WorldWideScience

Sample records for neuraxial anaesthesia presenting

  1. Rabies vaccine and neuraxial anaesthesia | Rewari | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This case report of neuraxial anaesthesia for emergency orthopaedic surgery serves to highlight the dilemma faced by anaesthetists when surgical intervention becomes necessary in a patient on anti-rabies vaccine. The two issues of importance are the possible reduction in the efficacy of vaccination by an ...

  2. Rabies vaccine and neuraxial anaesthesia | Rewari | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 16, No 5 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  3. The use of lumbar X-rays to facilitate neuraxial anaesthesia during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-10

    May 10, 2012 ... anaesthesia in patients who had undergone previous lumbar spinal surgery. Method ... the ease and safety of the neuraxial anaesthesia procedure. The study group ... There were three dural taps without any post-dural puncture headaches .... methods or aids used during the performance of neuraxial.

  4. The use of lumbar X-rays to facilitate neuraxial anaesthesia during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of lumbar X-rays to facilitate neuraxial anaesthesia during knee replacement surgery in patients who have had previous spinal surgery. ... The study group comprised 100 patients, scheduled for knee replacement surgery. ... Only four of a total of 23 combined spinal epidural procedures were not successful.

  5. Survey of external cephalic version for breech presentation and neuraxial blockade use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiniger, Carolyn F; Sultan, Pervez; Dunn, Ashley; Carvalho, Brendan

    2016-11-01

    Neuraxial blockade may increase external cephalic version (ECV) success rates. This survey aimed to assess the frequency and characteristics of neuraxial blockade used to facilitate ECV. We surveyed Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology members regarding ECV practice using a 15-item survey developed by 3 obstetric anesthesiologists and tested for face validity. The survey was e-mailed in January 2015 and again in February 2015 to the 1056 Society of Obstetric Anesthesiology and Perinatology members. We present descriptive statistics of responses. Our survey response rate was 322 of 1056 (30.5%). Neuraxial blockade was used for ECV always by 18 (5.6%), often by 52 (16.1%), sometimes by 98 (30.4%), rarely by 78 (24.2%), and never by 46 (14.3%) of respondents. An anesthetic sensory block target was selected by 141 (43.8%) respondents, and analgesic by 102 (31.7%) respondents. Epidural drug doses ranged widely, including sufentanil 5-25 μg; lidocaine 1% or 2% 10-20 mL, bupivacaine 0.0625% to 0.5% 6-15 mL, and ropivacaine 0.2% 20 mL. Intrathecal bupivacaine was used by 182 (56.5%) respondents; the most frequent doses were 2.5 mg used by 24 (7.5%), 7.5 mg used by 35 (10.9%), and 12 mg used by 30 (9.3%). Neuraxial blockade is not universally offered to facilitate ECV, and there is wide variability in neuraxial blockade techniques, in drugs and doses administered, and in the sensory blockade (anesthetic or analgesic) targeted. Future studies need to evaluate and remove barriers to allow for more widespread use of neuraxial blockade for pain relief and to optimize ECV success rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brief report: a cost analysis of neuraxial anesthesia to facilitate external cephalic version for breech fetal presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Brendan; Tan, Jonathan M; Macario, Alex; El-Sayed, Yasser Y; Sultan, Pervez

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we sought to determine whether neuraxial anesthesia to facilitate external cephalic version (ECV) increased delivery costs for breech fetal presentation. Using a computer cost model, which considers possible outcomes and probability uncertainties at the same time, we estimated total expected delivery costs for breech presentation managed by a trial of ECV with and without neuraxial anesthesia. From published studies, the average probability of successful ECV with neuraxial anesthesia was 60% (with individual studies ranging from 44% to 87%) compared with 38% (with individual studies ranging from 31% to 58%) without neuraxial anesthesia. The mean expected total delivery costs, including the cost of attempting/performing ECV with anesthesia, equaled $8931 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $8541-$9252). The cost was $9207 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $8896-$9419) if ECV was attempted/performed without anesthesia. The expected mean incremental difference between the total cost of delivery that includes ECV with anesthesia and ECV without anesthesia was $-276 (2.5th-97.5th percentile prediction interval $-720 to $112). The total cost of delivery in women with breech presentation may be decreased (up to $720) or increased (up to $112) if ECV is attempted/performed with neuraxial anesthesia compared with ECV without neuraxial anesthesia. Increased ECV success with neuraxial anesthesia and the subsequent reduction in breech cesarean delivery rate offset the costs of providing anesthesia to facilitate ECV.

  7. Comparing provision and appropriateness of health care between immigrants and non-immigrants in Germany using the example of neuraxial anaesthesia during labour: cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razum, Oliver; Reiss, Katharina; Breckenkamp, Jürgen; Kaufner, Lutz; Brenne, Silke; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Borde, Theda; David, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Objective Research on health services for immigrants has mostly been concerned with access barriers but rarely with appropriateness and responsiveness of care. We assessed whether appropriateness and responsiveness of care depend on migration status, using provision of neuraxial anaesthesia (NA) during labour as indicator. In relation to their migration status, we analysed whether (1) women undergoing elective or secondary/urgent secondary caesarean sections (ESCS) appropriately receive NA (instead of general anaesthesia), (2) women delivering vaginally appropriately receive NA and (3) women objecting to NA, for example, for religious reasons, may deliver vaginally without receiving NA (provider responsiveness). Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Three obstetric hospitals in Berlin, Germany. Methods Questionnaire survey covering 6391 women with migration history (first and second generations) and non-immigrant women giving birth; data linkage with routine obstetric data. We assessed the effects of migrant status, German language proficiency, religion and education on the provision of NA (primary outcome) after adjusting for other maternal and obstetric parameters. Results The chance of receiving NA for elective/ESCS was independent of migrant status after controlling for confounding variables (adjusted OR (aOR) 0.93, 95% CI 0.65 to 1.33). In vaginal deliveries, first (but not second) generation women (aOR 0.79, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.95), women with low German language skills (aOR 0.77, 95% CI 0.58 to 0.99) and women with low educational attainment (aOR 0.62, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.82) had lower chances of receiving NA; there was no evidence of overprovision among women with strong affinity to Islam (aOR 0.77, 95% CI 0.63 to 0.94). Conclusions We found evidence for underprovision of care among first-generation immigrants, among women with low German language proficiency and particularly among all women with low educational attainment, irrespective of migration

  8. Anaesthesia for an emergent caesarean section in a patient with acute transverse myelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel A Hunter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 32-year-old G1P0 woman at 32 weeks and two days gestation with new onset paraplegia, hyperreflexia, and sensory disturbance that gradually progressed over the past month and acutely worsened over the last 24 hours. MRI revealed a demyelinating process of the thoracic spine and diffuse cervicothoracic cord oedema. After 7 days, her foetus developed recurrent heart rate decelerations and an emergent caesarean section was performed. On airway exam, she was Mallampati 3 with a short thyromental distance. She reported fasting overnight and into the morning. Our choice was between performing neuraxial anaesthesia in the setting of an acute demyelinating process of her spinal cord versus general anaesthesia on a patient at risk of aspiration with a potentially difficult airway. Given the potential complications of neuraxial anaesthesia, we utilized rocuronium to perform a rapid sequence induction of general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation.

  9. NEURAXIAL ANESTHESIA and OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur sahin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is one of the serious condition that commonly effects health in modern age. It was reported that obesity was three-fold increased in the last three decades. According to the statement by World Health Organisation in 2005, 700 million people will be estimated obese in 2015. While neuraxial anesthesia is a commonly used technique in the worldwide, the process may have difficulties in obese patients. In this review, the pathophysiological changes and challenges in neuraxial anesthesia procedure in obesity were assessed with current literatures. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 234-236

  10. The evidence of neuraxial administration of analgesics for cancer-related pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, G P; Benthien, K S; Nordly, M

    2015-01-01

    related to cancer, pain, neuraxial route, analgesic and side effects. The search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane for the period until February 2014. Studies were analysed according to methods, results, quality of evidence, and strength of recommendation. RESULTS: The number of abstracts...... retrieved was 2147, and 84 articles were selected for full reading. The final selection comprised nine articles regarding randomised controlled trials (RCTs) divided in four groups: neuraxial combinations of opioid and adjuvant analgesic compared with neuraxial administration of opioid alone (n = 4); single...... neuraxial drug in bolus compared with continuous administration (n = 2); single neuraxial drug compared with neuraxial placebo (n = 1); and neuraxial opioid combined with or without adjuvant analgesic compared with other comprehensive medical management than neuraxial analgesics (n = 2). The RCTs presented...

  11. Revision of loop colostomy under regional anaesthesia and sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Oriana; Thong, Sze Ying; Chia, Claramae Shulyn; Teo, Melissa Ching Ching

    2015-05-01

    Patients presenting for emergency abdominal procedures often have medical issues that cause both general anaesthesia and central neuraxial blockade to pose significant risks. Regional anaesthetic techniques are often used adjunctively for abdominal procedures under general anaesthesia, but there is limited published data on procedures done under peripheral nerve or plexus blocks. We herein report the case of a patient with recent pulmonary embolism and supraventricular tachycardia who required colostomy refashioning. Ultrasonography-guided regional anaesthesia was administered using a combination of ilioinguinal-iliohypogastric, rectus sheath and transversus abdominis plane blocks. This was supplemented with propofol and dexmedetomidine sedation as well as intermittent fentanyl and ketamine boluses to cover for visceral stimulation. We discuss the anatomical rationale for the choice of blocks and compare the anaesthetic conduct with similar cases that were previously reported.

  12. Neuraxial blockade for external cephalic version: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, P; Carvalho, B

    2011-10-01

    The desire to decrease the number of cesarean deliveries has renewed interest in external cephalic version. The rationale for using neuraxial blockade to facilitate external cephalic version is to provide abdominal muscular relaxation and reduce patient discomfort during the procedure, so permitting successful repositioning of the fetus to a cephalic presentation. This review systematically examined the current evidence to determine the safety and efficacy of neuraxial anesthesia or analgesia when used for external cephalic version. A systematic literature review of studies that examined success rates of external cephalic version with neuraxial anesthesia was performed. Published articles written in English between 1945 and 2010 were identified using the Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE and Web of Sciences databases. Six, randomized controlled studies were identified. Neuraxial blockade significantly improved the success rate in four of these six studies. A further six non-randomized studies were identified, of which four studies with control groups found that neuraxial blockade increased the success rate of external cephalic version. Despite over 850 patients being included in the 12 studies reviewed, placental abruption was reported in only one patient with a neuraxial block, compared with two in the control groups. The incidence of non-reassuring fetal heart rate requiring cesarean delivery in the anesthesia groups was 0.44% (95% CI 0.15-1.32). Neuraxial blockade improved the likelihood of success during external cephalic version, although the dosing regimen that provides optimal conditions for successful version is unclear. Anesthetic rather than analgesic doses of local anesthetics may improve success. The findings suggest that neuraxial blockade does not compromise maternal or fetal safety during external cephalic version. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimal anaesthesia techniques for penile surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Myagkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal anaesthesia as a method of central neuraxial blockade is the best choice for penile surgeries due to the following reasons: protection against intraoperative stress and early postoperative pain, simplicity of the procedure which does not depend on constitutional and anatomical features of a patient, prevention of postoperative complications.

  14. Central Neuraxial Blockade-Assisted External Cephalic Version in Reducing Caesarean Section Rate: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaji, Ibrahim; Alabi-Isama, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    We review the medical literature on the success, safety and economic value of central neuraxial blockade-assisted (CNB) external cephalic version from randomized controlled studies identified from 1951 to 2009. The result showed that more women had successful ECV with regional anaesthesia with corresponding reduction in caesarean section rate. They were 1.5 times more likely than women not receiving anaesthesia to have a successful ECV. The number to treat is six women needed to receive anaesthesia for 1 baby to be turned from breech to cephalic presentation. Feto-maternal morbidity was not increased in the CNB-aided group consisting of only transient bradycardia. Although the appropriate amount of force for safe version has not been quantified, there was no report of uterine rupture despite removal of these patients from “excessive force-pain biofeedback loop” induced through motor nerve blockade. We can attribute 30% of cost savings amounting to £42,150.00 directly to CNB using the most up to date Health Resource Group Code (HRG4). The initial results are encouraging but until the benefits and safety of CNB-aided ECV are substantiated by large randomized, blinded controlled trials, this practice cannot be universally recommended. PMID:20069044

  15. Central Neuraxial Blockade-Assisted External Cephalic Version in Reducing Caesarean Section Rate: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Bolaji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the medical literature on the success, safety and economic value of central neuraxial blockade-assisted (CNB external cephalic version from randomized controlled studies identified from 1951 to 2009. The result showed that more women had successful ECV with regional anaesthesia with corresponding reduction in caesarean section rate. They were 1.5 times more likely than women not receiving anaesthesia to have a successful ECV. The number to treat is six women needed to receive anaesthesia for 1 baby to be turned from breech to cephalic presentation. Feto-maternal morbidity was not increased in the CNB-aided group consisting of only transient bradycardia. Although the appropriate amount of force for safe version has not been quantified, there was no report of uterine rupture despite removal of these patients from “excessive force-pain biofeedback loop” induced through motor nerve blockade. We can attribute 30% of cost savings amounting to £42,150.00 directly to CNB using the most up to date Health Resource Group Code (HRG4. The initial results are encouraging but until the benefits and safety of CNB-aided ECV are substantiated by large randomized, blinded controlled trials, this practice cannot be universally recommended.

  16. Self-reported post-discharge symptoms following obstetric neuraxial blockade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, N E

    2010-10-01

    Economic pressures are leading to earlier hospital discharge following delivery, before complications of obstetric neuraxial block may become apparent. Our aim was to estimate the incidence of symptoms presenting post-discharge at a single tertiary obstetric centre.

  17. Ultrasound in obstetric anaesthesia: a review of current applications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ecimovic, P

    2010-07-01

    Ultrasound equipment is increasingly used by non-radiologists to perform interventional techniques and for diagnostic evaluation. Equipment is becoming more portable and durable, with easier user-interface and software enhancement to improve image quality. While obstetric utilisation of ultrasound for fetal assessment has developed over more than 40years, the same technology has not found a widespread role in obstetric anaesthesia. Within the broader specialty of anaesthesia; vascular access, cardiac imaging and regional anaesthesia are the areas in which ultrasound is becoming increasingly established. In addition to ultrasound for neuraxial blocks, these other clinical applications may be of value in obstetric anaesthesia practice.

  18. [Local anaesthesia in ruminants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Karl; Schwarz, Andrea; Ringer, Simone

    2017-06-20

    The use of local anaesthesia in ruminants allows many surgical procedures to be conducted free of pain, efficiently and inexpensively in the field. Local anaesthesia combined with sedation and immobilisation of the animal can replace general anaesthesia for many procedures (e. g. castration, claw amputation). The level of difficulty differs among various local anaesthetic techniques: local infiltration of tissue or anaesthesia of the cornual nerve are easily performed, whereas local anaesthesia of the eye, regional anaesthesia in limbs or anaesthesia for umbilical surgery are more difficult to carry out. This article presents an illustrated overview of the most common local anaesthetic procedures in cattle as well as in small ruminants and serves as a practical guide for veterinarians in the field. In principle, these techniques can likewise be applied in other ruminants or artiodactyls.

  19. Modern Neuraxial Anesthesia for Labor and Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Marie-Louise; Smiley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    The availability of safe, effective analgesia during labor has become an expectation for women in most of the developed world over the past two or three decades. More than 60% of women in the United States now receive some kind of neuraxial procedure during labor. This article is a brief review of the advantages and techniques of neuraxial labor analgesia along with the recent advances and controversies in the field of labor analgesia. For the most part, we have aimed the discussion at the non-anesthesiologist to give other practitioners a sense of the state of the art and science of labor analgesia in the second decade of the 21st century.

  20. Neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, K; McIlroy, D; Kasza, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed associations between intraoperative neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia, and a composite primary outcome of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, at 30 days post-randomization in POISE-2 Trial subjects. METHODS: 10 010 high-risk noncardiac surgical pat...

  1. Anaesthesia ventilators

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bello...

  2. Nitrous oxide for labor analgesia: Utilization and predictors of conversion to neuraxial analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Caitlin D; Butwick, Alexander J; Riley, Edward T; Carvalho, Brendan

    2017-08-01

    We examined the characteristics of women who choose nitrous oxide for labor analgesia and identified factors that predict conversion from nitrous oxide to labor neuraxial analgesia. Retrospective descriptive study. Labor and Delivery Ward. 146 pregnant women who used nitrous oxide for analgesia during labor and delivery between September 2014 and September 2015. Chart review only. Demographic, obstetric, and intrapartum characteristics of women using nitrous oxide were examined. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial analgesia. Data are presented as n (%), median [IQR], adjusted relative risk (aRR), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) as appropriate. During the study period, 146 women used nitrous oxide for labor analgesia (accounting for 3% of the total deliveries). The majority (71.9%) of women who used nitrous oxide were nulliparous, and over half (51.9%) had expressed an initial preference for "nonmedical birth." The conversion rate to neuraxial blockade was 63.2%, compared to a concurrent institutional rate of 85.1% in women who did not use nitrous oxide. Factors associated with conversion from nitrous oxide to neuraxial blockade were labor induction (aRR=2.0, CI 1.2-3.3) and labor augmentation (aRR=1.7, CI 1.0-2.9). Only a small number of women opted to use nitrous oxide during labor, analgesia was minimal, and most converted to neuraxial analgesia. Women with induced and augmented labors should be counseled about the increased likelihood that they will convert to neuraxial analgesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Neuraxial blockade for external cephalic version: Cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasato, Kelly; Kaneshiro, Bliss; Salcedo, Jennifer

    2015-07-01

    Neuraxial blockade (epidural or spinal anesthesia/analgesia) with external cephalic version increases the external cephalic version success rate. Hospitals and insurers may affect access to neuraxial blockade for external cephalic version, but the costs to these institutions remain largely unstudied. The objective of this study was to perform a cost analysis of neuraxial blockade use during external cephalic version from hospital and insurance payer perspectives. Secondarily, we estimated the effect of neuraxial blockade on cesarean delivery rates. A decision-analysis model was developed using costs and probabilities occurring prenatally through the delivery hospital admission. Model inputs were derived from the literature, national databases, and local supply costs. Univariate and bivariate sensitivity analyses and Monte Carlo simulations were performed to assess model robustness. Neuraxial blockade was cost saving to both hospitals ($30 per delivery) and insurers ($539 per delivery) using baseline estimates. From both perspectives, however, the model was sensitive to multiple variables. Monte Carlo simulation indicated neuraxial blockade to be more costly in approximately 50% of scenarios. The model demonstrated that routine use of neuraxial blockade during external cephalic version, compared to no neuraxial blockade, prevented 17 cesarean deliveries for every 100 external cephalic versions attempted. Neuraxial blockade is associated with minimal hospital and insurer cost changes in the setting of external cephalic version, while reducing the cesarean delivery rate. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Taylor Approach of Spinal Anaesthesia in a case of Ankylosing Spondylitis for Hip Fracture Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmila Palaria

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease primarily affecting the axial joints manifesting as stiffnesss of the spine. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis is a challenge to anaesthesiologists in terms of airway management and neuraxial blocks. Modified paramedian approach (Taylor approach of spinal anaesthesia can be used as an alternative to technically difficult cases in patients undergoing lower limb surgeries.

  5. Neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Szarvas, Szilvia

    2012-02-03

    When intrathecal and epidural opioids are administered, pruritus occurs as an unwanted and troublesome side effect. The reported incidence varies between 30% and 100%. The exact mechanisms of neuraxial opioid-induced pruritus remain unclear. Postulated mechanisms include the presence of an "itch center" in the central nervous system, medullary dorsal horn activation, and antagonism of inhibitory transmitters. The treatment of intrathecal opioid-induced pruritus remains a challenge. Many pharmacological therapies, including antihistamines, 5-HT(3)-receptor antagonists, opiate-antagonists, propofol, nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs, and droperidol, have been studied. In this review, we will summarize pathophysiological and pharmacological advances that will improve understanding and ultimately the management of this troublesome problem.

  6. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish K Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV. PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  8. Anaesthesia ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-09-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits.

  9. Anaesthesia ventilators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajnish K; Swaminathan, Srinivasan

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia ventilators are an integral part of all modern anaesthesia workstations. Automatic ventilators in the operating rooms, which were very simple with few modes of ventilation when introduced, have become very sophisticated with many advanced ventilation modes. Several systems of classification of anaesthesia ventilators exist based upon various parameters. Modern anaesthesia ventilators have either a double circuit, bellow design or a single circuit piston configuration. In the bellows ventilators, ascending bellows design is safer than descending bellows. Piston ventilators have the advantage of delivering accurate tidal volume. They work with electricity as their driving force and do not require a driving gas. To enable improved patient safety, several modifications were done in circle system with the different types of anaesthesia ventilators. Fresh gas decoupling is a modification done in piston ventilators and in descending bellows ventilator to reduce th incidence of ventilator induced volutrauma. In addition to the conventional volume control mode, modern anaesthesia ventilators also provide newer modes of ventilation such as synchronised intermittent mandatory ventilation, pressure-control ventilation and pressure-support ventilation (PSV). PSV mode is particularly useful for patients maintained on spontaneous respiration with laryngeal mask airway. Along with the innumerable benefits provided by these machines, there are various inherent hazards associated with the use of the ventilators in the operating room. To use these workstations safely, it is important for every Anaesthesiologist to have a basic understanding of the mechanics of these ventilators and breathing circuits. PMID:24249886

  10. Mode of anaesthesia for preterm Caesarean delivery: secondary analysis from the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network Caesarean Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butwick, A J; El-Sayed, Y Y; Blumenfeld, Y J; Osmundson, S S; Weiniger, C F

    2015-08-01

    Preterm delivery is often performed by Caesarean section. We investigated modes of anaesthesia and risk factors for general anaesthesia among women undergoing preterm Caesarean delivery. Women undergoing Caesarean delivery between 24(+0) and 36(+6) weeks' gestation were identified from a multicentre US registry. The mode of anaesthesia was classified as neuraxial anaesthesia (spinal, epidural, or combined spinal and epidural) or general anaesthesia. Logistic regression was used to identify patient characteristic, obstetric, and peripartum risk factors associated with general anaesthesia. Within the study cohort, 11 539 women had preterm Caesarean delivery; 9510 (82.4%) underwent neuraxial anaesthesia and 2029 (17.6%) general anaesthesia. In our multivariate model, African-American race [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=1.9; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.7-2.2], Hispanic ethnicity (aOR=1.5; 95% CI=1.2-1.8), other race (aOR=1.4; 95% CI=1.1-1.9), and haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelets (HELLP) syndrome or eclampsia (aOR=2.8; 95% CI=2.2-3.5) were independently associated with receiving general anaesthesia for preterm Caesarean delivery. Women with an emergency Caesarean delivery indication had the highest odds for general anaesthesia (aOR=3.5; 95% CI=3.1-3.9). For every 1 week decrease in gestational age at delivery, the adjusted odds of general anaesthesia increased by 13%. In our study cohort, nearly one in five women received general anaesthesia for preterm Caesarean delivery. Although potential confounding by unmeasured factors cannot be excluded, our findings suggest that early gestational age at delivery, emergent Caesarean delivery indications, hypertensive disease, and non-Caucasian race or ethnicity are associated with general anaesthesia for preterm Caesarean delivery. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Ultrasonography for neuraxial blocks: a review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Maria F; Duong, Silvia; Finlayson, Roderick J; Tran, De Q

    2017-05-01

    This narrative review summarizes the evidence derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) pertaining to the use of adjunctive ultrasonography (US) for neuraxial blocks. The literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and PUBMED databases. For the MEDLINE and EMBASE searches, the MESH terms "ultrasonography" and key word "ultrasound" were queried; using the operator "and", they were combined with the MESH terms "neuraxial block," "epidural anesthesia," "epidural analgesia," "spinal anesthesia," "spinal analgesia," "intrathecal anesthesia," "intrathecal analgesia," "caudal anesthesia," and "caudal analgesia." For the PUBMED search, the search terms "ultrasound neuraxial," "ultrasound intrathecal," "ultrasound epidural" (limited to clinical trials), "ultrasound spinal" (limited to clinical trials), and "ultrasound caudal" (limited to clinical trials) were queried. Seventeen RCTs were retained for analysis. Compared to conventional palpation of landmarks, US assistance (i.e., preprocedural scanning) results in fewer needle passes/insertions and skin punctures for neuraxial blocks in obstetrical and surgical patients. These benefits seem most pronounced when expert operators carry out the sonographic exams and for patients displaying difficult spinal anatomy. Preliminary findings also suggest that US provides similar pain relief and functional improvement to fluoroscopy for epidural/caudal steroid injection in patients afflicted with chronic spinal pain. Although one trial demonstrated shorter needling time with US guidance (i.e., real-time scanning of needle advancement) compared to US assistance, these findings require further validation. Published reports of RCTs provide evidence to formulate limited recommendations regarding the use of adjunctive US for neuraxial blocks. Further well-designed RCTs are warranted.

  12. Neuraxial anesthesia in patients with multiple sclerosis - a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmar Bornemann-Cimenti

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: Current guidelines for neuraxial analgesia in patients with multiple sclerosis are ambiguous and offer the clinician only a limited basis for decision making. This systematic review examines the number of cases in which multiple sclerosis has been exacerbated after central neuraxial analgesia in order to rationally evaluate the safety of these procedures. Methods: A systematic literature search with the keywords "anesthesia or analgesia" and "epidural, peridural, caudal, spinal, subarachnoid or intrathecal" in combination with "multiple sclerosis" was performed in the databases PubMed and Embase, looking for clinical data on the effect of central neuraxial analgesia on the course of multiple sclerosis. Results and conclusions: Over a period of 65 years, our search resulted in 37 reports with a total of 231 patients. In 10 patients multiple sclerosis was worsened and nine multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica was first diagnosed in a timely context with central neuraxial analgesia. None of the cases showed a clear relation between cause and effect. Current clinical evidence does not support the theory that central neuraxial analgesia negatively affects the course of multiple sclerosis.

  13. Tumescent anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, Patrick H

    2013-01-31

    Tumescent anaesthesia describes the practice of injecting a very dilute solution of local anaesthetic combined with epinephrine and sodium bicarbonate into tissue until it becomes firm and tense (tumescent). It was initially described in the field of liposuction but now surgical applications for the technique are widely varied ranging across vascular surgery, breast surgery, plastic surgery and ENT procedures. It is widely used in both hospital- and office-based environments and may form the sole method of anaesthesia for surgery. Advantages include a reduction in blood loss through both epinephrine-induced vasoconstriction as well as hydrostatic compression from the tumescent effect. Sodium bicarbonate reduces pain associated with the injection of an acidic local anaesthetic solution. Due to the unique pharmacokinetic profile of this technique lidocaine doses of 35 mg\\/kg bodyweight have been shown to be safe for liposuction procedures. Tumescent lidocaine is absorbed very slowly from subcutaneous tissues producing lower, and more delayed, peak blood levels compared to other routes, as well as extended postoperative analgesia. Slow systemic absorption allows the rapid hepatic plasma clearance of lidocaine to maintain safe local anaesthetic blood levels. This slow absorption from subcutaneous tissue has been likened to a depot injection. Careful attention must be given to appropriate local anaesthetic dosage alterations in cases of co-administration with agents affecting hepatic drug clearance or conditions reducing liver blood supply. Adherence to these pharmacological principles has produced an exemplary safety record for this technique to date.

  14. Effect of informational internet web pages on patients' decision-making: randomised controlled trial regarding choice of spinal or general anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, N D; Humphreys, H W; Williams, A J; Jones, A

    2010-03-01

    This study explored whether patients' preference for particular types of anaesthesia could be influenced pre-operatively by giving them the addresses of various relevant websites. Patients at an orthopaedic pre-assessment education clinic completed a questionnaire, which included a short multiple-choice general knowledge quiz about anaesthesia, and also questioned them as to their choice of anaesthesia (general or neuraxial). Patients were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. Intervention group members were given the addresses of three relevant anaesthesia and health related websites to access at home. All patients were asked to complete the questionnaires on a second occasion, before surgery. Initially, most patients stated a preference for general anaesthesia. Subsequently, the intervention group altered their preference towards neuraxial anaesthesia compared to the control group (p < or = 0.0001). The increase in median (IQR [range]) anaesthesia knowledge test score was greater in the intervention group (from 10.0 (9.0-12.0 [5.0-14.0]) to 13.0 (11.0-14.0 [6.0-14.0])) than in the control group (from 10.0 (9.0-11.5 [3.0-13.0]) to 11.0 (9.0-12.0 [4.0-14.0]); p = 0.0068).

  15. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  16. Neuraxial Analgesia In Neonates And Infants: Review of Clinical and Preclinical Strategies for the Development of Safety and Efficacy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M.; Yaksh, Tony L.

    2015-01-01

    Neuraxial agents provide robust pain control, have the potential to improve outcomes, and are an important component of the perioperative care of children. Opioids or clonidine improve analgesia when added to perioperative epidural infusions; analgesia is significantly prolonged by addition of clonidine, ketamine, neostigmine or tramadol to single shot caudal injections of local anesthetic; and neonatal intrathecal anesthesia/analgesia is increasing in some centers. However, it is difficult to determine the relative risk-benefit of different techniques and drugs without detailed and sensitive data related to analgesia requirements, side-effects, and follow-up. Current data related to benefits and complications in neonates and infants are summarized, but variability in current neuraxial drug use reflects the relative lack of high quality evidence. Recent preclinical reports of adverse effects of general anesthetics on the developing brain have increased awareness of the potential benefit of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia to avoid or reduce general anesthetic dose requirements. However, the developing spinal cord is also vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, and although there are well-established preclinical models and criteria for assessing spinal cord toxicity in adult animals, until recently there had been no systematic evaluation during early life. Therefore, the second half of this review presents preclinical data evaluating age-dependent changes in the pharmacodynamic response to different spinal analgesics, and recent studies evaluating spinal toxicity in specific developmental models. Finally, we advocate use of neuraxial agents with the widest demonstrable safety margin and suggest minimum standards for preclinical evaluation prior to adoption of new analgesics or preparations into routine clinical practice. PMID:22798528

  17. Valvular heart disease and anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Abhijit; Das, Sucharita

    2017-09-01

    Valvular heart disease presents as mixed spectrum lesion in healthcare settings in the third-world and developing countries. Rheumatic heart disease still forms the bulk of the aetiopathology of valve lesions. Mitral and aortic valve lesions top the list of valvular pathology. A thorough understanding of the pathophysiology of valvular heart disease is essential while planning anaesthesia and perioperative care for such patients. Meticulous use of optimal fluids, close monitoring of the changing haemodynamics and avoidance of situations that can cause major reduction of cardiac output and fluid shifts are mandatory to achieve good clinical outcome. We searched MEDLINE using combinations of the following: anaesthesia, aortic, mitral, regurgitation, stenosis and valvular heart disease. We also hand searched textbooks and articles on valvular heart disease and anaesthesia. This article mainly focuses on the understanding the pathophysiology of valvular heart disease in patients presenting for non-cardiac surgeries in secondary and tertiary care setting.

  18. Paediatric anaesthesia and neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Disma, Nicola; Hansen, Tom G

    2016-01-01

    and the PANDA study. Interim results from the GAS study, which compared infants undergoing general and regional anaesthesia for hernia repair, have demonstrated that a single exposure of about one hour of anaesthesia does not affect the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Nowadays most of the knowledge...

  19. Anaesthesia for bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Chadha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchoscopy as an investigation or therapeutic procedure demands anaesthesiologist to act accordingly. The present review will take the reader from rigid to fibreoptic flexible bronchoscopy. These procedures are now done as day care procedures in the operation theatre or in critical care units. Advantages and limitations of both rigid and flexible bronchoscopy are analysed. Recently, conscious sedation has come up as the commonly used anaesthetic technique for simple bronchoscopic procedures. However, general anaesthesia still remains a standard technique for more complex procedures. New advances in the field of anaesthesiology such as use of short acting opioids, use of newer drugs such as dexmedetomidine, supraglottic airways and mechanical jet ventilators have facilitated and eased the conduct of the procedure.

  20. Neuraxial labor analgesia for vaginal delivery and its effects on childhood learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, Randall P; Lee, Kunmoo; Hofer, Ryan E; Beinborn, Charles W; Hambel, Ellen M; Klein, Melissa K; Gunn, Paul W; Wilder, Robert T; Katusic, Slavica K; Schroeder, Darrell R; Warner, David O; Sprung, Juraj

    2011-06-01

    In prior work, children born to mothers who received neuraxial anesthesia for cesarean delivery had a lower incidence of subsequent learning disabilities compared with vaginal delivery. The authors speculated that neuraxial anesthesia may reduce stress responses to delivery, which could affect subsequent neurodevelopmental outcomes. To further explore this possibility, we examined the association between the use of neuraxial labor analgesia and development of childhood learning disabilities in a population-based birth cohort of children delivered vaginally. The educational and medical records of all children born to mothers residing in the area of 5 townships of Olmsted County, Minnesota from 1976 to 1982 and remaining in the community at age 5 years were reviewed to identify those with learning disabilities. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compare the incidence of learning disabilities between children delivered vaginally with and without neuraxial labor analgesia, including analyses adjusted for factors of either potential clinical relevance or that differed between the 2 groups in univariate analysis. Of the study cohort, 4684 mothers delivered children vaginally, with 1495 receiving neuraxial labor analgesia. The presence of childhood learning disabilities in the cohort was not associated with use of labor neuraxial analgesia (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.05; 95%confidence interval, 0.85-1.31; P = 0.63). The use of neuraxial analgesia during labor and vaginal delivery was not independently associated with learning disabilities diagnosed before age 19 years. Future studies are needed to evaluate potential mechanisms of the previous finding indicating that the incidence of learning disabilities is lower in children born to mothers via cesarean delivery under neuraxial anesthesia compared with vaginal delivery.

  1. 'Closed Circuit' Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    its constant-flow flowmeters and accurate vaporisers, there. Department of Anaesthesia ... Enough evidence has accumulated on the dangers of long periods of ... form in the soda-lime. To understand how these problems may .be solved, one.

  2. Paediatric regional anaesthesia:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    induced respiratory depression. The purpose ... regional blocks are usually performed under anaesthesia or .... brachial plexus, as well as the axillary, musculo-cutaneous, ulnar, ... of their use for continuous postoperative pain management or.

  3. Neuraxial analgesia in neonates and infants: a review of clinical and preclinical strategies for the development of safety and efficacy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Suellen M; Yaksh, Tony L

    2012-09-01

    Neuraxial drugs provide robust pain control, have the potential to improve outcomes, and are an important component of the perioperative care of children. Opioids or clonidine improves analgesia when added to perioperative epidural infusions; analgesia is significantly prolonged by the addition of clonidine, ketamine, neostigmine, or tramadol to single-shot caudal injections of local anesthetic; and neonatal intrathecal anesthesia/analgesia is increasing in some centers. However, it is difficult to determine the relative risk-benefit of different techniques and drugs without detailed and sensitive data related to analgesia requirements, side effects, and follow-up. Current data related to benefits and complications in neonates and infants are summarized, but variability in current neuraxial drug use reflects the relative lack of high-quality evidence. Recent preclinical reports of adverse effects of general anesthetics on the developing brain have increased awareness of the potential benefit of neuraxial anesthesia/analgesia to avoid or reduce general anesthetic dose requirements. However, the developing spinal cord is also vulnerable to drug-related toxicity, and although there are well-established preclinical models and criteria for assessing spinal cord toxicity in adult animals, until recently there had been no systematic evaluation during early life. Therefore, in the second half of this review, we present preclinical data evaluating age-dependent changes in the pharmacodynamic response to different spinal analgesics, and recent studies evaluating spinal toxicity in specific developmental models. Finally, we advocate use of neuraxial drugs with the widest demonstrable safety margin and suggest minimum standards for preclinical evaluation before adoption of new analgesics or preparations into routine clinical practice.

  4. Dexmedetomidine and clonidine in epidural anaesthesia: A comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to find a better adjuvant in regional anaesthesia are underway since long. Aims and objectives are to compare the efficacy and clinical profile of two α-2 adrenergic agonists, dexmedetomidine and clonidine, in epidural anaesthesia with special emphasis on their sedative properties and an ability to provide smooth intra-operative and post-operative analgesia. A prospective randomized study was carried out which included 50 adult female patients between the ages of 44 and 65 years of (American Society of Anaesthesiologists ASAI/II grade who underwent vaginal hysterectomies. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups; ropivacaine + dexmedetomidine (RD and ropivacaine + clonidine (RC, comprising of 25 patients each. Group RD was administered 17 ml of 0.75% epidural ropivacaine and 1.5 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine, while group RC received admixture of 17 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine and 2 μg/kg of clonidine. Onset of analgesia, sensory and motor block levels, sedation, duration of analgesia and side effects were observed. The data obtained was subjected to statistical computation with analysis of variance and chi-square test using statistical package for social science (SPSS version 10.0 for windows and value of P 0.05. Dexmedetomidine is a better neuraxial adjuvant compared to clonidine for providing early onset of sensory analgesia, adequate sedation and a prolonged post-operative analgesia.

  5. Anaesthesia for parturients with severe cystic fibrosis: a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deighan, M

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects 1 in 1600-2500 live births and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It primarily involves the respiratory, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts, with impaired clearance of, and obstruction by, increasingly viscous secretions. Severe respiratory disease, diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux may result. Improvements in medical management and survival of cystic fibrosis patients means more are committing to pregnancies. Although guidance for anaesthesia in this patient group is available, management and outcome data associated with more severe cases are sparse. Patients with severe cystic fibrosis require multidisciplinary input and should be managed in a tertiary referral centre. Close monitoring of respiratory function and preoperative optimisation during pregnancy are mandatory. The risk of preterm labour and delivery is increased. Pregnancy and delivery can be managed successfully, even in patients with FEV1 <40% predicted. Neuraxial anaesthesia and analgesia should be the technique of choice for delivery. Postoperative care should be carried out in a critical care setting with the provision of postoperative ventilation if necessary.

  6. ANAESTHESIA FOR OPHTHALMIC SURGICAL PROCEDURES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review factors influencing the choice of anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgical procedures. ... as risk associated with general anaesthesia (8) they are more .... Wilson ME, Pandey SK, Thakur J. Paediatric cataract blindness in the ...

  7. [Measurement of the depth of anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G N; Müller, J; Bischoff, P

    2008-01-01

    One of the most important mandates of the anaesthesiologist is to control the depth of anaesthesia. An unsolved problem is that a straight definition of the depth of anaesthesia does not exist. Concerning this it is rational to separate hypnosis from analgesia, from muscle relaxation and from block of cardiovascular reactions. Clinical surrogate parameters such as blood pressure and heart rate are not well-suited for a valid statement about the depth of hypnosis. To answer this question the brain has become the focus of interest as the target of anaesthesia. It is possible to visualize the brain's electrical activity from anelectroencephalogram (EEG). The validity of the spontaneous EEG as an anesthetic depth monitor is limited by the multiphasic activity, especially when anaesthesia is induced (excitation) and in deep anaesthesia (burst suppression). Recently, various commercial monitoring systems have been introduced to solve this problem. These monitoring systems use different interpretations of the EEG or auditory-evoked potentials (AEP). These derived and calculated variables have no pure physiological basis. For that reason a profound knowledge of the algorithms and a validation of the monitoring systems is an indispensable prerequisite prior to their routine clinical use. For the currently available monitoring systems various studies have been reported. At this time it is important to know that the actual available monitors can only value the sedation and not the other components of anaesthesia. For example, they cannot predict if a patient will react to a painful stimulus or not. In the future it would be desirable to develop parameters which allow an estimate of the other components of anaesthesia in addition to the presently available monitoring systems to estimate sedation and muscle relaxation. These could be sensoric-evoked potentials to estimate analgesia and AEPs for the detection of awareness.

  8. Depth of anaesthesia and post-operative cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Funder, K S; Dahl, B T

    2010-01-01

    A deep level of anaesthesia measured by the bispectral index has been found to improve processing speed as one aspect of cognitive function after surgery. The purpose of the present study was to assess the possible effect of the level of anaesthesia on post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) 1...... week after surgery, as assessed by a neuropsychological test battery....

  9. Depth of anaesthesia and post-operative cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinmetz, J; Funder, K S; Dahl, B T

    2010-01-01

    A deep level of anaesthesia measured by the bispectral index has been found to improve processing speed as one aspect of cognitive function after surgery. The purpose of the present study was to assess the possible effect of the level of anaesthesia on post-operative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) 1...

  10. Guillain-Barre syndrome following spinal anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayin, R.; Kati, I.; Gunes, M.

    2013-01-01

    Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is the most common disease resulting in acute diffuse flaccid paralysis. It is an autoimmune disease that can occur at any age. The clinical course is characterized by weakness in the arms and legs, areflexia and the progression of muscle weakness from the lower limbs to the upper limbs. The most common causes of GBS include infections, vaccinations, surgery and some medicines. We present the case of a 48 years old male patient, who developed GBS after undergoing surgery for renal calculus, under spinal anaesthesia. In this case report, we presented a rather rare case of GBS occurring following spinal anaesthesia. (author)

  11. Neuraxial analgesia effects on labor progression: facts, fallacies, uncertainties, and the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Erica N.; Tao, Weike; Craig, Margaret; McIntire, Donald; Leveno, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 60% of women who labor receive some form of neuraxial analgesia, but concerns have been raised regarding whether it negatively impacts the labor and delivery process. In this review, we attempt to clarify what has been established as truths, falsities, and uncertainties regarding the effects of this form of pain relief on labor progression, negative and/or positive. Additionally, although the term “epidural” has become synonymous with neuraxial analgesia, we discuss two other techniques, combined spinal-epidural and continuous spinal analgesia, that are gaining popularity, as well as their effects on labor progression. PMID:25088476

  12. Regional Anaesthesia in Thyroid Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, N.; Abbas, S.A.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is usually performed under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Bilateral cervical plexus block has been occasionally used as sole anaesthesia technique for this operation in certain parts of world. Indications for regional anaesthesia elsewhere in the world are patient's preference and associated marked cardio-respiratory disease. This is the first report of thyroidectomy done solely under bilateral cervical plexus block in Pakistan. The patient had thyroid cancer and was medically compromised due to cardiac failure with ejection fraction of 25%. Bilateral cervical plexus block was performed to avoid the high risk with general anaesthesia. Total thyroidectomy was done while patient remained painfree during the procedure and top-up local anaesthetic infiltration was not required. Patient remained stable without any morbidity. Positive experience from this case indicates that regional anaesthesia with monitored anaesthesia care is safer than general anaesthesia in high risk patients and could be offered to selective thyroidectomy candidates. (author)

  13. Reactive airway and anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    the bevel facing upward. On piercing the interspinous ligament, the stylet was removed and a 20mls resistance-free glass syringe half full of air, attached to the epidural needle. A gentle continuous pressure was applied to the plunger as the needle was. *Correspondence author: Lawal I Ibrahim. Department of Anaesthesia.

