs joined a collaborative effort to prevent SWI. Programs implemented the protocol, collected compliance data, and provided data points from local clinical registries using Society of Thoracic Surgery Congenital Heart Surgery Database harvest-compliant software or from other registries. Nine programs prospectively collected compliance data on 4,198 children. Days between infections were extended from 68.2 days (range: 25-82) to 130 days (range: 43-412). Protocol compliance increased from 76.7% (first quarter) to 91.3% (final quarter). Ninety (1.9%) children developed an SWI preprotocol and 64 (1.5%) postprotocol, P = .18. The 657 (15%) delayed sternal closure patients had a 5% infection rate with 18 (5.7%) in year 1 and 14 (4.3%) in year 2 P = .43. Delayed sternal closure patients demonstrated a trend toward increased risk for SWI of 1.046 for each day the sternum remained open, P = .067. Children who received appropriately timed preop antibiotics developed less infections than those who did not, 1.9% versus 4.1%, P = .007. A multicenter QI project to reduce pediatric SWIs demonstrated an extension of days between infections and a decrease in SWIs. Patients who received preop antibiotics on time had lower SWI rates than those who did not.

  8. Atorvastatin improves cardiac function and remodeling in chronic non-ischemic heart failure: A clinical and pre-clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Elmadbouh

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Atorvastatin with standard CHF therapy improved cardiac function and remodeling. Cardio-protective “pleiotropic” actions of atorvastatin are anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and anti-oxidative. Thus, atorvastatin has a potential therapeutic value in the management of CHF patients.

  9. Implementing a working together model for Aboriginal patients with acute coronary syndrome: an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working together to improve hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daws, Karen; Punch, Amanda; Winters, Michelle; Posenelli, Sonia; Willis, John; MacIsaac, Andrew; Rahman, Muhammad Aziz; Worrall-Carter, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) contributes to the disparity in life expectancy between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. Improving hospital care for Aboriginal patients has been identified as a means of addressing this disparity. This project developed and implemented a working together model of care, comprising an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse, providing care coordination specifically directed at improving attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services for Aboriginal Australians in a large metropolitan hospital in Melbourne. A quality improvement framework using a retrospective case notes audit evaluated Aboriginal patients' admissions to hospital and identified low attendance rates at cardiac rehabilitation services. A working together model of care coordination by an Aboriginal Hospital Liaison Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse was implemented to improve cardiac rehabilitation attendance in Aboriginal patients admitted with ACS to the cardiac wards of the hospital. A retrospective medical records audit showed that there were 68 Aboriginal patients admitted to the cardiac wards with ACS from 1 July 2008 to 30 June 2011. A referral to cardiac rehabilitation was recorded for 42% of these. During the implementation of the model of care, 13 of 15 patients (86%) received a referral to cardiac rehabilitation and eight of the 13 (62%) attended. Implementation of the working together model demonstrated improved referral to and attendance at cardiac rehabilitation services, thereby, has potential to prevent complications and mortality. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC?: Aboriginal Australians experience disparities in access to recommended care for acute coronary syndrome. This may contribute to the life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Australians. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD?: This paper describes a model of care involving an Aboriginal Hospital Liaisons Officer and a specialist cardiac nurse working

  10. Process improvement in cardiac surgery: development and implementation of a reoperation for bleeding checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loor, Gabriel; Vivacqua, Alessandro; Sabik, Joseph F; Li, Liang; Hixson, Eric D; Blackstone, Eugene H; Koch, Colleen G

    2013-11-01

    High-performing health care organizations differentiate themselves by focusing on continuous process improvement initiatives aimed at enhancing patient outcomes. Reoperation for bleeding is an event associated with considerable morbidity risk. Hence, our primary objective was to develop and implement a formal operative checklist to reduce technical reasons for postoperative bleeding. From January 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012, 5812 cardiac surgical procedures were performed at Cleveland Clinic (Cleveland, OH). A multidisciplinary team developed a simple, easy-to-perform hemostasis checklist based on the most common sites of bleeding. An extensive educational in-service was performed before limited, then universal, checklist implementation. Geometric charts were used to track the number of cases between consecutive reoperations for bleeding. We compared these before (phase 0) and after the first limited implementation phase (phase 1) and the universal implementation phase (phase 2) of the checklist. The average number of cases between consecutive reoperations for bleeding increased from 32 in phase 0 to 53 in both phase 1 (P = .002) and phase 2 (P = .01). A substantial reduction in reoperation for bleeding cases followed implementation of a formalized hemostasis checklist. Our findings underscore the important influence of memory aids that focus attention on surgical techniques to improve patient outcomes in a complex, operative work environment. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Using a Multimedia Tool to Improve Cardiac Auscultation Knowledge and Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, David T; Mangrulkar, Rajesh S; Gruppen, Larry D; Lang, Angela L; Grum, Cyril M; Judge, Richard D

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Today's medical school graduates have significant deficits in physical examination skills. Medical educators have been searching for methods to effectively teach and maintain these skills in students. The objective of this study was to determine if an auscultation curriculum centered on a portable multimedia CD-ROM was effective in producing and maintaining significant gains in cardiac auscultatory skills. DESIGN Controlled cohort study PARTICIPANTS All 168 third-year medical students at 1 medical school in an academic medical center. INTERVENTIONS Students were tested before and after exposure to 1 or more elements of the auscultation curriculum: teaching on ward/clinic rotations, CD-ROM comprehensive cases with follow-up seminars, and a CD-ROM 20-case miniseries. The primary outcome measures were student performance on a 10-item test of auscultation skill (listening and identifying heart sound characteristics) and a 30-item test of auscultation knowledge (factual questions about auscultation). A subset of students was tested for attenuation effects 9 or 12 months after the intervention. RESULTS Compared with the control group (1 month clinical rotation alone), students who were also exposed to the CD-ROM 20-case miniseries had significant improvements in auscultation skills scores (P auscultation knowledge beyond the miniseries alone (P auscultation skills. Students' auscultation knowledge diminished one year after the intervention, but auscultation skills did not. CONCLUSION In addition to the standard curriculum of ward and conference teaching, portable multimedia tools may help improve quality of physical examination skills. PMID:11722691

  12. Social media in paediatric heart disease: professional use and opportunities to improve cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Lee, Joyce M; Pasquali, Sara K

    2015-12-01

    Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care.

  13. Renin inhibition improves cardiac function and remodeling after myocardial infarction independent of blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Westermann (Dirk); A. Riad (Alexander); O. Lettau (Olga); A.J.M. Roks (Anton); K. Sawatis (Konstantinos); P.M. Becher (Peter Moritz); F. Escher (Felicitas); A.H.J. Danser (Jan); H.P. Schultheiss (Heinz-Peter); C. Tschöpe (Carsten)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPharmacological renin inhibition with aliskiren is an effective antihypertensive drug treatment, but it is currently unknown whether aliskiren is able to attenuate cardiac failure independent of its blood pressure-lowering effects. We investigated the effect of aliskiren on cardiac

  14. Renal denervation improves cardiac function in rats with chronic heart failure: Effects on expression of β-adrenoceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hong; Liu, Xuefei; Sharma, Neeru M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic activation of the sympathetic drive contributes to cardiac remodeling and dysfunction during chronic heart failure (HF). The present study was undertaken to assess whether renal denervation (RDN) would abrogate the sympathoexcitation in HF and ameliorate the adrenergic dysfunction and cardiac damage. Ligation of the left coronary artery was used to induce HF in Sprague-Dawley rats. Four weeks after surgery, RDN was performed, 1 wk before the final measurements. At the end of the protocol, cardiac function was assessed by measuring ventricular hemodynamics. Rats with HF had an average infarct area >30% of the left ventricle and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) >20 mmHg. β1- and β2-adrenoceptor proteins in the left ventricle were reduced by 37 and 49%, respectively, in the rats with HF. RDN lowered elevated levels of urinary excretion of norepinephrine and brain natriuretic peptide levels in the hearts of rats with HF. RDN also decreased LVEDP to 10 mmHg and improved basal dP/dt to within the normal range in rats with HF. RDN blunted loss of β1-adrenoceptor (by 47%) and β2-adrenoceptor (by 100%) protein expression and improved isoproterenol (0.5 μg/kg)-induced increase in +dP/dt (by 71%) and −dP/dt (by 62%) in rats with HF. RDN also attenuated the increase in collagen 1 expression in the left ventricles of rats with HF. These findings demonstrate that RDN initiated in chronic HF condition improves cardiac function mediated by adrenergic agonist and blunts β-adrenoceptor expression loss, providing mechanistic insights for RDN-induced improvements in cardiac function in the HF condition. PMID:27288440

  15. Improving pediatric cardiac surgical care in developing countries: matching resources to needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearani, Joseph A; Neirotti, Rodolfo; Kohnke, Emily J; Sinha, Kingshuk K; Cabalka, Allison K; Barnes, Roxann D; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Cushing, John C

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews a systematic approach to the design and support of pediatric cardiac surgery programs in the developing world with the guidance and strategies of Children's HeartLink, an experienced non-government organization for more than 40 years. An algorithm with criteria for the selection of a partner site is outlined. A comprehensive education strategy from the physician to the allied health care provider is the mainstay for successful program development. In a partner program, the road to successful advancement and change depends on many factors, such as government support, hospital administration support, medical staff leadership, and a committed and motivated faculty with requisite skills, incentives, and resources. In addition to these factors, it is essential that the development effort includes considerations of environment (eg, governmental support, regulatory environment, and social structure) and health system (elements related to affordability, access, and awareness of care) that impact success. Partner programs should be willing to initiate a clinical database with the intent to analyze and critique their results to optimize quality assurance and improve outcomes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estrogen Therapy, Independent of Timing, Improves Cardiac Structure and Function in Oophorectomized mRen2.Lewis Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessup, Jewell A.; Wang, Hao; MacNamara, Lindsay M.; Presley, Tennille D.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Alex F.; Groban, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    Objective mRen2.Lewis Rats exhibit exacerbated increases in blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and diastolic impairment following the loss of estrogens. In this same model, depletion of estrogens has marked effects on the cardiac biopterin profile concomitant with suppressed nitric oxide (NO) release. With respect to the establishment of overt systolic hypertension after oophorectomy (OVX), we assessed the effects of timing chronic 17 β-estradiol (E2) therapy on myocardial function, structure, and the cardiac NO system. Methods Oophrectomy (OVX; n=24) or sham-operation (Sham; n=13) was performed in 4-week-old, female mRen2.Lewis rats. Following randomization, OVX rats received E2 immediately (OVX + early E2; n=7), E2 at 11 weeks of age (OVX + late E2 N=8), or no E2 at all (OVX N=9). Results Early E2 was associated with lower body weight, less hypertension-related cardiac remodeling, and decreased LV filling pressure compared to OVX rats without E2 supplementation. Late E2 similarly attenuated the adverse effects of ovarian hormone loss on tissue-Doppler derived LV filling pressures and perivascular fibrosis, and significantly improved myocardial relaxation, or mitral annular velocity (e′). Early and late exposure to E2 decreased dihydrobiopterin, but only late E2 yielded significant increases in cardiac nitrite concentrations. Conclusions Although there were some similarities between early and late E2 treatment on preservation of diastolic function and cardiac structure after OVX, the lusitropic potential of E2 was most consistent with late supplementation. The cardioprotective effects of late E2 were independent of blood pressure and may have occurred through regulation of cardiac biopterins and NO production. PMID:23481117

  17. Association of National Initiatives to Improve Cardiac Arrest Management With Rates of Bystander Intervention and Patient Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wissenberg, Mads; Lippert, Freddy K; Folke, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    resuscitation was attempted were identified between 2001 and 2010 in the nationwide Danish Cardiac Arrest Registry. Of 29 111 patients with cardiac arrest, we excluded those with presumed noncardiac cause of arrest (n = 7390) and those with cardiac arrests witnessed by emergency medical services personnel (n...

  18. Ginsenoside Rh2 Improves Cardiac Fibrosis via PPARδ–STAT3 Signaling in Type 1-Like Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsiang Lo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2 is an active principal ingredient contained in ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer, a medicinal herb used to enhance health worldwide. The present study is designed to investigate the effect of Rh2 on myocardial fibrosis in diabetic rats. In a streptozotocin-induced model of type-1 diabetic rats (STZ-diabetic rats, the increased fasting blood glucose levels and heart weight/body weight (HW/BW ratio were substantially alleviated by Rh2. Moreover, Rh2 improved cardiac performance in STZ-diabetic rats. Histological results from Masson staining showed that Rh2 attenuated cardiac fibrosis in STZ-diabetic rats. The effects of Rh2 were reversed by GSK0660 at a dose sufficient to inhibit peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ in STZ-diabetic rats. The role of PPARδ was subsequently investigated in vitro. Rh2 restored the decreased PPARδ expression level in high glucose-cultured cardiomyocytes. Moreover, increased protein levels of fibrotic signals, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, connective tissue growth factor (CCN2 and fibronectin, were reduced by Rh2 in high glucose-cultured cardiomyocytes. These effects of Rh2 were reversed by GSK0660 or siRNA specific for PPARδ Taken together, PPARδ activation may inhibit STAT3 activation to reduce CCN2 and fibronectin expression in diabetic rats with cardiac fibrosis. Moreover, Rh2 improves cardiac function and fibrosis by increasing PPARδ signaling. Therefore, Rh2 is suitable to develop as an alternative remedy for cardiac fibrosis.

  19. Methotrexate carried in lipid core nanoparticles reduces myocardial infarction size and improves cardiac function in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maranhão RC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Raul C Maranhão,1,2 Maria C Guido,1 Aline D de Lima,1 Elaine R Tavares,1 Alyne F Marques,1 Marcelo D Tavares de Melo,3 Jose C Nicolau,3 Vera MC Salemi,3 Roberto Kalil-Filho3 1Laboratory of Metabolism and Lipids, 2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 3Heart Failure Unit, Clinical Cardiology Division, Heart Institute (InCor, Medical School Hospital, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Purpose: Acute myocardial infarction (MI is accompanied by myocardial inflammation, fibrosis, and ventricular remodeling that, when excessive or not properly regulated, may lead to heart failure. Previously, lipid core nanoparticles (LDE used as carriers of the anti-inflammatory drug methotrexate (MTX produced an 80-fold increase in the cell uptake of MTX. LDE-MTX treatment reduced vessel inflammation and atheromatous lesions induced in rabbits by cholesterol feeding. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of LDE-MTX on rats with MI, compared with commercial MTX treatment.Materials and methods: Thirty-eight Wistar rats underwent left coronary artery ligation and were treated with LDE-MTX, or with MTX (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally, once/week, starting 24 hours after surgery or with LDE without drug (MI-controls. A sham-surgery group (n=12 was also included. Echocardiography was performed 24 hours and 6 weeks after surgery. The animals were euthanized and their hearts were analyzed for morphometry, protein expression, and confocal microscopy.Results: LDE-MTX treatment achieved a 40% improvement in left ventricular (LV systolic function and reduced cardiac dilation and LV mass, as shown by echocardiography. LDE-MTX reduced the infarction size, myocyte hypertrophy and necrosis, number of inflammatory cells, and myocardial fibrosis, as shown by morphometric analysis. LDE-MTX increased antioxidant enzymes; decreased apoptosis, macrophages, reactive oxygen species production; and tissue hypoxia in non-infarcted myocardium. LDE-MTX increased adenosine

  20. Improvements in Key Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Variables Following Cardiac Rehabilitation in Patients With Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Dejana; Kumar, Nikhil; Chaudhry, Sundeep; Bagai, Akshay; Arena, Ross; Kumar, Naresh

    2018-05-11

    Improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) post-cardiac rehabilitation (post-CR) are used to gauge therapeutic efficacy. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of supervised CR on other cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) variables, specifically those that reflect ventilatory efficiency and VO2 changes in relation to changes in work rate (WR). Patients (n = 142; mean age 63 ± 9 y; 23% female) with coronary artery disease (CAD) participated in supervised CR for 3 to 6 mo completing 60 ± 17 sessions (range: 32-96 sessions), with intensity derived from the baseline CPX. CPX was completed at baseline and post-CR on a cycle ergometer. The minimum heart rate (HR) during cycling was set 5 to 10 beats/min above the HR at ventilatory anaerobic threshold (VAT) while the maximum HR remained below the ischemic threshold observed during CPX, and this intensity was maintained for 25 min. VO2peak, peak O2 pulse, the minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) slope, the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES), and the ΔVO2/ΔWR slope were determined at baseline and post-CR. Following CR, there were significant improvements (all P < .001) in VO2peak (17.7 ± 4.7 mL/kg/min vs 20.9 ± 5.4 mL/kg/min), peak O2 pulse (11.6 ± 3.2 mL/beat vs 13.4 ± 3.6 mL/beat), VE/VCO2 slope (28.4 ± 5.3 vs 27.5 ± 4.7), OUES (1.8 ± 0.5 vs 2.0 ± 0.6), and ΔVO2/ΔWR slope (9.1 ± 1.2 mL/min/W vs 9.6 ± 1.1 mL/min/W). Key markers of ventilatory efficiency and VO2 kinetics during CPX significantly improve following CR. Expanding the list of variables assessed via CPX may provide better resolution in validation of CR therapeutic efficacy in patients with CAD.

  1. Exploring total cardiac variability in healthy and pathophysiological subjects using improved refined multiscale entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwaha, Puneeta; Sunkaria, Ramesh Kumar

    2017-02-01

    Multiscale entropy (MSE) and refined multiscale entropy (RMSE) techniques are being widely used to evaluate the complexity of a time series across multiple time scales 't'. Both these techniques, at certain time scales (sometimes for the entire time scales, in the case of RMSE), assign higher entropy to the HRV time series of certain pathologies than that of healthy subjects, and to their corresponding randomized surrogate time series. This incorrect assessment of signal complexity may be due to the fact that these techniques suffer from the following limitations: (1) threshold value 'r' is updated as a function of long-term standard deviation and hence unable to explore the short-term variability as well as substantial variability inherited in beat-to-beat fluctuations of long-term HRV time series. (2) In RMSE, entropy values assigned to different filtered scaled time series are the result of changes in variance, but do not completely reflect the real structural organization inherited in original time series. In the present work, we propose an improved RMSE (I-RMSE) technique by introducing a new procedure to set the threshold value by taking into account the period-to-period variability inherited in a signal and evaluated it on simulated and real HRV database. The proposed I-RMSE assigns higher entropy to the age-matched healthy subjects than that of patients suffering from atrial fibrillation, congestive heart failure, sudden cardiac death and diabetes mellitus, for the entire time scales. The results strongly support the reduction in complexity of HRV time series in female group, old-aged, patients suffering from severe cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular diseases, and in their corresponding surrogate time series.

  2. Are we improving after 10 years of humanitarian paediatric cardiac assistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, William M; Stidham, Gregory L; Karl, Thomas R; Guillory, Karen L; Ivanćan, Visnja; Malcić, Ivan; Sandoval, Nestor; Reid, Robert W; Lazorishisnets, Vasily V; Davis, Matthew C; Baum, Victor C; Di Sessa, Thomas G

    2005-08-01

    Paediatric cardiovascular services are frequently absent or poorly developed in many countries around the world. Our foundation made 83 trips in support of cardiovascular services between April 1993 and March 2003 to help alleviate this problem. In this study, we present an analysis of our results over these period of 10 years. We performed a review of all available records relating to the trips, including patient databases, audited financial statements, donated product inventory lists, lists of team members, and follow-up data from the host sites concerning the state of the patients treated. We made 83 trips to 14 countries, 40 of these being in Central Europe, 5 in Eastern Europe, 10 in Caribbean, and Central America, 18 in South America, 9 in Asia, and 1 in the Middle East. In the first 5 years, we made 23, as opposed to 60 in the second 5 years, this difference being significant (p less than 0.01). The total number of primary operations performed over 10 years was 1,580. The number of procedures performed yearly increased over the two intervals from 97.0 plus or minus 32.7 to 219.0 plus or minus 41.7, p less than 0.002. The probability of survival between the periods increased from 84.6 to 93.3 per cent, and this was also significantly different (p less than 0.001). Overall, the rate of survival for the period of 10 years was 90.5 per cent. Moreover, the value of services donated to support each trip also differed significantly, decreasing from 105,900 dollars plus or minus 14,581 dollars for the first period to 54,617 dollars plus or minus 11,425 dollars for the second period (p less than 0.001). Improving paediatric cardiac services in under-served countries requires significant financial and personnel commitments, but can produce reasonable outcomes.

  3. Estradiol improves cardiac and hepatic function after trauma-hemorrhage: role of enhanced heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, László; Shimizu, Tomoharu; Suzuki, Takao; Yu, Huang-Ping; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Schwacha, Martin G; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2006-03-01

    Although studies indicate that 17beta-estradiol administration after trauma-hemorrhage (T-H) improves cardiac and hepatic functions, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Because the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) can protect cardiac and hepatic functions, we hypothesized that these proteins contribute to the salutary effects of estradiol after T-H. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats ( approximately 300 g) underwent laparotomy and hemorrhagic shock (35-40 mmHg for approximately 90 min) followed by resuscitation with four times the shed blood volume in the form of Ringer lactate. 17beta-estradiol (1 mg/kg body wt) was administered at the end of the resuscitation. Five hours after T-H and resuscitation there was a significant decrease in cardiac output, positive and negative maximal rate of left ventricular pressure. Liver function as determined by bile production and indocyanine green clearance was also compromised after T-H and resuscitation. This was accompanied by an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and liver perfusate lactic dehydrogenase levels. Furthermore, circulating levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-10 were also increased. In addition to decreased cardiac and hepatic function, there was an increase in cardiac HSP32 expression and a reduction in HSP60 expression after T-H. In the liver, HSP32 and HSP70 were increased after T-H. There was no change in heart HSP70 and liver HSP60 after T-H and resuscitation. Estradiol administration at the end of T-H and resuscitation increased heart/liver HSPs expression, ameliorated the impairment of heart/liver functions, and significantly prevented the increase in plasma levels of ALT, TNF-alpha, and IL-6. The ability of estradiol to induce HSPs expression in the heart and the liver suggests that HSPs, in part, mediate the salutary effects of 17beta-estradiol on organ functions after T-H.

  4. Alternative research funding to improve clinical outcomes: model of prediction and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerburg, Robert J; Ullmann, Steven G

    2015-04-01

    Although identification and management of cardiovascular risk markers have provided important population risk insights and public health benefits, individual risk prediction remains challenging. Using sudden cardiac death risk as a base case, the complex epidemiology of sudden cardiac death risk and the substantial new funding required to study individual risk are explored. Complex epidemiology derives from the multiple subgroups having different denominators and risk profiles, while funding limitations emerge from saturation of conventional sources of research funding without foreseeable opportunities for increases. A resolution to this problem would have to emerge from new sources of funding targeted to individual risk prediction. In this analysis, we explore the possibility of a research funding strategy that would offer business incentives to the insurance industries, while providing support for unresolved research goals. The model is developed for the case of sudden cardiac death risk, but the concept is applicable to other areas of the medical enterprise. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Simvastatin-induced cardiac autonomic control improvement in fructose-fed female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Juliana da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Because autonomic dysfunction has been found to lead to cardiometabolic disorders and because studies have reported that simvastatin treatment has neuroprotective effects, the objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of simvastatin treatment on cardiovascular and autonomic changes in fructose-fed female rats. METHODS: Female Wistar rats were divided into three groups: controls (n=8, fructose (n=8, and fructose+ simvastatin (n=8. Fructose overload was induced by supplementing the drinking water with fructose (100 mg/L, 18 wks. Simvastatin treatment (5 mg/kg/day for 2 wks was performed by gavage. The arterial pressure was recorded using a data acquisition system. Autonomic control was evaluated by pharmacological blockade. RESULTS: Fructose overload induced an increase in the fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels and insulin resistance. The constant rate of glucose disappearance during the insulin intolerance test was reduced in the fructose group (3.4+ 0.32%/min relative to that in the control group (4.4+ 0.29%/min. Fructose+simvastatin rats exhibited increased insulin sensitivity (5.4+0.66%/min. The fructose and fructose+simvastatin groups demonstrated an increase in the mean arterial pressure compared with controls rats (fructose: 124+2 mmHg and fructose+simvastatin: 126 + 3 mmHg vs. controls: 112 + 2 mmHg. The sympathetic effect was enhanced in the fructose group (73 + 7 bpm compared with that in the control (48 + 7 bpm and fructose+simvastatin groups (31+8 bpm. The vagal effect was increased in fructose+simvastatin animals (84 + 7 bpm compared with that in control (49 + 9 bpm and fructose animals (46+5 bpm. CONCLUSION: Simvastatin treatment improved insulin sensitivity and cardiac autonomic control in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome in female rats. These effects were independent of the improvements in the classical plasma lipid profile and of reductions in arterial pressure. These results

  6. Interventions designed using quality improvement methods reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests during pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, James P; Kreeger, Renee; Varughese, Anna M; Wittkugel, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Although serious complications during pediatric anesthesia are less common than they were 20 years ago, serious airway events continue to occur. Based on Quality Improvement (QI) data from our institution, a QI project was designed to reduce the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. A quality improvement team consisting of members of the Department of Anesthesia was formed and QI data from previous years were analyzed. The QI team developed a Smart Aim, Key Driver Diagram, and specific Interventions that focused on the accessibility of emergency drugs, the use of nondepolarizing muscle relaxants for endotracheal intubation in children 2 years and younger, and the presence of anesthesia providers until emergence from anesthesia in high-risk patients. The percentage of cases where muscle relaxants were utilized in children 2 years and younger for endotracheal intubation and where atropine and succinylcholine were readily available increased at both our base and outpatient facilities. Over the 2.5-year study period, the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests was reduced by 44% and 59%, respectively compared to the previous 2-year period. We utilized QI methodology to design and implement a project which led to greater standardization of clinical practice within a large pediatric anesthesia group. Based on an understanding of system issues impacting our clinical practice, we designed and tested interventions that led to a significant reduction in the incidence of serious airway events and airway cardiac arrests. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Improved oxygenation during standing performance of deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure after cardiac surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Henrik; Faager, Gun; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2015-09-01

    Breathing exercises after cardiac surgery are often performed in a sitting position. It is unknown whether oxygenation would be better in the standing position. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxygenation and subjective breathing ability during sitting vs standing performance of deep breathing exercises on the second day after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (n = 189) were randomized to sitting (controls) or standing. Both groups performed 3 × 10 deep breaths with a positive expiratory pressure device. Peripheral oxygen saturation was measured before, directly after, and 15 min after the intervention. Subjective breathing ability, blood pressure, heart rate, and pain were assessed. Oxygenation improved significantly in the standing group compared with controls directly after the breathing exercises (p < 0.001) and after 15 min rest (p = 0.027). The standing group reported better deep breathing ability compared with controls (p = 0.004). A slightly increased heart rate was found in the standing group (p = 0.047). After cardiac surgery, breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure, performed in a standing position, significantly improved oxygenation and subjective breathing ability compared with sitting performance. Performance of breathing exercises in the standing position is feasible and could be a valuable treatment for patients with postoperative hypoxaemia.

  8. Intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells improves cardiac function in dilated cardiomyopathy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chenggang; Hou, Xu; Wang, Benzhen; Chi, Jingwei; Jiang, Yanjie; Zhang, Caining; Li, Zipu

    2017-01-28

    Stem cells provide a promising candidate for the treatment of the fatal pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). This study aimed to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) on the cardiac function of a DCM rat model. A DCM model was established by intraperitoneal injections of doxorubicin in Sprague-Dawley rats. hUCMSCs at different concentrations or cultured medium were injected via limb skeletal muscles, with blank medium injected as the control. The rats were monitored for 4 weeks, meanwhile BNP, cTNI, VEGF, HGF, GM-CSF, and LIF in the peripheral blood were examined by ELISA, and cardiac function was monitored by echocardiography (Echo-CG). Finally, the expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium was examined by histoimmunochemistry and real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure of the myocardium was examined by electron microscopy. Injection of hUCMSCs markedly improved cardiac function in the DCM rats by significantly elevating left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS). The BNP and cTNI levels in the peripheral blood were reduced by hUCMSCs, while HGF, LIF, GM-CSF, and VEGF were increased by hUCMSCs. Expression of IGF-1, HGF, and VEGF in the myocardium from the DCM rats was significantly increased by hUCMSC injection. Furthermore, hUCMSCs protected the ultrastructure of cardiomyocytes by attenuating mitochondrial swelling and maintaining sarcolemma integrity. Intramuscular injection of UCMSCs can improve DCM-induced cardiac function impairment and protect the myocardium. These effects may be mediated by regulation of relevant cytokines in serum and the myocardium.

  9. Uterine-derived progenitor cells are immunoprivileged and effectively improve cardiac regeneration when used for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludke, Ana; Wu, Jun; Nazari, Mansoreh; Hatta, Kota; Shao, Zhengbo; Li, Shu-Hong; Song, Huifang; Ni, Nathan C; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2015-07-01

    Cell therapy to prevent cardiac dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) is less effective in aged patients because aged cells have decreased regenerative capacity. Allogeneic transplanted stem cells (SCs) from young donors are usually rejected. Maintaining transplanted SC immunoprivilege may dramatically improve regenerative outcomes. The uterus has distinct immune characteristics, and we showed that reparative uterine SCs home to the myocardium post-MI. Here, we identify immunoprivileged uterine SCs and assess their effects on cardiac regeneration after allogeneic transplantation. We found more than 20% of cells in the mouse uterus have undetectable MHC I expression by flow cytometry. Uterine MHC I((neg)) and MHC I((pos)) cells were separated by magnetic cell sorting. The MHC I((neg)) population expressed the SC markers CD34, Sca-1 and CD90, but did not express MHC II or c-kit. In vitro, MHC I((neg)) and ((pos)) SCs show colony formation and endothelial differentiation capacity. In mixed leukocyte co-culture, MHC I((neg)) cells showed reduced cell death and leukocyte proliferation compared to MHC I((pos)) cells. MHC I((neg)) and ((pos)) cells had significantly greater angiogenic capacity than mesenchymal stem cells. The benefits of intramyocardial injection of allogeneic MHC I((neg)) cells after MI were comparable to syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation, with engraftment in cardiac tissue and limited recruitment of CD4 and CD8 cells up to 21 days post-MI. MHC I((neg)) cells preserved cardiac function, decreased infarct size and improved regeneration post-MI. This new source of immunoprivileged cells can induce neovascularization and could be used as allogeneic cell therapy for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Extended cardiac rehabilitation for socially vulnerable patients improves attendance and outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2013-01-01

    Patients living alone or having a low socioeconomic status are likely to quit cardiac rehabilitation. We aimed to compare patients being offered extended rehabilitation (ERP) with those being offered standard rehabilitation (SRP) as concerns 1) attendance rates and 2) achievement of treatment goals...

  11. Caloric restriction lowers endocannabinoid tonus and improves cardiac function in type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyk, van H.J.; Schinkel, van L.D.; Kantae, V.; Dronkers, C.E.A.; Westenberg, J.J.M.; Roos, de A.; Lamb, H.J.; Jukema, J.W.; Harms, A.C.; Hankemeier, T.; Stelt, van der M.; Jazet, I.M.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2018-01-01

    Background/ObjectivesEndocannabinoids (ECs) are associated with obesity and ectopic fat accumulation, both of which play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in type 2 diabetes (T2D). The effect of prolonged caloric restriction on ECs in relation to fat distribution and cardiac

  12. Relation of isovolumic times after cardiac resynchronization therapy to improvement in exercise capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A.H.M.; Peels, C.H.; Bracke, F.A.L.E.; Dantzig, van J.M.; Meijer, A.; van der Voort, P.H.; Gelder, van L.M.; Korsten, H.H.M.; Hemel, van N.M.

    2007-01-01

    M-mode echocardiography (using the septal-to-posterior wall motion delay [SPWMD]) and color-coded tissue Doppler imaging (TDI; using the septal-to-lateral delay in peak systolic velocity) have been proposed for assessment of left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony and prediction of response to cardiac

  13. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation improves outcome for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Selina Kikkenborg; Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    year of psycho-educational follow-up focusing on modifiable factors associated with poor outcomes. Two primary outcomes, general health score (Short Form-36 (SF-36)) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2), were used. Post-hoc analyses included SF-36 and ICD therapy history.Results:Comprehensive cardiac...

  14. Improving Risk Adjustment for Mortality After Pediatric Cardiac Surgery: The UK PRAiS2 Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Libby; Brown, Katherine L; Franklin, Rodney C; Ambler, Gareth; Anderson, David; Barron, David J; Crowe, Sonya; English, Kate; Stickley, John; Tibby, Shane; Tsang, Victor; Utley, Martin; Witter, Thomas; Pagel, Christina

    2017-07-01

    Partial Risk Adjustment in Surgery (PRAiS), a risk model for 30-day mortality after children's heart surgery, has been used by the UK National Congenital Heart Disease Audit to report expected risk-adjusted survival since 2013. This study aimed to improve the model by incorporating additional comorbidity and diagnostic information. The model development dataset was all procedures performed between 2009 and 2014 in all UK and Ireland congenital cardiac centers. The outcome measure was death within each 30-day surgical episode. Model development followed an iterative process of clinical discussion and development and assessment of models using logistic regression under 25 × 5 cross-validation. Performance was measured using Akaike information criterion, the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), and calibration. The final model was assessed in an external 2014 to 2015 validation dataset. The development dataset comprised 21,838 30-day surgical episodes, with 539 deaths (mortality, 2.5%). The validation dataset comprised 4,207 episodes, with 97 deaths (mortality, 2.3%). The updated risk model included 15 procedural, 11 diagnostic, and 4 comorbidity groupings, and nonlinear functions of age and weight. Performance under cross-validation was: median AUC of 0.83 (range, 0.82 to 0.83), median calibration slope and intercept of 0.92 (range, 0.64 to 1.25) and -0.23 (range, -1.08 to 0.85) respectively. In the validation dataset, the AUC was 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82 to 0.89), and the calibration slope and intercept were 1.01 (95% CI, 0.83 to 1.18) and 0.11 (95% CI, -0.45 to 0.67), respectively, showing excellent performance. A more sophisticated PRAiS2 risk model for UK use was developed with additional comorbidity and diagnostic information, alongside age and weight as nonlinear variables. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Demerdash, Salah [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Khorshid, Hazem, E-mail: hazemkhorshid@yahoo.com [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A. [Department of Cardiology, Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo (Egypt); Salem, Alaa M. [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Division, National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  16. Cardiac rehabilitation improves the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease who are not suitable for revascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Demerdash, Salah; Khorshid, Hazem; Salah, Iman; Abdel-Rahman, Mohamed A.; Salem, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart diseases including stable angina & acute events, represent a huge burden on both the individual & the society and represent an important source of disability. Aim: We aimed to identify the effect of cardiac rehabilitation program (CRP) on the ischemic burden in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) unsuitable for coronary revascularization. Methods: The study included 40 patients with IHD who were not suitable for coronary revascularization either by PCI or CABG (due to unsuitable coronary anatomy, co morbidities, high surgical/procedural risk or patient preference). All patients were subjected to sophisticated CRP protocols, including patient education, nutritional, medical, psychological and sexual counseling and group smoking cessation. All patients participated in low intensity exercise program twice weekly. The patient’s symptoms, vitals and medications were evaluated at each visit and clinical and laboratory data, echocardiography and stress myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT) were evaluated before and 3 months after the end of the study. Results: The mean age was 56.8 ± 3.1 years and only 2 patients (5%) were females. 22 (55%) patients were diabetic, 21 (53%) were hypertensive and 30 (75%) were smokers. It was found that 3 months after completion of CRP, there was a significant decrease in BMI (30.3 ± 2.9 vs. 31.2 ± 1.9, p < 0.001), and mean blood pressure (93.4 ± 11 vs. 105 ± 10.6 mmHg, p < 0.001). There was also a favorable effect on lipid profile and a significant improvement of the functional capacity in terms of NYHA functional class (2.1 ± 0.62 vs. 1.4 ± 0.6, p < 0.001). Despite that wall motion score index did not significantly change after CRP, there was a strong trend toward a better ejection fraction (53.7 ± 7.8 vs. 54.5 ± 6.3 %, p = 0.06) and significant improvement of Canadian cardiovascular class (1.42 ± 0.6 vs. 1.95 ± 0.5, p < 0.001) post CRP. Importantly, the difference between the SPECT

  17. Nanotized PPARα Overexpression Targeted to Hypertrophied Myocardium Improves Cardiac Function by Attenuating the p53-GSK3β-Mediated Mitochondrial Death Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Santanu; Datta, Ritwik; Chaudhuri, Ratul Datta; Chatterjee, Emeli; Chawla-Sarkar, Mamta; Sarkar, Sagartirtha

    2018-05-09

    Metabolic remodeling of cardiac muscles during pathological hypertrophy is characterized by downregulation of fatty acid oxidation (FAO) regulator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Thereby, we hypothesized that a cardiac-specific induction of PPARα might restore the FAO-related protein expression and resultant energy deficit. In the present study, consequences of PPARα augmentation were evaluated for amelioration of chronic oxidative stress, myocyte apoptosis, and cardiac function during pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Nanotized PPARα overexpression targeted to myocardium was done by a stearic acid-modified carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) conjugated to a 20-mer myocyte-targeted peptide (CMCP). Overexpression of PPARα ameliorated pathological hypertrophy and improved cardiac function. Augmented PPARα in hypertrophied myocytes revealed downregulated p53 acetylation (lys 382), leading to reduced apoptosis. Such cells showed increased binding of PPARα with p53 that in turn reduced interaction of p53 with glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), which upregulated inactive phospho-GSK3β (serine [Ser]9) expression within mitochondrial protein fraction. Altogether, the altered molecular milieu in PPARα-overexpressed hypertrophy groups restored mitochondrial structure and function both in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocyte-targeted overexpression of a protein of interest (PPARα) by nanotized plasmid has been described for the first time in this study. Our data provide a novel insight towards regression of pathological hypertrophy by ameliorating mitochondrial oxidative stress in targeted PPARα-overexpressed myocardium. PPARα-overexpression during pathological hypertrophy showed substantial betterment of mitochondrial structure and function, along with downregulated apoptosis. Myocardium-targeted overexpression of PPARα during pathological cardiac hypertrophy led to an overall improvement of cardiac energy deficit and subsequent cardiac

  18. Upper-body progressive resistance training improves strength and household physical activity performance in women attending cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coke, Lola A; Staffileno, Beth A; Braun, Lynne T; Gulanick, Meg

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of moderate-intensity, progressive, upper-body resistance training (RT) on muscle strength and perceived performance of household physical activities (HPA) among women in cardiac rehabilitation. The 10-week, pretest-posttest, experiment randomized women to either usual care (UC) aerobic exercise or RT. Muscle strength for 5 upper-body RT exercises (chest press, shoulder press, biceps curl, lateral row, and triceps extension) was measured using the 1-Repetition Maximum Assessment. The RT group progressively increased weight lifted using 40%, 50%, and 60% of obtained 1-Repetition Maximum Assessment at 3-week intervals. Perceived performance of HPA was measured with the Kimble Household Activities Scale. The RT group (n = 16, mean age 64 +/- 11) significantly increased muscle strength in all 5 exercises in comparison with the UC group (n = 14, mean age 65 +/- 10) (chest press, 18% vs 11%; shoulder press, 24% vs 14%; biceps curl, 21% vs 12%; lateral row, 32% vs 9%; and triceps extension, 28% vs 20%, respectively). By study end, Household Activities Scale scores significantly increased (F = 13.878, P = .001) in the RT group (8.75 +/- 3.19 vs 11.25 +/- 2.14), whereas scores in the UC group decreased (8.60 +/- 3.11 vs 6.86 +/- 4.13). Progressive upper-body RT in women shows promise as an effective tool to increase muscle strength and improve the ability to perform HPA after a cardiac event. Beginning RT early after a cardiac event in a monitored cardiac rehabilitation environment can maximize the strengthening benefit.

  19. Learning From Experience: Improving Early Tracheal Extubation Success After Congenital Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Peter D; Staudt, Anna M; Sebastian, Roby; Corridore, Marco; Tumin, Dmitry; Simsic, Janet; Galantowicz, Mark; Naguib, Aymen; Tobias, Joseph D

    2016-07-01

    The many advantages of early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery in young infants and children are now widely recognized. Benefits include avoiding the morbidity associated with prolonged intubation and the consequences of sedation and positive pressure ventilation in the setting of altered cardiopulmonary physiology. Our practice of tracheal extubation of young infants in the operating room following cardiac surgery has evolved and new challenges in the arena of postoperative sedation and pain management have appeared. Review our institutional outcomes associated with early tracheal extubation following congenital cardiac surgery. Inclusion criteria included all children less than 1 year old who underwent congenital cardiac surgery between October 1, 2010, and October 24, 2013. A total of 416 patients less than 1 year old were included. Of the 416 patients, 234 underwent tracheal extubation in the operating room (56%) with 25 requiring reintubation (10.7%), either immediately or following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU. Of the 25 patients extubated in the operating room who required reintubation, 22 failed within 24 hours of cardiothoracic ICU admission; 10 failures were directly related to narcotic doses that resulted in respiratory depression. As a result of this review, we have instituted changes in our cardiothoracic ICU postoperative care plans. We have developed a neonatal delirium score, and have adopted the "Kangaroo Care" approach that was first popularized in neonatal ICUs. This provision allows for the early parental holding of infants following admission to the cardiothoracic ICU and allows for appropriately selected parents to sleep in the same beds alongside their postoperative children.

  20. Improved cardiac filling facilitates the postprandial elevation of stroke volume in Python regius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enok, Sanne; Leite, Gabriella S P C; Leite, Cléo A C; Gesser, Hans; Hedrick, Michael S; Wang, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    To accommodate the pronounced metabolic response to digestion, pythons increase heart rate and elevate stroke volume, where the latter has been ascribed to a massive and fast cardiac hypertrophy. However, numerous recent studies show that heart mass rarely increases, even upon ingestion of large meals, and we therefore explored the possibility that a rise in mean circulatory filling pressure (MCFP) serves to elevate venous pressure and cardiac filling during digestion. To this end, we measured blood flows and pressures in anaesthetized Python regius The anaesthetized snakes exhibited the archetypal tachycardia as well as a rise in both venous pressure and MCFP that fully account for the approximate doubling of stroke volume. There was no rise in blood volume and the elevated MCFP must therefore stem from increased vascular tone, possibly by means of increased sympathetic tone on the veins. Furthermore, although both venous pressure and MCFP increased during volume loading, there was no evidence that postprandial hearts were endowed with an additional capacity to elevate stroke volume. In vitro measurements of force development of paced ventricular strips also failed to reveal signs of increased contractility, but the postprandial hearts had higher activities of cytochrome oxidase and pyruvate kinase, which probably serves to sustain the rise in cardiac work during digestion. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Haemodynamic improvement of older, previously replaced mechanical mitral valves by removal of the subvalvular pannus in redo cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Tae Youn; Choi, Jong Bum; Kuh, Ja Hong

    2017-01-01

    Patients requiring redo cardiac surgery for diseased heart valves other than mitral valves may show increased pressure gradients and reduced valve areas of previously placed mechanical mitral valves due to subvalvular pannus formation. We treated four women who had mechanical mitral valves inserted greater than or equal to 20 years earlier and who presented with circular pannus that protruded into the lower margin of the valve ring but did not impede leaflet motion. Pannus removal improved the haemodynamic function of the mitral valve. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Matrine pretreatment improves cardiac function in rats with diabetic cardiomyopathy via suppressing ROS/TLR-4 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-wei; Wang, Jun-kui; Qiu, Chuan; Guan, Gong-chang; Liu, Xin-hong; Li, Shang-jian; Deng, Zheng-rong

    2015-03-01

    Matrine is an alkaloid from Sophora alopecuroides L, which has shown a variety of pharmacological activities and potential therapeutic value in cardiovascular diseases. In this study we examined the protective effects of matrine against diabetic cardiomyopathy (DCM) in rats. Male SD rats were injected with streptozotocin (STZ) to induce DCM. One group of DCM rats was pretreated with matrine (200 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) for 10 consecutive days before STZ injection. Left ventricular function was evaluated using invasive hemodynamic examination, and myocardiac apoptosis was assessed. Primary rat myocytes were used for in vitro experiments. Intracellular ROS generation, MDA content and GPx activity were determined. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were performed to detect the expression of relevant mRNAs and proteins. DCM rats exhibited abnormally elevated non-fasting blood glucose levels at 4 weeks after STZ injection, and LV function impairment at 16 weeks. The cardiac tissues of DCM rats showed markedly increased apoptosis, excessive ROS production, and activation of TLR-4/MyD-88/caspase-8/caspase-3 signaling. Pretreatment with matrine significantly decreased non-fasting blood glucose levels and improved LV function in DCM rats, which were associated with reducing apoptosis and ROS production, and suppressing TLR-4/MyD-88/caspase-8/caspase-3 signaling in cardiac tissues. Incubation in a high-glucose medium induced oxidative stress and activation of TLR-4/MyD-88 signaling in cultured myocytes in vitro, which were significantly attenuated by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine. Excessive ROS production in DCM activates the TLR-4/MyD-88 signaling, resulting in cardiomyocyte apoptosis, whereas pretreatment with matrine improves cardiac function via suppressing ROS/TLR-4 signaling pathway.

  3. Improvement of myocardial perfusion detected by 201Tl scintigraphy on cardiac rehabilitation for patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Linxue; Nohara, Ryuji; Makita, Shigeru

    1996-01-01

    The effect of cardiac rehabilitation (mean 70±48 months) on myocardial perfusion was assessed using thallium-201 ( 201 Tl) exercise study in 63 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Subjects were those in a rehabilitation group (Rh=42) participating in supervised sports training two to three times per week and the control group (Ct=21) not taking active daily exercise. The interval between two 201 Tl SPECT studies was 19±16 months. After physical training, total duration of the exercise test increased from 443±112 to 536±121 seconds (+19%) in the Rh group, and from 484±129 to 432±115 seconds in the Ct group (-10.7%) (p 2 to 269.8±58 x 10 2 in the Rh group and decreased from 218.7±40 x 10 2 to 216.6±76 x 10 2 (p 201 Tl myocardial perfusion defect on exercise improved more in 54.8% (stress 59.5%, rest 35.7%) in the Rh group than in the Ct group (9.5%, p 201 Tl perfusion defect decreased from 68 (23.1%) to 49 regions (16.7%) of 294 total myocardial regions in the Rh group on exercise. However. it increased from 39 (26.5%) to 44 (29.9%) regions of 147 regions in the Ct group (p<0.01). Thus, cardiac rehabilitation increases exercise tolerance with improvement of myocardial perfusion. suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is an advisable and effective treatment for patients with ischemic heart disease. (author)

  4. Getting better : Nurse practitioner’s research for quality improvement in cardiac surgery: Beter worden : Onderzoek door verpleegkundig specialisten naar kwaliteitsverbetering rondom hartchirurgie

    OpenAIRE

    Valen, Richard

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis describes the efforts to reduce complications during and after cardiac surgery and to enhance the quality of patient care during the in-hospital stay after surgery. Several important topics for daily patient care will be addressed. In light of this goal, the scope and aims of the research described in this thesis are to improve patient outcomes after cardiac surgery by researching the following early perioperative and long-term postoperative issues. 1) The effects ...

  5. Chronic resuscitation after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement improves hepatocellular function and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmers, D E; Wang, P; Cioffi, W G; Bland, K I; Chaudry, I H

    1998-01-01

    To determine whether prolonged (chronic) resuscitation has any beneficial effects on cardiac output and hepatocellular function after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement. Acute fluid resuscitation after trauma-hemorrhage restores but does not maintain the depressed hepatocellular function and cardiac output. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent a 5-cm laparotomy (i.e., trauma was induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of maximal bleed-out volume was returned in the form of Ringer's lactate (RL). The animals were acutely resuscitated with RL using 4 times the volume of maximum bleed-out over 60 minutes, followed by chronic resuscitation of 0, 5, or 10 mL/kg/hr RL for 20 hours. Hepatocellular function was determined by an in vivo indocyanine green clearance technique. Hepatic microvascular blood flow was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. Plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined by bioassay. Chronic resuscitation with 5 mL/kg/hr RL, but not with 0 or 10 mL/kg/hr RL, restored cardiac output, hepatocellular function, and hepatic microvascular blood flow at 20 hours after hemorrhage. The regimen above also reduced plasma IL-6 levels. Because chronic resuscitation with 5 mL/kg/hr RL after trauma-hemorrhage and acute fluid replacement restored hepatocellular function and hepatic microvascular blood flow and decreased plasma levels of IL-6, we propose that chronic fluid resuscitation in addition to acute fluid replacement should be routinely used in experimental studies of trauma-hemorrhage.

  6. Soccer training improves cardiac function in men with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jakob Friis; Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Horton, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    training can counteract the early signs of diabetic heart disease. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of soccer training on cardiac function, exercise capacity and blood pressure in middle-aged men with T2DM. METHODS: Twenty-one men aged 49.8±1.7 yrs with T2DM and no history of cardiovascular disease......INTRODUCTION: Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease which is worsened by physical inactivity. Subclinical myocardial dysfunction is associated with increased risk of heart failure and impaired prognosis in T2DM; however, it is not clear if exercise...

  7. Introspection into institutional database allows for focused quality improvement plan in cardiac surgery: example for a new global healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Elizabeth; Postel, Mackenzie; Satou, Nancy; Shemin, Richard; Benharash, Peyman

    2013-10-01

    Reducing readmission rates is vital to improving quality of care and reducing healthcare costs. In accordance with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare will cut payments to hospitals with high 30-day readmission rates. We retrospectively reviewed an institutional database to identify risk factors predisposing adult cardiac surgery patients to rehospitalization within 30 days of discharge. Of 2302 adult cardiac surgery patients within the study period from 2008 to 2011, a total of 218 patients (9.5%) were readmitted within 30 days. Factors found to be significant predictors of readmission were nonwhite race (P = 0.003), government health insurance (P = 0.02), ejection fraction less than 40 per cent (P = 0.001), chronic lung disease (P improving patient care. Our data suggest that optimizing cardiopulmonary status in patients with comorbidities such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, increasing directed pneumonia prophylaxis, patient education tailored to specific patient social needs, earlier patient follow-up, and better communication between inpatient and outpatient physicians may reduce readmission rates.