  14. Paediatric magnetic resonance enteroclysis under general anaesthesia - initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadigh, Sophie; Chopra, Mark; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Watson, Tom A.; Sury, Michael R.; Shah, Neil

    2017-01-01

    MR enterography is the accepted imaging reference standard for small bowel assessment in inflammatory bowel disease. There is an increasing cohort of children with inflammatory bowel disease presenting at an early age (<5 years) with severe disease. Younger children present a technical challenge for enterography because of the need for sedation/general anaesthesia to allow image optimisation and the need for oral contrast to allow adequate luminal assessment. Through our experiences, MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia has proven to be a successful imaging technique for the work-up of these patients. In this paper, we present our institutional practice for performing MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  15. Paediatric magnetic resonance enteroclysis under general anaesthesia - initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadigh, Sophie; Chopra, Mark; Olsen, Oeystein E.; Watson, Tom A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Sury, Michael R. [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Anaesthetics, London (United Kingdom); Shah, Neil [Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Paediatric Gastroenterology, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    MR enterography is the accepted imaging reference standard for small bowel assessment in inflammatory bowel disease. There is an increasing cohort of children with inflammatory bowel disease presenting at an early age (<5 years) with severe disease. Younger children present a technical challenge for enterography because of the need for sedation/general anaesthesia to allow image optimisation and the need for oral contrast to allow adequate luminal assessment. Through our experiences, MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia has proven to be a successful imaging technique for the work-up of these patients. In this paper, we present our institutional practice for performing MR enteroclysis under general anaesthesia. (orig.)

  16. On speech recognition during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre

    2007-01-01

    This PhD thesis in human-computer interfaces (informatics) studies the case of the anaesthesia record used during medical operations and the possibility to supplement it with speech recognition facilities. Problems and limitations have been identified with the traditional paper-based anaesthesia...... and inaccuracies in the anaesthesia record. Supplementing the electronic anaesthesia record interface with speech input facilities is proposed as one possible solution to a part of the problem. The testing of the various hypotheses has involved the development of a prototype of an electronic anaesthesia record...... interface with speech input facilities in Danish. The evaluation of the new interface was carried out in a full-scale anaesthesia simulator. This has been complemented by laboratory experiments on several aspects of speech recognition for this type of use, e.g. the effects of noise on speech recognition...

  17. Association of Hospital-level Neuraxial Anesthesia Use for Hip Fracture Surgery with Outcomes: A Population-based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIsaac, Daniel I; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Huang, Allen; Bryson, Gregory L; van Walraven, Carl

    2018-03-01

    There is consistent and significant variation in neuraxial anesthesia use for hip fracture surgery across jurisdictions. We measured the association of hospital-level utilization of neuraxial anesthesia, independent of patient-level use, with 30-day survival (primary outcome) and length of stay and costs (secondary outcomes). We conducted a population-based cohort study using linked administrative data in Ontario, Canada. We identified all hip fracture patients more than 65 yr of age from 2002 to 2014. For each patient, we measured the proportion of hip fracture patients at their hospital who received neuraxial anesthesia in the year before their surgery. Multilevel, multivariable regression was used to measure the association of log-transformed hospital-level neuraxial anesthetic-use proportion with outcomes, controlling for patient-level anesthesia type and confounders. Of 107,317 patients, 57,080 (53.2%) had a neuraxial anesthetic; utilization varied from 0 to 100% between hospitals. In total, 9,122 (8.5%) of patients died within 30 days of surgery. Survival independently improved as hospital-level neuraxial use increased (P = 0.009). Primary and sensitivity analyses demonstrated that most of the survival benefit was realized with increase in hospital-level neuraxial use above 20 to 25%; there did not appear to be a substantial increase in survival above this point. No significant associations between hospital neuraxial anesthesia-use and other outcomes existed. Hip fracture surgery patients at hospitals that use more than 20 to 25% neuraxial anesthesia have improved survival independent of patient-level anesthesia type and other confounders. The underlying causal mechanism for this association requires a prospective study to guide improvements in perioperative care and outcomes of hip fracture patients. An online visual overview is available for this article at http://links.lww.com/ALN/B634.

  18. Vitamin D and Anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Biricik, Ebru; Güneş, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D is a vitamin not only associated with calcium-phosphorus metabolism but also affects many organ systems. Because of its effect on the immune system in recent years, it has attracted much attention. Vitamin D deficiency is a clinical condition that can be widely observed in the society. Thus, patients with vitamin D deficiency are often seen in anaesthesia practice. In the absence of vitamin D, prolongation of intensive care unit stay, increase in mortality and morbidity and also ass...

  19. Truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve for outpatient surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robiony, M; Demitri, V; Costa, F; Politi, M; Cugini, U

    1998-10-01

    We present our experience of transcutaneous truncal anaesthesia of the maxillary nerve in association with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Twelve patients with a skeletal transverse discrepancy of the maxilla were treated in our department from 1994 to 1995. Maxillary transcutaneous nerve block was done with a Quincke 8 cm spinal needle together with transmucosal anaesthesia of the sphenopalatine ganglion. Mepivacaine without adrenaline and sodium bicarbonate 1/10 was used for truncal anaesthesia and lidocaine-prilocaine cream for transmucosal anaesthesia. A Le Fort I osteotomy, lateral nasal wall osteotomy, pterygomaxillary osteotomy, and a palatal osteotomy were done for all patients before the maxillary expansion. Total anaesthesia of the maxillary area facilitated the operations and appreciably reduced the amount of postoperative pain. The ease of achieving effective anaesthesia before and after operation and the absence of side-effects make this form of anaesthetic particularly useful in surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion.

  20. Is segmental epidural anaesthesia an optimal technique for patients undergoing percutaneous nephrolithotomy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devangi A Parikh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Neuraxial anaesthesia has recently become popular for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL. We conducted a study comparing general anaesthesia (GA with segmental (T6–T12 epidural anaesthesia (SEA for PCNL with respect to anaesthesia and surgical characteristics. Methods: Ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status-I and II patients undergoing PCNL randomly received either GA or SEA. Overall patient satisfaction was the primary end point. Intraoperative haemodynamics, epidural block characteristics, post-operative pain, time to rescue analgesic, total analgesic consumption, discharge times from post-anaesthesia care unit, surgeon satisfaction scores and stone clearance were secondary end points. Parametric data were analysed by Student's t-test while non-parametric data were compared with Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: Group SEA reported better patient satisfaction (P = 0.005. Patients in group GA had significantly higher heart rates (P = 0.0001 and comparable mean arterial pressures (P = 0.24. Postoperatively, time to first rescue analgesic and total tramadol consumption was higher in Group GA (P = 0.001. Group SEA had lower pain scores (P = 0.001. Time to reach Aldrete's score of 9 was shorter in group SEA (P = 0.0001. The incidence of nausea was higher in group GA (P = 0.001; vomiting rates were comparable (P = 0.15. One patient in group SEA developed bradycardia which was successfully treated. Eight patients (18% had hypertensive episodes in group GA versus none in group SEA (P = 0.0001. One patient in GA group had pleural injury and was managed with intercostal drain. Stone clearance and post-operative haemoglobin levels were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: PCNL under SEA has a role in selected patients, for short duration surgery and in expert hands.

  1. Neuraxial analgesia to increase the success rate of external cephalic version: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magro-Malosso, Elena Rita; Saccone, Gabriele; Di Tommaso, Mariarosaria; Mele, Michele; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2016-09-01

    External cephalic version is a medical procedure in which the fetus is externally manipulated to assume the cephalic presentation. The use of neuraxial analgesia for facilitating the version has been evaluated in several randomized clinical trials, but its potential effects are still controversial. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of neuraxial analgesia as an intervention to increase the success rate of external cephalic version. Searches were performed in electronic databases with the use of a combination of text words related to external cephalic version and neuraxial analgesia from the inception of each database to January 2016. We included all randomized clinical trials of women, with a gestational age ≥36 weeks and breech or transverse fetal presentation, undergoing external cephalic version who were randomized to neuraxial analgesia, including spinal, epidural, or combined spinal-epidural techniques (ie, intervention group) or to a control group (either intravenous analgesia or no treatment). The primary outcome was the successful external cephalic version. The summary measures were reported as relative risk or as mean differences with a 95% confidence interval. Nine randomized clinical trials (934 women) were included in this review. Women who received neuraxial analgesia had a significantly higher incidence of successful external cephalic version (58.4% vs 43.1%; relative risk, 1.44, 95% confidence interval, 1.27-1.64), cephalic presentation in labor (55.1% vs 40.2%; relative risk, 1.37, 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.73), and vaginal delivery (54.0% vs 44.6%; relative risk, 1.21, 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.41) compared with those who did not. Women who were randomized to the intervention group also had a significantly lower incidence of cesarean delivery (46.0% vs 55.3%; relative risk, 0.83, 95% confidence interval, 0.71-0.97), maternal discomfort (1.2% vs 9.3%; relative risk, 0.12, 95% confidence interval, 0

  2. Risk of Epidural Hematoma after Neuraxial Techniques in Thrombocytopenic Parturients : A Report from the Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Linden O.; Bateman, Brian T.; Kheterpal, Sachin; Klumpner, Thomas T.; Housey, Michelle; Aziz, Michael F.; Hand, Karen W.; MacEachern, Mark; Goodier, Christopher G.; Bernstein, Jeffrey; Bauer, Melissa E.; Lirk, Philip; Wilczak, Janet; Soto, Roy; Tom, Simon; Cuff, Germaine; Biggs, Daniel A.; Coffman, Traci; Saager, Leif; Levy, Warren J.; Godbold, Michael; Pace, Nathan L.; Wethington, Kevin L.; Paganelli, William C.; Durieux, Marcel E.; Domino, Karen B.; Nair, Bala; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M.; Wanderer, Jonathan P.; Schonberger, Robert B.; Berris, Joshua; Lins, Steven; Coles, Peter; Cummings, Kenneth C.; Maheshwari, Kamal; Berman, Mitchell F.; Wedeven, Christopher; LaGorio, John; Fleishut, Peter M.; Ellis, Terri A.; Molina, Susan; Carl, Curtis; Kadry, Bassam; van Klei, Wilton A A; Pasma, Wietze; Jameson, Leslie C.; Helsten, Daniel L.; Avidan, Michael S.

    BACKGROUND:: Thrombocytopenia has been considered a relative or even absolute contraindication to neuraxial techniques due to the risk of epidural hematoma. There is limited literature to estimate the risk of epidural hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. The authors reviewed a large

  3. Limb fracture during recovery from general anaesthesia : an often tragic complication of equine anaesthesia : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.B. Dzikiti

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old Thoroughbred mare was presented for lameness of the left hindlimb as a result of an apical fracture of the lateral proximal sesamoid bone. The mare was ultimately euthanased after suffering catastrophic fractures of the 3rd and 4th metatarsal bones of the contra-lateral hindlimb during an uncoordinated attempt to rise during recovery from general anaesthesia after undergoing arthroscopic surgery. The case report focuses mostly on horse anaesthesia-related mortality, anaesthetic procedure in the horse, possible causes of fractures in horses during recovery and ways in which rate of occurrence of these fractures can be minimised.

  4. Sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Joanne; Sales, Karl

    2015-08-27

    Local anaesthesia for cataract surgery can be provided by sub-Tenon's or topical anaesthesia. Both techniques offer possible advantages. This review, which originally was published in 2007 and was updated in 2014, was undertaken to compare these two anaesthetic techniques. Our objectives were to compare the effectiveness of topical anaesthesia (with or without intracameral local anaesthetic) versus sub-Tenon's anaesthesia in providing pain relief during cataract surgery. We reviewed pain during administration of anaesthesia, postoperative pain, surgical satisfaction with operating conditions and patient satisfaction with pain relief provided, and we looked at associated complications. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and EMBASE (last search in November 2014) and the reference lists of published articles. We looked for conferences abstracts and trials in progress and placed no constraints on language or publication status. We included all randomized studies that compared sub-Tenon's anaesthesia versus topical anaesthesia for cataract surgery. We assessed trial quality and extracted data in the format allowing maximal data inclusion. We included eight studies in this updated review but could retain in the analysis only seven studies on 742 operated eyes of 617 participants. Two cross-over trials included 125 participants, and five parallel trials included 492 participants. These studies were published between 1997 and 2005. The mean age of participants varied from 71.5 years to 83.5 years. The female proportion of participants varied from 54% to 76%. Compared with sub-Tenon's anaesthesia, topical anaesthesia (with or without intracameral injection) for cataract surgery increases intraoperative pain but decreases postoperative pain at 24 hours. The amplitude of the effect (equivalent to 1.1 on a score from 0 to 10 for intraoperative pain, and to 0.2 on the same scale for postoperative pain at 24 hours), although statistically

  5. The Danish Anaesthesia Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antonsen, Kristian; Rosenstock, Charlotte Vallentin; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD) is the nationwide collection of data on all patients undergoing anesthesia. Collected data are used for quality assurance, quality development, and serve as a basis for research projects. STUDY POPULATION: The DAD was founded in 2004....... In addition, an annual DAD report is a benchmark for departments nationwide. CONCLUSION: The DAD is covering the anesthetic process for the majority of patients undergoing anesthesia in Denmark. Data in the DAD are increasingly used for both quality and research projects....

  6. Ultrasonography of the adult thoracic and lumbar spine for central neuraxial blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ki Jinn; Karmakar, Manoj Kumar; Peng, Philip

    2011-06-01

    The role of ultrasound in central neuraxial blockade has been underappreciated, partly because of the relative efficacy of the landmark-guided technique and partly because of the perceived difficulty in imaging through the narrow acoustic windows produced by the bony framework of the spine. However, this also is the basis for the utility of ultrasound: an interlaminar window that permits passage of sound waves into the vertebral canal also will permit passage of a needle. In addition, ultrasound aids in identification of intervertebral levels, estimation of the depth to epidural and intrathecal spaces, and location of important landmarks, including the midline and interlaminar spaces. This can facilitate neuraxial blockade, particularly in patients with difficult surface anatomic landmarks. In this review article, the authors summarize the current literature, describe the key ultrasonographic views, and propose a systematic approach to ultrasound imaging for the performance of spinal and epidural anesthesia in the adult patient.

  7. Meningitis following spinal anaesthesia in an obstetric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Mine; Kizilkaya, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Dogan, Nazim; Parlak, Mehmet; Can, Fatma Kesmez; Bayar, Meral

    2014-07-01

    Meningitis following lumbar puncture and spinal anaesthesia is a rare but serious complication. A 19-year-old woman was administered spinal anaesthesia at another centre prior to a Caesarean section. The following day she experienced headaches. On the fourth day, she started vomiting and having convulsions, and became agitated. Meningitis was diagnosed based on a clinical examination and analysis of a lumbar puncture sample. After 21 days of treatment, she was discharged. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with headaches following spinal anaesthesia. The causes of meningitis following spinal anaesthesia are debated, and it is difficult to distinguish between aseptic and bacterial meningitis. It should be compulsory to wear a face mask while performing a dural puncture. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  8. Contact radiator burn subsequent to spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sever, C; Aysal, B K; Sahin, C; Kulahci, Y

    2012-06-30

    An unusual case is reported in which a patient sustained a third-degree burn of the plantar surface of the right foot as the result of contact with a heating radiator. This occurred when the patient fell asleep in his hospital bed after knee surgery. Spinal anaesthesia is easy to perform, and the risk factors, though present, are not serious. Such accidents are not infrequent and care should be taken to prevent them.

  9. SEGMENTAL EPIDURAL ANAESTHESIA FOR INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachidanand

    2015-09-01

    . 10% of patients had fair quality of analgesia and relaxation only. In 3% patients the epidural block failed, in whom general anaesthesia was given. Overall success rate was 97%. Intraoperative and post - operative complications were very minimal. No cases of hypotension, bradycardia, nausea vomiting, total spinal block and respiratory depres sion were seen. CONCLUSION: From the present study it can be inferred that 0.5% Bupivacaine 5 - 6 ml is effective for segmental epidural block for inguinal hernia repair. Segmental epidural block is safe anaesthesia with minimal physiological alterations. Wi th less side effects

  10. Crisis management during anaesthesia: cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runciman, W B; Morris, R W; Watterson, L M; Williamson, J A; Paix, A D

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac arrest attributable to anaesthesia occurs at the rate of between 0.5 and 1 case per 10 000 cases, tends to have a different profile to that of cardiac arrest occurring elsewhere, and has an in-hospital mortality of 20%. However, as individual practitioners encounter cardiac arrest rarely, the rapidity with which the diagnosis is made and the consistency of appropriate management varies considerably. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a sub-algorithm for cardiac arrest, in the management of cardiac arrest occurring in association with anaesthesia. The potential performance of this structured approach for each the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 129 reports of cardiac arrest associated with anaesthesia among the first 4000 AIMS incident reports. Identified aetiological factors were grouped into five categories: (1) anaesthetic technique (11 cases with this category alone; 32 with this and one or more of the other categories, representing 25% of all 129 cardiac arrests); (2) drug related (16; 32, 25%); (3) associated with surgical procedure (9; 29, 22%); (4) associated with pre-existing medical or surgical disease (30; 82, 64%); (5) unknown (8; 14, 11%). The "real life" presentation and management of cardiac arrest in association with anaesthesia differs substantially from that detailed in general published guidelines. Cardiac rhythms at the time were sinus bradycardia (23%); asystole (22%); tachycardia/ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation (14%); and normal (7%), with a further third unknown. Details of treatment were recorded in 110 reports; modalities employed included cardiac compression (72%); adrenaline (61%); 100% oxygen (58%); atropine (38%); intravenous fluids (25%), and electrical defibrillation (17%). There

  11. The historical significance of anaesthesia events at Pearl Harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, Ja

    2014-07-01

    Up to the end of World War II, less than 10% of the general anaesthetics administered was with intravenous barbiturates. The remaining 90% of anaesthetics given in the USA were with diethyl ether. In the United Kingdom and elsewhere, chloroform was also popular. Diethyl ether administration was a relatively safe and simple procedure, often delegated to nurses or junior doctors with little or no specific training in anaesthesia. During the Japanese attack on the US bases at Pearl Harbor, with reduced stocks of diethyl ether available, intravenous Sodium Pentothal(®), a most 'sophisticated and complex' drug, was used with devastating effects in many of those hypovolaemic, anaemic and septic patients. The hazards of spinal anaesthesia too were realised very quickly. These effects were compounded by the dearth of trained anaesthetists. This paper presents the significance of the anaesthesia tragedies at Pearl Harbor, and the discovery in the next few years of many other superior drugs that caused medical and other health professionals to realise that anaesthesia needed to be a specialist medical discipline in its own right. Specialist recognition, aided by the foundation of the National Health Service in the UK, the establishment of Faculties of Anaesthesia and appropriate training in pharmacology, physiology and other sciences soon followed. Modern anaesthesiology, as we understand it today, was born and a century or more of ether anaesthesia finally ceased.

  12. The syndromic child and anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fourth and sixth arches give rise to the larynx and trachea, and ... Keywords: anaesthesia, syndrome, atlantoaxial joint, branchial arches, Down's syndrome, 22q11 deletion .... which causes proximal weakness and a high risk of malignant.

  13. Opioid-free anaesthesia in three dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna M. White

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Opioid-free anaesthesia (OFA is a relatively new and growing field in human medicine. There are multiple motivations behind this emerging practice with the recognition of several serious potential opioid-related adverse effects including opioid induced hyperalgesia, opioid tolerance and immunomodulatory effects of opioids. Opioids have long been the mainstay of veterinary anaesthesia and pain management practice. The feasibility of OFA in veterinary patients is presented here. A case series of three dogs that underwent OFA for canine ovariohysterectomy is reported. The authors conclude OFA is possible in veterinary medicine; however the move away from the familiar effects of opioids perioperatively is challenging. Gaining experience with these types of protocols for standard procedures in healthy animals, such as neutering, will provide the anaesthetist with the building blocks for more invasive surgeries.

  14. Neuraxial anesthesia for orthopedic surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Taking the outcome of mortality into consideration, there is controversy about the beneficial effects of neuraxial anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of neuraxial anesthesia versus general anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review at Universidade Federal de Alagoas. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 10, 2012, PubMed (1966 to November 2012, Lilacs (1982 to November 2012, SciELO, EMBASE (1974 to November 2012 and reference lists of the studies included. Only randomized controlled trials were included. RESULTS: Out of 5,032 titles and abstracts, 17 studies were included. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality (risk difference, RD: -0.01; 95% confidence interval, CI: -0.04 to 0.01; n = 1903, stroke (RD: 0.02; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.08; n = 259, myocardial infarction (RD: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.02; n = 291, length of hospitalization (mean difference, -0.05; 95% CI: -0.69 to 0.58; n = 870, postoperative cognitive dysfunction (RD: 0.00; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.05; n = 479 or pneumonia (odds ratio, 0.61; 95% CI: 0.25 to 1.49; n = 167. CONCLUSION: So far, the evidence available from the studies included is insufficient to prove that neuraxial anesthesia is more effective and safer than general anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. However, this systematic review does not rule out clinically important differences with regard to mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, length of hospitalization, postoperative cognitive dysfunction or pneumonia.

  15. Ayurvedic medicine and anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer L Pradhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of herbal medicines has increased dramatically over the past few years. The United States alone noted a 380% increase in the consumption of these products. Although the common practice of taking over-the-counter herbal soups, herbal teas and other such prepacked preparations was not associated with adverse events at large, still, some herbs are known to cause problems, especially when large doses are taken. The American Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA has taken a conservative stance and recommended that it is prudent to stop these products at least 2-3 weeks prior to anaesthesia and surgery. This advice may be difficult to implement as most preoperative evaluations occur only a few days prior to surgery. Some of the Ayurvedic preparations have shown to improve the patient outcome when taken during the perioperative period. Hence, the conservative stance by ASA may not always benefit the patient. More scientific studies are needed to have more targeted recommendations. This article puts forward the facts that need to be addressed by researchers in the future.

  16. Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Y C

    2006-12-01

    Critical incident monitoring in anaesthesia is an important tool for quality improvement and maintenance of high safety standards in anaesthetic services. It is now widely accepted as a useful quality improvement technique for reducing morbidity and mortality in anaesthesia and has become part of the many quality assurance programmes of many general hospitals under the Ministry of Health. Despite wide-spread reservations about its value, critical incident monitoring is a classical qualitative research technique which is particularly useful where problems are complex, contextual and influenced by the interaction of physical, psychological and social factors. Thus, it is well suited to be used in probing the complex factors behind human error and system failure. Human error has significant contributions to morbidities and mortalities in anaesthesia. Understanding the relationships between, errors, incidents and accidents is important for prevention and risk management to reduce harm to patients. Cardiac arrests in the operating theatre (OT) and prolonged stay in recovery, constituted the bulk of reported incidents. Cardiac arrests in OT resulted in significant mortality and involved mostly de-compensated patients and those with unstable cardiovascular functions, presenting for emergency operations. Prolonged-stay in the recovery extended period of observation for ill patients. Prolonged stay in recovery was justifiable in some cases, as these patients needed a longer period of post-operative observation until they were stable enough to return to the ward. The advantages of the relatively low cost, and the ability to provide a comprehensive body of detailed qualitative information, which can be used to develop strategies to prevent and manage existing problems and to plan further initiatives for patient safety makes critical incident monitoring a valuable tool in ensuring patient safety. The contribution of critical incident reporting to the issue of patient safety is

  17. The Danish Anaesthesia Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonsen K

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Kristian Antonsen,1 Charlotte Vallentin Rosenstock,2 Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm2 1Board of Directors, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospital, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Nordsjællands Hospital-Hillerød, Capital Region of Denmark, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD is the nationwide collection of data on all patients undergoing anesthesia. Collected data are used for quality assurance, quality development, and serve as a basis for research projects. Study population: The DAD was founded in 2004 as a part of Danish Clinical Registries (Regionernes Kliniske Kvalitetsudviklings Program [RKKP]. Patients undergoing general anesthesia, regional anesthesia with or without combined general anesthesia as well as patients under sedation are registered. Data are retrieved from public and private anesthesia clinics, single-centers as well as multihospital corporations across Denmark. In 2014 a total of 278,679 unique entries representing a national coverage of ~70% were recorded, data completeness is steadily increasing. Main variable: Records are aggregated for determining 13 defined quality indicators and eleven defined complications all covering the anesthetic process from the preoperative assessment through anesthesia and surgery until the end of the postoperative recovery period. Descriptive data: Registered variables include patients' individual social security number (assigned to all Danes and both direct patient-related lifestyle factors enabling a quantification of patients' comorbidity as well as variables that are strictly related to the type, duration, and safety of the anesthesia. Data and specific data combinations can be extracted within each department in order to monitor patient treatment. In addition, an annual DAD report is a benchmark for departments nationwide. Conclusion: The DAD is covering the

  18. Neuraxial and peripheral nerve blocks in patients taking anticoagulant or thromboprophylactic drugs: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jinlei Li, Thomas Halaszynski Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Incidence of hemorrhagic complications from neuraxial blockade is unknown, but classically cited as 1 in 150,000 epidurals and 1 in 220,000 spinals. However, recent literature and epidemiologic data suggest that for certain patient populations the frequency is higher (1 in 3,000. Due to safety concerns of bleeding risk, guidelines and recommendations have been designed to reduce patient morbidity/mortality during regional anesthesia. Data from evidence-based reviews, clinical series and case reports, collaborative experience of experts, and pharmacology used in developing consensus statements are unable to address all patient comorbidities and are not able to guarantee specific outcomes. No laboratory model identifies patients at risk, and rarity of neuraxial hematoma defies prospective randomized study so “patient-specific” factors and “surgery-related” issues should be considered to improve patient-oriented outcomes. Details of advanced age, older females, trauma patients, spinal cord and vertebral column abnormalities, organ function compromise, presence of underlying coagulopathy, traumatic or difficult needle placement, as well as indwelling catheter(s during anticoagulation pose risks for significant bleeding. Therefore, balancing between thromboembolism, bleeding risk, and introduction of more potent antithrombotic medications in combination with regional anesthesia has resulted in a need for more than “consensus statements” to safely manage regional interventions during anticoagulant/thromboprophylactic therapy. Keywords: antithrombotics, novel oral anticoagulant, regional, neurologic dysfunction, hematoma, peripheral nerve blockade

  19. Memory formation during anaesthesia: plausibility of a neurophysiological basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselis, R A

    2015-07-01

    As opposed to conscious, personally relevant (explicit) memories that we can recall at will, implicit (unconscious) memories are prototypical of 'hidden' memory; memories that exist, but that we do not know we possess. Nevertheless, our behaviour can be affected by these memories; in fact, these memories allow us to function in an ever-changing world. It is still unclear from behavioural studies whether similar memories can be formed during anaesthesia. Thus, a relevant question is whether implicit memory formation is a realistic possibility during anaesthesia, considering the underlying neurophysiology. A different conceptualization of memory taxonomy is presented, the serial parallel independent model of Tulving, which focuses on dynamic information processing with interactions among different memory systems rather than static classification of different types of memories. The neurophysiological basis for subliminal information processing is considered in the context of brain function as embodied in network interactions. Function of sensory cortices and thalamic activity during anaesthesia are reviewed. The role of sensory and perisensory cortices, in particular the auditory cortex, in support of memory function is discussed. Although improbable, with the current knowledge of neurophysiology one cannot rule out the possibility of memory formation during anaesthesia. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Update on best available options in obstetrics anaesthesia: perinatal outcomes, side effects and maternal satisfaction. Fifteen years systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizzo, Salvatore; Noventa, Marco; Fagherazzi, Simone; Lamparelli, Laura; Ancona, Emanuele; Di Gangi, Stefania; Saccardi, Carlo; D'Antona, Donato; Nardelli, Giovanni Battista

    2014-07-01

    In modern obstetrics, different pharmacological and non-pharmacological options allow to obtain pain relief during labour, one of the most important goals in women satisfaction about medical care. The aim of this review is to compare all the analgesia administration schemes in terms of effectiveness in pain relief, length of labour, mode of delivery, side effects and neonatal outcomes. A systematic literature search was conducted in electronic databases in the interval time between January 1999 and March 2013. Key search terms included: “labour analgesia”, “epidural anaesthesia during labour” (excluding anaesthesia for Caesarean section), “epidural analgesia and labour outcome” and “intra-thecal analgesia”. 10,331 patients were analysed: 5,578 patients underwent Epidural-Analgesia, 259 patients spinal analgesia, 2,724 combined spinal epidural analgesia, 322 continuous epidural infusion (CEI), 168 intermittent epidural bolus, 684 patient-controlled infusion epidural analgesia and 152 intra-venous patient-controlled epidural analgesia. We also considered 341 women who underwent patient-controlled infusion epidural analgesia in association with CEI and 103 patients who underwent patient-controlled infusion epidural analgesia in association with automatic mandatory bolus. No significant differences occurred among all the available administration schemes of neuraxial analgesia. In absence of obstetrical contraindication, neuraxial analgesia has to be considered as the gold standard in obtaining maternal pain relief during labour. The options available in the administration of analgesia should be known and evaluated together by both gynaecologists and anaesthesiologists to choose the best personalized scheme and obtain the best women satisfaction. Since it is difficult to identify comparable circumstances during labour, it is complicate to standardize drugs schemes and their combinations.

  1. Anaesthesia medical workforce in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, S Y

    2006-04-01

    This survey was conducted in all 28 New Zealand District Health Boards with a response rate of 100%. The Clinical Directors of Departments of Anaesthesia were asked to quantify their current anaesthesia service delivery and to assess their workforce level. Over half of the District Health Boards reported understaffing, fifty percent occurring in hospitals of provincial cities or towns with an inability to attract specialist anaesthesia staff. Financial constraint was the other main reason for understaffing. With the information from the survey, an attempt was made to predict future New Zealand anaesthesia workforce requirements. A model for Australasia established by Baker in 1997 was used. In comparing this survey to previous studies, there is evidence that the nature and expectations of the anaesthesia workforce are changing as well as the work environment. Currently, there is no indication that anaesthesia specialist training numbers should be reduced. Close, ongoing monitoring and planning are essential to ensure future demands for anaesthesia services can be met.

  2. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology...... for chlorhexidine. Only one patient has tested positive to a neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) so far. DISCUSSION: Our preliminary results appear to differ in two ways from results usually found in this field. Firstly, only one patient has tested positive for a NMBD and secondly, we have had four patients...

  3. Anaesthesia and the developing brain

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    colleagues: could the anaesthetic agents cause any long term neurological .... as persistent memory/learning impairments.13 These data have been reproduced in other ... that examined twins, with one child exposed to anaesthesia and the other not ... a short exposure to commonly used anaesthetics like propofol, ketamine ...

  4. Anaesthesia for a patient with beta thalassaemia major ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Presented here is a case report of a 32-year-old gentleman with beta thalassaemia major presenting for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and splenectomy, followed by a discussion of the literature. Keywords: anaemia, anaesthesia, beta thalassaemia, iron overload, laparoscopic cholecystectomy, splenectomy ...

  5. Kinetic considerations in the choice of treatment schedules for neuraxis radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheldon, T.E.

    1993-01-01

    Neuraxis radiotherapy of radiosensitive tumours such as medulloblastoma is usually carried out using conventionally sized fractions and a shrinking field technique. Plowman and Doughty (Br.J.Radiol., 64 (1991) 603-607) have proposed a partial transmission block (PTB) technique which entails the use of small daily doses over a conventional time period. Radiobiological analysis suggests that, although the PTB technique may be adequate for slowly growing tumours, therapeutic efficacy is likely to be compromised where the tumour doubling time is short. Accelerated hyperfractionation (twice daily fractions) provides a possible alternative to both conventional scheduling and the PTB technique. Direct measurement of the kinetics of tumour cells in CSF, where possible, may provide useful guidance in the choice of regimes. (author)

  6. A preliminary investigation of the mechanism of anti-pain and counter-injury effects of the acupuncture anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    In accordance with dialectical materialism and by dint of experimental acupuncture anaesthesia, the present investigation has: (1) Made an objective evaluation of the efficiency of acupuncture anaesthesia. (2) Brought forth some experimental evidence about the material basis of the anti-pain and counter-injury effect of acupuncture anaesthesia as well as the significance of its induction period. (3) Proposed the concept of humoral anaesthesia and its technique in order to improve the efficiency of animal laparotomies with acupuncture anaesthesia. Furthermore, it attempts to offer a theoretical explanation of the process of acupuncture anaesthesia under the combination of Chinese and Western medical theories and thereby gives some support to the "meridian-cerebral cortex-viscera inter-correlation hypothesis."

  7. MONITORING DEPTH OF ANAESTHESIA USING PRST SCORE AND BISPECTRAL INDEX

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul; Sowmya; Rangalakshmi; Roshan Kumar; Karthik

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Intraoperative awareness is a frightening experience for any patient for it has long term psychological consequences. Among the various tools available for monitoring depth of anaesthesia, Bispectral index monitoring (BIS) is one of the recent and widely accepted techniques. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES : The present study was carried out ...

  8. Cost analysis of injection laryngoplasty performed under local anaesthesia versus general anaesthesia: an Australian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, D; Woods, C M; Schar, M; Ma, N; Ooi, E H; Athanasiadis, T

    2018-02-01

    To conduct a cost analysis of injection laryngoplasty performed in the operating theatre under local anaesthesia and general anaesthesia. The retrospective study included patients who had undergone injection laryngoplasty as day cases between July 2013 and March 2016. Cost data were obtained, along with patient demographics, anaesthetic details, type of injectant, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, length of stay, total operating theatre time and surgeon procedure time. A total of 20 cases (general anaesthesia = 6, local anaesthesia = 14) were included in the cost analysis. The mean total cost under general anaesthesia (AU$2865.96 ± 756.29) was significantly higher than that under local anaesthesia (AU$1731.61 ± 290.29) (p costs. Procedures performed under local anaesthesia in the operating theatre are associated with shorter operating theatre time and length of stay in the hospital, and provide significant cost savings. Further savings could be achieved if local anaesthesia procedures were performed in the office setting.

  9. Ambulatory anaesthesia and cognitive dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars S; Steinmetz, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    serious adverse outcomes, hence difficult to obtain sound scientific evidence for avoiding complications. RECENT FINDINGS: Few studies have assessed recovery of cognitive function after ambulatory surgery, but it seems that both propofol and modern volatile anaesthetics are rational choices for general...... anaesthesia in the outpatient setting. Cognitive complications such as delirium and postoperative cognitive dysfunction are less frequent in ambulatory surgery than with hospitalization. SUMMARY: The elderly are especially susceptible to adverse effects of the hospital environment such as immobilisation...

  10. The Use of Neuraxial Catheters for Postoperative Analgesia in Neonates: A Multicenter Safety Analysis from the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Justin B; Joselyn, Anita S; Bhalla, Tarun; Tobias, Joseph D; De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Suresh, Santhanam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, there is limited evidence to support the safety of neuraxial catheters in neonates. Safety concerns have been cited as a major barrier to performing large randomized trials in this population. The main objective of this study is to examine the safety of neuraxial catheters in neonates across multiple institutions. Specifically, we sought to determine the incidence of overall and individual complications encountered when neuraxial catheters were used for postoperative analgesia in neonates. This was an observational study that used the Pediatric Regional Anesthesia Network database. Complications and adverse events were defined by the presence of at least 1 of the following intraoperative and/or postoperative factors: catheter malfunction (dislodgment/occlusion), infection, block abandoned (unable to place), block failure (no evidence of block), vascular (blood aspiration/hematoma), local anesthetic systemic toxicity, excessive motor block, paresthesia, persistent neurologic deficit, and other (e.g., intra-abdominal misplacement, tremors). Additional analyses were performed to identify the use of potentially toxic doses of local anesthetics. The study cohort included 307 neonates with a neuraxial catheter. There were 41 adverse events and complications recorded, resulting in an overall incidence of complications of 13.3% (95% confidence interval, 9.8%-17.4%). Among the complications, catheter malfunction, catheter contamination, and vascular puncture were common. None of the complications resulted in long-term complications and/or sequelae, resulting in an estimated incidence of any serious complications of 0.3% (95% confidence interval, 0.08%-1.8%). There were 120 of 307 patients who received intraoperative and/or postoperative infusions consistent with a potentially toxic local anesthetic dose in neonates. The incidence of potentially toxic local anesthetic infusion rates increased over time (P = 0.008). Neuraxial catheter techniques for intraoperative

  11. [Regional anaesthesia as advantage in competition between hospitals. Strategic market analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, A R; Bauer, K R; Eberlein-Gonska, M; Albrecht, D M; Koch, T

    2009-05-01

    The German Social Act V section sign 12 is aimed towards competition, efficiency and quality in healthcare. Because surgical departments are billing standard diagnosis-related group (DRG) case costs to health insurance companies, they claim best value for money for internal services. Thus, anaesthesia concepts are being closely scrutinized. The present analysis was performed to gain economic arguments for the strategic positioning of regional anaesthesia procedures into clinical pathways. Surgical procedures, which in 2005 had a relevant caseload in Germany, were chosen in which regional anaesthesia procedures (alone or in combination with general anaesthesia) could routinely be used. The structure of costs and earnings for hospital services, split by types and centres of cost, as well as by underlying procedures are contained in the annually updated public accessible dataset (DRG browser) of the German Hospital Reimbursement Institute (InEK). For the year 2005 besides own data, national anaesthesia staffing costs are available from the German Society of Anaesthesiology (DGAI). The curve of earnings per DRG can be calculated from the 2005 InEK browser. This curve intersects by the cost curve at the point of national mean length of stay. The cost curve was calculated by process-oriented distribution of cost centres over the length of stay and allows benchmarking within the national competitive environment. For comparison of process times data from our local database were used. While the InEK browser lacks process times, the cost positions 5.1-5.3 (staffing costs anaesthesia) and the national structure adjusted anaesthesia staffing costs 2005 as published by the DGAI, were used to calculate nationwide mean available anaesthesia times which were compared with own process times. Within the portfolio diagram of lengths of stay for each DRG and process times most procedures are located in the economic lower left, in particular those with high case mix (length of stay and

  12. Lessons learned from a single institution's retrospective analysis of emergent cesarean delivery following external cephalic version with and without neuraxial anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, A; Sviggum, H P; Tolcher, M C; Weaver, A L; Holman, M A; Arendt, K W

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the risk of emergent cesarean delivery with the use of neuraxial anesthesia for external cephalic version in a single practice. Randomized trials have shown increased external cephalic version success when neuraxial anesthesia is used, without additional risk. We hypothesized that in our actual clinical practice, outside the confines of randomized trials, neuraxial anesthesia could be associated with an increased risk of emergent cesarean delivery. This retrospective cohort study included all women who underwent external cephalic version at a single institution with and without neuraxial anesthesia. The primary outcome was the incidence of emergent cesarean delivery (defined as delivery within 4hours of version). Secondary outcomes were version success and ultimate mode of delivery. A total of 135 women underwent external cephalic version procedures; 58 with neuraxial anesthesia (43.0%) and 77 without (57.0%). Location of the procedure, tocolytic therapy, and gestational age were different between groups. An increased rate of emergent cesarean delivery was found in procedures with neuraxial anesthesia compared to procedures without (5/58 (8.6%) compared to 0/77 (0.0%); 95% CI for difference, 1.4 to 15.8%; P=0.013). In this single hospital's practice, patients who may be at higher risk of complications and have a lesser likelihood of success were provided NA for ECV. As a result, the use of neuraxial anesthesia for external cephalic version was associated with a higher rate of emergent cesarean delivery. Obstetric and anesthetic practices should evaluate their patient selection and procedure protocol for external cephalic version under neuraxial anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Topical anaesthesia in children: reducing the need for specialty referral.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Gabrielle

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: The management of wounds in children is stressful, not only for the child, but also for parents and staff. In our Emergency Department (ED), we currently do not have a paediatric sedation policy, and thus children requiring suturing, not amenable to distraction and infiltrative anaesthesia, are referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. We proposed that the introduction of a topical anaesthetic gel (lidocaine, adrenaline, tetracaine - LAT) might help to reduce the number of referrals, by allowing the ED staff to perform the procedures, in combination with nonpharmacological approaches. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective review of ED records of all children aged 14 years or less attending with wounds, over an 8-month period, from 01 May 2007 to 31 January 2008. RESULTS: Two hundred and one (50.6%) patients presented before the introduction of LAT gel, whereas 196 (49.3%) patients presented afterwards. A total of 39 (19.4%) patients were referred for specialty review pre-LAT, whereas only 19 (9.7%) patients were referred in the LAT group. Of these, 31 (15.4%) pre-LAT and 15 (7.7%) LAT group required general anaesthesia. There is a significant difference between these two groups, using Fischer\\'s exact test, P=0.018. CONCLUSION: We have found that the introduction of topical anaesthetic gel in ED has significantly reduced the number of children with wounds referred to specialty teams for general anaesthesia. This has important implications for patient safety and hospital resources.

  14. Relative Wave Energy based Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System model for the Estimation of Depth of Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzy, V K; Jasmin, E A; Koshy, Rachel Cherian; Amal, Frank; Indiradevi, K P

    2018-01-01

    The advancement in medical research and intelligent modeling techniques has lead to the developments in anaesthesia management. The present study is targeted to estimate the depth of anaesthesia using cognitive signal processing and intelligent modeling techniques. The neurophysiological signal that reflects cognitive state of anaesthetic drugs is the electroencephalogram signal. The information available on electroencephalogram signals during anaesthesia are drawn by extracting relative wave energy features from the anaesthetic electroencephalogram signals. Discrete wavelet transform is used to decomposes the electroencephalogram signals into four levels and then relative wave energy is computed from approximate and detail coefficients of sub-band signals. Relative wave energy is extracted to find out the degree of importance of different electroencephalogram frequency bands associated with different anaesthetic phases awake, induction, maintenance and recovery. The Kruskal-Wallis statistical test is applied on the relative wave energy features to check the discriminating capability of relative wave energy features as awake, light anaesthesia, moderate anaesthesia and deep anaesthesia. A novel depth of anaesthesia index is generated by implementing a Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system based fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm which uses relative wave energy features as inputs. Finally, the generated depth of anaesthesia index is compared with a commercially available depth of anaesthesia monitor Bispectral index.

  15. Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Residents’ Perception of Simulation Training in Four Romanian Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasian Horațiu N

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simulation training offers an opportunity to educate anaesthesia and intensive care (AIC residents safely. At present, it is not yet a mandatory part of residency curriculum.

  16. Total intravenous general anaesthesia vs. spinal anaesthesia for total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, A; Kehlet, H; Ljung, P

    2015-01-01

    , length of stay in the post-operative care unit, dizziness, post-operative nausea, need of urinary catheterisation and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: General anaesthesia resulted in slightly reduced length of hospital stay (26 vs. 30 h, P = 0.004), less nausea (P = 0.043) and dizziness (P ....008). Patients in the spinal anaesthesia group fulfilled the discharge criteria from the post-operative care unit earlier compared with the general anaesthesia patients (P = 0.004). General anaesthesia patients requested a change in the method of anaesthesia for a subsequent operation less often than the spinal...

  17. Memory formation during anaesthesia: plausibility of a neurophysiological basis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselis, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    As opposed to conscious, personally relevant (explicit) memories that we can recall at will, implicit (unconscious) memories are prototypical of ‘hidden’ memory; memories that exist, but that we do not know we possess. Nevertheless, our behaviour can be affected by these memories; in fact, these memories allow us to function in an ever-changing world. It is still unclear from behavioural studies whether similar memories can be formed during anaesthesia. Thus, a relevant question is whether implicit memory formation is a realistic possibility during anaesthesia, considering the underlying neurophysiology. A different conceptualization of memory taxonomy is presented, the serial parallel independent model of Tulving, which focuses on dynamic information processing with interactions among different memory systems rather than static classification of different types of memories. The neurophysiological basis for subliminal information processing is considered in the context of brain function as embodied in network interactions. Function of sensory cortices and thalamic activity during anaesthesia are reviewed. The role of sensory and perisensory cortices, in particular the auditory cortex, in support of memory function is discussed. Although improbable, with the current knowledge of neurophysiology one cannot rule out the possibility of memory formation during anaesthesia. PMID:25735711

  18. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care is to provide a medium for the dissemination of original works in Africa and other parts of the world about anaesthesia and intensive care including the application of basic sciences ...

  19. Anaesthesia associated developmental neurotoxicity (AADN) 2015

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'An estimated 6 million children (including 1.5 million infants) .... Effect of general anaesthesia in infancy on long-term recognition memory in humans and rats. .... socio-economic differences, short-term anaesthesia exposure was not linked to ...

  20. Respiratory arrest after retrobulbar anaesthesia | Ashaye | West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report highlights this rare but fatal complication of suspected brain stem anaesthesia after retrobulbar anaesthesia. Retrobulbar and peribulbar blocks should be performed in safe situations where individuals trained in airway maintenance and ventilatory support should be immediately available. Keywords: Cataract ...

  1. Crisis management during anaesthesia: hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R W; Watterson, L M; Westhorpe, R N; Webb, R K

    2005-06-01

    Hypotension is commonly encountered in association with anaesthesia and surgery. Uncorrected and sustained it puts the brain, heart, kidneys, and the fetus in pregnancy at risk of permanent or even fatal damage. Its recognition and correction is time critical, especially in patients with pre-existing disease that compromises organ perfusion. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for hypotension, in the management of hypotension when it occurs in association with anaesthesia. Reports of hypotension during anaesthesia were extracted and studied from the first 4000 incidents reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS). The potential performance of the COVER ABCD algorithm and the sub-algorithm for hypotension was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetist involved. There were 438 reports that mentioned hypotension, cardiovascular collapse, or cardiac arrest. In 17% of reports more than one cause was attributed and 550 causative events were identified overall. The most common causes identified were drugs (26%), regional anaesthesia (14%), and hypovolaemia (9%). Concomitant changes were reported in heart rate or rhythm in 39% and oxygen saturation or ventilation in 21% of reports. Cardiac arrest was documented in 25% of reports. As hypotension was frequently associated with abnormalities of other vital signs, it could not always be adequately addressed by a single algorithm. The sub-algorithm for hypotension is adequate when hypotension occurs in association with sinus tachycardia. However, when it occurs in association with bradycardia, non-sinus tachycardia, desaturation or signs of anaphylaxis or other problems, the sub-algorithm for hypotension recommends cross referencing to other relevant sub-algorithms. It was considered that, correctly applied, the core algorithm COVER ABCD would have diagnosed 18% of cases and led to resolution in

  2. Colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia: indications, technique and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukong, Christopher Suiye; Jabo, Basheer Abdullahi; Mfuh, Anita Yafeh

    2012-01-01

    Colostomy is a resuscitative procedure in paediatric surgical practice. In critical patients, mortality may be high, if general anaesthesia is used. Local anaesthesia may be an alternative in this group of neonates. The aim of this article was to evaluate the indications, the technique and outcome of colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia. A prospective analysis of 38 neonates who had colostomy under local anaesthesia, from July 2008 to September 2011, in our centre. There were 34 boys and 4 girls. The median age was 4 days (range 2-11 days),and all presented in a critical state. The indication for colostomy was anorectal malformation 37 (97.4%) and colonic atresia 1 (2.6%). COLOSTOMY: sigmoid 7 (18.4%), descending 29 (76.3%), transverse 2 (5.3%). The median duration of the procedure was 45 minutes (range 30-60 minutes). The hospital stay was 7-15 days (median 7 days) and cost of treatment 7000-7500 Naira (median 7500 Naira = $50). There were 5 (13.2%) early complications, namely, skin excoriation 2, superficial site infection 2, and bowel evisceration 1; mortality was 2 (5.3%). The late complications were stomal stenosis 1 (2.6%), colostomy diarrhoea 2 (5.3%), and parastomal hernia 2 (5.3%). 25 (65.7%) had colostomy takedown and 13 (34%) were yet to have colostomy takedown. Follow-up was for 1-2 years. None of the patients had a permanent colostomy. Colostomy in neonates under local anaesthesia is feasible, safe and cost-effective. The outcome is good and may be used when neonatal anaesthetic expertise and intensive care facilities are lacking.

  3. Regional anaesthesia in obstetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, H; Finster, M

    1984-01-01

    This review includes a brief discussion of the indications and pitfalls of regional anaesthetic techniques commonly used during parturition. Emphasis is given to the physiological changes of pregnancy and the potential effects on the fetus. The criteria for the choice of local anaesthetic are also presented.

  4. The Child with Cerebral Palsy and Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rudra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy (CP is the result of an injury to the developing brain during the antenatal, perinatal or postnatal period. Clinical manifestation relate to the areas affected. Patients with CP often present for elective surgical proce-dures to correct various deformities. Anaesthetic concerns of anaesthesia are intraoperative hypothermia , and slow emergence. Suxamethonium does not cause hyperkalaemia in these patients, and a rapid sequence induction may be indicated. Temperature should be monitored and an effort made to keep the patient warm. Cerebral abnormalities may lead to slow awakening; the patient should remain intubated until fully awake and airway reflexes have returned. Pulmonary infection can complicate the postoperative course. Postoperative pain management and the prevention of muscle spasms are important and drugs as baclofen and botulinum toxin are discussed. Epidural analgesia is particu-larly valuable when major orthopaedic procedures are performed.

  5. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology...... of in vitro testing and skin testing. Blood samples for tryptase analysis are taken at the time of reaction and a control sample is taken together with samples for specific IgE analysis 2-4 weeks after the reaction. Subsequent skin testing comprises both prick tests and intradermal tests in most cases...... for chlorhexidine. Only one patient has tested positive to a neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) so far. DISCUSSION: Our preliminary results appear to differ in two ways from results usually found in this field. Firstly, only one patient has tested positive for a NMBD and secondly, we have had four patients...

  6. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  7. Inhalational anaesthesia with low fresh gas flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hönemann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the inhalation of anaesthesia use of low fresh gas flow (0.35-1 L/min has some important advantages. There are three areas of benefit: pulmonary - anaesthesia with low fresh gas flow improves the dynamics of inhaled anaesthesia gas, increases mucociliary clearance, maintains body temperature and reduces water loss. Economic - reduction of anaesthesia gas consumption resulting in significant savings of > 75% and Ecological - reduction in nitrous oxide consumption, which is an important ozone-depleting and heat-trapping greenhouse gas that is emitted. Nevertheless, anaesthesia with high fresh gas flows of 2-6 L/min is still performed, a technique in which rebreathing is practically negligible. This special article describes the clinical use of conventional plenum vaporizers, connected to the fresh gas supply to easily perform low (1 L/min, minimal (0.5 L/min or metabolic flow anaesthesia (0.35 L/min with conventional Primus Draeger® anaesthesia machines in routine clinical practice.

  8. Magnesium Therapy in Pre-eclampsia Prolongs Analgesia Following Spinal Anaesthesia with Fentanyl and Bupivacaine: An Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Özkan Seyhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnesium has anti-nociceptive effects and potentiates opioid analgesia following its systemic and neuraxial administration. However, there is no study evaluating the effects of intravenous (IV magnesium sulphate (MgSO4 therapy on spinal anaesthesia characteristics in severely pre-eclamptic patients. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare spinal anaesthesia characteristics in severely pre-eclamptic parturients treated with MgSO4 and healthy preterm parturients undergoing caesarean section. Thus, our primary outcome was regarded as the time to first analgesic request following spinal anaesthesia. Study Design: Case-control Study. Methods: Following approval of Institutional Clinical Research Ethics Committee and informed consent of the patients, 44 parturients undergoing caesarean section with spinal anaesthesia were enrolled in the study in two groups: Healthy preterm parturients (Group C and severely pre-eclamptic parturients with IV MgSO4 therapy (Group Mg. Following blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF sampling, spinal anaesthesia was induced with 9 mg hyperbaric bupivacaine and 20 µg fentanyl. Serum and CSF magnesium levels, onset of sensory block at T4 level, highest sensory block level, motor block characteristics, time to first analgesic request, maternal haemodynamics as well as side effects were evaluated. Results: Blood and CSF magnesium levels were higher in Group Mg. Sensory block onset at T4 were 257.1±77.5 and 194.5±80.1 sec in Group C and Mg respectively (p=0.015. Time to first postoperative analgesic request was significantly prolonged in Group Mg than in Group C (246.1±52.8 and 137.4±30.5 min, respectively, p<0.001; with a mean difference of 108.6 min and 95% CI between 81.6 and 135.7. Side effects were similar in both groups. Group C required significantly more fluids. Conclusion: Treatment with IV MgSO4 in severe pre-eclamptic parturients significantly prolonged the time to first analgesic request compared

  9. [Shoulder surgery using only regional anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilbury, Claire; van Kampen, Paulien M; Offenberg, Tom A M M; Hogervorst, Tom; Huijsmans, Pol E

    2011-01-01

    Effective intra-operative anaesthesia and peri-operative analgesia are important aspects of patient care in orthopaedic surgery. The interscalene regional anaesthetic block technique, performed with the patient lying in a lateral decubitus position, is new for arthroscopic shoulder surgery conducted in the Netherlands. The combination of the interscalene block (without general anaesthesia) and the lateral decubitus position results in better peri-operative conditions for the patient. Better analgesia, increased patient satisfaction and fewer complications in comparison to general anaesthesia have been reported for these types of surgery.

  10. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  11. Abnormalities of contrast sensitivity and electroretinogram following sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that disturbances of the visual pathway following sevoflurane general anaesthesia (a) exist and persist even after clinical discharge criteria have been met and (b) are associated with decreased contrast sensitivity. METHODS: We performed pattern and full-field flash electroretinograms (ERG) in 10 unpremedicated ASA I patients who underwent nitrous oxide\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. ERG and contrast sensitivity were recorded preoperatively, immediately after discharge from the recovery room and 2 h after discontinuation of sevoflurane. The time at which the Post Anaesthesia Discharge Score first exceeded 9 was also noted. Data were analysed using paired, one-tailed t-tests and Pearson\\'s correlation coefficient. RESULTS: On the full-field photopic ERG, b-wave latency was greater at each postoperative time point (31.6+\\/-1.1 and 30.8+\\/-1.1 ms) compared to preoperatively (30.1+\\/-1.1 ms, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, respectively). Oscillatory potential latencies were greater on discharge from the recovery room compared with preanaesthetic values (23.1+\\/-3.1 vs. 22.4+\\/-3.3 ms, P = 0.01) and returned to baseline by 2 h after emergence from anaesthesia. Also at 2 h after emergence from anaesthesia: (a) P50 latency on the pattern ERG was greater than at baseline (81.5+\\/-17.9 vs. 51.15+\\/-22.6ms, P = 0.004); (b) N95 amplitude was less compared to preanaesthetic values (2.6+\\/-0.5 vs. 3.3+\\/-0.4 microV, P = 0.003) and (c) contrast sensitivity was less compared to baseline values (349+\\/-153 vs. 404+\\/-140, P = 0.048). A positive correlation was demonstrated between contrast sensitivity and both N95 amplitude and b-wave latency (r = 0.99 and r = -0.55 at significance levels of P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative ERG abnormalities and associated decreases in contrast sensitivity are consistently present in patients who have undergone nitrous oxide\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. These

  12. Inguinal hernia repair: anaesthesia, pain and convalescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Torben

    2003-01-01

    of less serious complications is lower by local anaesthesia, compared to other anaesthetic techniques. Of special interest is, that the rate of urinary retention can be eliminated by the use of local anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia results, in comparative studies, in a higher degree of patient satisfaction...... than other anaesthetic techniques. Local anaesthesia also facilitates faster mobilisation and earlier discharge/fulfilment of discharge criteria from post anaesthetic care units than other anaesthetic techniques. Pain after hernia repair is more pronounced at mobilisation or coughing than during rest....... Pain after laparoscopic surgery is less pronounced than after open surgery, while different open repair techniques do not exhibit significant differences. Postoperative pain is best treated with a combination of local analgesia and peripherally acting agents (paracetamol, NSAID or their combination...

  13. Mortality associated with anaesthesia at Zimbabwean teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1992-12-31

    Dec 31, 1992 ... procedures, there were 89 deaths between 1 January and. 31 December ... 24 hours of anaesthesia or failure of a patient, who was previously .... Equipment failure. 3 ... haemorrhage occurred in urology (7) and obstetrics (6),.

  14. An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ajmal, Muhammad

    2009-12-01

    Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.

  15. Piracetam improves children's memory after general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenko, Ułbołgan A

    2009-01-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia may account for postoperative complications including cognitive impairment. The purpose of the study was to assess the influence of general anaesthetics on children's memory and effectiveness of piracetam for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. The study included patients receiving different kinds of anaesthesia for various surgical procedures, randomly allocated to two groups. According to immediate postoperative treatment, the study group received intravenous piracetam 30 mg kg(-1) and the control group--placebo. The cognitive functions were examined preoperatively and within 10 consecutive postoperative days using the ten-word memory test. The study group consisted of 123 children, the control one--of 127. Declines in memory indexes were observed in all anaesthetized patients. The most injured function was long-term memory. The intravenous administration of piracetam improved this cognitive function. The study results confirm that general anaesthesia affects the memory function in children. Piracetam is effective for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction after anaesthesia.

  16. Complications associated with regional anaesthesia for Caesarean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    REVIEW. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia - February 2004. 15. Complications ..... The diagnosis may be difficult, since a chronic subdural haematoma may be mistaken for psychiatric disease61, and seizures may be ...

  17. Fatal subacute liver failure after repeated administration of sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizek, David; Ribnikar, Marija; Zizek, Bogomir; Ferlan-Marolt, Vera

    2010-01-01

    Sevoflurane is a widely used halogenated inhalation anaesthetic. In comparison with other similar anaesthetics, it is not metabolized to potentially hepatotoxic trifluoroacetylated proteins. In this case report, we present a 66-year-old woman with breast carcinoma, who underwent sevoflurane general anaesthesia twice in 25 days. Soon after the second elective surgical procedure, jaundice and marked elevations in serum transaminases developed. The patient died 66 days thereafter. Autopsy results denied evidence of major cardiovascular abnormality, and histological examination confirmed massive liver cell necrosis with no feature of chronic liver injury. Sevoflurane anaesthesia was imputed as the cause after exclusion of other possible aetiological agents. Besides, coexistent malignant tumours found in the patient could have modulated the immunological response to the applied anaesthetic followed by fatal consequences.

  18. Effects of ketamine and midazolam on emergence agitation after sevoflurane anaesthesia in children receiving caudal block: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozcan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emergence agitation is a common postanaesthetic problem in children after sevoflurane anaesthesia. We aimed to compare the effects of ketamine and midazolam administered intravenously, before the end of surgery, for prevention of emergence agitation in children who received caudal block for pain relief under sevoflurane anaesthesia. Methods: 62 American Society of Anesthesiologists patient classification status I children, aged 2–7 years, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair, circumcision or orchidopexy were enrolled to the study. Anaesthesia was induced with sevoflurane 8% in a mixture of 50% oxygen and nitrous oxide. After achieving adequate depth of anaesthesia, a laryngeal mask was placed and then caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL kg−1, 0.25% bupivacaine. At the end of the surgery, ketamine 0.25 mg kg−1, midazolam 0.03 mg kg−1 and saline were given to ketamine, midazolam and control groups, respectively. Agitation was assessed using Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scale and postoperative pain was evaluated with modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale. Results and conclusions: Modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale scores were found higher in control group than in ketamine and midazolam groups. Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores were similar between groups. Modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale and Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores showed a significant decrease by time in all groups during follow-up in postanaesthesia care unit. The present study resulted in satisfactory Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores which are below 10 in all groups. As a conclusion, neither ketamine nor midazolam added to caudal block under sevoflurane anaesthesia did show further effect on emergence agitation. In addition, pain relief still seems to be the major factor in preventing emergence agitation after

  19. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  20. General dental practitioner's views on dental general anaesthesia services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, A G; King, D; Milsom, K M; Blinkhom, A S; Tickle, M

    2007-06-01

    Policy has recently changed on provision of dental general anaesthetic services in England. The aim of this study was to investigate general dental practitioners' views about dental general anaesthetics, the reduction in its availability and the impact on care of children with toothache. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and clinical case scenarios. General dental practitioners providing NHS services in the North West of England. 93 general dental practitioners were interviewed and 91 answered a clinical case scenario about the care they would provide for a 7-year-old child with multiple decayed teeth presenting with toothache. Scenario responses showed variation; 8% would immediately refer for general anaesthesia, 25% would initially prescribe antibiotics, but the majority would attempt to either restore or extract the tooth causing pain. Interview responses also demonstrated variation in care, however most dentists agree general anaesthesia has a role for nervous children but only refer as a last resort. The responses indicated an increase in inequalities, and that access to services did not match population needs, leaving some children waiting in pain. Most general dental practitioners support moving dental general anaesthesia into hospitals but some believe that it has widened health inequalities and there is also a problem associated with variation in treatment provision. Additional general anaesthetic services in some areas with high levels of tooth decay are needed and evidence based guidelines about caring for children with toothache are required.

  1. Total intravenous anaesthesia in a goat undergoing craniectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieitez, Verónica; Álvarez Gómez de Segura, Ignacio; López Rámis, Víctor; Santella, Massimo; Ezquerra, Luis Javier

    2017-09-15

    Cerebral coenurosis is a disease of the central nervous system in sheep and goats, and is usually fatal unless surgical relief is provided. Information regarding neuroanaesthesia in veterinary medicine in goats is scant. We describe anaesthetic management of an intact female goat (2 years; 16 kg) presented for craniectomy. The goat was sedated with xylazine (0.05 mg kg -1 , i.m.) and morphine (0.05 mg kg -1 , i.m.). General anaesthesia was induced 20 min later with propofol and maintained with a constant rate infusion of propofol (0.2 mg kg -1  min -1 ). A cuffed endotracheal tube was placed and connected to a rebreathing (circle) system and mechanical ventilation with 100% oxygen was initiated. A bolus of lidocaine (1 mg kg -1 ), midazolam (0.25 mg kg -1 ) and fentanyl 2.5 μg kg -1 was delivered via the intravenous route followed immediately by a constant rate infusion of lidocaine (50 μg kg -1  min -1 ), midazolam (0.15 mg kg -1  h -1 ) and fentanyl (6 μg kg -1  h -1 ) administered via the intravenous route throughout surgery. Craniectomy was undertaken and the goat recovered uneventfully. Total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol, lidocaine, fentanyl and midazolam could be an acceptable option for anaesthesia during intracranial surgery in goats.

  2. Neuraxial anesthesia improves long-term survival after total joint replacement: a retrospective nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hung; Hung, Kuo-Chuan; Tan, Ping-Heng; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2015-04-01

    This study explored the effects of general (GA) and neuraxial (NA) anesthesia on the outcomes of primary total joint replacement (TJR) in terms of postoperative mortality, length of stay (LOS), and hospital treatment costs. From 1997 to 2010, this nationwide population-based study retrospectively evaluated 7,977 patients in Taiwan who underwent primary total hip or knee replacement. We generated two propensity-score-matched subgroups, each containing an equal number of patients who underwent TJR with either GA or NA. Of the 7,977 patients, 2,990 (37.5%) underwent GA and 4,987 (62.5%) underwent NA. Propensity-score matching was used to create comparable GA and NA groups adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, surgery type, hospital volume, and surgeon volume. Survival over the first three years following surgery was similar. The proportion of patients alive up to 14 years postoperatively for those undergoing NA was 58.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.4 to 66.0), and for those undergoing GA it was 57.3% (95% CI 51.4 to 63.2). Neuraxial anesthesia was associated with lower median [interquartile range; IQR] hospital treatment cost ($4,079 [3,805-4,444] vs $4,113 [3,812-4,568]; P anesthesia costs are removed. The mechanism underlying the association between NA and long-term survival is unknown.

  3. Inconsistencies in clinical guidelines for obstetric anaesthesia for Caesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Lars; Mitchell, A U; Møller, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthetists need evidence-based clinical guidelines, also in obstetric anaesthesia. We compared the Danish, English, American, and German national guidelines for anaesthesia for Caesarean section. We focused on assessing the quality of guideline development and evaluation of the guidelines...

  4. European dental students' opinions on their local anaesthesia education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Tan, L.L.S.; van der Spek, S.J.; Baart, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate students’ opinion about theoretical and clinical training in local anaesthesia at different European dental schools. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect information about local anaesthesia teaching. Students’ opinion was quantified with five-point

  5. Role of the internet as an information resource before anaesthesia consultation: A French prospective multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Bastian; Claret, Pierre-Geraud; Leclerc, Gilles; Chaumeron, Arnaud; Grillo, Philippe; Buleon, Clément; Leprince, Vincent; Raux, Mathieu; Minville, Vincent; Futier, Emmanuel; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Cuvillon, Philippe

    2017-12-01

    Use of the internet as an information search tool has increased dramatically. Our study assessed preoperative use of the internet by patients to search for information regarding anaesthesia, surgery, pain or outcomes. The aim of this study was to test whether patients used the internet prior to surgery and what kinds of information they looked for (anaesthetic technique, pain, adverse events, outcomes and surgery). Correlation between patient age and information sought about surgery from the internet was also explored. A prospective multicentre observational study. In total, 14 French private and public institutions from May 2015 to January 2016. In total, 3161 adult patients scheduled for elective surgery under regional or general anaesthesia. An anonymous questionnaire was presented to adult patients scheduled for elective surgery under regional or general anaesthesia for completion before the first meeting with the anaesthesiologist. The investigator at each centre completed specific items that the patient could not complete. We defined the primary endpoint as the number of patients who searched for information about their anaesthesia or surgery on the internet by the time of the their preanaesthetic consultation. Of the 3234 questionnaires distributed, responses were received from 3161 patients. Within this respondent sample, 1304 (45%) were professionally active and 1664 (59%) used the internet at least once per day. Among 3098 (98%) patients who answered the question concerning the primary endpoint, 1506 (48%) had searched the internet for information about their health. In total, 784 (25%) used the internet to find information about their surgery and 113 (3.5%) looked for specific information about anaesthesia. Of the 3161, 52% reported difficulty searching for appropriate information about anaesthesia on the internet. 'Daily use of the web' [odds ratio (OR) 2.0; (95% CI: 1.65 to 2.55) P internet was not widely used by patients scheduled for elective

  6. Measuring the clinical learning environment in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, N A; Castanelli, D J

    2015-03-01

    The learning environment describes the way that trainees perceive the culture of their workplace. We audited the learning environment for trainees throughout Australia and New Zealand in the early stages of curriculum reform. A questionnaire was developed and sent electronically to a large random sample of Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees, with a 26% final response rate. This new instrument demonstrated good psychometric properties, with Cronbach's α ranging from 0.81 to 0.91 for each domain. The median score was equivalent to 78%, with the majority of trainees giving scores in the medium range. Introductory respondents scored their learning environment more highly than all other levels of respondents (P=0.001 for almost all comparisons). We present a simple questionnaire instrument that can be used to determine characteristics of the anaesthesia learning environment. The instrument can be used to help assess curricular change over time, alignment of the formal and informal curricula and strengths and weaknesses of individual departments.

  7. Retrospective analysis of risk factors and predictors of intraoperative complications in neuraxial blocks at Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu-UNESP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ivan Dias Fernandes; Grando, Marcela Miguel; Vianna, Pedro Thadeu Galvão; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Castiglia, Yara Marcondes Machado; Vane, Luís Antônio; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro; do Nascimento, Paulo; Amorim, Rosa Beatriz; Rodrigues, Geraldo Rolim; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Ganem, Eliana Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular changes associated with neuraxial blocks are a cause of concern due to their frequency and because some of them can be considered physiological effects triggered by the sympathetic nervous system blockade. The objective of this study was to evaluate intraoperative cardiovascular complications and predictive factors associated with neuraxial blocks in patients ≥ 18 years of age undergoing non-obstetric procedures over an 18-year period in a tertiary university hospital--HCFMB-UNESP. A retrospective analysis of the following complications was undertaken: hypertension, hypotension, sinus bradycardia, and sinus tachycardia. These complications were correlated with anesthetic technique, physical status (ASA), age, gender, and preoperative co-morbidities. The Tukey test for comparisons among proportions and logistic regression was used for statistical analysis. 32,554 patients underwent neuraxial blocks. Intraoperative complications mentioned included hypotension (n=4,109), sinus bradycardia (n=1,107), sinus tachycardia (n=601), and hypertension (n=466). Hypotension was seen more often in patients undergoing continuous subarachnoid anesthesia (29.4%, OR=2.39), ≥ 61 years of age, and female (OR=1.27). Intraoperative hypotension and bradycardia were the complications observed more often. Hypotension was related to anesthetic technique (CSA), increased age, and female. Tachycardia and hypertension may not have been directly related to neuraxial blocks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. retrobulbar versus sub-conjunctival anaesthesia for cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DDS EYE CENTER

    Aim: To test the efficacy of subconjunctival anaesthesia (SCA) for cataract surgery against the established retrobulbar anaesthesia (RBA). Methods: This was a prospective study of 73 adults (44 males, 29 females) selected for cataract surgery and intraocular lens. (IOL) implants under local anaesthesia. Their ages ranged.

  9. Obstetric anaesthesia: Is there anything new under the sun? | Dyer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recent years have seen considerable sophistication in the practice of obstetric anaesthesia in the developed world. Important areas include regional anaesthesia in labour, regional anaesthesia for caesarean section (CS), categorization of the urgency of CS, and clearer definition of fetal indications for CS.

  10. Customer focused incident monitoring in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F A; Khimani, S

    2007-06-01

    The database of incident forms relating to anaesthesia services in an institutional risk management programme were reviewed for 2003-2005, the aim being to identify any recurring patterns. Incidents were prospectively categorised as relating to attitude/behaviour, communication breakdown, delay in service, or were related to care, cost, environment, equipment, security, administrative process, quality of service or miscellaneous. The total number of anaesthesia-related incidents reported during the period was 287, which related to 0.44% of the total number of anaesthetics administered during the time period. In all, 170 incidents were reported by the department, 96 by internal customers and 21 by external customers. Only 30% of the complaints came from the operating room. Thirty-four per cent of all incidents related to communication, behaviour and delay in service. A requirement to teach communication skills and stress handling formally in anaesthesia training programmes, and at the time of induction of staff into the department, has been identified.

  11. Recovery after total intravenous general anaesthesia or spinal anaesthesia for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, A; Kehlet, H; Toksvig-Larsen, S

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>This study was undertaken to compare the effects of general anaesthesia (GA) and spinal anaesthesia (SA) on the need for postoperative hospitalization and early postoperative comfort in patients undergoing fast-track total knee arthroplasty (TKA). METHODS: /st>One hundred and twenty....... Secondary outcome parameters included actual time of discharge, postoperative pain, intraoperative blood loss, length of stay in the Post Anaesthesia Care Unit, dizziness, postoperative nausea and vomiting, need for urinary catheterization and subject satisfaction. RESULTS: /st>GA resulted in shorter LOS...

  12. Newborns from deliveries with epidural anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramović Lidija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The use of epidural anaesthesia in delivery with the purpose to reduce pain and fear in a pregnant woman has the influence on the physiological status of the woman in childbirth and the course of delivery. From the epidural space of the pregnant woman, one part of free anaesthetic comes in the foetal circulation through the mother's circulation and placenta and connects with the foetal proteins. A lower value of albumins and serum proteins in the foetal circulation give bigger free fraction of anaesthetic which is accumulated in the foetal liver, brain and heart full of blood. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the influence of epidural anaesthesia on the newborn. Methods. Retrospective study of 6,398 documents of newborns was performed in our Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 'Narodni front' during 2006. The first group was made of 455 newborns from deliveries with epidural anaesthesia and the second was the control group of 5,943 remaining newborns. In both groups we analysed the following: sex, week of gestation, weight, Apgar score, measure of care and resuscitation, perinatal morbidity and then the obtained results were compared. Results. Most of deliveries were vaginal without obstetric intervention (86.6%. The number of deliveries finished with vacuum extractor (4.6% was statistically significantly bigger in the group with epidural anaesthesia than in the control group. Most of the newborns in the first group were born on time (96.5% in 39.0±1.0 week of gestation and with foetal weight 3448±412 grammes. There was no statistical significance in Apgar score between both groups. Epidural anaesthesia does not increase the degree of the newborn's injury. Lower pH of blood was found in the newborns from deliveries with vacuum extractor or operated on (the Ceasarean section. Conclusion. Application of epidural anaesthesia decreases duration of delivery and has no adverse effects on the newborn and hypoxic

  13. Unpacking the burden: gender issues in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange Khursandi, D C

    1998-02-01

    A survey carried out by the Australian Society of Anaesthetists explored gender issues in the personal and professional lives of anaesthetists. Issues highlighted include training and career paths, combining anaesthetic training with domestic responsibilities, personal relationships, pregnancy and childrearing, private practice, part-time work, parental leave, the single anaesthetist, doctor spouses, sexual harassment, and negative attitudes in colleagues. Particular problems were identified in the training years, in part-time work, in private practice, and in combining parental and domestic responsibilities with a career in anaesthesia. Strategies to address relevant issues are discussed, with reference to the increasing proportion of women in medicine and anaesthesia.

  14. Anaesthesia in Dental Medicine with Local Infiltrative Anaesthetic Technique Versus Diploe Anaesthesia Delivery Systems: Efficacy and Behaviour, an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Marques-Ferreira

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Diploe anaesthesia demonstrated better results in terms of analgesia than the infiltrative anaesthesia. It has been reported to be easy, safe and an effective procedure that allows anaesthesia in almost all clinical situations. This approach may offer particular advantages for endodontic therapy, providing greater comfort for the patient.

  15. Central neuraxial opioid analgesia after caesarean section: comparison of epidural diamorphine and intrathecal morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranza, R; Jeyapalan, I; Buggy, D J

    1999-04-01

    In a prospective, randomized, double-blind study in 55 women undergoing elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia, we compared epidural diamorphine 3 mg (2 distinct boluses, group ED) with single-dose intrathecal morphine 0.2 mg (group SM), in terms of analgesic efficacy, patient satisfaction and side-effects at 2, 3, 4, 8, 12, 16, 24 and 28 h postoperatively. There were no significant differences between groups in pain (assessed by 100 mm visual analogue scale), incidence of pruritus, sedation or respiratory depression measured by continuous pulse oximetry. However, time to first request for supplementary oral analgesia was longer in SM than in ED (mean +/- SD: 22.3+/-12.0 h vs. 13.8+/-6.5 h, P=0.04). The incidence of nausea or vomiting was significantly higher in SM than ED (73% vs. 41%, P=0.01). In ED, the mean +/- SD time to requirement of the second bolus was 6.7+/-3.2 h. There was a high level of satisfaction in both groups. We conclude that two boluses of epidural diamorphine 3 mg and single-dose intrathecal morphine 0.2 mg provide satisfactory analgesia after caesarean section, but spinal morphine was associated with both delayed requirement for supplementary analgesia and a higher incidence of nausea and vomiting.

  16. Regional anaesthesia in children: an update | Bosenberg | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peripheral nerve blocks are increasingly more favoured than neuraxial blocks. This change has been fuelled by the lower reported incidence of complications associated with peripheral nerve blocks, and is also in keeping with the increase in laparoscopic and thoracoscopic surgery. There has been renewed interest in ...

  17. Retinal detachment secondary to ocular perforation during retrobulbar Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Lingam

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics and the retinal breaks associated with rhegmatogenous retinal detachments secondary to accidental globe perforation during local infiltration anaesthesia in five highly myopic eyes are presented. Retinal detachment was total with variable proliferative vitreoretinopathy. The pattern of retinal breaks was rather typical and predictable. Management involved vitreous surgery with internal tamponade by silicone oil in four eyes and perfluoropropane gas in one eye. At the last follow-up, all eyes had attached retina. One eye did not recover useful vision due to possible concurrent optic nerve damage.

  18. Cardiac Arrest Following Spinal Anaesthesia With Plain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    year old woman who was admitted for an elective caesarean section. After preoperative evaluation and premedication she received a spinal anaesthesia in the L3-4 interspace with plain bupivacaine 0.5%. After being replaced in the supine ...

  19. porcine anaesthesia for advanced trauma operative management

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    David Ofori-Adjei

    2008-09-01

    Sep 1, 2008 ... with intermittent positive pressure ventilation. The purpose of this paper is to ... animals were fasted overnight. The animals were first .... fasted overnight. This period of fasting was adequate and there were no instances of regurgitation or vomit- ing during anaesthesia in our cases. Mean systolic blood ...

  20. determinants of general anaesthesia for ophthalmic surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. CHARLES IMARENGIAYE

    1999-08-01

    Objectives: To study the pattern of anaesthesia for ophthalmic procedures in order to improve the scheduling of cases in the ophthalmic operating room. Methods: The surgical register of the operating room from. August 01, 1999 to July 31, 2004 was examined, to document the types of procedure, timing of surgery (elective ...

  1. Teaching and learning spinal anaesthesia: anaesthetists' attitudes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, Dorothy

    2010-12-01

    To identify the determinants of learning for one medical procedural skill, spinal anaesthesia, by eliciting the opinions of anaesthetists in Ireland and Hungary. This objective is one component of a research project, Medical Competence Assessment Procedure (MedCAP) funded by the EU Leonardo da Vinci Lifelong Learning Programme.

  2. Accidental alfaxalone overdose in a mature cat undergoing anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Bayldon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Case summary This case report describes the clinical signs and treatment of an alfaxalone 10 times overdose in a 12-year-old cat undergoing anaesthesia for MRI. The cat was discharged from hospital following a prolonged recovery including obtunded mentation and cardiorespiratory depression for several hours following cessation of anaesthesia. The cat received supportive therapy that included supplemental oxygen via a face mask, intravenous crystalloid fluids and active rewarming. The benefits of using alfaxalone for maintenance of anaesthesia, its pharmacokinetics and previously reported lethal doses are discussed. Strategies for reducing the incidence of medication errors are presented. Relevance and novel information An unintentional overdose of alfaxalone by continuous rate infusion has not been reported previously in a cat. Treatment is supportive and directed towards maintenance of the cardiorespiratory systems. Whenever possible, smart pumps that have been designed to reduce human error should be used to help prevent medication errors associated with continuous rate infusions.

  3. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alister U Nicol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odours and whether they can be investigated under anaesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odour smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anaesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odour under anaesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and GABA in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anaesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odour was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odour during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odour. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50% of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odours prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odour many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anaesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odours as well as in evoked glutamate and

  4. Anaesthesia for caesarean section in a patient with acute generalised pustular psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samieh-Tucker, A; Rupasinghe, M

    2007-10-01

    We describe a 30-year-old parturient with acute generalised pustular psoriasis who presented for urgent caesarean section. A multidisciplinary team was involved and general anaesthesia was used successfully. Management of this condition is discussed and the literature reviewed. While generalised pustular psoriasis or impetigo herpetiformis is well recognised in pregnancy, it has not hitherto been reported in obstetric anaesthesia literature. The purpose of this article is to delineate the clinical picture of this disease, its treatment, and the effect on the mother and the fetus.

  5. Neuraxial blocks and spinal haematoma: Review of 166 case reports published 1994-2015. Part 1: Demographics and risk-factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerkranser, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Bleeding into the vertebral canal causing a spinal haematoma (SH) is a rare but serious complication to central neuraxial blocks (CNB). Of all serious complications to CNBs such as meningitis, abscess, cardiovascular collapse, and nerve injury, neurological injury associated with SH has the worst prognosis for permanent harm. Around the turn of the millennium, the first guidelines were published that aimed to reduce the risk of this complication. These guidelines are based on known risk factors for SH, rather than evidence from randomised, controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs, and therefore meta-analysis of RCTs, are not appropriate for identifying rare events. Analysing published case reports of rare complications may at least reveal risk factors and can thereby improve management of CNBs. The aims of the present review were to analyse case reports of SH after CNBs published between 1994 and 2015, and compare these with previous reviews of case reports. MEDLINE and EMBASE were used for identifying case reports published in English, German, or Scandinavian languages, using appropriate search terms. Reference lists were also scrutinised for case reports. Twenty different variables from each case were specifically searched for and filled out on an Excel spreadsheet, and incidences were calculated using the number of informative reports as denominator for each variable. Altogether 166 case reports on spinal haematoma after CNB published during the years between 1994 and 2015 were collected. The annual number of case reports published during this period almost trebled compared with the two preceding decades. This trend continued even after the first guidelines on safe practice of CNBs appeared around year 2000, although more cases complied with such guidelines during the second half of the observation period (2005-2015) than during the first half. Three types of risk factors dominated: (1) Patient-related risk factors such as haemostatic and spinal disorders, (2) CNB

  6. Comparative evaluation of femoral nerve block and intravenous fentanyl for positioning during spinal anaesthesia in surgery of femur fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spinal anaesthesia is the preferred technique to fix fracture of the femur. Extreme pain does not allow ideal positioning for this procedure. Intravenous fentanyl and femoral nerve block are commonly used techniques to reduce the pain during position for spinal anaesthesia however; results are conflicting regarding superiority of femoral nerve block over intravenous fentanyl. Aims: We conducted this study to compare the analgesic effect provided by femoral nerve block (FNB and intra- venous (IV fentanyl prior to positioning for central neuraxial block in patients undergoing surgery for femur fracture. Patients and Methods: In this randomized prospective study 60 patients scheduled for fracture femur operation under spinal were included. Patients were distributed in two groups through computer generated random numbers table; Femoral nerve block group (FNB and Intravenous fentanyl group (FENT. In FNB group patients received FNB guided by a peripheral nerve stimulator (Stimuplex; B Braun, Melsungen, AG 5 minutes prior to positioning. 20mL, 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000 was injected incrementally after a negative aspiration test. Patients in the fentanyl group received injection fentanyl 1 μg/kg IV 5 mins prior to positioning. Spinal block was performed and pain scores before and during positioning were recorded. Statistical analysis was done with Sigmaplot version-10 computer software. Student t-test was applied to compare the means and P < 0.05 was taken as significant. Results: VAS during positioning in group FNB: 0.57 ± 0.31 versus FENT 2.53 ± 1.61 (P = 0.0020. Time to perform spinal anesthesia in group FNB: 15.33 ± 1.64 min versus FENT 19.56 ± 3.09 min (P = 0.000049. Quality of patient positioning for spinal anesthesia in group FNB 2.67± 0.606 versus FENT 1.967 ± 0.85 (P = 0.000027. Patient acceptance was less in group FENT (P = 0.000031. Conclusion: Femoral nerve block provides better analgesia, patient

  7. Scrutinizing incident reporting in anaesthesia: why is an incident perceived as critical?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maaløe, R; la Cour, M; Hansen, A

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure the incidence and type of incidents that occurred in relation to anaesthesia and surgery during a 1-year period in six Danish hospitals. Furthermore, we wanted to identify risk factors for incidents, as well as risk factors for incidents being deeme...... critical....

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF MODIFIED RADICAL MASTECTOMY PERFORMED UNDER LOCAL ANAESTHESIA WITH DEXMEDETOMIDINE INFUSION VS. GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesan Chayampurath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The incidence of breast cancer is on the rise in developing countries. Though, there have been significant advances in general anaesthesia, surgery in elderly and those with comorbid illness still have an attendant morbidity and mortality. After the introduction of local anaesthesia by Kolher in 1884 and in spite of steady refinement, local anaesthesia is still not being widely used in major general surgical procedures. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted in Government Medical College, Calicut, a tertiary care centre in Kerala. The outcome of Modified Radical Mastectomy performed under Local Anaesthesia (LA and dexmedetomidine infusion was compared to similar cases done under General Anaesthesia (GA. RESULTS Rapid recovery from sedation leading to early restoration of normal physical activity was observed in the LA group when compared to GA group. Early initiation of oral feeds was possible in the former group as Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting (PONV was significantly less. Effective postoperative pain relief and significant reduction in respiratory complications was observed in the LA group compared to GA group. CONCLUSION Modified Radical Mastectomy under LA and procedural sedation with dexmedetomidine was significantly better in selected cases when compared to similar cases done under GA with respect to early recovery pain relief and decreased incidence of respiratory complications.