  8. Down-regulation of fibroblast growth factor 2 and its co-receptors heparan sulfate proteoglycans by resveratrol underlies the improvement of cardiac dysfunction in experimental diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunz, Célia Maria Cássaro; Roggerio, Alessandra; Cruz, Paula Lázara; Pacanaro, Ana Paula; Salemi, Vera Maria Cury; Benvenuti, Luiz Alberto; Mansur, Antonio de Pádua; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia

    2017-02-01

    Cardiac remodeling in diabetes involves cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis, and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is an important mediator of this process. Resveratrol, a polyphenolic antioxidant, reportedly promotes the improvement of cardiac dysfunction in diabetic rats. However, little information exists linking the amelioration of the cardiac function promoted by resveratrol and the expression of FGF2 and its co-receptors, heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs: Glypican-1 and Syndecan-4), in cardiac muscle of Type 2 diabetic rats. Diabetes was induced experimentally by the injection of streptozotocin and nicotinamide, and the rats were treated with resveratrol for 6 weeks. According to our results, there is an up-regulation of the expression of genes and/or proteins of Glypican-1, Syndecan-4, FGF2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and AMP-activated protein kinase in diabetic rats. On the other hand, resveratrol treatment promoted the attenuation of left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and the down-regulation of the expression of all proteins under study. The trigger for the changes in gene expression and protein synthesis promoted by resveratrol was the presence of diabetes. The negative modulation conducted by resveratrol on FGF2 and HSPGs expression, which are involved in cardiac remodeling, underlies the amelioration of cardiac function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Translating Stem Cell Research to Cardiac Disease Therapies: Pitfalls and Prospects for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Francis, Darrel P.; Cole, Graham D.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, there have been numerous stem cell studies focused on cardiac diseases, ranging from proof-of-concept to phase 2 trials. This series of articles focuses on the legacy of these studies and the outlook for future treatment of cardiac diseases with stem cell therapies. The first section by Rosen and Myerburg is an independent review that analyzes the basic science and translational strategies supporting the rapid advance of stem cell technology to the clinic, the philosophies behind them, trial designs, and means for going forward that may impact favorably on progress. The second and third sections were collected in response to the initial section of this review. The commentary by Francis and Cole discusses the Rosen and Myerburg review and details how trial outcomes can be affected by noise, poor trial design (particularly the absence of blinding), and normal human tendencies toward optimism and denial. The final, independent article by Marbán takes a different perspective concerning the potential for positive impact of stem cell research applied to heart disease and future prospects for its clinical application. PMID:25169179

  10. Improvement of cardiac contractile function by peptide-based inhibition of NF-κB in the utrophin/dystrophin-deficient murine model of muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guttridge Denis C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is an inherited and progressive disease causing striated muscle deterioration. Patients in their twenties generally die from either respiratory or cardiac failure. In order to improve the lifespan and quality of life of DMD patients, it is important to prevent or reverse the progressive loss of contractile function of the heart. Recent studies by our labs have shown that the peptide NBD (Nemo Binding Domain, targeted at blunting Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB signaling, reduces inflammation, enhances myofiber regeneration, and improves contractile deficits in the diaphragm in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. Methods To assess whether cardiac function in addition to diaphragm function can be improved, we investigated physiological and histological parameters of cardiac muscle in mice deficient for both dystrophin and its homolog utrophin (double knockout = dko mice treated with NBD peptide. These dko mice show classic pathophysiological hallmarks of heart failure, including myocyte degeneration, an impaired force-frequency response and a severely blunted β-adrenergic response. Cardiac contractile function at baseline and frequencies and pre-loads throughout the in vivo range as well as β-adrenergic reserve was measured in isolated cardiac muscle preparations. In addition, we studied histopathological and inflammatory markers in these mice. Results At baseline conditions, active force development in cardiac muscles from NBD treated dko mice was more than double that of vehicle-treated dko mice. NBD treatment also significantly improved frequency-dependent behavior of the muscles. The increase in force in NBD-treated dko muscles to β-adrenergic stimulation was robustly restored compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, histological features, including collagen content and inflammatory markers were not significantly different between NBD-treated and vehicle-treated dko mice. Conclusions We conclude

  11. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. METHODS: 825 patients with ischaemic heart...... and education. Patients with heart failure, low levels of education and household income appear to benefit most from this adherence promoting intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01668394....... disease or heart failure were open label randomised to either the LC arm (LC plus CR) or the control arm (CR alone) across three hospital units in Denmark. Both arms received same amount of training and education hours. LC consisted of individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced...

  12. Improvement of the temporal resolution of cardiac CT reconstruction algorithms using an optimized filtering step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, S.; Desbat, L.; Koenig, A.; Grangeat, P.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study a property of the filtering step of multi-cycle reconstruction algorithm used in the field of cardiac CT. We show that the common filtering step procedure is not optimal in the case of divergent geometry and decrease slightly the temporal resolution. We propose to use the filtering procedure related to the work of Noo at al ( F.Noo, M. Defrise, R. Clakdoyle, and H. Kudo. Image reconstruction from fan-beam projections on less than a short-scan. Phys. Med.Biol., 47:2525-2546, July 2002)and show that this alternative allows to reach the optimal temporal resolution with the same computational effort. (N.C.)

  13. A meta-analysis of mental health treatments and cardiac rehabilitation for improving clinical outcomes and depression among patients with coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Thomas; Redwine, Laura S; Linke, Sarah E; Mills, Paul J

    2013-05-01

    To quantify the efficacy of mental health (antidepressants & psychotherapies) and cardiac rehabilitation treatments for improving secondary event risk and depression among patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Using meta-analytic methods, we evaluated mental health and cardiac rehabilitation therapies for a) reducing secondary events and 2) improving depression severity in patients with CHD. Key word searches of PubMed and Psychlit databases and previous reviews identified relevant trials. Eighteen mental health trials evaluated secondary events and 22 trials evaluated depression reduction. Cardiac rehabilitation trials for the same categories numbered 17 and 13, respectively. Mental health treatments did not reduce total mortality (absolute risk reduction [ARR] = -0.001, confidence interval [95% CI] = -0.016 to 0.015; number needed to treat [NNT] = ∞), showed moderate efficacy for reducing CHD events (ARR = 0.029, 95% CI = 0.007 to 0.051; NNT = 34), and a medium effect size for improving depression (Cohen d = 0.297). Cardiac rehabilitation showed similar efficacy for treating depression (d = 0.23) and reducing CHD events (ARR = 0.017, 95% CI = 0.007 to 0.026; NNT = 59) and reduced total mortality (ARR = 0.016, 95% CI = 0.005 to 0.027; NNT = 63). Among patients with CHD, mental health treatments and cardiac rehabilitation may each reduce depression and CHD events, whereas cardiac rehabilitation is superior for reducing total mortality risk. The results support a continued role for mental health treatments and a larger role for mental health professionals in cardiac rehabilitation.

  14. Radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization lab: A time series quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzeid, Wael; Abunassar, Joseph; Leis, Jerome A; Tang, Vicky; Wong, Brian; Ko, Dennis T; Wijeysundera, Harindra C

    Interventional cardiologists have one of the highest annual radiation exposures yet systems of care that promote radiation safety in cardiac catheterization labs are lacking. This study sought to reduce the frequency of radiation exposure, for PCI procedures, above 1.5Gy in labs utilizing a Phillips system at our local institution by 40%, over a 12-month period. We performed a time series study to assess the impact of different interventions on the frequency of radiation exposure above 1.5Gy. Process measures were percent of procedures where collimation and magnification were used and percent of completion of online educational modules. Balancing measures were the mean number of cases performed and mean fluoroscopy time. Information sessions, online modules, policies and posters were implemented followed by the introduction of a new lab with a novel software (AlluraClarity©) to reduce radiation dose. There was a significant reduction (91%, psoftware (AlluraClarity©) in a new Phillips lab. Process measures of use of collimation (95.0% to 98.0%), use of magnification (20.0% to 14.0%) and completion of online modules (62%) helped track implementation. The mean number of cases performed and mean fluoroscopy time did not change significantly. While educational strategies had limited impact on reducing radiation exposure, implementing a novel software system provided the most effective means of reducing radiation exposure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Collaborative care model improves self-care ability, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Y. Hua

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is a common chronic disease that requires much care. This study aimed to explore the effects of collaborative care model (CCM on patients with CHF. A total of 114 CHF patients were enrolled in this study, and were randomly and equally divided into two groups: control and experimental. Patients in the two groups received either usual care or CCM for 3 continuous months. The impacts of CCM on the self-care ability and quality of life were assessed using self-care of heart failure index and short form health survey 12, respectively. Further, cardiac function was assessed by measuring left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and the level of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP, and by the 6-min walking test. Clinical and demographic characteristics of patients in the control and CCM groups were statistically equivalent. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly enhanced self-care abilities of patients with CHF, including self-care maintenance, self-care management and self-care confidence (all P<0.05. The physical and mental quality of life was also significantly improved by CCM (P<0.01 or P<0.05. Compared with usual care, CCM significantly increased the LVEF (P<0.01, decreased the NT-proBNP level (P<0.01, and enhanced exercise capacity (P<0.001. In conclusion, CCM improved the self-care, quality of life and cardiac function of patients with CHF compared with usual care.

  16. Cardiac gated ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, C.W. III; Hoffman, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    There are several theoretic advantages to synchronizing positive pressure breaths with the cardiac cycle, including the potential for improving distribution of pulmonary and myocardial blood flow and enhancing cardiac output. The authors evaluated the effects of synchronizing respiration to the cardiac cycle using a programmable ventilator and electron beam CT (EBCT) scanning. The hearts of anesthetized dogs were imaged during cardiac gated respiration with a 50 msec scan aperture. Multi slice, short axis, dynamic image data sets spanning the apex to base of the left ventricle were evaluated to determine the volume of the left ventricular chamber at end-diastole and end-systole during apnea, systolic and diastolic cardiac gating. The authors observed an increase in cardiac output of up to 30% with inspiration gated to the systolic phase of the cardiac cycle in a non-failing model of the heart

  17. Coronary grafts flow and cardiac pacing modalities: how to improve perioperative myocardial perfusion.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Ancona, Giuseppe

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to investigate modifications of coronary grafts flow during different pacing modalities after CABG. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two separate prospective studies were conducted in patients undergoing CABG and requiring intraoperative epicardial pacing. In a first study (22 patients) coronary grafts flows were measured during dual chamber pacing (DDD) and during ventricular pacing (VVI). In a second study (10 patients) flows were measured during DDD pacing at different atrio-ventricular (A-V) delay periods. A-V delay was adjusted in 25 ms increments from 25 to 250 ms and flow measurements were performed for each A-V delay increment. A transit time flowmeter was used for the measurements. RESULTS: An average of 3.4 grafts\\/patient were performed. In the first study, average coronary graft flow was 47.4+\\/-20.8 ml\\/min during DDD pacing and 41.8+\\/-18.2 ml\\/min during VVI pacing (P = 0.0004). Furthermore average systolic pressure was 94.3+\\/-10.1 mmHg during DDD pacing and 89.6+\\/-12.2 mmHg during VVV pacing (P = 0.0007). No significant differences in diastolic pressure were recorded during the two different pacing modalities. In the second study, maximal flows were achieved during DDD pacing with an A-V delay of 175 ms (54+\\/-9.6 ml\\/min) and minimal flows were detected at 25 ms A-V delay (38.1+\\/-4.7 ml\\/min) (P=ns). No significant differences in systolic or diastolic blood pressure were noticed during the different A-V delays. CONCLUSION: Grafts flowmetry provides an extra tool to direct supportive measures such as cardiac pacing after CABG. DDD mode with A-V delay around 175 ms. should be preferred to allow for maximal myocardial perfusion via the grafts.

  18. Value of improved lipid control in patients at high risk for adverse cardiac events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Anupam B; Blumenthal, Daniel M; Stevens, Warren; Chou, Jacquelyn W; Ton, Thanh G N; Goldman, Dana P

    2016-06-01

    Lipid-lowering therapy (LLT) is suboptimally used in patients with hyperlipidemia in the 2 highest statin benefit groups (SBGs), as categorized by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. This study estimated the social value of reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels by 50% for patients in SBGs 1 and 2 who have been treated with standard LLT but have not reached LDL-C goal, as well as the potential value of PCSK9 inhibitors for patients in these groups. Simulation model. We used National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) and US Census data to project the population of SBGs 1 and 2 in the time period 2015 to 2035. We used insurance claims data to estimate incidence rates of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), and NHANES with National Vital Statistics data to estimate cardiovascular disease mortality rates. Using established associations between LDL-C and MACE risk, we estimated the value of reducing LDL-C levels by 50%. We incorporated results from a meta-analysis to estimate the value of PSCK9 inhibitors. Among those treated with LLT with LDL-C > 70 mg/dL in SBGs 1 and 2, the cumulative value of reducing LDL-C levels by 50% would be $2.9 trillion from 2015 to 2035, resulting primarily from 1.6 million deaths averted. The cumulative value of PCSK9 inhibitors would range from $3.4 trillion to $5.1 trillion (1.9-2.8 million deaths averted), or $12,000 to $17,000 per patient-year of treatment. Lowering LDL-C in high-risk patients with hyperlipidemia has enormous potential social value. For patients in these high-risk groups, PCSK9 inhibitors may have considerable net value depending on the final prices payers ultimately select.

  19. Implementing an institution-wide quality improvement policy to ensure appropriate use of continuous cardiac monitoring: a mixed-methods retrospective data analysis and direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayo, Michael F; Mansfield, Jerry; Eiferman, Daniel; Mignery, Traci; White, Susan; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals have been slow to adopt guidelines from the American Heart Association (AHA) limiting the use of continuous cardiac monitoring for fear of missing important patient cardiac events. A new continuous cardiac monitoring policy was implemented at a tertiary-care hospital seeking to monitor only those patients who were clinically indicated and decrease the number of false alarms in order to improve overall alarm response. Leadership support was secured, a cross-functional alarm management task force was created, and a system-wide policy was developed based on current AHA guidelines. Process measures, including cardiac monitoring rate, monitored transport rate, emergency department (ED) boarding rate and the percentage of false, unnecessary and true alarms, were measured to determine the policy's impact on patient care. Outcome measures, including length of stay and mortality rate, were measured to determine the impact on patient outcomes. Cardiac monitoring rate decreased 53.2% (0.535 to 0.251 per patient day, pimprovements in process measures coupled with no adverse effects to patient outcomes suggest that the overall system became more resilient to current and emerging demands. This study indicates that when collaboration across a diverse team is coupled with strong leadership support, policies and procedures such as this one can improve clinical practice and patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Cardiac function improved by sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in a heart failure model induced by chronic myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei XIN

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective Chronic myocardial ischemia(CMI has become an important cause of heart failure(HF.The aim of present study was to examine the effects of Sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase(SERCA2a gene transfer in HF model in large animal induced by CMI.Methods HF was reproduced in minipigs by ligating the initial segment of proximal left anterior descending(LAD coronary artery with an ameroid constrictor to produce progressive vessel occlusion and ischemia.After confirmation of myocardial perfusion defect and cardiac function impairment by SPECT and echocardiography in the model,animals were divided into 4 groups: HF group;HF+enhanced green fluorescent protein(EGFP group;HF+SERCA2a group;and sham operation group as control.rAAV1-EGFP and rAAV1-SERCA2a(1×1012 vg for each animal were directly and intramyocardially injected to the animals of HF+EGFP and HF+SERCA2a groups.Sixty days after the gene transfer,the expression of SERCA2a at the protein level was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry,the changes in cardiac function were determined by echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis,and the changes in serum inflammatory and neuro-hormonal factors(including BNP,TNF-a,IL-6,ET-1 and Ang II were determined by radioimmunoassay.Results Sixty days after gene transfer,LVEF,Ev/Av and ±dp/dtmax increased significantly(P < 0.05,along with an increase of SERCA2a protein expression in the ischemic myocardium(PP < 0.05,accompanied by a significant decrease of inflammatory and neural-hormonal factors(PP < 0.05 in HF+SERCA2a group as compared with HF/HF+EGFP group.Conclusions Overexpression of SERCA2a may significantly improve the cardiac function of the ischemic myocardium of HF model induced by CMI and reverse the activation of neural-hormonal factors,implying that it has a potential therapeutic significance in CMI related heart failure.

  1. Macrophage overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in aged mice improves diastolic physiology and cardiac wound healing after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Jung, Mira; Iyer, Rugmani Padmanabhan; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Toba, Hiroe; Garrett, Michael R; Lindsey, Merry L

    2018-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 increases in the myocardium with advanced age and after myocardial infarction (MI). Because young transgenic (TG) mice overexpressing human MMP-9 only in macrophages show better outcomes post-MI, whereas aged TG mice show a worse aging phenotype, we wanted to evaluate the effect of aging superimposed on MI to see if the detrimental effect of aging counteracted the benefits of macrophage MMP-9 overexpression. We used 17- to 28-mo-old male and female C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) and TG mice ( n = 10-21 mice/group) to evaluate the effects of aging superimposed on MI. Despite similar infarct areas and mortality rates at day 7 post-MI, aging TG mice showed improved diastolic properties and remodeling index compared with WT mice (both P wound healing through direct and indirect mechanisms to improve diastolic physiology and remodeling. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Aging mice with macrophage overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 have increased macrophage numbers 7 days after myocardial infarction, resulting in improved diastolic physiology and left ventricular remodeling through effects on cardiac wound healing.

  2. Leukocyte depletion results in improved lung function and reduced inflammatory response after cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Boonstra, PW; vanOeveren, W

    Leukocyte depletion during cardiopulmonary bypass has been demonstrated in animal experiments to improve pulmonary function, Conflicting results have been reported, however, with clinical depletion by arterial line filter of leukocytes at the beginning of cardiopulmonary bypass. In this study, we

  3. Simulation training improves team dynamics and performance in a low-resource cardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaram Subaya Emani

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of simulationbased training in improving team dynamics and performance in lowresource pediatric CICU environments, indicating its potential role in eliminating communication barriers in these settings.

  4. Cardiac-specific inducible overexpression of human plasma membrane Ca2+ ATPase 4b is cardioprotective and improves survival in mice following ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadi, Al Muktafi; Afroze, Talat; Siraj, M Ahsan; Momen, Abdul; White-Dzuro, Colin; Zarrin-Khat, Dorrin; Handa, Shivalika; Ban, Kiwon; Kabir, M Golam; Trivieri, Maria G; Gros, Robert; Backx, Peter; Husain, Mansoor

    2018-03-30

    Background: Heart failure (HF) is associated with reduced expression of plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase 4 (PMCA4). Cardiac-specific overexpression of human PMCA4b in mice inhibited nNOS activity and reduced cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting calcineurin. Here we examine temporally regulated cardiac-specific overexpression of hPMCA4b in mouse models of myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) ex vivo , and HF following experimental myocardial infarction (MI) in vivo Methods and results: Doxycycline-regulated cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression and activity of hPMCA4b produced adaptive changes in expression levels of Ca 2+ -regulatory genes, and induced hypertrophy without significant differences in Ca 2+ transients or diastolic Ca 2+ concentrations. Total cardiac NOS and nNOS-specific activities were reduced in mice with cardiac overexpression of hPMCA4b while nNOS, eNOS and iNOS protein levels did not differ. hMPCA4b-overexpressing mice also exhibited elevated systolic blood pressure vs. controls, with increased contractility and lusitropy in vivo In isolated hearts undergoing IRI, hPMCA4b overexpression was cardioprotective. NO donor-treated hearts overexpressing hPMCA4b showed reduced LVDP and larger infarct size versus vehicle-treated hearts undergoing IRI, demonstrating that the cardioprotective benefits of hPMCA4b-repressed nNOS are lost by restoring NO availability. Finally, both pre-existing and post-MI induction of hPMCA4b overexpression reduced infarct expansion and improved survival from HF. Conclusions: Cardiac PMCA4b regulates nNOS activity, cardiac mass and contractility, such that PMCA4b overexpression preserves cardiac function following IRI, heightens cardiac performance and limits infarct progression, cardiac hypertrophy and HF, even when induced late post-MI. These data identify PMCA4b as a novel therapeutic target for IRI and HF. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  6. Chronic activation of hypothalamic oxytocin neurons improves cardiac function during left ventricular hypertrophy-induced heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrott, Kara; Dyavanapalli, Jhansi; Cauley, Edmund; Dwyer, Mary Kate; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Wang, Xin; Mendelowitz, David; Kay, Matthew W

    2017-09-01

    A distinctive hallmark of heart failure (HF) is autonomic imbalance, consisting of increased sympathetic activity, and decreased parasympathetic tone. Recent work suggests that activation of hypothalamic oxytocin (OXT) neurons could improve autonomic balance during HF. We hypothesized that a novel method of chronic selective activation of hypothalamic OXT neurons will improve cardiac function and reduce inflammation and fibrosis in a rat model of HF. Two groups of male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent trans-ascending aortic constriction (TAC) to induce left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy that progresses to HF. In one TAC group, OXT neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus were chronically activated by selective expression and activation of excitatory DREADDs receptors with daily injections of clozapine N-oxide (CNO) (TAC + OXT). Two additional age-matched groups received either saline injections (Control) or CNO injections for excitatory DREADDs activation (OXT NORM). Heart rate (HR), LV developed pressure (LVDP), and coronary flow rate were measured in isolated heart experiments. Isoproterenol (0.01 nM-1.0 µM) was administered to evaluate β-adrenergic sensitivity. We found that increases in cellular hypertrophy and myocardial collagen density in TAC were blunted in TAC + OXT animals. Inflammatory cytokine IL-1β expression was more than twice higher in TAC than all other hearts. LVDP, rate pressure product (RPP), contractility, and relaxation were depressed in TAC compared with all other groups. The response of TAC and TAC + OXT hearts to isoproterenol was blunted, with no significant increase in RPP, contractility, or relaxation. However, HR in TAC + OXT animals increased to match Control at higher doses of isoproterenol. Activation of hypothalamic OXT neurons to elevate parasympathetic tone reduced cellular hypertrophy, levels of IL-1β, and fibrosis during TAC-induced HF in rats. Cardiac contractility parameters were

  7. Reperfusion injury protection during Basic Life Support improves circulation and survival outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaty, Guillaume; Lurie, Keith; Metzger, Anja; Lick, Michael; Bartos, Jason A; Rees, Jennifer N; McKnite, Scott; Puertas, Laura; Pepe, Paul; Fowler, Raymond; Yannopoulos, Demetris

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic postconditioning (PC) using three intentional pauses at the start of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) improves outcomes after cardiac arrest in pigs when epinephrine (epi) is used before defibrillation. We hypothesized PC, performed during basic life support (BLS) in the absence of epinephrine, would reduce reperfusion injury and enhance 24h functional recovery. Prospective animal investigation. Animal laboratory Female farm pigs (n=46, 39±1kg). Protocol A: After 12min of ventricular fibrillation (VF), 28 pigs were randomized to four groups: (A) Standard CPR (SCPR), (B) active compression-decompression CPR with an impedance threshold device (ACD-ITD), (C) SCPR+PC (SCPR+PC) and (D) ACD-ITD CPR+PC. Protocol B: After 15min of VF, 18 pigs were randomized to ACD-ITD CPR or ACD-ITD+PC. The BLS duration was 2.75min in Protocol A and 5min in Protocol B. Following BLS, up to three shocks were delivered. Without return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), CPR was resumed and epi (0.5mg) and defibrillation delivered. The primary end point was survival without major adverse events. Hemodynamic parameters and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were also measured. Data are presented as mean±SEM. Protocol A: ACD-ITD+PC (group D) improved coronary perfusion pressure after 3min of BLS versus the three other groups (28±6, 35±7, 23±5 and 47±7 for groups A, B, C, D respectively, p=0.05). There were no significant differences in 24h survival between groups. LVEF 4h post ROSC was significantly higher with ACD-ITD+PC vs ACD-ITD alone (52.5±3% vs. 37.5±6.6%, p=0.045). Survival rates were significantly higher with ACD-ITD+PC vs. ACD-ITD alone (p=0.027). BLS using ACD-ITD+PC reduced post resuscitation cardiac dysfunction and improved functional recovery after prolonged untreated VF in pigs. 12-11. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Improvement and the mechanism of cardiac function by knockdown of ADAM10 in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoou; Xie, Lili; He, Bing; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Objective To study the role of a disintegrin and metalloproteinase10 (ADAM10) in shedding neural cadherin (N-cadherin) and develop an approach to interfere the process of ventricular remodeling in adriamycin-induced cardiomyopathy (ACM) rats. Methods In a rat model of ACM, the effects of intraperitoneal injection of the lentiviral RNAi vector of ADAM10 on the morphology of cardiomyocytes and contractile function were observed by HE staining and color Doppler echocardiography. The expressions of N-cadherin and C-terminal fragment 1 (CTF1) were detected by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results In the in vivo experiment, a large amount of fluorescence was seen in the isolated primary cardiomyocytes, which indicated that the transfection in the rat model was successful. In the treatment group, the morphology of cardiomyocytes and function of the heart were evidently improved, N-cadherin protein expression was remarkably up-regulated and CTF1 protein was obviously down-regulated compared with the model group. Conclusion Knock-down of ADAM10 increases N-cadherin expression and decreases CTF1 expression, thus improves cardiac function in the rat model of ACM.

  9. Improvement of skills and knowledge by a hands-on cardiac CT course. Before and after evaluation with a validated questionnaire and self-assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, E.; Germershausen, C.; Greupner, J.; Schnapauff, D.; Rief, M.; Grigoryev, M.; Wollenberg, U.; Dewey, Marc [Inst. fuer Radiologie, Charite-Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: cardiac computed tomography (CT) is becoming increasingly important in noninvasive imaging. To meet this demand, there are a growing number of short training courses for cardiac CT. Whether such courses improve the knowledge and skills of participants is not known. Materials and methods: the concept of a two-day cardiac CT course consisting of introductory lectures, live patient examinations, and hands-on exercises for interpreting cardiac CT scans on workstations was analyzed using participant evaluations (scales from 1 = excellent to 6 = very poor). Participants rated their increase in knowledge and completed a validated questionnaire with 20 questions. Results: a total of 102 participants attended the courses. There were significant differences in the number of correctly answered test questions between cardiac CT experts and participants at the beginning of the course (91.5 {+-} 6.3% vs. 62.4 {+-} 16.1% p < 0.001). The number of questions answered correctly by the participants increased significantly after completion of the course (mean increase of 4 correctly answered questions, 81.8 {+-} 11.4%. vs. 62.4 {+-} 16.1% p < 0.001). This objective increase in knowledge was in good agreement with participant self-assessments (76.4 {+-} 12.6% vs. 81.8 {+-} 11.4%). The quality of the course received good to very good scores, ranging from 1.8 {+-} 0.7 for speed of presentation to 1.4 {+-} 0.5 for lecturer competence. The score for overall course quality was 1.4 {+-} 0.6. Conclusion: A relatively short cardiac CT course can significantly improve the quantifiable knowledge of participants. The overall quality of the course was rated as very good. (orig.)

  10. Improvement of skills and knowledge by a hands-on cardiac CT course. Before and after evaluation with a validated questionnaire and self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, E.; Germershausen, C.; Greupner, J.; Schnapauff, D.; Rief, M.; Grigoryev, M.; Wollenberg, U.; Dewey, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: cardiac computed tomography (CT) is becoming increasingly important in noninvasive imaging. To meet this demand, there are a growing number of short training courses for cardiac CT. Whether such courses improve the knowledge and skills of participants is not known. Materials and methods: the concept of a two-day cardiac CT course consisting of introductory lectures, live patient examinations, and hands-on exercises for interpreting cardiac CT scans on workstations was analyzed using participant evaluations (scales from 1 = excellent to 6 = very poor). Participants rated their increase in knowledge and completed a validated questionnaire with 20 questions. Results: a total of 102 participants attended the courses. There were significant differences in the number of correctly answered test questions between cardiac CT experts and participants at the beginning of the course (91.5 ± 6.3% vs. 62.4 ± 16.1% p < 0.001). The number of questions answered correctly by the participants increased significantly after completion of the course (mean increase of 4 correctly answered questions, 81.8 ± 11.4%. vs. 62.4 ± 16.1% p < 0.001). This objective increase in knowledge was in good agreement with participant self-assessments (76.4 ± 12.6% vs. 81.8 ± 11.4%). The quality of the course received good to very good scores, ranging from 1.8 ± 0.7 for speed of presentation to 1.4 ± 0.5 for lecturer competence. The score for overall course quality was 1.4 ± 0.6. Conclusion: A relatively short cardiac CT course can significantly improve the quantifiable knowledge of participants. The overall quality of the course was rated as very good. (orig.)

  11. Shared medical appointments: improving access, outcomes, and satisfaction for patients with chronic cardiac diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kelly Bauer; Haney, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Improving access to care, health outcomes, and patient satisfaction are primary objectives for healthcare practices. This article outlines benefits, concerns, and possible challenges of shared medical appointments (SMAs) for patients and providers. The SMA model was designed to support providers' demanding schedules by allowing patients with the same chronic condition to be seen in a group setting. By concentrating on patient education and disease management, interactive meetings provide an opportunity for patients to share both successes and struggles with others experiencing similar challenges. Studies demonstrated that SMAs improved patient access, enhanced outcomes, and promoted patient satisfaction. This article describes the potential benefits of SMAs for patients with chronic heart disease, which consumes a large number of healthcare dollars related to hospital admissions, acute exacerbations, and symptom management. Education for self-management of chronic disease can become repetitive and time consuming. The SMA model introduces a fresh and unique style of healthcare visits, allowing providers to devote more time and attention to patients and improve productivity. The SMA model provides an outstanding method for nurse practitioners to demonstrate their role as a primary care provider, by leading patients in group discussions and evaluating their current health status. Patient selection, preparation, and facilitation of an SMA are discussed to demonstrate the complementary nature of an SMA approach in a healthcare practice.

  12. HDAC Inhibition Improves the Sarcoendoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase Activity in Cardiac Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraviglia, Viviana; Bocchi, Leonardo; Sacchetto, Roberta; Florio, Maria Cristina; Motta, Benedetta M; Corti, Corrado; Weichenberger, Christian X; Savi, Monia; D'Elia, Yuri; Rosato-Siri, Marcelo D; Suffredini, Silvia; Piubelli, Chiara; Pompilio, Giulio; Pramstaller, Peter P; Domingues, Francisco S; Stilli, Donatella; Rossini, Alessandra

    2018-01-31

    SERCA2a is the Ca 2+ ATPase playing the major contribution in cardiomyocyte (CM) calcium removal. Its activity can be regulated by both modulatory proteins and several post-translational modifications. The aim of the present work was to investigate whether the function of SERCA2 can be modulated by treating CMs with the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA). The incubation with SAHA (2.5 µM, 90 min) of CMs isolated from rat adult hearts resulted in an increase of SERCA2 acetylation level and improved ATPase activity. This was associated with a significant improvement of calcium transient recovery time and cell contractility. Previous reports have identified K464 as an acetylation site in human SERCA2. Mutants were generated where K464 was substituted with glutamine (Q) or arginine (R), mimicking constitutive acetylation or deacetylation, respectively. The K464Q mutation ameliorated ATPase activity and calcium transient recovery time, thus indicating that constitutive K464 acetylation has a positive impact on human SERCA2a (hSERCA2a) function. In conclusion, SAHA induced deacetylation inhibition had a positive impact on CM calcium handling, that, at least in part, was due to improved SERCA2 activity. This observation can provide the basis for the development of novel pharmacological approaches to ameliorate SERCA2 efficiency.

  13. A knowledge translation collaborative to improve the use of therapeutic hypothermia in post-cardiac arrest patients: protocol for a stepped wedge randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dainty, Katie N; Scales, Damon C; Brooks, Steve C; Needham, Dale M; Dorian, Paul; Ferguson, Niall; Rubenfeld, Gordon; Wax, Randy; Zwarenstein, Merrick; Thorpe, Kevin; Morrison, Laurie J

    2011-01-14

    Advances in resuscitation science have dramatically improved survival rates following cardiac arrest. However, about 60% of adults that regain spontaneous circulation die before leaving the hospital. Recently it has been shown that inducing hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors immediately following their arrival in hospital can dramatically improve both overall survival and neurological outcomes. Despite the strong evidence for its efficacy and the apparent simplicity of this intervention, recent surveys show that therapeutic hypothermia is delivered inconsistently, incompletely, and often with delay. This study will evaluate a multi-faceted knowledge translation strategy designed to increase the utilization rate of induced hypothermia in survivors of cardiac arrest across a network of 37 hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. The study is designed as a stepped wedge randomized trial lasting two years. Individual hospitals will be randomly assigned to four different wedges that will receive the active knowledge translation strategy according to a sequential rollout over a number of time periods. By the end of the study, all hospitals will have received the intervention. The primary aim is to measure the effectiveness of a multifaceted knowledge translation plan involving education, reminders, and audit-feedback for improving the use of induced hypothermia in survivors of cardiac arrest presenting to the emergency department. The primary outcome is the proportion of eligible OHCA patients that are cooled to a body temperature of 32 to 34°C within six hours of arrival in the hospital. Secondary outcomes will include process of care measures and clinical outcomes. Inducing hypothermia in cardiac arrest survivors immediately following their arrival to hospital has been shown to dramatically improve both overall survival and neurological outcomes. However, this lifesaving treatment is frequently not applied in practice. If this trial is positive, our results

  14. Training less-experienced faculty improves reliability of skills assessment in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Xiaoying; Lee, Richard; Feins, Richard H; Enter, Daniel; Hicks, George L; Verrier, Edward D; Fann, James I

    2014-12-01

    Previous work has demonstrated high inter-rater reliability in the objective assessment of simulated anastomoses among experienced educators. We evaluated the inter-rater reliability of less-experienced educators and the impact of focused training with a video-embedded coronary anastomosis assessment tool. Nine less-experienced cardiothoracic surgery faculty members from different institutions evaluated 2 videos of simulated coronary anastomoses (1 by a medical student and 1 by a resident) at the Thoracic Surgery Directors Association Boot Camp. They then underwent a 30-minute training session using an assessment tool with embedded videos to anchor rating scores for 10 components of coronary artery anastomosis. Afterward, they evaluated 2 videos of a different student and resident performing the task. Components were scored on a 1 to 5 Likert scale, yielding an average composite score. Inter-rater reliabilities of component and composite scores were assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and overall pass/fail ratings with kappa. All components of the assessment tool exhibited improvement in reliability, with 4 (bite, needle holder use, needle angles, and hand mechanics) improving the most from poor (ICC range, 0.09-0.48) to strong (ICC range, 0.80-0.90) agreement. After training, inter-rater reliabilities for composite scores improved from moderate (ICC, 0.76) to strong (ICC, 0.90) agreement, and for overall pass/fail ratings, from poor (kappa = 0.20) to moderate (kappa = 0.78) agreement. Focused, video-based anchor training facilitates greater inter-rater reliability in the objective assessment of simulated coronary anastomoses. Among raters with less teaching experience, such training may be needed before objective evaluation of technical skills. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Multimedia Exercise Training Program Improves Distance Walked, Heart Rate Recovery, and Self-efficacy in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wei; Ou, Shu-Hua; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yue-Cune; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Patient education has been shown to be more effective when delivered using multimedia than written materials. However, the effects of using multimedia to assist patients in cardiac rehabilitation have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of an inpatient multimedia exercise training program on distance walked in the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), heart rate recovery, and walking self-efficacy of patients who had undergone heart surgery. For this longitudinal quasi-experimental study, 60 consecutive patients were assigned to an experimental (n = 20; inpatient multimedia exercise training program) or control (n = 40; routine care) group. Data were collected at 3 times (before surgery, 1 to 2 days before hospital discharge, and 1 month after hospital discharge) and analyzed with the generalized estimating equation approach. Most subjects were men (66.7%), had a mean age of 61.32 ± 13.4 years and left ventricular ejection fraction of 56.96% ± 13.28%, and underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n = 34, 56.7%). Subjects receiving the exercise training program showed significantly greater improvement than those in the control group in the 6MWT walking distance (P self-efficacy (P = .002) at hospital discharge. Furthermore, the intervention effects on 6MWT distance (P self-efficacy (P exercise training program safely improved distance walked in the 6MWT, heart rate recovery, and self-efficacy at hospital discharge in patients after heart surgery and maintained their improvement in 6MWT and self-efficacy 1 month later.

  16. Improving patient care by making small sustainable changes: a cardiac telemetry unit's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, Jane S; Bellhouse, Dorothy E

    2007-01-01

    With the introduction of each new drug, technology, and regulation, the processes of care become more complicated, creating an elaborate set of procedures connecting various hospital units and departments. Using methods of Adaptive Design and the Toyota Production System, a nursing unit redesigned work systems to achieve sustainable improvements in productivity, staff and patient satisfaction, and quality outcomes. The first hurdle of redesign was identifying problems, to which staff had become so accustomed with various work arounds that they had trouble seeing the process bottlenecks. Once the staff identified problems, they assumed they could solve the problem because they assumed they knew the causes. Utilizing root cause analysis, asking, "why, why, why," was essential to unearthing the true cause of a problem. Similarly, identifying solutions that were simple and low cost was an essential step in problem solving. Adopting new procedures and sustaining the commitment to identify and signal problems was a last and critical step toward realizing improvement, requiring a manager to function as "teacher/coach" rather than "fixer/firefighter".

  17. Improving Surveillance and Prevention of Surgical Site Infection in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Melissa; Hersey, Diane; Harrison, Sheilah; Joy, Brian; Naguib, Aymen; Galantowicz, Mark; Simsic, Janet

    2016-03-01

    Postoperative cardiovascular surgical site infections are preventable events that may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. To improve surgical wound surveillance and reduce the incidence of surgical site infections. An institutional review of surgical site infections led to implementation of 8 surveillance and process measures: appropriate preparation the night before surgery and the day of surgery, use of appropriate preparation solution in the operating room, appropriate timing of preoperative antibiotic administration, placement of a photograph of the surgical site in the patient's chart at discharge, sending a photograph of the surgical site to the patient's primary care physician, 30-day follow-up of the surgical site by an advanced nurse practitioner, and placing a photograph of the surgical site obtained on postoperative day 30 in the patient's chart. Mean overall compliance with the 8 measures from March 2013 through February 2014 was 88%. Infections occurred in 10 of 417 total operative cases (2%) in 2012, in 8 of 437 total operative cases (2%) in 2013, and in 7 of 452 total operative cases (1.5%) in 2014. Institution of the surveillance process has resulted in improved identification of suspected surgical site infections via direct rather than indirect measures, accurate identification of all surgical site infections based on definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network, collaboration with all persons involved, and enhanced communication with patients' family members and referring physicians. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Stimulating endogenous cardiac regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda eFinan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The healthy adult heart has a low turnover of cardiac myocytes. The renewal capacity, however, is augmented after cardiac injury. Participants in cardiac regeneration include cardiac myocytes themselves, cardiac progenitor cells, and peripheral stem cells, particularly from the bone marrow compartment. Cardiac progenitor cells and bone marrow stem cells are augmented after cardiac injury, migrate to the myocardium, and support regeneration. Depletion studies of these populations have demonstrated their necessary role in cardiac repair. However, the potential of these cells to completely regenerate the heart is limited. Efforts are now being focused on ways to augment these natural pathways to improve cardiac healing, primarily after ischemic injury but in other cardiac pathologies as well. Cell and gene therapy or pharmacological interventions are proposed mechanisms. Cell therapy has demonstrated modest results and has passed into clinical trials. However, the beneficial effects of cell therapy have primarily been their ability to produce paracrine effects on the cardiac tissue and recruit endogenous stem cell populations as opposed to direct cardiac regeneration. Gene therapy efforts have focused on prolonging or reactivating natural signaling pathways. Positive results have been demonstrated to activate the endogenous stem cell populations and are currently being tested in clinical trials. A potential new avenue may be to refine pharmacological treatments that are currently in place in the clinic. Evidence is mounting that drugs such as statins or beta blockers may alter endogenous stem cell activity. Understanding the effects of these drugs on stem cell repair while keeping in mind their primary function may strike a balance in myocardial healing. To maximize endogenous cardiac regeneration,a combination of these approaches couldameliorate the overall repair process to incorporate the participation ofmultiple cell players.

  19. Simulation exercise to improve retention of cardiopulmonary resuscitation priorities for in-hospital cardiac arrests: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nancy J; Duval-Arnould, Jordan; Twilley, Marida; Smith, Sarah P; Aksamit, Deborah; Boone-Guercio, Pam; Jeffries, Pamela R; Hunt, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Traditional American Heart Association (AHA) cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum focuses on teams of two performing quality chest compressions with rescuers on their knees but does not include training specific to In-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (IHCA), i.e. patient in hospital bed with large resuscitation teams and sophisticated technology available. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with the primary goal of evaluating the effectiveness and ideal frequency of in-situ training on time elapsed from call for help to; (1) initiation of chest compressions and (2) successful defibrillation in IHCA. Non-intensive care unit nurses were randomized into four groups: standard AHA training (C) and three groups that participated in 15 min in-situ IHCA training sessions every two (2M), three (3M) or six months (6M). Curriculum included specific choreography for teams to achieve immediate chest compressions, high chest compression fractions and rapid defibrillation while incorporating use of a backboard, stepstool. More frequent training was associated with decreased median (IQR) seconds to: starting compressions: [C: 33(25-40) vs. 6M: 21(15-26) vs. 3M: 14(10-20) vs. 2M: 13(9-20); p training sessions: [C:5%(1/18) vs. 6M: 23%(4/17) vs. 3M: 56%(9/16) vs. 2M: 73%(11/15); p training sessions conducted every 3 months are effective in improving timely initiation of chest compressions and defibrillation in IHCA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improvements in Attention and Cardiac Autonomic Modulation After a 2-Weeks Sprint Interval Training Program: A Fidelity Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arilson F. M. de Sousa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to: (1 investigate the influence of a 2-weeks sprint interval training (SIT program on aerobic capacity, cardiac autonomic control, and components of attention in young healthy university students; and (2 to ascertain whether training fidelity would influence these adaptations. One hundred and nine participants were divided into an experimental (EG and control (CG groups. The EG performed a SIT program that consisted of 6 sessions of 4 × 30 s “all-out” efforts on a cycle ergometer, interspersed with active rests of 4 min. The criterion for fidelity was achieving >90% of estimated maximum heart rate (HR during sprint bouts. After analyses, the EG was divided into HIGH (n = 26 and LOW (n = 46 fidelity groups. Components of attention were assessed using the Attention Network Test (ANT. Aerobic capacity (VO2max was estimated while the sum of skinfolds was determined. Autonomic control of HR was assessed by means of HR variability (HRV and HR complexity at rest and during ANT. Both HIGH and LOW significantly increased aerobic capacity, vagal modulation before and during ANT, and executive control, and decreased body fatness after SIT (p < 0.05. However, only participants from HIGH showed an increase in HR complexity and accuracy in ANT when compared to LOW (p < 0.05. Two weeks of SIT improved executive control, body fatness, aerobic fitness, and autonomic control in university students with better results reported in those individuals who exhibited high fidelity.

  1. Sokolow-Lyon voltage is suitable for monitoring improvement in cardiac function and prognosis of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Kenji; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Okumura, Takahiro; Hiraiwa, Hiroaki; Aoki, Soichiro; Ichii, Takeo; Sugiura, Yuki; Kitagawa, Katsuhide; Kondo, Toru; Watanabe, Naoki; Kano, Naoaki; Furusawa, Kenji; Sawamura, Akinori; Morimoto, Ryota; Bando, Yasuko; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2017-09-01

    The clinical significance of electrocardiogram in the assessment of patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) is currently unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of recording serial changes in Sokolow-Lyon voltage (∆%QRS-voltage) in one year to estimate left ventricular reverse remodeling (LVRR) and predict a prognosis of IDCM patients under tailored medical therapy. Sixty-eight consecutive patients with mild symptoms (52.1 ± 13 years old; 69% men; NYHA I/II/III/IV; 33/29/6/0) underwent electrocardiography and echocardiography at baseline and 12 month follow-up (follow-up period: 3.9 years). LVRR was observed in 30 patients (44.1%). The ∆%QRS-voltage was significantly lower in the LVRR group (LVRR; -26.9%, non-LVRR: -9.2%, p voltage correlated with ∆%LV end-diastolic diameter (r = .634, p voltage group (voltage is associated with improvement in cardiac function and favorable prognosis in IDCM patients on medical therapy, suggesting that this index is a feasible marker for response to treatment of IDCM. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Paracrine action of HO-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells mediates cardiac protection and functional improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bin; Ren, Xiaofeng; Lin, Guosheng; Zhu, Chengang; Chen, Honglei; Yin, Jiechao; Jiang, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ding, Danhua

    2008-10-01

    The aim has been to determine whether the supernatants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transfected with adenovirus carrying human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) gene protect cardiomyocytes from ischemic injury. We have found that hHO-1 infected MSCs (hHO-1-MSCs) increased expression of hHO-1 protein. Apoptosis of cultured hHO-1-MSCs exposed to hypoxia was suppressed. Several cytokines, including HGF, bFGF, TGF-beta, VEGF and IL-1beta, were produced by hHO-1-MSCs, some being significantly enhanced under hypoxia stimulation. Meanwhile, those cytokines reduced caspase-3 level and activity in cultured adult rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (ARVCs) exposed to hypoxia. Supernatants obtained from hHO-1-MSCs improved left ventricular function, limited myocardial infarct size, increased microvessel density, and inhibited apoptosis of cardiomyocytes in rat myocardial infarction. It can be concluded hHO-1-modified MSCs prevent myocardial cell injury via secretion of paracrine-acting mediators.

  3. Pulmonary Perfusion and Ventilation During Cardiopulmonary Bypass Are Not Associated with Improved Postoperative Outcomes After Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiliam F Rodriguez-Blanco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesClinical trials of either pulmonary perfusion or ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass are equivocal. We hypothesized that to achieve significant improvement in outcomes both interventions had to be concurrent.DesignRetrospective case-control studySettingsMajor academic tertiary referral medical centerParticipants274 consecutive patients who underwent open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass 2009 - 2013.InterventionsThe outcomes of 86 patients who received pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass were retrospectively compared to the control group of 188 patients.Measurements and Main ResultsRespiratory complications rates were similar in both groups (33.7% vs. 33.5%, as were the rates of postoperative pneumonia (4.7% vs. 4.3%, pleural effusions (13.9% vs. 12.2% and re-intubations (9.3% vs. 9.1%. Rates of adverse postoperative cardiac events including ventricular tachycardia (9.3% vs. 8.5% and atrial fibrillation (33.7% vs. 28.2% were equivalent in both groups. Incidence of sepsis (8.1% vs. 5.3%, postoperative stroke (2.3% vs. 2.1%, acute kidney injury (2.3% vs. 3.7% and renal failure (5.8% vs. 3.7% were likewise comparable. Despite similar transfusion requirements, coagulopathy (12.8% vs. 5.3%, p=0.031 and the need for mediastinal re-exploration (17.4% vs. 9.6%, p=0.0633 were observed more frequently in the pulmonary perfusion and ventilation group, but the difference did not reach the statistical significance. ICU and hospital stays, and the ICU readmission rates (7.0% vs. 8.0% were similar in both groups.ConclusionsSimultaneous pulmonary perfusion and ventilation during cardiopulmonary bypass were not associated with improved clinical outcomes.

  4. Improved quality of life after treatment of prolonged asystole during breath holding spells with a cardiac pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Kolterer

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Cardiac pacing using appropriate pacemaker settings seems effective in the prevention of LOC and reduction of the frequency of BHS. Our results imply a reduction of subjective stress levels of patients and parents as well as an increased quality of everyday life. After all, randomized controlled trials of the influence of cardiac pacemaker implantation on subjective stress levels in patients with BHS are needed.

  5. Serial measurement of neuron specific enolase improves prognostication in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storm Christian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuron specific enolase (NSE has repeatedly been evaluated for neurological prognostication in patients after cardiac arrest. However, it is unclear whether current guidelines for NSE cutoff levels also apply to cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Thus, we investigated the prognostic significance of absolute NSE levels and NSE kinetics in cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia. Methods In a prospective study of 35 patients resuscitated from cardiac arrest, NSE was measured daily for four days following admission. Outcome was assessed at ICU discharge using the CPC score. All patients received hypothermia treatment for 24 hours at 33°C with a surface cooling device according to current guidelines. Results The cutoff for absolute NSE levels in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 72 hours after cardiac arrest was 57 μg/l with an area under the curve (AUC of 0.82 (sensitivity 47%, specificity 100%. The cutoff level for NSE kinetics in patients with unfavourable outcome (CPC 3-5 was an absolute increase of 7.9 μg/l (AUC 0.78, sensitivity 63%, specificity 100% and a relative increase of 33.1% (AUC 0.803, sensitivity 67%, specificity 100% at 48 hours compared to admission. Conclusion In cardiac arrest patients treated with hypothermia, prognostication of unfavourable outcome by NSE kinetics between admission and 48 hours after resuscitation may be superior to prognostication by absolute NSE levels.

  6. High intensity interval training (HIIT) improves resting blood pressure, metabolic (MET) capacity and heart rate reserve without compromising cardiac function in sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Fergal; Herbert, Peter; Elliott, Adrian D; Richards, Jo; Beaumont, Alexander; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F

    2017-05-13

    This study examined a programme of pre-conditioning exercise with subsequent high intensity interval training (HIIT) on blood pressure, echocardiography, cardiac strain mechanics and maximal metabolic (MET) capacity in sedentary (SED) aging men compared with age matched masters athletes (LEX). Using a STROBE compliant observational design, 39 aging male participants (SED; n=22, aged 62.7±5.2yrs) (LEX; n=17, aged=61.1±5.4yrs) were recruited to a study that necessitated three distinct assessment phases; enrolment (Phase A), following pre-conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B), then following 6weeks of HIIT performed once every five days by both groups before reassessment (Phase C). Hemodynamic, echocardiographic and cardiac strain mechanics were obtained at rest and maximal cardiorespiratory and chronotropic responses were obtained at each measurement phase. The training intervention improved systolic, mean arterial blood pressure, rate pressure product and heart rate reserve (each PHIIT. Echocardiography and cardiac strain measures were unremarkable apart from trivial increase to intra-ventricular septum diastole (IVSd) (PHIIT. A programme of preconditioning exercise with HIIT induces clinically relevant improvements in blood pressure, rate pressure product and encourages recovery of heart rate reserve in SED, while improving maximal MET capacity in both SED and LEX without inducing any pathological cardiovascular remodeling. These data add to the emerging repute of HIIT as a safe and promising exercise prescription to improve cardiovascular function and metabolic capacity in sedentary aging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Paeoniflorin improves cardiac function and decreases adverse postinfarction left ventricular remodeling in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen H

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hengwen Chen,* Yan Dong,* Xuanhui He, Jun Li, Jie Wang Guang’anmen Hospital, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences, Beijing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Paeoniflorin (PF is the active component of Paeonia lactiflora Pall. or Paeonia veitchii Lynch. This study was, therefore, aimed to evaluate the improvement and mechanism of the PF on ventricular remodeling in rats with acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Materials and methods: In this study, AMI model was established by ligating the anterior descending coronary artery in Wistar rats. After 4 weeks gavage of PF, the apparent signs and the left ventricle weight index of Wistar rats were observed. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was evaluated by Doppler ultrasonography. Changes in cardiac morphology were observed by pathologic examination, and apoptosis was observed by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 interleukin-10 (IL-10 and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot method were applied to detect Caspase-3 and Caspase-9. Results: Compared with the model control, the survival conditions of rats in all treatment groups were generally improved after PF treatment. LVEF was significantly increased, and both left ventricular end-diastolic inner diameter and left ventricular end-systolic inner diameter were significantly reduced. Moreover, pathologic examination showed that the myocardium degeneration of the rats treated with PF was decreased, including neater arrangement, more complete myofilament, more uniform gap and less interstitial collagen fibers. Furthermore, the mitochondrial structure of cardiomyocytes was significantly improved. The ultrastructure was clear, and the arrangement of myofilament was more regular. Also, the expression of

  8. Inpatient and outpatient cardiac rehabilitation programmes improve cardiometabolic risk in revascularized coronary patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu Avram

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to evaluate cardiometabolic risk reduction of diabetic patients following coronary revascularizationprocedures after participation in outpatients or inpatients cardiac rehabilitation programmes. Materials and methods: weperformed a retrospective analytical study which included a group of 103 revascularized coronary patients with diabetesmellitus. Depending on participation in a cardiac rehabilitation program we have defined the following subgroups of patients:Group O (N=37 - attended the outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program; Group H (N=37 - attended the inpatient cardiacrehabilitation program; Group C (N=34 - did not participate in any cardiac rehabilitation program. Between those two momentsof assessment: T0 - revascularization / early post-revascularization and T1 - time of the interview (16±2.3 months afterrevascularization, patients in groups A and S participated in outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (12 weeks, 3sessions/week of exercise training, with clinical and paraclinical evaluation scheduled at 1, 6, 12 months afterrevascularization, or inpatient cardiac rehabilitation program (3 weeks, intensive sessions, scheduled at 1, 3, 6 and 12months after revascularization. Results: at the end of the study, we found significant differences among the three groups forthe following parameters: body mass index (p=0.01, systolic blood pressure (p=0.002, total cholesterol (p<0.001, LDLcholesterol(p<0.001 and non-HDL cholesterol (p=0.004 in favor of groups A and S, that have participated in comprehensivecardiac rehabilitation programs. Conclusions: comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation programmes, performed outpatient orinpatient, are effective methods of reducing the high cardiometabolic risk, specific in revascularized coronary patients withdiabetes.

  9. Angiotensin receptor blockade improves cardiac mitochondrial activity in response to an acute glucose load in obese insulin resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Thorwald

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia increases the risk of oxidant overproduction in the heart through activation of a multitude of pathways. Oxidation of mitochondrial enzymes may impair their function resulting in accumulation of intermediates and reverse electron transfer, contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS becomes inappropriately activated during metabolic syndrome, increasing oxidant production. To combat excess oxidant production, the transcription factor, nuclear factor erythriod-2- related factor 2 (Nrf2, induces expression of many antioxidant genes. We hypothesized that angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 blockade improves mitochondrial function in response to an acute glucose load via upregulation of Nrf2. To address this hypothesis, an oral glucose challenge was performed in three groups prior to dissection (n = 5–8 animals/group/time point of adult male rats: 1 Long Evans Tokushima Otsuka (LETO; lean strain-control, 2 insulin resistant, obese Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF, and 3 OLETF + angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB; 10 mg olmesartan/kg/d × 6 weeks. Hearts were collected at T0, T60, and T120 minutes post-glucose infusion. ARB increased Nrf2 binding 32% compared to OLETF at T60. Total superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT activities were increased 45% and 66% respectively in ARB treated animals compared to OLETF. Mitochondrial enzyme activities of aconitase, complex I, and complex II increased by 135%, 33% and 66%, respectively in ARB compared to OLETF. These data demonstrate the protective effects of AT1 blockade on mitochondrial function during the manifestation of insulin resistance suggesting that the inappropriate activation of AT1 during insulin resistance may impair Nrf2 translocation and subsequent antioxidant activities and mitochondrial function. Keywords: Angiotensin II, Mitochondria, Cardiac, Antioxidant enzymes, TCA cycle

  10. Description of hot debriefings after in-hospital cardiac arrests in an international pediatric quality improvement collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweberg, Todd; Sen, Anita I; Mullan, Paul C; Cheng, Adam; Knight, Lynda; Del Castillo, Jimena; Ikeyama, Takanari; Seshadri, Roopa; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Raymond, Tia; Niles, Dana E; Nadkarni, Vinay; Wolfe, Heather

    2018-05-22

    The American Heart Association recommends debriefing after attempted resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to improve resuscitation quality and outcomes. This is the first published study detailing the utilization, process and content of hot debriefings after pediatric IHCA. Using prospective data from the Pediatric Resuscitation Quality Collaborative (pediRES-Q), we analyzed data from 227 arrests occurring between February 1, 2016, and August 31, 2017. Hot debriefings, defined as occurring within minutes to hours of IHCA, were evaluated using a modified Team Emergency Assessment Measure framework for qualitative content analysis of debriefing comments. Hot debriefings were performed following 108 of 227 IHCAs (47%). The median interval to debriefing was 130 min (Interquartile range [IQR] 45, 270). Median debriefing duration was 15 min (IQR 10, 20). Physicians facilitated 95% of debriefings, with a median of 9 participants (IQR 7, 11). After multivariate analysis, accounting for hospital site, debriefing frequency was not associated with patient age, gender, race, illness category or unit type. The most frequent positive (plus) comments involved cooperation/coordination (60%), communication (47%) and clinical standards (41%). The most frequent negative (delta) comments involved equipment (46%), cooperation/coordination (45%), and clinical standards (36%). Approximately half of pediatric IHCAs were followed by hot debriefings. Hot debriefings were multi-disciplinary, timely, and often addressed issues of team cooperation/coordination, communication, clinical standards, and equipment. Additional studies are warranted to identify barriers to hot debriefings and to evaluate the impact of these debriefings on patient outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The patient education - Learning and Coping Strategies - improves adherence in cardiac rehabilitation (LC-REHAB): A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynggaard, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Vinther; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Taylor, Rod S; May, Ole

    2017-06-01

    Despite proven benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR), adherence to CR remains suboptimal. This trial aimed to assess the impact of the patient education 'Learning and Coping Strategies' (LC) on patient adherence to an eight-week CR program. 825 patients with ischaemic heart disease or heart failure were open label randomised to either the LC arm (LC plus CR) or the control arm (CR alone) across three hospital units in Denmark. Both arms received same amount of training and education hours. LC consisted of individual clarifying interviews, participation of experienced patients as co-educators, situational, reflective and inductive teaching. The control arm received structured deductive teaching. The primary outcomes were patient adherence to at least 75% of the exercise training or education sessions. We tested for subgroup effects on the primary outcomes using interaction terms. The primary outcomes were compared across arms using logistic regression. More patients in the LC arm adhered to at least 75% of the exercise training sessions than control (80% versus 73%, adjusted odds ratio (OR):1.48; 95% CI:1.07 to 2.05, P=0.018) and 75% of education sessions (79% versus 70%, adjusted OR:1.61, 1.17 to 2.22, P=0.003). Some evidence of larger effects of LC on adherence was seen for patients with heart failure, low education and household income. Addition of LC strategies improved adherence in rehabilitation both in terms of exercise training and education. Patients with heart failure, low levels of education and household income appear to benefit most from this adherence promoting intervention. www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01668394. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol improves cardiac autonomic function after coronary artery bypass graft surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Simões, Rodrigo Polaquini; De Souza Melo Costa, Fernando; Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo, Luciana; Luzzi, Sérgio; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Arena, Ross; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2010-01-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is accompanied by severe impairment of cardiac autonomous regulation (CAR). This study aimed to determine whether a short-term physiotherapy exercise protocol post-CABG, during inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR), might improve CAR. Seventy-four patients eligible for CABG were recruited and randomised into physiotherapy exercise group (EG) or physiotherapy usual care group (UCG). EG patients underwent a short-term supervised inpatient physiotherapy exercise protocol consisting of an early mobilisation with progressive exercises plus usual care (respiratory exercises). UCG only received respiratory exercises. Forty-seven patients (24 EG and 23 UGC) completed the study. Outcome measures of CAR included linear and non-linear measures of heart rate variability (HRV) assessed before discharge. By hospital discharge, EG presented significantly higher parasympathetic HRV values [rMSSD, high frequency (HF), SD1)], global power (STD RR, SD2), non-linear HRV indexes [detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA)alpha1, DFAalpha2, approximate entropy (ApEn)] and mean RR compared to UCG (pexercise protocol during inpatient CR improves CAR at the time of discharge. Thus, exercise-based inpatient CR might be an effective non-pharmacological tool to improve autonomic cardiac tone in patient's post-CABG.

  13. Taurine exerts hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, improves insulin-mediated glucose transport signaling pathway in heart and ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Joydeep; Vasan, Vandana; Sil, Parames C., E-mail: parames@bosemain.boseinst.ac.in

    2012-01-15

    Hyperlipidemia, inflammation and altered antioxidant profiles are the usual complications in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of taurine in diabetes associated cardiac complications using a rat model. Rats were made diabetic by alloxan (ALX) (single i.p. dose of 120 mg/kg body weight) and left untreated or treated with taurine (1% w/v, orally, in water) for three weeks either from the day of ALX exposure or after the onset of diabetes. Animals were euthanized after three weeks. ALX-induced diabetes decreased body weight, increased glucose level, decreased insulin content, enhanced the levels of cardiac damage markers and altered lipid profile in the plasma. Moreover, it increased oxidative stress (decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased xanthine oxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and ROS generation) and enhanced the proinflammatory cytokines levels, activity of myeloperoxidase and nuclear translocation of NFκB in the cardiac tissue of the experimental animals. Taurine treatment could, however, result to a decrease in the elevated blood glucose and proinflammatory cytokine levels, diabetes-evoked oxidative stress, lipid profiles and NFκB translocation. In addition, taurine increased GLUT 4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of IR and IRS1 at tyrosine and Akt at serine residue in the heart. Results also suggest that taurine could protect cardiac tissue from ALX induced apoptosis via the regulation of Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins. Taken together, taurine supplementation in regular diet could play a beneficial role in regulating diabetes and its associated complications in the heart. Highlights: ► Taurine controls blood glucose via protection of pancreatic β cells in diabetic rat. ► Taurine controls blood glucose via increasing the insulin level in diabetic rat. ► Taurine improves cardiac AKT/GLUT4 signaling

  14. Taurine exerts hypoglycemic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats, improves insulin-mediated glucose transport signaling pathway in heart and ameliorates cardiac oxidative stress and apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Joydeep; Vasan, Vandana; Sil, Parames C.

    2012-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia, inflammation and altered antioxidant profiles are the usual complications in diabetes mellitus. In the present study, we investigated the therapeutic potential of taurine in diabetes associated cardiac complications using a rat model. Rats were made diabetic by alloxan (ALX) (single i.p. dose of 120 mg/kg body weight) and left untreated or treated with taurine (1% w/v, orally, in water) for three weeks either from the day of ALX exposure or after the onset of diabetes. Animals were euthanized after three weeks. ALX-induced diabetes decreased body weight, increased glucose level, decreased insulin content, enhanced the levels of cardiac damage markers and altered lipid profile in the plasma. Moreover, it increased oxidative stress (decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH/GSSG ratio, increased xanthine oxidase enzyme activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and ROS generation) and enhanced the proinflammatory cytokines levels, activity of myeloperoxidase and nuclear translocation of NFκB in the cardiac tissue of the experimental animals. Taurine treatment could, however, result to a decrease in the elevated blood glucose and proinflammatory cytokine levels, diabetes-evoked oxidative stress, lipid profiles and NFκB translocation. In addition, taurine increased GLUT 4 translocation to the cardiac membrane by enhanced phosphorylation of IR and IRS1 at tyrosine and Akt at serine residue in the heart. Results also suggest that taurine could protect cardiac tissue from ALX induced apoptosis via the regulation of Bcl2 family and caspase 9/3 proteins. Taken together, taurine supplementation in regular diet could play a beneficial role in regulating diabetes and its associated complications in the heart. Highlights: ► Taurine controls blood glucose via protection of pancreatic β cells in diabetic rat. ► Taurine controls blood glucose via increasing the insulin level in diabetic rat. ► Taurine improves cardiac AKT/GLUT4 signaling

  15. Cardiac rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rehab; Heart failure - cardiac rehab References Anderson L, Taylor RS. Cardiac rehabilitation for people with heart disease: ... of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  16. Sudden cardiac death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Parakh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sudden cardiac death is one of the most common cause of mortality worldwide. Despite significant advances in the medical science, there is little improvement in the sudden cardiac death related mortality. Coronary artery disease is the most common etiology behind sudden cardiac death, in the above 40 years population. Even in the apparently healthy population, there is a small percentage of patients dying from sudden cardiac death. Given the large denominator, this small percentage contributes to the largest burden of sudden cardiac death. Identification of this at risk group among the apparently healthy individual is a great challenge for the medical fraternity. This article looks into the causes and methods of preventing SCD and at some of the Indian data. Details of Brugada syndrome, Long QT syndrome, Genetics of SCD are discussed. Recent guidelines on many of these causes are summarised.

  17. The importance of daily physical activity for improved exercise tolerance in heart failure patients with limited access to centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Noriaki; Origuchi, Hideki; Yamamoto, Umpei; Takanaga, Yasuhiro; Mohri, Masahiro

    2012-09-01

    Supervised cardiac rehabilitation provided at dedicated centres ameliorates exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure. To correlate the amount of physical activity outside the hospital with improved exercise tolerance in patients with limited access to centre-based programs. Forty patients (median age 69 years) with stable heart failure due to systolic left ventricular dysfunction participated in cardiac rehabilitation once per week for five months. Using a validated single-axial accelerometer, the number of steps and physical activity-related energy expenditures on nonrehabilitation days were determined. Median (interquartile range) peak oxygen consumption was increased from 14.4 mL/kg/min (range 12.9 mL/kg/min to 17.8 mL/kg/min) to 16.4 mL/kg/min (range 13.9 mL/kg/min to 19.1 mL/kg/min); Pdaily number of steps (Pexercise time per day and time spent for light (≤3 metabolic equivalents) exercise, but not with time spent for moderate/vigorous (>3 metabolic equivalents) exercise. The number of steps and energy expenditures outside the hospital were correlated with improved exercise capacity. An accelerometer may be useful for guiding home-based cardiac rehabilitation.

  18. Yoga-based postoperative cardiac rehabilitation program for improving quality of life and stress levels: Fifth-year follow-up through a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraballi Amaravathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was aimed to assess the efficacy of yoga-based lifestyle program (YLSP in improving quality of life (QOL and stress levels in patients after 5 years of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Methodology: Three hundred patients posted for elective CABG in Narayana Hrudayalaya Super Speciality Hospital, Bengaluru, were randomized into two groups: YLSP and conventional lifestyle program (CLSP, and follow-up was done for 5 years. Intervention: In YLSP group, all practices of integrative approach of yoga therapy such as yama, niyama, asana, pranayama, and meditation were used as an add-on to conventional cardiac rehabilitation. The control group (CLSP continued conventional cardiac rehabilitation only. Outcome Measures: World Health Organization (WHO-QOL BREF Questionnaire, Perceived Stress Scale, Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed before surgery and at the end of the 5th year after CABG. As data were not normally distributed, Mann–Whitney U-test was used for between-group comparisons and Wilcoxon's signed-rank test was used for within-group comparisons. Results: At the end of 5 years, mental health (P = 0.05, perceived stress (P = 0.01, and negative affect (NA (P = 0.05 have shown significant improvements. WHO-QOL BREF score has shown improvements in physical health (P = 0.046, environmental health (P = 0.04, perceived stress (P = 0.001, and NA (P = 0.02 in YLSP than CLSP. Positive affect has significantly improved in CLSP than YLSP. Other domains of WHO-QOL-BREF, PANAS, and HADS did not reveal any significant between-group differences. Conclusion: Addition of long-term YLSP to conventional cardiac rehabilitation brings better improvements in QOL and reduction in stress levels at the end of 5 years after CABG.

  19. Dietary salt restriction improves cardiac and adipose tissue pathology independently of obesity in a rat model of metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takuya; Murase, Tamayo; Takatsu, Miwa; Nagasawa, Kai; Matsuura, Natsumi; Watanabe, Shogo; Murohara, Toyoaki; Nagata, Kohzo

    2014-12-02

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) enhances salt sensitivity of blood pressure and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The effects of dietary salt restriction on cardiac pathology associated with metabolic syndrome remain unclear. We investigated whether dietary salt restriction might ameliorate cardiac injury in DahlS.Z-Lepr(fa)/Lepr(fa) (DS/obese) rats, which are derived from a cross between Dahl salt-sensitive and Zucker rats and represent a model of metabolic syndrome. DS/obese rats were fed a normal-salt (0.36% NaCl in chow) or low-salt (0.0466% NaCl in chow) diet from 9 weeks of age and were compared with similarly treated homozygous lean littermates (DahlS.Z-Lepr(+)/Lepr(+), or DS/lean rats). DS/obese rats fed the normal-salt diet progressively developed hypertension and showed left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction at 15 weeks. Dietary salt restriction attenuated all of these changes in DS/obese rats. The levels of cardiac oxidative stress and inflammation and the expression of cardiac renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes were increased in DS/obese rats fed the normal-salt diet, and dietary salt restriction downregulated these parameters in both DS/obese and DS/lean rats. In addition, dietary salt restriction attenuated the increase in visceral adipose tissue inflammation and the decrease in insulin signaling apparent in DS/obese rats without reducing body weight or visceral adipocyte size. Dietary salt restriction did not alter fasting serum glucose levels but it markedly decreased the fasting serum insulin concentration in DS/obese rats. Dietary salt restriction not only prevents hypertension and cardiac injury but also ameliorates insulin resistance, without reducing obesity, in this model of metabolic syndrome. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. Estimating cost-effectiveness of mass cardiopulmonary resuscitation training strategies to improve survival from cardiac arrest in private locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swor, Robert; Compton, Scott

    2004-01-01

    Most cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) trainees are young, and most cardiac arrests occur in private residences witnessed by older individuals. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of a CPR training program targeted at citizens over the age of 50 years compared with that of current nontargeted public CPR training. A model was developed using cardiac arrest and known demographic data from a single suburban zip code (population 36,325) including: local data (1997-1999) regarding cardiac arrest locations (public vs. private); incremental survival with CPR (historical survival rate 7.8%, adjusted odds ratio for CPR 2.0); arrest bystander demographics obtained from bystander telephone interviews; zip code demographics regarding population age and distribution; and 12.50 dollars per student for the cost of CPR training. Published rates of CPR training programs by age were used to estimate the numbers typically trained. Several assumptions were made: 1) there would be one bystander per. arrest; 2) the bystander would always perform CPR if trained; 3) cardiac arrest would be evenly distributed in the population; and 4) CPR training for a proportion of the population would proportionally increase CPR provision. Rates of arrest, bystanders by age, number of CPR trainees needed to result in increased arrest survival, and training cost per life saved for a one-year study period were calculated. There were 24.3 cardiac arrests per year, with 21.9 (90%) occurring in homes. In 66.5% of the home arrests, the bystander was more than 50 years old. To yield one additional survivor using the current CPR training strategy, 12,306 people needed to be trained (3,510 bystanders aged 50 years), which resulted in CPR provision to 7.14 additional patients. The training cost per life saved for a bystander aged 50 years was 785,040 dollars. Using a strategy of training only those cost of 53,383 dollars per life saved. Using these assumptions, current CPR training strategy is not a cost

  1. Cardiac rehabilitation: a good measure to improve quality of life in peri- and postmenopausal women with microvascular angina

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Szot; Joanna Zając; Magdalena Kostkiewicz; Jakub Owoc; Iwona Bojar

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac Syndrome X (CSX) was considered a stable coronary syndrome, yet due to its nature, CSX symptoms often have a great impact on patients’ Quality of Life (QoL). According to ESC 2013 stable coronary artery disease criteria, CSX was replaced by Microvascular Angina (MA).Unfortunately, most CSX or MA patients, after classical angina (involving main coronary vessels) has been ruled out, often do not receive proper treatment. Indications for pharmacological treatment of MA patients were intr...

  2. Megestrol acetate improves cardiac function in a model of cancer cachexia-induced cardiomyopathy by autophagic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Vincenzo; Palus, Sandra; Tschirner, Anika; Drescher, Cathleen; Gliozzi, Micaela; Carresi, Cristina; Vitale, Cristiana; Muscoli, Carolina; Doehner, Wolfram; von Haehling, Stephan; Anker, Stefan D; Mollace, Vincenzo; Springer, Jochen

    2016-12-01

    Cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with cancer. One of the features of cachexia is the loss of muscle mass, characterized by an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. Muscle atrophy is caused by the hyperactivation of some of the main cellular catabolic pathways, including autophagy. Cachexia also affects the cardiac muscle. As a consequence of the atrophy of the heart, cardiac function is impaired and mortality is increased. Anti-cachectic therapy in patients with cancer cachexia is so far limited to nutritional support and anabolic steroids. The use of the appetite stimulant megestrol acetate (MA) has been discussed as a treatment for cachexia. In this study the effects of MA were tested in cachectic tumour-bearing rats (Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma). Rats were treated daily with 100 mg/kg of MA or placebo starting one day after tumour inoculation, and for a period of 16 days. Body weight and body composition were assessed at baseline and at the end of the study. Cardiac function was analysed by echocardiography at baseline and at day 11. Locomotor activity and food intake were assessed before tumour inoculation and at day 11. Autophagic markers were assessed in gastrocnemius muscle and heart by western blot analysis. Treatment with 100 mg/kg/day MA significantly attenuated the loss of body weight (-9 ± 12%, P  cachexia-induced cardiomyopathy.

  3. Intramyocardial implantation of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhanced by TGF-β1 improves cardiac function in heart failure rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, Y. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China); Liu, B. [Department of Pathology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Wang, H.P. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei North University, Zhangjiakou, Hebei (China); Zhang, L. [Department of Histology and Embryology, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei (China)

    2016-05-31

    The present study tested the hypotheses that i) transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) enhances differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cardiomyogenic phenotype and ii) intramyocardial implantation of the TGF-β1-treated MSCs improves cardiac function in heart failure rats. MSCs were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 72 h, and then morphological characteristics, surface antigens and mRNA expression of several transcription factors were assessed. Intramyocardial implantation of these TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart was also investigated. MSCs were initially spindle-shaped with irregular processes. On day 28 after TGF-β1 treatment, MSCs showed fusiform shape, orientating parallel with one another, and were connected with adjoining cells forming myotube-like structures. Immunofluorescence revealed the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins, α-sarcomeric actin and troponin T, in these cells. The mRNA expression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 genes was slightly increased on day 7, enhanced on day 14 and decreased on day 28 while α-MHC gene was not expressed on day 7, but expressed slightly on day 14 and enhanced on day 28. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the induced cells had myofilaments, z line-like substances, desmosomes, and gap junctions, in contrast with control cells. Furthermore, intramyocardial implantation of TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart reduced scar area and increased the number of muscle cells. This structure regeneration was concomitant with the improvement of cardiac function, evidenced by decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, increased left ventricular systolic pressure and increased maximal positive pressure development rate. Taken together, these results indicate that intramyocardial implantation of differentiated MSCs enhanced by TGF-β1 improved cardiac function in heart failure rats.

  4. Low-dose β-blocker in combination with milrinone safely improves cardiac function and eliminates pulsus alternans in patients with acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Susa, Takehisa; Tanaka, Takeo; Murakami, Wakako; Fukuta, Seiko; Okuda, Shinichi; Doi, Masahiro; Wada, Yasuaki; Nao, Tomoko; Yamada, Jutaro; Okamura, Takayuki; Yano, Masafumi; Matsuzaki, Masunori

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a low-dose β-blocker, in combination with milrinone, improves cardiac function in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) with tachycardia. Twenty ADHF patients (New York Heart Association classification III, n=1, and IV, n=19; heart rate [HR], 107±12 beats/min; left ventricular ejection fraction, 24±7%; cardiac index [CI], 2.2±0.6 L·min(-1)·m(-2); pulmonary capillary wedge pressure [PCWP], 26±8 mmHg) were enrolled in this study. The patients first underwent conventional therapy with milrinone, vasodilators and diuretics; landiolol (1.5-6.0 µg·kg(-1)·min(-1); i.v.), which is an ultra-short-acting β(1)-selective blocker, was then added to the treatment regimen to study its effect on hemodynamics. Low-dose landiolol (1.5 µg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) significantly reduced HR by 11% without changing blood pressure (BP) and CI, whereas higher doses (≥3.0 µg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) tended to decrease BP and CI while increasing PCWP and systemic vascular resistance. After treatment with landiolol (1.5 µg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), hemodynamic parameters such as PCWP, stroke volume index, SvO(2), rate pressure product, filling time/RR, E/e', and Tei index were significantly improved. A low-dose β-blocker in combination with milrinone improved cardiac function in ADHF patients with tachycardia; therefore, it may be considered as an adjunct therapy for use when standard therapy with milrinone is not effective at slowing HR.

  5. Combined administration of mesenchymal stem cells overexpressing IGF-1 and HGF enhances neovascularization but moderately improves cardiac regeneration in a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Mauricio, Guadalupe; Moscoso, Isabel; Martín-Cancho, María-Fernanda; Crisóstomo, Verónica; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Báez-Díaz, Claudia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M; Bernad, Antonio

    2016-07-16

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) are among the most promising growth factors for promoting cardiorepair. Here, we evaluated the combination of cell- and gene-based therapy using mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) genetically modified to overexpress IGF-1 or HGF to treat acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a porcine model. Pig MSC from adipose tissue (paMSC) were genetically modified for evaluation of different therapeutic strategies to improve AMI treatment. Three groups of infarcted Large White pigs were compared (I, control, non-transplanted; II, transplanted with paMSC-GFP (green fluorescent protein); III, transplanted with paMSC-IGF-1/HGF). Cardiac function was evaluated non-invasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for 1 month. After euthanasia and sampling of the animal, infarcted areas were studied by histology and immunohistochemistry. Intramyocardial transplant in a porcine infarct model demonstrated the safety of paMSC in short-term treatments. Treatment with paMSC-IGF-1/HGF (1:1) compared with the other groups showed a clear reduction in inflammation in some sections analyzed and promoted angiogenic processes in ischemic tissue. Although cardiac function parameters were not significantly improved, cell retention and IGF-1 overexpression was confirmed within the myocardium. The simultaneous administration of IGF-1- and HGF-overexpressing paMSC appears not to promote a synergistic effect or effective repair. The combined enhancement of neovascularization and fibrosis in paMSC-IGF-1/HGF-treated animals nonetheless suggests that sustained exposure to high IGF-1 + HGF levels promotes beneficial as well as deleterious effects that do not improve overall cardiac regeneration.

  6. Intramyocardial implantation of differentiated rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells enhanced by TGF-β1 improves cardiac function in heart failure rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Y.; Liu, B.; Wang, H.P.; Zhang, L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study tested the hypotheses that i) transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) enhances differentiation of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards the cardiomyogenic phenotype and ii) intramyocardial implantation of the TGF-β1-treated MSCs improves cardiac function in heart failure rats. MSCs were treated with different concentrations of TGF-β1 for 72 h, and then morphological characteristics, surface antigens and mRNA expression of several transcription factors were assessed. Intramyocardial implantation of these TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart was also investigated. MSCs were initially spindle-shaped with irregular processes. On day 28 after TGF-β1 treatment, MSCs showed fusiform shape, orientating parallel with one another, and were connected with adjoining cells forming myotube-like structures. Immunofluorescence revealed the expression of cardiomyocyte-specific proteins, α-sarcomeric actin and troponin T, in these cells. The mRNA expression of GATA4 and Nkx2.5 genes was slightly increased on day 7, enhanced on day 14 and decreased on day 28 while α-MHC gene was not expressed on day 7, but expressed slightly on day 14 and enhanced on day 28. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the induced cells had myofilaments, z line-like substances, desmosomes, and gap junctions, in contrast with control cells. Furthermore, intramyocardial implantation of TGF-β1-treated MSCs to infarcted heart reduced scar area and increased the number of muscle cells. This structure regeneration was concomitant with the improvement of cardiac function, evidenced by decreased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, increased left ventricular systolic pressure and increased maximal positive pressure development rate. Taken together, these results indicate that intramyocardial implantation of differentiated MSCs enhanced by TGF-β1 improved cardiac function in heart failure rats

  7. Haemodynamics and oxygenation improvement induced by high frequency percussive ventilation in a patient with hypoxia following cardiac surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persi Bruno

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction High frequency percussive ventilation is a ventilatory technique that delivers small bursts of high flow respiratory gas into the lungs at high rates. It is classified as a pneumatically powered, pressure-regulated, time-cycled, high-frequency flow interrupter modality of ventilation. High frequency percussive ventilation improves the arterial partial pressure of oxygen with the same positive end expiratory pressure and fractional inspiratory oxygen level as conventional ventilation using a minor mean airway pressure in an open circuit. It reduces the barotraumatic events in a hypoxic patient who has low lung-compliance. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no papers published about this ventilation modality in patients with severe hypoxaemia after cardiac surgery. Case presentation A 75-year-old Caucasian man with an ejection fraction of 27 percent, developed a lung infection with severe hypoxaemia [partial pressure of oxygen/fractional inspiratory oxygen of 90] ten days after cardiac surgery. Conventional ventilation did not improve the gas exchange. He was treated with high frequency percussive ventilation for 12 hours with a low conventional respiratory rate (five per minute. His cardiac output and systemic and pulmonary pressures were monitored. Compared to conventional ventilation, high frequency percussive ventilation gives an improvement of the partial pressure of oxygen from 90 to 190 mmHg with the same fractional inspiratory oxygen and positive end expiratory pressure level. His right ventricular stroke work index was lowered from 19 to seven g-m/m2/beat; his pulmonary vascular resistance index from 267 to 190 dynes•seconds/cm5/m2; left ventricular stroke work index from 28 to 16 gm-m/m2/beat; and his pulmonary arterial wedge pressure was lowered from 32 to 24 mmHg with a lower mean airway pressure compared to conventional ventilation. His cardiac index (2.7 L/min/m2 and ejection fraction (27 percent

  8. [The challenge of improving evidence-based therapy adherence in the secondary prevention of coronary artery disease: the next frontier of cardiac rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardi, Sabino; Mazzone, Carmine; Umari, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    Non-adherence to prescribed drug regimens is an increasing medical problem affecting physicians and patients and contribute to negative outcomes, such as the increased risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. Analysis of various patient populations shows that the choice of drug, its tolerability and the duration of treatment influence the non-adherence. Intervention is required toward patients and health-care providers to improve medication adherence. This review deals about the prevalence of non-adherence to therapy after medical and surgical cardiac event, the risk factors affecting non-adherence and the strategies to implement it. Interventions that may successfully improve adherence should include improved physician compliance with guidelines, patient education and patient reminders, frequent visits or telephone calls from staff, simplification of the patient's drug regimen by reducing the number of pills and daily doses. Since single interventions do not appear efficaceous, it is necessary to establish multiple interventions simultaneously addressing a number of barriers to adherence.

  9. Why did high-dose rosuvastatin not improve cardiac remodeling in chronic heart failure? Mechanistic insights from the UNIVERSE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Emma; Windebank, Emma; Skiba, Marina; Reid, Christopher; Schneider, Hans; Rosenfeldt, Franklin; Tonkin, Andrew; Krum, Henry

    2011-02-03

    Statins are often prescribed for prevention of atherosclerotic outcomes in patients who have chronic heart failure (CHF), if this has an ischaemic etiology. These agents may also possess additional properties, independent of effects on blood lipid levels, which may have an effect on cardiac remodeling. However, beneficial effects were not observed in the recent UNIVERSE trial. We prospectively planned a sub-study of UNIVERSE to explore relevant mechanistic effects of rosuvastatin, including effects on collagen turnover and plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ) levels. Additionally, CoQ levels in CHF patients receiving chronic statin therapy were measured. CoQ levels were significantly reduced after 26 weeks of rosuvastatin statin therapy (n = 32), compared to placebo (n = 37) in CHF patients in UNIVERSE trial. Patients with CHF (n = 56) matched for age, gender and severity of disease who had been taking statins for 12 months or longer had CoQ levels of 847 ± 344 nmol/L, significantly lower than 1065.4 ± 394 nmol/L in UNIVERSE patients at baseline (p = 0.0001). Serum types I and III N-terminal procollagen peptide (PINP and PIIINP), measures of collagen turnover which can contribute to cardiac fibrosis were significantly increased in the rosuvastatin group compared to baseline in UNIVERSE patients (PINP: p = 0.03, PIIINP: p = 0.001). In conclusion putative beneficial effects of statin therapy on cardiac remodeling in UNIVERSE may have been negated by increases in collagen turnover markers as well as a reduction in plasma CoQ levels in these patients with CHF. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Recent developments in cardiac pacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodak, D J

    1995-10-01

    Indications for cardiac pacing continue to expand. Pacing to improve functional capacity, which is now common, relies on careful patient selection and technical improvements, such as complex software algorithms and diagnostic capabilities.

  11. Efficient preloading of the ventricles by a properly timed atrial contraction underlies stroke work improvement in the acute response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuxuan; Gurev, Viatcheslav; Constantino, Jason; Trayanova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Background The acute response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has been shown to be due to three mechanisms: resynchronization of ventricular contraction, efficient preloading of the ventricles by a properly timed atrial contraction, and mitral regurgitation reduction. However, the contribution of each of the three mechanisms to the acute response of CRT, specifically stroke work improvement, has not been quantified. Objective The goal of this study was to use an MRI-based anatomically accurate 3D model of failing canine ventricular electromechanics to quantify the contribution of each of the three mechanisms to stroke work improvement and identify the predominant mechanisms. Methods An MRI-based electromechanical model of the failing canine ventricles assembled previously by our group was further developed and modified. Three different protocols were used to dissect the contribution of each of the three mechanisms to stroke work improvement. Results Resynchronization of ventricular contraction did not lead to significant stroke work improvement. Efficient preloading of the ventricles by a properly timed atrial contraction was the predominant mechanism underlying stroke work improvement. Stroke work improvement peaked at an intermediate AV delay, as it allowed ventricular filling by atrial contraction to occur at a low diastolic LV pressure but also provided adequate time for ventricular filling before ventricular contraction. Diminution of mitral regurgitation by CRT led to stroke work worsening instead of improvement. Conclusion Efficient preloading of the ventricles by a properly timed atrial contraction is responsible for significant stroke work improvement in the acute CRT response. PMID:23928177

  12. Improving the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation by training dedicated cardiac arrest teams incorporating a mechanical load-distributing device at the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Quah, Joy Li Juan; Annathurai, Annitha; Noor, Noorkiah Mohamed; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Tan, Kenneth Boon Kiat; Pothiawala, Sohil; Poh, Ah Ho; Loy, Chye Khiaw; Fook-Chong, Stephanie

    2013-04-01

    Determine if implementing cardiac arrest teams trained with a 'pit-crew' protocol incorporating a load-distributing band mechanical CPR device (Autopulse™ ZOLL) improves the quality of CPR, as determined by no-flow ratio (NFR) in the first 10min of resuscitation. A phased, prospective, non-randomized, before-after cohort evaluation. Data collection was from April 2008 to February 2011. There were 100 before and 148 after cases. Continuous video and chest compression data of all study subjects were analyzed. All non-traumatic, collapsed patients aged 18 years and above presenting to the emergency department were eligible. Primary outcome was NFR. Secondary outcomes were return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), survival to hospital admission and neurological outcome at discharge. After implementation, mean total NFR for the first 5min decreased from 0.42 to 0.27 (decrease=0.15, 95% CI 0.10-0.19, pCPR ratio increased from 46.4% to 88.4% (increase=41.9%, 95% CI 36.9-46.9, pTraining cardiac arrest teams in a 'pit-crew' protocol may improve the quality of CPR at the ED. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel all-extremity high-intensity interval training improves aerobic fitness, cardiac function and insulin resistance in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Kim, Han-Kyul; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Handberg, Eileen M; Petersen, John W; Christou, Demetra D

    2016-09-01

    Aging is associated with decreased aerobic fitness and cardiac remodeling leading to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the treadmill has been reported to be more effective in ameliorating these risk factors compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in patients with cardiometabolic disease. In older adults, however, weight-bearing activities are frequently limited due to musculoskeletal and balance problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of non-weight-bearing all-extremity HIIT in older adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that all-extremity HIIT will be more effective in improving aerobic fitness, cardiac function, and metabolic risk factors compared with all-extremity MICT. Fifty-one healthy sedentary older adults (age: 65±1years) were randomized to HIIT (n=17), MICT (n=18) or non-exercise control (CONT; n=16). HIIT (4×4min 90% of peak heart rate; HRpeak) and isocaloric MICT (70% of HRpeak) were performed on a non-weight-bearing all-extremity ergometer, 4×/week for 8weeks under supervision. All-extremity HIIT was feasible in older adults and resulted in no adverse events. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption; VO2peak) and ejection fraction (echocardiography) improved by 11% (PHIIT, while no changes were observed in MICT and CONT (P≥0.1). Greater improvements in ejection fraction were associated with greater improvements in VO2peak (r=0.57; PHIIT by 26% (P=0.016). Diastolic function, body composition, glucose and lipids were unaffected (P≥0.1). In conclusion, all-extremity HIIT is feasible and safe in older adults. HIIT, but not MICT, improved aerobic fitness, ejection fraction, and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Novel All-Extremity High-Intensity Interval Training Improves Aerobic Fitness, Cardiac Function and Insulin Resistance in Healthy Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yoo, Jeung-Ki; Kim, Han-Kyul; Hwang, Moon-Hyon; Handberg, Eileen M.; Petersen, John W.; Christou, Demetra D.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with decreased aerobic fitness and cardiac remodeling leading to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) on the treadmill has been reported to be more effective in ameliorating these risk factors compared with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) in patients with cardiometabolic disease. In older adults, however, weight-bearing activities are frequently limited due to musculoskeletal and balance problems. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility and safety of non-weight-bearing all-extremity HIIT in older adults. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that all-extremity HIIT will be more effective in improving aerobic fitness, cardiac function, and metabolic risk factors compared with all-extremity MICT. Fifty-one healthy sedentary older adults (age: 65±1 years) were randomized to HIIT (n=17), MICT (n=18) or non-exercise control (CONT; n=16). HIIT (4×4 minutes 90% of peak heart rate; HRpeak) and isocaloric MICT (70% of HRpeak) were performed on a non-weight-bearing all-extremity ergometer, 4x/week for 8 weeks under supervision. All-extremity HIIT was feasible in older adults and resulted in no adverse events. Aerobic fitness (peak oxygen consumption; VO2peak) and ejection fraction (echocardiography) improved by 11% (PHIIT, while no changes were observed in MICT and CONT (P≥0.1). Greater improvements in ejection fraction were associated with greater improvements in VO2peak (r=0.57; PHIIT by 26% (P=0.016). Diastolic function, body composition, glucose and lipids were unaffected (P≥0.1). In conclusion, all-extremity HIIT is feasible and safe in older adults. HIIT, but not MICT, improved aerobic fitness, ejection fraction, and insulin resistance. PMID:27346646

  15. Recirculating cardiac delivery of AAV2/1SERCA2a improves myocardial function in an experimental model of heart failure in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, M J; Power, J M; Preovolos, A; Mariani, J A; Hajjar, R J; Kaye, D M

    2008-12-01

    Abnormal excitation-contraction coupling is a key pathophysiologic component of heart failure (HF), and at a molecular level reduced expression of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA2a) is a major contributor. Previous studies in small animals have suggested that restoration of SERCA function is beneficial in HF. Despite this promise, the means by which this information might be translated into potential clinical application remains uncertain. Using a recently established cardiac-directed recirculating method of gene delivery, we administered adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2)/1SERCA2a to sheep with pacing-induced HF. We explored the effects of differing doses of AAV2/1SERCA2a (low 1 x 10(10) d.r.p.; medium 1 x 10(12) d.r.p. and high 1 x 10(13) d.r.p.) in conjunction with an intra-coronary delivery group (2.5 x 10(13) d.r.p.). At the end of the study, haemodynamic, echocardiographic, histopathologic and molecular biologic assessments were performed. Cardiac recirculation delivery of AAV2/1SERCA2a elicited a dose-dependent improvement in cardiac performance determined by left ventricular pressure analysis, (+d P/d t(max); low dose -220+/-70, P>0.05; medium dose 125+/-53, P0.05; medium dose 1+/-2, P>0.05; high dose 6.5+/-3.9, Preversal of the HF molecular phenotype. In contrast, direct intra-coronary infusion did not elicit any effect on ventricular function. As such, AAV2/1SERCA2a elicits favourable functional and molecular actions when delivered in a mechanically targeted manner in an experimental model of HF. These observations lay a platform for potential clinical translation.

  16. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  17. Does accelerometer feedback on high-quality chest compression improve survival rate? An in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min Hee; Oh, Je Hyeok; Kim, Chan Woong; Kim, Sung Eun; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chang, Wen Joen

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether visual feedback from an accelerometer device facilitated high-quality chest compressions during an in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation using a manikin. Thirty health care providers participated in an in-hospital cardiac arrest simulation with 1 minute of continuous chest compressions. Chest compressions were performed on a manikin lying on a bed according to visual feedback from an accelerometer feedback device. The manikin and accelerometer recorded chest compression data simultaneously. The simulated patient was deemed to have survived when the chest compression data satisfied all of the preset high-quality chest compression criteria (depth ≥51 mm, rate >100 per minute, and ≥95% full recoil). Survival rates were calculated from the feedback device and manikin data. The survival rate according to the feedback device data was 80%; however, the manikin data indicated a significantly lower survival rate (46.7%; P = .015). The difference between the accelerometer and manikin survival rates was not significant for participants with a body mass index greater than or equal to 20 kg/m(2) (93.3 vs 73.3%, respectively; P = .330); however, the difference in survival rate was significant in participants with body mass index less than 20 kg/m(2) (66.7 vs 20.0%, respectively; P = .025). The use of accelerometer feedback devices to facilitate high-quality chest compression may not be appropriate for lightweight rescuers because of the potential for compression depth overestimation. Clinical Research Information Service (KCT0001449). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved coronary in-stent visualization using a combined high-resolution kernel and a hybrid iterative reconstruction technique at 256-slice cardiac CT—Pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Seitaro; Utsunomiya, Daisuke; Funama, Yoshinori; Takaoka, Hiroko; Katahira, Kazuhiro; Honda, Keiichi; Noda, Katsuo; Oshima, Shuichi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic performance of 256-slice cardiac CT for the evaluation of the in-stent lumen by using a hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) algorithm combined with a high-resolution kernel. Methods: This study included 28 patients with 28 stents who underwent cardiac CT. Three different reconstruction images were obtained with: (1) a standard filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm with a standard cardiac kernel (CB), (2) an FBP algorithm with a high-resolution cardiac kernel (CD), and (3) an HIR algorithm with the CD kernel. We measured image noise and kurtosis and used receiver operating characteristics analysis to evaluate observer performance in the detection of in-stent stenosis. Results: Image noise with FBP plus the CD kernel (80.2 ± 15.5 HU) was significantly higher than with FBP plus the CB kernel (28.8 ± 4.6 HU) and HIR plus the CD kernel (36.1 ± 6.4 HU). There was no significant difference in the image noise between FBP plus the CB kernel and HIR plus the CD kernel. Kurtosis was significantly better with the CD- than the CB kernel. The kurtosis values obtained with the CD kernel were not significantly different between the FBP- and HIR reconstruction algorithms. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves with HIR plus the CD kernel were significantly higher than with FBP plus the CB- or the CD kernel. The difference between FBP plus the CB- or the CD kernel was not significant. The average sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value for the detection of in-stent stenosis were 83.3, 50.0, 33.3, and 91.6% for FBP plus the CB kernel, 100, 29.6, 40.0, and 100% for FBP plus the CD kernel, and 100, 54.5, 40.0, and 100% for HIR plus the CD kernel. Conclusions: The HIR algorithm combined with the high-resolution kernel significantly improved diagnostic performance in the detection of in-stent stenosis

  19. Cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... magnesium. These minerals help your heart's electrical system work. Abnormally high or low levels can cause cardiac arrest. Severe physical stress. Anything that causes a severe stress on your ...

  20. Cardiac Ochronosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erek, Ersin; Casselman, Filip P.A.; Vanermen, Hugo

    2004-01-01

    We report the case of 67-year-old woman who underwent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair due to ochronotic valvular disease (alkaptonuria), which was diagnosed incidentally during cardiac surgery. PMID:15745303

  1. Cardiac catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tests. However, it is very safe when done by an experienced team. The risks include: Cardiac tamponade Heart attack Injury to a coronary artery Irregular heartbeat Low blood pressure Reaction to the contrast dye Stroke Possible complications ...

  2. Nuclear cardiac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between nuclear medicine and cardiology has continued to produce a surfeit of interesting, illuminating, and important reports involving the analysis of cardiac function, perfusion, and metabolism. To simplify the presentation, this review is broken down into three major subheadings: analysis of myocardial perfusion; imaging of the recent myocardial infarction; and the evaluation of myocardial function. There appears to be an increasingly important relationship between cardiology, particularly cardiac physiology, and nuclear imaging techniques

  3. Cardiac anatomy and physiology: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, M

    1998-04-01

    This article reviews the normal anatomy and physiology of the heart. Understanding the normal anatomic and physiologic relationships described in this article will help perioperative nurses care for patients who are undergoing cardiac procedures. Such knowledge also assists nurses in educating patients about cardiac procedures and about activities that can prevent, reverse, or improve cardiac illness.

  4. Gαq protein carboxyl terminus imitation polypeptide GCIP-27 improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Lan Lu

    Full Text Available Gαq protein carboxyl terminus imitation polypeptide (GCIP-27 has been shown to alleviate pathological cardiomyocyte hypertrophy induced by various factors. Pathological cardiac hypertrophy increases the morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases while it compensates for poor heart function. This study was designed to investigate the effects of GCIP-27 on heart function in rats with heart failure induced by doxorubicin.Forty-eight rats were randomly divided into the following six groups receiving vehicle (control, doxorubicin (Dox, losartan (6 mg/kg, i.g. and three doses of GCIP-27 (10, 30, 90 μg/kg; i.p., bid, respectively. Heart failure was induced by Dox, which was administered at a 20 mg/kg cumulative dose. After 10 weeks of treatment, we observed that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/kg significantly increased ejection fraction, fraction shortening, stroke volume and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase activity of Dox-treated hearts. Additionally, GCIP-27 decreased myocardial injury, heart weight index and left ventricular weight index, fibrosis and serum cardiac troponin-I concentration in Dox-treated mice. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and real-time PCR experiments indicated that GCIP-27 (10-90 μg/kg could markedly upregulate the protein expression of myocardial α-myosin heavy chain (MHC, Bcl-2, protein kinase C (PKC ε and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK 1/2 as well as the mRNA expression of α-MHC, but downregulated the expression of β-MHC, Bax and PKC βII, and the mRNA expression levels of β-MHC in Dox-treated mice. It was also found that GCIP-27 (30, 90 μg/L decreased cell size and protein content of cardiomyocytes significantly in vitro by comparison of Dox group.GCIP-27 could effectively ameliorate heart failure development induced by Dox. PKC-ERK1/2 signaling might represent the underlying mechanism of the beneficial effects of GCIP-27.