  9. Anaesthesia for the separation of conjoined twins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Lalwani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoraco-omphalopagus is one of the most common type of conjoint twins accounting for 74% cases of conjoint twins. We report the anaesthetic management for successful separation of thoraco-omphalopagus conjoint twins, both of them surviving till date. We highlight the responsibility of anaesthesia team in anaesthetising the two individual patients simultaneously, need of careful monitoring and anticipation of complications like massive blood loss, hypotension, hypokalemia, hypoxia and hypercabia. Detailed description of successful management is reported.

  10. [Anaesthesia for patients with obstructive airway diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeben, H; Keller, V; Silvanus, M T

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive lung diseases like asthma or chronic obstructive lung diseases have a high prevalence and are one of the four most frequent causes of death. Obstructive lung diseases can be significantly influenced by the choice of anesthetic techniques and anesthetic agents. Basically, the severity of the COPD and the degree of bronchial hyperreactivity will determine the perioperative anesthetic risk. This risk has to be assessed by a thorough preoperative evaluation and will give the rationale on which to decide for the adequate anaesthetic technique. In particular, airway instrumentation can cause severe reflex bronchoconstriction. The use of regional anaesthesia alone or in combination with general anaesthesia can help to avoid airway irritation and leads to reduced postoperative complications. Prophylactic antiobstructive treatment, volatile anesthetics, propofol, opioids, and an adequate choice of muscle relaxants minimize the anesthetic risk, when general anesthesia is required In case, despite all precautions intra-operative bronchospasm occurs, deepening of anaesthesia, repeated administration of beta2-adrenergic agents and parasympatholytics, and a single systemic dose of corticosteroids represent the main treatment options.

  11. Stress-related biomarkers of dream recall and implicit memory under anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, P; Lai, C; Perilli, V; Dello Russo, C; Federico, B; Navarra, P; Proietti, R; Sollazzi, L

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether auditory presentation of a story during general anaesthesia might influence stress hormone changes and thus affecting dream recall and/or implicit memory. One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned either to hear a recording of a story through headphones or to have routine care with no auditory recording while undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Anaesthesia was standardised. Blood samples for cortisol and prolactin assays were collected 20 min before anaesthesia and 5 min after pneumoperitoneum. Dream recall and explicit/implicit memory were investigated upon awakening from anaesthesia and approximately 24 h after the end of the operation. Auditory presentation was associated with lower intra-operative serum prolactin concentration compared with control (p = 0.0006). Twenty-seven patients with recall of dreaming showed higher intra-operative prolactin (p = 0.004) and lower cortisol (p = 0.03) concentrations compared with those without dream recall. The knowledge of this interaction might be useful in the quest to ensure postoperative amnesia. © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Post-anaesthesia care unit stay after total hip and knee arthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, T H; Kristensen, B B; Gaarn-Larsen, L

    2012-01-01

    patients operated with primary unilateral total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA) under spinal anaesthesia were included in this hypothesis-generating, prospective, observational cohort study during a 4-month period. Surgical technique, analgesia, and perioperative care were standardized. Well......BACKGROUND: Post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) admission must be well founded and the stay as short as possible without compromising patient safety. However, within the concept of fast-track surgery, studies are limited in addressing the question: why are patients staying in the PACU? METHODS: All...

  13. A critical incident reporting system in anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzimbamuto, F D; Chiware, R

    2001-01-01

    To audit the recently established Critical Incident Reporting System in the Department of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, University of Zimbabwe Medical School. The system was set up with the purpose of improving the quality of care delivered by the department. Cross sectional study. A critical incident was defined as 'any adverse and reversible event in theatre, during or immediately after surgery that if it persisted without correction would cause harm to the patient'. The anaesthetic or recovery room staff filled a critical incident form anonymously. Data was collected from critical incident reporting forms for analysis. The anaesthetic service in the two teaching hospitals of Harare Central and Parirenyatwa General Hospitals. Between May and October 2000, 62 completed critical incident forms were collected. The nature of the incident and the monitoring used were recorded, the cause was classified as human, equipment or monitoring failure and the outcome for each patient reported. There was no formal system for reminding staff to fill in their critical incident forms. A total of 14,165 operations were performed over the reporting period: 62 critical incident forms were collected, reporting 130 incidents, giving a rate of 0.92% (130/14,165). Of these, 42 patients were emergencies and 20 elective. The incidents were hypotension, hypoxia, bradycardia, ECG changes, aspiration, laryngospasm, high spinal, and cardiac arrest. Monitoring present on patients who had critical incidents was: capnography 57%, oxymetry 90% and ECG 100%. Other monitors are not reported. Human error contributed in 32/62 of patients and equipment failure in 31/62 of patients. Patient outcome showed 15% died, 23% were unplanned admissions to HDU while 62% were discharged to the ward with little or no adverse outcome. Despite some under reporting, the critical incident rate was within the range reported in the literature. Supervision of juniors is not adequate, especially on call. The

  14. Experience with the delegation of anaesthesia for disbudding and castration to trained and certified livestock owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaaod, Maher; Doherr, Marcus G; Greber, Deborah; Steiner, Adrian

    2014-02-04

    Anaesthesia is mandatory for disbudding and castrating calves and lambs of any age, in Switzerland. According to the "anaesthesia delegation model" (ADM), anaesthesia for disbudding calves delegation of anaesthesia for disbudding calves and procedures II and III were anaesthesia for castrating calves and lambs. Procedure I was performed with local anaesthesia in all farms of 51.8% of the veterinary practices, while this was only 39.3% and 7.6% for procedures II and III (p delegation of anaesthesia to certified farmers may be a promising model to reinforce the obligation to provide local anaesthesia for disbudding and castrating calves, but to a lesser extent for castrating lambs.

  15. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the potential therapeutic benefits of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care are presented. This article aims to review the physiological properties of melatonin and how these could prove useful for several clinical applications in perioperative management, critical care and pain medicine. The topic was handsearched from textbooks and journals and electronically from PubMed, and Google scholar using text words.

  16. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurdi, Madhuri S; Patel, Tushar

    2013-03-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the potential therapeutic benefits of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care are presented. This article aims to review the physiological properties of melatonin and how these could prove useful for several clinical applications in perioperative management, critical care and pain medicine. The topic was handsearched from textbooks and journals and electronically from PubMed, and Google scholar using text words.

  17. Comparison between local anaesthesia with remifentanil and total intravenous anaesthesia for operative hysteroscopic procedures in day surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majholm, B; Bartholdy, J; Clausen, H V

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: /st>This study aimed at comparing total i.v. anaesthesia (TIVA) with monitored anaesthesia care (MAC) during day-surgery operative hysteroscopy regarding: operation time, time to mobilization and discharge, and patient satisfaction. METHODS: /st>Ninety-one healthy women were randomized...... to MAC with paracervical local anaesthesia and remifentanil or to TIVA with propofol and remifentanil. Time from arrival to leaving the operating theatre, time from arrival in the recovery room to mobilization and discharge readiness, and patient satisfaction with MAC and TIVA were observed. RESULTS: /st.......003). CONCLUSIONS: /st>Paracervical local anaesthesia combined with remifentanil is suitable for operative hysteroscopy in day surgery....

  18. Anaesthesia in Dental Medicine with Local Infiltrative Anaesthetic Technique Versus Diploe Anaesthesia Delivery Systems: Efficacy and Behaviour, an Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Ferreira, Manuel; Carrilho, Eunice; Paulo, Siri; Carrilho, Teresa; Pedro Figueiredo, José; Macedo, Ricardo

    2017-12-29

    This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy and the influence of local infiltrative anesthesia techniques, with diploe anesthesia, on the cardiac rhythmMaterial and Methods: We selected 32 healthy volunteers who were given both anaesthetic techniques on tooth 1.4 (0.45 mL of lidocaine with adrenaline, 1:80 000). In the first phase, the volunteers underwent periapical infiltrative anaesthesia. In the second phase, diploe anaesthesia was performed with a QuickSleeper® device. The parameters analysed were pulp response to the electrical test and heart rate of the participants. These parameters were evaluated on five different occasions: before anaesthesia (t0), immediately after anaesthesia (t1), 15 minutes later (t15), 30 minutes later (t30) and 60 minutes later (t60). Statistical analysis of the data was performed using SPSS 2.0 software, with α = 0.05. With the diploe anaesthesia, a level of analgesia was obtained faster. There was a slight increase in heart rate soon after administration of diploe anaesthesia, which stabilized after t15 of the procedure. This technique still proved to be painless. Diploe anaesthesia demonstrated better results in terms of analgesia than the infiltrative anaesthesia. It has been reported to be easy, safe and an effective procedure that allows anaesthesia in almost all clinical situations. This approach may offer particular advantages for endodontic therapy, providing greater comfort for the patient.

  19. Management of antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing elective invasive procedures. Proposals from the French Working Group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) and the French Study Group on thrombosis and haemostasis (GFHT). In collaboration with the French Society for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (SFAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godier, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Motte, Serge; Steib, Annick; Bonhomme, Fanny; Schlumberger, Sylvie; Lecompte, Thomas; Rosencher, Nadia; Susen, Sophie; Vincentelli, André; Gruel, Yves; Albaladejo, Pierre; Collet, Jean-Philippe

    2018-01-05

    The French Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) and the French Study Group on Haemostasis and Thrombosis (GFHT) in collaboration with the French Society for Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine (SFAR) drafted up-to-date proposals for the management of antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing elective invasive procedures. The proposals were discussed and validated by a vote; all proposals but one could be assigned with a high strength. The management of antiplatelet therapy is based on their indication and the procedure. The risk of bleeding related to the procedure can be divided into high, moderate and low categories depending on the possibility of performing the procedure in patients receiving antiplatelet agents (none, monotherapy and dual antiplatelet therapy respectively). If discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy is indicated before the procedure, a last intake of aspirin, clopidogrel, ticagrelor and prasugrel 3, 5, 5 and 7 days before surgery respectively is proposed. The thrombotic risk associated with discontinuation should be assessed according to each specific indication of antiplatelet therapy and is higher for patients receiving dual therapy for coronary artery disease (with further refinements based on a few well-accepted items) than for those receiving monotherapy for cardiovascular prevention, for secondary stroke prevention or for lower extremity arterial disease. These proposals also address the issue of the potential role of platelet functional tests and consider management of antiplatelet therapy for regional anaesthesia, including central neuraxial anaesthesia and peripheral nerve blocks, and for coronary artery surgery. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of aqueous tear production in dogs after general anaesthesia with medetomidine-propofol-carprofen-halothane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komnenou, A T H; Kazakos, G M; Savvas, I; Thomas, A L N

    2013-08-10

    The influence of an anaesthetic protocol, which included medetomidine, propofol, carprofen and halothane on tear production in the dog. There are no previous studies on the effects of this combination on tear production in dogs or in any other species. The present study included 39 dogs, which underwent non-ophthalmic surgery in our clinic. Preanaesthetically, all dogs had normal tear production (18.62±3.65 mm/minute) as this was recorded with Schirmer tear test I (STT I) and the ophthalmologic examination did not reveal anything abnormal. Tear production readings were recorded before the administration of premedication, at the end of anaesthesia, one hour and two hours postanaesthesia. No reverse agent was administrated. At the end of anaesthesia (right eye (oculus dexter, OD) P<0.0005, left eye (oculus sinister, OS) P<0.0005), as well as one hour postanaesthesia (OD P=0.020, OS P=0.001) there was a statistically significant reduction in tear production, which returned to normal values two hours postanaesthesia, regardless of the duration of the operation. This anaesthetic combination resulted in a decrease in tear production and, therefore, the use of tear substitute treatment in dogs undergoing anaesthesia with this protocol (combination) from the time the sedative is given until at least two hours after the end of anaesthesia is highly recommended.

  1. Anaesthesia for a child with adrenoleukodystrophy: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sien Hui Tan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a 9-year-old boy with X-linked cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (X-linked ALD and previous umbilical cord transplant who required general anaesthesia. An anaesthetic plan for each individual should be tailored to ensure the best possible anaesthetic care for these patients. The anaesthetic considerations include mental retardation, seizure disorder, hypotonia, liver function abnormalities, gastro-oesophageal reflux, impaired adrenocortical function and immunosuppression. Pre-operative sedation should be avoided because of hypotonia of the pharyngeal muscles. Anti-convulsants are continued, and potentially epileptogenic anaesthetic agents are avoided. The patient was intubated using a modified rapid sequence induction with a head up position of 30 degrees. Four other cases have been reported in literature. Nevertheless, there is still no established anaesthetic management for these patients, and total intravenous anaesthesia can be considered as a safe and alternative method of anaesthesia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported use of total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in a case of cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy, and with a favourable outcome.

  2. Validation of a clinical assessment tool for spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Breen, D

    2011-07-01

    There is a need for a procedure-specific means of assessment of clinical performance in anaesthesia. The aim of this study was to devise a tool for assessing the performance of spinal anaesthesia, which has both content and construct validity.

  3. Anaesthesia for transsphenoidal surgery in a patient with extreme gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V W; Tindal, S

    1988-03-01

    The management of anaesthesia for transsphenoidal removal of a pituitary adenoma in a true pituitary giant with acromegaly is described. Problems which may be anticipated in such a patient and an approach to their management are discussed, with particular emphasis upon the need for thorough preoperative assessment of the upper airway and the provision of adequate pulmonary ventilation during anaesthesia.

  4. Creating the perfect intern anaesthesia rotation: a survey using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    used to improve the current intern training programme for anaesthesia and to structure the ... The following feedback was common: more autonomy, longer duration of the anaesthesia ... Community service had a greater impact on career choice than internship. ... Community service doctors often work unsupervised and with.

  5. Patients' knowledge and perception of anaesthesia and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aDepartment of Anaesthesia, School of Medicine and Dentistry, College of Health ... The perception of most patients is that anaesthesia is all about 'putting patients to sleep and waking them up'. ... 99%.6,7 Assuming an expected level of patients' knowledge of ... secondary/high school as secondary and any other beyond.

  6. A survey of local anaesthesia education in European dental schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, H.S.; Kuin, D.; Baart, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A survey of European dental schools was conducted in 2006 to determine the curricular structure, techniques and materials used in local anaesthesia teaching to dental students. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was designed to collect information about local anaesthesia education.

  7. Oxygen supplementation before induction of general anaesthesia in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrom, H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/340414634; Schaap, M W H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314411488; van Loon, J P A M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834610

    REASONS FOR PERFORMING STUDY: Hypoventilation or apnoea, caused by the induction of general anaesthesia, may cause hypoxaemia. Pre-oxygenation may lengthen the period before this happens. No scientific studies are published on pre-oxygenation in equine anaesthesia. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether

  8. Obstetric anaesthesia: the source of the crisis | Lamacraft | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anaesthesia. All the level 1 and 2 hospitals in which caesarean sections (CSs) were being performed were investigated. The foremost problems identified were lack of training and experience in administering obstetric anaesthesia, and lack of senior anaesthetic assistance. South African Medical Journal Vol. 98 (2) 2008: pp ...

  9. Creating the perfect intern anaesthesia rotation: a survey using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This feedback will be used to improve the current intern training programme for anaesthesia and to structure the rotation according to their needs. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to Pietermaritzburg (PMB) interns who completed their anaesthesia intern rotation between 2008 and 2010. Two data sets were collected: ...

  10. The Role of Infiltrative Local Anaesthesia in Thyroidectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anaesthesia if we were to offer services to all the scheduled patients. We included all patients who had class 2 goitre and gave informed consent. We excluded ... local anaesthesia prior to cleaning and draping the surgical field. After draping, a collar crease incision was performed and a sub-platysmal flap raised, after.

  11. Observational study of choice of anaesthesia and outcome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia ... of anaesthetic that was administered was determined and compared for maternal intraoperative haemodynamic changes and maternal and neonatal outcomes. ... Neonatal morbidity and mortality occurred in 33.3% of GA and in 10.3% of spinal anaesthesia cases.

  12. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibedita Pani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice.

  13. Attention to the application of vein anaesthesia in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Zonggui; Cheng Yongde

    2006-01-01

    Interventional radiology is mostly carried out under local anesthesia with micro invasive characteristics. However, the questions of patient's pain, nerve intense, change of blood pressure and heart rate always influence the performance of operation. General anaesthesia in interventional radiology is a comparatively simple venous anaesthesia modality with a controlled dose of anesthetics injecting via periphery vein through persistent minimally injecting pump to keep the patient in dormancy under electrocardiographic monitoring. It doesn't require a tube insertion of trachea. The anaesthesia depth and time are under control. The half-life of the anaesthesia drugs is short with less side-effect. It is necessary to introduce the advanced anaesthesia into common interventional radiological therapy with attentions of promoting the development through new modalities. (authors)

  14. The incidence of spontaneous movements (myoclonus) in dogs undergoing total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattai, Andrea; Rabozzi, Roberto; Natale, Valentina; Franci, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of myoclonus (involuntary movements during anaesthesia, unrelated to inadequate hypnosis or analgesia, and of sufficient severity to require treatment) in dogs anaesthetized with a TIVA of propofol with or without the use of fentanyl. Retrospective clinical study. Dogs, undergoing general anaesthesia for clinical procedures between January 2012 and January 2013 and subject to TIVA with propofol. A retrospective analysis reviewed the medical and anaesthetic records. Animals with existing or potential neurological or neuromuscular pathology in the anamnesis or upon clinical examination and cases with incomplete clinical records were excluded. Myoclonus was considered as involuntary muscle contractions which did not cease following a bolus administration of propofol or fentanyl and, due to their intensity and duration, made continuation of the procedure impracticable without other drug administration. Tremors, paddling or muscle spasms, explicable as insufficient hypnosis or analgesia, and transient excitatory phenomena only present during the awakening phase, were not considered as myoclonus. Out of a total of 492 dogs undergoing anaesthesia, six mixed breed dogs (1.2%), one male and five females, American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I, median (range) weight 20.5 (7-37) kg and age 1.5 (1-5) years had myoclonus according to the aforementioned definition. In all subjects, myoclonus appeared within 20 minutes after induction of anaesthesia, and mainly involved the limb muscles. All subjects appeared to be in an adequate plane of anaesthesia before and during myoclonus. This study shows that 1.2% of dogs, undergoing TIVA with propofol with or without fentanyl administration, developed myoclonus, which required to be, and were treated successfully pharmacologically. The cause of this phenomenon is yet to be determined. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and

  15. Anaesthesia and Pentalogy of Cantrell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    In the absence of a dia- phragmatic hernia, high intra-abdominal pressures will splint the diaphragm and compromise respiratory function. High intra-abdominal pressures may also compromise re- nal perfusion and function. This is particularly important if renal abnormalities (horseshoe kidney, renal agenesis) are present.

  16. WHAT HAPPENS TO INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE AFTER PERIBULBAR ANAESTHESIA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Segharipuram Ranganathan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Most of intraocular surgeries are done under local anaesthesia. The peribulbar anaesthesia provides adequate anaesthesia and akinesia. There is no reported intraoperative and/or postoperative amaurosis. The peribulbar anaesthesia provides adequate anaesthesia and akinesia. The disadvantages of it are the larger quantity of the aesthetic agent. Increasing the bulk load on the globe and a reported rise of intraocular pressure. MATERIALS AND METHODS A study of fifty cases was conducted in patients who received peribulbar anaesthesia undergoing cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation and their intraocular pressures were noted and studied after giving the peribulbar anaesthesia all given by the same surgeon. RESULTS This study did show that the peribulbar anaesthesia increases the intraocular pressure in all the cases. The external ocular compression indeed helps to dissipate the anaesthetic load thereby reducing the enormous rise in IOP, which is only expected if you recollect the fact that the eyeball occupies one sixth of the total volume of the orbit that is 5 mL and 30 mL. The volume of peribulbar anaesthesia (6 mL does add its effects to increase the IOP. Hence, a properly planned post peribulbar compression helps to minimise the transient rise in IOP. CONCLUSION Summarising the study, it is better to give peribulbar injection initially followed by external ocular compression after a delay of at least 2 to 5 minutes. It is also advised that an initial compression maybe given in slightly risk cases, so that the peribulbarinduced rise may not be alarming. The anaesthetic solution maybe fragmented and the second injection maybe delayed by 5 minutes or omitted if good akinesia and anaesthesia are achieved already.

  17. IFNA approved Chinese Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program: A Delphi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiale; Fallacaro, Michael D; Jiang, Lili; Wu, Junyan; Jiang, Hong; Shi, Zhen; Ruan, Hong

    2017-09-01

    Numerous nurses work in operating rooms and recovery rooms or participate in the performance of anaesthesia in China. However, the scope of practice and the education for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses is not standardized, varying from one geographic location to another. Furthermore, most nurses are not trained sufficiently to provide anaesthesia care. This study aimed to develop the first Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program in Mainland China based on the Educational Standards of the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists. The Delphi technique was applied to develop the scope of practice, competencies for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses and education program. In 2014 the Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program established by the hospital applied for recognition by the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists. The Program's curriculum was evaluated against the IFNA Standards and recognition was awarded in 2015. The four-category, 50-item practice scope, and the three-domain, 45-item competency list were identified for Chinese Anaesthesia Nurses. The education program, which was established based on the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists educational standards and Chinese context, included nine curriculum modules. In March 2015, 13 candidates received and passed the 21-month education program. The Anaesthesia Nurse Education Program became the first program approved by the International Federation of Nurse Anaesthetists in China. Policy makers and hospital leaders can be confident that anaesthesia nurses graduating from this Chinese program will be prepared to demonstrate high level patient care as reflected in the recognition by IFNA of their adoption of international nurse anaesthesia education standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The art of providing anaesthesia in Greek mythology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntaidou, T K; Siempos, I I

    2012-07-01

    We endeavored to thoroughly review Greek mythology and collect tales dealing with anaesthesia and myochalasis (paralysis). Among the evaluated sources were the poems of Hesiod, the epics of Homer, the tragedies of the great Athenian poets (namely Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides) as well as the contributions of several Latin writers, including Ovid. We found several examples of achieving hypnosis, analgesia and amnesia through the administration of drugs (inhaled or not) and music. Adverse events of drugs used for this purpose, such as post-anaesthetic emergence delirium, hallucinations, respiratory arrest and penis erection, were described in the presented myths. We noted that providing sleep was considered a divine privilege, although several mortals (mainly women) exhibited such powers as well. The concepts of sleep and death were closely associated in ancient classical thought. This review may stimulate anaesthetists' fantasy and may help them realise the nobility of their medical specialty.

  19. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CASE BASED DISCUSSION AS A VALID PROBLEM BASED LEARNING METHOD IN ANAESTHESIA POSTGRADUATE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melveetil S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : CONTEXT: Anaesthesia is a branch of medicine which allows only a very narrow margin of error. Anaesthesia post-graduate (PG teaching with problem-based learning (PBL enhances the critical thinking and problem-solving skills among the students .Among the different problem based learning methods case based discussions (CBD are most widely practiced out of all in anaesthesia PG teaching. METHODS AND MATERIAL: An anonymous questionnaire based, crosssectional survey among 37 anaesthesia residents from two medical institutions in North Kerala, India was conducted. The present survey was designed to assess the effectiveness of case based discussions in anaesthesia PG teaching by assessing the student’s satisfaction with CBD and the suggested modifications if any to improve the current status of teaching. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The CBD as a part of PBL in anesthesia PG teaching in our set up lacks many important aspects of PBL such as formulation of objectives, facilitation skills, communication on direction of PBL and supplementation of inadequacies. A broader, strict and organized implementation of PBL incorporating the key elements of PBL needs emphasis in PG teaching curriculum. Facilitation skill development programs needs motivation and encouragement from the perspective of the academic administrators.

  20. Major complications of central neuraxial block: report on the Third National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Counsell, D; Wildsmith, J A W

    2009-02-01

    Serious complications of central neuraxial block (CNB) are rare. Limited information on their incidence and impact impedes clinical decision-making and patient consent. The Royal College of Anaesthetists Third National Audit Project was designed to inform this situation. A 2 week national census estimated the number of CNB procedures performed annually in the UK National Health Service. All major complications of CNBs performed over 1 yr (vertebral canal abscess or haematoma, meningitis, nerve injury, spinal cord ischaemia, fatal cardiovascular collapse, and wrong route errors) were reported. Each case was reviewed by an expert panel to assess causation, severity, and outcome. 'Permanent' injury was defined as symptoms persisting for more than 6 months. Efforts were made to validate denominator (procedures performed) and numerator (complications) data through national databases. The census phase produced a denominator of 707,455 CNB. Eighty-four major complications were reported, of which 52 met the inclusion criteria at the time they were reported. Data were interpreted 'pessimistically' and 'optimistically'. 'Pessimistically' there were 30 permanent injuries and 'optimistically' 14. The incidence of permanent injury due to CNB (expressed per 100,000 cases) was 'pessimistically' 4.2 (95% confidence interval 2.9-6.1) and 'optimistically' 2.0 (1.1-3.3). 'Pessimistically' there were 13 deaths or paraplegias, 'optimistically' five. The incidence of paraplegia or death was 'pessimistically' 1.8 per 100,000 (1.0-3.1) and 'optimistically' 0.7 (0-1.6). Two-thirds of initially disabling injuries resolved fully. The data are reassuring and suggest that CNB has a low incidence of major complications, many of which resolve within 6 months.

  1. Use of brachial plexus blockade and medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for repair of radio-ulna fracture in an adult cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimeli, Peter; Mogoa, Eddy M; Mwangi, Willy E; Kipyegon, Ambrose N; Kirui, Gilbert; Muasya, Daniel W; Mande, John D; Kariuki, Edward; Mijele, Dominic

    2014-10-10

    Regional anaesthetic techniques have been used in combination with systemic analgesics during small animal surgery to provide multimodal analgesia. Brachial plexus nerves block using local anaesthetics provides analgesia of the thoracic limb through desensitization of the nerves that provide sensory and motor innervation. This has been shown to reduce intra-operative anesthetic requirements and provide postoperative pain relief. Decreasing the doses of general anaesthetics allows more stable cardiopulmonary function during anaesthesia and the development of less side effects. The present case reports a successful use of brachial plexus blockade to supplement medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for repair of radio-ulna fracture in an adult cheetah (acinonyx jubatus). An adult male Cheetah weighing about 65 kg was presented with a history of leg carrying lameness of the left forelimb sustained following a car accident a week earlier. Clinical examination under general anaesthesia revealed slight dehydration and a swelling with a wound on the caudo-medial aspect of the left radio-ulna region. Crepitation was present on manipulation and radiography confirmed a complete transverse radio-ulna fracture of the left forelimb, which required open reduction and internal fixation. Brachial plexus blockade using lignocaine hydrochloride was used to supplement medetomidine-ketamine-isoflurane anaesthesia for the surgical procedure. Isoflurane anaesthesia was maintained at 0.5 - 2.0% throughout the surgical procedure, which was uneventful. Temperature and cardio-pulmonary parameters remained stable intra-operatively. Limb paralysis extended for 5 hours post-operatively, suggesting prolonged anaesthesia. To the researchers' knowledge, this is the first reported case of the use of brachial plexus blockade to supplement general anaesthesia to facilitate forelimb surgery in an adult cheetah. The use of brachial plexus block with a light plane of general anaesthesia proved to

  2. Alternative practices of achieving anaesthesia for dental procedures: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Zavattini; Polyvios, Charalambous

    2018-04-01

    Managing pain and anxiety in patients has always been an essential part of dentistry. To prevent pain, dentists administer local anaesthesia (LA) via a needle injection. Unfortunately, anxiety and fear that arise prior to and/or during injection remains a barrier for many children and adults from receiving dental treatment. There is a constant search for techniques to alleviate the invasive and painful nature of the needle injection. In recent years, researchers have developed alternative methods which enable dental anaesthesia to be less invasive and more patient-friendly. The aim of this review is to highlight the procedures and devices available which may replace the conventional needle-administered local anaesthesia. The most known alternative methods in providing anaesthesia in dentistry are: topical anaesthesia, electronic dental anaesthesia, jet-injectors, iontophoresis, and computerized control local anaesthesia delivery systems. Even though these procedures are well accepted by patients to date, it is the authors' opinion that the effectiveness practicality of such techniques in general dentistry is not without limitations.

  3. Comparison of propofol based anaesthesia to conventional inhalational general anaesthesia for spine surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L D Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Often conventional Inhalational agents are used for maintenance of anaesthesia in spine surgery. This study was undertaken to compare propofol with isoflurane anaesthesia with regard to haemodynamic stability, early emergence, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV and early assessment of neurological functions. Patients & Methods: Eighty ASA grade I &II adult patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Patients in study group received inj propofol for induction as well as for maintenance along with N 2O+O2 and the control group patients received inj thiopentone for induction and N 2 O+O 2 +isoflurane for maintenance. BIS monitoring was used for titrating the anaesthetic dose adjustments in all patients. All patients received fentanyl boluses for intraoperative analgesia and atracurium as muscle relaxant. Statistical data containing haemodynamic parameters, PONV, emergence time, dose of drug consumed & quality of surgical field were recorded and compared using student t′ test and Chi square test. Results: The haemodynamic stability was coparable in both the groups. The quality of surgical field were better in study group. Though there was no significant difference in the recovery profile (8.3% Vs 9.02% between both the groups, the postoperative nausea and vomiting was less in propofol group than isoflurane group (25%Vs60%. The anaesthesia cost was nearly double for propofol than isoflurane anaesthesia. Conclusion: Haemodynamic stability was comparable in both the groups. There was no significant difference in the recovery time between intravenous and inhalational group. Patients in propofol group were clear headed at awakening and were better oriented to place than inhalational group.

  4. An unusual reason for severe bradycardia leading to cardiac arrest during general anaesthesia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzkova, Klara; Stourac, Petr; Kanovsky, Jan; Krikava, Ivo; Toukalkova, Michaela; Sevcik, Pavel

    2014-12-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy also known as transient balooning syndrome is an increasingly reported phenomenon characterized by acute reversible apical or midventricular dysfunction. This stress- induced cardiomyopathy mimics myocardial infarction, but without significant coronary artery disease, and rarely presents in perioperative period. We report a case of postmenopausal woman scheduled to undergo elective cholecystectomy, with no history of coronary artery disease. She presented perioperatively with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy by unique manifestation-asystoly. This uncommon cause of cardiac arrest during anaesthesia was possibly induced by preoperative emotional stress. There was full recovery thanks to intensive management. In Takotsubo cardiomyopathy related cardiogenic shock we used the calcium sensitiser levosimendan successfully. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy has an excellent long-term prognosis and nearly all patients have full recovery of left ventricular function. We emphasize the importance of heavy premedication by stress compromised patients and the need of sufficiently deep anaesthesia and analgesia during surgeries.

  5. Combined usage of intercostal nerve block and tumescent anaesthesia: an effective anaesthesia technique for breast augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yusuke; Nagasao, Tomohisa; Taneda, Hiroko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Asou, Toru; Imanishi, Nobuyuki; Kishi, Kazuo

    2014-02-01

    Patients are occasionally unhappy with the size, shape, and positioning of breast implants. An option to improve their satisfaction with breast augmentation includes directly involving them in the process with awake surgery done under nerve block and tumescence. This study describes the resultsof using such an awake anaesthesia technique in 35 patients. After the intercostal nerves dominating the Th3 to Th6 regions were anaesthetized using 0.5% bupivacaine, a tumescent solution consisting of lidocaine, epinephrine, and saline was injected around the mammary gland, and breast augmentation was conducted using silicon implants. The majority of patients (31/35) reported no pain during the procedure and all patients were able to choose and confirm their final implant size and positioning. In all cases, blood loss was less than 10 ml. No patient experienced pneumothorax or toxicity of local anaesthetics. Combined usage of the intercostal nerve block and tumescent anaesthesia effectively reduces pain during breast augmentation. Keeping patient conscious enables meeting their requests during operation, contributing to increased satisfaction. For these advantages, combined usage of the intercostal nerve block and tumescent anaesthesia is recommended as a useful anaesthetic technique for breast augmentation.

  6. Automated Data Aggregation for Time-Series Analysis: Study Case on Anaesthesia Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamer, Antoine; Jeanne, Mathieu; Ficheur, Grégoire; Marcilly, Romaric

    2016-01-01

    Data stored in operational databases are not reusable directly. Aggregation modules are necessary to facilitate secondary use. They decrease volume of data while increasing the number of available information. In this paper, we present four automated engines of aggregation, integrated into an anaesthesia data warehouse. Four instances of clinical questions illustrate the use of those engines for various improvements of quality of care: duration of procedure, drug administration, assessment of hypotension and its related treatment.

  7. EWTD compliance amongst Anaesthesia trainees in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohan, J; Moore, D

    2017-02-01

    The implications of the EWTD include a limit of 48 h working week and 11 consecutive hours rest every 24 h. This survey was designed to assess EWTD compliance over designated 1-week and 1-month periods amongst College of Anaesthesetists of Ireland (CAI) trainees and non-training Anaesthesia NCHDs. The two key elements of EWTD compliance were assessed; the compliance to a 48 h working week, and a minimizing of shift duration to 24 h. Existence of protected training time and teaching time were also assessed. This survey was completed by 191 Anaesthesia NCHDs, including 151 responses from CAI trainees; 75 % response rate from CAI trainees. 71 % of respondents worked in excess of 48 h. 37 % of respondents reported to have worked a shift >24 h duration. The average hours worked was 66 h (range 48.5-103 h). Our figures are a contrast to the reported figures in the HSE "Performance Assurance Report". 49 % of respondents reported a change in their working patterns to facilitate EWTD compliance. There appears to be a negative impact on training however, with 68 % respondents missing departmental teaching sessions and 30 % not receiving protected training time. 33 % of respondents were not in favour of full EWTD compliance. As work patterns change, it is vital to ensure that training is not compromised. Previous reports have recommended an increase in consultant numbers, which has yet to be achieved. This may provide a solution to allow service provision, NCHD training and EWTD compliance amongst NCHDs.

  8. Regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lisa J; Craven, Paul D; Lakkundi, Anil; Foster, Jann P; Badawi, Nadia

    2015-06-09

    With improvements in neonatal intensive care, more preterm infants are surviving the neonatal period and presenting for surgery in early infancy. Inguinal hernia is the most common condition requiring early surgery, appearing in 38% of infants whose birth weight is between 751 grams and 1000 grams. Approximately 20% to 30% of otherwise healthy preterm infants having general anaesthesia for inguinal hernia surgery at a postmature age have at least one apnoeic episode within the postoperative period. Research studies have failed to adequately distinguish the effects of apnoeic episodes from other complications of extreme preterm gestation on the risk of brain injury, or to investigate the potential impact of postoperative apnoea upon longer term neurodevelopment. In addition to episodes of apnoea, there are concerns that anaesthetic and sedative agents may have a direct toxic effect on the developing brain of preterm infants even after reaching postmature age. It is proposed that regional anaesthesia may reduce the risk of postoperative apnoea, avoid the risk of anaesthetic-related neurotoxicity and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in preterm infants requiring surgery for inguinal hernia at a postmature age. To determine if regional anaesthesia reduces postoperative apnoea, bradycardia, the use of assisted ventilation, and neurological impairment, in comparison to general anaesthesia, in preterm infants undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at a postmature age. The following databases and resources were searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, 2015, Issue 2), MEDLINE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), EMBASE (December 2002 to 25 February 2015), controlled-trials.com and clinicaltrials.gov, reference lists of published trials and abstracts published in Pediatric Research and Pediatric Anesthesia. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of regional (spinal, epidural, caudal) versus general anaesthesia, or

  9. Another look at religious objections to obstetric anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, A G

    2016-08-01

    Starting with the earliest biographies of James Young Simpson, the topic of religious opposition to obstetric anaesthesia in 1847 was gradually embellished in historical articles. Objective data are lacking and it has been suggested that this is a myth of recent medical history. A search for more information led to a contemporaneous case-book of the maternity hospital in Edinburgh, which was examined. The provision of anaesthesia in the 11months before publication of Simpson's pamphlet Answer to the Religious Objections was compared with that in the 11months after. This revealed a marked increase (P<0.01) in the provision of anaesthesia for childbirth after the publication of Simpson's pamphlet in December 1847. This analysis supports the existence of opposition to obstetric anaesthesia and the success of Simpson's pamphlet in overcoming it, but the introduction of chloroform about six weeks earlier, may also have contributed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 15, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesia management of acute aortic dissection type B in Marfan syndrome complicating end-stage pregnancy · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. K Laudanski, S Robicsek, 29-30 ...

  11. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 19, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pioneers in South African Anaesthesia: Professor Arthur Bull and the Taurus Radiofrequency Blood Warmer · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. PC Gordon, ND Hauser, J Marais, 194-196 ...

  12. Incidence of severe critical events in paediatric anaesthesia (APRICOT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habre, Walid; Disma, Nicola; Virag, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    a relatively high rate of severe critical events during the anaesthesia management of children for surgical or diagnostic procedures in Europe, and a large variability in the practice of paediatric anaesthesia. These findings are substantial enough to warrant attention from national, regional, and specialist......BACKGROUND: Little is known about the incidence of severe critical events in children undergoing general anaesthesia in Europe. We aimed to identify the incidence, nature, and outcome of severe critical events in children undergoing anaesthesia, and the associated potential risk factors. METHODS...... 261 participating centres across 33 European countries. The primary endpoint was the occurence of perioperative severe critical events requiring immediate intervention. A severe critical event was defined as the occurrence of respiratory, cardiac, allergic, or neurological complications requiring...

  13. The outcome of anaesthesia related cardiac arrest in a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Adekola

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion: Anaesthesia related cardiac arrest and mortality were linked to cardiovascular depression from halothane overdose in our institution. The burden can be reduced by improving on establishing standard monitoring in the perioperative period, and a team approach to patients care.

  14. Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia for an elective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-02

    Feb 2, 2012 ... This was followed by the injection of. 2 ml normal saline into the ... expressed feeling minimal discomfort during the application of fundal pressure to .... CSE anaesthesia as a safe technique in a parturient with achondroplasia ...

  15. Regional anaesthesia, local anaesthetics and the surgical stress response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Herroeder, Susanne; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2004-01-01

    Epidural anaesthesia has the potential to improve patients' outcome after major surgical procedures by reducing postoperative morbidity and duration of recovery. Possible benefits include the attenuation of cardiac complications, an earlier return of gastrointestinal function associated with an

  16. Preoperative airway assessment - experience gained from a multicentre cluster randomised trial and the Danish Anaesthesia Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Anders Kehlet

    2016-01-01

    difficult intubation compared with usual care for airway assessment. This thesis is based on data from the Danish Anaesthesia Database (DAD). Paper 1 presents an observational cohort study on 188,064 patients who underwent tracheal intubation from 2008 to 2011. Data on the anaesthesiologists' preoperative...... to the DIFFICAIR trial described in Paper 4. The trial was designed to randomise anaesthesia department to either thorough education in, and subsequent use of the SARI for preoperative airway assessment or to continue usual care. Registration of the SARI in DAD was made mandatory in SARI departments and impossible...... unanticipated. Furthermore, 94% of all difficult mask ventilations were unanticipated. In Paper 4, 59,514 patients were included in the primary analyses. The proportion of unanticipated difficult intubations was 2.38% (696/29,209) in SARI departments and 2.39% (723/30,305) in usual care departments...

  17. Perioperative management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation (a lesson for other anaesthesia settings).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanal, J M; Real, M I; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are some of the most challenging for an anaesthesiologist to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing surgical procedures is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias and ischaemia leading to haemodynamic instability. Lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease. Patients undergoing lung transplantation present a variety of challenges for anaesthesia team, but pulmonary hypertension remains the most important. The purpose of this article is to review the anaesthetic management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation, with particular emphasis on the choice of anaesthesia, pulmonary vasodilator therapy, inotropic and vasopressor therapy, and the most recent intraoperative monitoring recommendations to optimize patient care. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Should general anaesthesia be avoided in the elderly?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, C; Rasmussen, L S; Sieber, F E

    2014-01-01

    Surgery and anaesthesia exert comparatively greater adverse effects on the elderly than on the younger brain, manifest by the higher prevalence of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction. Postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction delay rehabilitation, and are associated...... with increases in morbidity and mortality among elderly surgical patients. We review the aetiology of postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction in the elderly with a particular focus on anaesthesia and sedation, discuss methods of diagnosing and monitoring postoperative cognitive decline, and describe...