  5. A Turbine-Driven Ventilator Improves Adherence to Advanced Cardiac Life Support Guidelines During a Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Scott G; Brewer, Lara; Gillis, Erik S; Pace, Nathan L; Sakata, Derek J; Orr, Joseph A

    2017-09-01

    Research has shown that increased breathing frequency during cardiopulmonary resuscitation is inversely correlated with systolic blood pressure. Rescuers often hyperventilate during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Current American Heart Association advanced cardiac life support recommends a ventilation rate of 8-10 breaths/min. We hypothesized that a small, turbine-driven ventilator would allow rescuers to adhere more closely to advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines. Twenty-four ACLS-certified health-care professionals were paired into groups of 2. Each team performed 4 randomized rounds of 2-min cycles of CPR on an intubated mannikin, with individuals altering between compressions and breaths. Two rounds of CPR were performed with a self-inflating bag, and 2 rounds were with the ventilator. The ventilator was set to deliver 8 breaths/min, pressure limit 22 cm H 2 O. Frequency, tidal volume (V T ), peak inspiratory pressure, and compression interruptions (hands-off time) were recorded. Data were analyzed with a linear mixed model and Welch 2-sample t test. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) frequency with the ventilator was 7.98 (7.98-7.99) breaths/min. Median (IQR) frequency with the self-inflating bag was 9.5 (8.2-10.7) breaths/min. Median (IQR) ventilator V T was 0.5 (0.5-0.5) L. Median (IQR) self-inflating bag V T was 0.6 (0.5-0.7) L. Median (IQR) ventilator peak inspiratory pressure was 22 (22-22) cm H 2 O. Median (IQR) self-inflating bag peak inspiratory pressure was 30 (27-35) cm H 2 O. Mean ± SD hands-off times for ventilator and self-inflating bag were 5.25 ± 2.11 and 6.41 ± 1.45 s, respectively. When compared with a ventilator, volunteers ventilated with a self-inflating bag within ACLS guidelines. However, volunteers ventilated with increased variation, at higher V T levels, and at higher peak pressures with the self-inflating bag. Hands-off time was also significantly lower with the ventilator. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration NCT

  6. Comparison of team-focused CPR vs standard CPR in resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: Results from a statewide quality improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, David A; Darrell Nelson, R; Monk, Lisa; Tyson, Clark; Jollis, James G; Granger, Christopher B; Corbett, Claire; Garvey, Lee; Runyon, Michael S

    2016-08-01

    Team-focused CPR (TFCPR) is a choreographed approach to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with emphasis on minimally interrupted high-quality chest compressions, early defibrillation, discourages endotracheal intubation and encourages use of the bag-valve-mask (BVM) and/or blind-insertion airway device (BIAD) with a ventilation rate of 8-10 breaths/min to minimize hyperventilation. Widespread incorporation of TFCPR in North Carolina (NC) EMS agencies began in 2011, yet its impact on outcomes is unknown. To determine whether TFCPR improves survival with good neurological outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients compared to standard CPR. This retrospective cohort analysis of NC EMS agencies reporting data to the Cardiac Arrest Registry for Enhanced Survival (CARES) database from January 2010 to June 2014 included adult, non-traumatic OHCA with presumed cardiac etiology where EMS performed CPR or patient received defibrillation. Exclusions were arrest terminated per EMS policy or DNR. EMS agencies self-reported the TFCPR implementation dates. Patients were categorized as receiving either TFCPR or standard CPR. The primary outcome was good neurologic outcome at time of hospital discharge defined as Pittsburgh Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) 1-2. Of 14,994 OHCAs, 14,129 patients were included for analysis with a mean age 65 (IQR 50-81) years, 61% male, 7.3% with good neurologic outcome, 24.3% with shockable initial rhythm, and 71.5% receiving TFCPR. Of the 3427 (24.3%) with an initial shockable rhythm, 739 (71.9%) had a good neurological outcome. Good neurologic outcome was higher with TFCPR [836 (8.3%, 95%CI 7.7-8.8%)] vs. standard CPR [193 (4.8%, 95%CI 4.2-5.5%)]. Logistic regression controlling for demographic and arrest characteristics revealed TFCPR (OR 1.5), witnessed arrest (OR 4.3), initial shockable rhythm (OR 7.1), and in-hospital hypothermia (OR 3.3) were associated with good neurologic outcome. Mechanical CPR device (OR 0.68), CPR

  7. Adapting detection sensitivity based on evidence of irregular sinus arrhythmia to improve atrial fibrillation detection in insertable cardiac monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pürerfellner, Helmut; Sanders, Prashanthan; Sarkar, Shantanu; Reisfeld, Erin; Reiland, Jerry; Koehler, Jodi; Pokushalov, Evgeny; Urban, Luboš; Dekker, Lukas R C

    2017-10-03

    Intermittent change in p-wave discernibility during periods of ectopy and sinus arrhythmia is a cause of inappropriate atrial fibrillation (AF) detection in insertable cardiac monitors (ICM). To address this, we developed and validated an enhanced AF detection algorithm. Atrial fibrillation detection in Reveal LINQ ICM uses patterns of incoherence in RR intervals and absence of P-wave evidence over a 2-min period. The enhanced algorithm includes P-wave evidence during RR irregularity as evidence of sinus arrhythmia or ectopy to adaptively optimize sensitivity for AF detection. The algorithm was developed and validated using Holter data from the XPECT and LINQ Usability studies which collected surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and continuous ICM ECG over a 24-48 h period. The algorithm detections were compared with Holter annotations, performed by multiple reviewers, to compute episode and duration detection performance. The validation dataset comprised of 3187 h of valid Holter and LINQ recordings from 138 patients, with true AF in 37 patients yielding 108 true AF episodes ≥2-min and 449 h of AF. The enhanced algorithm reduced inappropriately detected episodes by 49% and duration by 66% with adapts sensitivity for AF detection reduced inappropriately detected episodes and duration with minimal reduction in sensitivity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology

  8. Improved extraction of ePTFE and medical adhesive modified defibrillation leads from the coronary sinus and great cardiac vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkoff, Bruce L; Belott, Peter H; Love, Charles J; Scheiner, Avram; Westlund, Randy; Rippy, Marian; Krishnan, Mohan; Norlander, Barry E; Steinhaus, Bruce; Emmanuel, Janson; Zeller, Peter J

    2005-03-01

    Permanent leads with shocking coils for defibrillation therapy are sometimes implanted in the coronary sinus (CS) and great cardiac vein (GCV). These shocking coils, as documented by pathologic examination of animal investigations, often become tightly encapsulated by fibrosis and can be very difficult to remove. One of three configurations of the Guidant model 7109 Perimeter coronary sinus shocking lead was implanted into the distal portion of the GCV of 24 sheep for up to 14 months. Group 1 had unmodified coils (control), group 2 had coils backfilled with medical adhesive (MA), and Group 3 had coils coated with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE). Eighteen leads, three from each group at 6 and 14 months were transvenously extracted from the left jugular vein. The remaining six animals were not subject to extraction. All animals were euthanized for pathological and microscopic examination. All six of the control, three of the MA, and one of the ePTFE leads required the use of an electrosurgical dissection sheath (EDS) for extraction. Five control, two MA, and none of the ePTFE leads had significant fibrotic attachments to the shocking coils. Significant trauma was observed at necropsy for those leads requiring the use of the EDS for extraction. Tissue ingrowth is a major impediment to the removal of defibrillation leads implanted in the CS and GCV of sheep. Reduction of tissue ingrowth by coating the shocking coils with ePTFE or by backfilling with MA facilitates transvenous lead removal with reduced tissue trauma.

  9. Effect of indacaterol on lung deflation improves cardiac performance in hyperinflated COPD patients: an interventional, randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santus, Pierachille; Radovanovic, Dejan; Di Marco, Silvia; Valenti, Vincenzo; Raccanelli, Rita; Blasi, Francesco; Centanni, Stefano; Bussotti, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    COPD is often associated with cardiovascular comorbidity. Treatment guidelines recommend therapy with bronchodilators as first choice. We investigated the acute effect of single-dose indacaterol on lung hyperinflation in COPD subjects, for the first time evaluating the potential effects on right heart performance. In this Phase IV, randomized, interventional, double-blind, crossover clinical study, we recruited 40 patients (50-85 years of age) with stable COPD. Patients were treated with 150 μg indacaterol or placebo and after 60 minutes (T60) and 180 minutes (T180) the following tests were performed: trans-thoracic echocardiography (TTE), plethysmography, diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide, saturation of peripheral oxygen, and visual analog scale dyspnea score. Patients underwent a crossover re-challenge after a further 72 hours of pharmacological washout. All TTE measurements were conducted blindly by the same operator and further interpreted by two different blinded operators. Consensus decisions were taken on every value and parameter. The primary outcome was the effect of the reduction of residual volume and functional residual capacity on right heart systolic and diastolic function indexes evaluated by TTE in patients treated with indacaterol, as compared to placebo. Vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly increased by indacaterol, when compared with placebo, while residual volume, intrathoracic gas volume, and specific airway resistance were significantly reduced in patients treated with indacaterol. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was significantly increased versus placebo, paralleled by an increase of tricuspid E-wave deceleration time. The cardiac frequency was also significantly reduced in indacaterol-treated patients. Indacaterol significantly reduces lung hyperinflation in acute conditions, with a clinically relevant improvement of dyspnea. These modifications are

  10. Improving the effectiveness of psychological interventions for depression and anxiety in the cardiac rehabilitation pathway using group-based metacognitive therapy (PATHWAY Group MCT): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Adrian; McNicol, Kirsten; Reeves, David; Salmon, Peter; Davies, Linda; Heagerty, Anthony; Doherty, Patrick; McPhillips, Rebecca; Anderson, Rebecca; Faija, Cintia; Capobianco, Lora; Morley, Helen; Gaffney, Hannah; Shields, Gemma; Fisher, Peter

    2018-04-03

    Anxiety and depression are prevalent among cardiac rehabilitation patients but pharmacological and psychological treatments have limited effectiveness in this group. Furthermore, psychological interventions have not been systematically integrated into cardiac rehabilitation services despite being a strategic priority for the UK National Health Service. A promising new treatment, metacognitive therapy, may be well-suited to the needs of cardiac rehabilitation patients and has the potential to improve outcomes. It is based on the metacognitive model, which proposes that a thinking style dominated by rumination, worry and threat monitoring maintains emotional distress. Metacognitive therapy is highly effective at reducing this thinking style and alleviating anxiety and depression in mental health settings. This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group-based metacognitive therapy for cardiac rehabilitation patients with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms. The PATHWAY Group-MCT trial is a multicentre, two-arm, single-blind, randomised controlled trial comparing the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of group-based metacognitive therapy plus usual cardiac rehabilitation to usual cardiac rehabilitation alone. Cardiac rehabilitation patients (target sample n = 332) with elevated anxiety and/or depressive symptoms will be recruited across five UK National Health Service Trusts. Participants randomised to the intervention arm will receive six weekly sessions of group-based metacognitive therapy delivered by either cardiac rehabilitation professionals or research nurses. The intervention and control groups will both be offered the usual cardiac rehabilitation programme within their Trust. The primary outcome is severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms at 4-month follow-up measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale total score. Secondary outcomes are severity of anxiety/depression at 12-month follow-up, health

  11. The System-Wide Effect of Real-Time Audiovisual Feedback and Postevent Debriefing for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest: The Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality Improvement Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Keith; Kimani, Peter K; Abella, Benjamin S; Chilwan, Mehboob; Cooke, Matthew W; Davies, Robin P; Field, Richard A; Gao, Fang; Quinton, Sarah; Stallard, Nigel; Woolley, Sarah; Perkins, Gavin D

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of implementing real-time audiovisual feedback with and without postevent debriefing on survival and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality at in-hospital cardiac arrest. A two-phase, multicentre prospective cohort study. Three UK hospitals, all part of one National Health Service Acute Trust. One thousand three hundred and ninety-five adult patients who sustained an in-hospital cardiac arrest at the study hospitals and were treated by hospital emergency teams between November 2009 and May 2013. During phase 1, quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and patient outcomes were measured with no intervention implemented. During phase 2, staff at hospital 1 received real-time audiovisual feedback, whereas staff at hospital 2 received real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing. No intervention was implemented at hospital 3 during phase 2. The primary outcome was return of spontaneous circulation. Secondary endpoints included other patient-focused outcomes, such as survival to hospital discharge, and process-focused outcomes, such as chest compression depth. Random-effect logistic and linear regression models, adjusted for baseline patient characteristics, were used to analyze the effect of the interventions on study outcomes. In comparison with no intervention, neither real-time audiovisual feedback (adjusted odds ratio, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.31-1.22; p=0.17) nor real-time audiovisual feedback supplemented by postevent debriefing (adjusted odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.35-1.21; p=0.17) was associated with a statistically significant improvement in return of spontaneous circulation or any process-focused outcome. Despite this, there was evidence of a system-wide improvement in phase 2, leading to improvements in return of spontaneous circulation (adjusted odds ratio, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.06-3.30; p=0.03) and process-focused outcomes. Implementation of real-time audiovisual feedback with or without postevent debriefing did not

  12. Cardiac CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewey, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  13. Cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewey, Marc [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2011-07-01

    Computed tomography of the heart has become a highly accurate diagnostic modality that is attracting increasing attention. This extensively illustrated book aims to assist the reader in integrating cardiac CT into daily clinical practice, while also reviewing its current technical status and applications. Clear guidance is provided on the performance and interpretation of imaging using the latest technology, which offers greater coverage, better spatial resolution, and faster imaging. The specific features of scanners from all four main vendors, including those that have only recently become available, are presented. Among the wide range of applications and issues to be discussed are coronary artery bypass grafts, stents, plaques, and anomalies, cardiac valves, congenital and acquired heart disease, and radiation exposure. Upcoming clinical uses of cardiac CT, such as plaque imaging and functional assessment, are also explored. (orig.)

  14. Cardiac echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović-Krstić Branislava A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac hydatid disease is rare. We report on an uncommon hydatid cyst localized in the right ventricular wall, right atrial wall tricuspid valve left atrium and pericard. A 33-year-old woman was treated for cough, fever and chest pain. Cardiac echocardiograpic examination revealed a round tumor (5.8 x 4 cm in the right ventricular free wall and two smaller cysts behind that tumor. There were cysts in right atrial wall and tricuspidal valve as well. Serologic tests for hydatidosis were positive. Computed tomography finding was consistent with diagnosis of hydatid cyst in lungs and right hylar part. Surgical treatment was rejected due to great risk of cardiac perforation. Medical treatment with albendazole was unsuccessful and the patient died due to systemic hydatid involvement of the lungs, liver and central nervous system.

  15. The relationship between the improvement of cardiac function and the myocardial uptake of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy treated by beta-blocker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakita, Tomio; Numata, Yuichi; Ogata, Yasuhiro; Harada, Eisaku; Mizumasa, Yutaka

    1995-01-01

    Chronic β-blocker therapy improves hemodynamics and cardiac function in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy. However, the change in myocardial uptake of I-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) before and after treatment has not been determined. Myocardial imaging with 123 I-MIBG was performed before and 2 or 3 months after β-blocker (bisoprolol) therapy in 11 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. The following parameters were compared before and after the treatment : 1) New York Heart Association functional class, 2) X-ray cardiothoracic ratio, 3) heart rate and blood pressure, 4) echocardiographic data (left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, and left ventricular ejection fraction), 5) plasma concentrations of epinephrine, norepinephrine and human atrial natriuretic peptide (HANP), and 6) exercise tolerance time by treadmill. The heart-to-mediastinum ratio of 123 I-MIBG activities obtained 3 hours after intravenous injection (late H/M) and washout rate improved significantly after β-blocker therapy. Cardiothoracic ratio, heart rate, echocardiographic parameters, HANP and exercise tolerance also improved significantly. Late H/M had no significant relationship with any of the clinical parameters, but washout rate was significantly related to left ventricular ejection fraction. These findings suggest that washout rate may be useful to assess the effect of short-term β-blocker therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy patients. (author)

  16. Effect of Smaller Left Ventricular Capture Threshold Safety Margins to Improve Device Longevity in Recipients of Cardiac Resynchronization-Defibrillation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Daniel A; Waks, Jonathan W; Collins, Robert; Kleckner, Karen; Kramer, Daniel B; Zimetbaum, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Device longevity in cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is affected by the pacing capture threshold (PCT) and programmed pacing amplitude of the left ventricular (LV) pacing lead. The aims of this study were to evaluate the stability of LV pacing thresholds in a nationwide sample of CRT defibrillator recipients and to determine potential longevity improvements associated with a decrease in the LV safety margin while maintaining effective delivery of CRT. CRT defibrillator patients in the Medtronic CareLink database were eligible for inclusion. LV PCT stability was evaluated using ≥2 measurements over a 14-day period. Separately, a random sample of 7,250 patients with programmed right atrial and right ventricular amplitudes ≤2.5 V, LV thresholds ≤ 2.5 V, and LV pacing ≥90% were evaluated to estimate theoretical battery longevity improvement using LV safety margins of 0.5 and 1.5 V. Threshold stability analysis in 43,256 patients demonstrated LV PCT stability of 1 V had the greatest increases in battery life (mean increase 0.86 years, 95% confidence interval 0.85 to 0.87). In conclusion, nearly all CRT defibrillator patients had LV PCT stability <1.0 V. Decreasing the LV safety margin from 1.5 to 0.5 V provided consistent delivery of CRT for most patients and significantly improved battery longevity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Discovery and progress of direct cardiac reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hidenori; Ieda, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac disease remains a major cause of death worldwide. Direct cardiac reprogramming has emerged as a promising approach for cardiac regenerative therapy. After the discovery of MyoD, a master regulator for skeletal muscle, other single cardiac reprogramming factors (master regulators) have been sought. Discovery of cardiac reprogramming factors was inspired by the finding that multiple, but not single, transcription factors were needed to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from fibroblasts. We first reported a combination of cardiac-specific transcription factors, Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5 (GMT), that could convert mouse fibroblasts into cardiomyocyte-like cells, which were designated as induced cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs). Following our first report of cardiac reprogramming, many researchers, including ourselves, demonstrated an improvement in cardiac reprogramming efficiency, in vivo direct cardiac reprogramming for heart regeneration, and cardiac reprogramming in human cells. However, cardiac reprogramming in human cells and adult fibroblasts remains inefficient, and further efforts are needed. We believe that future research elucidating epigenetic barriers and molecular mechanisms of direct cardiac reprogramming will improve the reprogramming efficiency, and that this new technology has great potential for clinical applications.

  18. Cardiac and vascular structure and function parameters do not improve with alternate nightly home hemodialysis: An interventional cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson David W

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nightly extended hours hemodialysis may improve left ventricular hypertrophy and function and endothelial function but presents problems of sustainability and increased cost. The effect of alternate nightly home hemodialysis (NHD on cardiovascular structure and function is not known. Methods Sixty-three patients on standard hemodialysis (SHD: 3.5-6 hours/session, 3-5 sessions weekly converted to NHD (6-10 hours/session overnight for 3-5 sessions weekly. 2Dimensional transthoracic echocardiography and ultrasound measures of brachial artery reactivity (BAR, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT, total arterial compliance (TAC and augmentation index (AIX were performed post dialysis at baseline and 18-24 months following conversion to NHD. In 37 patients, indices of oxidative stress: plasma malonyldialdehyde (MDA and anti-oxidant enzymes: catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPX and superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and total antioxidant status (TAS were measured at baseline, 3 and 6 months. Results Left ventricular mass index (LVMI remained stable. Despite significant derangement at baseline, there were no changes in diastolic function measures, CIMT, BAR and TAC. AIX increased. Conversion to NHD improved bone mineral metabolism parameters and blood pressure control. Interdialytic weight gains increased. No definite improvements in measures of oxidative stress were demonstrated. Conclusions Despite improvement in uremic toxin levels and some cardiovascular risk factors, conversion to an alternate nightly NHD regimen did not improve cardiovascular structure and function. Continuing suboptimal control of uremic toxins and interdialytic weight gains may be a possible explanation. This study adds to the increasing uncertainty about the nature of improvement in cardiovascular parameters with conversion to intensive hemodialysis regimens. Future randomized controlled trials will be important to determine whether increases in

  19. Consequences of implementing a cardiac troponin assay with improved sensitivity at Swedish coronary care units: an analysis from the SWEDEHEART registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Kai M; Lindahl, Bertil; Melki, Dina; Jernberg, Tomas

    2016-08-07

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) assays with improved sensitivity are increasingly utilized for the assessment of patients admitted because of suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, data on the clinical consequences of the implementation of such assays are limited. In a retrospective register-based study (37 710 coronary care unit admissions; SWEDEHEART registry), we compared the case mix, the use of diagnostic procedures, treatments, and 1-year all-cause mortality 1 year before the implementation of a cTn assay with improved sensitivity (study period 1) and 1 year thereafter (study period 2). During study period 2, more at-risk patients were admitted and more patients had cTn levels above the myocardial infarction cut-off (ACS patients +13.1%; non-ACS patients +160.1%). cTn levels above this cut-off exhibited stronger associations with mortality risk in study period 2 (adjusted HR 4.45 [95% confidence interval, CI, 3.36-5.89]) compared with period 1 (adjusted HR 2.43 [95% CI 2.11-2.80]), similar as for the cTn ratio relative to the respective 99th percentile. While there was no multivariable-adjusted increase in the use of diagnostic procedures, significant trends towards more differentiated treatment depending on the cause of cTn elevation, i.e. ACS or non-ACS, were noted. The implementation of a cTn assay with improved sensitivity was associated with an increase in the number of patients who due to their cTn-status were identified as suitable for beneficial therapies. There was no inappropriate increase in hospital resource utilization. As such, cTn assays with improved sensitivity provide an opportunity to improve the clinical management of patients with suspected ACS. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Can cardiac rehabilitation programs improve functional capacity and left ventricular diastolic function in patients with mechanical reperfusion after ST elevation myocardial infarction?: A double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allahyar Golabchi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current guidelines recommend cardiac rehabilitation programs (CRP as a means to improve functional status of patients after coronary revascularization. However, research supporting this recommendation has been limited and positive effects of CRP on diastolic function are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of an 8-week CRP on left ventricular diastolic function.    METHODS: This randomized, clinical trial included 29 men with ST elevation myocardial infarction (MI who had received reperfusion therapy, i.e. coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG or percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. They were randomized to a training group (n = 15; mean age: 54.2 ± 9.04 years old and a control group (n = 14; mean age: 51.71 ± 6.98 years old. Patients in the training group performed an 8-week CRP with an intensity of 60-85% of maximum heart rate. Exercise sessions lasted 60-90 minutes and were held three times a week. At the start and end of the study, all patients performed symptom-limited exercise test based on Naughton treadmill protocol. Pulsed-wave Doppler echocardiography was also used to determine peak velocity of early (E and late (A waves, E/A ratios, and the deceleration time of E (DT.    RESULTS: Left ventricular diastolic indices (E, A, E/A ratio, DT did not change significantly after the CRP. Compared to baseline, patients in the training group had significant improvements in functional capacity (8.30 ± 1.30 vs. 9.7 ± 1.7 and maximum heart rate (118.50 ± 24.48 vs. 126.85 ± 22.75. Moreover, resting heart rate of the training group was significantly better than the control group at the end of the study (75.36 ± 7.94 vs. 79.80 ± 7.67; P < 0.001.    CONCLUSION: An 8-week CRP in post-MI patients revascularized with PCI or CABG led to improved exercise capacity. However, the CRP failed to enhance diastolic function.      Keywords: Cardiac Rehabilitation, Diastolic Function, Functional Capacity

  1. P-wave characteristics on routine preoperative electrocardiogram improve prediction of new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jim K; Lobato, Robert L; Pinesett, Andre; Maxwell, Bryan G; Mora-Mangano, Christina T; Perez, Marco V

    2014-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that including preoperative electrocardiogram (ECG) characteristics with clinical variables significantly improves the new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation prediction model. Retrospective analysis. Single-center university hospital. Five hundred twenty-six patients, ≥ 18 years of age, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, aortic valve replacement, mitral valve replacement/repair, or a combination of valve surgery and coronary artery bypass grafting requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Retrospective review of medical records. Baseline characteristics and cardiopulmonary bypass times were collected. Digitally-measured timing and voltages from preoperative electrocardiograms were extracted. Postoperative atrial fibrillation was defined as atrial fibrillation requiring therapeutic intervention. Two hundred eight (39.5%) patients developed postoperative atrial fibrillation. Clinical predictors were age, ejection fractionelectrocardiogram variables to the prediction model with only clinical predictors significantly improved the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, from 0.71 to 0.78 (p<0.01). Overall net reclassification improvement was 0.059 (p = 0.09). Among those who developed postoperative atrial fibrillation, the net reclassification improvement was 0.063 (p = 0.03). Several p-wave characteristics are independently associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation. Addition of these parameters improves the postoperative atrial fibrillation prediction model. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Cardiac cachexia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miján, Alberto; Martín, Elvira; de Mateo, Beatriz

    2006-05-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF), especially affecting the right heart, frequently leads to malnutrition. If the latter is severe and is combined to other factors, it may lead to cardiac cachexia. This one is associated to increased mortality and lower survival of patients suffering from it. The causes of cardiac cachexia are diverse, generally associated to maintenance of a negative energy balance, with increasing evidence of its multifactorial origin. Neurohumoral, inflammatory, immunological, and metabolic factors, among others, are superimposed in the patient with CHF, leading to involvement and deterioration of several organs and systems, since this condition affects both lean (or active cellular) mass and adipose and bone tissue osteoporosis. Among all, the most pronounced deterioration may be seen at skeletal muscle tissue, at both structural and functional levels, the heart not being spared. As for treatment, it should be based on available scientific evidence. Assessment of nutritional status of any patient with CHF is a must, with the requirement of nutritional intervention in case of malnutrition. In this situation, especially if accompanied by cardiac cachexia, it is required to modify energy intake and oral diet quality, and to consider the indication of specific complementary or alternative artificial nutrition. Besides, the causal relationship of the beneficial role of moderate physical exertion is increasing, as well as modulation of metabolic and inflammatory impairments observed in cardiac cachexia with several drugs, leading to a favorable functional and structural response in CHF patients.

  3. Cardiac Pacemakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiandra, O.; Espasandin, W.; Fiandra, H.

    1984-01-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control

  4. Education of Physicians and Implementation of a Formal Referral System Can Improve Cardiac Rehabilitation Referral and Participation Rates after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahhan, Ali; Maddox, William R; Krothapalli, Siva; Farmer, Matthew; Shah, Amit; Ford, Benjamin; Rhodes, Marc; Matthews, Laurie; Barnes, Vernon A; Sharma, Gyanendra K

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is an effective preventive measure that remains underutilised in the United States. The study aimed to determine the CR referral rate (RR) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) at an academic tertiary care centre, identify barriers to referral, and evaluate awareness of CR benefits and indications (CRBI) among cardiologists. Subsequently, it aimed to evaluate if an intervention consisting of physicians' education about CRBI and implementation of a formal CR referral system could improve RR and consequently participation rate (PR). Data were retrospectively collected for all consecutive patients who underwent PCI over 12 months. Referral rate was determined and variables were compared for differences between referred and non-referred patients. A questionnaire was distributed among the physicians in the Division of Cardiology to assess awareness of CRBI and referral practice patterns. After implementation of the intervention, data were collected retrospectively for consecutive patients who underwent PCI in the following six months. Referral rate and changes in PRs were determined. Prior to the intervention, RR was 17.6%. Different barriers were identified, but the questionnaire revealed lack of physicians' awareness of CRBI and inconsistent referral patterns. After the intervention, RR increased to 88.96% (Odds Ratio 37.73, 95% CI 21.34-66.70, pEducation of providers and implementation of a formal referral system can improve RR and PR. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Evidence towards improved estimation of respiratory muscle effort from diaphragm mechanomyographic signals with cardiac vibration interference using sample entropy with fixed tolerance values.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Sarlabous

    Full Text Available The analysis of amplitude parameters of the diaphragm mechanomyographic (MMGdi signal is a non-invasive technique to assess respiratory muscle effort and to detect and quantify the severity of respiratory muscle weakness. The amplitude of the MMGdi signal is usually evaluated using the average rectified value or the root mean square of the signal. However, these estimations are greatly affected by the presence of cardiac vibration or mechanocardiographic (MCG noise. In this study, we present a method for improving the estimation of the respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals that is robust to the presence of MCG. This method is based on the calculation of the sample entropy using fixed tolerance values (fSampEn, that is, with tolerance values that are not normalized by the local standard deviation of the window analyzed. The behavior of the fSampEn parameter was tested in synthesized mechanomyographic signals, with different ratios between the amplitude of the MCG and clean mechanomyographic components. As an example of application of this technique, the use of fSampEn was explored also in recorded MMGdi signals, with different inspiratory loads. The results with both synthetic and recorded signals indicate that the entropy parameter is less affected by the MCG noise, especially at low signal-to-noise ratios. Therefore, we believe that the proposed fSampEn parameter could improve estimates of respiratory muscle effort from MMGdi signals with the presence of MCG interference.

  6. Direct Cardiac Reprogramming: Advances in Cardiac Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart disease is one of the lead causes of death worldwide. Many forms of heart disease, including myocardial infarction and pressure-loading cardiomyopathies, result in irreversible cardiomyocyte death. Activated fibroblasts respond to cardiac injury by forming scar tissue, but ultimately this response fails to restore cardiac function. Unfortunately, the human heart has little regenerative ability and long-term outcomes following acute coronary events often include chronic and end-stage heart failure. Building upon years of research aimed at restoring functional cardiomyocytes, recent advances have been made in the direct reprogramming of fibroblasts toward a cardiomyocyte cell fate both in vitro and in vivo. Several experiments show functional improvements in mouse models of myocardial infarction following in situ generation of cardiomyocyte-like cells from endogenous fibroblasts. Though many of these studies are in an early stage, this nascent technology holds promise for future applications in regenerative medicine. In this review, we discuss the history, progress, methods, challenges, and future directions of direct cardiac reprogramming.

  7. Cardiac resynchronization therapy by multipoint pacing improves response of left ventricular mechanics and fluid dynamics: a three-dimensional and particle image velocimetry echo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Mariachiara; Migliore, Federico; Badano, Luigi; Bertaglia, Emanuele; Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Cavedon, Stefano; Zorzi, Alessandro; Corrado, Domenico; Iliceto, Sabino; Muraru, Denisa

    2017-11-01

    To characterize the effect of multipoint pacing (MPP) compared to biventricular pacing (BiV) on left ventricle (LV) mechanics and intraventricular fluid dynamics by three-dimensional echocardiography (3DE) and echocardiographic particle imaging velocimetry (Echo-PIV). In 11 consecutive patients [8 men; median age 65 years (57-75)] receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with a quadripolar LV lead (Quartet,St.Jude Medical,Inc.), 3DE and Echo-PIV data were collected for each pacing configuration (CRT-OFF, BiV, and MPP) at follow-up after 6 months. 3DE data included LV volumes, LV ejection fraction (LVEF), strain, and systolic dyssynchrony index (SDI). Echo-PIV was used to evaluate the directional distribution of global blood flow momentum, ranging from zero, when flow force is predominantly along the base-apex direction, up to 90° when it becomes transversal. MPP resulted in significant reduction in end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes compared with both CRT-OFF (P = 0.02; P = 0.008, respectively) and BiV (P = 0.04; P = 0.03, respectively). LVEF and cardiac output were significant superior in MPP compared with CRT-OFF, but similar between MPP and BiV. Statistical significant differences when comparing global longitudinal and circumferential strain and SDI with MPP vs. CRT-OFF were observed (P = 0.008; P = 0.008; P = 0.01, respectively). There was also a trend towards improvement in strain between BiV and MPP that did not reach statistical significance. MPP reflected into a significant reduction of the deviation of global blood flow momentum compared with both CRT-OFF and BiV (P = 0.002) indicating a systematic increase of longitudinal alignment from the base-apex orientation of the haemodynamic forces. These preliminary results suggest that MPP resulted in significant improvement of LV mechanics and fluid dynamics compared with BiV. However, larger studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. © Crown copyright 2016.

  8. Improving left ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI using intramodality image registration for cardiac blood flow analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas; Bustamante, Mariana; Fredriksson, Alexandru; Carlhäll, Carl-Johan; Ebbers, Tino

    2018-01-01

    Assessment of blood flow in the left ventricle using four-dimensional flow MRI requires accurate left ventricle segmentation that is often hampered by the low contrast between blood and the myocardium. The purpose of this work is to improve left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI for reliable blood flow analysis. The left ventricle segmentations are first obtained using morphological cine-MRI with better in-plane resolution and contrast, and then aligned to four-dimensional flow MRI data. This alignment is, however, not trivial due to inter-slice misalignment errors caused by patient motion and respiratory drift during breath-hold based cine-MRI acquisition. A robust image registration based framework is proposed to mitigate such errors automatically. Data from 20 subjects, including healthy volunteers and patients, was used to evaluate its geometric accuracy and impact on blood flow analysis. High spatial correspondence was observed between manually and automatically aligned segmentations, and the improvements in alignment compared to uncorrected segmentations were significant (P  0.05). Our results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed approach in improving left-ventricular segmentation in four-dimensional flow MRI, and its potential for reliable blood flow analysis. Magn Reson Med 79:554-560, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Effect of indacaterol on lung deflation improves cardiac performance in hyperinflated COPD patients: an interventional, randomized, double-blind clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santus P

    2015-09-01

    residual capacity on right heart systolic and diastolic function indexes evaluated by TTE in patients treated with indacaterol, as compared to placebo.Results: Vital capacity, inspiratory capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 second were significantly increased by indacaterol, when compared with placebo, while residual volume, intrathoracic gas volume, and specific airway resistance were significantly reduced in patients treated with indacaterol. Tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion was significantly increased versus placebo, paralleled by an increase of tricuspid E-wave deceleration time. The cardiac frequency was also significantly reduced in indacaterol-treated patients.Conclusion: Indacaterol significantly reduces lung hyperinflation in acute conditions, with a clinically relevant improvement of dyspnea. These modifications are associated with a significant increase of the right ventricular compliance indexes and may have a role in improving left ventricular preload leading to a reduction in cardiac frequency.Keywords: lung deflation, bronchodilator, cardiac performance, right ventricular function, echocardiography

  10. Characterization of respiratory and cardiac motion from electro-anatomical mapping data for improved fusion of MRI to left ventricular electrograms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Roujol

    Full Text Available Accurate fusion of late gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and electro-anatomical voltage mapping (EAM is required to evaluate the potential of MRI to identify the substrate of ventricular tachycardia. However, both datasets are not acquired at the same cardiac phase and EAM data is corrupted with respiratory motion limiting the accuracy of current rigid fusion techniques. Knowledge of cardiac and respiratory motion during EAM is thus required to enhance the fusion process. In this study, we propose a novel approach to characterize both cardiac and respiratory motion from EAM data using the temporal evolution of the 3D catheter location recorded from clinical EAM systems. Cardiac and respiratory motion components are extracted from the recorded catheter location using multi-band filters. Filters are calibrated for each EAM point using estimates of heart rate and respiratory rate. The method was first evaluated in numerical simulations using 3D models of cardiac and respiratory motions of the heart generated from real time MRI data acquired in 5 healthy subjects. An accuracy of 0.6-0.7 mm was found for both cardiac and respiratory motion estimates in numerical simulations. Cardiac and respiratory motions were then characterized in 27 patients who underwent LV mapping for treatment of ventricular tachycardia. Mean maximum amplitude of cardiac and respiratory motion was 10.2±2.7 mm (min = 5.5, max = 16.9 and 8.8±2.3 mm (min = 4.3, max = 14.8, respectively. 3D Cardiac and respiratory motions could be estimated from the recorded catheter location and the method does not rely on additional imaging modality such as X-ray fluoroscopy and can be used in conventional electrophysiology laboratory setting.

  11. Elevated cranial ultrasound resistive indices are associated with improved neurodevelopmental outcomes one year after pediatric cardiac surgery: A single center pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Christopher L; Hernandez, Ana; Stavinoha, Peter L; Morris, Michael C; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli; Garg, Parvesh; Forbess, Joseph M; Koch, Joshua

    To determine if a non-invasive, repeatable test can be used to predict neurodevelopmental outcomes in patients with congenital heart disease. This was a prospective study of pediatric patients less than two months of age undergoing congenital heart surgery at the Children's Health Children's Medical Center at Dallas. Multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was utilized during the surgery, and ultrasound (US) resistive indices (RI) of the major cranial vessels were obtained prior to surgery, immediately post-operatively, and prior to discharge. Pearson's correlation, Fischer exact t test, and Fischer r to z transformation were used where appropriate. A total of 16 patients were enrolled. All had US data. Of the sixteen patients, two died prior to the neurodevelopmental testing, six did not return for the neurodevelopmental testing, and eight patients completed the neurodevelopmental testing. There were no significant correlations between the prior to surgery and prior to discharge US RI and neurodevelopmental outcomes. The immediate post-operative US RI demonstrated a strong positive correlation with standardized neurodevelopmental outcome measures. We were able to demonstrate qualitative differences using multichannel NIRS during surgery, but experienced significant technical difficulties implementing consistent monitoring. A higher resistive index in the major cerebral blood vessels following cardiac surgery in the neonatal period is associated with improved neurological outcomes one year after surgery. Obtaining an ultrasound with resistive indices of the major cerebral vessels prior to and after surgery may yield information that is predictive of neurodevelopmental outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Information technology implementing globalization on strategies for quality care provided to children submitted to cardiac surgery: International Quality Improvement Collaborative Program--IQIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarra, Adilia Maria Pires; Croti, Ulisses Alexandre; Batigalia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the world's most common major birth defect, affecting one in every 120 children. Ninety percent of these children are born in areas where appropriate medical care is inadequate or unavailable. To share knowledge and experience between an international center of excellence in pediatric cardiac surgery and a related program in Brazil. The strategy used by the program was based on long-term technological and educational support models used in that center, contributing to the creation and implementation of new programs. The Telemedicine platform was used for real-time monthly broadcast of themes. A chat software was used for interaction between participating members and the group from the center of excellence. Professionals specialized in care provided to the mentioned population had the opportunity to share to the knowledge conveyed. It was possible to observe that the technological resources that implement the globalization of human knowledge were effective in the dissemination and improvement of the team regarding the care provided to children with congenital heart diseases.

  13. Usefulness of abdominal belt for restricting respiratory cardiac motion and improving image quality in myocardial perfusion PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Yasutaka; Tomita, Yoya; Ishida, Masaki; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Takeda, Kan; Sakuma, Hajime

    2018-04-01

    The current study evaluated the usefulness of a belt technique for restricting respiratory motion of the heart and for improving image quality of 13 N-ammonia myocardial PET/CT, and it assessed the tolerability of the belt technique in the clinical setting. Myocardial 13 N-ammonia PET/CT scanning was performed in 8 volunteers on Discovery PET/CT 690 with an optical respiratory motion tracking system. Emission scans were performed with and without an abdominal belt. The amplitude of left ventricular (LV) respiratory motion was measured on respiratory-gated PET images. The degree of erroneous decreases in regional myocardial uptake was visually assessed on ungated PET images using a 5-point scale (0 = normal, 1/2/3 = mild/moderate/severe decrease, 4 = defect). The tolerability of the belt technique was evaluated in 53 patients. All subjects tolerated the belt procedure. The amplitude of the LV respiratory motion decreased significantly with the belt (8.1 ± 7.1 vs 12.1 ± 6.1 mm, P = .0078). The belt significantly improved the image quality scores in the anterior (0.29 ± 0.81 vs 0.71 ± 1.04, P = .015) and inferior (0.33 ± 0.92 vs 1.04 ± 1.04, P PET/CT, and it is well tolerated by patients.

  14. [Experimental therapy of cardiac remodeling with quercetin-containing drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, M A; Pavlyuchenko, V B; Tumanovskaya, L V; Dosenko, V E; Moybenko, A A

    2013-01-01

    It was shown that continuous beta-adrenergic hyperstimulation resulted in cardiac function disturbances and fibrosis of cardiac tissue. Treatment with quercetin-containing drugs, particularly, water-soluble corvitin and tableted quertin exerted favourable effect on cardiac hemodynamics, normalized systolic and diastolic function in cardiac remodeling, induced by sustained beta-adrenergic stimulation. It was estimated that conducted experimental therapy limited cardiac fibrosis area almost three-fold, that could be associated with first and foremost improved cardiac distensibility, characteristics of diastolic and also pump function in cardiac remodeling.

  15. Combined moderate and high intensity exercise with dietary restriction improves cardiac autonomic function associated with a reduction in central and systemic arterial stiffness in obese adults: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study aimed to assess the effects of exercise with dietary restriction on cardiac autonomic activity, arterial stiffness, and cardiovascular biomarkers in obese individuals. Methods Seventeen obese adults completed an 8-week exercise and dietary program. Anthropometry, body composition, and multiple biochemical markers were measured. We used carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV, brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV, central blood pressure, and augmentation index (AIx to assess arterial stiffness. To determine cardiac autonomic activity, heart rate variability (HRV was analyzed by standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN, square root of the mean squared differences of successive normal-to-normal intervals (RMSSD, total power (TF, low-frequency power in normalized units (LFnu, high-frequency power in normalized units (HFnu, and low-frequency power/high-frequency power (LF/HF. Results Following the exercise and diet intervention, obese subjects had significant reductions in body weight, body mass index, body fat percentage, brachial systolic blood pressure, and resting heart rate, and they had shown improvements in blood chemistry markers such as lipid profiles, insulin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. There was a significant reduction in both cfPWV and baPWV following the intervention when compared to baseline levels. Moreover, the AIx and aortic systolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after the intervention. The diet and exercise intervention significantly increased cardiac autonomic modulation (determined by improved SDNN, RMSSD, TP LF, HF, and LF/HF, which was partly due to changes in heart rate, insulin resistance, and the inflammatory pattern. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between enhanced cardiac autonomic modulation (LF/HF and decreased arterial stiffness, as measured by central cfPWV and systemic baPWV. Discussion An 8-week combined intervention of diet and

  16. End-Tidal CO2-Guided Chest Compression Delivery Improves Survival in a Neonatal Asphyxial Cardiac Arrest Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Justin T; Hamrick, Jennifer L; Bhalala, Utpal; Armstrong, Jillian S; Lee, Jeong-Hoo; Kulikowicz, Ewa; Lee, Jennifer K; Kudchadkar, Sapna R; Koehler, Raymond C; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Shaffner, Donald H

    2017-11-01

    To determine whether end-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery improves survival over standard cardiopulmonary resuscitation after prolonged asphyxial arrest. Preclinical randomized controlled study. University animal research laboratory. 1-2-week-old swine. After undergoing a 20-minute asphyxial arrest, animals received either standard or end-tidal CO2-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. In the standard group, chest compression delivery was optimized by video and verbal feedback to maintain the rate, depth, and release within published guidelines. In the end-tidal CO2-guided group, chest compression rate and depth were adjusted to obtain a maximal end-tidal CO2 level without other feedback. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation included 10 minutes of basic life support followed by advanced life support for 10 minutes or until return of spontaneous circulation. Mean end-tidal CO2 at 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was 34 ± 8 torr in the end-tidal CO2 group (n = 14) and 19 ± 9 torr in the standard group (n = 14; p = 0.0001). The return of spontaneous circulation rate was 7 of 14 (50%) in the end-tidal CO2 group and 2 of 14 (14%) in the standard group (p = 0.04). The chest compression rate averaged 143 ± 10/min in the end-tidal CO2 group and 102 ± 2/min in the standard group (p tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery. The response of the relaxation arterial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure to the initial epinephrine administration was greater in the end-tidal CO2 group than in the standard group (p = 0.01 and p = 0.03, respectively). The prevalence of resuscitation-related injuries was similar between groups. End-tidal CO2-guided chest compression delivery is an effective resuscitation method that improves early survival after prolonged asphyxial arrest in this neonatal piglet model. Optimizing end-tidal CO2 levels during cardiopulmonary resuscitation required that chest compression delivery rate exceed current guidelines

  17. Cardiac hybrid imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Nuclear Cardiology, Cardiovascular Center, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Alkadhi, Hatem [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Hybrid cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT imaging allows combined assessment of anatomical and functional aspects of cardiac disease. In coronary artery disease (CAD), hybrid SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of coronary artery stenosis and myocardial perfusion abnormalities. The clinical value of hybrid imaging has been documented in several subsets of patients. In selected groups of patients, hybrid imaging improves the diagnostic accuracy to detect CAD compared to the single imaging techniques. Additionally, this approach facilitates functional interrogation of coronary stenoses and guidance with regard to revascularization procedures. Moreover, the anatomical information obtained from CT coronary angiography or coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) adds prognostic information over perfusion data from SPECT. The use of cardiac hybrid imaging has been favoured by the dissemination of dedicated hybrid systems and the release of dedicated image fusion software, which allow simple patient throughput for hybrid SPECT/CT studies. Further technological improvements such as more efficient detector technology to allow for low-radiation protocols, ultra-fast image acquisition and improved low-noise image reconstruction algorithms will be instrumental to further promote hybrid SPECT/CT in research and clinical practice. (orig.)

  18. Reduction of radiation exposure and improvement of image quality with BMI-adapted prospective cardiac computed tomography and iterative reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosch, Waldemar; Stiller, Wolfram; Mueller, Dirk; Gitsioudis, Gitsios; Welzel, Johanna; Dadrich, Monika; Buss, Sebastian J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Kauczor, Hans U.; Katus, Hugo A.; Korosoglou, Grigorios

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of body mass index (BMI)-adapted protocols and iterative reconstruction algorithms (iDose) on patient radiation exposure and image quality in patients undergoing prospective ECG-triggered 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA). Methods: Image quality and radiation exposure were systematically analyzed in 100 patients. 60 Patients underwent prospective ECG-triggered CCTA using a non-tailored protocol and served as a ‘control’ group (Group 1: 120 kV, 200 mA s). 40 Consecutive patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent prospective CCTA, using BMI-adapted tube voltage and standard (Group 2: 100/120 kV, 100–200 mA s) versus reduced tube current (Group 3: 100/120 kV, 75–150 mA s). Iterative reconstructions were provided with different iDose levels and were compared to filtered back projection (FBP) reconstructions. Image quality was assessed in consensus of 2 experienced observers and using a 5-grade scale (1 = best to 5 = worse), and signal- and contrast-to-noise ratios (SNR and CNR) were quantified. Results: CCTA was performed without adverse events in all patients (n = 100, heart rate of 47–87 bpm and BMI of 19–38 kg/m 2 ). Patients examined using the non-tailored protocol in Group 1 had the highest radiation exposure (3.2 ± 0.4 mSv), followed by Group 2 (1.7 ± 0.7 mSv) and Group 3 (1.2 ± 0.6 mSv) (radiation savings of 47% and 63%, respectively, p < 0.001). Iterative reconstructions provided increased SNR and CNR, particularly when higher iDose level 5 was applied with Multi-Frequency reconstruction (iDose5 MFR) (14.1 ± 4.6 versus 21.2 ± 7.3 for SNR and 12.0 ± 4.2 versus 18.1 ± 6.6 for CNR, for FBP versus iDose5 MFR, respectively, p < 0.001). The combination of BMI adaptation with iterative reconstruction reduced radiation exposure and simultaneously improved image quality (subjective image quality of 1.4 ± 0.4 versus 1.9 ± 0.5 for Group 2 reconstructed using iDose5 MFR versus

  19. Remodelling of cardiac sympathetic re-innervation with thoracic spinal cord stimulation improves left ventricular function in a porcine model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Song-Yan; Liu, Yuan; Zuo, Mingliang; Zhang, Yuelin; Yue, Wensheng; Au, Ka-Wing; Lai, Wing-Hon; Wu, Yangsong; Shuto, Chika; Chen, Peter; Siu, Chung-Wah; Schwartz, Peter J; Tse, Hung-Fat

    2015-12-01

    Thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been shown to improve left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the optimal duration (intermittent vs. continuous) of stimulation and the mechanisms of action remain unclear. We performed chronic thoracic SCS at the level of T1-T3 (50 Hz, pulse width 0.2 ms) in 30 adult pigs with HF induced by myocardial infarction and rapid ventricular pacing for 4 weeks. All the animals were treated with daily oral metoprolol succinate (25 mg) plus ramipril (2.5 mg), and randomized to a control group (n = 10), intermittent SCS (4 h ×3, n = 10) or continuous SCS (24 h, n = 10) for 10 weeks. Serial measurements of LVEF and +dP/dt and serum levels of norepinephrine and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured. After sacrifice, immunohistological studies of myocardial sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve sprouting and innervation were performed. Echocardiogram revealed a significant increase in LVEF and +dP/dt at 10 weeks in both the intermittent and continuous SCS group compared with controls (P < 0.05). In both SCS groups, there was diffuse sympathetic nerve sprouting over the infarct, peri-infarct, and normal regions compared with only the peri-infarct and infarct regions in the control group. In addition, sympathetic innervation at the peri-infarct and infarct regions was increased following SCS, but decreased in the control group. Myocardium norepinephrine spillover and serum BNP at 10 weeks was significantly decreased only in the continuous SCS group (P < 0.05). In a porcine model of HF, SCS induces significant remodelling of cardiac sympathetic innervation over the peri-infarct and infarct regions and is associated with improved LV function and reduced myocardial norepinephrine spillover. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. What is needed to implement a web-based audit and feedback intervention with outreach visits to improve care quality: A concept mapping study among cardiac rehabilitation teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M; Peek, Niels; Haafkens, Joke A; Joukes, Erik; Vromen, Tom; Jaspers, Monique W M; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2017-01-01

    Evidence on successful quality improvement (QI) in health care requires quantitative information from randomized clinical trials (RCTs) on the effectiveness of QI interventions, but also qualitative information from professionals to understand factors influencing QI implementation. Using a structured qualitative approach, concept mapping, this study determines factors identified by cardiac rehabilitation (CR) teams on what is needed to successfully implement a web-based audit and feedback (A&F) intervention with outreach visits to improve the quality of CR care. Participants included 49 CR professionals from 18 Dutch CR centres who had worked with the A&F system during a RCT. In three focus group sessions participants formulated statements on factors needed to implement QI successfully. Subsequently, participants rated all statements for importance and feasibility and grouped them thematically. Multi dimensional scaling was used to produce a final concept map. Forty-two unique statements were formulated and grouped into five thematic clusters in the concept map. The cluster with the highest importance was QI team commitment, followed by organisational readiness, presence of an adequate A&F system, access to an external quality assessor, and future use and functionalities of the A&F system. Concept mapping appeared efficient and useful to understand contextual factors influencing QI implementation as perceived by healthcare teams. While presence of a web-based A&F system and external quality assessor were seen as instrumental for gaining insight into performance and formulating QI actions, QI team commitment and organisational readiness were perceived as essential to actually implement and carry out these actions. These two sociotechnical factors should be taken into account when implementing and evaluating the success of QI implementations in future research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzke, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net

  2. Robotic Applications in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan P. Kypson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cardiac surgery has been performed through a median sternotomy, which allows the surgeon generous access to the heart and surrounding great vessels. As a paradigm shift in the size and location of incisions occurs in cardiac surgery, new methods have been developed to allow the surgeon the same amount of dexterity and accessibility to the heart in confined spaces and in a less invasive manner. Initially, long instruments without pivot points were used, however, more recent robotic telemanipulation systems have been applied that allow for improved dexterity, enabling the surgeon to perform cardiac surgery from a distance not previously possible. In this rapidly evolving field, we review the recent history and clinical results of using robotics in cardiac surgery.

  3. Cardiac Cachexia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Raposo André

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a chronic, progressive, and incurable disease. Cardiac cachexia is a strong predictor of poor prognosis, regardless of other important variables. This review intends to gather evidence to enable recognition of cardiac cachexia, identification of early stages of muscle waste and sarcopenia, and improve identification of patients with terminal heart failure in need of palliative care, whose symptoms are no longer controlled by usual medical measures. The pathophysiology is complex and multifactorial. There are many treatment options to prevent or revert muscle waste and sarcopenia; although, these strategies are less effective in advanced stages of cardiac cachexia. In these final stages, symptomatic palliation plays an important role, focussing on the patient’s comfort and avoiding the ‘acute model’ treatment of aggressive, disproportionate, and inefficient care. In order to provide adequate care and attempt to prevent this syndrome, thus reducing its impact on healthcare, there should be improved communication between general practitioners, internal medicine physicians, cardiologists, and palliative care specialists since heart failure has an unforeseeable course and is associated with an increasing number of deaths and different levels of suffering.

  4. Administration of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor accompanied with a balanced diet improves cardiac function alterations induced by high fat diet in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daltro, Pâmela Santana; Alves, Paula Santana; Castro, Murilo Fagundes; Azevedo, Carine M; Vasconcelos, Juliana Fraga; Allahdadi, Kyan James; de Freitas, Luiz Antônio Rodrigues; de Freitas Souza, Bruno Solano; Dos Santos, Ricardo Ribeiro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Macambira, Simone Garcia

    2015-12-03

    High fat diet (HFD) is a major contributor to the development of obesity and cardiovascular diseases due to the induction of cardiac structural and hemodynamic abnormalities. We used a model of diabetic cardiomyopathy in C57Bl/6 mice fed with a HFD to investigate the effects of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), a cytokine known for its beneficial effects in the heart, on cardiac anatomical and functional abnormalities associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Groups of C57Bl/6 mice were fed with standard diet (n = 8) or HFD (n = 16). After 36 weeks, HFD animals were divided into a group treated with G-CSF + standard diet (n = 8) and a vehicle control group + standard diet (n = 8). Cardiac structure and function were assessed by electrocardiography, echocardiography and treadmill tests, in addition to the evaluation of body weight, fasting glicemia, insulin and glucose tolerance at different time points. Histological analyses were performed in the heart tissue. HFD consumption induced metabolic alterations characteristic of type 2 diabetes and obesity, as well as cardiac fibrosis and reduced exercise capacity. Upon returning to a standard diet, obese mice body weight returned to non-obese levels. G-CSF administration accelerated the reduction in of body weight in obese mice. Additionally, G-CSF treatment reduced insulin levels, diminished heart fibrosis, increased exercise capacity and reversed cardiac alterations, including bradycardia, elevated QRS amplitude, augmented P amplitude, increased septal wall thickness, left ventricular posterior thickening and cardiac output reduction. Our results indicate that G-CSF administration caused beneficial effects on obesity-associated cardiac impairment.

  5. Socially differentiated cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meillier, Lucette Kirsten; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Larsen, Finn Breinholt

    2012-01-01

    in recruitment and participation among low educated and socially vulnerable patients must be addressed to lower inequality in post-MI health. Our aim was to improve referral, attendance, and adherence rates among socially vulnerable patients by systematic screening and by offering a socially differentiated...... to a standard rehabilitation programme (SRP). If patients were identified as socially vulnerable, they were offered an extended version of the rehabilitation programme (ERP). Excluded patients were offered home visits by a cardiac nurse. Concordance principles were used in the individualised programme elements......%. Patients were equally distributed to the SRP and the ERP. No inequality was found in attendance and adherence among referred patients. Conclusions: It seems possible to overcome unequal referral, attendance, and adherence in cardiac rehabilitation by organisation of systematic screening and social...

  6. Fetal cardiac assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, K.R.

    1983-01-01

    The better understanding of fetal cardiovascular physiology coupled with improved technology for non-invasive study of the fetus now enable much more detailed assessment of fetal cardiac status than by heart rate alone. Even the latter, relatively simple, measurement contains much more information than was previously realized. It is also increasingly clear that no single measurement will provide the answer to all clinical dilemmas either on cardiac function or the welfare of the fetus as a whole. There are obvious clinical advantages in measuring several variables from one signal and the measurement of heart rate, heart rate variation and waveform from the ECG in labour is a potentially useful combination. Systolic time intervals or flow measurements could easily be added or used separately by combining real-time and Doppler ultrasound probes

  7. Modeling Major Adverse Outcomes of Pediatric and Adult Patients With Congenital Heart Disease Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization: Observations From the NCDR IMPACT Registry (National Cardiovascular Data Registry Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Natalie; Spertus, John A; Kennedy, Kevin F; Vincent, Robert; Martin, Gerard R; Curtis, Jeptha P; Nykanen, David; Moore, Phillip M; Bergersen, Lisa

    2017-11-21

    Risk standardization for adverse events after congenital cardiac catheterization is needed to equitably compare patient outcomes among different hospitals as a foundation for quality improvement. The goal of this project was to develop a risk-standardization methodology to adjust for patient characteristics when comparing major adverse outcomes in the NCDR's (National Cardiovascular Data Registry) IMPACT Registry (Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatment). Between January 2011 and March 2014, 39 725 consecutive patients within IMPACT undergoing cardiac catheterization were identified. Given the heterogeneity of interventional procedures for congenital heart disease, new procedure-type risk categories were derived with empirical data and expert opinion, as were markers of hemodynamic vulnerability. A multivariable hierarchical logistic regression model to identify patient and procedural characteristics predictive of a major adverse event or death after cardiac catheterization was derived in 70% of the cohort and validated in the remaining 30%. The rate of major adverse event or death was 7.1% and 7.2% in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Six procedure-type risk categories and 6 independent indicators of hemodynamic vulnerability were identified. The final risk adjustment model included procedure-type risk category, number of hemodynamic vulnerability indicators, renal insufficiency, single-ventricle physiology, and coagulation disorder. The model had good discrimination, with a C-statistic of 0.76 and 0.75 in the derivation and validation cohorts, respectively. Model calibration in the validation cohort was excellent, with a slope of 0.97 (standard error, 0.04; P value [for difference from 1] =0.53) and an intercept of 0.007 (standard error, 0.12; P value [for difference from 0] =0.95). The creation of a validated risk-standardization model for adverse outcomes after congenital cardiac catheterization can support reporting of risk

  8. Cardiac pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenik, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    The construction of a cardiac pacemaker is described which is characterized by particularly small dimensions, small weight and long life duration. The weight is under 100g, the specific weight under 1.7. Mass inertia forces which occur through acceleration and retardation processes, thus remain below the threshold values, above which one would have to reckon with considerable damaging of the surrounding body tissue. The maintaining of small size and slight weight is achieved by using an oscillator on COSMOS basis, where by considerably lower energy consumption, amongst others the lifetimes of the batteries used - a lithium anode with thionyl chloride electrolyte - is extended to over 5 years. The reliability can be increased by the use of 2 or more batteries. The designed dimension are 20x60x60 mm 3 . (ORU/LH) [de

  9. Cardiac ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillis, L.D.; Grossman, W.

    1986-01-01

    Cardiac ventriculography has been used extensively to define the anatomy of the ventricles and related structures in patients with congenital, valvular, coronary, and cardiomyopathic heart disease. Specifically, left ventriculography may provide valuable information about global and segmental left ventricular function, mitral valvular incompetence, and the presence, location, and severity of a number of other abnormalities, including ventricular septal defect and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. As a result, it should be a routine part of catheterization in patients being evaluated for coronary artery disease, aortic or mitral valvular disease, unexplained left ventricular failure, or congenital heart disease. Similarly, right ventriculography may provide information about global and segmental right ventricular function and can be especially helpful in patients with congenital heart disease

  10. Cardiac tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MILICA RADISIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that clinically sized (1-5 mm thick,compact cardiac constructs containing physiologically high density of viable cells (~108 cells/cm3 can be engineered in vitro by using biomimetic culture systems capable of providing oxygen transport and electrical stimulation, designed to mimic those in native heart. This hypothesis was tested by culturing rat heart cells on polymer scaffolds, either with perfusion of culture medium (physiologic interstitial velocity, supplementation of perfluorocarbons, or with electrical stimulation (continuous application of biphasic pulses, 2 ms, 5 V, 1 Hz. Tissue constructs cultured without perfusion or electrical stimulation served as controls. Medium perfusion and addition of perfluorocarbons resulted in compact, thick constructs containing physiologic density of viable, electromechanically coupled cells, in contrast to control constructs which had only a ~100 mm thick peripheral region with functionally connected cells. Electrical stimulation of cultured constructs resulted in markedly improved contractile properties, increased amounts of cardiac proteins, and remarkably well developed ultrastructure (similar to that of native heart as compared to non-stimulated controls. We discuss here the state of the art of cardiac tissue engineering, in light of the biomimetic approach that reproduces in vitro some of the conditions present during normal tissue development.

  11. Getting better : Nurse practitioner’s research for quality improvement in cardiac surgery : Beter worden : Onderzoek door verpleegkundig specialisten naar kwaliteitsverbetering rondom hartchirurgie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Valen (Richard)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThis thesis describes the efforts to reduce complications during and after cardiac surgery and to enhance the quality of patient care during the in-hospital stay after surgery. Several important topics for daily patient care will be addressed. In light of this goal, the scope and

  12. Human adipose stem cell and ASC-derived cardiac progenitor cellular therapy improves outcomes in a murine model of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davy PMC

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Philip MC Davy,1 Kevin D Lye,2,3 Juanita Mathews,1 Jesse B Owens,1 Alice Y Chow,1 Livingston Wong,2 Stefan Moisyadi,1 Richard C Allsopp1 1Institute for Biogenesis Research, 2John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Mānoa, 3Tissue Genesis, Inc., Honolulu, HI, USA Background: Adipose tissue is an abundant and potent source of adult stem cells for transplant therapy. In this study, we present our findings on the potential application of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs as well as induced cardiac-like progenitors (iCPs derived from ASCs for the treatment of myocardial infarction. Methods and results: Human bone marrow (BM-derived stem cells, ASCs, and iCPs generated from ASCs using three defined cardiac lineage transcription factors were assessed in an immune-compromised mouse myocardial infarction model. Analysis of iCP prior to transplant confirmed changes in gene and protein expression consistent with a cardiac phenotype. Endpoint analysis was performed 1 month posttransplant. Significantly increased endpoint fractional shortening, as well as reduction in the infarct area at risk, was observed in recipients of iCPs as compared to the other recipient cohorts. Both recipients of iCPs and ASCs presented higher myocardial capillary densities than either recipients of BM-derived stem cells or the control cohort. Furthermore, mice receiving iCPs had a significantly higher cardiac retention of transplanted cells than all other groups. Conclusion: Overall, iCPs generated from ASCs outperform BM-derived stem cells and ASCs in facilitating recovery from induced myocardial infarction in mice. Keywords: adipose stem cells, myocardial infarction, cellular reprogramming, cellular therapy, piggyBac, induced cardiac-like progenitors

  13. Experiences of recruiting to a pilot trial of Cardiac Rehabilitation In patients with Bowel cancer (CRIB) with an embedded process evaluation: lessons learned to improve recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Gill; Campbell, Anna; Davies, Zoe; Munro, Julie; Ireland, Aileen V; Leslie, Stephen; Watson, Angus Jm; Treweek, Shaun

    2015-01-01

    Recruitment to randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is a perennial problem. Calls have been made for trialists to make recruitment performance publicly available. This article presents our experience of recruiting to a pilot RCT of cardiac rehabilitation for patients with bowel cancer with an embedded process evaluation. Recruitment took place at three UK hospitals. Recruitment figures were based on the following: i) estimated number of patient admissions, ii) number of patients likely to meet inclusion criteria from clinician input and iii) recruitment rates in previous studies. The following recruitment procedure was used:Nurse assessed patients for eligibility.Patients signed a screening form indicating interest in and agreement to be approached by a researcher about the study.An appointment was made at which the patient signed a consent form and was randomised to the intervention or control group. Information about all patients considered for the study and subsequently included or excluded at each stage of the recruitment process and reasons given were recorded. There were variations in the time taken to award Research Management approval to run the study at the three sites (45-359 days). Sixty-two percent of the original recruitment estimate was reached. The main reason for under-recruitment was due to over-estimation of the number of patient admissions; other reasons were i) not assessing all patients for eligibility, ii) not completing a screening form for eligible patients and iii) patients who signed a screening form being lost to the study before consenting and randomisation. Pilot trials should not simply aim to improve recruitment estimates but should also identify factors likely to influence recruitment performance in a future trial and inform the development of that trial's recruitment strategies. Pilot trials are a crucial part of RCT design. Nevertheless, pilot trials are likely to be small scale, involving only a small number of sites, and

  14. Transplantation of Immortalized CD34+ and CD34- Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Improve Cardiac Function and Mitigate Systemic Pro-Inflammatory Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ho Kim

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs have the potential to differentiate into various cell lineages and they are easily obtainable from patients, which makes them a promising candidate for cell therapy. However, a drawback is their limited life span during in vitro culture. Therefore, hTERT-immortalized CD34+ and CD34- mouse ADSC lines (mADSCshTERT tagged with GFP were established. We evaluated the proliferation capacity, multi-differentiation potential, and secretory profiles of CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT in vitro, as well as their effects on cardiac function and systemic inflammation following transplantation into a rat model of acute myocardial infarction (AMI to assess whether these cells could be used as a novel cell source for regeneration therapy in the cardiovascular field. CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT demonstrated phenotypic characteristics and multi-differentiation potentials similar to those of primary mADSCs. CD34+ mADSCshTERT exhibited a higher proliferation ability compared to CD34- mADSCshTERT, whereas CD34- mADSCshTERT showed a higher osteogenic differentiation potential compared to CD34+ mADSCshTERT. Primary mADSCs, CD34+, and CD34- mADSCshTERT primarily secreted EGF, TGF-β1, IGF-1, IGF-2, MCP-1, and HGFR. CD34+ mADSCshTERT had higher secretion of VEGF and SDF-1 compared to CD34- mADSCshTERT. IL-6 secretion was severely reduced in both CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT compared to primary mADSCs. Transplantation of CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT significantly improved the left ventricular ejection fraction and reduced infarct size compared to AMI-induced rats after 28 days. At 28 days after transplantation, engraftment of CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT was confirmed by positive Y chromosome staining, and differentiation of CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT into endothelial cells was found in the infarcted myocardium. Significant decreases were observed in circulating IL-6 levels in CD34+ and CD34- mADSCshTERT groups compared to the AMI

  15. Cardiac regeneration therapy: connections to cardiac physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Naofumi; Matsubara, Hiroaki

    2011-12-01

    Without heart transplantation, a large number of patients with failing hearts worldwide face poor outcomes. By means of cardiomyocyte regeneration, cardiac regeneration therapy is emerging with great promise as a means for restoring loss of cardiac function. However, the limited success of clinical trials using bone marrow-derived cells and myoblasts with heterogeneous constituents, transplanted at a wide range of cell doses, has led to disagreement on the efficacy of cell therapy. It is therefore essential to reevaluate the evidence for the efficacy of cell-based cardiac regeneration therapy, focusing on targets, materials, and methodologies. Meanwhile, the revolutionary innovation of cardiac regeneration therapy is sorely needed to help the millions of people who suffer heart failure from acquired loss of cardiomyocytes. Cardiac regeneration has been used only in limited species or as a developing process in the rodent heart; now, the possibility of cardiomyocyte turnover in the human heart is being revisited. In the pursuit of this concept, the use of cardiac stem/progenitor stem cells in the cardiac niche must be focused to usher in a second era of cardiac regeneration therapy for the severely injured heart. In addition, tissue engineering and cellular reprogramming will advance the next era of treatment that will enable current cell-based therapy to progress to "real" cardiac regeneration therapy. Although many barriers remain, the prevention of refractory heart failure through cardiac regeneration is now becoming a realistic possibility.

  16. Deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure at a higher rate improve oxygenation in the early period after cardiac surgery--a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urell, Charlotte; Emtner, Margareta; Hedenström, Hans; Tenling, Arne; Breidenskog, Marie; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2011-07-01

    In addition to early mobilisation, a variety of breathing exercises are used to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery. The optimal duration of the treatment is not well evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 30 versus 10 deep breaths hourly, while awake, with positive expiratory pressure on oxygenation and pulmonary function the first days after cardiac surgery. A total of 181 patients, undergoing cardiac surgery, were randomised into a treatment group, performing 30 deep breaths hourly the first postoperative days, or into a control group performing 10 deep breaths hourly. The main outcome measurement arterial blood gases and the secondary outcome pulmonary function, evaluated with spirometry, were determined on the second postoperative day. Preoperatively, both study groups were similar in terms of age, SpO(2), forced expiratory volume in 1s and New York Heart Association classification. On the second postoperative day, arterial oxygen tension (PaO(2)) was 8.9 ± 1.7 kPa in the treatment group and 8.1 ± 1.4 kPa in the control group (p = 0.004). Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) was 92.7 ± 3.7% in the treatment group and 91.1 ± 3.8% in the control group (p = 0.016). There were no differences in measured lung function between the groups or in compliance to the breathing exercises. Compliance was 65% of possible breathing sessions. A significantly increased oxygenation was found in patients performing 30 deep breaths the first two postoperative days compared with control patients performing 10 deep breaths hourly. These results support the implementation of a higher rate of deep breathing exercises in the initial phase after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling during Cardiac Development and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan W. Buikema

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is essential for proper cardiac specification, progenitor expansion and myocardial growth. During development, the mass of the embryonic heart increases multiple times to achieve the dimensions of adult ventricular chambers. Cell division in the embryonic heart is fairly present, whereas cell turnover in the adult myocardium is extremely low. Understanding of embryonic cardiomyocyte cell-replication, therefore, could improve strategies for cardiac regenerative therapeutics. Here, we review which role Wnt signaling plays in cardiac development and highlight a selection of attempts that have been made to modulate Wnt signaling after cardiac ischemic injury to improve cardiac function and reduce infarct size.

  18. Cerebral Oximetry in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Shepelyuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the data of numerous current references, the review describes different neuromonitoring methods during cardiac surgery under extracorporeal circulation. It shows that it is important and necessary to make neuromonitoring for the early diagnosis and prevention of neurological complications after cardiac surgery. Particular attention is given to cerebral oximetry; the possibilities and advantages of this technique are described. Correction of cerebral oximetric values is shown to improve survival rates and to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. Lack of cerebral oximetry monitoring denudes a clinician of important information and possibilities to optimize patient status and to prevent potentially menacing complications, which allows one to conclude that it is necessary to use cerebral oximetry procedures within neu-romonitoring in cardiac surgery. Key words: extracorporeal circulation, cerebral oximetry, neurological dysfunction, cerebral oxygenation.

  19. Stem cell mobilization induced by subcutaneous granulocyte-colony stimulating factor to improve cardiac regeneration after acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction: result of the double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled stem cells in myocardial infarction (STEMMI) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Jørgensen, Erik; Wang, Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phase 1 clinical trials of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment after myocardial infarction have indicated that G-CSF treatment is safe and may improve left ventricular function. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial aimed to assess the efficacy...... hours after symptom onset. Patients were randomized to double-blind treatment with G-CSF (10 microg/kg of body weight) or placebo for 6 days. The primary end point was change in systolic wall thickening from baseline to 6 months determined by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An independent core...

  20. Cardiac Function Remains Impaired Despite Reversible Cardiac Remodeling after Acute Experimental Viral Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Moritz Becher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Infection with Coxsackievirus B3 induces myocarditis. We aimed to compare the acute and chronic phases of viral myocarditis to identify the immediate effects of cardiac inflammation as well as the long-term effects after resolved inflammation on cardiac fibrosis and consequently on cardiac function. Material and Methods. We infected C57BL/6J mice with Coxsackievirus B3 and determined the hemodynamic function 7 as well as 28 days after infection. Subsequently, we analyzed viral burden and viral replication in the cardiac tissue as well as the expression of cytokines and matrix proteins. Furthermore, cardiac fibroblasts were infected with virus to investigate if viral infection alone induces profibrotic signaling. Results. Severe cardiac inflammation was determined and cardiac fibrosis was consistently colocalized with inflammation during the acute phase of myocarditis. Declined cardiac inflammation but no significantly improved hemodynamic function was observed 28 days after infection. Interestingly, cardiac fibrosis declined to basal levels as well. Both cardiac inflammation and fibrosis were reversible, whereas the hemodynamic function remains impaired after healed viral myocarditis in C57BL/6J mice.

  1. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and cardiac ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Gredilla, Ricardo

    According with different international organizations, cardiovascular diseases are becoming the first cause of death in western countries. Although exposure to different risk factors, particularly those related to lifestyle, contribute to the etiopathogenesis of cardiac disorders, the increase in average lifespan and aging are considered major determinants of cardiac diseases events. Mitochondria and oxidative stress have been pointed out as relevant factors both in heart aging and in the development of cardiac diseases such as heart failure, cardiac hypertrophy and diabetic cardiomyopathy. During aging, cellular processes related with mitochondrial function, such as bioenergetics, apoptosis and inflammation are altered leading to cardiac dysfunction. Increasing our knowledge about the mitochondrial mechanisms related with the aging process, will provide new strategies in order to improve this process, particularly the cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Variation in Red Blood Cell Transfusion Practices During Cardiac Operations Among Centers in Maryland: Results From a State Quality-Improvement Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magruder, J Trent; Blasco-Colmenares, Elena; Crawford, Todd; Alejo, Diane; Conte, John V; Salenger, Rawn; Fonner, Clifford E; Kwon, Christopher C; Bobbitt, Jennifer; Brown, James M; Nelson, Mark G; Horvath, Keith A; Whitman, Glenn R

    2017-01-01

    Variation in red blood cell (RBC) transfusion practices exists at cardiac surgery centers across the nation. We tested the hypothesis that significant variation in RBC transfusion practices between centers in our state's cardiac surgery quality collaborative remains even after risk adjustment. Using a multiinstitutional statewide database created by the Maryland Cardiac Surgery Quality Initiative (MCSQI), we included patient-level data from 8,141 patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass (CAB) or aortic valve replacement at 1 of 10 centers. Risk-adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to predict the need for any intraoperative RBC transfusion, as well as for any postoperative RBC transfusion, with anonymized center number included as a factor variable. Unadjusted intraoperative RBC transfusion probabilities at the 10 centers ranged from 13% to 60%; postoperative RBC transfusion probabilities ranged from 16% to 41%. After risk adjustment with demographic, comorbidity, and operative data, significant intercenter variability was documented (intraoperative probability range, 4% -59%; postoperative probability range, 13%-39%). When stratifying patients by preoperative hematocrit quartiles, significant variability in intraoperative transfusion probability was seen among all quartiles (lowest quartile: mean hematocrit value, 30.5% ± 4.1%, probability range, 17%-89%; highest quartile: mean hematocrit value, 44.8% ± 2.5%; probability range, 1%-35%). Significant variation in intercenter RBC transfusion practices exists for both intraoperative and postoperative transfusions, even after risk adjustment, among our state's centers. Variability in intraoperative RBC transfusion persisted across quartiles of preoperative hematocrit values. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Diffuse infiltrative cardiac tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulati, Gurpreet S; Kothari, Shyam S

    2011-01-01

    We present the cardiac magnetic resonance images of an unusual form of cardiac tuberculosis. Nodular masses in a sheet-like distribution were seen to infiltrate the outer myocardium and pericardium along most of the cardiac chambers. The lesions showed significant resolution on antitubercular therapy

  4. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure During Exercise Improves Walking Time in Patients Undergoing Inpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoni, Camila Bianca Falasco; Di Thommazo-Luporini, Luciana; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Caruso, Flávia Cristina Rossi; Mezzalira, Daniel; Arena, Ross; Amaral-Neto, Othon; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Borghi-Silva, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used as an effective support to decrease the negative pulmonary effects of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery. However, it is unknown whether CPAP can positively influence patients undergoing CABG during exercise. This study evaluated the effectiveness of CPAP on the first day of ambulation after CABG in patients undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation (CR). Fifty-four patients after CABG surgery were randomly assigned to receive either inpatient CR and CPAP (CPG) or standard CR without CPAP (CG). Cardiac rehabilitation included walking and CPAP pressures were set between 10 to 12 cmH2O. Participants were assessed on the first day of walking at rest and during walking. Outcome measures included breathing pattern variables, exercise time in seconds (ETs), dyspnea/leg effort ratings, and peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2). Twenty-seven patients (13 CPG vs 14 CG) completed the study. Compared with walking without noninvasive ventilation assistance, CPAP increased ETs by 43.4 seconds (P = .040) during walking, promoted better thoracoabdominal coordination, increased ventilation during walking by 12.5 L/min (P = .001), increased SpO2 values at the end of walking by 2.6% (P = .016), and reduced dyspnea ratings by 1 point (P = .008). Continuous positive airway pressure can positively influence exercise tolerance, ventilatory function, and breathing pattern in response to a single bout of exercise after CABG.

  5. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). A one-year follow-up study. A CR programme (GoHeart) was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≥45%). Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9%) were included (mean age 63.8 years). At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol (p management (p < 0.001), Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p < 0.001 and mental; p < 0.01) and in depression symptoms (p < 0.01). At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p < 0.05), and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p < 0.05). There were no sex differences. CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart) improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  6. Cardiac Rehabilitation Series: Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L.; Bennett, Stephanie; Ardern, Chris I.; Clark, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is among the leading causes of mortality and morbidity in Canada. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has a long robust history here, and there are established clinical practice guidelines. While the effectiveness of CR in the Canadian context is clear, only 34% of eligible patients participate, and strategies to increase access for under-represented groups (e.g., women, ethnic minority groups) are not yet universally applied. Identified CR barriers include lack of referral and physician recommendation, travel and distance, and low perceived need. Indeed there is now a national policy position recommending systematic inpatient referral to CR in Canada. Recent development of 30 CR Quality Indicators and the burgeoning national CR registry will enable further measurement and improvement of the quality of CR care in Canada. Finally, the Canadian Association of CR is one of the founding members of the International Council of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, to promote CR globally. PMID:24607018

  7. The cardiac patient in Ramadan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamsi-Pasha, Majed; Chamsi-Pasha, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Ramadan is one of the five fundamental pillars of Islam. During this month, the majority of the 1.6 billion Muslims worldwide observe an absolute fast from dawn to sunset without any drink or food. Our review shows that the impact of fasting during Ramadan on patients with stable cardiac disease is minimal and does not lead to any increase in acute events. Most patients with the stable cardiac disease can fast safely. Most of the drug doses and their regimen are easily manageable during this month and may need not to be changed. Ramadan fasting is a healthy nonpharmacological means for improving cardiovascular risk factors. Most of the Muslims, who suffer from chronic diseases, insist on fasting Ramadan despite being exempted by religion. The Holy Quran specifically exempts the sick from fasting. This is particularly relevant if fasting worsens one's illness or delays recovery. Patients with unstable angina, recent myocardial infarction, uncontrolled hypertension, decompensated heart failure, recent cardiac intervention or cardiac surgery or any debilitating diseases should avoid fasting.

  8. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne

    2016-01-01

    hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. CONCLUSION: The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). STUDY POPULATION: Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated...... with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date...

  9. Computer graphic display of cardiac CT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.; Carlsson, E.

    1982-01-01

    In order to improve spatial conception and quantitative assessment of the cardiac structures based on cardiac computed tomography, methods for computer graphic display were developed. Excised hearts and living dogs with myocardial infarctions were subjected to CT scanning. The data on the scanner tapes were processed to provide isodensity plots, linear section plots, time-weighted integrated isodensity plots as well as topographical density displays and three-dimensional spatial reconstructions of single and multi-layer scans. (orig.)

  10. Use of cardiocerebral resuscitation or AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines is associated with improved survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, Marcus; Ewy, Gordon A; Sasson, Comilla

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the use of cardiocerebral resuscitation (CCR) or AHA/ERC 2005 Resuscitation Guidelines improved patient outcomes from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared to older guidelines. Systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library databases. We also hand-searched study references and consulted experts. Design: randomised controlled trials and observational studies. OHCA patients, age >17 years. 'Control' protocol versus 'Study' protocol. 'Control' protocol defined as AHA/ERC 2000 Guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). 'Study' protocol defined as AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines for CPR, or a CCR protocol. Survival to hospital discharge. High-quality or medium-quality studies, as measured by the Newcastle Ottawa Scale using predefined categories. Twelve observational studies met inclusion criteria. All the three studies using CCR demonstrated significantly improved survival compared to use of AHA 2000 Guidelines, as did five of the nine studies using AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines. Pooled data demonstrate that use of a CCR protocol has an unadjusted OR of 2.26 (95% CI 1.64 to 3.12) for survival to hospital discharge among all cardiac arrest patients. Among witnessed ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT) patients, CCR increased survival by an OR of 2.98 (95% CI 1.92 to 4.62). Studies using AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines showed an overall trend towards increased survival, but significant heterogeneity existed among these studies. We demonstrate an association with improved survival from OHCA when CCR protocols or AHA/ERC 2005 Guidelines are compared to use of older guidelines. In the subgroup of patients with witnessed VF/VT, there was a threefold increase in OHCA survival when CCR was used. CCR appears to be a promising resuscitation protocol for Emergency Medical Services providers in increasing survival from OHCA. Future research will need to be conducted to directly compare AHA/ERC 2010

  11. Cardiac rehabilitation: a comprehensive review

    OpenAIRE

    Lear, Scott A; Ignaszewski, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a commonly used treatment for men and women with cardiovascular disease. To date, no single study has conclusively demonstrated a comprehensive benefit of CR. Numerous individual studies, however, have demonstrated beneficial effects such as improved risk-factor profile, slower disease progression, decreased morbidity, and decreased mortality. This paper will review the evidence for the use of CR and discuss the implications and limitations of these stu...

  12. Simultaneous total cavopulmonary connection and cardiac re-synchronisation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Shiori; Amano, Atsushi

    2017-08-01

    We report the simultaneous use of cardiac re-synchronisation therapy and total cavopulmonary connection in a patient with dyssynchrony, wide QRS, and cardiac failure. To our knowledge, this simultaneous approach has not been reported previously. On follow-up, we noted that QRS width and brain natriuretic peptide levels improved. In addition, speckle tracking revealed improved synchronisation of ventricular wall motion.

  13. Marketing cardiac CT programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jason

    2010-01-01

    There are two components of cardiac CT discussed in this article: coronary artery calcium scoring (CACS) and coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA).The distinctive advantages of each CT examination are outlined. In order to ensure a successful cardiac CT program, it is imperative that imaging facilities market their cardiac CT practices effectively in order to gain a competitive advantage in this valuable market share. If patients receive quality care by competent individuals, they are more likely to recommend the facility's cardiac CT program. Satisfied patients will also be more willing to come back for any further testing.

  14. An update on insertable cardiac monitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Flemming J; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Krieger, Derk W

    2015-01-01

    Continuous cardiac rhythm monitoring has undergone compelling progress over the past decades. Cardiac monitoring has emerged from 12-lead electrocardiograms being performed at the discretion of the treating physician to in-hospital telemetry, Holter monitoring, prolonged external event monitoring...... turning point in the field of arrhythmia management. However, their role in the detection of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation after cryptogenic strokes has yet to evolve. This will be the main focus of this review. Issues surrounding patient selection, clinical relevance and determination of cost......-effectiveness for prolonged cardiac monitoring require further studies. Furthermore, insertable cardiac monitoring has not only the potential to augment diagnostic capabilities but also to improve the management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation....

  15. Melt Electrospinning Writing of Poly-Hydroxymethylglycolide-co-ε-Caprolactone-Based Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castilho, Miguel; Feyen, Dries; Flandes-Iparraguirre, María; Hochleitner, Gernot; Groll, Jürgen; Doevendans, Pieter A.F.; Vermonden, Tina; Ito, Keita; Sluijter, Joost P G; Malda, Jos

    2017-01-01

    Current limitations in cardiac tissue engineering revolve around the inability to fully recapitulate the structural organization and mechanical environment of native cardiac tissue. This study aims at developing organized ultrafine fiber scaffolds with improved biocompatibility and architecture in

  16. Melt Electrospinning Writing of Poly-Hydroxymethylglycolide-co-ε-Caprolactone-Based Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castilho, Miguel; Feyen, Dries; Flandes-Iparraguirre, María; Hochleitner, Gernot; Groll, Jürgen; Doevendans, Pieter A.F.; Vermonden, Tina; Ito, Keita; Sluijter, Joost P.G.; Malda, Jos

    Current limitations in cardiac tissue engineering revolve around the inability to fully recapitulate the structural organization and mechanical environment of native cardiac tissue. This study aims at developing organized ultrafine fiber scaffolds with improved biocompatibility and architecture in

  17. Melt electrospinning writing of poly-Hydroxymethylglycolide-co-ε-Caprolactone-based scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castilho, M.; Feyen, D.; Flandes-Iparraguirre, M.; Hochleitner, G.; Groll, J.; Doevendans, P.A.F.; Vermonden, T.; Ito, K.; Sluijter, J.P.G.; Malda, J.

    2017-01-01

    Current limitations in cardiac tissue engineering revolve around the inability to fully recapitulate the structural organization and mechanical environment of native cardiac tissue. This study aims at developing organized ultrafine fiber scaffolds with improved biocompatibility and architecture in

  18. Clinical evaluation of the Spiral Pump® after improvements to the original project in patients submitted to cardiac surgeries with cardiopulmonary bypass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarbas Jakson Dinkhuysen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this paper is to present the results from Spiral Pump clinical trial after design modifications performed at its previous project. This pump applies axial end centrifugal hydraulic effects for blood pumping during cardiopulmonary bypass for patients under cardiac surgery. Methods: This study was performed in 52 patients (51% males, between 20 to 80 (67±14.4 years old weighing 53 to 102 (71.7±12.6 kg, mostly under myocardial revascularization surgery (34.6% and valvular surgery (32.8%. Besides the routine evaluation of the data observed in these cases, we monitored pump rotational speed, blood flow, cardiopulmonary bypass duration, urine free hemoglobin for blood cell trauma analysis (+ to 4+, lactate desidrogenase (UI/L, fibrinogen level (mg/dL and platelet count (nº/mm3. Results: Besides maintaining appropriate blood pressure and metabolic parameters it was also observed that the Free Hemoglobin levels remained normal, with a slight increase after 90 minutes of cardiopulmonary bypass. The Lactate Dehydrogenase showed an increase, with medians varying between 550-770 IU/L, whereas the decrease in Fibrinogen showed medians of 130-100 mg/dl. The number of platelets showed a slight decrease with the medians ranging from 240,000 to 200,000/mm3. No difficulty was observed during perfusion terminations, nor were there any immediate deaths, and all patients except one, were discharged in good condition. CONCLUSION: The Spiral Pump, as blood propeller during cardiopulmonary bypass, demonstrated to be reliable and safe, comprising in a good option as original and national product for this kind of application.

  19. Direct transport to a PCI-capable hospital is associated with improved survival after adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of medical aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Nicole; Williams, Teresa A; Ho, Kwok M; Inoue, Madoka; Bailey, Paul; Celenza, Antonio; Fatovich, Daniel; Jenkins, Ian; Finn, Judith

    2018-05-02

    To compare survival outcomes of adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) of medical aetiology directly transported to a percutaneous-coronary-intervention capable (PCI-capable) hospital (direct transport) with patients transferred to a PCI-capable hospital via another hospital without PCI services available (indirect transport) by emergency medical services (EMS). This retrospective cohort study used the St John Ambulance Western Australia OHCA Database and medical chart review. We included OHCA patients (≥18 years) admitted to any one of five PCI-capable hospitals in Perth between January 2012 and December 2015. Survival to hospital discharge (STHD) and survival up to 12-months after OHCA were compared between the direct and indirect transport groups using multivariable logistic and Cox-proportional hazards regression, respectively, while adjusting for so-called "Utstein variables" and other potential confounders. Of the 509 included patients, 404 (79.4%) were directly transported to a PCI-capable hospital and 105 (20.6%) transferred via another hospital to a PCI-capable hospital; 274/509 (53.8%) patients STHD and 253/509 (49.7%) survived to 12-months after OHCA. Direct transport patients were twice as likely to STHD (adjusted odds ratio 1.97, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-3.43) than those transferred via another hospital. Indirect transport was also associated with a possible increased risk of death, up to 12-months, compared to direct transport (adjusted hazard ratio 1.36, 95% CI 1.00-1.84). Direct transport to a PCI-capable hospital for post-resuscitation care is associated with a survival advantage for adults with OHCA of medical aetiology. This has implications for EMS transport protocols for patients with OHCA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Does Pre-hospital Endotracheal Intubation Improve Survival in Adults with Non-traumatic Out-of-hospital Cardiac Arrest? A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Tiah

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Endotracheal intubation (ETI is currently considered superior to supraglottic airway devices (SGA for survival and other outcomes among adults with non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA. We aimed to determine if the research supports this conclusion by conducting a systematic review. Methods: We searched the MEDLINE, Scopus and CINAHL databases for studies published between January 1, 1980, and 30 April 30, 2013, which compared pre-hospital use of ETI with SGA for outcomes of return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC; survival to hospital admission; survival to hospital discharge; and favorable neurological or functional status. We selected studies using pre-specified criteria. Included studies were independently screened for quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. We did not pool results because of study variability. Study outcomes were extracted and results presented as summed odds ratios with 95% CI. Results: We identified five eligible studies: one quasi-randomized controlled trial and four cohort studies, involving 303,348 patients in total. Only three of the five studies reported a higher proportion of ROSC with ETI versus SGA with no difference reported in the remaining two. None found significant differences between ETI and SGA for survival to hospital admission or discharge. One study reported better functional status at discharge for ETI versus SGA. Two studies reported no significant difference for favorable neurological status between ETI and SGA. Conclusion: Current evidence does not conclusively support the superiority of ETI over SGA for multiple outcomes among adults with OHCA. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  1. [Cardiac rehabilitation: current status and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahmann, H W

    2012-02-01

    The goal of cardiac rehabilitation is to support heart patients using a multidisciplinary team in order to obtain the best possible physical and mental health and achieve long-term social reintegration. In addition to improving physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation restores self-confidence, thus better equipping patients to deal with mental illness and improving their social reintegration ("participation"). Once the causes of disease have been identified and treated as effectively as possible, drug and lifestyle changes form the focus of cardiac rehabilitation measures. In particular diseases, rehabilitation offers the opportunity for targeted educational courses for diabetics or drug dose escalation, as well as special training for heart failure patients. A nationwide network of outpatient heart groups is available for targeted follow-up. Cardiac patients predominantly rehabilitated in follow-up rehabilitation are older and have greater morbidity than in the past; moreover, they generally come out of acute clinical care earlier and are discharged from hospital more quickly. The proportion of severely ill and multimorbid patients presents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in cardiac rehabilitation, although cardiac rehabilitation was not initially conceived for this patient group. The benefit of cardiac rehabilitation has been a well documented reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, hurdles remain, partly due to the patients themselves, partly due to the health insurers. Some insurance providers still refuse rehabilitation for non-ST-segment elevation infarction. In principle rehabilitation can be carried out in an inpatient or an outpatient setting. Specific allocation criteria have not yet been established, but the structure and process quality of outpatient rehabilitation should correspond to that of the inpatient setting. The choice between the two settings should be based on pragmatic criteria. Both settings should be possible for an individual

  2. Cardiac surgeons and the quality movement: the Michigan experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Richard L; Armenti, Frederick R; Bassett, Joseph S; Bell, Gail F; Drake, Daniel; Hanson, Eric C; Heiser, John C; Johnson, Scott H; Plasman, F B; Shannon, Francis L; Share, David; Theurer, Patty; Williams, Jaelene

    2009-01-01

    The Michigan Society of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons created a voluntary quality collaborative with all the cardiac surgeons in the state and all hospitals doing adult cardiac surgery. Utilizing this collaborative over the last 3 years and creating a unique relationship with a payor, an approach to processes and outcomes has produced improvements in the quality of care for cardiac patients in the state of Michigan.

  3. Safety in cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siregar, S.

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of safety in cardiac surgery is a complex process, which involves many clinical, practical, methodological and statistical issues. The objective of this thesis was to measure and to compare safety in cardiac surgery in The Netherlands using the Netherlands Association for

  4. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  5. CARDIAC LYMPHOMA IN DOG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. D. Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoma is a lymphoid tumor that originates in hematopoietic organs such as lymph node, spleen or liver. In dogs, the overall prevalence of cardiac tumors was estimated to be only 0.19% based on the results of the survey of a large database, and lymphomas accounts for approximately 2% of all cardiac tumors. In general, the involvement of the myocardium is rarely described in canine lymphoma. Currently, there is no evidence of a viral association with primary cardiac lymphoma in dogs, but other types of immunosuppression may contribute to abnormal events, such as involvement primary cardiac. The aim of this study was to analyze a case of sudden death of a bitch, SRD, aged 10, who had the final diagnosis of cardiac lymphoma.

  6. Mathematical cardiac electrophysiology

    CERN Document Server

    Colli Franzone, Piero; Scacchi, Simone

    2014-01-01

    This book covers the main mathematical and numerical models in computational electrocardiology, ranging from microscopic membrane models of cardiac ionic channels to macroscopic bidomain, monodomain, eikonal models and cardiac source representations. These advanced multiscale and nonlinear models describe the cardiac bioelectrical activity from the cell level to the body surface and are employed in both the direct and inverse problems of electrocardiology. The book also covers advanced numerical techniques needed to efficiently carry out large-scale cardiac simulations, including time and space discretizations, decoupling and operator splitting techniques, parallel finite element solvers. These techniques are employed in 3D cardiac simulations illustrating the excitation mechanisms, the anisotropic effects on excitation and repolarization wavefronts, the morphology of electrograms in normal and pathological tissue and some reentry phenomena. The overall aim of the book is to present rigorously the mathematica...

  7. Biomaterials for cardiac regeneration

    CERN Document Server

    Ruel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    This book offers readers a comprehensive biomaterials-based approach to achieving clinically successful, functionally integrated vasculogenesis and myogenesis in the heart. Coverage is multidisciplinary, including the role of extracellular matrices in cardiac development, whole-heart tissue engineering, imaging the mechanisms and effects of biomaterial-based cardiac regeneration, and autologous bioengineered heart valves. Bringing current knowledge together into a single volume, this book provides a compendium to students and new researchers in the field and constitutes a platform to allow for future developments and collaborative approaches in biomaterials-based regenerative medicine, even beyond cardiac applications. This book also: Provides a valuable overview of the engineering of biomaterials for cardiac regeneration, including coverage of combined biomaterials and stem cells, as well as extracellular matrices Presents readers with multidisciplinary coverage of biomaterials for cardiac repair, including ...

  8. Serum cortisol concentration with exploratory cut-off values do not predict the effects of hydrocortisone administration in children with low cardiac output after cardiac surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, E. J.; Hogenbirk, Karin; Roest, Arno A. W.; van Brempt, Ronald; Hazekamp, Mark G.; de Jonge, Evert

    2012-01-01

    Low cardiac output syndrome is common after paediatric cardiac surgery. Previous studies suggested that hydrocortisone administration may improve haemodynamic stability in case of resistant low cardiac output syndrome in critically ill children. This study was set up to test the hypothesis that the

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Brogaard Hansen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR. The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM. Design A one-year follow-up study. Setting A CR programme (GoHeart was evaluated in a cohort at Lillebaelt Hospital Vejle, DK from 2010 to 2011. Participants Consecutive patients admitted to CR were included. The inclusion criteria were the event of acute myocardial infarction or stable angina and invasive revascularization (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF ≥45%. Main outcome measures Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were assessed at admission (phase IIa, at three months at discharge (phase IIb and at one-year follow-up (phase III. Intention-to-treat and predefined subgroup analysis on sex was performed. Results Of 241 patients, 183 (75.9% were included (mean age 63.8 years. At discharge improvements were found in total-cholesterol ( p  < 0.001, low density lipoprotein (LDL; p  < 0.001, functional capacities (metabolic equivalent of tasks (METS, p  < 0.01, self-care management ( p  < 0.001, Health status Short Form 12 version (SF12; physical; p  < 0.001 and mental; p  < 0.01 and in depression symptoms ( p  < 0.01. At one-year follow-up these outcomes were maintained; additionally there was improvement in body mass index (BMI; p  < 0.05, and high density lipoprotein (HDL; p  < 0.05. There were no sex differences. Conclusion CR shared between local and regional health authorities led by a NCM (GoHeart improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial factors. Further improvements in most variables were at one-year follow-up.

  10. J Waves for Predicting Cardiac Events in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toyonobu; Hayashi, Kenshi; Konno, Tetsuo; Sakata, Kenji; Fujita, Takashi; Hodatsu, Akihiko; Nagata, Yoji; Teramoto, Ryota; Nomura, Akihiro; Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takamura, Masayuki; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Fujino, Noboru; Yamagishi, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    This study sought to investigate whether the presence of J waves was associated with cardiac events in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). It has been uncertain whether the presence of J waves predicts life-threatening cardiac events in patients with HCM. This study evaluated consecutive 338 patients with HCM (207 men; age 61 ± 17 years of age). A J-wave was defined as J-point elevation >0.1 mV in at least 2 contiguous inferior and/or lateral leads. Cardiac events were defined as sudden cardiac death, ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachycardia, or appropriate implantable cardiac defibrillator therapy. The study also investigated whether adding the J-wave in a conventional risk model improved a prediction of cardiac events. J waves were seen in 46 (13.6%) patients at registration. Cardiac events occurred in 31 patients (9.2%) during median follow-up of 4.9 years (interquartile range: 2.6 to 7.1 years). In a Cox proportional hazards model, the presence of J waves was significantly associated with cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio: 4.01; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.78 to 9.05; p = 0.001). Compared with the conventional risk model, the model using J waves in addition to conventional risks better predicted cardiac events (net reclassification improvement, 0.55; 95% CI: 0.20 to 0.90; p = 0.002). The presence of J waves was significantly associated with cardiac events in HCM. Adding J waves to conventional cardiac risk factors improved prediction of cardiac events. Further confirmatory studies are needed before considering J-point elevation as a marker of risk for use in making management decisions regarding risk in patients with HCM. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of local cardiac denervation on cardiac innervation and ventricular arrhythmia after chronic myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liu

    Full Text Available Modulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS has already been demonstrated to display antiarrhythmic effects in patients and animals with MI. In this study, we investigated whether local cardiac denervation has any beneficial effects on ventricular electrical stability and cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI.Twenty-one anesthetized dogs were randomly assigned into the sham-operated, MI and MI-ablation groups, respectively. Four weeks after local cardiac denervation, LSG stimulation was used to induce VPCs and VAs. The ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT and the incidence of inducible VPCs were measured with electrophysiological protocol. Cardiac innervation was determined with immunohistochemical staining of growth associated protein-43 (GAP43 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH. The global cardiac and regional ventricular function was evaluated with doppler echocardiography in this study.Four weeks after operation, the incidence of inducible VPC and VF in MI-ablation group were significantly reduced compared to the MI dogs (p<0.05. Moreover, local cardiac denervation significantly improved VFT in the infarcted border zone (p<0.05. The densities of GAP43 and TH-positive nerve fibers in the infarcted border zone in the MI-ablation group were lower than those in the MI group (p<0.05. However, the local cardiac denervation did not significantly improve cardiac function in the chronic phase of MI, determined by the left ventricle diameter (LV, left atrial diameter (LA, ejection fraction (EF.Summarily, in the chronic phase of MI, local cardiac denervation reduces the ventricular electrical instability, and attenuates spatial heterogeneity of sympathetic nerve reconstruction. Our study suggests that this methodology might decrease malignant ventricular arrhythmia in chronic MI, and has a great potential for clinical application.

  12. Cardiac MRI in restrictive cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, A. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Singh Gulati, G., E-mail: gulatigurpreet@rediffmail.com [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Seth, S. [Department of Cardiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India); Sharma, S. [Department of Cardiovascular Radiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Ansari Nagar, Delhi (India)

    2012-02-15

    Restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM) is a specific group of heart muscle disorders characterized by inadequate ventricular relaxation during diastole. This leads to diastolic dysfunction with relative preservation of systolic function. Although short axis systolic function is usually preserved in RCM, the long axis systolic function may be severely impaired. Confirmation of diagnosis and information regarding aetiology, extent of myocardial damage, and response to treatment requires imaging. Importantly, differentiation from constrictive pericarditis (CCP) is needed, as only the latter is managed surgically. Echocardiography is the initial cardiac imaging technique but cannot reliably suggest a tissue diagnosis; although recent advances, especially tissue Doppler imaging and spectral tracking, have improved its ability to differentiate RCM from CCP. Cardiac catheterization is the reference standard, but is invasive, two-dimensional, and does not aid myocardial characterization. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is a versatile technique providing anatomical, morphological and functional information. In recent years, it has been shown to provide important information regarding disease mechanisms, and also been found useful to guide treatment, assess its outcome and predict patient prognosis. This review describes the CMR features of RCM, appearances in various diseases, its overall role in patient management, and how it compares with other imaging techniques.

  13. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Hochstrasser, Stefan; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe O

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The costs of comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation are established and compared to the corresponding costs of usual care. The effect on health-related quality of life is analyzed. METHODS: An unprecedented and very detailed cost assessment was carried out, as no guidelines existed...... and may be as high as euro 1.877. CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is more costly than usual care, and the higher costs are not outweighed by a quality of life gain. Comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation is, therefore, not cost-effective....

  14. Dual energy cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Patricia; Deviggiano, Alejandro; Rodriguez-Granillo, Gastón

    2017-06-01

    Conventional single energy CT suffers from technical limitations related to the polychromatic nature of X-rays. Dual energy cardiac CT (DECT) shows promise to attenuate and even overcome some of these limitations, and might broaden the scope of patients eligible for cardiac CT towards the inclusion of higher risk patients. This might be achieved as a result of both safety (contrast reduction) and physiopathological (myocardial perfusion and characterization) issues. In this article, we will review the main clinical cardiac applications of DECT, that can be summarized in two core aspects: coronary artery evaluation, and myocardial evaluation.