  19. Anaesthesia nursing education in the Nordic countries: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yunsuk; Lahtinen, Pia; Meretoja, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to analyse post-registration anaesthesia nursing education in the Nordic countries. The analysis was based on key determinants fundamental to analysing nursing education: 1) the sys]tem of anaesthesia nursing education, 2) entry requirements, 3) credits, the duration and the title or degree awarded, and 4) the amount of practical training. A scoping review was approached in a systematic manner. The literature was analysed using deductive content analysis. Data was gathered based on key determinants. The data were quantified into frequencies and percentages to compare the similarities and differences of anaesthesia nursing. The Nordic countries have different types of post-registration anaesthesia nursing education from non-degree supplementary programmes to Master's degree programmes. Even though the entry requirements correspond between countries, many more differences than similarities in anaesthesia nursing education were noted. A title granting the right to work as a nurse anaesthetist can be obtained through a variety of educational systems, credit requirements, the duration, and the amount of practical training in post-registration anaesthesia nursing programmes. This aim of the study was to analyse post-registration anaesthesia nursing education from the Nordic perspective. Harmonising the educational system and minimum education requirements in anaesthesia nursing education is recommended in order to facilitate free movement and assure the quality of care from the Nordic perspective. Since each Nordic country has its own native language, it was difficult to gather information from all the Nordic countries. Therefore, creating common educational database published in English can help to bench mark each country's educational system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: summary of main findings and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, J J; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H M G; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Cook, T M

    2014-10-01

    We present the main findings of the 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia (AAGA). Incidences were estimated using reports of accidental awareness as the numerator, and a parallel national anaesthetic activity survey to provide denominator data. The incidence of certain/probable and possible accidental awareness cases was ~1:19,600 anaesthetics (95% confidence interval 1:16,700-23,450). However, there was considerable variation across subtypes of techniques or subspecialities. The incidence with neuromuscular block (NMB) was ~1:8200 (1:7030-9700), and without, it was ~1:135,900 (1:78,600-299,000). The cases of AAGA reported to NAP5 were overwhelmingly cases of unintended awareness during NMB. The incidence of accidental awareness during Caesarean section was ~1:670 (1:380-1300). Two-thirds (82, 66%) of cases of accidental awareness experiences arose in the dynamic phases of anaesthesia, namely induction of and emergence from anaesthesia. During induction of anaesthesia, contributory factors included: use of thiopental, rapid sequence induction, obesity, difficult airway management, NMB, and interruptions of anaesthetic delivery during movement from anaesthetic room to theatre. During emergence from anaesthesia, residual paralysis was perceived by patients as accidental awareness, and commonly related to a failure to ensure full return of motor capacity. One-third (43, 33%) of accidental awareness events arose during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia, mostly due to problems at induction or towards the end of anaesthesia. Factors increasing the risk of accidental awareness included: female sex, age (younger adults, but not children), obesity, anaesthetist seniority (junior trainees), previous awareness, out-of-hours operating, emergencies, type of surgery (obstetric, cardiac, thoracic), and use of NMB. The following factors were not risk factors for accidental awareness: ASA physical status, race, and use or omission

  1. Pilot study of long-term anaesthesia in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, Peter M; Connerton, Ian F; White, Kate L

    2016-01-01

    To provide stable anaesthesia of long duration in broiler chickens in order to perform a terminal caecal ligated loop procedure. Prospective experimental study. Seven clinically healthy broiler chickens (Gallus domesticus) aged 27-36 days, weighing 884-2000 g. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. All birds underwent intermittent positive pressure ventilation for the duration. End-tidal carbon dioxide, peripheral haemoglobin oxygen saturation, heart rate and oesophageal temperature were monitored continuously. All birds received intraosseous fluids. Butorphanol (2 mg kg(-1)) was administered intramuscularly at two hourly intervals. Euthanasia by parenteral pentobarbitone was performed at the end of procedure. Stable anaesthesia was maintained in four chickens for durations ranging from 435 to 510 minutes. One bird died and one was euthanized after 130 and 330 minutes, respectively, owing to surgical complications and another died from anaesthetic complication after 285 minutes. Long-term, stable anaesthesia is possible in clinically healthy chickens, provided complications such as hypothermia and hypoventilation are addressed and vital signs are carefully monitored. There are no known previous reports describing monitored, controlled anaesthesia of this duration in chickens. © 2015 The Authors Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  2. Anaesthesia generates neuronal insulin resistance by inducing hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutherland Calum

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anaesthesia is commonly employed prior to surgical investigations and to permit icv injections in rodents. Indeed it is standard practise in many studies examining the subsequent actions of hormones and growth factors on the brain. Recent evidence that the basal activity of specific intracellular signalling proteins can be affected by anaesthesia prompted us to examine the effect of anaesthesia not only on the basal activity but also the insulin sensitivity of the major insulin signalling pathways. Results We find that urethane- and ketamine-induced anaesthesia results in rapid activation of the phosphatidylinositol (PI 3-kinase-protein kinase B (PKB signalling pathway in the brain, increases tau phosphorylation while at the same time reducing basal activity of the Ras-ERK pathway. Subsequent injection of insulin does not alter the activity of either the PI 3-kinase or ERK signalling pathways, indicating a degree of neuronal molecular insulin resistance. However, if body temperature is maintained during anaesthesia then there is no alteration in the basal activity of these signalling molecules. Subsequent response of both pathways to insulin injection is restored. Conclusion The data is consistent with a hypothermia related alteration in neuronal signalling following anaesthesia, and emphasises the importance of maintaining the body temperature of rodents when monitoring insulin (or growth factor/neurotrophic agent action in the brain of anesthetised rodents.

  3. [A German network for regional anaesthesia of the scientific working group regional anaesthesia within DGAI and BDA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Thomas; Engelhardt, Lars; Spies, Claudia; Steinfeldt, Thorsten; Kutter, Bernd; Heller, Axel; Werner, Christian; Heid, Florian; Bürkle, Hartmut; Koch, Thea; Vicent, Oliver; Geiger, Peter; Kessler, Paul; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2009-11-01

    Regional anaesthesia generally is considered to be safe. However, reports of complications with different severities are also well known. The scientific working group of regional anaesthesia of the DGAI has founded a network in conjunction with the BDA. With the aid of a registry, we are now able to describe risk profiles and associations in case of a complication. Moreover, a benchmark has been implemented in order to continuously improve complication rates. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  4. Split-mouth and parallel-arm trials to compare pain with intraosseous anaesthesia delivered by the computerised Quicksleeper system and conventional infiltration anaesthesia in paediatric oral healthcare: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Smail-Faugeron , Violaine; Muller-Bolla , Michèle; Sixou , Jean-Louis; Courson , Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Local anaesthesia is commonly used in paediatric oral healthcare. Infiltration anaesthesia is the most frequently used, but recent developments in anaesthesia techniques have introduced an alternative: intraosseous anaesthesia. We propose to perform a split-mouth and parallel-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the pain caused by the insertion of the needle for the injection of conventional infiltration anaesthesia, and intraosseous anaesthesia by the comp...

  5. Evaluation of lung and chest wall mechanics during anaesthesia using the PEEP-step method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, P; Stenqvist, O; Lundin, S

    2018-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications are common. Between patients there are differences in lung and chest wall mechanics. Individualised mechanical ventilation based on measurement of transpulmonary pressures would be a step forward. A previously described method evaluates lung and chest wall mechanics from a change of ΔPEEP and calculation of change in end-expiratory lung volume (ΔEELV). The aim of the present study was to validate this PEEP-step method (PSM) during general anaesthesia by comparing it with the conventional method using oesophageal pressure (PES) measurements. In 24 lung healthy subjects (BMI 18.5-32), three different sizes of PEEP steps were performed during general anaesthesia and ΔEELVs were calculated. Transpulmonary driving pressure (ΔPL) for a tidal volume equal to each ΔEELV was measured using PES measurements and compared to ΔPEEP with limits of agreement and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). ΔPL calculated with both methods was compared with a Bland-Altman plot. Mean differences between ΔPEEP and ΔPL were mechanical properties among the lung healthy patients stresses the need for individualised ventilator settings based on measurements of lung and chest wall mechanics. The agreement between ΔPLs measured by the two methods during general anaesthesia suggests the use of the non-invasive PSM in this patient population. NCT 02830516. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Recruitment manoeuvres in anaesthesia: How many more excuses are there not to use them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, J; Romero, A; Blanco, A; Gonzalez, P; Abad-Gurumeta, A; Bergese, S D

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary recruitment manoeuvres (RM) are intended to reopen collapsed lung areas. RMs are present in nature as a physiological mechanism to get a newborn to open their lungs for the first time at birth, and we also use them, in our usual anaesthesiological clinical practice, after induction or during general anaesthesia when a patient is desaturated. However, there is much confusion in clinical practice regarding their safety, the best way to perform them, when to do them, in which patients they are indicated, and in those where they are totally contraindicated. There are important differences between RM in the patient with adult respiratory distress syndrome, and in a healthy patient during general anaesthesia. Our intention is to review, from a clinical and practical point of view, the use of RM, specifically in anaesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Mediated interruptions of anaesthesia providers using predictions of workload from anaesthesia information management system data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, R H; Dexter, F

    2012-09-01

    Perioperative interruptions generated electronically from anaesthesia information management systems (AIMS) can provide useful feedback, but may adversely affect task performance if distractions occur at inopportune moments. Ideally such interruptions would occur only at times when their impact would be minimal. In this study of AIMS data, we evaluated the times of comments, drugs, fluids and periodic assessments (e.g. electrocardiogram diagnosis and train-of-four) to develop recommendations for the timing of interruptions during the intraoperative period. The 39,707 cases studied were divided into intervals between: 1) enter operating room; 2) induction; 3) intubation; 4) surgical incision; and 5) end surgery. Five-minute intervals of no documentation were determined for each case. The offsets from the start of each interval when >50% of ongoing cases had completed initial documentation were calculated (MIN50). The primary endpoint for each interval was the percentage of all cases still ongoing at MIN50. Results were that the intervals from entering the operating room to induction and from induction to intubation were unsuitable for interruptions confirming prior observational studies of anaesthesia workload. At least 13 minutes after surgical incision was the most suitable time for interruptions with 92% of cases still ongoing. Timing was minimally affected by the type of anaesthesia, surgical facility, surgical service, prone positioning or scheduled case duration. The implication of our results is that for mediated interruptions, waiting at least 13 minutes after the start of surgery is appropriate. Although we used AIMS data, operating room information system data is also suitable.

  8. Ambulatory laparoscopic tubal ligation: A comparison of general anaesthesia with local anaesthesia and sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To compare the anaesthetic techniques for laparoscopic tubal ligation using either general anaesthesia with LMA or a combination of local anaesthetic and intravenous sedation, this study was conducted on 60 ASA-1/2 patients in the age group of 20-40 years. Patients & Methods:60 ASA grade I & II female patients undergoing laparoscopic tubal ligation on a day care basis were randomly divided in two groups- group I (GA using LMA, n=30, group II (Local anaesthesia, n=30. Both groups received similar premedication. General anaesthesia in group I was induced with propofol 2-3 mg kg -1 and following LMA insertion, the anaesthesia was maintained with 0.5-1.5% halothane. In group II the incision site was infiltrated with 10 ml of 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline and patients were sedated with intravenous midazolam 0.07mg kg -1 and ketamine 0.5 mg kg -1 . A rescue dose of 0.15 mg kg -1 of ketamine was given in group II if the patient complained of pain or discomfort during the procedure. Diclofenac sodium 1 mg kg -1 was used for postoperative analgesia in both the groups. All patients were observed in the PACU until they met the discharge criteria. Results:The demographic profile was similar in both the groups. The induction to skin incision time was significantly more in group I (5.13 ±0.93 min vs 3.01 ±1.86 min in group II. The decrease in pulse rate and blood pressure (systolic and diastolic was also significant in group I. The incidence of intraoperative bradycardia was 16.7% and 10% in group I & group II respectively. The changes in SpO 2 during the procedure, recovery time and time to meet discharge criteria were comparable in both the groups. The incidence of PONV was 20% & 3.3% in group I and 10% & 6.6% in group II respectively. All patients in both the groups required postoperative analgesics. Conclusions:Both the techniques were found to be comparable for laparoscopic sterilization, however a longer induction to skin incision time

  9. Rocuronium duration of action under sevoflurane, desflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidatsi, P G; Zaralidou, A Th; Gorgias, N K; Amaniti, E N; Karakoulas, K A; Giala, M M

    2004-10-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized study to evaluate whether the duration of action of a single bolus dose of rocuronium is influenced by maintenance of anaesthesia with sevoflurane, desflurane or propofol infusion. Fifty-seven ASA I-II patients undergoing elective abdominal surgery were enrolled in this study. Anaesthesia was induced with thiopental 3-5 mg kg(-1) or propofol 2.5 mg kg(-1) and fentanyl 5 microg kg(-1) and tracheal intubation was facilitated with rocuronium 0.9 mg kg(-1). Thereafter patients were randomly allocated to three different groups to receive sevoflurane, desflurane or propofol for maintenance of anaesthesia. Recovery of neuromuscular function was monitored by single twitch stimulation of the ulnar nerve and by recording the adductor pollicis response using accelerometry. Intergroup recovery times to 5% of control value of single twitch were analysed using analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction. The mean (95% confidence interval) recovery time to 5% of control value of single twitch during desflurane anaesthesia was 90.18 (86.11-94.25) min. Significantly shorter recovery times were observed during sevoflurane or propofol anaesthesia, 58.86 (54.73-62.99) min and 51.11 (45.47-56.74) min, respectively (P < 0.001). There were also significant differences in the recovery time between groups receiving desflurane vs. sevoflurane (P < 0.001) and desflurane vs. propofol (P < 0.001). Desflurane anaesthesia significantly prolongs the duration of action of rocuronium at 0.9 mg kg(-1) single bolus dose, compared to sevoflurane or propofol anaesthesia maintenance regimens.

  10. International online survey to assess current practice in equine anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfender, F D; Doherr, M G; Driessen, B; Hartnack, S; Johnston, G M; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R

    2015-01-01

    Multicentre Confidential Enquiries into Perioperative Equine Fatalities (CEPEF) have not been conducted since the initial CEPEF Phases 1-3, 20 years ago. To collect data on current practice in equine anaesthesia and to recruit participants for CEPEF-4. Online questionnaire survey. An online questionnaire was prepared and the link distributed internationally to veterinarians possibly performing equine anaesthesia, using emails, posters, flyers and an editorial. The questionnaire included 52 closed, semiclosed and open questions divided into 8 subgroups: demographic data, anaesthetist, anaesthesia management (preoperative, technical equipment, monitoring, drugs, recovery), areas of improvements and risks and motivation for participation in CEPEF-4. Descriptive statistics and Chi-squared tests for comparison of categorical variables were performed. A total of 199 questionnaires were completed by veterinarians from 14 different countries. Of the respondents, 43% worked in private hospitals, 36% in private practices and 21% in university teaching hospitals. In 40 institutions (23%) there was at least one diplomate of the European or American colleges of veterinary anaesthesia and analgesia on staff. Individual respondents reported routinely employ the following anaesthesia monitoring modalities: electrocardiography (80%), invasive arterial blood pressures (70%), pulse oximetry (60%), capnography (55%), arterial blood gases (47%), composition of inspired and expired gases (45%) and body temperature (35%). Drugs administered frequently or routinely as part of a standard protocol were: acepromazine (44%), xylazine (68%), butorphanol (59%), ketamine (96%), diazepam (83%), isoflurane (76%), dobutamine (46%), and, as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, phenylbutazone (73%) or flunixin meglumine (66%). Recovery was routinely assisted by 40%. The main factors perceived by the respondents to affect outcome of equine anaesthesia were the preoperative health status of the

  11. The 5th National Audit Project (NAP5) on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia: summary of main findings and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, J J; Andrade, J; Bogod, D G; Hitchman, J M; Jonker, W R; Lucas, N; Mackay, J H; Nimmo, A F; O'Connor, K; O'Sullivan, E P; Paul, R G; Palmer, J H MacG; Plaat, F; Radcliffe, J J; Sury, M R J; Torevell, H E; Wang, M; Hainsworth, J; Cook, T M

    2014-10-01

    We present the main findings of the 5th National Audit Project on accidental awareness during general anaesthesia. Incidences were estimated using reports of accidental awareness as the numerator, and a parallel national anaesthetic activity survey to provide denominator data. The incidence of certain/probable and possible accidental awareness cases was ~1:19 600 anaesthetics (95% CI 1:16 700-23 450). However, there was considerable variation across subtypes of techniques or subspecialties. The incidence with neuromuscular blockade was ~1:8200 (1:7030-9700), and without it was ~1:135 900 (1:78 600-299 000). The cases of accidental awareness during general anaesthesia reported to 5th National Audit Project were overwhelmingly cases of unintended awareness during neuromuscular blockade. The incidence of accidental awareness during caesarean section was ~1:670 (1:380-1300). Two thirds (82, 66%) of cases of accidental awareness experiences arose in the dynamic phases of anaesthesia, namely induction of and emergence from anaesthesia. During induction of anaesthesia, contributory factors included: use of thiopental; rapid sequence induction; obesity; difficult airway management; neuromuscular blockade; and interruptions of anaesthetic delivery during movement from anaesthetic room to theatre. During emergence from anaesthesia, residual paralysis was perceived by patients as accidental awareness, and commonly related to a failure to ensure full return of motor capacity. One third (43, 33%) of accidental awareness events arose during the maintenance phase of anaesthesia, most due to problems at induction or towards the end of anaesthesia. Factors increasing the risk of accidental awareness included: female sex; age (younger adults, but not children); obesity; anaesthetist seniority (junior trainees); previous awareness; out-of-hours operating; emergencies; type of surgery (obstetric, cardiac, thoracic); and use of neuromuscular blockade. The following factors were

  12. Anaesthesia practice and reproductive outcomes: Facts unveiled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrutha Bindu Nagella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Anaesthetic practice is associated with a risk of chronic exposure to anaesthetic agents. With the advent of newer inhalational agents and changing anaesthetic practices, the risks for anaesthesiologists with regard to adverse reproductive outcomes is unknown. Hence, a nationwide online survey was conducted to study the anaesthetic practices prevalent in India and their association, if any, with poor reproductive outcomes. Methods: The online survey involved 9974 anaesthesiologists. A questionnaire soliciting information regarding anaesthetic practice techniques, reproductive outcomes and perinatal outcomes was designed. All the anaesthesiologists in the ISA National database were mailed a link to the above questionnaire. Results: Female anaesthesiologists and spouses of male anaesthesiologists had a higher incidence of first trimester spontaneous abortions than the general population. Female anaesthesiologists when compared with spouses of male anaesthesiologists faced more difficulty with conception (P = 0.015. Female anaesthesiologists who worked in the operating room (OR in their first trimester of gestation had a higher incidence of spontaneous abortions than those who did not work in the OR (P = 0.05. Longer hours of general anaesthesia conducted in the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of birth defects in their progeny (P = 0.05. Conclusion: Spontaneous abortions and birth defects were higher in female anaesthesiologists who worked in the OR in the first trimester of gestation. Both female anaesthesiologists and spouses of male anaesthesiologists had a greater risk for a first trimester miscarriage than the general population.

  13. Tolerability of hysteroscopy under local anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrullah, F.D.; Khan, A.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the tolerability of hysteroscopy amongst patients, when performed under local anesthesia. Patients attending the Outpatient Clinics with bleeding per vagina were randomly selected. After the clinical work-up and taking consent, all patients were given injection diclofenac sodium half an hour prior to the procedure. After preparing and positioning the patient,10cc of injection Bupivacaine was given for para cervical block at 3 and 9 o'clock positions. The uterine cavity was distended with normal saline. Hysteroscopy was performed and the findings noted. Pain scoring was done by visual analogue scale. The condition of the patient was monitored during and after the procedure; they were kept under observation for four hours. Tolerability of the procedure was assessed by pain scoring and the presence of complications, and the results analyzed. During the study period 113 patients underwent hysteroscopy for abnormal uterine bleeding. The procedure was performed successfully in 98.2% patients without any complications, while 1.8% patients experienced transient vasovagal attack. The procedure was painless in 52.2% patients; 40.7% patients had mild pain (score <3) and were reassured, whereas 7.1% patients had moderate pain (score 3-5). Only 3.5% cases required analgesia for pain control. All patients remained haemodynamically stable during and after the procedure. Hysteroscopy is very well tolerated under local anaesthesia by our local population. (author)

  14. Anaesthesia and Sedation for the Autistic Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacoor, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Autism is a disability that affects how a person communicates and relates to the world around them. Patients on the autistic spectrum may be referred to a Special Care Dentistry service to be managed under sedation or general anaesthetic, as their visit to the dentist can be stressful and disruptive to their routine. As it is a spectrum disorder, each patient needs to be assessed individually in order to determine whether sedation or general anaesthetic would be appropriate for them. Some autistic patients may have good verbal communication and mild learning difficulties, and may be able to tolerate treatment under local anaesthetic with behavioural management alone. On the other end of the spectrum, patients with severe autism and learning difficulties may not permit the dentist to even examine them and will require a general anaesthetic. There will also be patients on the autistic spectrum who are suitable for conscious sedation depending on their level of learning difficulty and cooperation. Oral and transmucosal sedation can also be useful for providing presedation to a patient to facilitate venous access. In order to minimise distress to the patient, it is important that adequate sedation, anaesthesia and analgesia are achieved both perioperatively and post-operatively.

  15. Caesarean section in a patient with varicella: Anaesthesia considerations and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandini M Dave

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A primigravida with chicken pox was posted for an emergency caesarean section. General anaesthesia was administered. Key issues in anaesthesia management and the clinical implications are discussed.

  16. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    Aim  Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  17. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Cor A J; Laheij, Robert J F; Krabbe, Paul F M

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  18. General anaesthesia does not improve outcome in opioid antagonist detoxification treatment: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, C.A.J. de; Laheij, R.J.F.; Krabbe, P.F.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Opioid detoxification by administering opioid-antagonists under general anaesthesia has caused considerable controversy. This study is conducted to determine whether rapid detoxification under general anaesthesia results in higher levels of opioid abstinence than rapid detoxification without

  19. Efficacy of local anaesthesia in repair of inguinal hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafiq, M.K.; Sultan, B.; Malik, M.A.; Khan, K.; Abbasi, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Local anaesthesia has been identified as the most favourable anaesthesia for elective inguinal hernia repair with respect to complication rate, cost effectiveness and overall patients' satisfaction. This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of local anaesthesia in inguinal hernia in terms of pain relief, wound infection and hospital stay. Methods: In this randomized controlled trial (RCT), 60 patients with inguinal hernia were included at the General Surgical 'B' Unit, Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad. Results: The day-case rates were significantly higher when patients underwent surgery under LA compared to GA (82.6 percent versus 42.6 percent). The incidence of urinary retention was higher in the GA group (p<0.05). There were 17 (2.9 percent) re-admissions overall. The reasons for re-admission included haematoma (n=6), severe pain (n=4), infection (n=3), fainting (n=2) and urinary retention (n=2). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that local anaesthesia for inguinal hernia repair has better efficacy as compared to general anaesthesia. (author)

  20. Crisis management during anaesthesia: obstruction of the natural airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visvanathan, T; Kluger, M T; Webb, R K; Westhorpe, R N

    2005-06-01

    Obstruction of the natural airway, while usually easily recognised and managed, may present simply as desaturation, have an unexpected cause, be very difficult to manage, and have serious consequences for the patient. To examine the role of a previously described core algorithm "COVER ABCD-A SWIFT CHECK", supplemented by a specific sub-algorithm for obstruction of the natural airway, in the management of acute airway obstruction occurring in association with anaesthesia. The potential performance for this structured approach for each of the relevant incidents among the first 4000 reported to the Australian Incident Monitoring Study (AIMS) was compared with the actual management as reported by the anaesthetists involved. There were 62 relevant incidents among the first 4000 reports to the AIMS. It was considered that the correct use of the structured approach would have led to earlier recognition of the problem and/or better management in 11% of cases. Airway management is a fundamental anaesthetic responsibility and skill. Airway obstruction demands a rapid and organised approach to its diagnosis and management and undue delay usually results in desaturation and a potential threat to life. An uncomplicated pre-learned sequence of airway rescue instructions is an essential part of every anaesthetist's clinical practice requirements.

  1. Isoflurane anaesthesia in an African wild dog, Lycaon pictus : short communication

    OpenAIRE

    G.F. Stegmann

    2000-01-01

    Anaesthesia was required in a captive female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) for surgical wound treatment. After it was immobilised with a medetomidine-ketamine combination, bradycardia, hypothermia, systolic hypertension and metabolic acidosis were observed. Surgical anaesthesia was maintained with a 1 %end-tidal isoflurane concentration. A decrease in the arterial blood pressure, rectal temperature and pHoccurred during maintenance of anaesthesia.

  2. Premedication with granisetron reduces shivering during spinal anaesthesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldaba, Ahmed A; Amr, Yasser M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of prophylactic granisetron on the incidence of postoperative shivering after spinal anaesthesia in children. Eighty children, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to II and aged two to five years were scheduled for surgery of the lower limb under spinal anaesthesia. The children were randomised to receive 10 µg/kg granisetron diluted in 10 ml saline 0.9% intravenously (group 1, n=40) or placebo (10 ml 0.9% saline, group 2, n=40) to be given over five minutes just before spinal puncture. Shivering, core temperature and the levels of motor and sensory block were assessed. No patients shivered in group 1. However, six patients shivered in Group 2 (P=0.025). There were no significant differences in the other measured variables between the groups. Granisetron is an effective agent to prevent shivering after spinal anaesthesia in children from two to five years of age.

  3. Influence of anaesthesia on energy metabolism in surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prigorodov М.V.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to establish adequacy of protection of energy metabolism in a patient under anaes-thesiology in cholecystectomy from mini-access. Material et methods: 122 patients subjected to cholecystectomy from mini access have been surveyed. Among them 92 patients have got intravenous general anaesthesia with AVL, 30 patients have got prolonged epidural anaesthesia on spontaneous breath with insufflations of oxygen through an obverse mask with sedatations. Monitoring of energy-plastic metabolism has been carried out in all patients. Results: Groups of patients have been compared by anthropometrical data, traumatic interventions. In both groups of patients loss of energy to traumatic to an operation stage has insignificantly increased, but after the anaesthesia termination in the group of patients with intravenous anaesthesia loss of energy continued to rise, and in the group of patients with prolonged epidural blockade it has returned to the initial level. After the anaesthesia termination the energy metabolism became essential higher in the first group of patients in comparison with the second one (p <0,01. The energy-plastic metabolism increased in the first group of patients and decreased in the second. PEA during cholecystectomy from mini access provided a stable condition of energy and energy-plastic metabolism. The conclusion: The inspection of 122 patients subjected to cholecystectomy from mini access has established the following data: PEA on spontaneous breath with insufflations of oxygen through an obverse mask in comparison with intravenous general anaesthesia and AVL allows keeping on an optimum level of energy and energy-plastic metabolism.

  4. Speech recognition for the anaesthesia record during crisis scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alapetite, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: This article describes the evaluation of a prototype speech-input interface to an anaesthesia patient record, conducted in a full-scale anaesthesia simulator involving six doctor-nurse anaesthetist teams. Objective: The aims of the experiment were, first, to assess the potential...... and observations almost simultaneously when they are given or made. The tested speech input strategies were successful, even with the ambient noise. Speaking to the system while working appeared feasible, although improvements in speech recognition rates are needed. Conclusion: A vocal interface leads to shorter...

  5. Anaesthesia in Dental Medicine with Local Infiltrative Anaesthetic Technique Versus Diploe Anaesthesia Delivery Systems: Efficacy and Behaviour, an Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Manuel Marques-Ferreira; Eunice Carrilho; Siri Paulo; Teresa Carrilho; José Pedro Figueiredo; Ricardo Macedo

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy and the influence of local infiltrative anesthesia techniques, with diploe anesthesia, on the cardiac rhythm Material and Methods: We selected 32 healthy volunteers who were given both anaesthetic techniques on tooth 1.4 (0.45 mL of lidocaine with adrenaline, 1:80 000). In the first phase, the volunteers underwent periapical infiltrative anaesthesia. In the second phase, diploe anaesthesia was performed with a QuickSleeper® d...

  6. Big data and visual analytics in anaesthesia and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpao, A F; Ahumada, L M; Rehman, M A

    2015-09-01

    Advances in computer technology, patient monitoring systems, and electronic health record systems have enabled rapid accumulation of patient data in electronic form (i.e. big data). Organizations such as the Anesthesia Quality Institute and Multicenter Perioperative Outcomes Group have spearheaded large-scale efforts to collect anaesthesia big data for outcomes research and quality improvement. Analytics--the systematic use of data combined with quantitative and qualitative analysis to make decisions--can be applied to big data for quality and performance improvements, such as predictive risk assessment, clinical decision support, and resource management. Visual analytics is the science of analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces, and it can facilitate performance of cognitive activities involving big data. Ongoing integration of big data and analytics within anaesthesia and health care will increase demand for anaesthesia professionals who are well versed in both the medical and the information sciences. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Comparing the Ease of Inducing Spinal Anaesthesia in the Sitting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Under strict asepsis, spinal anaesthesia was established at a preferred intervertebral space (L2-L5), proportion of first attempt success, number of attempts, number of redirections, duration taken to establish spinal, complication were compared. Results: There were no statistical differences between the two groups in relation ...

  8. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 15, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesia for a morbidly obese patient with schizophrenia and intellectual disability · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Y Asahi, Y Kawai, M Sugimoto, T Suzuki, S Omichi, J Kotani, 32-33. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/22201173.2009.10872621 ...

  9. Anaesthesia in a child with Rubenstein-Taybi syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-02-03

    Feb 3, 2012 ... temperature because patients with congenital abnormalities are prone to malignant .... and dental crowding and malocclusion, do not impact on anaesthesia.2,3 ... Cardiovascular: Acynotic cardiac defects (atrial septal defect, ventricular ... Major anaesthetic considerations are a difficult intubation, patient ...

  10. Safety of spinal anaesthesia in patients with recent coronary stents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-04

    Oct 4, 2012 ... Spinal anaesthesia was planned because of the patient's chronic obstructive airway ... Furthermore, he had coronary artery disease with angina following .... According to ASRA, treatment with nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory .... American Dental Association, with representation from the American. College of ...

  11. Practising anaesthesia as a community service doctor: a survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bClinical Department, Anaesthesia, Critical Care and Pain Management, Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. cDiscipline of .... Steps in the Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE) training. ... rotation in either the first or second year of internship were also .... The results of this study will further aid in the.

  12. hyperbaric ropivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for knee arthroscopy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Maulana Azad Medical College, Lok Nayak Hospital, ... Spinal anaesthesia is usually adequate for these procedures but ... disorder, language problems, history of chronic pain, alcohol, drug ... identity of the solution. .... to age, sex, ASA physical status, weight where height (p > 0.05).

  13. Automated anaesthesia record systems, observations on future trends of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, W

    1995-02-01

    The introduction of electronic anaesthesia documentation systems was attempted as early as in 1979, although their efficient application has become reality only in the past few years. Today, documentation technology is offered by most of the monitor manufacturers and new systems are being developed by various working groups. The advantages of the electronic protocol are apparent: Continuous high quality documentation, comparability of data due to the availability of a anaesthesia data bank, reduction of the workload of the anaesthesia staff and availability of new additional information. Disadvantages of the electronic protocol have also been discussed. Typically, by going through the process of entering data on the course of the anaesthetic procedure on the protocol sheet, the information is mentally absorbed and evaluated by the anaesthetist. This mental processing of information may, however, be missing when the data are recorded fully automatically--without active involvement on the part of the anaesthetist. It seems that electronic anaesthesia protocols will be required in the near future. The advantages of accurate documentation and quality control in the presence of careful planning will outweight cost considerations. However, at this time, almost none of the commercially available systems have matured to a point where their purchase can be recommended without reservation. There is still a lack of standards for the subsequent exchange of data and a solution to a number of ergonomic problems still remains to be found.

  14. Anaesthesia care for emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Patricia; Haahr, Camilla; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently, no standard approach exists to the level of monitoring or presence of staff with anaesthetic expertise required during emergency esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) for peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). We assess the association between anaesthesia care and mortality. We further...

  15. Ethamsylate in vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, G. B.; Eltringham, R. J.; Nightingale, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Sixty patients scheduled for vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural block were randomly allocated into two groups, one of which received ethamsylate intravenously prior to induction of anaesthesia. Ethamsylate did not reduce the blood loss at operation in these patients. The possible factors underlying this observation are discussed.

  16. Ethamsylate in vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G B; Eltringham, R J; Nightingale, J J

    1983-03-01

    Sixty patients scheduled for vaginal surgery under lumbar epidural block were randomly allocated into two groups, one of which received ethamsylate intravenously prior to induction of anaesthesia. Ethamsylate did not reduce the blood loss at operation in these patients. The possible factors underlying this observation are discussed.

  17. Case Report: Anaesthesia for Marfan's Syndrome | Bösenberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 13, No 4 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  18. Graded epidural anaesthesia for Caesarean section in a parturient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Open Access article distributed under the terms of the. Creative Commons License ... CASE REPORT. Graded epidural anaesthesia for Caesarean section in a parturient with Shone's syndrome: a case study. Anjum Naza*, Sugata Dasguptab, Bijoy Kumar Bandyopadhyayb and Hasibul Hasan Shirazeec. aDepartment of ...

  19. Management of failed spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    based on an intent-to-treat analysis. Of these, 10 ... testing the level of a spinal block, nor is there an algorithm on how ... scenarios of failed spinal anaesthesia was distributed to 51 government hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa (SA).

  20. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 17, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous measurement of heart rate variability following carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum during nitrous oxide/sevoflurane anaesthesia · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. S Kurashige, K Takakura, M Mizogami, 174-176.

  1. Percutaneous vertebroplasty under local anaesthesia: feasibility regarding patients' experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnard, Eric; Foti, Pauline; Amoretti, Nicolas; Kastler, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Evaluate patients' intraoperative experience of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) performed without general anaesthesia in order to assess the feasibility of local anaesthesia and simple analgesic medication as pain control protocol. Ninety-five patients who underwent single-site PV were consecutively included in the study between 2011 and 2013. Each procedure was achieved under local anaesthesia and perfusion of paracetamol, tramadol and dolasetron, with combined CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Numeric pain scale (NPS) was collected before, during and after intervention. After intervention, patients were asked to evaluate their experience as ''very bad'', ''bad'', ''fair'', ''good'' or ''very good'', independently of the pain. Indications for vertebroplasty were osteopenic fractures (78 %), aggressive angiomas (13 %) and somatic tumours (9 %). In 76 % of cases, patients' experience was described as ''very good'' (44 %) or ''good'' (32 %), whereas 19 % described it as ''fair'' and 5 % as ''very bad''. Mean operative NPS was 5.5. After intervention, NPS was significantly lower with a decrease of 4.5 points. No differences were found according to the localization, type of lesion, age or sex either in terms of experience or NPS. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is feasible under local anaesthesia alone, with a very good or good experience in 76 % of the patients. (orig.)

  2. Ensuring that patient-controlled anaesthesia is safe | Coetzee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient-controlled anaesthesia (PCA) is effective because it enables self-titration to individual requirements. PCA is ... Strategies for safety improvement include an understanding of opioid pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, appropriate dosing regimens, establishing guidelines and written orders, appropriate ...

  3. Anaesthesia for a morbidly obese patient with schizophrenia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report the case of a morbidly obese woman with schizophrenia and intellectual disability who underwent dental treatment using general anaesthesia. The 38-year-old patient was 156 cm tall and weighed 140 kg, with a body mass index of 57.5 kg.m-2. Her developmental age was less than five or six years. She had ...

  4. Lifebox | Wilson | Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 18, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Lifebox. IH Wilson. Abstract.

  5. Lifebox | Wilson | Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 18, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  6. Assessing unmet anaesthesia need in Sierra Leone: a secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the unmet anaesthesia need in a low resource region. Introduction: Surgery and anæsthesia services in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are under-equipped, under- staffed, and unable to meet current surgical need. There is little objective measure as to the true extent and nature of ...

  7. Vasectomy under local anaesthesia performed free of charge as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vasectomy under local anaesthesia performed free of charge as a family planning service: Complications and results. ... The complication (5.6%) and failure rates (0%) were lowest for the registrar who had performed the smallest number of vasectomies and whose average operation time was longest. Comparing the first ...

  8. Chemical dependency: An occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, S.

    2010-01-01

    The medical personnel are vulnerable to substance abuse and dependence due to ready access to substance of abuse. Addiction is considered as an occupational hazard for those involved in the practice of anaesthesia for the same reason. Substance abuse is defined as a psychosocial biogenetic disease, which results from dynamic interplay between a susceptible host and favourable environment. According to the fifth and the last National Survey on Drug Abuse (NSDA) in 1993 by Pakistan Narcotic Control, there are nearly three million drug dependants Review Article Chemical dependency: An occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia Samina Ismail Department of Anaesthesia, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. in Pakistan, but no data is available to determine the prevalence among medical or anaesthesia personnel. In order to handle the rising trend of chemical abuse, we need to have more surveys and studies on this subject, written policy and educational programme in postgraduate training with proper control and frequent checking of narcotic dispensing. Reporting of drug abuse and rehabilitation of affected doctors are areas which need to be worked upon. (author)

  9. Observational study of choice of anaesthesia and outcome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... defined as pre-eclampsia with one or more of the following: systolic blood pressure of ... pressure and heart rate; type of administered anaesthesia; maternal ..... With this in mind, the impact of these factors on the choice of ...

  10. Editorial | Borges | Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 23, No 3 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF ...

  11. Spinal anaesthesia in young patients: evaluation of needle gauge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The well-known complication of spinal anaesthesia, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is especially troublesome in young patients. The needle gauge and configuration of needle tip appear to be the important factors in reducing the incidence of PDPH; however it may increase the incidence of technical ...

  12. A practical approach to anaesthesia for paediatric liver transplantation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A practical approach to anaesthesia for paediatric liver transplantation. Jenny Thomas, M McCulloch, W Spearman, T Butt, A Numanoglu ... In more recent years, the use of reduced size and living related organs has increased the donor pool for infants and children. Paediatric liver transplantation in South Africa, up until the ...

  13. Perceptions of final-year UKZN medical students about anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    perceptions of anaesthesiology was the medical school rotation, with the need for ... Conclusion:The perceptions of medical students concerning anaesthesia are multi-faceted, with ... questionnaire and were thus included in the analysis. .... commonest themes that emerged in students' responses were .... A survey of factors.

  14. Thyroidectomy under local anaesthesia: experience with giant goitres

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    the thyroid notch and the lower flap down to the suprasternal notch. The investing fascia is then incised ... required in thyroid gland mobilization especially when done under local anaesthesia and traction on the .... Gitau W. An analysis of thyroid diseases seen at Kenyatta Hospital. E. Afr. Med. J. 1975; 52:564-570. 4.

  15. Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia - Vol 18, No ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparison of ultrasound-guided vs. anatomical landmark-guided cannulation of the femoral vein at the optimum position in infant · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Cervical epidural anaesthesia for shoulder arthroscopy and effective postoperative physiotherapy for a frozen shoulder: A case study · EMAIL FREE FULL ...

  16. Anaesthesia for scoliosis correction surgery complicated by severe ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-10-02

    Oct 2, 2012 ... 1Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care and Pain Medicine, Children's University Hospital, Temple Street, Dublin, Ireland. 2Department of ... She was transferred to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). .... old achondroplastic baby undergoing neurosurgery in the prone position. Anaesth Intensive ...

  17. Orthopaedic anaesthesia for upper extremity procedures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgeries in our centre, which is a positive development in a resource limited setting. Introduction ... Department of Anaesthesia, University College Hospital, Ibadan,. Nigeria. 2. ... requiring no supplemental local anaesthetic administration intraoperatively ... blocks has been blamed on deficiencies of training, equipment and ...

  18. some recent advances in anaesthesia of interest to ophthalmic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1971-04-10

    Apr 10, 1971 ... Perhaps the most obvious field in which our interests over- lap, is that of ... eye surgery for which this form of anaesthesia, admini- stered as a rule .... Beside the ... Techniques of induced hypotension on the other hand not only ...

  19. The informed consent process for anaesthesia: perspectives of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patient the false impression that anaesthesia and surgery are ... regard to the information divulged by the anaesthetist during ... attitudes of patients with regard to the existing method of obtaining ... any change in how patients view anaesthetists before and ... specific doctors and their specialities, and a belief that all doctors.

  20. Comparative usability of modern anaesthesia ventilators: a human factors study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, J; Schweizer, T; Schmutz, A; Buerkle, H; Schumann, S

    2017-11-01

    The anaesthesia ventilator represents the key equipment for intraoperative respiratory care. Improper operation of this device may threaten a patient's health. A self-explanatory interface facilitates handling and decreases the risk of operating errors. This study systematically evaluates the usability of user interfaces in four modern anaesthesia ventilators. Twenty naïve operators were asked to execute 20 tasks on each of four different anaesthesia ventilators (Avance CS2™, GE Healthcare; Flow-i™, Maquet; and Perseus™ and Primus™, Dräger) in a randomized order. The success of task execution, frequency of requests for assistance, and processing times were recorded. During the tasks, the operators' visual focus was measured via eye-tracking. Additionally, subjective assessments of usability were evaluated by a standardized questionnaire. For comparison, six experienced operators undertook the same protocol. The overall rate of falsely executed tasks was low. Naïve operators requested assistance least when using the Perseus (26). Pooled processing times were shortest for the Perseus (222 s), followed by the Primus (223 s), the Avance (238 s), and the Flow-i (353 s). Task-specific processing times differed considerably between the devices. Eye-tracking analyses revealed associated interface issues that impeded the operators' performance. Operators rated usability best for the Perseus [mean (sd): 67 (17) arbitrary units] and worst for the Flow-i [50 (16) arbitrary units]. Results from experienced operators support these findings by trend. The usability of modern anaesthesia ventilators differs considerably. Interface issues of specific tasks impair the operator's efficiency. Eliminating the specific usability issues might improve the operator's performance and, as a consequence, the patient's safety. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  1. Test of neural inertia in humans during general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuizenga, M H; Colin, P J; Reyntjens, K M E M; Touw, D J; Nalbat, H; Knotnerus, F H; Vereecke, H E M; Struys, M M R F

    2018-03-01

    Neural inertia is defined as the tendency of the central nervous system to resist transitions between arousal states. This phenomenon has been observed in mice and Drosophila anaesthetized with volatile anaesthetics: the effect-site concentration required to induce anaesthesia in 50% of the population (C 50 ) was significantly higher than the effect-site concentration for 50% of the population to recover from anaesthesia. We evaluated this phenomenon in humans using propofol or sevoflurane (both with or without remifentanil) as anaesthetic agents. Thirty-six healthy volunteers received four sessions of anaesthesia with different drug combinations in a step-up/step-down design. Propofol or sevoflurane was administered with or without remifentanil. Serum concentrations of propofol and remifentanil were measured from arterial blood samples. Loss and return of responsiveness (LOR-ROR), response to pain (PAIN), Patient State Index (PSI) and spectral edge frequency (SEF) were modeled with NONMEM®. For propofol, the C 50 for induction and recovery of anaesthesia was not significantly different across the different endpoints. For sevoflurane, for all endpoints except SEF, significant differences were found. For some endpoints (LOR and PAIN) the difference was significant only when sevoflurane was combined with remifentanil. Our results nuance earlier findings with volatile anaesthetics in mice and Drosophila. Methodological aspects of the study, such as the measured endpoint, influence the detection of neural inertia. A more thorough definition of neural inertia, with a robust methodological framework for clinical studies is required to advance our knowledge of this phenomenon. NCT 02043938. Copyright © 2017 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Does anaesthesia cause postoperative cognitive dysfunction? : a randomised study of regional versus general anaesthesia in 438 elderly patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasmussen, L.S.; Johnson, T.; Kuipers, H.M.; Kristensen, D.; Siersma, V.D.; Vila, P.; Jolles, J.; Papaioannou, A.; Abildstrom, H.; Silverstein, J.H.; Bonal, J.A.; Raeder, J.; Nielsen, I.K.; Korttila, K.; Munoz, L.; Dodds, C.; Hanning, C.D.; Moller, J.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords:anesthesia;cognitive function;complications;postoperative period;regional anesthesia;surgery Background: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a common complication after cardiac and major non-cardiac surgery with general anaesthesia in the elderly. We hypothesized that the

  3. The patient inflating valve in anaesthesia and resuscitation breathing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, P M; Bell, G

    2013-03-01

    Patient inflating valves combined with self-inflating bags are known to all anaesthetists as resuscitation devices and are familiar as components of draw-over anaesthesia systems. Their variants are also commonplace in transfer and home ventilators. However, the many variations in structure and function have led to difficulties in their optimal use, definition and classification. After reviewing the relevant literature, we defined a patient inflating valve as a one-way valve that closes an exit port to enable lung inflation, also permitting exhalation and spontaneous breathing, the actions being automatic. We present a new classification based on the mechanism of valve opening/closure; namely elastic recoil of a flexible flap/diaphragm, sliding spindle opened by a spring/magnet or a hollow balloon collapsed by external pressure. The evolution of these valves has been driven by the difficulties documented in critical incidents, which we have used along with information from modern International Organization for Standardization standards to identify 13 ideal properties, the top six of which are non-jamming, automatic, no bypass effect, no rebreathing or air entry at patient end, low resistance, robust and easy to service. The Ambu and the Laerdal valves have remained popular due to their simplicity and reliability. Two new alternatives, the Fenton and Diamedica valves, offer the benefits of location away from the patient while retaining a small functional dead space. They also offer the potential for greater use of hybrid continuous flow/draw-over systems that can operate close to atmospheric pressure. The reliable application of positive end-expiratory pressure/continuous positive airway pressure remains a challenge.