  15. Korean guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Yong, Hwan Seok [Dept. of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul(Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Mok [Dept. of Radiology, amsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung A [Dept. of Radiology, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    The development of cardiac CT has provided a non-invasive alternative to echocardiography, exercise electrocardiogram, and invasive angiography and cardiac CT continues to develop at an exponential speed even now. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements in the medical performances of physicians and can reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to better public health. However, until now, there has been no guideline regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist clinicians and other health professionals in the use of cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatment of heart diseases, especially in patients at high risk or suspected of heart disease.

  16. Cooling the crisis: Therapeutic hypothermia after sickle cardiac arrest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metske, Hennie A.; Postema, Pieter G.; Biemond, Bart J.; Bouman, Catherine S. C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The management of patients with sickle-cell disease and cardiac arrest presents special challenges. Mild therapeutic hypothermia may improve survival and neurologic outcome after cardiac arrest, however, it may also precipitate sickling in patients with sickle-cell disease. Rigorous

  17. Design of the Circulation Improving Resuscitation Care (CIRC) Trial: a new state of the art design for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, E.B.; Persse, D.; Souders, C.M.; Sterz, F.; Malzer, R.; Lozano, M., Jr.; Westfall, M.; Brouwer, M.A.; Grunsven, P.M. van; Whitehead, A.; Olsen, J.A.; Herken, U.R.; Wik, L.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Mechanical chest compression devices, such as the AutoPulse((R)), have been developed to overcome problems associated with manual CPR (M-CPR). Animal and human studies have shown that AutoPulse CPR improves hemodynamic parameters over M-CPR. However, human studies conducted in the

  18. Cardiac-specific overexpression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 exacerbates cardiac remodeling in response to pressure overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujith Dassanayaka

    2018-07-01

    Full Text Available Pathological cardiac remodeling during heart failure is associated with higher levels of lipid peroxidation products and lower abundance of several aldehyde detoxification enzymes, including aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2. An emerging idea that could explain these findings concerns the role of electrophilic species in redox signaling, which may be important for adaptive responses to stress or injury. The purpose of this study was to determine whether genetically increasing ALDH2 activity affects pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction. Mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC for 12 weeks developed myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, which were associated with diminished ALDH2 expression and activity. Cardiac-specific expression of the human ALDH2 gene in mice augmented myocardial ALDH2 activity but did not improve cardiac function in response to pressure overload. After 12 weeks of TAC, ALDH2 transgenic mice had larger hearts than their wild-type littermates and lower capillary density. These findings show that overexpression of ALDH2 augments the hypertrophic response to pressure overload and imply that downregulation of ALDH2 may be an adaptive response to certain forms of cardiac pathology. Keywords: Heart failure, Hypertrophy, Oxidative stress, Aldehydes, Cardiac remodeling, Hormesis

  19. “Booster” training: Evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M.; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A.; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S.; Lengetti, Evelyn L.; Berg, Robert A.; Helfaer, Mark A.; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside “booster” cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Design Prospective, randomized trial. Setting General pediatric wards at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Subjects Sixty-nine Basic Life Support–certified hospital-based providers. Intervention CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Measurements and Main Results Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min−1 and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests. PMID:20625336

  20. "Booster" training: evaluation of instructor-led bedside cardiopulmonary resuscitation skill training and automated corrective feedback to improve cardiopulmonary resuscitation compliance of Pediatric Basic Life Support providers during simulated cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Robert M; Niles, Dana; Meaney, Peter A; Aplenc, Richard; French, Benjamin; Abella, Benjamin S; Lengetti, Evelyn L; Berg, Robert A; Helfaer, Mark A; Nadkarni, Vinay

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of brief bedside "booster" cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training to improve CPR guideline compliance of hospital-based pediatric providers. Prospective, randomized trial. General pediatric wards at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Sixty-nine Basic Life Support-certified hospital-based providers. CPR recording/feedback defibrillators were used to evaluate CPR quality during simulated pediatric arrest. After a 60-sec pretraining CPR evaluation, subjects were randomly assigned to one of three instructional/feedback methods to be used during CPR booster training sessions. All sessions (training/CPR manikin practice) were of equal duration (2 mins) and differed only in the method of corrective feedback given to participants during the session. The study arms were as follows: 1) instructor-only training; 2) automated defibrillator feedback only; and 3) instructor training combined with automated feedback. Before instruction, 57% of the care providers performed compressions within guideline rate recommendations (rate >90 min(-1) and 38 mm); and 36% met overall CPR compliance (rate and depth within targets). After instruction, guideline compliance improved (instructor-only training: rate 52% to 87% [p .01], and overall CPR compliance, 43% to 78% [p CPR compliance, 35% to 96% [p training combined with automated feedback: rate 48% to 100% [p CPR compliance, 30% to 100% [p CPR instruction, most certified Pediatric Basic Life Support providers did not perform guideline-compliant CPR. After a brief bedside training, CPR quality improved irrespective of training content (instructor vs. automated feedback). Future studies should investigate bedside training to improve CPR quality during actual pediatric cardiac arrests.

  1. Cardiac Catheterization (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, the doctor might call for a cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or a CAT scan . ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (more than 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  2. Cardiac Catheterization (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doctor may also call for a cardiac MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan or a CT (computerized tomography) ... first couple of days. This means no heavy lifting (nothing over 10 pounds) and no sports. After ...

  3. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  4. Autonomic cardiac innervation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Wohaib

    2013-01-01

    Autonomic cardiac neurons have a common origin in the neural crest but undergo distinct developmental differentiation as they mature toward their adult phenotype. Progenitor cells respond to repulsive cues during migration, followed by differentiation cues from paracrine sources that promote neurochemistry and differentiation. When autonomic axons start to innervate cardiac tissue, neurotrophic factors from vascular tissue are essential for maintenance of neurons before they reach their targets, upon which target-derived trophic factors take over final maturation, synaptic strength and postnatal survival. Although target-derived neurotrophins have a central role to play in development, alternative sources of neurotrophins may also modulate innervation. Both developing and adult sympathetic neurons express proNGF, and adult parasympathetic cardiac ganglion neurons also synthesize and release NGF. The physiological function of these “non-classical” cardiac sources of neurotrophins remains to be determined, especially in relation to autocrine/paracrine sustenance during development.   Cardiac autonomic nerves are closely spatially associated in cardiac plexuses, ganglia and pacemaker regions and so are sensitive to release of neurotransmitter, neuropeptides and trophic factors from adjacent nerves. As such, in many cardiac pathologies, it is an imbalance within the two arms of the autonomic system that is critical for disease progression. Although this crosstalk between sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves has been well established for adult nerves, it is unclear whether a degree of paracrine regulation occurs across the autonomic limbs during development. Aberrant nerve remodeling is a common occurrence in many adult cardiovascular pathologies, and the mechanisms regulating outgrowth or denervation are disparate. However, autonomic neurons display considerable plasticity in this regard with neurotrophins and inflammatory cytokines having a central regulatory

  5. Cardiac imaging in adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority

  6. Cardiac imaging in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    This book approaches adult cardiac disease from the correlative imaging perspective. It includes chest X-rays and angiographs, 2-dimensional echocardiograms with explanatory diagrams for clarity, plus details on digital radiology, nuclear medicine techniques, CT and MRI. It also covers the normal heart, valvular heart disease, myocardial disease, pericardial disease, bacterial endocarditis, aortic aneurysm, cardiac tumors, and congenital heart disease of the adult. It points out those aspects where one imaging technique has significant superiority.

  7. Cardiac biomarkers in Neonatology

    OpenAIRE

    Vijlbrief, D.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, the role for cardiac biomarkers in neonatology was investigated. Several clinically relevant results were reported. In term and preterm infants, hypoxia and subsequent adaptation play an important role in cardiac biomarker elevation. The elevated natriuretic peptides are indicative of abnormal function; elevated troponins are suggestive for cardiomyocyte damage. This methodology makes these biomarkers of additional value in the treatment of newborn infants, separate or as a co...

  8. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  9. Awareness in cardiac anesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Serfontein, Leon

    2010-02-01

    Cardiac surgery represents a sub-group of patients at significantly increased risk of intraoperative awareness. Relatively few recent publications have targeted the topic of awareness in this group. The aim of this review is to identify areas of awareness research that may equally be extrapolated to cardiac anesthesia in the attempt to increase understanding of the nature and significance of this scenario and how to reduce it.

  10. Wernicke's encephalopathy after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yoshiyuki

    2018-05-01

    A 76-year-old woman who had been on hemodialysis for 3 years developed ischemic mitral valve insufficiency, tricuspid insufficiency, and chronic atrial fibrillation, and underwent cardiac surgery. On the 4th postoperative day, she experienced a sudden disturbance of consciousness, aphasia, and limb ataxia. Brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed no abnormalities. Wernicke's encephalopathy was suspected and the patient was given vitamin B1, whereupon her symptoms gradually improved. On the 42nd postoperative day, she was free of neurological symptoms and discharged.

  11. Imaging pitfalls, normal anatomy, and anatomical variants that can simulate disease on cardiac imaging as demonstrated on multidetector computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terpenning, Silanath; White, Charles S

    2015-01-01

    Advances in computed tomography have led to continuous improvement in cardiac imaging. Dedicated postprocessing capabilities, faster scan times, and cardiac gating methods reveal details of normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants that can mimic pathologic conditions. This article will review normal cardiac anatomy and variants that can mimic disease. Radiologists should be familiar with normal cardiac anatomy and anatomic variants to avoid misinterpretation of normal findings for pathologic processes

  12. Making an APPropriate Care Program for Indigenous Cardiac Disease: Customization of an Existing Cardiac Rehabilitation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, DanaKai; Hansen, David; Karunanithi, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major health problem for all Australians and is the leading cause of death in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. In 2010, more then 50% of all heart attack deaths were due to repeated events. Cardiac rehabilitation programs have been proven to be effective in preventing the recurrence of cardiac events and readmission to hospitals. There are however, many barriers to the use of these programs. To address these barriers, CSIRO developed an IT enabled cardiac rehabilitation program delivered by mobile phone through a smartphone app and succesfully trialed it in an urban general population. If these results can be replicated in Indigenous populations, the program has the potential to significantly improve life expectancy and help close the gap in health outcomes. The challenge described in this paper is customizing the existing cardiac health program to make it culturally relevant and suitable for Indigenous Australians living in urban and remote communities.

  13. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna L. B. Pereira

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16, in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415–539; T group: 273 (258–297 µm2; p = 0.004. Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039 in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  14. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Supplementation Induces Changes in Cardiac miRNA Expression, Reduces Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Mass, and Improves Diastolic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Bruna L B; Arruda, Fernanda C O; Reis, Patrícia P; Felix, Tainara F; Santos, Priscila P; Rafacho, Bruna P; Gonçalves, Andrea F; Claro, Renan T; Azevedo, Paula S; Polegato, Bertha F; Okoshi, Katashi; Fernandes, Ana A H; Paiva, Sergio A R; Zornoff, Leonardo A M; Minicucci, Marcos F

    2015-11-19

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tomato supplementation on the normal rat heart and the role of oxidative stress in this scenario. Male Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: a control group (C; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet + 0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day, and a tomato group (T; n = 16), in which animals received a control diet supplemented with tomato +0.5 mL of corn oil/kg body weight/day. After three months, morphological, functional, and biochemical analyses were performed. Animals supplemented with tomato had a smaller left atrium diameter and myocyte cross-sectional area (CSA) compared to the control group (C group: 474 (415-539); T group: 273 (258-297) µm²; p = 0.004). Diastolic function was improved in rats supplemented with tomato. In addition, lipid hydroperoxide was lower (C group: 267 ± 46.7; T group: 219 ± 23.0 nmol/g; p = 0.039) in the myocardium of rats supplemented with tomato. Tomato intake was also associated with up-regulation of miR-107 and miR-486 and down-regulation of miR-350 and miR-872. In conclusion, tomato supplementation induces changes in miRNA expression and reduces oxidative stress. In addition, these alterations may be responsible for CSA reduction and diastolic function improvement.

  15. [Pressure sensors to prevent cardiac decompensation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Didier

    2017-11-01

    Most cases of hospitalisation for heart failure are preceded by episodes of cardiac decompensation. Preventing these episodes would improve quality of life and reduce mortality and treatment costs. The monitoring of intracardiac pressures, using innovative sensors, coupled with telemedicine, offers interesting perspectives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. The Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Hüche; Nørgaard, Bjarne Linde; Tilsted, Hans-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As a subregistry to the Western Denmark Heart Registry (WDHR), the Western Denmark Cardiac Computed Tomography Registry (WDHR-CCTR) is a clinical database established in 2008 to monitor and improve the quality of cardiac computed tomography (CT) in Western Denmark. OBJECTIVE: We...... examined the content, data quality, and research potential of the WDHR-CCTR. METHODS: We retrieved 2008-2012 data to examine the 1) content; 2) completeness of procedure registration using the Danish National Patient Registry as reference; 3) completeness of variable registration comparing observed vs...

  17. Cardiac biomarkers in neonatal hypoxic ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, D

    2012-04-01

    Following a perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic insult, term infants commonly develop cardiovascular dysfunction. Troponin-T, troponin-I and brain natriuretic peptide are sensitive indicators of myocardial compromise. The long-term effects of cardiovascular dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcome following perinatal hypoxic ischaemia remain controversial. Follow-up studies are warranted to ensure optimal cardiac function in adulthood. CONCLUSION: Cardiac biomarkers may improve the diagnosis of myocardial injury, help guide management, estimate mortality risk and may also aid in longterm neurodevelopmental outcome prediction following neonatal hypoxic-ischaemia.

  18. Evaluating the effect of a web-based quality improvement system with feedback and outreach visits on guideline concordance in the field of cardiac rehabilitation: rationale and study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Engen-Verheul, Mariëtte M; de Keizer, Nicolette F; van der Veer, Sabine N; Kemps, Hareld M C; Scholte op Reimer, Wilma J M; Jaspers, Monique W M; Peek, Niels

    2014-12-31

    Implementation of clinical practice guidelines into daily care is hampered by a variety of barriers related to professional knowledge and collaboration in teams and organizations. To improve guideline concordance by changing the clinical decision-making behavior of professionals, computerized decision support (CDS) has been shown to be one of the most effective instruments. However, to address barriers at the organizational level, additional interventions are needed. Continuous monitoring and systematic improvement of quality are increasingly used to achieve change at this level in complex health care systems. The study aims to assess the effectiveness of a web-based quality improvement (QI) system with indicator-based performance feedback and educational outreach visits to overcome organizational barriers for guideline concordance in multidisciplinary teams in the field of cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A multicenter cluster-randomized trial with a balanced incomplete block design will be conducted in 18 Dutch CR clinics using an electronic patient record with CDS at the point of care. The intervention consists of (i) periodic performance feedback on quality indicators for CR and (ii) educational outreach visits to support local multidisciplinary QI teams focussing on systematically improving the care they provide. The intervention is supported by a web-based system which provides an overview of the feedback and facilitates development and monitoring of local QI plans. The primary outcome will be concordance to national CR guidelines with respect to the CR needs assessment and therapy indication procedure. Secondary outcomes are changes in performance of CR clinics as measured by structure, process and outcome indicators, and changes in practice variation on these indicators. We will also conduct a qualitative process evaluation (concept-mapping methodology) to assess experiences from participating CR clinics and to gain insight into factors which influence the

  19. Cardiac radiology: centenary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roos, Albert; Higgins, Charles B

    2014-11-01

    During the past century, cardiac imaging technologies have revolutionized the diagnosis and treatment of acquired and congenital heart disease. Many important contributions to the field of cardiac imaging were initially reported in Radiology. The field developed from the early stages of cardiac imaging, including the use of coronary x-ray angiography and roentgen kymography, to nowadays the widely used echocardiographic, nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomographic (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) applications. It is surprising how many of these techniques were not recognized for their potential during their early inception. Some techniques were described in the literature but required many years to enter the clinical arena and presently continue to expand in terms of clinical application. The application of various CT and MR contrast agents for the diagnosis of myocardial ischemia is a case in point, as the utility of contrast agents continues to expand the noninvasive characterization of myocardium. The history of cardiac imaging has included a continuous process of advances in our understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, along with advances in imaging technology that continue to the present day.

  20. Significant reduction of radiation exposure to operator and staff during cardiac interventions by analysis of radiation leakage and improved lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuon, Eberhard; Schmitt, Moritz; Dahm, Johannes B

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to disclose and to reduce occupational radiation leakage in invasive cardiology. Prospectively, we analyzed various dose parameters for 330 coronary procedures. We used a Rando phantom to measure scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator (S-ESAK-O) during fluoroscopy for all standard tube angulations, and to plot isodose lines for 0 degrees /0 degrees -posterior anterior angulation. The patient's measured dose area product due to diagnostic catheterization and elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was 6.2 and 10.4 Gycm(2), which represents 11% and 13% of currently typical values, respectively. With use of 0.5- and 1.0-mm overcouch and undercouch shielding, it was possible to reduce the mean of 4,686 nSv/Gycm(2) to 677 and 277 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. Closure of radiation leakage up to 897 microSv/hour at the operator's gonadal height (80 to 105 cm), not heretofore described, was achieved by an additional 1.0-mm, lead-equivalent undercouch-top and overcouch-flap adjacent to the table, down to a S-ESAK-O/dose area product level of 47.5 nSv/Gycm(2). With use of a 0.5-mm lead apron, collar, glasses, foot-switch shield and 1.0-mm lead cover around the patient's thighs, the operator received a mean S-ESAK-O of 8.5, while his forehead, eyes, thyroid, chest, gonads, and hands were exposed to 68.2, 1.2, 1.2, 1.2, 0.8, and 58.2 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. In conclusion, radiation-attenuating intervention techniques and improved lead protection can effectively contribute to a new state of the art in invasive cardiology, with reduction of operator radiation exposure to 0.8% of typical S-ESAK-O levels in advanced catheterization laboratories.

  1. Inhibition of the Unfolded Protein Response Mechanism Prevents Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody Groenendyk

    Full Text Available Cardiac fibrosis attributed to excessive deposition of extracellular matrix proteins is a major cause of heart failure and death. Cardiac fibrosis is extremely difficult and challenging to treat in a clinical setting due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms leading to cardiac fibrosis and effective anti-fibrotic therapies. The objective in this study was to examine whether unfolded protein response (UPR pathway mediates cardiac fibrosis and whether a pharmacological intervention to modulate UPR can prevent cardiac fibrosis and preserve heart function.We demonstrate here that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse with increased expression of calreticulin, a model of heart failure, stems from impairment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, transient activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR pathway and stimulation of the TGFβ1/Smad2/3 signaling pathway. Remarkably, sustained pharmacologic inhibition of the UPR pathway by tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA is sufficient to prevent cardiac fibrosis, and improved exercise tolerance.We show that the mechanism leading to development of fibrosis in a mouse model of heart failure stems from transient activation of UPR pathway leading to persistent remodelling of cardiac tissue. Blocking the activation of the transiently activated UPR pathway by TUDCA prevented cardiac fibrosis, and improved prognosis. These findings offer a window for additional interventions that can preserve heart function.

  2. Anatomical Basis for the Cardiac Interventional Electrophysiologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián Sánchez-Quintana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of radiofrequency catheter ablation techniques as the mainstay in the treatment of tachycardia has renewed new interest in cardiac anatomy. The interventional arrhythmologist has drawn attention not only to the gross anatomic details of the heart but also to architectural and histological characteristics of various cardiac regions that are relevant to the development or recurrence of tachyarrhythmias and procedural related complications of catheter ablation. In this review, therefore, we discuss some anatomic landmarks commonly used in catheter ablations including the terminal crest, sinus node region, Koch’s triangle, cavotricuspid isthmus, Eustachian ridge and valve, pulmonary venous orifices, venoatrial junctions, and ventricular outflow tracts. We also discuss the anatomical features of important structures in the vicinity of the atria and pulmonary veins, such as the esophagus and phrenic nerves. This paper provides basic anatomic information to improve understanding of the mapping and ablative procedures for cardiac interventional electrophysiologists.

  3. The outcome of anaesthesia related cardiac arrest in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Adekola

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Anaesthesia related cardiac arrest and mortality were linked to cardiovascular depression from halothane overdose in our institution. The burden can be reduced by improving on establishing standard monitoring in the perioperative period, and a team approach to patients care.

  4. Nitrates for the prevention of cardiac morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na; Xu, Jin; Singh, Balwinder; Yu, Xuerong; Wu, Taixiang; Huang, Yuguang

    2016-08-04

    Cardiac complications are not uncommon in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery, especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) or at high risk of CAD. Perioperative cardiac complications can lead to mortality and morbidity, as well as higher costs for patient care. Nitrates, which are among the most commonly used cardiovascular drugs, perform the function of decreasing cardiac preload while improving cardiac blood perfusion. Sometimes, nitrates are administered to patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery to reduce the incidence of cardiac complications, especially for patients with CAD. However, their effects on patients' relevant outcomes remain controversial. • To assess effects of nitrates as compared with other interventions or placebo in reducing cardiac risk (such as death caused by cardiac factors, angina pectoris, acute myocardial infarction, acute heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia) in patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery.• To identify the influence of different routes and dosages of nitrates on patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Chinese BioMedical Database until June 2014. We also searched relevant conference abstracts of important anaesthesiology or cardiology scientific meetings, the database of ongoing trials and Google Scholar.We reran the search in January 2016. We added three potential new studies of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting classification' and will incorporate them into our formal review findings for the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing nitrates versus no treatment, placebo or other pharmacological interventions in participants (15 years of age and older) undergoing non-cardiac surgery under any type of anaesthesia. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by Cochrane. Two review authors selected trials, extracted data from included studies and assessed risk of bias. We

  5. Isolated Cardiac Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, U.; Rehman, A. U.; Shahid, R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is common in our part of the world. Cardiac hydatid cyst is its rare manifestation. We report this case of 48-year male having isolated cardiac hydatid cyst, incidentally found on computed tomography. This patient presented in medical OPD of Combined Military Hospital, Lahore with one month history of mild retrosternal discomfort. His general physical and systemic examinations as well as ECG were unremarkable. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged cardiac shadow with mildly irregular left heart border. Contrast enhanced CT scan of the chest showed a large well defined multiloculated non-enhancing cystic lesion with multiple daughter cysts involving wall of left ventricle and overlying pericardium. Serology for echinococcus confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. Patient was offered the surgical treatment but he opted for medical treatment only. Albendezol was prescribed. His follow-up echocardiography after one month showed no significant decrease in size of the cyst. (author)

  6. Pediatric cardiac postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auler Jr. José Otávio Costa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Heart Institute of the University of São Paulo, Medical School is a referral center for the treatment of congenital heart diseases of neonates and infants. In the recent years, the excellent surgical results obtained in our institution may be in part due to modern anesthetic care and to postoperative care based on well-structured protocols. The purpose of this article is to review unique aspects of neonate cardiovascular physiology, the impact of extracorporeal circulation on postoperative evolution, and the prescription for pharmacological support of acute cardiac dysfunction based on our cardiac unit protocols. The main causes of low cardiac output after surgical correction of heart congenital disease are reviewed, and methods of treatment and support are proposed as derived from the relevant literature and our protocols.

  7. Cardiac output measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Möller Petrun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, developments in the measuring of cardiac output and other haemodynamic variables are focused on the so-called minimally invasive methods. The aim of these methods is to simplify the management of high-risk and haemodynamically unstable patients. Due to the need of invasive approach and the possibility of serious complications the use of pulmonary artery catheter has decreased. This article describes the methods for measuring cardiac output, which are based on volume measurement (Fick method, indicator dilution method, pulse wave analysis, Doppler effect, and electrical bioimpedance.

  8. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  9. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  10. Neonatal cardiac emergencies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    flow) or require intervention (surgical or catheter) within the first ... Cardiac. History. Risk factors, e.g. meconium-stained liquor, prematurity, ... 'snowman' sign for supracardiac total anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (TAPVD), cardiomegaly with plethora for ... central cyanosis and on auscultation you hear no murmurs.

  11. Comparative cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brundage, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    This book is designed to compare all major cardiac imaging techniques. All major imaging techniques - including conventional angiography, digital angiography, echocardiography and Doppler imaging, conventional radioisotope techniques, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging - are covered in this text as they apply to the major cardiovascular disorders. There is brief coverage of positron emission tomography and an extensive presentation of ultrafast computed tomography

  12. Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood Community Coll., Cedar Rapids, IA.

    This document contains materials for an advanced college course in cardiac life support developed for the State of Iowa. The course syllabus lists the course title, hours, number, description, prerequisites, learning activities, instructional units, required text, six references, evaluation criteria, course objectives by units, course…

  13. Cardiac Pacemakers; Marcapasos Cardiacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiandra, O [Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de Maedicina, Departamento de Cardiologia, Montevideo(Uruguay); Espasandin, W [Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Cirugia Cardiaca, Montevideo (Uruguay); Fiandra, H [Instituto Nacional de Cirugia Cardiaca, Departamento de Hemodinamia y Marcapasos, Montevideo (Uruguay); and others

    1984-07-01

    A complete survey of physiological biophysical,clinical and engineering aspects of cardiac facing,including the history and an assessment of possible future developments.Among the topics studied are: pacemakers, energy search, heart stimulating with pacemakers ,mathematical aspects of the electric cardio stimulation chronic, pacemaker implants,proceeding,treatment and control.

  14. Nonexercise cardiac stress testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, J.L.; Baldwin, T.

    1989-01-01

    Many patients who require evaluation for coronary artery disease are unable to undergo exercise stress testing because of physiologic or psychological limitations. Drs Vacek and Baldwin describe three alternative methods for assessment of cardiac function in these patients, all of which have high levels of diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. 23 references

  15. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-06

    Mar 6, 2011 ... Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is becoming a routine diagnostic technique. BRUCE s sPOTTiswOOdE, PhD. MRC/UCT Medical Imaging Research Unit, University of Cape Town, and Division of Radiology, Stellenbosch University. Bruce Spottiswoode ...

  16. Cardiac MRI in ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Masaki; Kato, Shingo; Sakuma, Hajime

    2009-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cine MRI is recognized as the most accurate method for evaluating ventricular function. Late gadolinium-enhanced MRI can clearly delineate subendocardial infarction, and the assessment of transmural extent of infarction on MRI is widely useful for predicting myocardial viability. Stress myocardial perfusion MRI allows for detection of subendocardial myocardial ischemia, and the diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion MRI is superior to stress perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD). In recent years, image quality, volume coverage, acquisition speed and arterial contrast of 3-dimensional coronary magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) have been substantially improved with use of steady-state free precession sequences and parallel imaging techniques, permitting the acquisition of high-quality, whole-heart coronary MRA within a reasonably short imaging time. It is now widely recognized that cardiac MRI has tremendous potential for the evaluation of ischemic heart disease. However, cardiac MRI is technically complicated and its use in clinical practice is relatively limited. With further improvements in education and training, as well as standardization of appropriate study protocols, cardiac MRI will play a central role in managing patients with CAD. (author)

  17. Overexpression of Catalase Diminishes Oxidative Cysteine Modifications of Cardiac Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Yao

    Full Text Available Reactive protein cysteine thiolates are instrumental in redox regulation. Oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, react with thiolates to form oxidative post-translational modifications, enabling physiological redox signaling. Cardiac disease and aging are associated with oxidative stress which can impair redox signaling by altering essential cysteine thiolates. We previously found that cardiac-specific overexpression of catalase (Cat, an enzyme that detoxifies excess H2O2, protected from oxidative stress and delayed cardiac aging in mice. Using redox proteomics and systems biology, we sought to identify the cysteines that could play a key role in cardiac disease and aging. With a 'Tandem Mass Tag' (TMT labeling strategy and mass spectrometry, we investigated differential reversible cysteine oxidation in the cardiac proteome of wild type and Cat transgenic (Tg mice. Reversible cysteine oxidation was measured as thiol occupancy, the ratio of total available versus reversibly oxidized cysteine thiols. Catalase overexpression globally decreased thiol occupancy by ≥1.3 fold in 82 proteins, including numerous mitochondrial and contractile proteins. Systems biology analysis assigned the majority of proteins with differentially modified thiols in Cat Tg mice to pathways of aging and cardiac disease, including cellular stress response, proteostasis, and apoptosis. In addition, Cat Tg mice exhibited diminished protein glutathione adducts and decreased H2O2 production from mitochondrial complex I and II, suggesting improved function of cardiac mitochondria. In conclusion, our data suggest that catalase may alleviate cardiac disease and aging by moderating global protein cysteine thiol oxidation.

  18. Economic and biological costs of cardiac imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picano Eugenio

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical imaging market consists of several billion tests per year worldwide. Out of these, at least one third are cardiovascular procedures. Keeping in mind that each test represents a cost, often a risk, and a diagnostic hypothesis, we can agree that every unnecessary and unjustifiable test is one test too many. Small individual costs, risks, and wastes multiplied by billions of examinations per year represent an important population, society and environmental burden. Unfortunately, the appropriateness of cardiac imaging is extra-ordinarily low and there is little awareness in patients and physicians of differential costs, radiological doses, and long term risks of different imaging modalities. For a resting cardiac imaging test, being the average cost (not charges of an echocardiogram equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of a CT is 3.1x, of a SPECT 3.27x, of a Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance imaging 5.51x, of a PET 14.03x, and of a right and left heart catheterization 19.96x. For stress cardiac imaging, compared with the treadmill exercise test equal to 1 (as a cost comparator, the cost of stress echocardiography is 2.1x and of a stress SPECT scintigraphy is 5.7x. Biohazards and downstream long-term costs linked to radiation-induced oncogenesis should also be considered. The radiation exposure is absent in echo and magnetic resonance, and corresponds to 500 chest x rays for a sestamibi cardiac stress scan and to 1150 chest x rays for a thallium scan. The corresponding extra-risk in a lifetime of fatal cancer is 1 in 2000 exposed patients for a sestamibi stress and 1 in 1000 for a thallium scan. Increased awareness of economic, biologic, and environmental costs of cardiac imaging will hopefully lead to greater appropriateness, wisdom and prudence from both the prescriber and the practitioner. In this way, the sustainability of cardiac imaging will eventually improve.

  19. Cardiac surgery in the Pacific Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip John; Wainer, Zoe; O'Keefe, Michael; Nand, Parma

    2011-12-01

    Rheumatic heart disease constitutes a significant disease burden in under-resourced communities. Recognition of the devastating impact of rheumatic heart disease has resulted in volunteer cardiac teams from Australasia providing surgical services to regions of need. The primary objective of this study was to compare New Zealand hospitals' volunteer cardiac surgical operative results in Samoa and Fiji with the accepted surgical mortality and morbidity rates for Australasia. A retrospective review from seven volunteer cardiac surgical trips to Samoa and Fiji from 2003 to 2009 was conducted. Patient data were retrospectively and prospectively collected. Preoperative morbidity and mortality risk were calculated using the European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (euroSCORE). Audit data were collated in line with the Australasian Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons guidelines. One hundred and three operations were performed over 6 years. EuroSCORE predicted an operative mortality of 3.32%. In-hospital mortality was 0.97% and post-discharge mortality was 2.91%, resulting in a 30-day mortality of 3.88%. This study demonstrated that performing cardiac surgery in Fiji and Samoa is viable and safe. However, the mortality was slightly higher than predicted by euroSCORE. Difficulties exist in predicting mortality rates in patients with rheumatic heart disease from Pacific Island nations as known risk scoring models fail to be disease, ethnically or culturally inclusive. Audit processes and risk model development and assessment are an essential part of this complex surgical charity work and will result in improved patient selection and outcomes. © 2011 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2011 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Rossau, Henriette Knold; Nakano, Anne; Foghmar, Sussie; Eichhorst, Regina; Prescott, Eva; Cerqueira, Charlotte; Soja, Anne Merete Boas; Gislason, Gunnar H; Larsen, Mogens Lytken; Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Gustafsson, Ida; Thomsen, Kristian K; Boye Hansen, Lene; Hammer, Signe; Viggers, Lone; Christensen, Bo; Kvist, Birgitte; Lindström Egholm, Cecilie; May, Ole

    2016-01-01

    The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database (DHRD) aims to improve the quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) to the benefit of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Hospitalized patients with CHD with stenosis on coronary angiography treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, coronary artery bypass grafting, or medication alone. Reporting is mandatory for all hospitals in Denmark delivering CR. The database was initially implemented in 2013 and was fully running from August 14, 2015, thus comprising data at a patient level from the latter date onward. Patient-level data are registered by clinicians at the time of entry to CR directly into an online system with simultaneous linkage to other central patient registers. Follow-up data are entered after 6 months. The main variables collected are related to key outcome and performance indicators of CR: referral and adherence, lifestyle, patient-related outcome measures, risk factor control, and medication. Program-level online data are collected every third year. Based on administrative data, approximately 14,000 patients with CHD are hospitalized at 35 hospitals annually, with 75% receiving one or more outpatient rehabilitation services by 2015. The database has not yet been running for a full year, which explains the use of approximations. The DHRD is an online, national quality improvement database on CR, aimed at patients with CHD. Mandatory registration of data at both patient level as well as program level is done on the database. DHRD aims to systematically monitor the quality of CR over time, in order to improve the quality of CR throughout Denmark to benefit patients.

  1. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Laura X.; Arany, Zolt

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal ‘invasion’ profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation with a nurse case manager (GoHeart) across local and regional health authorities improves risk factors, self-care and psychosocial outcomes. A one-year follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vibeke Brogaard; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen

    2014-01-01

    %). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiac risk factors, stratified self-care and self-reported psychosocial factors (SF12 and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)) were assessed at admission (phase IIa), at three months at discharge (phase IIb) and at one-year follow-up (phase III). Intention.......01), self-care management (p depression symptoms (p ...OBJECTIVES: In Denmark, the local and regional health authorities share responsibility for cardiac rehabilitation (CR). The objective was to assess effectiveness of CR across sectors coordinated by a nurse case manager (NCM). DESIGN: A one-year follow-up study. SETTING: A CR programme (Go...

  3. Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in twelve European countries results of the European cardiac rehabilitation registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benzer, Werner; Rauch, Bernhard; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Results from EuroCaReD study should serve as a benchmark to improve guideline adherence and treatment quality of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in Europe. METHODS AND RESULTS: Data from 2.054 CR patients in 12 European countries were derived from 69 centres. 76% were male. Indication for CR...

  4. Cardiac fusion and complex congenital cardiac defects in thoracopagus twins: diagnostic value of cardiac CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong-Jun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Cardiac Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hye-Sung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Most thoracopagus twins present with cardiac fusion and associated congenital cardiac defects, and assessment of this anatomy is of critical importance in determining patient care and outcome. Cardiac CT with electrocardiographic triggering provides an accurate and quick morphological assessment of both intracardiac and extracardiac structures in newborns, making it the best imaging modality to assess thoracopagus twins during the neonatal period. In this case report, we highlight the diagnostic value of cardiac CT in thoracopagus twins with an interatrial channel and complex congenital cardiac defects. (orig.)

  5. Cardiac computed tomography in patients with acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlett, C.L.; Bamberg, F.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, cardiac computed tomography (CT) is increasingly being implemented into clinical algorithms, primarily due to substantial technical advances over the last decade. Its use in the setting of suspected acute coronary syndrome is of particular relevance, given the high degree of accumulating scientific evidence of improving patient outcomes. Performing cardiac CT requires specific knowledge on the available scan acquisitions and patient preparation. Also, expertise is required in order to interpret the coronary and extra-coronary findings adequately. The present article provides an overview of the different aspects on the use of cardiac CT in the setting of acute coronary syndrome.

  6. Ventilation and gas exchange management after cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherasan, Yuda; Raimondo, Pasquale; Pelosi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    For several decades, physicians had integrated several interventions aiming to improve the outcomes in post-cardiac arrest patients. However, the mortality rate after cardiac arrest is still as high as 50%. Post-cardiac arrest syndrome is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to not only poor neurological outcome and cardiovascular failure but also respiratory dysfunction. To minimize ventilator-associated lung injury, protective mechanical ventilation by using low tidal volume ventilation and driving pressure may decrease pulmonary complications and improve survival. Low level of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) can be initiated and titrated with careful cardiac output and respiratory mechanics monitoring. Furthermore, optimizing gas exchange by avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia as well as maintaining normocarbia may improve neurological and survival outcome. Early multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation intervention is recommended. Minimally invasive monitoring techniques, that is, echocardiography, transpulmonary thermodilution method measuring extravascular lung water, as well as transcranial Doppler ultrasound, might be useful to improve appropriate management of post-cardiac arrest patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Home-based versus centre-based cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Dalal, Hayes; Jolly, Kate; Moxham, Tiffany; Zawada, Anna

    2010-01-20

    ; HDL-cholesterol; LDL-cholesterol) or proportion of smokers at follow up or health-related quality of life. There was no consistent difference in the healthcare costs of the two forms of cardiac rehabilitation. Home- and centre-based cardiac rehabilitation appear to be equally effective in improving the clinical and health-related quality of life outcomes in acute MI and revascularisation patients. This finding, together with an absence of evidence of difference in healthcare costs between the two approaches, would support the extension of home-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes such as the Heart Manual to give patients a choice in line with their preferences, which may have an impact on uptake of cardiac rehabilitation in the individual case.

  8. Complete cardiac regeneration in a mouse model of myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubner, Bernhard Johannes; Adamowicz-Brice, Martyna; Khadayate, Sanjay; Tiefenthaler, Viktoria; Metzler, Bernhard; Aitman, Tim; Penninger, Josef M

    2012-12-01

    Cardiac remodeling and subsequent heart failure remain critical issues after myocardial infarction despite improved treatment and reperfusion strategies. Recently, complete cardiac regeneration has been demonstrated in fish and newborn mice following resection of the cardiac apex. However, it remained entirely unclear whether the mammalian heart can also completely regenerate following a complex cardiac ischemic injury. We established a protocol to induce a severe heart attack in one-day-old mice using left anterior descending artery (LAD) ligation. LAD ligation triggered substantial cardiac injury in the left ventricle defined by Caspase 3 activation and massive cell death. Ischemia-induced cardiomyocyte death was also visible on day 4 after LAD ligation. Remarkably, 7 days after the initial ischemic insult, we observed complete cardiac regeneration without any signs of tissue damage or scarring. This tissue regeneration translated into long-term normal heart functions as assessed by echocardiography. In contrast, LAD ligations in 7-day-old mice resulted in extensive scarring comparable to adult mice, indicating that the regenerative capacity for complete cardiac healing after heart attacks can be traced to the first week after birth. RNAseq analyses of hearts on day 1, day 3, and day 10 and comparing LAD-ligated and sham-operated mice surprisingly revealed a transcriptional programme of major changes in genes mediating mitosis and cell division between days 1, 3 and 10 postnatally and a very limited set of genes, including genes regulating cell cycle and extracellular matrix synthesis, being differentially regulated in the regenerating hearts. We present for the first time a mammalian model of complete cardiac regeneration following a severe ischemic cardiac injury. This novel model system provides the unique opportunity to uncover molecular and cellular pathways that can induce cardiac regeneration after ischemic injury, findings that one day could be translated

  9. Pattern of perioperative cardiac arrests at University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwari, Y D; Bello, M R; Eni, U E

    2010-01-01

    Perioperative cardiac arrests and death on the table represent the most serious complications of surgery and anaesthesia. This paper was designed to study their pattern, causes and outcomes following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and intensive care unit (ICU) management in our institution. Three year retrospective review of perioperative cardiac arrests and death on operating table following surgical procedure under anaesthesia. For each cardiac arrest or death on the table the sequence of events leading to the arrest was evaluated using case notes, anaesthetic chart and ICU records. Study variables which include demographic data, ASA score, anaesthetic technique, causes and outcome were analysed and discussed. Fourteen perioperative cardiac arrests were encountered following 4051 anaesthetics administered over the three year study period. Twelve out of the fourteen cardiac arrests occurred following general anaesthesia, while the remaining two occurred following spinal anaesthesia. There was no cardiac arrest following local anaesthesia. Children suffered more cardiac arrest than adults. ASA class III and IV risk status suffered more arrests than ASA I and II. Hypoxia from airway problems was the commonest cause of cardiac arrest followed by septic shock. Monitoring with pulse oximeter was done in only 4 out of the 14 cardiac arrests. Only 2 (14%) out of 14 cardiac arrests recovered to home discharge, one of them with significant neurological deficit. Majority of arrests were due to hypoxia from airway problems that were not detected early There is need to improve on patient monitoring, knowledge of CPR and intensive care so as to improve the outcome of perioperative cardiac arrest.

  10. Ictal Cardiac Ryhthym Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rushna

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm abnormalities in the context of epilepsy are a well-known phenomenon. However, they are under-recognized and often missed. The pathophysiology of these events is unclear. Bradycardia and asystole are preceded by seizure onset suggesting ictal propagation into the cortex impacting cardiac autonomic function, and the insula and amygdala being possible culprits. Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) refers to the unanticipated death of a patient with epilepsy not related to status epilepticus, trauma, drowning, or suicide. Frequent refractory generalized tonic-clonic seizures, anti-epileptic polytherapy, and prolonged duration of epilepsy are some of the commonly identified risk factors for SUDEP. However, the most consistent risk factor out of these is an increased frequency of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Prevention of SUDEP is extremely important in patients with chronic, generalized epilepsy. Since increased frequency of GTCS is the most consistently reported risk factor for SUDEP, effective seizure control is the most important preventive strategy.

  11. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma.

  12. Cardiac nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerson, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The book begins with a review of the radionuclide methods available for evaluating cardiac perfusion and function. The authors discuss planar and tomographic thallium myocardial imaging, first-pass and equilibrium radionuclide angiography, and imaging with infarct-avid tracers. Several common but more specialized procedures are then reviewed: nonogemetric measurement of left ventricular volume, phase (Fourier) analysis, stroke volume ratio, right ventricular function, and diastolic function. A separate chapter is devoted to drug interventions and in particular the use of radionuclide ventriculography to monitor doxorubicin toxicity and therapy of congestive heart failure. The subsequent chapters provide a comprehensive guide to test selection, accuracy, and results in acute myocardial infarction, in postmyocardial infarction, in chronic coronary artery disease, before and after medical or surgical revascularization, in valvular heart disease, in cardiomyopathies, and in cardiac trauma

  13. Cardiac function studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horn, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    A total of 27 patients were subjected tointramyocardial sequential scintiscanning (first pass) using 99m-Tc human serum albumin. A refined method is described that is suitable to analyse clinically relevant parameters like blood volume, cardiac output, ejection fraction, stroke volume, enddiastolic and endsystolic volumes as well as pulmonal transition time and uses a complete camaracomputer system adapted to the requirements of a routine procedure. Unless there is special hardware available, the method does not yet appear mature enough to be put into general practice. Its importance recently appeared in a new light due to the advent of particularly shortlived isotopes. For the time being, however, ECG-triggered equilibrium studies are to be preferred for cardiac function tests. (TRV) [de

  14. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    OpenAIRE

    S Ramakrishnan; Manisha Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressur...

  15. Multifractality in Cardiac Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Rosenblum, Misha; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo; Goldberger, Ary

    1997-03-01

    Wavelet decomposition is used to analyze the fractal scaling properties of heart beat time series. The singularity spectrum D(h) of the variations in the beat-to-beat intervals is obtained from the wavelet transform modulus maxima which contain information on the hierarchical distribution of the singularities in the signal. Multifractal behavior is observed for healthy cardiac dynamics while pathologies are associated with loss of support in the singularity spectrum.

  16. Integrative Cardiac Health Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    primary cardiac arrest. Circulation. 1998;97(2):155Y160. 8. Sesso HD, Lee IM, Gaziano JM, Rexrode KM, Glynn RJ, Buring JE. Maternal and paternal ...to signal transduction, inflammation, and host–pathogen interactions .27 Whole blood RNA isolation systems such as PAXgene accurately capture in vivo...the effect of healthy behaviors on leukocyte function and leukocyte–endothelium interactions that are important for cardiovascular health

  17. Patient-specific models of cardiac biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Adarsh; Villongco, Christopher T.; Chuang, Joyce; Frank, Lawrence R.; Nigam, Vishal; Belezzuoli, Ernest; Stark, Paul; Krummen, David E.; Narayan, Sanjiv; Omens, Jeffrey H.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Kerckhoffs, Roy C. P.

    2013-07-01

    Patient-specific models of cardiac function have the potential to improve diagnosis and management of heart disease by integrating medical images with heterogeneous clinical measurements subject to constraints imposed by physical first principles and prior experimental knowledge. We describe new methods for creating three-dimensional patient-specific models of ventricular biomechanics in the failing heart. Three-dimensional bi-ventricular geometry is segmented from cardiac CT images at end-diastole from patients with heart failure. Human myofiber and sheet architecture is modeled using eigenvectors computed from diffusion tensor MR images from an isolated, fixed human organ-donor heart and transformed to the patient-specific geometric model using large deformation diffeomorphic mapping. Semi-automated methods were developed for optimizing the passive material properties while simultaneously computing the unloaded reference geometry of the ventricles for stress analysis. Material properties of active cardiac muscle contraction were optimized to match ventricular pressures measured by cardiac catheterization, and parameters of a lumped-parameter closed-loop model of the circulation were estimated with a circulatory adaptation algorithm making use of information derived from echocardiography. These components were then integrated to create a multi-scale model of the patient-specific heart. These methods were tested in five heart failure patients from the San Diego Veteran's Affairs Medical Center who gave informed consent. The simulation results showed good agreement with measured echocardiographic and global functional parameters such as ejection fraction and peak cavity pressures.

  18. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for refractory cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A Conrad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR is the use of rapid deployment venoarterial (VA extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to support systemic circulation and vital organ perfusion in patients in refractory cardiac arrest not responding to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Although prospective controlled studies are lacking, observational studies suggest improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR when ECPR is instituted within 30-60 min following cardiac arrest. Adult and pediatric patients with witnessed in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and good quality CPR, failure of at least 15 min of conventional resuscitation, and a potentially reversible cause for arrest are candidates. Percutaneous cannulation where feasible is rapid and can be performed by nonsurgeons (emergency physicians, intensivists, cardiologists, and interventional radiologists. Modern extracorporeal systems are easy to prime and manage and are technically easy to manage with proper training and experience. ECPR can be deployed in the emergency department for out-of-hospital arrest or in various inpatient units for in-hospital arrest. ECPR should be considered for patients with refractory cardiac arrest in hospitals with an existing extracorporeal life support program, able to provide rapid deployment of support, and with resources to provide postresuscitation evaluation and management.

  19. Cardiac rehabilitation: an effective secondary prevention intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Fiona

    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research was used to determine the effectiveness of a cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programme in a cohort of patients referred to the service at a London hospital. Quantitative data analysis provided evidence of effectiveness of participation in CR in reduced hospital readmission rates and use of recognised pharmacological management strategies. Self-reported physical activity levels and quality of life (QOL) in individuals who participated in the cardiac rehabilitation programme were qualitatively measured with questionnaires. Results provided evidence of benefit in continued participation in exercise. However, there was no evidence of benefit to QOL status post participation at 1 year. A p-value of 0.001 provided significant statistical evidence supporting the hypothesis of benefit in continued participation in exercise in participants following attendance at a cardiac rehabilitation programme. QOL status; a statistically significant p-value of 0.001 rejected the hypothesis (H1) of benefit. This would imply that participation CR programmes does not appear to provide sustained benefits in QOL. A number of moderating variables were suggested as explaining the finding such as homogeneity of respondents, age, mood bias and the timeframe of 1 year between participation in rehabilitation and self-reporting. CR appears to be an effective but time-limited intervention in relation to improvements in QOL. Collaborative working partnerships between specialist interventions, such as CR with chronic disease management strategies may provide greater sustainability of benefits gained from participation in cardiac rehabilitation programmes.

  20. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery and transesophageal echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Jha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved cosmetic appearance, reduced pain and duration of post-operative stay have intensified the popularity of minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS; however, the increased risk of stroke remains a concern. In conventional cardiac surgery, surgeons can visualize and feel the cardiac structures directly, which is not possible with MICS. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE is essential during MICS in detecting problems that require immediate correction. Comprehensive evaluation of the cardiac structures and function helps in the confirmation of not only the definitive diagnosis, but also the success of surgical treatment. Venous and aortic cannulations are not under the direct vision of the surgeon and appropriate positioning of the cannulae is not possible during MICS without the aid of TEE. Intra-operative TEE helps in the navigation of the guide wire and correct placement of the cannulae and allows real-time assessment of valvular pathologies, ventricular filling, ventricular function, intracardiac air, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass and adequacy of the surgical procedure. Early detection of perioperative complications by TEE potentially enhances the post-operative outcome of patients managed with MICS.

  1. Cardiac Limited Ultrasound Examination Techniques to Augment the Bedside Cardiac Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Bruce J; Shaw, David J; Amundson, Stan A; Phan, James N; Blanchard, Daniel G; DeMaria, Anthony N

    2015-09-01

    The current practice of physical diagnosis is dependent on physician skills and biases, inductive reasoning, and time efficiency. Although the clinical utility of echocardiography is well known, few data exist on how to integrate 2-dimensional screening "quick-look" ultrasound applications into a novel, modernized cardiac physical examination. We discuss the evidence basis behind ultrasound "signs" pertinent to the cardiovascular system and elemental in synthesis of bedside diagnoses and propose the application of a brief cardiac limited ultrasound examination based on these signs. An ultrasound-augmented cardiac physical examination can be taught in traditional medical education and has the potential to improve bedside diagnosis and patient care. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  2. The benefits of the Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy website for the design of cardiac devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Julianne H; Quill, Jason L; Bateman, Michael G; Eggen, Michael D; Howard, Stephen A; Goff, Ryan P; Howard, Brian T; Quallich, Stephen G; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes how the Atlas of Human Cardiac Anatomy website can be used to improve cardiac device design throughout the process of development. The Atlas is a free-access website featuring novel images of both functional and fixed human cardiac anatomy from over 250 human heart specimens. This website provides numerous educational tutorials on anatomy, physiology and various imaging modalities. For instance, the 'device tutorial' provides examples of devices that were either present at the time of in vitro reanimation or were subsequently delivered, including leads, catheters, valves, annuloplasty rings and stents. Another section of the website displays 3D models of the vasculature, blood volumes and/or tissue volumes reconstructed from computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of various heart specimens. The website shares library images, video clips and computed tomography and MRI DICOM files in honor of the generous gifts received from donors and their families.