  4. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiliopoulos, S.; Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 ± 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 ± 1.6 versus 4.6 ± 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 ± 2.7 versus 19 ± 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 ± 1.3 versus 4.5 ± 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  5. Does ultrasound-guided lidocaine injection improve local anaesthesia before femoral artery catheterization?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiliopoulos, S., E-mail: stavspiliop@upatras.g [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece); Katsanos, K.; Diamantopoulos, A.; Karnabatidis, D.; Siablis, D. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Patras University Hospital, School of Medicine, Patras (Greece)

    2011-05-15

    Aim: To present the results of a prospective, randomized, single-centre study investigating local anaesthesia before percutaneous common femoral artery (CFA) puncture and catheterization with the use of ultrasound-guided injection of lidocaine versus standard infiltration by manual palpation. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled to undergo diagnostic or therapeutic transfemoral catheter-based procedures gave informed consent and were randomized in two groups. In the first arm local anaesthesia with lidocaine hydrochloride 1% was performed under ultrasound guidance (group U/S), while in the second arm the standard method of manual artery palpation was applied (group M). In both groups, subsequent CFA catheterization was achieved under ultrasound guidance. The primary study endpoint was peri-procedural pain level evaluated with a visual-analogue scale (VAS score 0-10). Results: Between January 2009 and 2010, 200 patients (161 men, mean age 63 {+-} 12 years) were equally assigned to each group without any significant differences in baseline demographics. Patients in group U/S experienced significantly less pain during CFA catheterization in comparison with group M with a difference of three points in mean VAS score reported (1.6 {+-} 1.6 versus 4.6 {+-} 1.9, p < 0.0001). In addition, significantly less volume of lidocaine was used in group U/S compared to group M (16 {+-} 2.7 versus 19 {+-} 0.8 ml, p < 0.001).Total vascular access time was similar in both groups (4.4 {+-} 1.3 versus 4.5 {+-} 1.3 min). Overall complications included two small groin haematomas in each group. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided local anaesthesia of the CFA prior to percutaneous transcatheter procedures is safe and achieves superior levels of analgesia with minimal patient pain and discomfort compared to the standard method of manual palpation.

  6. Postoperative changes in the full-field electroretinogram following sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that disturbances of the visual pathway persist following general anaesthesia, even after normal clinical discharge criteria have been met. METHODS: We performed full-field flash electroretinography in the right eye of 10 unpremedicated ASA I patients who underwent N2O\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded preoperatively, immediately after discharge from the recovery room and 2 h after discontinuation of sevoflurane. The time at which postanaesthesia discharge score first exceeded 9 was also noted. Data were analysed using paired, one-tailed Student\\'s t-test. RESULTS: Latency of the b-wave on the photopic electroretinogram was greater at each postoperative time point (30.5 +\\/- 0.9 and 30 +\\/- 1.3 ms), compared to preoperative values (29.2 +\\/- 0.8 ms, P < 0.001 and P = 0.04, respectively). The A-B amplitude of the b-wave was less postoperatively (220.3 +\\/- 52.7 and 210.3 +\\/- 42.7 pV) compared to values before operation (248.1 +\\/- 57.6 microV, P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively). Oscillatory potential latencies were greater at each postoperative time point (21.4 +\\/- 0.5 and 20.8 +\\/- 0.6 ms) compared to before operation (20.4 +\\/- 0.4 ms, P < 0.001 and P = 0.03, respectively). Oscillatory potential amplitudes were less at the first postoperative time point (17.5 +\\/- 6.1 microV), compared to preoperative values (22 +\\/- 6.4 microV, P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: Postoperative electroretinogram abnormalities are consistently present in patients who have undergone N2O\\/sevoflurane anaesthesia. These abnormalities persist beyond the time at which standard clinical discharge criteria have been met.

  7. Anaesthesia perspective of combat injuries at south waziristan agency-a field experience of war on terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Ahmad, M.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the presentation form of combat injuries, different aspects of anaesthesia management and methods of effective pain control inside the field hospital. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: South Waziristan Scouts Hospital, South Waziristan Agency, Wana, Khyber Pakhtun Khawa province from March 2007 to August 2009. Patients and Methods: A descriptive review of the type of injuries sustained by the troops including local civil population reporting to South Waziristan Scouts (SWS) Hospital from March 2007 to Aug 2009. All patients of combat related injuries reporting to SWS Hospital were included in this study excluding elective surgical cases, gynaecological cases and routine medical patients. Initial anaesthesia management, pain control in anaesthetized patients or analgesia provided without anaesthesia in injured patients and evacuation process of emergencies to tertiary care hospital are discussed. The data was collected from hospital records including operation theatre and was analyzed in the SPSS version 14 for windows in the form of frequency of patients. Results: A total of 149 male (age 30 ± 15) patients were managed at SWS hospital after sustaining combat related injuries. General anaesthesia was given to 61% patients whereas 26% were operated under spinal anaesthesia. Deaths reported were 12.75% comprising 1.3% brought in dead during combat, 2.68% after cardiopulmonary resuscitation inside the hospital, 2.68% homicides by miscreants, 0.67% suicide, 0.67% of bomb disposal squad during mines search operation and 4.69% due to helicopter crash due to snow fall. Firearm and splinter injuries were the commonest in active encounter followed by IED linked injuries. Stray bullets injured a soldier in the chest causing pneumothorax and minor injuries to other 2%. Suicide 0.67% of permanent residing troop and homicides of 2.68% soldiers by the miscreants were documented. The time for casualty arrival in the hospital was 15 min

  8. A qualitative study of regional anaesthesia for vitreo-retinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Christine; Harrington, Ann; King, Lindy

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research was to collect experiential knowledge about regional ocular anaesthesia - an integral component of most vitreo-retinal surgery. Anaesthesia for vitreo-retinal surgery has predominantly used general anaesthesia, because of the length and complexity of the surgical procedure. However, recent advances in surgical instrumentation and techniques have reduced surgical times; this decision has led to the adoption of regional ocular anaesthesia for vitreo-retinal day surgery. Although regional ocular anaesthesia has been studied from several perspectives, knowledge about patients' experience of the procedure is limited. An interpretive qualitative research methodology underpinned by Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics. Eighteen participants were interviewed in-depth between July 2006-December 2007 following regional ocular anaesthesia. Interview data were thematically analysed by coding and grouping concepts. Four themes were identified: 'not knowing': the time prior to the experience of a regional eye block; 'experiencing': the experience of regional ocular anaesthesia; 'enduring': the capacity participants displayed to endure regional ocular anaesthesia with the hope that their vision would be restored; and 'knowing': when further surgery was required and past experiences were recalled. The experience of regional ocular anaesthesia had the capacity to invoke anxiety in the participants in this study. Many found the experience overwhelming and painful. What became clear was the participant's capacity to stoically 'endure' regional ocular anaesthesia, indicating the value people placed on visual function. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age after general anaesthesia and awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS): an international multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Disma, Nicola; De Graaff, Jurgen C; Withington, Davinia E; Dorris, Liam; Bell, Graham; Stargatt, Robyn; Bellinger, David C; Schuster, Tibor; Arnup, Sarah J; Hardy, Pollyanna; Hunt, Rodney W; Takagi, Michael J; Giribaldi, Gaia; Hartmann, Penelope L; Salvo, Ida; Morton, Neil S; Von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; Wilton, Niall; Lynn, Anne; Thomas, Joss J; Polaner, David; Bagshaw, Oliver; Szmuk, Peter; Absalom, Anthony R; Frawley, Geoff; Berde, Charles; Ormond, Gillian D; Marmor, Jacki; Mccann, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that general anaesthetics affect brain development. There is mixed evidence from cohort studies that young children exposed to anaesthesia can have an increased risk of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. We aimed to establish whether general anaesthesia in infancy

  10. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age after general anaesthesia and awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS) : an international multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J; Disma, Nicola; de Graaff, Jurgen C; Withington, Davinia E; Dorris, Liam; Bell, Graham; Stargatt, Robyn; Bellinger, David C; Schuster, Tibor; Arnup, Sarah J; Hardy, Pollyanna; Hunt, Rodney W; Takagi, Michael J; Giribaldi, Gaia; Hartmann, Penelope L; Salvo, Ida; Morton, Neil S; von Ungern Sternberg, Britta S; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; Wilton, Niall; Lynn, Anne; Thomas, Joss J; Polaner, David; Bagshaw, Oliver; Szmuk, Peter; Absalom, Anthony R; Frawley, Geoff; Berde, Charles; Ormond, Gillian D; Marmor, Jacki; McCann, Mary Ellen

    BACKGROUND: Preclinical data suggest that general anaesthetics affect brain development. There is mixed evidence from cohort studies that young children exposed to anaesthesia can have an increased risk of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. We aimed to establish whether general anaesthesia in infancy

  11. Neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age after general anaesthesia and awake-regional anaesthesia in infancy (GAS) : an international multicentre, randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, Andrew J.; Disma, Nicola; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Withington, Davinia E.; Dorris, Liam; Bell, Graham; Stargatt, Robyn; Bellinger, David C.; Schuster, Tibor; Arnup, Sarah J.; Hardy, Pollyanna; Hunt, Rodney W.; Takagi, Michael J.; Giribaldi, Gaia; Hartmann, Penelope L.; Salvo, Ida; Morton, Neil S.; Sternberg, Britta S. von Ungern; Locatelli, Bruno Guido; Wilton, Niall; Lynn, Anne; Thomas, Joss J.; Polaner, David; Bagshaw, Oliver; Szmuk, Peter; Absalom, Anthony R.; Frawley, Geoff; Berde, Charles; Ormond, Gillian D.; Marmor, Jacki; McCann, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background Preclinical data suggest that general anaesthetics affect brain development. There is mixed evidence from cohort studies that young children exposed to anaesthesia can have an increased risk of poor neurodevelopmental outcome. We aimed to establish whether general anaesthesia in infancy

  12. Two novel mutations in the BCHE gene in patients with prolonged duration of action of mivacurium or succinylcholine during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gätke, Mona R; Bundgaard, Jens R; Viby-Mogensen, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) hydrolyses the neuromuscular blocking agents, succinylcholine and mivacurium used during general anaesthesia. Hereditary low BChE activity may result in an extensively prolonged duration of action of these drugs, especially in patients who are homozygous for the atypi......Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) hydrolyses the neuromuscular blocking agents, succinylcholine and mivacurium used during general anaesthesia. Hereditary low BChE activity may result in an extensively prolonged duration of action of these drugs, especially in patients who are homozygous...... for the atypical or silent variants. We present three novel mutations in the butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE) identified in three families in which a member had experienced severely prolonged duration of action of succinylcholine....

  13. General anaesthesia for insertion of an automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator in a child with Brugada and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwetal Goraksha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 14-year-old autistic boy presented with acute gastroenteritis and hypotension. The electrocardiogram showed a ventricular fibrillation rhythm - he went into cardiorespiratory arrest and was immediately resuscitated. On investigation, the electrocardiogram showed a partial right bundle branch block with a "coved" pattern of ST elevation in leads v 1 -v 3 . A provisional diagnosis of Brugada syndrome was made, for which an automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator (AICD implantation was advised. Although the automated implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation is usually performed under sedation, because this was an autistic child, he needed general anaesthesia. We performed the procedure uneventfully under general anaesthesia and he was discharged after a short hospital stay.

  14. Sufentanil Vs Fentanyl for Fast-Track Cardiac Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C M Deshpande

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A perioperative anaesthetic management that aims to facilitate tracheal extubation of patients within 1-6 hrs after cardiac surgery is called "fast-track′. Main advantage of ′fast-track" method is better usage of medical resources and lowering hospital costs without increasing morbidity and mortality of the patients. Standard fast-track protocols contain short acting anaesthetic agents, smaller incisions and decreased pump times without hypothermia. In this study we compared two short acting opioid drugs, fentanyl versus Sufentanil when used as a part of the balanced anaesthesia technique for fast track in cardiac surgery patients& evaluated the time taken for extubation, haemodynamic stability, analgesia requirements& incidence of awareness. The results from the study show thatboth agents provide good haemodynamic stability and postoperative analgesia. Although Sufentanil provides earlier extuba-tion, both agents reduce the ICU stay equally. In conclusion both agents can be used effectively for fasttrack cardiac anaesthesia.

  15. Anaesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy - new tricks for old drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stripp, Tobias Kvist; Jorgensen, Martin Balslev; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched for exist......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to investigate existing literature in order to delineate whether the use of anaesthesia and timing of seizure induction in a new and optimised way may improve the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). METHODS: PubMed/MEDLINE was searched...... the shortest seizures, etomidate and ketamine the longest. Etomidate and ketamine+propofol 1 : 1 seems to yield the seizures with best quality. Seizure quality is improved when induction of ECT is delayed until the effect of the anaesthetic has waned - possibly monitored with BIS values. Manual...

  16. Scandinavian clinical practice guidelines on general anaesthesia for emergency situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gadegaard Jensen, Anders; Callesen, T; Hagemo, J S

    2010-01-01

    Emergency patients need special considerations and the number and severity of complications from general anaesthesia can be higher than during scheduled procedures. Guidelines are therefore needed. The Clinical Practice Committee of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care...... Medicine appointed a working group to develop guidelines based on literature searches to assess evidence, and a consensus meeting was held. Consensus opinion was used in the many topics where high-grade evidence was unavailable. The recommendations include the following: anaesthesia for emergency patients...... breathing for 3 min or eight deep breaths over 60 s and oxygen flow 10 l/min should be used. Pre-oxygenation in the obese patients should be performed in the head-up position. The use of cricoid pressure is not considered mandatory, but can be used on individual judgement. The hypnotic drug has a minor...

  17. Chemical dependency: an occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Samina

    2010-10-01

    The medical personnel are vulnerable to substance abuse and dependence due to ready access to substance of abuse. Addiction is considered as an occupational hazard for those involved in the practice of anaesthesia for the same reason. Substance abuse is defined as a psychosocial biogenetic disease, which results from dynamic interplay between a susceptible host and favourable environment. According to the 5th and the last National Survey on Drug Abuse (NSDA) in 1993 by Pakistan Narcotic Control, there are nearly three million drug dependants in Pakistan, but no data is available to determine the prevalence among medical or anaesthesia personnel. In order to handle the rising trend of chemical abuse, we need to have more surveys and studies on this subject, written policy and educational programme in postgraduate training with proper control and frequent checking of narcotic dispensing. Reporting of drug abuse and rehabilitation of affected doctors are areas which need to be worked upon.

  18. Transfusion-associated anaphylaxis during anaesthesia and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindsted, G; Larsen, R; Krøigaard, M

    2014-01-01

    in Denmark. Our aims were to identify possible cases of TAA, to characterize their symptoms and tryptase levels and to investigate the reporting of TAA to the haemovigilance systems. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed 245 patients with suspected allergic reactions during anaesthesia and surgery, investigated...... and results of laboratory and clinical investigations were collected. TAA cases were identified according to the recommendations of the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT). RESULTS: Ten possible TAA cases (30% of all transfused patients) were identified, all DAAC negative. The frequency...... at the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC). Based on the outcome of this investigation, the patients were classified as DAAC positive (confirmed hypersensitivity to identified agent, n = 112), or DAAC negative (no confirmed hypersensitivity, n = 133). Data on case history, details of blood transfusion...

  19. Cardiovascular effects of oesophageal dilation under general anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C H; Rasmussen, V; Rosenberg, J

    1999-01-01

    , but was not associated with the actual time of oesophageal distension. Thus, all cases of myocardial ischaemia were related to the time of extubation. No lasting complications were seen, and all patients could be discharged a maximum of 24 hours after the procedure. Pneumatic dilation of the oesophagus under general......Myocardial ischaemia and cardiac arrhythmias may occur during oesophageal dilation under conscious sedation, but no prospective data exist regarding dilation under general anaesthesia. We have studied the haemodynamic and electrocardiographic changes during routine oesophageal balloon dilation...... the procedure. Four patients developed significant hypotension at the time of balloon inflation with two patients requiring medical intervention to re-establish sufficient cardiovascular function. Tachycardia and ST-deviation occurred in four and three patients, respectively, during the general anaesthesia...

  20. Analgesia and anaesthesia in childbirth: obscurantism and obfuscation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, R

    1998-07-01

    The terms 'analgesia' and 'anaesthesia' have been defined by emphasizing differing aspects of their effects. The distinction between these interventions has not been clarified by their definitions. The historical remedies for pain were similarly unclear. This lack of clarity is apparent in the introduction of chloroform in childbirth, which has much in common with the introduction and effects of epidural analgesia. The reasons for and benefits of this lack of clarity are examined.

  1. A Clinical Comparison of Three Techniques of Mandibular Local Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sthitaprajna Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: After using Gow-Gates method, it was found that the Gow-Gates technique is a highly successful alternative to the conventional inferior nerve block with regards to increased success rate, constancy of landmarks, decreased positive aspiration rate, decreased incidence of complications such as trismus, the advantage of one injection to anaesthetize a greater area supplied by the mandibular nerve, longer duration of anaesthesia and less amount of pain experienced during injection.

  2. [Operating cost analysis of anaesthesia: activity based costing (ABC analysis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majstorović, Branislava M; Kastratović, Dragana A; Vučović, Dragan S; Milaković, Branko D; Miličić, Biljana R

    2011-01-01

    Cost of anaesthesiology represent defined measures to determine a precise profile of expenditure estimation of surgical treatment, which is important regarding planning of healthcare activities, prices and budget. In order to determine the actual value of anaestesiological services, we started with the analysis of activity based costing (ABC) analysis. Retrospectively, in 2005 and 2006, we estimated the direct costs of anestesiological services (salaries, drugs, supplying materials and other: analyses and equipment.) of the Institute of Anaesthesia and Resuscitation of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. The group included all anesthetized patients of both sexes and all ages. We compared direct costs with direct expenditure, "each cost object (service or unit)" of the Republican Healthcare Insurance. The Summary data of the Departments of Anaesthesia documented in the database of the Clinical Centre of Serbia. Numerical data were utilized and the numerical data were estimated and analyzed by computer programs Microsoft Office Excel 2003 and SPSS for Windows. We compared using the linear model of direct costs and unit costs of anaesthesiological services from the Costs List of the Republican Healthcare Insurance. Direct costs showed 40% of costs were spent on salaries, (32% on drugs and supplies, and 28% on other costs, such as analyses and equipment. The correlation of the direct costs of anaestesiological services showed a linear correlation with the unit costs of the Republican Healthcare Insurance. During surgery, costs of anaesthesia would increase by 10% the surgical treatment cost of patients. Regarding the actual costs of drugs and supplies, we do not see any possibility of costs reduction. Fixed elements of direct costs provide the possibility of rationalization of resources in anaesthesia.

  3. Self-Inflicted Trauma Secondary to Local Anaesthesia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikrishna Vempaty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Long acting local anaesthetics and inferior alveolar nerve block in children can cause loss of sensation and proprioception in a large area supplied by that particular nerve. Similar to the maxilla in mandible also, adequate level of anaesthesia can be achieved in the desired site of treatment by using a short acting local anaesthetic. Early return of normal sensory feedback after using short acting anaesthetics can be helpful in preventing self-harm.

  4. Effect of laryngoscopy on middle ear pressure during anaesthesia induction

    OpenAIRE

    Degerli, Semih; Acar, Baran; Sahap, Mehmet; Horasanlı, Eyup

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The procedure of laryngoscopic orotracheal intubation (LOTI) has many impacts on several parts of the body. But its effect on middle ear pressure (MEP) is not known well. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the MEP changes subsequent to insertion of endotracheal tube with laryngoscope. Subjects and methods: 44 patients were included in this study with a normal physical examination of ear, nose and throat. A standard general anaesthesia induction without any inhaler agent was perfor...

  5. Isoflurane anaesthesia in an African wild dog, Lycaon pictus : short communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Stegmann

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia was required in a captive female African wild dog (Lycaon pictus for surgical wound treatment. After it was immobilised with a medetomidine-ketamine combination, bradycardia, hypothermia, systolic hypertension and metabolic acidosis were observed. Surgical anaesthesia was maintained with a 1 %end-tidal isoflurane concentration. A decrease in the arterial blood pressure, rectal temperature and pHoccurred during maintenance of anaesthesia.

  6. Dexmedetomidine infusion during middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia to provide oligaemic surgical field: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumkum Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Middle ear surgery requires bloodless surgical field for better operating conditions, deep level of anaesthesia and rapid emergence. Recent studies suggest that α2 agonists could provide desired surgical field, sedation and analgesia. The present study was aimed to evaluate the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine infusion as anaesthetic adjuvant during middle ear surgery using operating microscope. Methods: Sixty four adult patients aged 18-58 years, American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grades I and II, of both gender were randomised into two comparable equal groups of 32 patients each for middle ear surgery under general anaesthesia with standard anaesthetic technique. After induction of general anaesthesia, patients of Group I were given dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h and patients of Group II were given placebo infusion of normal saline. Isoflurane concentration was titrated to achieve a systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline value. All patients were assessed intra-operatively for bleeding at surgical field, haemodynamic changes, awakening time and post-operative recovery. Results: Statistically significant reduction was observed in the required percentage of isoflurane (0.8 ± 0.6% to maintain the systolic blood pressure 30% below the baseline values in patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion when compared to those receiving placebo infusion (1.6 ± 0.7%. Patients receiving dexmedetomidine infusion had statistically significant lesser bleeding at surgical field (P < 0.05. The mean awakening time and recovery from anaesthesia did not show any significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine infusion can be safely used to provide oligaemic surgical field for better visualization using operating microscope for middle ear surgery.

  7. Anaesthetic efficacy of bupivacaine 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin for dental anaesthesia after inferior alveolar nerve block in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpe, L; Franz-Montan, M; Santos, C P dos; Silva, C B da; Nolasco, F P; Caldas, C S; Volpato, M C; Paula, E de; Groppo, F C

    2014-05-01

    Bupivacaine is a long-acting local anaesthetic that is widely used in medicine and dentistry. The duration and intensity of its sensory blockade in animal models is increased by its inclusion in complexes with cyclodextrins. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anaesthetic efficacy of bupivacaine 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) inclusion complex for dental anaesthesia after inferior alveolar nerve block in rats. Thirty rats were each given an injection close to the mandibular foramen of 0.2ml of one of the following formulations: 0.5% bupivacaine alone; 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine; and 0.5% bupivacaine-HPβCD inclusion complex (bupivacaine-HPβCD). The other sides were used as controls, with either 0.9% saline or anaesthetic-free HPβCD solution being injected. The onset, success, and duration of pulpal anaesthesia were assessed by electrical stimulation ("pulp tester") on inferior molars. Results were analysed using ANOVA (Tukey), log rank, and chi square tests (α=5%). There were no differences among the formulations in onset of anaesthesia (p=0.59) or between the bupivacaine plus epinephrine and bupivacaine plus HPβCD in duration of anaesthesia, but bupivacaine plus epinephrine gave significantly higher values than bupivacaine alone (p=0.007). Bupivacaine plus epinephrine was a better anaesthetic than bupivacaine alone (p=0.02), while Bupi-HPβCD gave intermediate results, and therefore did not differ significantly from the other 2 groups (p=0.18 with bupivacaine alone; and p=0.44 with bupivacaine plus epinephrine). The bupivacaine-HPβCD complex showed similar anaesthetic properties to those of bupivacaine with epinephrine. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Alfaxalone anaesthesia in the green iguana (Iguana iguana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeněk Knotek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate short-term intravenous anaesthesia with alfaxalone in green iguanas (Iguana iguana. Alfaxalone at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg was administered to thirteen adult male green iguanas via the ventral caudal vein following 24 h fasting. The induction time, tracheal tube insertion time, surgical plane of anaesthesia interval, and full recovery time were recorded. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure (measured indirectly, pulse rate, respiratory rate, SpO2 and ETCO2 were recorded. The induction time and tracheal tube insertion time was 41.54 ± 27.69 s and 69.62 ± 37.03 s, respectively. The time from the alfaxalone administration to the loss of toe-pinch reflex was 2.20 ± 1.47 min. Full activity was restored 14.23 ± 4.15 min after the initial alfaxalone administration. The respiratory rate increased significantly (P 2 from 43.65 ± 10.54 to 26.58 ± 8.10 mmHg (P th min after alfaxalone administration. The pulse rate, SpO2 and blood pressure did not change significantly. Intravenous use of alfaxalone proved to be a suitable and safe form for short term anaesthesia in green iguanas.

  9. Spectral entropy monitoring for adults and children undergoing general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Anjolie; Subramaniam, Rajeshwari; Srivastava, Anurag; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Kalaivani, Mani; Paranjape, Saloni

    2016-03-14

    Anaesthetic drugs during general anaesthesia are titrated according to sympathetic or somatic responses to surgical stimuli. It is now possible to measure depth of anaesthesia using electroencephalography (EEG). Entropy, an EEG-based monitor can be used to assess the depth of anaesthesia using a strip of electrodes applied to the forehead, and this can guide intraoperative anaesthetic drug administration. The primary objective of this review was to assess the effectiveness of entropy monitoring in facilitating faster recovery from general anaesthesia. We also wanted to assess mortality at 24 hours, 30 days, and one year following general anaesthesia with entropy monitoring.The secondary objectives were to assess the effectiveness of the entropy monitor in: preventing postoperative recall of intraoperative events (awareness) following general anaesthesia; reducing the amount of anaesthetic drugs used; reducing cost of the anaesthetic as well as in reducing time to readiness to leave the postanaesthesia care unit (PACU). We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 10), MEDLINE via Ovid SP (1990 to September 2014) and EMBASE via Ovid SP (1990 to September 2014). We reran the search in CENTRAL, MEDLINE via Ovid SP and EMBASE via Ovid SP in January 2016. We added one potential new study of interest to the list of 'Studies awaiting Classification' and we will incorporate this study into the formal review findings during the review update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted in adults and children (aged greater than two years of age), where in one arm entropy monitoring was used for titrating anaesthesia, and in the other standard practice (increase in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, lacrimation, movement in response to noxious surgical stimuli) was used for titrating anaesthetic drug administration. We also included trials with an additional third arm, wherein another EEG monitor, the Bispectral index

  10. Effects of anaesthesia techniques and drugs on pulmonary function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Saraswat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary task of the lungs is to maintain oxygenation of the blood and eliminate carbon dioxide through the network of capillaries alongside alveoli. This is maintained by utilising ventilatory reserve capacity and by changes in lung mechanics. Induction of anaesthesia impairs pulmonary functions by the loss of consciousness, depression of reflexes, changes in rib cage and haemodynamics. All drugs used during anaesthesia, including inhalational agents, affect pulmonary functions directly by acting on respiratory system or indirectly through their actions on other systems. Volatile anaesthetic agents have more pronounced effects on pulmonary functions compared to intravenous induction agents, leading to hypercarbia and hypoxia. The posture of the patient also leads to major changes in pulmonary functions. Anticholinergics and neuromuscular blocking agents have little effect. Analgesics and sedatives in combination with volatile anaesthetics and induction agents may exacerbate their effects. Since multiple agents are used during anaesthesia, ultimate effect may be different from when used in isolation. Literature search was done using MeSH key words 'anesthesia', 'pulmonary function', 'respiratory system' and 'anesthesia drugs and lungs' in combination in PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar filtered by review and research articles sorted by relevance.

  11. Determinants of learning to perform spinal anaesthesia: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kulcsar, Z

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This study examined attitudes and views held by stakeholders regarding their experience of training in spinal anaesthesia. The aim was to identify key factors related to learning and teaching processes which were perceived to influence the acquisition of competence in spinal anaesthesia. METHODS: The study was carried out at a busy acute tertiary referral teaching hospital over a period of 1 yr. It applied a qualitative research approach in three phases, namely (i) completion of preliminary questionnaires, (ii) completion of focused questionnaires and (iii) focus group discussions. RESULTS: Five factors were perceived to be critical \\'determinants of learning\\': (i) the existence of a formal, structured training programme; (ii) time constraints\\/theatre efficiency; (iii) trainer-trainee interaction; (iv) patient safety\\/trainee\\/trainer stressors; and (v) visualization of the anatomy and procedure. CONCLUSION: The study highlighted the need for a formal and structured training programme in spinal anaesthesia, through which many of the undesirable and discouraging factors (such as stress, adverse trainer-trainee interaction and time constraints) identified in the study could be minimized. Further studies are needed to validate the results in other hospital settings, as well as to define the relative importance of each of the proposed determinants and their interrelationships.

  12. Preoperative parental information and parents' presence at induction of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuto, M; Rosano, G; Rizzo, G; Disma, N; Raciti, L; Sciuto, O

    2006-06-01

    Preoperative preparation of paediatric patients and their environment in order to prevent anxiety is an important issue in paediatric anaesthesia. Anxiety in paediatric patients may lead to immediate negative postoperative responses. When a child undergoes surgery, information about the child's anaesthesia must be provided to parents who are responsible for making informed choices about healthcare on their child's behalf. A combination of written, pictorial, and verbal information would improve the process of informed consent. The issue of parental presence during induction of anaesthesia has been a controversial topic for many years. Potential benefits from parental presence at induction include reducing or avoiding the fear and anxiety that might occur in both the child and its parents, reducing the need for preoperative sedatives, and improving the child's compliance even if other studies showed no effects on the anxiety and satisfaction level. The presence of other figures such as clowns in the operating room, together with one of the child's parents, is an effective intervention for managing child and parent anxiety during the preoperative period.

  13. Analgesic Effect of Tramadol and Buprenorphin in Continuous Propofol Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capík I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare in clinical patients the analgesic effect of the centrally acting analgesics tramadol and buprenorphine in continuous intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA with propofol. Twenty dogs undergoing prophylactic dental treatment, aged 2−7 years, weighing 6−27 kg, were included in ASA I. and II. groups. Two groups of dogs received intravenous (IV administration of tramadol hydrochloride (2 mg.kg−1 or buprenorphine hydrochloride (0.2 mg.kg−1 30 minutes prior to sedation, provided by midazolam hydrochloride (0.3 mg.kg−1 and xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 mg.kg-1 IV. General anaesthesia was induced by propofol (2 mg.kg−1 and maintained by a 120 minutes propofol infusion (0.2 mg.kg−1min−1. Oscilometric arterial blood pressure (ABP measured in mm Hg, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, SAT, body temperature (BT and pain reaction elicited by haemostat forceps pressure at the digit were recorded in ten minute intervals. The tramadol group of dogs showed significantly better parameters of blood pressure (P < 0.001, lower tendency to bradycardia (P < 0.05, and better respiratory rate (P < 0.001 without negative influence to oxygen saturation. Statistically better analgesia was achieved in the tramadol group (P < 0.001. Tramadol, in comparison with buprenorphine provided significantly better results with respect to the degree of analgesia, as well as the tendency of complications arising during anaesthesia.

  14. Combined epidural-spinal opioid-free anaesthesia and analgesia for hysterectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, T; Schouenborg, Lars Øland; Nielsen, D

    1999-01-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are major problems after gynaecological surgery. We studied 40 patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy, allocated randomly to receive opioid-free epidural-spinal anaesthesia or general anaesthesia with continuous epidural bupivacaine 15 mg h-1...... or continuous bupivacaine 10 mg h-1 with epidural morphine 0.2 mg h-1, respectively, for postoperative analgesia. Nausea, vomiting, pain and bowel function were scored on 4-point scales for 3 days. Patients undergoing general anaesthesia had significantly higher nausea and vomiting scores (P ... for hysterectomy caused less PONV, but with less effective analgesia compared with general anaesthesia with postoperative continuous epidural morphine and bupivacaine....

  15. A COMPARISON OF SPINAL ANAESTHESIA WITH LEVOBUPIVACAINE AND HYPERBARIC BUPIVACAINE COMBINED WITH FENTANYL IN CAESAREAN SECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurmanadh Kalepalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Recent trends in obstetric anaesthesia show increased popularity of regional anaesthesia among obstetric anaesthetists. General anaesthesia in caesarean section is associated with high morbidity and mortality rate when compared with regional anaesthesia. Regional anaesthesia has its own demerits which are primarily related to excessively high spinal blocks and toxicity of local anaesthetics. Reduction in doses and improvement in technique to avoid high level blocks and increased awareness of toxicity of local anaesthetics have contributed to reduction in complications related to regional anaesthesia. The challenges presented by a parturient requiring anaesthesia or analgesia, or both, make the role of obstetric anaesthesiologist both challenging and rewarding. Spinal anesthesia is a popular technique for caesarean delivery. Hyperbaric Bupivacaine in 8% glucose is often used. Plain or glucose-free, Bupivacaine has been frequently referred to as “Isobaric” in the literature, even after Blomqvist and Nilsson demonstrated its hypobaricity. More recently, several studies have confirmed that plain Bupivacaine is indeed hypobaric in comparison with human CSF. Although hyperbaric local anesthetic solutions have a remarkable record of safety, their use is not totally without risk. To prevent unilateral or saddle blocks, patients should move from the lateral or sitting position rapidly to supine position. Hyperbaric solutions may cause sudden cardiac arrest after spinal anesthesia because of the extension of the sympathetic block. The use of truly isobaric solutions may prove less sensitive to position issues. Hyperbaric solutions may cause hypotension or bradycardia after mobilization. Isobaric solutions are favored with respect to their less sensitivity to postural changes. MATERIALS AND METHODS 60 full term parturients of ASA Grade 1 and 2 posted for elective caesarean section under spinal anaesthesia were divided in to two groups. GROUP

  16. Hypobaric Unilateral Spinal Anaesthesia versus General Anaesthesia in Elderly Patients Undergoing Hip Fracture Surgical Repair: A Prospective Randomised Open Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuret, Pascal; Bouvet, Lionel; Villet, Benoit; Hafez, Mohamed; Allaouchiche, Bernard; Boselli, Emmanuel

    2018-04-01

    Intraoperative hypotension during hip fracture surgery is frequent in the elderly. No study has compared the haemodynamic effect of hypobaric unilateral spinal anaesthesia (HUSA) and standardised general anaesthesia (GA) in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgical repair. We performed a prospective, randomised open study, including 40 patients aged over 75 years, comparing the haemodynamic effects of HUSA (5 mg isobaric bupivacaine with 5 μg sufentanil and 1 mL sterile water) and GA (induction with etomidate/remifentanil and maintenance with desflurane/remifentanil). An incidence of severe hypotension, defined by a decrease in systolic blood pressure of >40% from baseline, was the primary endpoint. The incidence of severe hypotension was lower in the HUSA group compared with that in the GA group (32% vs. 71%, respectively, p=0.03). The median [IQR] ephedrine consumption was lower (p=0.001) in the HUSA group (6 mg, 0-17 mg) compared with that in the GA group (36 mg, 21-57 mg). Intraoperative muscle relaxation and patients' and surgeons' satisfaction were similar between groups. No difference was observed in 5-day complications or 30-day mortality. This study shows that HUSA provides better haemodynamic stability than GA, with lower consumption of ephedrine and similar operating conditions. This new approach of spinal anaesthesia seems to be safe and effective in elderly patients undergoing hip fracture surgery.

  17. Effects of ketamine and midazolam on emergence agitation after sevoflurane anaesthesia in children receiving caudal block: a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozcan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Emergence agitation is a common postanaesthetic problem in children after sevoflurane anaesthesia. We aimed to compare the effects of ketamine and midazolam administered intravenously, before the end of surgery, for prevention of emergence agitation in children who received caudal block for pain relief under sevoflurane anaesthesia. Methods: 62 American Society of Anesthesiologists patient classification status I children, aged 2–7 years, scheduled for inguinal hernia repair, circumcision or orchidopexy were enrolled to the study. Anaesthesia was induced with sevoflurane 8% in a mixture of 50% oxygen and nitrous oxide. After achieving adequate depth of anaesthesia, a laryngeal mask was placed and then caudal block was performed with 0.75 mL kg−1, 0.25% bupivacaine. At the end of the surgery, ketamine 0.25 mg kg−1, midazolam 0.03 mg kg−1 and saline were given to ketamine, midazolam and control groups, respectively. Agitation was assessed using Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scale and postoperative pain was evaluated with modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale. Results and conclusions: Modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale scores were found higher in control group than in ketamine and midazolam groups. Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores were similar between groups. Modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale and Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores showed a significant decrease by time in all groups during follow-up in postanaesthesia care unit. The present study resulted in satisfactory Paediatric Anaesthesia Emergence Delirium scores which are below 10 in all groups. As a conclusion, neither ketamine nor midazolam added to caudal block under sevoflurane anaesthesia did show further effect on emergence agitation. In addition, pain relief still seems to be the major factor in preventing emergence agitation after

  18. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane and medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl in guinea pigs and its influence on physiological parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Schmitz

    Full Text Available Repeated anaesthesia may be required in experimental protocols and in daily veterinary practice, but anaesthesia is known to alter physiological parameters in GPs (Cavia porcellus, GPs. This study investigated the effects of repeated anaesthesia with either medetomidine-midazolam-fentanyl (MMF or isoflurane (Iso on physiological parameters in the GP. Twelve GPs were repeatedly administered with MMF or Iso in two anaesthesia sets. One set consisted of six 40-min anaesthesias, performed over 3 weeks (2 per week; the anaesthetic used first was randomized. Prior to Iso anaesthesia, atropine was injected. MMF anaesthesia was antagonized with AFN (atipamezole-flumazenil-naloxone. Abdominally implanted radio-telemetry devices recorded the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, heart rate (HR and core body temperature continuously. Additionally, respiratory rate, blood glucose and body weight were assessed. An operable state could be achieved and maintained for 40 min in all GPs. During the surgical tolerance with MMF, the GPs showed a large MAP range between the individuals. In the MMF wake- up phase, the time was shortened until the righting reflex (RR returned and that occurred at lower MAP and HR values. Repeated Iso anaesthesia led to an increasing HR during induction (anaesthesias 2-6, non-surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 3-6 and surgical tolerance (anaesthesias 4, 6. Both anaesthetics may be used repeatedly, as repeating the anaesthesias resulted in only slightly different physiological parameters, compared to those seen with single anaesthesias. The regular atropine premedication induced HR increases and repeated MMF anaesthesia resulted in a metabolism increase which led to the faster return of RR. Nevertheless, Iso's anaesthesia effects of strong respiratory depression and severe hypotension remained. Based on this increased anaesthesia risk with Iso, MMF anaesthesia is preferable for repeated use in GPs.

  19. Endotracheal tube cuff pressures during general anaesthesia while using air versus a 50% mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen as inflating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesni Joseph Manissery

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at assessing the efficacy of filling a 50% mixture of nitrous oxide : oxygen (50%N 2 O:O 2 in the endotracheal tube cuff to provide stable cuff pressures during general anaesthesia with 67%N 2 O. The endotracheal tube cuff pressures with air (control as the inflating agent in the tubes were found to have a total mean pressure of 62.60±12.33 at the end of one hour of general anaesthesia. When comparing the endotracheal tube cuff pressures in the Mallinckrodt tubes with that of the Portex tubes, with air as the inflating agent, the Portex tubes showed a significantly lower cuff pressures at the end of one hour. The endotracheal tube cuff pressures with 50%N 2 O:O 2 as the inflating agent showed a total mean pressure of 27.63 ± 3.221 at the end of one hour of general anaesthesia. This indicates that inflation of the cuff of the endotracheal tubes with a 50%N 2 O:O 2 rather than air maintains a stable intra cuff pressure. Therefore, the method of using a 50%N 2 O:O 2 for filling endotracheal tube cuff can be adopted for endotracheal tubes with high-volume, low-pressure cuffs to prevent both excessive cuff pressure and disruption of cuff seal, during general anaesthesia lasting up to one hour.

  20. The effect of isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy on circulating corticosterone and ACTH in BALB/c mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Kalliokoski, Otto; Teilmann, Anne Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    compared to anaesthetised mice not treated with dexamethasone. Thus, dexamethasone effectively inhibited the corticosterone response in the anaesthetised-only mice, but not in the mice subjected to surgery. In conclusion, both isoflurane anaesthesia and vasectomy during isoflurane anaesthesia resulted...

  1. Audit of epidural anaesthesia services at a district hospital in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia is considered the 'gold standard' analgesic technique for major surgery. However, its practice is limited in most hospitals in Nigeria. The objective of this review was to determine the rate of administration of epidural anaesthesia and to review the challenges affecting its ...

  2. The effect on outcome of peribulbar anaesthesia in conjunction with general anesthesia for vitreoretinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghali, A M; El Btarny, A M

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate peri-operative outcome after vitreoretinal surgery when peribulbar anaesthesia is combined with general anaesthesia. Sixty adult patients undergoing elective primary retinal detachment surgery with scleral buckling or an encircling procedure received either peribulbar anaesthesia in conjunction with general anaesthesia or general anaesthesia alone. For peribulbar anaesthesia a single percutaneous injection of 5-7 ml of local anaesthetic solution (0.75% ropivacaine with hyaluronidase 15 iu.ml(-1)) was used. The incidence of intra-operative oculocardiac reflex and surgical bleeding interfering with the surgical field, postoperative pain and analgesia requirements, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded. In the block group there was a lower incidence of oculocardiac reflex and surgical bleeding intra-operatively. Patients in the block group also had better postoperative analgesia and a lower incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting compared with the group without a block. The use of peribulbar anaesthesia in conjunction with general anesthesia was superior to general anaesthesia alone for vitreoretinal surgery with scleral buckling.