  3. Obesity-associated cardiac pathogenesis in broiler breeder hens: Pathological adaption of cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C Y; Lin, H Y; Chen, Y W; Ko, Y J; Liu, Y J; Chen, Y H; Walzem, R L; Chen, S E

    2017-07-01

    Broiler hens consuming feed to appetite (ad libitum; AL) show increased mortality. Feed restriction (R) typically improves reproductive performance and livability of hens. Rapidly growing broilers can exhibit increased mortality due to cardiac insufficiency but it is unknown whether the increased mortality of non-R broiler hens is also due to cardiac compromise. To assess cardiac growth and physiology in fully mature birds, 45-week-old hens were either continued on R rations or assigned to AL feeding for 7 or 21 days. AL hens exhibited increased bodyweight, adiposity, absolute and relative heart weight, ventricular hypertrophy, and cardiac protein/DNA ratio by d 21 (P hens (P Hens allowed AL feeding for 70 d exhibited a higher incidence of mortality (40% vs. 10%) in association with ascites, pericardial effusion, and ventricle dilation. A higher incidence of irregular ECG patterns and rhythmicity consistent with persistently elevated systolic blood pressure and ventricle fibrosis were observed in AL hens (P feeding in broiler hens results in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy that progresses to overt pathogenesis in contractility and thereby increases mortality. Feed restriction provides clear physiological benefit to heart function of adult broiler hens. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect.

  5. Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Soo; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2004-01-01

    Molecular nuclear cardiac imaging has included Tc-99m Annexin imaging to visualize myocardial apoptosis, but is now usually associated with gene therapy and cell-based therapy. Cardiac gene therapy was not successful so far but cardiac reporter gene imaging was made possible using HSV-TK (herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase) and F-18 FHBG (fluoro-hydroxymethylbutyl guanine) or I-124 FIAU (fluoro-deoxyiodo-arabino-furanosyluracil). Gene delivery was performed by needle injection with or without catheter guidance. TK expression did not last longer than 2 weeks in myocardium. Cell-based therapy of ischemic heart or failing heart looks promising, but biodistribution and differentiation of transplanted cells are not known. Reporter genes can be transfected to the stem/progenitor cells and cells containing these genes can be transplanted to the recipients using catheter-based purging or injection. Repeated imaging should be available and if promoter are varied to let express reporter transgenes, cellular (trans)differentiation can be studied. NIS (sodium iodide symporter) or D2R receptor genes are promising in this aspect

  6. Early and Late Neurological Complications after Cardiac Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Balkanay

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The clinical use of cyclosporine as an immunosuppressant improved the recipient’s life span and revolutionized the field of cardiac transplantation. But most of the immunesuppressant drugs including cyclosporine may cause neurological and many other side effects. In this article we present three cases, from 58 patients, undergoing cardiac transplantation at our hospital from 1989 to 2008 in whom developed transient neurological complications.

  7. Evaluation of respiratory and cardiac motion correction schemes in dual gated PET/CT cardiac imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamare, F., E-mail: frederic.lamare@chu-bordeaux.fr; Fernandez, P. [Univ. Bordeaux, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Service de Médecine Nucléaire, Hôpital Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Le Maitre, A.; Visvikis, D. [INSERM, UMR1101, LaTIM, Université de Bretagne Occidentale, 29609 Brest (France); Dawood, M.; Schäfers, K. P. [European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Münster, Mendelstr. 11, 48149 Münster (Germany); Rimoldi, O. E. [Vita-Salute University and Scientific Institute San Raffaele, Milan, Italy and CNR Istituto di Bioimmagini e Fisiologia Molecolare, Milan (Italy)

    2014-07-15

    observed in the performance of the two motion models considered. Superior image SNR and contrast were seen using the affine respiratory motion model in combination with the diastole cardiac bin in comparison to the use of the whole cardiac cycle. In contrast, when simultaneously correcting for cardiac beating and respiration, the elastic respiratory motion model outperformed the affine model. In this context, four cardiac bins associated with eight respiratory amplitude bins seemed to be adequate. Conclusions: Considering the compensation of respiratory motion effects only, both affine and elastic based approaches led to an accurate resizing and positioning of the myocardium. The use of the diastolic phase combined with an affine model based respiratory motion correction may therefore be a simple approach leading to significant quality improvements in cardiac PET imaging. However, the best performance was obtained with the combined correction for both cardiac and respiratory movements considering all the dual-gated bins independently through the use of an elastic model based motion compensation.

  8. Smoking Cessation in Cardiac Patients: The Influence of Action Plans, Coping Plans and Self-Efficacy on Quitting Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac…

  9. Initial Efficacy of a Cardiac Rehabilitation Transition Program: Cardiac TRUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullo, Melissa; Boxer, Rebecca; Moore, Shirley M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients recovering from cardiac events are increasingly using postacute care, such as home health care and skilled nursing facility services. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the initial efficacy, feasibility, and safety of a specially designed postacute care transitional rehabilitation intervention for cardiac patients. Cardiac Transitional Rehabilitation Using Self- Management Techniques (Cardiac TRUST) is a family-focused intervention that includes progressive low-intensity walking and education in self-management skills to facilitate recovery following a cardiac event. Using a randomized two-group design, exercise self-efficacy, steps walked, and participation in an outpatient cardiac rehabilitation program were compared in a sample of 38 older adults; 17 who received the Cardiac TRUST program and 21 who received usual care only. At discharge from postacute care, the intervention group had a trend for higher levels of self-efficacy for exercise outcomes (X=39.1, SD=7.4) than the usual care group (X=34.5; SD=7.0) (t-test 1.9, p=.06). During the 6 weeks following discharge, compared with the usual care group, the intervention group had more attendance in out-patient cardiac rehabilitation (33% compared to 11.8%, F=7.1, p=.03) and a trend toward more steps walked during the first week (X=1,307, SD=652 compared to X=782, SD=544, t-test 1.8, p=.07). The feasibility of the intervention was better for the home health participants than for those in the skilled nursing facility and there were no safety concerns. The provision of cardiac-focused rehabilitation during postacute care has the potential to bridge the gap in transitional services from hospitalization to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation for these patients at high risk for future cardiac events. Further evidence of the efficacy of Cardiac TRUST is warranted. PMID:22084960

  10. The Danish Cardiac Rehabilitation Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwisler AD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ann-Dorthe Zwisler,1 Henriette Knold Rossau,1 Anne Nakano,2,3 Sussie Foghmar,4 Regina Eichhorst,5 Eva Prescott,6 Charlotte Cerqueira,7 Anne Merete Boas Soja,4 Gunnar H Gislason,8–10 Mogens Lytken Larsen,5 Ulla Overgaard Andersen,11 Ida Gustafsson,4 Kristian K Thomsen,12 Lene Boye Hansen,13 Signe Hammer,14 Lone Viggers,15 Bo Christensen,16 Birgitte Kvist,17 Cecilie Lindström Egholm,18 Ole May19 On behalf of the Working Group of Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation, Danish Society of Cardiology, and the Working Group of Cardiac Clinical Registries, Danish Society of Cardiology 1Danish Centre for Rehabilitation and Palliative Care, Odense University Hospital and University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 2Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, 3Registry Support Centre (West – Clinical Quality Improvement & Health Informatics, Aarhus, 4Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, 5Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, 6Department of Cardiology, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 7Registry Support Centre (East – Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Research Centre for Prevention and Health, the Capital Region of Denmark, Glostrup, 8Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, 9The Danish Heart Foundation, Copenhagen, 10The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, 11Department of Cardiology, Holbaek Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 12Department of Cardiology, Hospital of Southwest Jutland, Esbjerg, 13Department of Cardiology, Gentofte Hospital, Gentofte, 14Department of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Herlev Hospital, Herlev, 15Department of Nutrition, Regional Hospital West Jutland, Holstebro, 16Department of General Medicine, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, 17Department of Health Care and Prevention, Municipality of Frederikshavn, Frederikshavn, 18

  11. A model of survival following pre-hospital cardiac arrest based on the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Masha; Barnes, Vanessa; Whyman, Andrew; Currell, Alex; Bernard, Stephen; Walker, Tony; Smith, Karen L

    2007-11-01

    This study describes the epidemiology of sudden cardiac arrest patients in Victoria, Australia, as captured via the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Register (VACAR). We used the VACAR data to construct a new model of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), which was specified in accordance with observed trends. All cases of cardiac arrest in Victoria that were attended by Victorian ambulance services during the period of 2002-2005. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 3.8% among 18,827 cases of OHCA. Survival was 15.7% among 1726 bystander witnessed, adult cardiac arrests of presumed cardiac aetiology, presenting in ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT), where resuscitation was attempted. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, bystander CPR, cardiac arrest (CA) location, response time, age and sex were predictors of VF/VT, which, in turn, was a strong predictor of survival. The same factors that affected VF/VT made an additional contribution to survival. However, for bystander CPR, CA location and response time this additional contribution was limited to VF/VT patients only. There was no detectable association between survival and age younger than 60 years or response time over 15min. The new model accounts for relationships among predictors of survival. These relationships indicate that interventions such as reduced response times and bystander CPR act in multiple ways to improve survival.

  12. Antifibrinolytics in cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achal Dhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac surgery exerts a significant strain on the blood bank services and is a model example in which a multi-modal blood-conservation strategy is recommended. Significant bleeding during cardiac surgery, enough to cause re-exploration and/or blood transfusion, increases morbidity and mortality. Hyper-fibrinolysis is one of the important contributors to increased bleeding. This knowledge has led to the use of anti-fibrinolytic agents especially in procedures performed under cardiopulmonary bypass. Nothing has been more controversial in recent times than the aprotinin controversy. Since the withdrawal of aprotinin from the world market, the choice of antifibrinolytic agents has been limited to lysine analogues either tranexamic acid (TA or epsilon amino caproic acid (EACA. While proponents of aprotinin still argue against its non-availability. Health Canada has approved its use, albeit under very strict regulations. Antifibrinolytic agents are not without side effects and act like double-edged swords, the stronger the anti-fibrinolytic activity, the more serious the side effects. Aprotinin is the strongest in reducing blood loss, blood transfusion, and possibly, return to the operating room after cardiac surgery. EACA is the least effective, while TA is somewhere in between. Additionally, aprotinin has been implicated in increased mortality and maximum side effects. TA has been shown to increase seizure activity, whereas, EACA seems to have the least side effects. Apparently, these agents do not differentiate between pathological and physiological fibrinolysis and prevent all forms of fibrinolysis leading to possible thrombotic side effects. It would seem prudent to select the right agent knowing its risk-benefit profile for a given patient, under the given circumstances.

  13. Exercise-related cardiac arrest in cardiac rehabilitation - The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prescribed physical activity plays a major role in the rehabilitation of patients with coronary artery disease, and as with any other form of treatment its benefits must be weighed against its possible risks. This study attempted to establish the safety of cardiac rehabilitation as a medical intervention at the Johannesburg Cardiac ...

  14. Single ventricle cardiac defect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eren, B.; Turkmen, N.; Fedakar, R.; Cetin, V.

    2010-01-01

    Single ventricle heart is defined as a rare cardiac abnormality with a single ventricle chamber involving diverse functional and physiological defects. Our case is of a ten month-old baby boy who died shortly after admission to the hospital due to vomiting and diarrhoea. Autopsy findings revealed cyanosis of finger nails and ears. Internal examination revealed; large heart, weighing 60 grams, single ventricle, without a septum and upper membranous part. Single ventricle is a rare pathology, hence, this paper aims to discuss this case from a medico-legal point of view. (author)

  15. CSI cardiac prevent 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The CSI Cardiac Prevent 2015 was held at Hotel Taj Palace, New Delhi, on September 25-27, 2015. The major challenge was to create interest among cardiologists and physicians on preventive cardiology, a neglected area. The theme of the conference was "Innovations in Heart Disease Prevention.′′ This conference included "CSI at WHF Roadmap Workshop, Inauguration Ceremony, scientific program, plenary sessions, Nursing/Dietician track, Industry Exhibition, Social Events," Great India blood pressure Survey, and CSI Smart Heart App. A total of 848 delegates/faculties attended this conference against a total of 1140 people registered for the meeting.

  16. Hypertension and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  17. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Handouts Cardiac arrest (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Cardiac Arrest updates ... this? GO MEDICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA Cardiac arrest Related Health Topics Arrhythmia CPR Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators National Institutes ...

  18. The economics of cardiac biomarker testing in suspected myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Steve; Thokala, Praveen

    2015-03-01

    Suspected myocardial infarction (MI) is a common reason for emergency hospital attendance and admission. Cardiac biomarker measurement is an essential element of diagnostic assessment of suspected MI. Although the cost of a routinely available biomarker may be small, the large patient population and consequences in terms of hospital admission and investigation mean that the economic impact of cardiac biomarker testing is substantial. Economic evaluation involves comparing the estimated costs and effectiveness (outcomes) of two or more interventions or care alternatives. This process creates some difficulties with respect to cardiac biomarkers. Estimating the effectiveness of cardiac biomarkers involves identifying how they help to improve health and how we can measure this improvement. Comparison to an appropriate alternative is also problematic. New biomarkers may be promoted on the basis of reducing hospital admission or length of stay, but hospital admission for low risk patients may incur significant costs while providing very little benefit, making it an inappropriate comparator. Finally, economic evaluation may conclude that a more sensitive biomarker strategy is more effective but, by detecting and treating more cases, is also more expensive. In these circumstances it is unclear whether we should use the more effective or the cheaper option. This article provides an introduction to health economics and addresses the specific issues relevant to cardiac biomarkers. It describes the key concepts relevant to economic evaluation of cardiac biomarkers in suspected MI and highlights key areas of uncertainty and controversy. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, M.S.; Ambudkar, I.S.; Young, E.P.; Naseem, S.M.; Heald, F.P.; Shamoo, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect on the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum of an atherogenic (1% cholesterol) diet fed during the neonatal vs the juvenile period of life was studied in Yorkshire swine. Male piglets were randomly assigned at birth to 1 of 4 groups: group I (control), group II (lactation feeding), group III (juvenile period feeding) and group IV (lactation and juvenile feeding). All animals were killed at 55 weeks of age and cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) isolated for assay of calcium uptake, Ca 2+ -Mg 2+ ATPase activity, and lipid analysis by thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography. The amount of cholesterol/mg SR protein and the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio were higher in the animals fed during lactation (groups II and IV) and lower in those fed only during the juvenile period (group III). Phospholipid fatty acid patterns as measured by gas chromatography were unaltered in any group. Calcium uptake was markedly diminished in all experimental conditions: group II 47%, group III 65% and group IV 96%. Compared to the observed changes in calcium transport, the ATP hydrolytic activity was relatively less affected. Only in group IV a significant decrease (41%) was seen. Groups II and III show no change in ATP hydrolytic activity. The decrease in calcium uptake and altered cholesterol/phospholipid ratio without effect on ATP hydrolytic activity is consistent with an uncoupling of calcium transport related to the atherogenic diet in early life. (author)

  20. Cardiac chamber scintiscanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goretzki, G.

    1981-01-01

    The two methods of cardiac chamber scintiscanning, i.e. 'first pass' and 'ECG-triggered' examinations, are explained and compared. Two tables indicate the most significant radiation doses of the applied radio tracers, i.e. 99m-Tc-pertechnetate and 99m-Tc-HSA, to which a patient is exposed. These averaged values are calculated from various data given in specialised literature. On the basis of data given in literature, an effective half-life of approximately 5 hours in the intravascular space was calculated for the erythrocytes labelled with technetium 99m. On this basis, the radiation doses for the patients due to 99m-Tc-labelled erythrocytes are estimated. The advantages and disadvantages of the two methods applied for cardiac chamber scintiscanning are put into contrast and compared with the advantages and disadvantages of the quantitative X-ray cardiography of the left heart. The still existing problems connected with the assessment of ECG-triggered images are discussed in detail. The author performed investigations of his own, which concerned the above-mentioned problems. (orig./MG) [de

  1. Cardiac arrest – cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basri Lenjani

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: All survivors from cardiac arrest have received appropriate medical assistance within 10 min from attack, which implies that if cardiac arrest occurs near an institution health care (with an opportunity to provide the emergent health care the rate of survival is higher.

  2. Lentiginosis, Deafness and Cardiac Abnormalities*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... His height. mass. intelligence and genitalia were normal. The aSSOCiatIOn between deafness and disturbance of cardiac conduction and between pigmented skin lesions and cardiac abnormalities, has been well described. Should. ~I patient present with multiple lentigines and/or familial sensineural ...

  3. Health Instruction Packages: Cardiac Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gwen; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nurses, students, and other health care professionals in cardiac anatomy and functions and in fundamental electrocardiographic techniques. The first module, "Cardiac Anatomy and Physiology: A Review" by Gwen Phillips, teaches the learner to draw…

  4. Neuromuscular diseases after cardiac transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mateen, Farrah J.; van de Beek, Diederik; Kremers, Walter K.; Daly, Richard C.; Edwards, Brooks S.; McGregor, Christopher G. A.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac transplantation is a therapeutic option in end-stage heart failure. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) disease is known to occur in cardiac transplant recipients but has not been fully characterized. METHODS: This retrospective cohort review reports the PNS-related concerns of 313

  5. Hypokalemia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Keld

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately three million people suffer sudden cardiac death annually. These deaths often emerge from a complex interplay of substrates and triggers. Disturbed potassium homeostasis among heart cells is an example of such a trigger. Thus, hypokalemia and, also, more transient...... of fatal arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death a patient is, the more attention should be given to the potassium homeostasis....

  6. Cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding-Barclay, Michael A; Stern, Jessica; Mehler, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder, which is associated with many different medical complications as a result of the weight loss and malnutrition that characterise this illness. It has the highest mortality rate of any psychiatric disorder. A large portion of deaths are attributable to the cardiac abnormalities that ensue as a result of the malnutrition associated with anorexia nervosa. In this review, the cardiac complications of anorexia nervosa will be discussed. A comprehensive literature review on cardiac changes in anorexia nervosa was carried out. There are structural, functional, and rhythm-type changes that occur in patients with anorexia nervosa. These become progressively significant as ongoing weight loss occurs. Cardiac changes are inherent to anorexia nervosa and they become more life-threatening and serious as the anorexia nervosa becomes increasingly severe. Weight restoration and attention to these cardiac changes are crucial for a successful treatment outcome.

  7. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac...... peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...

  8. Living cardiac patch: the elixir for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2012-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the cellular and muscle fiber orientation in left ventricular cardiac tissue is of paramount importance for the generation of artificial cardiac patches to treat the ischemic myocardium. The major challenge faced during cardiac patch engineering is to choose a perfect combination of three entities; cells, scaffolds and signaling molecules comprising the tissue engineering triad for repair and regeneration. This review provides an overview of various scaffold materials, their mechanical properties and fabrication methods utilized in cardiac patch engineering. Stem cell therapies in clinical trials and the commercially available cardiac patch materials were summarized in an attempt to provide a recent perspective in the treatment of heart failure. Various tissue engineering strategies employed thus far to construct viable thick cardiac patches is schematically illustrated. Though many strategies have been proposed for fabrication of various cardiac scaffold materials, the stage and severity of the disease condition demands the incorporation of additional cues in a suitable scaffold material. The scaffold may be nanofibrous patch, hydrogel or custom designed films. Integration of stem cells and biomolecular cues along with the scaffold may provide the right microenvironment for the repair of unhealthy left ventricular tissue as well as promote its regeneration.

  9. Defective branched chain amino acid catabolism contributes to cardiac dysfunction and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Fuyang; Xia, Yunlong; Zhao, Shihao; Yan, Wenjun; Wang, Helin; Lee, Yan; Li, Congye; Zhang, Ling; Lian, Kun; Gao, Erhe; Cheng, Hexiang; Tao, Ling

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac metabolic remodeling is a central event during heart failure (HF) development following myocardial infarction (MI). It is well known that myocardial glucose and fatty acid dysmetabolism contribute to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. However, the role of amino acid metabolism in post-MI HF remains elusive. Branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) are an important group of essential amino acids and function as crucial nutrient signaling in mammalian animals. The present study aimed to determine the role of cardiac BCAA metabolism in post-MI HF progression. Utilizing coronary artery ligation-induced murine MI models, we found that myocardial BCAA catabolism was significantly impaired in response to permanent MI, therefore leading to an obvious elevation of myocardial BCAA abundance. In MI-operated mice, oral BCAA administration further increased cardiac BCAA levels, activated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, and exacerbated cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. These data demonstrate that BCAAs act as a direct contributor to post-MI cardiac pathologies. Furthermore, these BCAA-mediated deleterious effects were improved by rapamycin cotreatment, revealing an indispensable role of mTOR in BCAA-mediated adverse effects on cardiac function/structure post-MI. Of note, pharmacological inhibition of branched chain ketoacid dehydrogenase kinase (BDK), a negative regulator of myocardial BCAA catabolism, significantly improved cardiac BCAA catabolic disorders, reduced myocardial BCAA levels, and ameliorated post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. In conclusion, our data provide the evidence that impaired cardiac BCAA catabolism directly contributes to post-MI cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Moreover, improving cardiac BCAA catabolic defects may be a promising therapeutic strategy against post-MI HF. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Cardiac Rehabilitation Enhancing Programs in Patients with Myocardial Infarction: A literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahyana Ahyana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR is a process that involves a multidisciplinary team of health professionals in order to optimize the status of patients’ physical, psychological, social, and vocational well being. The CR program has been proven to influence health outcomes in patients with cardiac diseases, particularly myocardial infarction (MI and stable angina. However, patients’ compliance with cardiac rehabilitation programs remains a challenge.Purpose: The purpose of this study is to review and identify interventions that enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors in MI patients.Method: A literature review was conducted by analyzing related research reports published since 2000 to 2012. Only English language articles were included.Result: There were 10 experimental studies and 2 meta-analysis studies. Interventions widely used to enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors in MI patients were self-efficacy and self management derived programs. These programs involved interventions that enhance cardiac rehabilitation behaviors, including training exercise, behavioral change, education and psychological support, and lifestyle changing strategies. None have reported the use of culturally tailored intervention. Four phases of cardiac rehabilitation were accepted as each phase represents a different aspect of care: inpatient care, early post discharge period, exercise training, and long term follow up. Critical factors for patients in maintaining an optimum health condition after a cardiac event are, in order, status of patient’s physical, psychological, social, and vocational well being.Conclusion: Cardiac Rehabilitation program has been shown to improve quality of life and decrease mortality in MI patients. The development of culturally specific interventions to increase cardiac rehabilitation behaviors will provide a significant improvement for cardiac patient’s care that ultimately results in better health outcomes. Health care

  11. Cardiac Intensive Care Unit Management of Patients After Cardiac Arrest: Now the Real Work Begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Varinder K; Grunau, Brian E; Debicki, Derek B; Zhou, Jian; Hegazy, Ahmed F; McPherson, Terry; Nagpal, A Dave

    2018-02-01

    Survival with a good quality of life after cardiac arrest continues to be abysmal. Coordinated resuscitative care does not end with the effective return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC)-in fact, quite the contrary is true. Along with identifying and appropriately treating the precipitating cause, various components of the post-cardiac arrest syndrome also require diligent observation and management, including post-cardiac arrest neurologic injury and myocardial dysfunction, systemic ischemia-reperfusion phenomenon with potential consequent multiorgan failure, and the various sequelae of critical illness. There is growing evidence that an early invasive approach to coronary reperfusion with percutaneous coronary intervention, together with active targeted temperature management and optimization of hemodynamic, ventilator, and metabolic parameters, may improve survival and neurologic outcomes in cardiac arrest survivors. Neuroprognostication is complex, as are survivorship issues and long-term rehabilitation. Our paramedics, emergency physicians, and resuscitation specialists are all to be congratulated for ever-increasing success with ROSC… but now the real work begins. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac and vascular malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, S.; Ley-Zaporozhan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Malformations of the heart and great vessels show a high degree of variation. There are numerous variants and defects with only few clinical manifestations and are only detected by chance, such as a persistent left superior vena cava or a partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Other cardiovascular malformations are manifested directly after birth and need prompt mostly surgical interventions. At this point in time echocardiography is the diagnostic modality of choice for morphological and functional characterization of malformations. Additional imaging using computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is only required in a minority of cases. If so, the small anatomical structures, the physiological tachycardia and tachypnea are a challenge for imaging modalities and strategies. This review article presents the most frequent vascular, cardiac and complex cardiovascular malformations independent of the first line diagnostic imaging modality. (orig.) [de

  13. Pneumothorax in cardiac pacing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To identify risk factors for pneumothorax treated with a chest tube after cardiac pacing device implantation in a population-based cohort.METHODS AND RESULTS: A nationwide cohort study was performed based on data on 28 860 patients from the Danish Pacemaker Register, which included all Danish...... age was 77 years (25th and 75th percentile: 69-84) and 55% were male (n = 15 785). A total of 190 patients (0.66%) were treated for pneumothorax, which was more often in women [aOR 1.9 (1.4-2.6)], and in patients with age >80 years [aOR 1.4 (1.0-1.9)], a prior history of chronic obstructive pulmonary...

  14. Sudden Cardiac Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, Bjarke; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Jabbari, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to describe the use of pharmacotherapy in a nationwide cohort of young patients with sudden cardiac death (SCD). Background Several drugs have been associated with an increased risk of SCD and sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). It remains unclear how...... pharmacotherapy may contribute to the overall burden of SCD in the general population. Methods This was a nationwide study that included all deaths that occurred between 2000 and 2009 and between 2007 and 2009 in people age 1 to 35 years and 36 to 49 years, respectively. Two physicians identified all SCDs through...... review of death certificates. Autopsy reports were collected. Pharmacotherapy prescribed within 90 days before SCD was identified in the Danish Registry of Medicinal Product Statistics. Results We identified 1,363 SCDs; median age was 38 years (interquartile range: 29 to 45 years), and 72% (n = 975) were men...

  15. Cardiac potassium channel subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2014-01-01

    About 10 distinct potassium channels in the heart are involved in shaping the action potential. Some of the K(+) channels are primarily responsible for early repolarization, whereas others drive late repolarization and still others are open throughout the cardiac cycle. Three main K(+) channels...... drive the late repolarization of the ventricle with some redundancy, and in atria this repolarization reserve is supplemented by the fairly atrial-specific KV1.5, Kir3, KCa, and K2P channels. The role of the latter two subtypes in atria is currently being clarified, and several findings indicate...... that they could constitute targets for new pharmacological treatment of atrial fibrillation. The interplay between the different K(+) channel subtypes in both atria and ventricle is dynamic, and a significant up- and downregulation occurs in disease states such as atrial fibrillation or heart failure...

  16. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...

  17. Mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noedir A. G. Stolf

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Assessment of incidence and behavior of mediastinitis after cardiac transplantation. METHODS: From 1985 to 1999, 214 cardiac transplantations were performed, 12 (5.6% of the transplanted patients developed confirmed mediastinitis. Patient's ages ranged from 42 to 66 years (mean of 52.3±10.0 years and 10 (83.3% patients were males. Seven (58.3% patients showed sternal stability on palpation, 4 (33.3% patients had pleural empyema, and 2 (16.7% patients did not show purulent secretion draining through the wound. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus was the infectious agent identified in the wound secretion or in the mediastinum, or both, in 8 (66.7% patients. Staphylococcus epidermidis was identified in 2 (16.7% patients, Enterococcus faecalis in 1 (8.3% patient, and the cause of mediastinitis could not be determined in 1 (8.3% patient. Surgical treatment was performed on an emergency basis, and the extension of the débridement varied with local conditions. In 2 (16.7% patients, we chose to leave the surgical wound open and performed daily dressings with granulated sugar. Total sternal resection was performed in only 1 (8.3% patient. Out of this series, 5 (41.7% patients died, and the causes of death were related to the infection. Autopsy revealed persistence of mediastinitis in 1 (8.3% patient. CONCLUSION: Promptness in diagnosing mediastinitis and precocious surgical drainage have changed the natural evolution of this disease. Nevertheless, observance of the basic precepts of prophylaxis of infection is still the best way to treat mediastinitis.

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells 10 Years Later: For Cardiac Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2017-06-09

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are reprogrammed cells that have features similar to embryonic stem cells, such as the capacity of self-renewal and differentiation into many types of cells, including cardiac myocytes. Although initially the reprogramming efficiency was low, several improvements in reprogramming methods have achieved robust and efficient generation of iPSCs without genomic insertion of transgenes. iPSCs display clonal variations in epigenetic and genomic profiles and cellular behavior in differentiation. iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes (iPSC cardiac myocytes) recapitulate phenotypic differences caused by genetic variations, making them attractive human disease models, and are useful for drug discovery and toxicology testing. In addition, iPSC cardiac myocytes can help with patient stratification in regard to drug responsiveness. Furthermore, they can be used as source cells for cardiac regeneration in animal models. Here, we review recent progress in iPSC technology and its applications to cardiac diseases. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Pentoxifylline Attenuates Cardiac Remodeling Induced by Tobacco Smoke Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minicucci, Marcos; Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Priscila; Polegato, Bertha; Roscani, Meliza; Fernandes, Ana Angelica; Lustosa, Beatriz; Paiva, Sergio; Zornoff, Leonardo; Azevedo, Paula, E-mail: paulasa@fmb.unesp.br [Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Tobacco smoke exposure is an important risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Under this condition, inflammation, oxidative stress, energy metabolism abnormalities, apoptosis, and hypertrophy are present. Pentoxifylline has anti‑inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-thrombotic and anti-proliferative properties. The present study tested the hypothesis that pentoxifylline would attenuate cardiac remodeling induced by smoking. Wistar rats were distributed in four groups: Control (C), Pentoxifylline (PX), Tobacco Smoke (TS), and PX-TS. After two months, echocardiography, invasive blood pressure measurement, biochemical, and histological studies were performed. The groups were compared by two-way ANOVA with a significance level of 5%. TS increased left atrium diameter and area, which was attenuated by PX. In the isolated heart study, TS lowered the positive derivate (+dp/dt), and this was attenuated by PX. The antioxidants enzyme superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were decreased in the TS group; PX recovered these activities. TS increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and decreased 3-hydroxyacyl Coenzyme A dehydrogenases (OH-DHA) and citrate synthase (CS). PX attenuated LDH, 3-OH-DHA and CS alterations in TS-PX group. TS increased IL-10, ICAM-1, and caspase-3. PX did not influence these variables. TS induced cardiac remodeling, associated with increased inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and changed energy metabolism. PX attenuated cardiac remodeling by reducing oxidative stress and improving cardiac bioenergetics, but did not act upon cardiac cytokines and apoptosis.

  20. The pathogenesis and treatment of cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kate T

    2016-02-15

    Cancer cachexia is a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with significant functional impairment. In addition to a loss of skeletal muscle mass and function, many patients with cancer cachexia also experience cardiac atrophy, remodeling, and dysfunction, which in the field of cancer cachexia is described as cardiac cachexia. The cardiac alterations may be due to underlying heart disease, the cancer itself, or problems initiated by the cancer treatment and, unfortunately, remains largely underappreciated by clinicians and basic scientists. Despite recent major advances in the treatment of cancer, little progress has been made in the treatment of cardiac cachexia in cancer, and much of this is due to lack of information regarding the mechanisms. This review focuses on the cardiac atrophy associated with cancer cachexia, describing some of the known mechanisms and discussing the current and future therapeutic strategies to treat this condition. Above all else, improved awareness of the condition and an increased focus on identification of mechanisms and therapeutic targets will facilitate the eventual development of an effective treatment for cardiac atrophy in cancer cachexia. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Sacral Neuromodulation in Patients With a Cardiac Pacemaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Gahzi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to describe our experience using sacral neuromodulation to treat urinary urgency, frequency, urge incontinence, and chronic urinary retention in patients with cardiac pacemakers. With the increasingly widespread use of InterStim for bladder function restoration, we are seeing more complex patients with multiple comorbidities, including cardiac conditions. Herein, we report 3 cases of individuals with cardiac pacemakers who underwent InterStim implantation to treat urinary conditions. This study is a case series of 3 patients with cardiac pacemakers who underwent sacral neuromodulation to treat refractory voiding dysfunction. The initial patient screening for InterStim therapy involved percutaneous nerve evaluation (PNE, in which a temporary untined lead wire was placed through the S3 foramen. Patients who did not respond to PNE proceeded to a staged implant. All patients in this study had a greater than 50% improvement of their urinary symptoms during the initial trial and underwent placement of the InterStim implantable pulse generator (IPG. Postoperative programming was done under electrocardiogram monitoring by a cardiologist. No interference was observed between the Inter-Stim IPG and the cardiac pacemaker. In this group of patients, sacral neuromodulation in the presence of a cardiac pacemaker appears to have been safe.

  2. Factors affecting cardiac rehabilitation referral by physician specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Grewal, Keerat; Stewart, Donna E

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is widely underutilized because of multiple factors including physician referral practices. Previous research has shown CR referral varies by type of provider, with cardiologists more likely to refer than primary care physicians. The objective of this study was to compare factors affecting CR referral in primary care physicians versus cardiac specialists. A cross-sectional survey of a stratified random sample of 510 primary care physicians and cardiac specialists (cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons) in Ontario identified through the Canadian Medical Directory Online was administered. One hundred four primary care physicians and 81 cardiac specialists responded to the 26-item investigator-generated survey examining medical, demographic, attitudinal, and health system factors affecting CR referral. Primary care physicians were more likely to endorse lack of familiarity with CR site locations (P negatively impacting CR referral practices than cardiac specialists. Cardiac specialists were significantly more likely to perceive that their colleagues and department would regularly refer patients to CR than primary care physicians (P Marketing CR site locations, provision of standardized referral forms, and ensuring discharge summaries are communicated to primary care physicians may improve their willingness to refer to CR.

  3. Cardiac function in acute hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaghue, K.; Hales, I.; Allwright, S.; Cooper, R.; Edwards, A.; Grant, S.; Morrow, A.; Wilmshurst, E.; Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney

    1985-01-01

    It has been established that chronic hypothyroidism may affect cardiac function by several mechanisms. It is not known how long the patient has to be hypothyroid for cardiac involvement to develop. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of a short period of hypothyroidism (10 days) on cardiac function. Nine patients who had had total tyroidectomy, had received ablative radioiodine for thyroid cancer and were euthyroid on replacement therapy were studied while both euthyroid and hypothyroid. Cardiac assessment was performed by X-ray, ECG, echocardiography and gated blood-pool scans. After 10 days of hypothyroidisms, the left-ventricular ejection fraction failed to rise after exercise in 4 of the 9 patients studied, which was significant (P<0.002). No significant changes in cardiac size or function at rest were detected. This functional abnormality in the absence of any demonstrable change in cardiac size and the absence of pericardial effussion with normal basal function suggest that short periods of hypothyroidism may reduce cardiac reserve, mostly because of alterations in metabolic function. (orig.)

  4. Trends in Cardiac Pacemaker Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswara Sarma Mallela

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Batteries used in Implantable cardiac pacemakers-present unique challenges to their developers and manufacturers in terms of high levels of safety and reliability. In addition, the batteries must have longevity to avoid frequent replacements. Technological advances in leads/electrodes have reduced energy requirements by two orders of magnitude. Micro-electronics advances sharply reduce internal current drain concurrently decreasing size and increasing functionality, reliability, and longevity. It is reported that about 600,000 pacemakers are implanted each year worldwide and the total number of people with various types of implanted pacemaker has already crossed 3 million. A cardiac pacemaker uses half of its battery power for cardiac stimulation and the other half for housekeeping tasks such as monitoring and data logging. The first implanted cardiac pacemaker used nickel-cadmium rechargeable battery, later on zinc-mercury battery was developed and used which lasted for over 2 years. Lithium iodine battery invented and used by Wilson Greatbatch and his team in 1972 made the real impact to implantable cardiac pacemakers. This battery lasts for about 10 years and even today is the power source for many manufacturers of cardiac pacemakers. This paper briefly reviews various developments of battery technologies since the inception of cardiac pacemaker and presents the alternative to lithium iodine battery for the near future.

  5. Metoclopramide-induced cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha M. Rumore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of cardiac arrest in a patient receiving intravenous (IV metoclopramide and review the pertinent literature. A 62-year-old morbidly obese female admitted for a gastric sleeve procedure, developed cardiac arrest within one minute of receiving metoclopramide 10 mg via slow intravenous (IV injection. Bradycardia at 4 beats/min immediately appeared, progressing rapidly to asystole. Chest compressions restored vital function. Electrocardiogram (ECG revealed ST depression indicative of myocardial injury. Following intubation, the patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. Various cardiac dysrrhythmias including supraventricular tachycardia (SVT associated with hypertension and atrial fibrillation occurred. Following IV esmolol and metoprolol, the patient reverted to normal sinus rhythm. Repeat ECGs revealed ST depression resolution without pre-admission changes. Metoclopramide is a non-specific dopamine receptor antagonist. Seven cases of cardiac arrest and one of sinus arrest with metoclopramide were found in the literature. The metoclopramide prescribing information does not list precautions or adverse drug reactions (ADRs related to cardiac arrest. The reaction is not dose related but may relate to the IV administration route. Coronary artery disease was the sole risk factor identified. According to Naranjo, the association was possible. Other reports of cardiac arrest, severe bradycardia, and SVT were reviewed. In one case, five separate IV doses of 10 mg metoclopramide were immediately followed by asystole repeatedly. The mechanism(s underlying metoclopramide’s cardiac arrest-inducing effects is unknown. Structural similarities to procainamide may play a role. In view of eight previous cases of cardiac arrest from metoclopramide having been reported, further elucidation of this ADR and patient monitoring is needed. Our report should alert clinicians to monitor patients and remain diligent in surveillance and

  6. Real-time MRI guidance of cardiac interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; Tavallaei, Mohammad A; Pop, Mihaela; Grant, Elena K; Chubb, Henry; Rhode, Kawal; Wright, Graham A

    2017-10-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is appealing to guide complex cardiac procedures because it is ionizing radiation-free and offers flexible soft-tissue contrast. Interventional cardiac MR promises to improve existing procedures and enable new ones for complex arrhythmias, as well as congenital and structural heart disease. Guiding invasive procedures demands faster image acquisition, reconstruction and analysis, as well as intuitive intraprocedural display of imaging data. Standard cardiac MR techniques such as 3D anatomical imaging, cardiac function and flow, parameter mapping, and late-gadolinium enhancement can be used to gather valuable clinical data at various procedural stages. Rapid intraprocedural image analysis can extract and highlight critical information about interventional targets and outcomes. In some cases, real-time interactive imaging is used to provide a continuous stream of images displayed to interventionalists for dynamic device navigation. Alternatively, devices are navigated relative to a roadmap of major cardiac structures generated through fast segmentation and registration. Interventional devices can be visualized and tracked throughout a procedure with specialized imaging methods. In a clinical setting, advanced imaging must be integrated with other clinical tools and patient data. In order to perform these complex procedures, interventional cardiac MR relies on customized equipment, such as interactive imaging environments, in-room image display, audio communication, hemodynamic monitoring and recording systems, and electroanatomical mapping and ablation systems. Operating in this sophisticated environment requires coordination and planning. This review provides an overview of the imaging technology used in MRI-guided cardiac interventions. Specifically, this review outlines clinical targets, standard image acquisition and analysis tools, and the integration of these tools into clinical workflow. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 5 J

  7. Postoperative Cardiac Arrest after Heart Surgery: Does Extracorporeal Perfusion Support a Paradigm Change in Management?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gologorsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Early institution of extracorporeal perfusion support (ECPS may improve survival after cardiac arrest. Two patients sustained unexpected cardiac arrest in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU following cardiac interventions. ECPS was initiated due to failure to restore hemodynamics after prolonged (over 60 minutes advanced cardiac life support (ACLS protocol-guided cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Despite relatively late institution of ECPS, both patients survived with preserved neurological function. This communication focuses on the utility of ECPS in the ICU as a part of resuscitative efforts.

  8. Acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-feng; Wang, Xian

    2013-12-01

    Cardiac injury is the most serious adverse event in acupuncture therapy. The causes include needling chest points near the heart, the cardiac enlargement and pericardial effusion that will enlarge the projected area on the body surface and make the proper depth of needling shorter, and the incorrect needling method of the points. Therefore, acupuncture practitioners must be familiar with the points of the heart projected area on the chest and the correct needling methods in order to reduce the risk of acupuncture therapy related cardiac injury.

  9. External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) techniques used in breast cancer treatment to reduce cardiac exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, Esther; Hendry, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy in breast cancer treatment has been shown to reduce local recurrence and improve survival rates. However, there is a concern that breast radiotherapy can cause an increase in cardiac mortality, particularly in patients being treated for left-sided breast cancer. This review aims to investigate how cardiac exposure is minimised in breast radiotherapy and determine an optimal method for reducing cardiac dose, using literature from ScienceDirect, Medline and CINAHL. IMRT and breathing-adapted radiotherapy both reduce cardiac exposure but IMRT also increases the irradiated volume at low dose. Several issues were reported with regards to the clinical implementation of these techniques. It is suggested that inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy, is the preferred solution to minimising cardiac exposure but more research is warranted to confirm this. Long-term follow-up is required to determine dose–response relationships. Research needs to focus on breast cancer treatment as a whole in order to effectively reduce cardiac mortality.

  10. Stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging provides effective cardiac risk reclassification in patients with known or suspected stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravi; Heydari, Bobak; Coelho-Filho, Otavio; Murthy, Venkatesh L; Abbasi, Siddique; Feng, Jiazhuo H; Pencina, Michael; Neilan, Tomas G; Meadows, Judith L; Francis, Sanjeev; Blankstein, Ron; Steigner, Michael; di Carli, Marcelo; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Kwong, Raymond Y

    2013-08-06

    A recent large-scale clinical trial found that an initial invasive strategy does not improve cardiac outcomes beyond optimized medical therapy in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Novel methods to stratify at-risk patients may refine therapeutic decisions to improve outcomes. In a cohort of 815 consecutive patients referred for evaluation of myocardial ischemia, we determined the net reclassification improvement of the risk of cardiac death or nonfatal myocardial infarction (major adverse cardiac events) incremental to clinical risk models, using guideline-based low (3%) annual risk categories. In the whole cohort, inducible ischemia demonstrated a strong association with major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio=14.66; Pstatistic, 0.81-0.86; P=0.04; adjusted hazard ratio=7.37; PStress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging effectively reclassifies patient risk beyond standard clinical variables, specifically in patients at moderate to high pretest clinical risk and in patients with previous coronary artery disease. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01821924.

  11. Risk stratification in stable coronary artery disease is possible at cardiac troponin levels below conventional detection and is improved by use of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngbæk, Stig; Winkel, Per; Gøtze, Jens P

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: Low prevalence of detectable cardiac troponin in healthy people and low-risk patients previously curtailed its use. With a new high-sensitive cardiac troponin assay (hs-cTnT), concentrations below conventional detection may have prognostic value, notably in combination with N-terminal pro......-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP). METHODS AND RESULTS: Biomarker concentrations were determined from serum obtained at enrolment in the CLARICOR trial involving 4197 patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) followed for 2.6 years. Serum hs-cTnT was detectable (above 3 ng/l) in 78% and above...... the conventional 99th percentile (13.5 ng/l) in 23%. Across all levels of hs-cTnT there was a graded increase in the risk of cardiovascular death after adjustment for known prognostic indicators: hazard ratio (HR) per unit increase in the natural logarithm of the hs-cTnT level, 1.49; 95% confidence interval (CI...

  12. Usefulness of cardiac 125I-metaiodobenzylguanidine uptake for evaluation of cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Nanami; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Shigeta, Yukio

    1992-01-01

    We investigated cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities in streptozocin-induced diabetic rats using 125 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The radioactivity ratio of cardiac tissue to 1 ml blood (H/B) was used as an index of cardiac MIBG uptake. Cardiac 125 I-MIBG uptake (H/B) in 4-, 8- and 20-wk diabetic rats was 48% lower than that in control rats. Similar results were obtained even when the data were corrected for g wet tissue weight. Although there was no improvement in H/B following 2-wk insulin treatment, the H/B ratio increased significantly, to 85% of control levels, following 4 wk insulin treatment indicating the reversibility of impaired MIBG uptake in diabetic rats. In vivo reserpine treatment resulted in a 50% reduction in the H/B value in control rats. However, the treatment did not significantly suppress uptake in diabetic rats. Cardiac norepinephrine content in both * 4- and ** 8-wk diabetic rats was significantly ( * p ** p 125 I-MIBG in diabetic rats is significantly impaired due to cardiac sympathetic nerve abnormalities. These abnormalities are reversible, however, dependent on the diabetic state. (author)

  13. Cardiac CT for planning redo cardiac surgery: effect of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction on image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Seitaro; Weissman, Gaby; Weigold, W. Guy; Vembar, Mani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of knowledge-based iterative model reconstruction (IMR) on image quality in cardiac CT performed for the planning of redo cardiac surgery by comparing IMR images with images reconstructed with filtered back-projection (FBP) and hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR). We studied 31 patients (23 men, 8 women; mean age 65.1 ± 16.5 years) referred for redo cardiac surgery who underwent cardiac CT. Paired image sets were created using three types of reconstruction: FBP, HIR, and IMR. Quantitative parameters including CT attenuation, image noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of each cardiovascular structure were calculated. The visual image quality - graininess, streak artefact, margin sharpness of each cardiovascular structure, and overall image quality - was scored on a five-point scale. The mean image noise of FBP, HIR, and IMR images was 58.3 ± 26.7, 36.0 ± 12.5, and 14.2 ± 5.5 HU, respectively; there were significant differences in all comparison combinations among the three methods. The CNR of IMR images was better than that of FBP and HIR images in all evaluated structures. The visual scores were significantly higher for IMR than for the other images in all evaluated parameters. IMR can provide significantly improved qualitative and quantitative image quality at in cardiac CT for planning of reoperative cardiac surgery. (orig.)

  14. Association between prehospital physician involvement and survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton, Annika; Steinmetz, Jacob; Wissenberg, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Sudden out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is an important public health problem. While several interventions are known to improve survival, the impact of physician-delivered advanced cardiac life support for OHCA is unclear. We aimed to assess the association between prehospital physician...

  15. Pioglitazone reverses down-regulation of cardiac PPARγ expression in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, Theo; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Arias-Loza, Paula Anahi; Segerer, Stephan; Lichtenwald, Margit; Law, Marilyn P.; Schaefers, Michael; Ertl, Georg; Neyses, Ludwig

    2005-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) plays a critical role in peripheral glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, and inhibits cardiac hypertrophy in non-diabetic animal models. The functional role of PPARγ in the diabetic heart, however, is not fully understood. Therefore, we analyzed cardiac gene expression, metabolic control, and cardiac glucose uptake in male Zucker diabetic fatty rats (ZDF fa/fa) and lean ZDF rats (+/+) treated with the high affinity PPARγ agonist pioglitazone or placebo from 12 to 24 weeks of age. Hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and hypertriglyceridemia as well as lower cardiac PPARγ, glucose transporter-4 and α-myosin heavy chain expression levels were detected in diabetic ZDF rats compared to lean animals. Pioglitazone increased body weight and improved metabolic control, cardiac PPARγ, glut-4, and α-MHC expression levels in diabetic ZDF rats. Cardiac [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake was not detectable by micro-PET studies in untreated and pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats but was observed after administration of insulin to pioglitazone treated ZDF fa/fa rats. PPARγ agonists favorably affect cardiac gene expression in type-2 diabetic rats via activation and up-regulation of cardiac PPARγ expression whereas improvement of impaired cardiac glucose uptake in advanced type-2 diabetes requires co-administration of insulin

  16. Use of I-123 MIBG cardiac scintigraphy to assess the impact of carvedilol on cardiac adrenergic neuronal function in childhood dilated cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maunoury, C.; Acar, P.; Sidi, D.

    2006-01-01

    I-123 MIBG cardiac scintigraphy is a useful tool to assess cardiac adrenergic neuronal function, which is impaired in children with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). In adults with DCM, long-term treatment with carvedilol improves both cardiac adrenergic neuronal function and left ventricular function. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the impact of carvedilol on cardiac adrenergic neuronal function and on left ventricular function in seventeen patients (11 female, 6 male, mean age 39 ± 57 months, range 1 - 168 months) with DCM. All patients underwent I-123 MIBG cardiac scintigraphy and equilibrium radio-nuclide angiography before and after a 6 month period of carvedilol therapy. A static anterior view of the chest was acquired 4 hours after intravenous injection of 20 to 75 MBq of I-123 MIBG. Cardiac neuronal uptake of I-123 MIBG was measured using the heart to mediastinum count ratio (HMR). Radionuclide left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was assessed following a standard protocol. There was no major cardiac events (death or transplantation) during the follow-up period. I-123 MIBG cardiac uptake and left ventricular function respectively increased by 38% and 65% after 6 months of treatment with carvedilol (HMR 223 ± 49% vs 162 ± 26%, p < 0.0001 and LVEF = 43 ± 17% vs 26 ± 11%, p < 0.0001). Carvedilol can improve cardiac adrenergic neuronal function and left ventricular function in children with DCM. Further studies are needed to assess the relationship between improvement in I-123 MIBG cardiac uptake and the beneficial effects of carvedilol on morbidity and mortality. (authors)

  17. Impact of cardiac rehabilitation on health related quality of life.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Riaz, A

    2012-02-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs are recognized as integral part of the comprehensive care of patients with cardiovascular disease and are recommended as useful and effective (Class I) by the American Heart Association (AHA). In this study we used serial administration of the short form 36 (SF36) to evaluate patient\\'s response to CR in terms of improvement in Health related Quality of Life. A total of 49 patients were included in the analysis. There was a significant improvement observed after CR in the Physical Capacity Score (42.3 vs 49.9 p = 0.0005). There was no significant improvement in the Mental Capacity Score (54.8 vs 54.9 p = 0.96). We conclude that Cardiac Rehabilitation Program causes a significant improvement in the health related quality of life of patients by improving their physical health and well being but does not improve the mental capacity which is already at a healthy level before CR.