  3. Effects of general anaesthesia on endocrine system of body in paediatric patients during surgical intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, N.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 50 children (mean age 7, range 2-12 years), undergoing minor to major surgical operations were evaluated for hormonal changes induced by anaesthesia 15 hormones i.e. GH, ACTH, OH, FISH, TSH, PTH, FT4, T3, prolactin, insulin estradiol, testosterone, aldosterone, progesterone, and cortisol were studies results obtained showed significant increase in the levels of GH, cortisol, aldosterone, prolactin, progesterone, and PTH at the time of induction of anaesthesia. Of these GH, prolactin and aldosterone levels showed further increase during surgery (maintenance of anaesthesia). Values of TSH, LH, FSH, FT4 and testosterone levels remained essentially unaffected at induction of anaesthesia, but showed significant rise during surgery (maintenance of anaesthesia). Serum levels of ACTH, insulin, estradiol, and T3 were basically unaffected by anaesthesia and surgery. Furthermore, increase in cortisol and PTH levels was more prominent in patients anaesthetized with halothane alone. In this group ACTH level recorded a decrease while in thiopentone, halothane+nitrous oxide anaesthesia group ACTH showed a significantly rise. Growth hormone and insulin response was significantly more prominent in patients undergoing major surgery as compared to others. These findings under score the importance of stress response resulting from general anaesthesia and surgical trauma in children, and brings into focus the need of careful pre and post operative monitoring of patients in this age group. (author)

  4. Anaesthesia in austere environments: literature review and considerations for future space exploration missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Fleming, Sarah; Mawkin, Mala; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2018-01-01

    Future space exploration missions will take humans far beyond low Earth orbit and require complete crew autonomy. The ability to provide anaesthesia will be important given the expected risk of severe medical events requiring surgery. Knowledge and experience of such procedures during space missions is currently extremely limited. Austere and isolated environments (such as polar bases or submarines) have been used extensively as test beds for spaceflight to probe hazards, train crews, develop clinical protocols and countermeasures for prospective space missions. We have conducted a literature review on anaesthesia in austere environments relevant to distant space missions. In each setting, we assessed how the problems related to the provision of anaesthesia (e.g., medical kit and skills) are dealt with or prepared for. We analysed how these factors could be applied to the unique environment of a space exploration mission. The delivery of anaesthesia will be complicated by many factors including space-induced physiological changes and limitations in skills and equipment. The basic principles of a safe anaesthesia in an austere environment (appropriate training, presence of minimal safety and monitoring equipment, etc.) can be extended to the context of a space exploration mission. Skills redundancy is an important safety factor, and basic competency in anaesthesia should be part of the skillset of several crewmembers. The literature suggests that safe and effective anaesthesia could be achieved by a physician during future space exploration missions. In a life-or-limb situation, non-physicians may be able to conduct anaesthetic procedures, including simplified general anaesthesia.

  5. Cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to electrically induced cycling with complete epidural anaesthesia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Perko, G; Secher, N H

    1994-01-01

    Cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to electrically induced dynamic exercise were investigated in eight healthy young males with afferent neural influence from the legs blocked by epidural anaesthesia (25 ml 2% lidocaine) at L3-L4. This caused cutaneous sensory anaesthesia below T8-T9 and co...

  6. Choice of Future Career amongst Medical Students in Enugu, Nigeria: Implications for Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T C Onyeka

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion - This study has highlighted a very low level of interest for anaesthesia amongst Nigerian undergraduates. It also showed that ability to pursue other hobbies, availability of posts as well as academic and research opportunities are the main influencing factors in the choice of future specialty.We call for urgent measures be put in place tomake anaesthesia more attractive to young medical graduates

  7. The patient's experience of temporary paralysis from spinal anaesthesia, a part of total knee replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Louise; Konradsen, Hanne; Dreyer, Pia Sander

    2015-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe the meaning of being temporary paralysed from spinal anaesthesia when undergoing total knee replacement. BACKGROUND: Total knee arthroplasty is a common procedure, and regional anaesthesia is used as a method for anaesthetising the patient...... of the experience of spinal anaesthesia, as a part of having a total knee replacement. METHODS: Twelve patients were interviewed in March 2014 after undergoing an elective total knee arthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia. The interviews were analysed with a Ricoeur-inspired interpretation method. RESULTS: Three...... TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results of this study contribute to insights and deeper knowledge that can enhance staff's ability to provide care for patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty in spinal anaesthesia. The results provide perspectives that argue for care in accordance to individual needs....

  8. Incidence and related factors for intraoperative failed spinal anaesthesia for lower limb arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasvang, E K; Laursen, M B; Madsen, J

    2018-01-01

    include the risk for intraoperative failed spinal anaesthesia with associated pain, discomfort and suboptimal settings for airway management. Small-scale studies suggest incidences from 1 to 17%; however, no multi-institutional large data exists on failed spinal incidence and related factors during THA....../TKA, hindering evidence-based information and potential anaesthesia stratification. METHODS: In a sub-analysis, data from a prospective study on spinal anaesthesia for THA/TKA were examined for incidence of intraoperative conversion to general anaesthesia. Potential perioperative factors (age, gender, American...... Society of Anaesthesiologist (ASA) score, height, weight, BMI, procedure, bupivacaine dosage and duration of time from spinal administration until end of surgery) were analysed with logistic regression for relation to failed spinal anaesthesia. RESULTS: In all, 1451 patients were included for analysis...

  9. Postoperative changes in visual evoked potentials and cognitive function tests following sevoflurane anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Iohom, G

    2012-02-03

    We tested the hypothesis that minor disturbance of the visual pathway persists following general anaesthesia even when clinical discharge criteria are met. To test this, we measured visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in 13 ASA I or II patients who did not receive any pre-anaesthetic medication and underwent sevoflurane anaesthesia. VEPs were recorded on four occasions, before anaesthesia and at 30, 60, and 90 min after emergence from anaesthesia. Patients completed visual analogue scales (VAS) for sedation and anxiety, a Trieger Dot Test (TDT) and a Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST) immediately before each VEP recording. These results were compared using Student\\'s t-test. P<0.05 was considered significant. VEP latency was prolonged (P<0.001) and amplitude diminished (P<0.05) at 30, 60, and 90 min after emergence from anaesthesia, when VAS scores for sedation and anxiety, TDT, and DSST had returned to pre-anaesthetic levels.

  10. Characteristics of children less than 2 years of age undergoing anaesthesia in Denmark 2005-2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm, C; Afshari, A; Lundstrøm, L H

    2018-01-01

    There are few data available that describe the current anaesthetic management of children. We have analysed anaesthetic practice and peri-operative complications for children in Denmark aged less than two years. We conducted a population-based observational cohort study using the Danish Anaesthesia...... Database to identify children who received anaesthesia in hospital from 1 January 2005 until 31 December 2015. Data were combined with that from the Danish National Patient Registry and the Danish Civil Registration System. Age, sex, height, weight, ASA physical status, days in hospital before anaesthesia......, number of anaesthetics per child, indications for anaesthesia, methods of anaesthesia, airway management and complications were all recorded. A total of 17,436 children (64% of whom were male) received 27,653 anaesthetics during the study period. In 58% of cases, the child had an ASA physical status...

  11. Frequency and risk factors for malnutrition in children undergoing general anaesthesia in a French university hospital: A cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaud-Morlaes, Louis; Frison, Eric; Babre, Florence; De Luca, Arnaud; Didier, Anne; Borde, Maryline; Zaghet, Brigitte; Batoz, Hélène; Semjen, François; Nouette-Gaulain, Karine; Enaud, Raphael; Hankard, Régis; Lamireau, Thierry

    2017-08-01

    Malnutrition is often underdiagnosed in hospitalised children, although it is associated with postoperative complications, longer hospital lengths of stay and increased healthcare-related costs. We aimed to estimate the frequency of, and identify factors associated with, malnutrition in children undergoing anaesthesia. Cross-sectional observational study. Paediatric anaesthesia department at the University Children's Hospital, Bordeaux, France. A total of 985 patients aged less than 18 years. Anthropometric measurements, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification score and the Pediatric Nutritional Risk Score (PNRS) recorded at the pre-anaesthesia evaluation. When assessed as a Waterlow index less than 80%, malnutrition was present in 7.6% children. This increased to 8.1% of children assessed by clinical signs and to 11% of children when defined by a BMI less than the third percentile. In a univariate analysis, children with a BMI less than the third percentile were more often born prematurely (22.4 vs 10.4%; P = 0.0008), were small for gestational age at birth (18.4 vs 4.5%; P malnutrition. In the multivariate analysis, a premature birth, a lower birth weight and a higher Pediatric Nutritional Risk Score were significantly associated with a higher odds of malnutrition when defined by BMI. All children should be screened routinely for malnutrition or the risk of malnutrition at the pre-anaesthesia visit, allowing a programme of preoperative and/or postoperative nutritional support to be initiated. We suggest that as well as weight and height, BMI and a pediatric nutritional risk score such as PNRS should be recorded routinely at the pre-anaesthesia visit.

  12. Anaesthesia and subglottic airway obstruction | Bulbulia | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stridor was the presenting feature. A good history and careful assessment will reduce the likelihood of erroneous or delayed diagnosis and will improve patient outcome.This case report highlights the use of target-controlled infusions and jet ventilation (high-pressure source ventilation) in the surgical excision of a subglottic ...

  13. Comparison of azaperone-detomidine-butorphanol-ketamine and azaperone-tiletamine-zolazepam for anaesthesia in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Mari L; Raekallio, Marja R; Oliviero, Claudio; Ahokas, Sanna; Peltoniemi, Olli A T

    2009-03-01

    To investigate a combination of azaperone, detomidine, butorphanol and ketamine (DBK) in pigs and to compare it with the combination of azaperone, tiletamine and zolazepam (TZ). Prospective, randomized, blinded, cross-over study. Twelve clinically healthy crossbred pigs aged about 2 months and weighing 16-25 kg. Pigs were pre-medicated with azaperone (4 mg kg(-1)). Ten minutes later anaesthesia was induced with intramuscular DBK (detomidine 0.08 mg kg(-1), butorphanol 0.2 mg kg(-1), ketamine 10 mg kg(-1)) or TZ (tiletamine and zolazepam 5 mg kg(-1)). The pigs were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Heart and respiratory rates, posture, anaesthesia score, PaO(2), PaCO(2), pH and bicarbonate concentration were measured. t-test was used to compare the areas under time-anaesthesia index curve (AUC(anindex)) between treatments. Data concerning heart and respiratory rates, PaO(2), PaCO(2) and anaesthesia score were analysed with anova for repeated measurements. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for the data concerning the duration of sedation and anaesthesia. The sedation, analgesia and anaesthesia lasted longer after DBK than TZ. The AUC(anscore) were 863 +/- 423 and 452 +/- 274 for DBK and TZ, respectively (p = 0.002). The duration of surgical anaesthesia lasted a median of 35 minutes (0-105 minutes) after DBK and a median of 15 minutes (0-35 minutes) after TZ (p = 0.05). Four pigs after DBK and six after TZ did not achieve the plane of surgical anaesthesia. The heart rate was lower after DBK than after TZ. Both treatments had similar effects on the other parameters measured. At the doses used DBK was more effective than TZ for anaesthesia in pigs under field conditions. The combinations can be used for sedation and minor field surgery in pigs. The doses and drugs chosen were insufficient to produce a reliable surgical plane of anaesthesia in these young pigs.

  14. Effect of Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Depth of Anaesthesia during and after Isoflurane Anaesthesia in Sulphur-Crested Cockatoos (Cacatua galerita galerita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Chemonges

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the effect of intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV on the depth of inhalation anaesthesia in parrots. Anaesthesia was induced with 3.0% isoflurane in six Sulphur-crested Cockatoos (Cacatua galerita galerita and maintained using either 1.5% or 3.0% during spontaneous ventilation (SV or IPPV at 6 (IPPV-6 or 12 (IPPV-12 breaths per minute. The time taken for the appearance of somatic reflexes and the return of SV after IPPV was recorded. During recovery, the body jerk, beak, eye, and shivering reflexes appeared after 126 ± 27 s, 133 ± 26 s, 165 ± 34 s, and 165 ± 44 s, respectively. All cockatoos developed apnoea after IPPV-12 and only some did after IPPV-6. Return of SV after IPPV-12 was delayed compared to IPPV-6. Recovery times after the SV runs were significantly different between 1.5% and 3.0% isoflurane anaesthesia. Similarly, after IPPV, the recovery times were significantly different between 1.5% and 3.0% isoflurane anaesthesia. Recovery times after 3.0% inhaled isoflurane were longer than those of 1.5% inhaled isoflurane. In conclusion, cockatoos recovering from isoflurane anaesthesia are likely to exhibit body jerk, beak, eye, and shivering reflexes in that order. IPPV increases the depth of anaesthesia in a rate and dose-related manner and prolongs recovery.

  15. Metallic stent implantation in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuming; Jin Yong; Xie Hong; Cheng Long; Gu Xingshi; Chang Liuhui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the tracheal stent implantation for treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia. Methods: Eighteen patients with malignant tracheal stenosis underwent preoperative 64-slice spiral CT scan and airway reconstruction. The stenotic sites were located in main tracheal trunk (5 patients), in right main bronchus (1 patient), in trachea and left main bronchus (4 patients), in trachea and right main bronchus (3 patients), in main tracheal trunk and bilateral main bronchus (5 patients). The degree of stenosis was rated 51% to 70% in 7 cases, 71% to 90% in 11 cases. All patients, 17 patients of ASA grade Ⅳ and 1 patient of grade Ⅲ, presented with severe dyspnea. Under general anaesthesia, implantation of metallic stent was performed through the sputum aspiration hole of the connecting tubing with DSA guidance. The NBP, ECG, RR, SaO 2 of the patients were recorded and compared with t test during the entire procedure. At the end of the procedure, relief of dyspnea, complications related to anesthesia and operation were recorded. Results: The success rate of stent placement was 18/18, and dyspnea was significantly relived in all patients. Slightly bloody sputum occurred in 7 cases. The stent was obstructed by sputum in 1 case,and the patient was treated with medication. There were no severe complications. The operative course were rated 11 to 9 in 17 cases, and 6 to 8 in 1 case. All 18 patients were cooperative during the procedure. Sixteen patients rated the procedure as very comfortable and 2 rated the procedure as comfortable. Respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) decreased in all patients after the operation [(37.1 ± 2.8)/min and (106.5 ± 14.2) bpm before the operation respectively, (18.6 ± 1.4)/min and (73.2 ± 7.6) bpm after the operation respectively], t=17.81 and 3.80, P<0.01. Pulse oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) during the operation [(91.2 ± 1.8)%]increased [(76.3 ± 8.6 )% before the

  16. Effect of anaesthesia with clove oil in fish (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javahery, Susan; Nekoubin, Hamed; Moradlu, Abdolmajid Haji

    2012-12-01

    Clove oil is an effective, local and natural anaesthetic. Many hatcheries and research studies use clove oil to immobilize fish for handling, sorting, tagging, artificial reproduction procedures and surgery and to suppress sensory systems during invasive procedures. Clove oil may be more appropriate for use in commercial aquaculture situations. Improper clove oil use can decrease fish viability, distort physiological data or result in mortalities. Because animals may be anaesthetized by unskilled labourers and released in natural water bodies, training in the proper use of clove oil may decrease variability in recovery and experimental results and increase fish survival. Here, we briefly describe many aspects of clove oil, including the legal uses of it, anaesthesia mechanism and what is currently known about the preparation and behavioural and pathologic effects of the anaesthetic. We outline methods and precautions for administration and changes in fish behaviour during progressively deeper anaesthesia and discuss the physiological effects of clove oil, its potential for compromising fish health and effectiveness of water quality parameters.

  17. Induction position for spinal anaesthesia: Sitting versus lateral position

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzad, K.; Afshan, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of induction position on block characteristics (sensory and motor nerves) and haemodynamic stability in elderly patients with isobaric bupivacaine. Patient comfort was also looked at. Methods: The randomized single blinded study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from September 2007 to August 2008. A total of 70 patients aged >60 years of both genders were included. Spinal anaesthesia was performed either in sitting or lateral position according to random allocation. Assessments of sensory, motor block and heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded for 20 minutes. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: There was no significant difference for haemodynamic variables heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure. The onset of anaesthesia was faster in the sitting group (4.5 minutes vs 5.4 minutes). The motor block characteristics were similar in both the groups. The majority of patients who reported 'very comfortable' for induction position belonged to the lateral group. Conclusion: Both sitting and lateral positions have similar effects on sensory and motor blockade and haemodynamic stability. However, patients generally found lateral position very comfortable. (author)

  18. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy is safe and well-tolerated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Jakob Hessel; Olsen, Karsten Skovgaard

    2010-10-01

    Awake craniotomy for tumour resection has been performed at Glostrup Hospital since 2004. We describe and discuss the various anaesthetic approaches for such surgery and retrospectively analyse the 44 planned awake craniotomies performed at Glostrup Hospital. The surgery falls into four phases: craniotomy, mapping, tumour resection and closing. Three methods are being used: monitored anaesthetic care, asleep-awake-asleep and asleep-awake (AA). Anaesthesia is induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. A laryngeal mask (LM) is used as an airway during the craniotomy phase. In the AA method, patients are mapped and the tumour is resected while the patient is awake. A total of 41 of 44 planned AA craniotomies were performed. Three had to be converted into general anaesthesia (GA) due to tight brain, leaking LM and tumour haemorrhage, respectively. The following complications were observed: bradycardia 10%, leaking LM 5%, nausea 10%, vomiting 5%, focal seizures 28%, generalized seizures 10%, hypoxia 2%, hypotension 5% and hypertension 2%. Our results comply well with the international literature in terms of complications related to haemodynamics, respiration, seizures, vomiting and nausea and in terms of patient satisfaction. Awake craniotomy is a well-tolerated procedure with potential benefits. More prospective randomized studies are required.

  19. The Feasibility of Percutaneous Renal Cryoablation Under Local Anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerviler, Eric de; Margerie-Mellon, Constance de; Coffin, Alexandre; Legrand, Guillaume; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Ploussard, Guillaume; Meria, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cryoablation of renal tumours without sedation.Materials and methodsWe prospectively evaluated 149 computed tomography-guided renal cryoablation procedures that were performed at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The patients received only 1 g of IV paracetamol prior to the procedure; intraprocedural, local anaesthesia was administered. We recorded the date and duration of the procedure, size and location of the tumour, number of cryoneedles used, need for dissection with saline or carbon dioxide and intraprocedural degree of pain, which was scored using an established visual analogue pain score (VAS) (0–10). Multivariate analysis was used to identify the associations between the recorded parameters and VAS.ResultsAn interventional radiologist and a technician could perform all procedures without the help of anaesthesiologists and with adequate analgesia. The pain level ranged from 0 to 8 (mean, 2.0). It did not correlate with the tumour size or with the number of cryoneedles. It was significantly greater when the ice ball involved renal cavities (p = .0033) and when carbon dioxide was used for dissection (p < .0001). Conversely, the team experience was positively correlated with lower pain levels (p = .0381).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that the cryoablation of renal tumours is feasible by interventional radiologists alone using a combination of IV paracetamol and local anaesthesia

  20. The Feasibility of Percutaneous Renal Cryoablation Under Local Anaesthesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerviler, Eric de, E-mail: eric.de-kerviler@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Radiologie, INSERM UMR-S1165, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Margerie-Mellon, Constance de, E-mail: constancedemm@gmail.com; Coffin, Alexandre, E-mail: alex-surikat@yahoo.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Radiologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Legrand, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.legrand@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service d’Urologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Resche-Rigon, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.resche-rigon@univ-paris-diderot.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service de Biostatistique et d’Information Médicale (SBIM), Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); Ploussard, Guillaume, E-mail: guillaume.ploussard@sls.aphp.fr; Meria, Paul, E-mail: paul.meria@sls.aphp.fr [Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Service d’Urologie, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance Publique, Hôpitaux de Paris (France); and others

    2015-06-15

    ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cryoablation of renal tumours without sedation.Materials and methodsWe prospectively evaluated 149 computed tomography-guided renal cryoablation procedures that were performed at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The patients received only 1 g of IV paracetamol prior to the procedure; intraprocedural, local anaesthesia was administered. We recorded the date and duration of the procedure, size and location of the tumour, number of cryoneedles used, need for dissection with saline or carbon dioxide and intraprocedural degree of pain, which was scored using an established visual analogue pain score (VAS) (0–10). Multivariate analysis was used to identify the associations between the recorded parameters and VAS.ResultsAn interventional radiologist and a technician could perform all procedures without the help of anaesthesiologists and with adequate analgesia. The pain level ranged from 0 to 8 (mean, 2.0). It did not correlate with the tumour size or with the number of cryoneedles. It was significantly greater when the ice ball involved renal cavities (p = .0033) and when carbon dioxide was used for dissection (p < .0001). Conversely, the team experience was positively correlated with lower pain levels (p = .0381).ConclusionThis study demonstrates that the cryoablation of renal tumours is feasible by interventional radiologists alone using a combination of IV paracetamol and local anaesthesia.

  1. Mock MRI: reducing the need for anaesthesia in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, Amanda J. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Occupational Therapy, Queensland (Australia); Greer, Mary-Louise C.; Gray, Simon E. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Queensland (Australia); Ware, Robert S. [School of Public Health, University of Queensland, Queensland (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    With a longer waiting list for paediatric MRI performed under general anaesthesia (GA) and considering safety concerns, the Royal Children's Hospital Brisbane established a mock MRI service. The aim of this service is to reduce the requirement for MRI under GA. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the percentage of children ages 3 years to 14 years in the study period that required general anaesthesia would be less with mock MRI when compared to standard practise. A retrospective audit of clinical data was conducted to examine the impact of mock MRI on the GA rate for clinical MRI. Results indicated the addition of a mock MRI reduced the need for GA most significantly for children ages 3 to 8 years. In this age group, the rate of GA was 16.8% lower than that of the non-mock MRI group (P = <0.05). Mock MRI reduces the need for GA in children with the greatest effect evident in children aged between 3 and 8 years. (orig.)

  2. Anaesthesia in aspirin-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiker, V; Basgül, E

    2003-01-01

    The triad of bronchial asthma, nasal polyposis, and intolerance to aspirin and aspirin-like chemicals are designated aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) or Samter's syndrome. The exact mechanism of the disease is unknown but it is thought to be a disorder of arachidonic acid metabolism. These patients are frequently referred to allergy clinics for preoperative evaluation for possible anesthetic agent sensitivity, requiring anesthesia for nasal polypectomy or several other reasons. Anesthetists must be aware of their pulmonary dysfunction, because the anesthetic management of asthma requires a specific approach. Marked cross-sensitivity with NSAIDs, which may also precipitate severe bronchospasm and adverse reactions, is the main problem faced by anesthetists in postoperative pain management. This article discusses the relationship between AIA and anesthesia. We also present our experience with 47 patients diagnosed with AIA between 1991 and 2003 in the department of chest diseases and adult allergy unit who underwent surgery requiring general anesthesia. In conclusion, preoperative evaluation of these patients and collaboration between the allergists and anesthesiologists is essential to prevent preoperative, perioperative and postoperative complications.

  3. A rare presentation of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta and congenital laryngomalacia for herniotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshith Chandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sometimes anaesthesiologists come across rare congenital anomalies in their practice. The inherent complications associated with the disorder necessitate tailor-made approaches for providing anaesthesia to even seemingly simple surgical interventions. Here, we share our experience of anaesthesia management of an infant with congenital laryngomalacia and recently diagnosed osteogenesis imperfecta type 1 who had presented to us with an acute abdomen for a semi-emergency herniotomy.

  4. Non-pharmacological interventions for assisting the induction of anaesthesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyande, Anne; Cyna, Allan M; Yip, Peggy; Chooi, Cheryl; Middleton, Philippa

    2015-07-14

    Induction of general anaesthesia can be distressing for children. Non-pharmacological methods for reducing anxiety and improving co-operation may avoid the adverse effects of preoperative sedation. To assess the effects of non-pharmacological interventions in assisting induction of anaesthesia in children by reducing their anxiety, distress or increasing their co-operation. In this updated review we searched CENTRAL (the Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12) and searched the following databases from inception to 15 January 2013: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We reran the search in August 2014. We will deal with the single study found to be of interest when we next update the review. We included randomized controlled trials of a non-pharmacological intervention implemented on the day of surgery or anaesthesia. At least two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias in trials. We included 28 trials (2681 children) investigating 17 interventions of interest; all trials were conducted in high-income countries. Overall we judged the trials to be at high risk of bias. Except for parental acupuncture (graded low), all other GRADE assessments of the primary outcomes of comparisons were very low, indicating a high degree of uncertainty about the overall findings. Parental presence: In five trials (557 children), parental presence at induction of anaesthesia did not reduce child anxiety compared with not having a parent present (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.14 to 0.20). In a further three trials (267 children) where we were unable to pool results, we found no clear differences in child anxiety, whether a parent was present or not. In a single trial, child anxiety showed no significant difference whether one or two parents were present, although parental anxiety was significantly reduced when both parents were present at the induction. Parental presence was significantly less effective than

  5. Effect of changes in PCO2 and body positions on intraocular pressure during general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidberg, A; Kessing, S V; Fernandes, A

    1981-08-01

    Elevated arterial carbon dioxide tension, induced by the administration of CO2 via the respiratory air or by hypoventilation, entailed a gradual increase in the IOP in patients without eye diseases under general anaesthesia. A sudden cessation of CO2 administration or hyperventilation caused such a rapid, simultaneous fall in IOP to values below the initial level that the pressure variations must be of vascular nature, presumably related to changes in choroidal blood volume. The above-mentioned procedures always cause a change in the central venous pressure (CVP) simultaneously with the IOP changes. Alterations of the CVP induced by hydrostatic factors in postural changes, placing the head 15 degrees above or below the horizontal level while keeping the PaCO2 constant, caused IOP changes of the same configuration and magnitude as described above. It is concluded, therefore, that presumably the CO2-conditioned IOP changes are due predominantly to changes in central venous pressure, being one link in a CO2-conditioned action upon the general circulation, entailing passive secondary changes in the choroidal venous blood volume and thereby an influence upon the IOP. On the basis of the present results it appears rational to recommend hyperventilation to keep the PaCO2 between 25 and 30 mm and a 15 degree anti-Trendelenburg position in operations on the eye under general anaesthesia, since both procedures afford a low central venous pressure and consequently a low pressure in the posterior segment of the eye, with its attendant advantages as regards vitreous complications and the insertion of intraocular lenses. Owing to the risk of an unacceptable fall in BP in the combined procedure, a frequent checking of the BP is needed.

  6. For beginners in anaesthesia, self-training with an audiovisual checklist improves safety during anaesthesia induction: A prospective, randomised, controlled two-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Stefanie; Reich, Christian; Krause, Dorothea; Ruhnke, Bjarne; Daubmann, Anne; Weimann, Jörg; Zöllner, Christian; Kubitz, Jens

    2018-01-31

    Beginners in residency programmes in anaesthesia are challenged because working environment is complex, and they cannot rely on experience to meet challenges. During this early stage, residents need rules and structures to guide their actions and ensure patient safety. We investigated whether self-training with an electronic audiovisual checklist app on a mobile phone would produce a long-term improvement in the safety-relevant actions during induction of general anaesthesia. During the first month of their anaesthesia residency, we randomised 26 residents to the intervention and control groups. The study was performed between August 2013 and December 2014 in two university hospitals in Germany. In addition to normal training, the residents of the intervention group trained themselves on well tolerated induction using the electronic checklist for at least 60 consecutive general anaesthesia inductions. After an initial learning phase, all residents were observed during one induction of general anaesthesia. The primary outcome was the number of safety items completed during this anaesthesia induction. Secondary outcomes were similar observations 4 and 8 weeks later. Immediately, and 4 weeks after the first learning phase, residents in the intervention group completed a significantly greater number of safety checks than residents in the control group 2.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4 to 5.1, P = 0.021, Cohen's d = 0.47] and 3.7 (95% CI 1.3 to 6.1, P = 0.003, Cohen's d = 0.61), respectively. The difference between the groups had disappeared by 8 weeks: mean difference in the number of safety checks at 8 weeks was 0.4, 95% CI -2.0 to 2.8, P = 0.736, Cohen's d = 0.07). The use of an audiovisual self-training checklists improves safety-relevant behaviour in the early stages of a residency training programme in anaesthesia.

  7. Peri-anal surgery under saddle block anaesthesia comparing three different doses of hyperbaric 0.75% bupivacaine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, L.; Alam, W.; Abbas, M.A.; Ali, U.

    2017-01-01

    To compare three doses of hyperbaric 0.75% bupivacaine and measuring time for home readiness after day care perianal surgery under saddle block anaesthesia. Study Design: Non randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: The study was conducted at the department of Anaesthesia, CMH Rawalpindi from Jun 2014 to Apr 2015. Material and Methods: In this study 90 patients who presented for perianal day care surgery, were divided in three equal groups. Group A received 7.5 mg, group B 6.0 mg and group C 4.5 mg of hyperbaric 0.75% bupivacaine. Intrathecal injection was given in L4-5 space by 25 G spinal needle in sitting position. Lithotomy position was made after five minutes. After surgery patients were monitored in recovery room. After fulfilling ambulatory and discharge criteria patients were allowed to go home with attendants. Time of intrathecal injection, assessment of above criteria and time of discharge were noted and analyzed. Results: Male patients were 85.6% and females were 14.4%. Mean time of surgery was 48 +- 10.59 min. Mean time of discharge in minutes for group A was 235.86 +- 49.38, for group B 217.7 +- 42.49 and for group C 205.76 +- 32. Time of discharge was significantly different between group A and group C (p=0.02). While it was not significantly different between group A and group B (p=0.29) and between group B and group C (p=0.819). Conclusion: Lower dose of hyperbaric bupivacaine can reduce the time for home readiness compared to higher dose. Time of discharge is mainly dependent on time to micturate after saddle block anaesthesia. (author)

  8. Post-traumatic stress disorder in parturients delivering by caesarean section and the implication of anaesthesia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, U; Meyer, M; Loures, V; Iselin-Chaves, I; Epiney, M; Kern, C; Haller, G

    2017-06-02

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in 1-7% of women following childbirth. While having a caesarean section (C-section) is known to be a significant risk factor for postpartum PTSD, it is currently unknown whether coexisting anaesthesia-related factors are also associated to the disorder. The aim of this study was to assess anaesthesia-linked factors in the development of acute postpartum PTSD. We performed a prospective cohort study on women having a C-section in a tertiary hospital in Switzerland. Patients were followed up six weeks postpartum. Patient and procedure characteristics, past morbidity or traumatic events, psychosocial status and stressful perinatal events were measured. Outcome was divided into two categories: full PTSD disease and PTSD profile. This was based on the number of DSM-IV criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th edition (DSM-IV) present. The PTSD Checklist Scale and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale were used for measurement. Of the 280 patients included, 217 (77.5%) answered the questionnaires and 175 (62.5%) answered to an additional phone interview. Twenty (9.2%) had a PTSD profile and six (2.7%) a PTSD. When a full predictive model of risk factors for PTSD profile was built using logistic regression, maternal prepartum and intrapartum complications, anaesthetic complications and dissociative experiences during C-section were found to be the significant predictors for PTSD profile. This is the first study to show in parturients having a C-section that an anaesthesia complication is an independent risk factor for postpartum PTSD and PTSD profile development, in addition to known perinatal and maternal risk factors.

  9. Clinical perspectives of intravenous ketamine anaesthesia in peafowl (Pavo cristatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, M; Shakoor, A; Muhammad, G; Sarwar, M N; Chaudhry, N I

    1996-01-01

    A total of 29 peafowl (Pavo cristatus), rectified surgically for infraorbital abscesses (n = 22), lacerated wounds (n = 4), and fractures of tibia (n = 2) and radius (n = 1), were anaesthetized by the intravenous administration of ketamine hydrochloride (Inj. Calypsol, Gedeon Richter, Hungary) in a dose of 15 20 mg/kg body weight. Divided doses (10 mg + 5 mg + 5 mg) were used with an interval of 1-2 min. No premedication was undertaken in any of the birds. Anaesthesia lasted for about 15 min and the birds gained their feet completely after 30 min to 3 hours. The respiration rate was markedly depressed (8-10/min) and the respiratory pattern was deep abdominal. Only a slight increase was observed in the heart rate. Analgesia was incomplete and muscle relaxation was not satisfactory. Mild salivation was also noticed in some of the birds (n = 3). Recovery, although not smooth, was uneventful.

  10. Radiological appearance of air introduced during equine regional limb anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirberger, R.M.; Gottschalk, R.D.; Guthrie, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve horses were injected intra-articularly into the metacarpophalangeal joint and extra-articularly in the region of the lateral palmar digital nerve with 1 ml air and local anaesthetic to simulate gas accidentally introduced during regional anaesthesia. Half the horses underwent limited exercise after which all horses were radiographed at 15 and 45 min and then every 24 h until all evidence of gas had disappeared. Intra-articular gas appeared as gas capped radiolucencies (GCR) in the proximal aspect of the joint. Extra-articular gas appeared as linear radiolucencies (LR) which initially tended to migrate proximally. There was no significant difference in gas resorption in exercised and nonexercised horses. All gas was resorbed within 96 h with most of the gas already gone at 48 h

  11. Publication rate of studies presented at veterinary anaesthesia specialty meetings during the years 2003-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Marilies; Braun, Christina; Moens, Yves

    2016-03-01

    To assess publication rates, factors predicting publication, and discrepancies between conference abstracts and subsequent full-text publications of abstracts from the veterinary meetings of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists and the Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists from 2003 to 2008. Retrospective cohort study. A total of 607 abstracts were identified and a database search (Scopus, PubMed, CAB) was conducted to identify matching publications. Authors of nonmatching abstracts were contacted to participate in a confidential online survey. Risk ratios were used to assess factors predicting publication and these were tested for significance (p publication rate was 63.3% and the mean (± SD) time to publication was 25 ± 19 months. Factors significantly associated with subsequent full publication (i.e. publication of a full manuscript in a peer-reviewed journal) were continent of origin (North America), study design (experimental studies), specialty (analgesia) and the presence of a source of funding. The principal reasons why studies remained unpublished were lack of time and responsibility lying with co-authors. Minor changes compared with the original abstract were found in 71.6% of all publications. Major changes were noted in 34.6% and the outcome of the study changed in 7.6%. These data suggest that some of the abstracts reported preliminary findings. Therefore, caution is warranted when quoting abstracts as references in scientific publications. To date, major veterinary journals have not issued recommendations in their author guidelines addressing the use of abstracts as a reference. The authors propose the inclusion of such a statement in author guidelines. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. [Interest of ultrasonographic guidance in paediatric regional anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadure, C; Raux, O; Rochette, A; Capdevila, X

    2009-10-01

    The use of ultrasonographic guidance for regional anaesthesia has known recently a big interest in children in recent years. The linear ultrasound probes with a 25 mm active surface area (or probes with 38 mm active surface area in older children), with high sound frequencies in the range 8-14 MHz, allow a good compromise between excellent resolution for superficial structure and good penetration depths. In children, the easiest ultrasound guided blocks are axillar blocks, femoral blocks, fascia iliaca compartment blocks, ilio-inguinal blocks and para-umbilical blocks, caudal blocks. They permit a safe and easy learning curve of these techniques. The main advantage of ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is the visualization of different anatomical structures and the approximate localization of the tip of needle. The other advantages for ultrasound guided peripheral nerve blocks in children are: faster onset time of sensory and motor block, longer duration of sensory blockade, increase of blockade quality and reduction of local anesthetic injection. The use of ultrasonographic guidance for central block allows to visualize different structures as well as spine and his content. Spinous process, ligament flavum, dura mater, conus medullaris and cerebrospinal fluid are identifiable, and give some information on spine, epidural space and the depth between epidural space and skin. At last, in caudal block, ultrasounds permit to evaluate the anatomy of caudal epidural space, especially the relation of the sacral hiatus to the dural sac and the search of occult spinal dysraphism. Benefit of this technique is the visualization of targeted nerves or spaces and the spread of injected local anaesthetic.

  13. Visual metaphors on anaesthesia monitors do not improve anaesthetists' performance in the operating theatre

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, K.; Cnossen, F.; Ballast, A.; Struys, M. M. R. F.

    Background. Previous research using a metaphorical anaesthesia monitor, where dimensions of rectangles proportionally represent 30 patient variable values, showed improved performance in diagnosing adverse events compared with the standard monitor. Steady-state values were represented by a frame

  14. General anaesthesia with multimodal principles versus intrathecal analgesia with conventional principles in total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harsten, Andreas; Hjartarson, Hjortur; Werner, Mads Utke

    2013-01-01

    Postoperative outcomes following major surgery are influenced by surgical and anaesthesiological factors. While techniques of minimal invasive surgery have been associated with improved outcome, the techniques of minimal invasive, multimodal anaesthesia have not been adequately investigated. The ...

  15. African Journal of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care - Vol 15, No 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparing the Ease of Inducing Spinal Anaesthesia in the Sitting Position in Trauma Patients with the Hip Flexed Versus Non Flexed (Hamstring Position) ... Society for the Study of Pain, Nigeria (SSPN) 18th Annual Scientific Conference ...

  16. Non-technical skills of anaesthesia providers in Rwanda: an ethnography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Patricia; Zolpys, Lauren; Mukwesi, Christian; Twagirumugabe, Theogene; Whynot, Sara; MacLeod, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety depends on excellent practice of anaesthetists' non-technical skills (ANTS). The ANTS framework has been validated in developed countries but there is no literature on the practice of ANTS in low-income countries. This study examines ANTS in this unexplored context. This qualitative ethnographic study used observations of Rwandan anaesthesia providers and in-depth interviews with both North American and Rwandan anaesthesia providers to understand practice of ANTS in Rwanda. Communication is central to the practice of ANTS. Cultural factors in Rwanda, such as lack of assertiveness and discomfort taking leadership, and the strains of working in a resource-limited environment hinder the unfettered and focused communication needed for excellent anaesthesia practice. Despite the challenges, anaesthesia providers are able to coordinate activities when good communication is actively encouraged. Future teaching interventions should address leadership and communication skills through encouraging both role definition and speaking up for patient safety.

  17. appraisal of the efficacy of tactile subjective test for anaesthesia of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    efficacy. In conducting subjective test after inferior dental and lingual nerves block anaesthesia, the patient was often asked .... procedures. It should ... computerised injection system for local pain control. ... antecedents of dental anxiety. JADA ...

  18. Spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section: How can we make it safer?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    2004-05-03

    May 3, 2004 ... where predominantly general anaesthesia for caesarean section is still performed, and ... data is being collected, so that information will be available on ... deaths during obstetric delivery in the United States, 1979-1990.

  19. Anaesthesia Management of Caesarean Section in Two Patients with Eisenmenger's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Fang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently two parturients with Eisenmenger's syndrome underwent caesarean section at our hospital. They were managed by a multidisciplinary team during their perioperative period. The caesarean sections were uneventfully performed, one under general anaesthesia and one with epidural anaesthesia, with delivery of two newborns with satisfactory Apgar scores. One patient died in the post-partum period, and the other did well. We discuss the anaesthetic considerations in managing these high-risk patients.

  20. Identifying research priorities in anaesthesia and perioperative care: final report of the joint National Institute of Academic Anaesthesia/James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, Oliver; Bell, Madeline; Bell, Natalie; Conquest, Ann; Cumbers, Marion; Drake, Sharon; Galsworthy, Mike; Gath, Jacqui; Grocott, Michael P W; Harris, Emma; Howell, Simon; Ingold, Anthony; Nathanson, Michael H; Pinkney, Thomas; Metcalf, Leanne

    2015-12-16

    To identify research priorities for Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine. Prospective surveys and consensus meetings guided by an independent adviser. UK. 45 stakeholder organisations (25 professional, 20 patient/carer) affiliated as James Lind Alliance partners. First 'ideas-gathering' survey: Free text research ideas and suggestions. Second 'prioritisation' survey: Shortlist of 'summary' research questions (derived from the first survey) ranked by respondents in order of priority. Final 'top ten': Agreed by consensus at a final prioritisation workshop. First survey: 1420 suggestions received from 623 respondents (49% patients/public) were refined into a shortlist of 92 'summary' questions. Second survey: 1718 respondents each nominated up to 10 questions as research priorities. Top ten: The 25 highest-ranked questions advanced to the final workshop, where 23 stakeholders (13 professional, 10 patient/carer) agreed the 10 most important questions: ▸ What can we do to stop patients developing chronic pain after surgery? ▸ How can patient care around the time of emergency surgery be improved? ▸ What long-term harm may result from anaesthesia, particularly following repeated anaesthetics?▸ What outcomes should we use to measure the 'success' of anaesthesia and perioperative care? ▸ How can we improve recovery from surgery for elderly patients? ▸ For which patients does regional anaesthesia give better outcomes than general anaesthesia? ▸ What are the effects of anaesthesia on the developing brain? ▸ Do enhanced recovery programmes improve short and long-term outcomes? ▸ How can preoperative exercise or fitness training, including physiotherapy, improve outcomes after surgery? ▸ How can we improve communication between the teams looking after patients throughout their surgical journey? Almost 2000 stakeholders contributed their views regarding anaesthetic and perioperative research priorities. This is the largest example of patient and public

  1. Changes in heart rate variability during anaesthesia induction using sevoflurane or isoflurane with nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic balance using heart rate variability (HRV) during induction of anaesthesia between sevoflurane and isoflurane in combination with nitrous oxide. 40 individuals aged from 30 to 60 years, scheduled for general anaesthesia were equally divided into sevoflurane or isoflurane groups. After 100% oxygen inhalation for a few minutes, anaesthesia was induced with nitrous oxide 3 L min-1, oxygen 3 L min-1 and sevoflurane or isoflurane. Sevoflurane or isoflurane concentration was increased by 0.5% every 2 to 3 breaths until 5% was attained for sevoflurane, or 3% for isoflurane. Vecuronium was administered to facilitate tracheal intubation. After intubation, sevoflurane was set to 2% while isoflurane was set to 1% with nitrous oxide with oxygen (1:1) for 5 min. Both sevoflurane and isoflurane provoked a decrease in blood pressure, total power, the low frequency component (LF), and high frequency component (HF) of HRV. Although the heart rate increased during isoflurane anaesthesia, it decreased under sevoflurane. The power of LF and HF also decreased in both groups. LF was higher in the isoflurane group while HF was higher in the sevoflurane group. The LF/HF ratio increased transiently in the isoflurane group, but decreased in the sevoflurane group. Anaesthesia induction with isoflurane-nitrous oxide transiently increased cardiac sympathetic activity, while sevoflurane-nitrous oxide decreased both cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities. The balance of cardiac parasympathetic/sympathetic activity was higher in sevoflurane anaesthesia.