  18. The Johannesburg cardiac rehabilitation programme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-16

    Feb 16, 1991 ... sion 72,9% of patients were smokers, 26,3% had hypertension and 34,3% had ... Cardiac rehabilitation, including supervised exercise therapy, has become a .... sions on risk factor modification, diet, aspects of heart disease,.

  19. Optimal Technique in Cardiac Anesthesia Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Svircevic, V.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to evaluate fast-track cardiac anesthesia techniques and investigate their impact on postoperative mortality, morbidity and quality of life. The following topics will be discussed in the thesis. (1.) Is fast track cardiac anesthesia a safe technique for cardiac surgery? (2.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on mortality and morbidity after cardiac surgery? (3.) Does thoracic epidural anesthesia have an effect on quality of life after cardiac surgery? ...

  20. Cardiac effects of noncardiac neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoen, F.J.; Berger, B.M.; Guerina, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinically significant cardiovascular abnormalities may occur as secondary manifestations of noncardiac neoplasms. The principal cardiac effects of noncardiac tumors include the direct results of metastases to the heart or lungs, the indirect effects of circulating tumor products (causing nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, myeloma-associated amyloidosis, pheochromocytoma-associated cardiac hypertrophy and myofibrillar degeneration, and carcinoid heart disease), and the undesired cardiotoxicities of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. 89 references

  1. Cardiac risks in multimodal breast cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Almost all breast cancer patients receive one or more adjuvant treatments consisting of tamoxifen, aromatase inhibitors, LHRH-antogonists, chemotherapy, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy. These treatments have been shown to considerably improve overall survival. As a result, long term survival for 15 and more years is achieved in more than two thirds of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. Therefore, more interest in short and long term risks of adjuvant treatments has been arisen. The focus of this article is the long term cardiac risks of adjuvant radiotherapy in breast cancer patients and possible interactions with chemotherapy and trastuzumab. (orig.)

  2. Endothelial dysfunction after non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, E S; Fonnes, S; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    was to systematically review the literature to evaluate the association between non-cardiac surgery and non-invasive markers of endothelial function. METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library Database according to the PRISMA guidelines. Endothelial dysfunction was described only...... transplantation and vascular surgery respectively) had an improvement in endothelial dysfunction 1 month after surgery. CONCLUSION: Endothelial function changes in relation to surgery. Assessment of endothelial function by non-invasive measures has the potential to guide clinicians in the prevention or treatment...

  3. An ethical framework for cardiac report cards: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Shawn A; Rawal, Shail; Martin, Douglas K

    2005-03-28

    The recent proliferation of health care report cards, especially in cardiac care, has occurred in the absence of an ethical framework to guide in their development and implementation. An ethical framework is a consistent and comprehensive theoretical foundation in ethics, and is formed by integrating ethical theories, relevant literature, and other critical information (such as the views of stakeholders). An ethical framework in the context of cardiac care provides guidance for developing cardiac report cards (CRCs) that are relevant and legitimate to all stakeholders. The purpose of this study is to develop an ethical framework for CRCs. Delphi technique - 13 panelists: 2 administrators, 2 cardiac nurses, 5 cardiac patients, 2 cardiologists, 1 member of the media, and 1 outcomes researcher. Panelists' views regarding the ethics of CRCs were analyzed and organized into themes. We have organized panelists' views into ten principles that emerged from the data: 1) improving quality of care, 2) informed understanding, 3) public accountability, 4) transparency, 5) equity, 6) access to information 7) quality of information, 8) multi-stakeholder collaboration, 9) legitimacy, and 10) evaluation and continuous quality improvement. We have developed a framework to guide the development and dissemination of CRCs. This ethical framework can provide necessary guidance for those generating CRCs and may help them avoid a number of difficult issues associated with existing ones.

  4. Three good reasons for heart surgeons to understand cardiac metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doenst, Torsten; Bugger, Heiko; Schwarzer, Michael; Faerber, Gloria; Borger, Michael A; Mohr, Friedrich W

    2008-05-01

    It is the principal goal of cardiac surgeons to improve or reinstate contractile function with, through or after a surgical procedure on the heart. Uninterrupted contractile function of the heart is irrevocably linked to the uninterrupted supply of energy in the form of ATP. Thus, it would appear natural that clinicians interested in myocardial contractile function are interested in the way the heart generates ATP, i.e. the processes generally referred to as energy metabolism. Yet, it may appear that the relevance of energy metabolism in cardiac surgery is limited to the area of cardioplegia, which is a declining research interest. It is the goal of this review to change this trend and to illustrate the role and the therapeutic potential of metabolism and metabolic interventions for management. We present three compelling reasons why cardiac metabolism is of direct, practical interest to the cardiac surgeon and why a better understanding of energy metabolism might indeed result in improved surgical outcomes: (1) To understand cardioplegic arrest, ischemia and reperfusion, one needs a working knowledge of metabolism; (2) hyperglycemia is an underestimated and modifiable risk factor; (3) acute metabolic interventions can be effective in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  5. An ethical framework for cardiac report cards: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawal Shail

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent proliferation of health care report cards, especially in cardiac care, has occurred in the absence of an ethical framework to guide in their development and implementation. An ethical framework is a consistent and comprehensive theoretical foundation in ethics, and is formed by integrating ethical theories, relevant literature, and other critical information (such as the views of stakeholders. An ethical framework in the context of cardiac care provides guidance for developing cardiac report cards (CRCs that are relevant and legitimate to all stakeholders. The purpose of this study is to develop an ethical framework for CRCs. Methods Delphi technique – 13 panelists: 2 administrators, 2 cardiac nurses, 5 cardiac patients, 2 cardiologists, 1 member of the media, and 1 outcomes researcher. Panelists' views regarding the ethics of CRCs were analyzed and organized into themes. Results We have organized panelists' views into ten principles that emerged from the data: 1 improving quality of care, 2 informed understanding, 3 public accountability, 4 transparency, 5 equity, 6 access to information 7 quality of information, 8 multi-stakeholder collaboration, 9 legitimacy, and 10 evaluation and continuous quality improvement. Conclusion We have developed a framework to guide the development and dissemination of CRCs. This ethical framework can provide necessary guidance for those generating CRCs and may help them avoid a number of difficult issues associated with existing ones.

  6. Imaging in cardiac mass lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundinger, A.; Gruber, H.P.; Dinkel, E.; Geibel, A.; Beck, A.; Wimmer, B.; Schlosser, V.

    1992-01-01

    In 26 patients with cardiac mass lesions confirmed by surgery, diagnostic imaging was performed preoperatively by means of two-dimensional echocardiography (26 patients), angiography (12 patients), correlative computed tomography (CT, 8 patients), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 3 patients). Two-dimensional echocardiography correctly identified the cardiac masses in all patients. Angiography missed two of 12 cardiac masses; CT missed one of eight. MRI identified three of three cardiac masses. Although the sensitivity of two-dimensional echocardiography was high (100%), all methods lacked specificity. None of the methods allowed differentiation between myxoma (n=13) and thrombus (n=7). Malignancy of the lesions was successfully predicted by noninvasive imaging methods in all six patients. However, CT and MRI provided additional information concerning cardiac mural infiltration, pericardial involvement, and extracardiac tumor extension, and should be integrated within a preoperative imaging strategy. Thus two-dimensional echocardiography is the method of choice for primary assessment of patients with suspected cardiac masses. Further preoperative imaging by CT or MRI can be limited to patients with malignancies suspected on the grounds of pericardial effusion or other clinical results. (author)

  7. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, Manfred [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany); Erbel, Raimund [University Hospital Essen (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital, Mainz (Germany). Clinic and Polyclinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Barkhausen, Joerg (eds.) [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany). Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  8. Cardiac imaging. A multimodality approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thelen, Manfred; Erbel, Raimund; Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Barkhausen, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    An excellent atlas on modern diagnostic imaging of the heart Written by an interdisciplinary team of experts, Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach features an in-depth introduction to all current imaging modalities for the diagnostic assessment of the heart as well as a clinical overview of cardiac diseases and main indications for cardiac imaging. With a particular emphasis on CT and MRI, the first part of the atlas also covers conventional radiography, echocardiography, angiography and nuclear medicine imaging. Leading specialists demonstrate the latest advances in the field, and compare the strengths and weaknesses of each modality. The book's second part features clinical chapters on heart defects, endocarditis, coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, cardiac tumors, pericardial diseases, pulmonary vascular diseases, and diseases of the thoracic aorta. The authors address anatomy, pathophysiology, and clinical features, and evaluate the various diagnostic options. Key features: - Highly regarded experts in cardiology and radiology off er image-based teaching of the latest techniques - Readers learn how to decide which modality to use for which indication - Visually highlighted tables and essential points allow for easy navigation through the text - More than 600 outstanding images show up-to-date technology and current imaging protocols Cardiac Imaging: A Multimodality Approach is a must-have desk reference for cardiologists and radiologists in practice, as well as a study guide for residents in both fields. It will also appeal to cardiac surgeons, general practitioners, and medical physicists with a special interest in imaging of the heart. (orig.)

  9. Cardiac output during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P.; Sørensen, H.

    2015-01-01

    Several techniques assessing cardiac output (Q) during exercise are available. The extent to which the measurements obtained from each respective technique compares to one another, however, is unclear. We quantified Q simultaneously using four methods: the Fick method with blood obtained from...... the right atrium (Q(Fick-M)), Innocor (inert gas rebreathing; Q(Inn)), Physioflow (impedance cardiography; Q(Phys)), and Nexfin (pulse contour analysis; Q(Pulse)) in 12 male subjects during incremental cycling exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (FiO2  = 12%). While all four methods reported...... a progressive increase in Q with exercise intensity, the slopes of the Q/oxygen uptake (VO2) relationship differed by up to 50% between methods in both normoxia [4.9 ± 0.3, 3.9 ± 0.2, 6.0 ± 0.4, 4.8 ± 0.2 L/min per L/min (mean ± SE) for Q(Fick-M), Q(Inn), QP hys and Q(Pulse), respectively; P = 0...

  10. Recurrent late cardiac tamponade following cardiac surgery : a deceiving and potentially lethal complication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; Meuzelaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Cardiac tamponade, characterized by inflow obstruction of the heart chambers by extracardiac compression, is a potentially lethal complication following cardiac surgery. Case report - We present a case of recurrent cardiac tamponade following valve surgery. At first presentation,

  11. Recurrent late cardiac tamponade following cardiac surgery: a deceiving and potentially lethal complication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Ralf E.; Meuzelaar, Jacobus J.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade, characterized by inflow obstruction of the heart chambers by extracardiac compression, is a potentially lethal complication following cardiac surgery. We present a case of recurrent cardiac tamponade following valve surgery. At first presentation, diagnosis was delayed because of

  12. Cardiac function and cognition in older community-dwelling cardiac patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggermont, Laura H.P.; Aly, Mohamed F.A.; Vuijk, Pieter J.; de Boer, Karin; Kamp, Otto; van Rossum, Albert C.; Scherder, Erik J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive deficits have been reported in older cardiac patients. An underlying mechanism for these findings may be reduced cardiac function. The relationship between cardiac function as represented by different echocardiographic measures and different cognitive function domains in older

  13. A slow-releasing form of prostacyclin agonist (ONO1301SR) enhances endogenous secretion of multiple cardiotherapeutic cytokines and improves cardiac function in a rapid-pacing-induced model of canine heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, Tomonori; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Atsuhiro; Shiozaki, Motoko; Kawaguchi, Naomasa; Matsuura, Nariaki; Nakatani, Satoshi; Sakai, Yoshiki; Daimon, Takashi; Okita, Yutaka; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2013-08-01

    Cardiac functional deterioration in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is known to be reversed by intramyocardial up-regulation of multiple cardioprotective factors, whereas a prostacyclin analog, ONO1301, has been shown to paracrinally activate interstitial cells to release a variety of protective factors. We here hypothesized that intramyocardial delivery of a slow-releasing form of ONO1301 (ONO1301SR) might activate regional myocardium to up-regulate cardiotherapeutic factors, leading to regional and global functional recovery in DCM. ONO1301 elevated messenger RNA and protein level of hepatocyte growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and stromal-derived factor-1 of normal human dermal fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Intramyocardial delivery of ONO1301SR, which is ONO1301 mixed with polylactic and glycolic acid polymer (PLGA), but not that of PLGA only, yielded significant global functional recovery in a canine rapid pacing-induced DCM model, assessed by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization (n = 5 each). Importantly, speckle-tracking echocardiography unveiled significant regional functional recovery in the ONO1301-delivered territory, consistent to significantly increased vascular density, reduced interstitial collagen accumulation, attenuated myocyte hypertrophy, and reversed mitochondrial structure in the corresponding area. Intramyocardial delivery of ONO1301SR, which is a PLGA-coated slow-releasing form of ONO1301, up-regulated multiple cardiotherapeutic factors in the injected territory, leading to region-specific reverse left ventricular remodeling and consequently a global functional recovery in a rapid-pacing-induced canine DCM model, warranting a further preclinical study to optimize this novel drug-delivery system to treat DCM. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. C.A.U.S.E.: Cardiac arrest ultra-sound exam--a better approach to managing patients in primary non-arrhythmogenic cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Caleb; Shuler, Klaus; Hannan, Hashibul; Sonyika, Chionesu; Likourezos, Antonios; Marshall, John

    2008-02-01

    Cardiac arrest is a condition frequently encountered by physicians in the hospital setting including the Emergency Department, Intensive Care Unit and medical/surgical wards. This paper reviews the current literature involving the use of ultrasound in resuscitation and proposes an algorithmic approach for the use of ultrasound during cardiac arrest. At present there is the need for a means of differentiating between various causes of cardiac arrest, which are not a direct result of a primary ventricular arrhythmia. Identifying the cause of pulseless electrical activity or asystole is important as the underlying cause is what guides management in such cases. This approach, incorporating ultrasound to manage cardiac arrest aids in the diagnosis of the most common and easily reversible causes of cardiac arrest not caused by primary ventricular arrhythmia, namely; severe hypovolemia, tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, and massive pulmonary embolus. These four conditions are addressed in this paper using four accepted emergency ultrasound applications to be performed during resuscitation of a cardiac arrest patient with the aim of determining the underlying cause of a cardiac arrest. Identifying the underlying cause of cardiac arrest represents the one of the greatest challenges of managing patients with asystole or PEA and accurate determination has the potential to improve management by guiding therapeutic decisions. We include several clinical images demonstrating examples of cardiac tamponade, massive pulmonary embolus, and severe hypovolemia secondary to abdominal aortic aneurysm. In conclusion, this protocol has the potential to reduce the time required to determine the etiology of a cardiac arrest and thus decrease the time between arrest and appropriate therapy.

  15. Survival in patients without acute ST elevation after cardiac arrest and association with early coronary angiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dankiewicz, J; Nielsen, N; Annborn, M

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate whether early coronary angiography (CAG) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause is associated with improved outcomes in patients without acute ST elevation. METHODS: The target temperature management after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (TTM) trial...... showed no difference in all-cause mortality or neurological outcome between an intervention of 33 and 36 °C. In this post hoc analysis, 544 patients where the admission electrocardiogram did not show acute ST elevation were included. Early CAG was defined as being performed on admission or within...... early CAG was not significantly associated with survival. CONCLUSIONS: In this post hoc observational study of a large randomized trial, early coronary angiography for patients without acute ST elevation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of a presumed cardiac cause was not associated with improved...

  16. Type D patients report poorer health status prior to and after cardiac rehabilitation compared to non-type D patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelle, Aline J; Erdman, Ruud A M; van Domburg, Ron T

    2008-01-01

    Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients.......Type D personality is an emerging risk factor in coronary artery disease (CAD). Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) improves outcomes, but little is known about the effects of CR on Type D patients....

  17. Halogenated anaesthetics and cardiac protection in cardiac and non-cardiac anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landoni Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile anaesthetic agents have direct protective properties against ischemic myocardial damage. The implementation of these properties during clinical anaesthesia can provide an additional tool in the treatment or prevention, or both, of ischemic cardiac dysfunction in the perioperative period. A recent meta-analysis showed that desflurane and sevoflurane reduce postoperative mortality and incidence of myocardial infarction following cardiac surgery, with significant advantages in terms of postoperative cardiac troponin release, need for inotrope support, time on mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit and overall hospital stay. Multicentre, randomised clinical trials had previously demonstrated that the use of desflurane can reduce the postoperative release of cardiac troponin I, the need for inotropic support, and the number of patients requiring prolonged hospitalisation following coronary artery bypass graft surgery either with and without cardiopulmonary bypass. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Guidelines recommend volatile anaesthetic agents during non-cardiac surgery for the maintenance of general anaesthesia in patients at risk for myocardial infarction. Nonetheless, e vidence in non-coronary surgical settings is contradictory and will be reviewed in this paper together with the mechanisms of cardiac protection by volatile agents.

  18. The potential of electrocardiographic markers to tune cardiac device therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, S.C.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis an effort was made to translate basic research into clinical practice to improve cardiac device therapy. We showed the electrocardiogram (ECG) is everything but obsolete or outdated and is of great value as a simple non-invasive tool in identifying individuals that can benefit from

  19. Endothelial Dysfunction in Resuscitated Cardiac Arrest (ENDO-RCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Anna Sina P; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Kjærgaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Morbidity and mortality following initial survival of cardiac arrest remain high despite great efforts to improve resuscitation techniques and post-resuscitation care, in part due to the ischemia-reperfusion injury secondary to the restoration of the blood circulation. Patients resusc...

  20. Outcomes After Cardiac Arrest in an Adult Burn Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-07

    of in-hospital CA are likely to report widely varying survival rates as a result of study populations with characteristic but distinct demo- graphics ...Rehabil 1997;18:S119. [2] Sandroni C, Nolan J. In-hospital cardiac arrest: incidence, prognosis and possible measures to improve survival. Intens Care Med

  1. Practolol in Hyperthyroid Cardiac Failure | Epstein | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Practolol (Eraldint), a recently developed beta-adrenergic blocking agent, has been found useful in conjunction with digitalis and diuretics in 6 patients with thyrocardiac disease who had been refractory to therapy. In all cases cardiac failure improved dramatically, suggesting better myocardial efficiency and a return of ...

  2. Expanded cardiac rehabilitation in socially vulnerable patients with myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Kathrine; Nielsen, Kirsten Melgaard; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) has been shown to reduce cardiovascular risk. A research project performed at a university hospital in Denmark offered an expanded CR intervention to socially vulnerable patients. One-year follow-up showed significant improvements concerning medicine...

  3. Cardiac resynchronization therapy : advances in optimal patient selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Gabe Berend

    2007-01-01

    Despite the impressive results of cardiac resynchronization theraphy (CRT) in recent large randomized trials a consistent number of patients fails to improve following CRT implantation when the established CRT selection criteria (NYHA class III-IV heart failure, LV ejection fraction ≤35 % and QRS

  4. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  5. Exercise training restores cardiac protein quality control in heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane C Campos

    Full Text Available Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H₂O₂ release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H₂O₂ resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca²⁺-induced permeability transition and reduced H₂O₂ release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy.

  6. Cardiac rehabilitation costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghei, Mahshid; Turk-Adawi, Karam; Isaranuwatchai, Wanrudee; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Oh, Paul; Chessex, Caroline; Grace, Sherry L

    2017-10-01

    Despite the clinical benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and its cost-effectiveness, it is not widely received. Arguably, capacity could be greatly increased if lower-cost models were implemented. The aims of this review were to describe: the costs associated with CR delivery, approaches to reduce these costs, and associated implications. Upon finalizing the PICO statement, information scientists were enlisted to develop the search strategy of MEDLINE, Embase, CDSR, Google Scholar and Scopus. Citations identified were considered for inclusion by the first author. Extracted cost data were summarized in tabular format and qualitatively synthesized. There is wide variability in the cost of CR delivery around the world, and patients pay out-of-pocket for some or all of services in 55% of countries. Supervised CR costs in high-income countries ranged from PPP$294 (Purchasing Power Parity; 2016 United States Dollars) in the United Kingdom to PPP$12,409 in Italy, and in middle-income countries ranged from PPP$146 in Venezuela to PPP$1095 in Brazil. Costs relate to facilities, personnel, and session dose. Delivering CR using information and communication technology (mean cost PPP$753/patient/program), lowering the dose and using lower-cost personnel and equipment are important strategies to consider in containing costs, however few explicitly low-cost models are available in the literature. More research is needed regarding the costs to deliver CR in community settings, the cost-effectiveness of CR in most countries, and the economic impact of return-to-work with CR participation. A low-cost model of CR should be standardized and tested for efficacy across multiple healthcare systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Patch in Cardiac Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Alizadeh Ghavidel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Excessive bleeding presents a risk for the patient in cardiovascular surgery. Local haemostatic agents are of great value to reduce bleeding and related complications. TachoSil (Nycomed, Linz, Austria is a sterile, haemostatic agent that consists of an equine collagen patchcoated with human fibrinogen and thrombin. This study evaluated the safety and efficacy of TachoSil compared to conventional technique.Methods: Forty-two patients scheduled for open heart surgeries, were entered to this study from August 2010 to May 2011. After primary haemostatic measures, patients divided in two groups based on surgeon’s judgment. Group A: 20 patients for whom TachoSil was applied and group B: 22 patients that conventional method using Surgicel (13 patients or wait and see method (9 cases, were performed in order to control the bleeding. In group A, 10 patients were male with mean age of 56.95±15.67 years and in group B, 9 cases were male with mean age of 49.95±14.41 years. In case group 70% (14/20 of the surgeries were redo surgeries versus 100% (22/22 in control group.Results: Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. In TachoSil group 75% of patients required transfusion versus 90.90% in group B (P=0.03.Most transfusions consisted of packed red blood cell; 2±1.13 units in group A versus 3.11±1.44 in group B (P=0.01, however there were no significant differences between two groups regarding the mean total volume of intra and post-operative bleeding. Re-exploration was required in 10% in group A versus 13.63% in group B (P=0.67.Conclusion: TachoSil may act as a superior alternative in different types of cardiac surgery in order to control the bleeding and therefore reducing transfusion requirement.

  8. A Benign Cardiac Growth but Not So Indolent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil S. Wani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac lipomatous hypertrophy is a rare benign condition that usually involves the interatrial septum. Due to its benign nature it rarely requires intervention. Its presence outside the interatrial septum is reported infrequently. We present a case of lipomatous hypertrophy in the intraventricular septum that was complicated by a severe, symptomatic, and disabling dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The symptoms significantly improved following the excision of the mass. In our case transthoracic echocardiogram was used to visualize the mass and measure the severity of the obstruction; Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to characterize the mass and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis.

  9. A Benign Cardiac Growth but Not So Indolent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sahadev T.; Biederman, Robert W. W.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac lipomatous hypertrophy is a rare benign condition that usually involves the interatrial septum. Due to its benign nature it rarely requires intervention. Its presence outside the interatrial septum is reported infrequently. We present a case of lipomatous hypertrophy in the intraventricular septum that was complicated by a severe, symptomatic, and disabling dynamic left ventricular outflow tract obstruction. The symptoms significantly improved following the excision of the mass. In our case transthoracic echocardiogram was used to visualize the mass and measure the severity of the obstruction; Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging was used to characterize the mass and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. PMID:27293911

  10. Functions of PDE3 Isoforms in Cardiac Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movsesian, Matthew; Ahmad, Faiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Isoforms in the PDE3 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases have important roles in cyclic nucleotide-mediated signalling in cardiac myocytes. These enzymes are targeted by inhibitors used to increase contractility in patients with heart failure, with a combination of beneficial and adverse effects on clinical outcomes. This review covers relevant aspects of the molecular biology of the isoforms that have been identified in cardiac myocytes; the roles of these enzymes in modulating cAMP-mediated signalling and the processes mediated thereby; and the potential for targeting these enzymes to improve the profile of clinical responses. PMID:29415428

  11. Post-resuscitation care for survivors of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashvarya Mangla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest can occur following a myriad of clinical conditions. With advancement of medical science and improvements in Emergency Medical Services systems, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation for patients who suffer an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA continues to increase. Managing these patients is challenging and requires a structured approach including stabilization of cardiopulmonary status, early consideration of neuroprotective strategies, identifying and managing the etiology of arrest and initiating treatment to prevent recurrence. This requires a closely coordinated multidisciplinary team effort. In this article, we will review the initial management of survivors of OHCA, highlighting advances and ongoing controversies.

  12. Extra-cardiac manifestations of adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaeta, Stephen A; Ward, Cary; Krasuski, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in correction or palliation of congenital cardiac lesions has greatly improved the lifespan of congenital heart disease patients, resulting in a rapidly growing adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) population. As this group has increased in number and age, emerging science has highlighted the systemic nature of ACHD. Providers caring for these patients are tasked with long-term management of multiple neurologic, pulmonary, hepatic, renal, and endocrine manifestations that arise as syndromic associations with congenital heart defects or as sequelae of primary structural or hemodynamic abnormalities. In this review, we outline the current understanding and recent research into these extra-cardiac manifestations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advances in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging of congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driessen, Mieke M.P. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); The Interuniversity Cardiology Institute of the Netherlands (ICIN) - Netherlands Heart Institute, PO Box 19258, Utrecht (Netherlands); Breur, Johannes M.P.J. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J.; Oorschot, Joep W.M. van; Leiner, Tim [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kimmenade, Roland R.J. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijboom, Folkert J. [University of Utrecht, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, PO Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Due to advances in cardiac surgery, survival of patients with congenital heart disease has increased considerably during the past decades. Many of these patients require repeated cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to assess cardiac anatomy and function. In the past decade, technological advances have enabled faster and more robust cardiovascular magnetic resonance with improved image quality and spatial as well as temporal resolution. This review aims to provide an overview of advances in cardiovascular magnetic resonance hardware and acquisition techniques relevant to both pediatric and adult patients with congenital heart disease and discusses the techniques used to assess function, anatomy, flow and tissue characterization. (orig.)

  14. Animal models of cardiac cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Francesca; Malara, Natalia; Mollace, Vincenzo; Rosano, Giuseppe; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2016-09-15

    Cachexia is the loss of body weight associated with several chronic diseases including chronic heart failure (CHF). The cachectic condition is mainly due to loss of skeletal muscle mass and adipose tissue depletion. The majority of experimental in vivo studies on cachexia rely on animal models of cancer cachexia while a reliable and appropriate model for cardiac cachexia has not yet been established. A critical issue in generating a cardiac cachexia model is that genetic modifications or pharmacological treatments impairing the heart functionality and used to obtain the heart failure model might likely impair the skeletal muscle, this also being a striated muscle and sharing with the myocardium several molecular and physiological mechanisms. On the other hand, often, the induction of heart damage in the several existing models of heart failure does not necessarily lead to skeletal muscle loss and cachexia. Here we describe the main features of cardiac cachexia and illustrate some animal models proposed for cardiac cachexia studies; they include the genetic calsequestrin and Dahl salt-sensitive models, the monocrotaline model and the surgical models obtained by left anterior descending (LAD) ligation, transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and ascending aortic banding. The availability of a specific animal model for cardiac cachexia is a crucial issue since, besides the common aspects of cachexia in the different syndromes, each disease has some peculiarities in its etiology and pathophysiology leading to cachexia. Such peculiarities need to be unraveled in order to find new targets for effective therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Improvement in Care and Outcomes for Emergency Medical Service-Transported Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) With and Without Prehospital Cardiac Arrest: A Mission: Lifeline STEMI Accelerator Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kragholm, Kristian; Lu, Di; Chiswell, Karen; Al-Khalidi, Hussein R; Roettig, Mayme L; Roe, Matthew; Jollis, James; Granger, Christopher B

    2017-10-11

    Patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) may benefit from direct transport to a percutaneous cardiac intervention (PCI) hospital but have previously been less likely to bypass local non-PCI hospitals to go to a PCI center. We reported time trends in emergency medical service transport and care of patients with STEMI with and without OHCA included from 171 PCI-capable hospitals in 16 US regions with participation in the Mission: Lifeline STEMI Accelerator program between July 1, 2012, and March 31, 2014. Time trends by quarter were assessed using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for hospital clustering. Of 13 189 emergency medical service-transported patients, 88.7% (N=11 703; 10.5% OHCA) were taken directly to PCI hospitals. Among 1486 transfer-in patients, 21.7% had OHCA. Direct transport to a PCI center for OHCA increased from 74.7% (July 1, 2012) to 83.6% (March 31, 2014) (odds ratio per quarter, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.14), versus 89.0% to 91.0% for patients without OHCA (odds ratio, 1.03; 95% confidence interval, 0.99-1.07; interaction P =0.23). The proportion with prehospital ECGs increased for patients taken directly to PCI centers (53.9%-61.9% for those with OHCA versus 73.9%-81.9% for those without OHCA; interaction P =0.12). Of 997 patients with OHCA taken directly to PCI hospitals and treated with primary PCI, first medical contact-to-device times within the guideline-recommended goal of ≤90 minutes were met for 34.5% on July 1, 2012, versus 41.8% on March 31, 2014 (51.6% and 56.1%, respectively, for 9352 counterparts without OHCA; interaction P =0.72). Direct transport to PCI hospitals increased for patients with STEMI with and without OHCA during the 2012 to 2014 Mission: Lifeline STEMI Accelerator program. Proportions with prehospital ECGs and timely reperfusion increased for patients taken directly to PCI hospitals. © 2017 The Authors

  16. Acquisition, processing and display of gated cardiac scintigrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpert, N.M.; Chesler, D.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Potsaid, M.S.; Pohost, G.M.; Dinsmore, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    An improved method for non-traumatic and essentially noninvasive evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function with /sup 99m/Tc as the tracer was developed. This method combines previously used EKG gating techniques for cardiac blood pool visualization with new computerized acquisition, processing and display techniques. An Anger camera, a small computer, and a physiological synchronizer are used to acquire a sequence of eight scintigrams which span the entire cardiac cycle. Under our present protocol two twenty-minute sequences are obtained, one an LAO (50 0 ) projection, the other an RAO (30 0 ) projection. Subsequently these images are processed on-line with a digital filter to increase definition of the cardiac borders. The eight images are then displayed sequentially on a specially designed electronic monitor to give an impression of the beating heart somewhat analogous to that obtained with invasive contrast angiography

  17. Cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in myeloma-associated cardiac amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanile, Alfonso; Sozzi, Fabiola B; Canetta, Ciro; Danzi, Gian Battista

    2013-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with multiple myeloma and light-chain amyloidosis with significant heart involvement developed an in-hospital cardiac arrest. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a stable sinus rhythm without any cerebral damage was restored, and the patient was admitted to the coronary care unit. A cardioverter-defibrillator was implanted, and it successfully intervened in two sustained ventricular tachycardia episodes and one ventricular fibrillation episode, which were recorded during hospitalization. After achieving discrete cardiac compensation, the patient was transferred to the emergency medicine department where she underwent chemotherapy for multiple myeloma. The patient died 40 days after admission from refractory heart failure. In the literature, there are studies that describe the use of cardioverter-defibrillator implantation in cardiac amyloidosis; however, at present, there is no evidence of a beneficial effect on survival with the use of this intervention. A high index of suspicion for amyloid heart disease and early diagnosis are critical to improving outcomes.

  18. Minimally Invasive Cardiac Surgery: Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive cardiac surgery is less traumatic and therefore leads to quicker recovery. With the assistance of engineering technologies on devices, imaging, and robotics, in conjunction with surgical technique, minimally invasive cardiac surgery will improve clinical outcomes and expand the cohort of patients that can be treated. We used transapical aortic valve implantation as an example to demonstrate that minimally invasive cardiac surgery can be implemented with the integration of surgical techniques and engineering technologies. Feasibility studies and long-term evaluation results prove that transapical aortic valve implantation under MRI guidance is feasible and practical. We are investigating an MRI compatible robotic surgical system to further assist the surgeon to precisely deliver aortic valve prostheses via a transapical approach. Ex vivo experimentation results indicate that a robotic system can also be employed in in vivo models.

  19. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B.; Screaton, Nicholas J.

    2009-01-01

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  20. Electrospun biocomposite nanofibrous patch for cardiac tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Ramakrishna, Seeram [Health Care and Energy Materials Laboratory, Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Kai, Dan [NUS Graduate School of Integrative Sciences and Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Ghasemi-Mobarakeh, Laleh, E-mail: nnimpp@nus.edu.s [Islamic Azad University, Najafabad Branch, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    A bioengineered construct that matches the chemical, mechanical, biological properties and extracellular matrix morphology of native tissue could be suitable as a cardiac patch for supporting the heart after myocardial infarction. The potential of utilizing a composite nanofibrous scaffold of poly(dl-lactide-co-glycolide)/gelatin (PLGA/Gel) as a biomimetic cardiac patch is studied by culturing a population of cardiomyocyte containing cells on the electrospun scaffolds. The chemical characterization and mechanical properties of the electrospun PLGA and PLGA/Gel nanofibers were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and tensile measurements. The biocompatibility of the scaffolds was also studied and the cardiomyocytes seeded on PLGA/Gel nanofibers were found to express the typical functional cardiac proteins such as alpha-actinin and troponin I, showing the easy integration of cardiomyocytes on PLGA/Gel scaffolds. Our studies strengthen the application of electrospun PLGA/Gel nanofibers as a bio-mechanical support for injured myocardium and as a potential substrate for induction of endogenous cardiomyocyte proliferation, ultimately reducing the cardiac dysfunction and improving cardiac remodeling.

  1. Cardiac causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension: assessment with multidetector CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Gopalan, Deepa; Agrawal, S.K.B. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Papworth Hospital NHS Trust, Diagnostic Centre, Department of Radiology, Papworth Everard, Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-15

    The causes of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are diverse and include multiple congenital and acquired cardiac diseases as well as diseases primarily affecting the pulmonary vasculature, lung, pleura and chest wall. The traditional role of CT in evaluating PAH includes assessment of pulmonary vasculature and lung parenchyma with limited assessment of the heart. Advances in multidetector CT technology with improved spatial and temporal resolution now permit accurate delineation of cardiac morphology. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) is widely utilised in the workup of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease and can identify both pulmonary and cardiac causes. As the initial presentation for CTPA is often precipitated by nonspecific, unexplained symptoms and therefore undertaken by a general radiologist, it is important that a systematic approach to the interpretation of these studies, including cardiac evaluation, is routinely adopted. This paper reviews the CT evaluation in pulmonary hypertension with a particular focus on the cardiac causes, their subclassification into congenital systemic to pulmonary shunts and secondary to left heart disease, and their imaging features. It emphasises the use of a systematic approach to interpretation of CTPA examinations both in patients with known PAH and those with previously unsuspected disease. (orig.)

  2. Current Pharmacological Advances in the Treatment of Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Papastylianou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac arrest is defined as the sudden cessation of spontaneous ventilation and circulation. Within 15 seconds of cardiac arrest, the patient loses consciousness, electroencephalogram becomes flat after 30 seconds, pupils dilate fully after 60 seconds, and cerebral damage takes place within 90–300 seconds. It is essential to act immediately as irreversible damage can occur in a short time. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR is an attempt to restore spontaneous circulation through a broad range of interventions which are early defibrillation, high-quality and uninterrupted chest compressions, advanced airway interventions, and pharmacological interventions. Drugs should be considered only after initial shocks have been delivered (when indicated and chest compressions and ventilation have been started. During cardiopulmonary resuscitation, no specific drug therapy has been shown to improve survival to hospital discharge after cardiac arrest, and only few drugs have a proven benefit for short-term survival. This paper reviews current pharmacological treatment of cardiac arrest. There are three groups of drugs relevant to the management of cardiac arrest: vasopressors, antiarrhythmics, and other drugs such as sodium bicarbonate, calcium, magnesium, atropine, fibrinolytic drugs, and corticosteroids.

  3. The Spectrum of Epidemiology Underlying Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Meiso; Shimizu, Wataru; Albert, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from cardiac arrest is a major international public health problem accounting for an estimated 15–20% of all deaths. Although resuscitation rates are generally improving throughout the world, the majority of individuals who suffer a sudden cardiac arrest will not survive. SCD most often develops in older adults with acquired structural heart disease, but it also rarely occurs in the young, where it is more commonly due to inherited disorders. Coronary heart disease (CHD) is known to be the most common pathology underlying SCD, followed by cardiomyopathies, inherited arrhythmia syndromes, and valvular heart disease. Over the past three decades, declines in SCD rates have not been as steep as for other causes of CHD deaths, and there is a growing fraction of SCDs not due to CHD and/or ventricular arrhythmias, particularly among certain subsets of the population. The growing heterogeneity of the pathologies and mechanisms underlying SCD present major challenges for SCD prevention, which are magnified further by a frequent lack of recognition of the underlying cardiac condition prior to death. Multifaceted preventative approaches, which address risk factors in seemingly low risk and known high-risk populations will be required to decrease the burden of SCD. In this Compendium, we review the wide-ranging spectrum of epidemiology underlying SCD within both the general population and in high-risk subsets with established cardiac disease placing an emphasis on recent global trends, remaining uncertainties, and potential targeted preventive strategies. PMID:26044246

  4. Guideline for appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Hong, Yoo Jin; Yong, Hwan Seok; Kim, Sung Mok; Kim, Jeong A; Yang, Dong Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of deaths in Korea, along with malignant neoplasms and cerebrovascular diseases. The proper diagnosis and management for patients with suspected heart diseases should be warranted for the public health care. Advances in CT technology have allowed detailed images of the heart to be obtained, which enable evaluations not only of the coronary arteries but also of other cardiac structures. Currently, the latest multi-detector CT machines are widespread around Korea. The appropriate use of cardiac CT may lead to improvements of the physicians' medical performances and to reduce medical costs which eventually contribute to promotions of public health. However, until now, there has been no guidelines regarding the appropriate use of cardiac CT in Korea. We intend to provide guidelines for the appropriate use of cardiac CT in heart diseases based on scientific data. The purpose of this guideline is to assist the clinicians and other health professionals when using cardiac CT for diagnosis and treatments of heart diseases.

  5. The effects of levosimendan in cardiac surgery patients with poor left ventricular function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hert, Stefan G.; Lorsomradee, Suraphong; Cromheecke, Stefanie; van der Linden, Philippe J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with poor left ventricular function often require inotropic drug support immediately after cardiopulmonary bypass. Levosimendan improves cardiac function by a novel mechanism of action compared to currently available drugs. We hypothesized that, in patients with severely

  6. Optimizing survival outcomes for adult patients with nontraumatic cardiac arrest [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julianna; Zaurova, Milana

    2016-10-22

    Patient survival after cardiac arrest can be improved significantly with prompt and effective resuscitative care. This systematic review analyzes the basic life support factors that improve survival outcome, including chest compression technique and rapid defibrillation of shockable rhythms. For patients who are successfully resuscitated, comprehensive postresuscitation care is essential. Targeted temperature management is recommended for all patients who remain comatose, in addition to careful monitoring of oxygenation, hemodynamics, and cardiac rhythm. Management of cardiac arrest in circumstances such as pregnancy, pulmonary embolism, opioid overdose and other toxicologic causes, hypothermia, and coronary ischemia are also reviewed. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Emergency Medicine Practice].

  7. Skills of primary healthcare physicians in paediatric cardiac auscultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanakis, Ioannis; Petridou, Eleni T H; Varlamis, George; Matsoukis, Ioannis L; Papadopoulou-Legbelou, Kiriaki; Kalmanti, Maria

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the performance of primary healthcare physicians in paediatric cardiac auscultation and the impact of a multimedia-based teaching intervention. A total of 106 primary healthcare physicians (77 paediatricians, 14 general practitioners and 15 medical graduates) attended four paediatric cardiac auscultation teaching courses based on virtual patients' presentation (digital phonocardiography). Their auscultatory performance was documented at the beginning of each course and at the end of two of the courses. Participants initially detected 73% of abnormal murmurs and 17% of additional sounds, while 22% of innocent murmurs were interpreted as abnormal. Overall cardiac auscultation performance, assessed by a combined auscultation score, was low and independent of training level (graduates: 39.5/trainees: 42.8/board certified: 42.6, p = 0.89) or specialty (paediatricians: 42.7/general practitioners: 43.1, p = 0.89). Multimedia-based teaching was associated with a significant improvement in abnormal murmur (92.5%) and additional sound (40%) detection (p auscultation, independent of training level or specialty, still leave potential for improvement. Multimedia-based teaching interventions represent an effective means of improving paediatric cardiac auscultatory skills. ©2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  8. Use of endpoint adjudication to improve the quality and validity of endpoint assessment for medical device development and post marketing evaluation: Rationale and best practices. A report from the cardiac safety research consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Jonathan H; Heise, Ted; Carson, Peter; Canos, Daniel; Hiatt, Jo Carol; Vranckx, Pascal; Christen, Thomas; Cutlip, Donald E

    2017-08-01

    This white paper provides a summary of presentations, discussions and conclusions of a Thinktank entitled "The Role of Endpoint Adjudication in Medical Device Clinical Trials". The think tank was cosponsored by the Cardiac Safety Research Committee, MDEpiNet and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and was convened at the FDA's White Oak headquarters on March 11, 2016. Attention was focused on tailoring best practices for evaluation of endpoints in medical device clinical trials, practical issues in endpoint adjudication of therapeutic, diagnostic, biomarker and drug-device combinations, and the role of adjudication in regulatory and reimbursement issues throughout the device lifecycle. Attendees included representatives from medical device companies, the FDA, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), end point adjudication specialist groups, clinical research organizations, and active, academically based adjudicators. The manuscript presents recommendations from the think tank regarding (1) rationale for when adjudication is appropriate, (2) best practices establishment and operation of a medical device adjudication committee and (3) the role of endpoint adjudication for post market evaluation in the emerging era of real world evidence. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayad, Hadi; Monnier, Florian [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France); Odille, Freedy; Felblinger, Jacques [INSERM U947, University of Nancy, Nancy (France); Lamare, Frederic [INCIA, UMR5287, CNRS, CHU Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Visvikis, Dimitris [LaTIM, INSERM, UMR 1101, Brest (France)

    2015-05-18

    Respiratory and cardiac motion in PET/MR imaging leads to reduced quantitative and qualitative image accuracy. Correction methodologies involve the use of double gated acquisitions which lead to low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and to issues concerning the combination of cardiac and respiratory frames. The objective of this work is to use a generalized reconstruction by inversion of coupled systems (GRICS) approach, previously used for PET/MR respiratory motion correction, combined with a cardiac phase signal and a reconstruction incorporated PET motion correction approach in order to reconstruct motion free images from dual gated PET acquisitions. The GRICS method consists of formulating parallel MRI in the presence of patient motion as a coupled inverse problem. Its resolution, using a fixed-point method, allows the reconstructed image to be improved using a motion model constructed from the raw MR data and two respiratory belts. GRICS obtained respiratory displacements are interpolated using the cardiac phase derived from an ECG to model simultaneous cardiac and respiratory motion. Three different volunteer datasets (4DMR acquisitions) were used for evaluation. GATE was used to simulate 4DPET datasets corresponding to the acquired 4DMR images. Simulated data were subsequently binned using 16 cardiac phases (M1) vs diastole only (M2), in combination with 8 respiratory amplitude gates. Respiratory and cardiac motion corrected PET images using either M1 or M2 were compared to respiratory only corrected images and evaluated in terms of SNR and contrast improvement. Significant visual improvements were obtained when correcting simultaneously for respiratory and cardiac motion (using 16 cardiac phase or diastole only) compared to respiratory motion only compensation. Results were confirmed by an associated increased SNR and contrast. Results indicate that using GRICS is an efficient tool for respiratory and cardiac motion correction in dual gated PET/MR imaging.

  10. Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhe; Jayaram, Raja; Jiang, Lixin; Emberson, Jonathan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Qi; Du, Juan; Guarguagli, Silvia; Hill, Michael; Chen, Zhengming; Collins, Rory; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-05-05

    Complications after cardiac surgery are common and lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses of small randomized trials have suggested that perioperative statin therapy can prevent some of these complications. We randomly assigned 1922 patients in sinus rhythm who were scheduled for elective cardiac surgery to receive perioperative rosuvastatin (at a dose of 20 mg daily) or placebo. The primary outcomes were postoperative atrial fibrillation within 5 days after surgery, as assessed by Holter electrocardiographic monitoring, and myocardial injury within 120 hours after surgery, as assessed by serial measurements of the cardiac troponin I concentration. Secondary outcomes included major in-hospital adverse events, duration of stay in the hospital and intensive care unit, left ventricular and renal function, and blood biomarkers. The concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and C-reactive protein after surgery were lower in patients assigned to rosuvastatin than in those assigned to placebo (PSTICS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01573143.).

  11. Comparing Methods for Cardiac Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graeser, Karin; Zemtsovski, Mikhail; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2018-01-01

    of the left ventricular outflow tract. METHODS: The primary aim was a systematic comparison of CO with Doppler-derived 3D TEE and CO by thermodilution in a broad population of patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A subanalysis was performed comparing cross-sectional area by TEE with cardiac computed...... tomography (CT) angiography. Sixty-two patients, scheduled for elective heart surgery, were included; 1 was subsequently excluded for logistic reasons. Inclusion criteria were coronary artery bypass surgery (N = 42) and aortic valve replacement (N = 19). Exclusion criteria were chronic atrial fibrillation......, left ventricular ejection fraction below 0.40 and intracardiac shunts. Nineteen randomly selected patients had a cardiac CT the day before surgery. All images were stored for blinded post hoc analyses, and Bland-Altman plots were used to assess agreement between measurement methods, defined as the bias...

  12. A 128-channel receive-only cardiac coil for highly accelerated cardiac MRI at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Melanie; Potthast, Andreas; Sosnovik, David E; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Wiggins, Graham C; Triantafyllou, Christina; Wald, Lawrence L

    2008-06-01

    A 128-channel receive-only array coil is described and tested for cardiac imaging at 3T. The coil is closely contoured to the body with a "clam-shell" geometry with 68 posterior and 60 anterior elements, each 75 mm in diameter, and arranged in a continuous overlapped array of hexagonal symmetry to minimize nearest neighbor coupling. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and noise amplification for parallel imaging (G-factor) were evaluated in phantom and volunteer experiments. These results were compared to those of commercially available 24-channel and 32-channel coils in routine use for cardiac imaging. The in vivo measurements with the 128-channel coil resulted in SNR gains compared to the 24-channel coil (up to 2.2-fold in the apex). The 128- and 32-channel coils showed similar SNR in the heart, likely dominated by the similar element diameters of these coils. The maximum G-factor values were up to seven times better for a seven-fold acceleration factor (R=7) compared to the 24-channel coil and up to two-fold improved compared to the 32-channel coil. The ability of the 128-channel coil to facilitate highly accelerated cardiac imaging was demonstrated in four volunteers using acceleration factors up to seven-fold (R=7) in a single spatial dimension. Copyright (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device implantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkfeldt, Rikke Esberg; Johansen, Jens Brock; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2013-01-01

    Complications after cardiac implantable electronic device (CIED) treatment, including permanent pacemakers (PMs), cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with defibrillators (CRT-Ds) or without (CRT-Ps), and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), are associated with increased patient...

  14. Hybrid options for treating cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Ramanan; Leacche, Marzia; Zhao, David X; Gallion, Anna H; Mishra, Prabodh C; Byrne, John G

    2011-01-01

    The options for treating heart disease have greatly expanded during the course of the last 2 1/2 decades with the advent of hybrid technology. The hybrid option for treating cardiac disease implies using the technology of both interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery to treat cardiac disease. This rapidly developing technology has given rise to new and creative techniques to treat cardiac disease involving coronary artery disease, coronary artery disease and cardiac valve disease, and atrial fibrillation. It has also led to the establishment of new procedural suites called hybrid operating rooms that facilitate the integration of technologies of interventional cardiology catheterization laboratories with those of cardiac surgery operating rooms. The development of hybrid options for treating cardiac disease has also greatly augmented teamwork and collaboration between interventional cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... HRS Find a Specialist Share Twitter Facebook SCA Risk Assessment Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) occurs abruptly and without ... people of all ages and health conditions. Start Risk Assessment The Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) Risk Assessment Tool ...

  16. Milrinone and esmolol decrease cardiac damage after resuscitation from prolonged cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoerner, F; Lennmyr, F; Wiklund, L; Martijn, C; Semenas, E

    2015-04-01

    Long-term survival after cardiac arrest (CA) due to shock-refractory ventricular fibrillation (VF) is low. Clearly, there is a need for new pharmacological interventions in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) to improve outcome. Here, hemodynamic parameters and cardiac damage are compared between the treatment group (milrinone, esmolol and vasopressin) and controls (vasopressin only) during resuscitation from prolonged CA in piglets. A total of 26 immature male piglets were subjected to 12-min VF followed by 8-min CPR. The treatment group (n=13) received i.v. (intravenous) boluses vasopressin 0.4 U/kg, esmolol 250 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 13 min, followed by i.v. boluses esmolol 375 μg/kg and milrinone 25 μg/kg after 18 min and continuous esmolol 15 μg/kg/h infusion during 180 min reperfusion, whereas controls (n=13) received equal amounts of vasopressin and saline. A 200 J monophasic counter-shock was delivered to achieve resumption of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) after 8 min CPR. If ROSC was not achieved, another 200 J defibrillation and bolus vasopressin 0.4 U/kg would be administered in both groups. Direct current shocks at 360 J were applied as one shot per minute over maximally 5 min. Hemodynamic variables and troponin I as a marker of cardiac injury were recorded. Troponin I levels after 180 min reperfusion were lower in the treatment group than in controls (Pmilrinone, esmolol and vasopressin decreased cardiac injury compared with vasopressin alone. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Human technology after cardiac epigenesis. Artificial heart versus cardiac transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losman, J G

    1977-09-24

    Cardiovascular disease is the chief cause of death in technologically advanced countries and accounts for more than 50% of all deaths in the USA. For a patient with end-stage cardiac failure the only treatment presently available is organ replacement, either by transplantation or by the use of a mechanical heart. Transplantation has demonstrated its value: survival of more than 8 years and restoration of a normal quality of life to patients who were in end-stage cardiac decompensation. However, the prospect of routine clinical application of an artificial heart remains distant. The development of a totally implantable artificial heart still presents a series of challenging engineering problems with regard to strict constraints of size, weight, blood-material compatibility, adaptability of output to demand, efficiency and reliability of the power supply, and safety if nuclear fuel is used. The totally artificial heart is presently not an alternative to the