  2. Intra-arterial papaverine and leg vascular resistance during in situ bypass surgery with high or low epidural anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rørdam, Peter; Jensen, Leif Panduro; Schroeder, T V

    1993-01-01

    In situ saphenous vein arterial bypass flow was studied in 16 patients with respect to level of epidural anaesthesia. Arterial pressure and electromagnetic flow were used to evaluate arterial tone by intra-arterial (i.a.) papaverine. Eight patients had a low epidural block (... patients were operated during high epidural anaesthesia (> Th. 10). Flow increased and arterial pressure decreased after i.a. papaverine in all patients. When compared with patients operated during high epidural anaesthesia, flow increase and decrease in vascular resistance took place in patients operated...... during low epidural anaesthesia (P i.a. papaverine was not significantly different in patients operated in low epidural and general anaesthesia (n = 8). In eight patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus who had low epidural anaesthesia, the increase...

  3. Effect of sleep deprivation after a night shift duty on simulated crisis management by residents in anaesthesia. A randomised crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzalier-Daret, Ségolène; Buléon, Clément; Bocca, Marie-Laure; Denise, Pierre; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2018-04-01

    Sleep deprivation has been associated with an increased incidence of medical errors and can jeopardise patients' safety during medical crisis management. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of sleep deprivation on the management of simulated anaesthesia crisis by residents in anaesthesiology. A randomised, comparative, monocentric crossover study involving 48 residents in anaesthesia was performed on a high fidelity patient simulator. Each resident was evaluated in a sleep-deprived state (deprived group, after a night shift duty) and control state (control group, after a night of sleep). Performance was assessed through points obtained during crisis scenario 1 (oesophageal intubation followed by anaphylactic shock) and scenario 2 (anaesthesia-related bronchospasm followed by ventricular tachycardia). Sleep periods were recorded by actigraphy. Two independent observers assessed the performances. The primary endpoint of the study was the score obtained for each scenario. Resident's crisis management performance is associated with sleep deprivation (scenario 1: control=39 [33-42] points vs. deprived=26 [19-40] points, P=0.02; scenario 2: control=21 [17-24] vs. deprived=14 [12-19], P=0.01). The main errors observed were: error in drug administration and dose, delay in identification of hypotension, and missing communication with the surgical team about situation. The present study showed that sleep deprivation is associated with impairment of performance to manage crisis situations by residents in anaesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Alfaxalone anaesthesia in the green iguana (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, Mads F; Sauer, Cathrine D

    2011-09-01

    To characterise the anaesthetic effects of alfaxalone administered intramuscularly (IM) at 10, 20, and 30 mg kg(-1) . Prospective, randomized cross-over study. Ten juvenile green iguanas (Iguana iguana) of mean body weight (±SD) 480 ± 134 g. Alfaxalone was administered IM in the triceps of both thoracic limbs. Times for anaesthetic induction, plateau and recovery periods were recorded. Skeletal muscle tone of the jaw, neck, thoracic limbs, pelvic limbs, and tail was scored. The palpebral, corneal and righting reflexes, and the response to painful stimuli were also assessed. Pulse rate and respiratory rate were recorded. Comparisons between different dosages and over time were made using anova. Times are given for 10, 20 and 30 mg kg(-1) dosages respectively: mean time to maximal effect was 7.7 ± 2.2, 5.4 ± 1.7 and 3.9 ± 1.2 minutes; duration of the plateau phase was 11.3 ± 3.8, 22.1 ± 6.5 and 39.1 ± 11.5 minutes; recovery time was 10 ± 2.4, 17.5 ± 8.6 and 25 ± 7.1 minutes; and total anaesthetic duration was 29 ± 35.7, 45 ± 8.2 and 68 ± 9.8 inutes. Endotracheal intubation was possible in 40% of the subjects given 10 mg kg(-1) and in 100% subjects given both 20 and 30 mg kg(-1) . Loss of response to a painful stimulus was seen in 0/10, 8/10 and 9/10 animals at 10, 20, and 30 mg kg(-1) respectively. There was an initial dose-dependent depression of respiration followed by a significant increase in frequency over time. In contrast, pulse rates decreased by 20% over the duration of the anaesthetic events. Intramuscular administration of alfaxalone is a simple, rapid and reliable means of achieving relatively brief sedation or anaesthesia in healthy green iguanas. A dosage of 10 mg kg(-1) provides light sedation, appropriate for examination and venipuncture; 20 mg kg(-1) provides a level suitable for minor procedures or for endotracheal intubation and supplementation with

  5. Metabolism before, during and after anaesthesia in colic and healthy horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essén-Gustavsson Birgitta

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many colic horses are compromised due to the disease state and from hours of starvation and sometimes long trailer rides. This could influence their muscle energy reserves and affect the horses' ability to recover. The principal aim was to follow metabolic parameter before, during, and up to 7 days after anaesthesia in healthy horses and in horses undergoing abdominal surgery due to colic. Methods 20 healthy horses given anaesthesia alone and 20 colic horses subjected to emergency abdominal surgery were anaesthetised for a mean of 228 minutes and 183 minutes respectively. Blood for analysis of haematology, electrolytes, cortisol, creatine kinase (CK, free fatty acids (FFA, glycerol, glucose and lactate was sampled before, during, and up to 7 days after anaesthesia. Arterial and venous blood gases were obtained before, during and up to 8 hours after recovery. Gluteal muscle biopsy specimens for biochemical analysis of muscle metabolites were obtained at start and end of anaesthesia and 1 h and 1 day after recovery. Results Plasma cortisol, FFA, glycerol, glucose, lactate and CK were elevated and serum phosphate and potassium were lower in colic horses before anaesthesia. Muscle adenosine triphosphate (ATP content was low in several colic horses. Anaesthesia and surgery resulted in a decrease in plasma FFA and glycerol in colic horses whereas levels increased in healthy horses. During anaesthesia muscle and plasma lactate and plasma phosphate increased in both groups. In the colic horses plasma lactate increased further after recovery. Plasma FFA and glycerol increased 8 h after standing in the colic horses. In both groups, plasma concentrations of CK increased and serum phosphate decreased post-anaesthesia. On Day 7 most parameters were not different between groups. Colic horses lost on average 8% of their initial weight. Eleven colic horses completed the study. Conclusion Colic horses entered anaesthesia with altered

  6. Castration of piglets under CO2-gas anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritzen, M A; Kluivers-Poodt, M; Reimert, H G M; Hindle, V; Lambooij, E

    2008-11-01

    It has become common practice in pig fattening production systems to castrate young boar piglets without the use of anaesthesia. In this study, we examined whether or not CO2 gas is capable of inducing an acceptable anaesthetic state during which castration can be performed. The first step was to identify the most promising CO2/O2 mixture. Based on the results from this first experiment, a mixture of 70% CO2 + 30% O2 was chosen for further investigation as a potential anaesthetic during the castration of young piglets. Thereby, it was established whether the duration and depth of anaesthesia were acceptable for castration where the animal has to be insensible and unconscious. Physiological effects were assessed based on electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements, blood gas values and behavioural responses. During the induction phase, the only typical behaviour the piglets exhibited when exposed to the 70/30 gas mixture was heavy breathing. All piglets (n = 25) lost consciousness after approximately 30 s according to the EEG. Heart rate decreased slowly during the induction phase, a serious drop occurred when piglets lost their posture. Immediately after this drop, the heart rate neared zero or showed a very irregular pattern. Shortly after loss of posture, most animals showed a few convulsions. None of the animals showed any reaction to castration in behaviour and/or on the EEG and ECG. On average, the piglets recovered within 59 s, i.e. EEG returned to its pre-induction pattern and piglets were able to regain a standing position. After 120 s, heart rate returned to pre-induction levels. In order to explore the usage range of CO2 concentration, 24 piglets were exposed to 60% CO2 + 20% O2 + 20% N2 for up to 30 s after loss of consciousness (as registered on EEG), and castrated after removal from the chamber. Sixteen of the 24 animals showed a reaction to the castration on the EEG. To establish the maximum time piglets survive in 70% CO2 + 30

  7. Life-threatening acute subdural haematoma after combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia in labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulent Bakar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Only few reports in literature have pointed out to the possibility of a cranial subdural haematoma formation associated with dural puncture during spinal or epidural analgesia. We herein describe such a rare case who was diagnosed to have acute subdural haematoma after combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia used in labour. Case report: A 34-year-old, primigravid women with a gestation of 38 weeks underwent caesarean section under combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia and gave birth to a healthy boy. Thirty-two hours after delivery, her moderate headache progressed to a severe headache associated with nausea and vomiting and later was more complicated with a generalized tonic–clonic seizure and ensuing lethargy. Computed tomography of the brain demonstrated a right-sided fronto-temporo-parietal acute subdural haematoma with diffuse cerebral oedema. She underwent urgent FTP craniotomy and evacuation of the haematoma. Early postoperative cranial computed tomography showed a clean operative site. Eight days after subdural haematoma surgery, she became lethargic again, and this time cranial computed tomography disclosed an extradural haematoma under the bone flap for which she had to undergo surgery again. Two days later, she was discharged home with Karnofsky performance score of 90/100. At follow-up exam, she was neurologically intact and her cranial computed tomography and magnetic resonance were normal. Conclusions: As conclusion, with the use of this combined spinal–epidural anaesthesia, it should be kept in mind that headache does not always mean low pressure headache associated with spinal anaesthesia and that a catastrophic complication of subdural haematoma may also occur. Resumo: Justificativa e objetivos: Apenas alguns relatos na literatura mencionaram a possibilidade de formação de hematoma subdural craniano associada à punção durante a raquianestesia ou anestesia epidural. O presente relato descreve

  8. Orbital bleeding in rats while under diethylether anaesthesia does not influence telemetrically determined heart rate, body temperature, locomotor and eating activity when compared with anaesthesia alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanHerck, H; DeBoer, SF; Hesp, APM; VanLith, HA; Baumans, [No Value; Beynen, AC; Herck, H. van; Lith, H.A. van

    The question addressed was whether orbital bleeding in rats, while under diethylether anaesthesia, affects their locomotor activity, body core temperature, heart rate rhythm and eating pattern. Roman High Avoidance (RHA) and Roman Low Avoidance (RLA) rats were used to enhance generalization of the

  9. Evaluation of cardiology consultations sought from the anaesthesia clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minai, F.N.; Kamal, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the criteria for cardiology referrals and to assess the perioperative relevance of the cardiology advice given in patients evaluated for non-cardiac surgery. Materials and Methods: A review of case files of 70 patients, scheduled for non-cardiac surgery, who were referred for cardiology consultations from the Anaesthesia Clinic at AKUH during the study period. The clinical criteria for seeking cardiology advice, the cardiology advice given, its influence on patient management, as well as number of adverse cardiac events in the perioperative period were documented. Results: A history of hypertension, ischemic heart disease, and ECG abnormalities were the major criteria for seeking opinion on cardiac status. Cardiology advice frequently resulted in the ordering of extensive cardiac investigations. Among the patients identified for further tests by the cardiologists, 75% had no evidence of ischemic heart disease or myocardial dysfunction; none of them were monitored invasively intraoperatively or had adverse cardiac events in the perioperative period requiring intensive care or prolonged hospital stay. Conclusion: No definite criteria or pattern for referrals was identified. Most of the referrals did not fall within the AHA guidelines. Cardiology advice given had very little influence on the perioperative management. (author)

  10. Procedural Complications of Spinal Anaesthesia in the Obese Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wenk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Complications of spinal anaesthesia (SpA range between 1 and 17%. Habitus and operator experience may play a pivotal role, but only sparse data is available to substantiate this claim. Methods. 161 patients were prospectively enrolled. Data such as spread of block, duration of puncture, number of trials, any complication, operator experience, haemodynamic parameters, was recorded and anatomical patient habitus assessed. Results. Data from 154 patients were analyzed. Success rate of SpA in the group of young trainees was 72% versus 100% in the group of consultants. Trainees succeeded in patients with a normal habitus in 83.3% of cases versus 41.3% when patients had a difficult anatomy (P=0.02. SpA in obese patients (BMI ≥ 32 was associated with a significantly longer duration of puncture, an increased failure ratio when performed by trainees (almost 50%, and an increased number of bloody punctures. Discussion. Habitus plays a pivotal role for SpA efficiency. In patients with obscured landmarks, failure ratio in unexperienced operators is high. Hence, patient prescreening as well as adequate choice of operators may be beneficial for the success rate of SpA and contribute to less complications and better patient and trainee satisfaction.

  11. General Anaesthesia Protocols for Patients Undergoing Electroconvulsive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Aravind; Lal, Chandar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to review general anaesthesia protocols for patients undergoing electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) at a tertiary care hospital in Oman, particularly with regards to clinical profile, potential drug interactions and patient outcomes. Methods This retrospective study took place at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. The electronic medical records of patients undergoing ECT at SQUH between January 2010 and December 2014 were reviewed for demographic characteristics and therapy details. Results A total of 504 modified ECT sessions were performed on 57 patients during the study period. All of the patients underwent a uniform general anaesthetic regimen consisting of propofol and succinylcholine; however, they received different doses between sessions, as determined by the treating anaesthesiologist. Variations in drug doses between sessions in the same patient could not be attributed to any particular factor. Self-limiting tachycardia and hypertension were periprocedural complications noted among all patients. One patient developed aspiration pneumonitis (1.8%). Conclusion All patients undergoing ECT received a general anaesthetic regimen including propofol and succinylcholine. However, the interplay of anaesthetic drugs with ECT efficacy could not be established due to a lack of comprehensive data, particularly with respect to seizure duration. In addition, the impact of concurrent antipsychotic therapy on anaesthetic dose and subsequent complications could not be determined. PMID:28417028

  12. The effects of ambient music on simulated anaesthesia monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, P M; Tosh, N; Philp, S; Rudie, J; Watson, M O; Russell, W J

    2005-11-01

    We examined the effect of no music, classical music or rock music on simulated patient monitoring. Twenty-four non-anaesthetist participants with high or low levels of musical training were trained to monitor visual and auditory displays of patients' vital signs. In nine anaesthesia test scenarios, participants were asked every 50-70 s whether one of five vital signs was abnormal and the trend of its direction. Abnormality judgements were unaffected by music or musical training. Trend judgements were more accurate when music was playing (p = 0.0004). Musical participants reported trends more accurately (p = 0.004), and non-musical participants tended to benefit more from music than did the musical participants (p = 0.063). Music may provide a pitch and rhythm standard from which participants can judge changes in vital signs from auditory displays. Nonetheless, both groups reported that it was easier to monitor the patient with no music (p = 0.0001), and easier to rely upon the auditory displays with no music (p = 0.014).

  13. Detomidine-diazepam-ketamine anaesthesia in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawde, A M; Amarpal; Kinjavdekar, P; Aithal, H P; Pratap, K; Bisht, G S

    2000-04-01

    Eight buffalo calves (8-12 months, 70-100 kg) were randomly assigned to two groups of four animals each. Animals of group I were given detomidine (100 micrograms/kg), whereas animals of group II received a mixture of detomidine (100 micrograms/kg), diazepam (100 micrograms/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (DDK) intravenously. Various clinical parameters, such as weak time, down time, pedal and pinprick reflexes, muscle relaxation and extent of sedation, as well as heart and respiratory rates and electrocardiograms were measured before (time 0) and 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 min after treatment. In all the animals of group II (DDK), the pedal reflex was completely abolished (score: 3.00 +/- 0.00) within 5 min, the pinprick response was either very weak or it was completely abolished at this interval. Muscle relaxation and sedation were excellent within 5 min of DDK administration. The depth of sedation and analgesia was maximum from 5 to 15 min postinjection. Detomidine alone, however, failed to produce appropriate depression of the pedal and pinprick reflexes, sedation was mild and muscle relaxation was inadequate. Heart rate showed a significant (P detomidine. The results indicated that DDK combination is safe and suitable for 15 min of anaesthesia with excellent muscle relaxation and has only limited cardiorespiratory effects in buffaloes.

  14. Effect of laryngoscopy on middle ear pressure during anaesthesia induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerli, Semih; Acar, Baran; Sahap, Mehmet; Horasanlı, Eyup

    2013-01-01

    The procedure of laryngoscopic orotracheal intubation (LOTI) has many impacts on several parts of the body. But its effect on middle ear pressure (MEP) is not known well. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the MEP changes subsequent to insertion of endotracheal tube with laryngoscope. 44 patients were included in this study with a normal physical examination of ear, nose and throat. A standard general anaesthesia induction without any inhaler agent was performed to the all patients. The MEP measurements for both ears were applied under 1 minute; before induction (BI) and after intubation (AI) with a middle ear analyzer. Also hemodynamic parameters were recorded before induction and after intubation. Of the 44 patients were 25 women and 19 men with a 43.5±15.1 mean age. A statistically significant rise in MEP was seen in all patients subsequent to insertion of endotracheal tube (Ptube, size and type of the blades, drugs and face masking time. But on the other hand in our opinion cardiovascular and haemodynamic response to LOTI has the most impact over the middle ear mucosa with mucosal venous congestion.

  15. HAEMATOMA BLOCK- AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO GENERAL ANAESTHESIA FOR REDUCTION OF DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhati Rani Mishra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Most common fracture in elderly patients is distal radius fracture. The most common method of management is closed reduction and immobilisation. The aim of the study is to compare the analgesic effects of haematoma block and general anaesthesia for closed reduction of distal fracture of radius. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective randomised controlled study was carried out among 100 patients of age group between 15-70 years of either sex who had fracture distal radius between 2015-2016. The patients having multiple fractures, pathological fractures or suffering from any organic diseases were excluded from the study. After taking informed written consent, the patients were randomised into two equal groups. In group A, reduction of fracture was done following administration of IV propofol and in group B after infiltration with 2% lignocaine into fracture haematoma site. Pain score was compared by VAS before, during and after manipulation in both the groups. Time taken from presentation at emergency department to reduction and discharge from hospital was also compared. Statistical analysis was done by applying SPSS software. RESULTS 100 patients of mean age 42.5 years, male: female 43:57 with fracture distal radius were studied. Mean time from admission to fracture reduction in group A was 2.64±0.93 hours and in group B 0.90±0.45 hours (P=0.0001. Discharge time from hospital after reduction of fracture in group A was 4.24±0.94 hours and in group B 0.75±0.2 hours (P=0.0001. VAS during reduction in group A was 0 and in group B 0.98±0.8 (P=0.0001. 10 minutes after reduction VAS in group A was 2.28±0.24 and group B 0.72±0.45 (P=0.0001. CONCLUSION For closed reduction of distal radius fracture, haematoma block with lignocaine is safe and effective alternative to intravenous general anaesthesia with propofol.

  16. Maternal and anaesthesia-related risk factors and incidence of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in elective caesarean section: A multinomial logistic regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakherpour, Atousa; Ghaem, Haleh; Fattahi, Zeinabsadat; Zaree, Samaneh

    2018-01-01

    Although spinal anaesthesia (SA) is nowadays the preferred anaesthesia technique for caesarean section (CS), it is associated with considerable haemodynamic effects, such as maternal hypotension. This study aimed to evaluate a wide range of variables (related to parturient and anaesthesia techniques) associated with the incidence of different degrees of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. This prospective study was conducted on 511 mother-infant pairs, in which the mother underwent elective CS under SA. The data were collected through preset proforma containing three parts related to the parturient, anaesthetic techniques and a table for recording maternal blood pressure. It was hypothesized that some maternal (such as age) and anaesthesia-related risk factors (such as block height) were associated with occurance of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. The incidence of mild, moderate and severe hypotension was 20%, 35% and 40%, respectively. Eventually, ten risk factors were found to be associated with hypotension, including age >35 years, body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 , 11-20 kg weight gain, gravidity ≥4, history of hypotension, baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) 100 beats/min in maternal modelling, fluid preloading ≥1000 ml, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block height >T 4 in anaesthesia-related modelling ( P < 0.05). Age, body mass index, weight gain, gravidity, history of hypotension, baseline SBP and heart rate, fluid preloading, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block hieght were the main risk factors identified in the study for SA-induced hypotension during CS.

  17. Maternal and anaesthesia-related risk factors and incidence of spinal anaesthesia-induced hypotension in elective caesarean section: A multinomial logistic regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atousa Fakherpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Although spinal anaesthesia (SA is nowadays the preferred anaesthesia technique for caesarean section (CS, it is associated with considerable haemodynamic effects, such as maternal hypotension. This study aimed to evaluate a wide range of variables (related to parturient and anaesthesia techniques associated with the incidence of different degrees of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 511 mother–infant pairs, in which the mother underwent elective CS under SA. The data were collected through preset proforma containing three parts related to the parturient, anaesthetic techniques and a table for recording maternal blood pressure. It was hypothesized that some maternal (such as age and anaesthesia-related risk factors (such as block height were associated with occurance of SA-induced hypotension during elective CS. Results: The incidence of mild, moderate and severe hypotension was 20%, 35% and 40%, respectively. Eventually, ten risk factors were found to be associated with hypotension, including age >35 years, body mass index ≥25 kg/m2, 11–20 kg weight gain, gravidity ≥4, history of hypotension, baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP 100 beats/min in maternal modelling, fluid preloading ≥1000 ml, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block height >T4in anaesthesia-related modelling (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Age, body mass index, weight gain, gravidity, history of hypotension, baseline SBP and heart rate, fluid preloading, adding sufentanil to bupivacaine and sensory block hieght were the main risk factors identified in the study for SA-induced hypotension during CS.

  18. Assessment of block height for satisfactory spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousley, R; Egan, C; Dowling, K; Cyna, A M

    2012-12-01

    We investigated block heights that anaesthetists considered adequate for caesarean section to proceed under spinal anaesthesia. During 3 months, 15 obstetric anaesthetists recorded block height to touch, pinprick or cold when spinal anaesthesia was considered satisfactory for caesarean section to proceed. Median (IQR [range]) block height for touch, pinprick, first cold and icy were: T10 (T7-T12 [T3-L1]); T5 (T4-T6 [C7-L1]); T5 (T4-T6 [C7-L1]); and T3 (T2-T4 [C7-L1]), respectively. Modalities were significantly correlated for: touch and cold, p = 0.0001; touch and icy, p = 0.0007; touch and pinprick, p = 0.0018; cold and icy, p satisfactory anaesthesia despite 76 (81%) having a block to touch below T6. Single modality assessment of block height, particularly using touch, may erroneously indicate inadequate anaesthesia for caesarean section. Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. A comparison of low dose hyperbaric levobupivacaine and hypobaric levobupivacaine in unilateral spinal anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, M; Oztürk, I; Tuncel, G; Senel, G Ozalp; Eskiçirak, H; Kadioğullari, N

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical effects and characteristics of hyperbaric and hypobaric levobupivacaine for unilateral spinal anaesthesia. Sixty patients were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either 7.5 mg (1.5 ml) hyperbaric levobupivacaine 0.5% or 7.5 mg (4 ml) hypobaric levobupivacaine 0.1875% for elective arthroscopic surgery of the knee under spinal anaesthesia. The level and duration of sensory block, intensity and duration of motor block were recorded. Unilateral sensory block was observed in 27 patients (90%) in the hyperbaric group and 24 patients (80%) in the hypobaric group in the lateral position. After 15 minutes, patients were turned to supine to redistribute the spinal block toward the non-operative side, but spinal anaesthesia was still unilateral in 18 patients (60%) in the hyperbaric group and 10 patients (33%) in the hypobaric group (P = 0.038). Time to readiness for home discharge and complete recovery of sensory block were similar in both groups. In the hyperbaric group, the motor block scores were higher on the operative side during first 10 minutes than they were in the hypobaric group (P hyperbaric group (P = 0.01). Hyperbaric and hypobaric levobupivacaine both provided satisfactory unilateral spinal anaesthesia with good haemodynamic stability for arthroscopic surgery, but with more frequent unilateral spinal anaesthesia in the hyperbaric group.

  20. Reasons of repeat dental treatment under general anaesthesia: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, J; Bagher, S; Felemban, O; Rich, A; Loo, C

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this chart review study was to investigate the common factors that exist in paediatric patients requiring a repeat dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA2) within four years after the initial dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA1). The Electronic Health Records of one to 12 year-old children who received dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) between April 2004 and October 2009 were identified and analysed by a single examiner. Children who had GA2, within a four year period following GA1 were categorised as cases. Children who had only one dental treatment under GA were considered the control pool. Each case was matched to three controls based on sex and age range at GA1 of ± 6 months. Other recorded variables included: date of birth, date of GAs (GA1 and GA2 for cases; GA1 for controls), type of payment, dmfs before GA1, dental treatments provided under GA, return of 1-week post-GA1 follow-up, frequency of recare/recall visits following one-year post-GA1 visit and the type and frequency of post GA1 emergency visits. Out of 581 subjects, 29 (4.99%) cases were matched to 87 controls. Medically compromised patients had four times the risk of GA2. At GA1, cases received statistically significant less sealants (p=0.026), less extractions (pdental treatment under general anaesthesia were more likely to have a repeat dental treatment under general anaesthesia within 4 years.

  1. Survey of the capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Janet; Tau, Goa; Cherian, Meena Nathan; Vergel de Dios, Jennifer; Mills, David; Fitzpatrick, Jane; Adu-Krow, William; Cheng, Davy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess capacity to provide essential surgical services including emergency, obstetric and anaesthesia care in Papua New Guinea (PNG) in order to support planning for relevant post-2015 sustainable development goals for PNG. Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Hospitals and health facilities in PNG. Participants 21 facilities including 3 national/provincial hospitals, 11 district/rural hospitals, and 7 health centres. Outcome measures The WHO Situational Analysis Tool to Assess Emergency and Essential Surgical Care (WHO-SAT) was used to measure each participating facility's capacity to deliver essential surgery and anaesthesia services, including 108 items related to relevant infrastructure, human resources, interventions and equipment. Results While major surgical procedures were provided at each hospital, fewer than 30% had uninterrupted access to oxygen, and 57% had uninterrupted access to resuscitation bag and mask. Most hospitals reported capacity to provide general anaesthesia, though few hospitals reported having at least one certified surgeon, obstetrician and anaesthesiologist. Access to anaesthetic machines, pulse oximetry and blood bank was severely limited. Many non-hospital health centres providing basic surgical procedures, but almost none had uninterrupted access to electricity, running water, oxygen and basic supplies for resuscitation, airway management and obstetric services. Conclusions Capacity for essential surgery and anaesthesia services is severely limited in PNG due to shortfalls in physical infrastructure, human resources, and basic equipment and supplies. Achieving post-2015 sustainable development goals, including universal healthcare, will require significant investment in surgery and anaesthesia capacity in PNG. PMID:26674504

  2. Patient safety issues in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, Stuart; Schwappach, David; Harder, Yves; Staender, Sven; Elger, Bernice

    2017-08-01

    To identify the spectrum of patient safety issues in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Purposive sample of 23 experts in surgery and anaesthesia and quality and regulation in Switzerland. Data were collected via individual qualitative interviews using a researcher-developed semi-structured interview guide between March 2016 and September 2016. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using conventional content analysis. Issues were categorised under the headings "structure", "process", and "outcome". Experts identified two key overarching patient safety and regulatory issues in relation to office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. First, experts repeatedly raised the current lack of data and transparency of the setting. It is unknown how many surgeons are operating in offices, how many and what types of operations are being done, and what the outcomes are. Secondly, experts also noted the limited oversight and regulation of the setting. While some standards exists, most experts felt that more minimal safety standards are needed regarding the requirements that must be met to do office-based surgery and what can and cannot be done in the office-based setting are needed, but they advocated a self-regulatory approach. There is a lack of empirical data regarding the quantity and quality office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Further research is needed to address these research gaps and inform health policy in relation to patient safety in office-based surgery and anaesthesia in Switzerland. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Randomized clinical trial of immersive virtual reality tour of the operating theatre in children before anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J-H; Park, S-J; Park, J-W; Kim, J-W; Yoo, H-J; Kim, T-W; Hong, J S; Han, S-H

    2017-11-01

    A virtual reality (VR) tour of the operating theatre before anaesthesia could provide a realistic experience for children. This study was designed to determine whether a preoperative VR tour could reduce preoperative anxiety in children. Children scheduled for elective surgery under general anaesthesia were randomized into a control or VR group. The control group received conventional information regarding anaesthesia and surgery. The VR group watched a 4-min video showing Pororo, the famous little penguin, visiting the operating theatre and explaining what is in it. The main outcome was preoperative anxiety, assessed using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-YPAS) before entering the operating theatre. Secondary outcomes included induction compliance checklist (ICC) and procedural behaviour rating scale (PBRS) scores during anaesthesia. A total of 69 children were included in the analysis, 35 in the control group and 34 in the VR group. Demographic data and induction time were similar in the two groups. Children in the VR group had a significantly lower m-YPAS score than those in the control group (median 31·7 (i.q.r. 23·3-37·9) and 51·7 (28·3-63·3) respectively; P anxiety and increasing compliance during induction of anaesthesia in children undergoing elective surgery. Registration number: UMIN000025232 (http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Effect of anaesthesia type on postoperative mortality and morbidities: a matched analysis of the NSQIP database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saied, N N; Helwani, M A; Weavind, L M; Shi, Y; Shotwell, M S; Pandharipande, P P

    2017-01-01

    The anaesthetic technique may influence clinical outcomes, but inherent confounding and small effect sizes makes this challenging to study. We hypothesized that regional anaesthesia (RA) is associated with higher survival and fewer postoperative organ dysfunctions when compared with general anaesthesia (GA). We matched surgical procedures and type of anaesthesia using the US National Surgical Quality Improvement database, in which 264,421 received GA and 64,119 received RA. Procedures were matched according to Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) and ASA physical status classification. Our primary outcome was 30-day postoperative mortality and secondary outcomes were hospital length of stay, and postoperative organ system dysfunction. After matching, multiple regression analysis was used to examine associations between anaesthetic type and outcomes, adjusting for covariates. After matching and adjusting for covariates, type of anaesthesia did not significantly impact 30-day mortality. RA was significantly associated with increased likelihood of early discharge (HR 1.09; Ppatient characteristic confounders, RA was associated with significantly lower odds of several postoperative complications, decreased hospital length of stay, but not mortality when compared with GA. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Anaesthesia for a patient with Eisenmenger′s syndrome undergoing caesarean section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gurumurthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Eisenmenger′s syndrome is a cyanotic congenital heart disease that includes pulmonary hypertension with reversed or bidirectional shunt associated with septal defects or patent ductus arteriosus. The decreased systemic vascular resistance associated with pregnancy increases the degree of right to left shunting, thereby carrying substantial risk to both the mother and the foetus. The maternal mortality rate of pregnancy in the presence of Eisenmenger′s syndrome is reported to be as high as 30-70%. We present a case of a 22-year-old primigravida with Eisenmenger′s syndrome who gave birth at 37 weeks of gestation via caesarean section to a live female baby under general anaesthesia. On the third post-operative day, the patient developed tachycardia, tachypnoea, hypotension and decrease in oxygen saturation despite supplemental oxygen, clinically suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. We describe the anaesthetic management for caesarean section and its complications in a patient with Eisenmenger′s syndrome. Although pregnancy should be discouraged in women with Eisenmenger′s syndrome, it can be successful.

  6. Consensus statement on anaesthesia for day care surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Kulkarni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of day-care surgery units is to allow for early recovery of the patients so that they can return to their familiar 'home' environment; the management hence should be focused towards achieving these ends. The benefits could include a possible reduction in the risk of thromboembolism and hospital-acquired infections. Furthermore, day-care surgery is believed to reduce the average unit cost of treatment by up to 70% as compared to inpatient surgery. With more than 20% of the world's disease burden, India only has 6% of the world's hospital beds. Hence, there is an immense opportunity for expansion in day-care surgery in India to ensure faster and safer, cost-effective patient turnover. For this to happen, there is a need of change in the mindset of all concerned clinicians, surgeons, anaesthesiologists and even the patients. A group of nine senior consultants from various parts of India, a mix of private and government anaesthesiologists, assembled in Mumbai and deliberated and discussed on the various aspects of day-care surgery. They formulated a consensus statement, the first of its kind in the Indian scenario, which can act as a guidance and tool for day-care anaesthesia in India. The statements are derived from the available published evidence in peer-reviewed literature including guidelines of several bodies such as the American Society of Anesthesiologists, British Association of Day Surgery and International Association of Ambulatory Surgery. The authors also offer interpretive comments wherever such evidence is inadequate or contradictory.

  7. Applied anatomy of the lingual nerve: relevance to dental anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vui Leng; Andrawos, Alice; Ghabriel, Mounir N; Townsend, Grant C

    2014-03-01

    (1) to classify the external morphology of the lingual nerve and investigate any relationship between its external and internal morphology, (2) to explore the fascicular structure, nerve tissue density and capillary density of the lingual nerve, and (3) to provide an anatomical explanation as to why adverse clinical outcomes more commonly affect the lingual nerve following local dental anaesthesia. Where possible, comparisons were made between the lingual and inferior alveolar nerves. The lingual and inferior alveolar nerves were examined in 23 hemi-sectioned heads macroscopically and microscopically 2mm above the lingula. The lingual nerve was also examined in the regions of the third and second molars. Specimens underwent histological processing and staining with Haematoxylin & Eosin, Masson's Trichrome, anti-GLUT-1 and anti-CD 34. The lingual nerve became flatter as it traversed through the pterygomandibular space. There was an increase in the connective tissue and a decrease in nerve tissue density along the lingual nerve (p<0.001). At 2mm above the lingula, the lingual nerve was uni-fascicular in 39% of cases, whilst the inferior alveolar nerve consistently had more fascicles (p<0.001). The lingual nerve fascicles had thicker perineurium but the endoneurial vascular density was not significantly different in the two nerves. The greater susceptibility of lingual nerve dysfunction during inferior alveolar nerve blocks may be due to its uni-fascicular structure and the thicker perineurium, leading to increased endoneurial pressure and involvement of all axons if oedema or haemorrhage occurs due to trauma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navdeep Sokhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Methods: Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Results: Propofol (81.5% and dexmedetomidine (18.5% were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7% was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%, desaturation (7.4%, tight brain (7.4%, and shivering (5.6%. The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05. There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03. In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1-14 days and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3-30 days. Conclusions: ′Conscious sedation′ was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and

  9. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A retrospective study of 54 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokhal, Navdeep; Rath, Girija Prasad; Chaturvedi, Arvind; Dash, Hari Hara; Bithal, Parmod Kumar; Chandra, P Sarat

    2015-05-01

    The anaesthetic challenge of awake craniotomy is to maintain adequate sedation, analgesia, respiratory and haemodynamic stability in an awake patient who should be able to co-operate during intraoperative neurological assessment. The current literature, sharing the experience on awake craniotomy, in Indian context, is minimal. Hence, we carried out a retrospective study with the aim to review and analyse the anaesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing awake craniotomy, at our centre. Medical records of 54 patients who underwent awake craniotomy for intracranial lesions over a period of 10 years were reviewed, retrospectively. Data regarding anaesthetic management, intraoperative complications and post-operative course were recorded. Propofol (81.5%) and dexmedetomidine (18.5%) were the main agents used for providing conscious sedation to facilitate awake craniotomy. Hypertension (16.7%) was the most commonly encountered complication during intraoperative period, followed by seizures (9.3%), desaturation (7.4%), tight brain (7.4%), and shivering (5.6%). The procedure had to be converted to general anaesthesia in one of patients owing to refractory brain bulge. The incidence of respiratory and haemodynamic complications were comparable in the both groups (P > 0.05). There was less incidence of intraoperative seizures in patients who received propofol (P = 0.03). In post-operative period, 20% of patients developed new motor deficit. Mean intensive care unit stay was 2.8 ± 1.9 day (1-14 days) and mean hospital stay was 7.0 ± 5.0 day (3-30 days). 'Conscious sedation' was the technique of choice for awake craniotomy, at our institute. Fentanyl, propofol, and dexmedetomidine were the main agents used for this purpose. Patients receiving propofol had less incidence of intraoperative seizure. Appropriate selection of patients, understanding the procedure of surgery, and judicious use of sedatives or anaesthetic agents are key to the

  10. Successful fetoscopic laser coagulation for twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome under local anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooley, S

    2011-06-01

    A review of the efficacy and outcome of fifteen fetoscopic laser ablations under local anaesthesia for twin to twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the National Maternity Hospital Dublin was undertaken. The mean gestation at laser was 19.7 weeks (range 16-25 weeks) with a mean gestation at delivery of 29.1 weeks (range 20-35 weeks). The overall liveborn birth rate was 79% (22 infants) and one pregnancy was still ongoing. There were four neonatal deaths secondary to complications of prematurity. The surviving eighteen infants (64%) undergo regular paediatric review. The procedure was performed successfully in all cases with local anaesthesia. In no case was there maternal discomfort that warranted the procedure to be abandoned and good visual access of the vascular anastamoses was obtained in all cases. Local anaesthesia therefore offers a safe effective anaesthetic option for fetoscopic laser coagulation in monochorionic pregnancies complicated by TTTS.

  11. Critical incidence reporting systems - an option in equine anaesthesia? Results from a panel meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnack, Sonja; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Driessen, Bernd; Pang, Daniel; Wohlfender, Franziska

    2013-11-01

    To provide a brief introduction into Critical Incident Reporting Systems (CIRS) as used in human medicine, and to report the discussion from a recent panel meeting discussion with 23 equine anaesthetists in preparation for a new CEPEF-4 (Confidential Enquiry into Perioperative Equine Fatalities) study. Moderated group discussions, and review of literature. The first group discussion focused on the definition of 'preventable critical incidents' and/or 'near misses' in the context of equine anaesthesia. The second group discussion focused on categorizing critical incidents according to an established framework for analysing risk and safety in clinical medicine. While critical incidents do occur in equine anaesthesia, no critical incident reporting system including systematic collection and analysis of critical incidents is in place. Critical incident reporting systems could be used to improve safety in equine anaesthesia - in addition to other study types such as mortality studies. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  12. The effect of anaesthesia on the radiosensitivity of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Gaiser, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison has been made of the effects of Nembutal (sodium pentobarbital) and Ethrane (2-chloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethyldifluoromethyl ether) anaesthesia on the radiation responses of rat intestine, foot skin and R-1 rhabdomyosarcoma. Single-dose experiments under Nembutal or short-lasting Ethrane anaesthesia resulted in equivalent radiosensitivities for the R-1 sarcoma and foot skin, whereas Ethrane induced radiosensitization in the intestine. In the Ethrane anaesthesia lasting 3 hours, and in the split-dose experiments, Ethrane inhibited repair of radiation-induced damage in the R-1 sarcoma and in the foot skin. It is therefore recommended that the use of Ethrane as an anaesthetic should be avoided in experiments designed to investigate repair of damage in fractionated studies or during protracted irradiation treatments. (UK)

  13. Sevoflurane anaesthesia for nasal surgery in a patient with multiple chemical sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Martín, M T; Álvarez López, J C

    2018-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome is a group of complex disorders that include psychiatric disorders, chronic fatigue and/or respiratory problems. This syndrome could be triggered by specific allergens and toxins that cause neurophysiological sensitization and the appearance of the clinical symptomatology. Anaesthesia for these patients always poses a challenge for the anaesthetist, because they need to find and use drugs that do not trigger or aggravate the symptoms of the disease. Therefore, sevoflurane in these circumstances might be "the ideal anaesthetic". Performing general anaesthesia with sevoflurane as the sole anaesthetic agent, together with a series of environmental measures formed the basis for successful anaesthesia and surgery in our patient with a multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [The risk of general anaesthesia and sedation in the older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomens, M A E M; Booij, L H D; Baart, J A

    2015-12-01

    Temporary memory problems and aggravation of pre-existing memory disorders may occur after treatment under general anaesthesia. A frequency of postoperative cognition disorders between 10 and 50% has been identified in the literature. Risk factors for the occurrence of postoperative memory disorders are advanced age, low level of education, intellectual comorbidity, the onset of dementia and other neurodegenerative disorders, existing sleep disorders and the experience of postoperative pain. The morphological changes seen in the brain after general anaesthesia are similar to the changes occurring in Alzheimer's disease. In addition to metabolic changes, general anaesthetics directly enhance the apoptosis of brain cells. Older people are already familiar with a decrease in the number of neurons, which provides them with a limited spare capacity. Moreover, older people are often known to have the risk factors for the occurrence of postoperative memory disorders as mentioned before. Caution and restraint in the indication for dental -treatment under general anaesthesia or sedation is therefore required.

  15. Long-term surgical anaesthesia with isoflurane in human habituated Nile Crocodiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George F. Stegmann

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A suitable long-term anaesthetic technique was required for implantation of physiological sensors and telemetric devices in sub-adult Nile crocodiles (Crocodylus niloticus to allow the collection of physiological data. Five Nile crocodiles with a median body mass of 24 kg were used. After manual capture, they were blindfolded and 0.2 mL (1 mg/mL medetomidine was administered intramuscularly in four of the animals which had an estimated body mass between 20 kg and 30 kg. One crocodile with an estimated body mass of 50 kg received 0.5 mL. For induction, 5 mL propofol (10 mg/mL was injected intravenously into the occipital sinus. Additional doses were given when required to ensure adequate anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was maintained with 1.5% isoflurane. Ventilation was controlled. Local anaesthesia was administered for surgical incision and external placement of the radio transmitter. Medetomidine was antagonised with atipamezole at the end of surgery. Median heart rate during surgery was 22 beats/min, at extubation 32 beats per min and 30 beats per min the following day at the same body temperature as under anaesthesia. Median body temperature of the animals increased from 27.3 °C to 27.9 °C during anaesthesia, as room temperature increased from 24.5 °C to 29.0 °C during surgery. Anaesthesia was successfully induced with intramuscular medetomidine and intravenous propofol and was maintained with isoflurane for the placement of telemetric implants. Intraoperative analgesia was supplemented with lidocaine infiltration. Perioperative physiological parameters remained stable and within acceptable clinical limits. Multiple factors appear to influence these variables during the recovery period, including residual anaesthetic effects, environmental temperature and physical activity.

  16. Cardiocirculatory intraoperative assessment during single-shot caudal anaesthesia in children: comparison between levobupivacaine and ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gentili

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caudal block with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine is the most commonly used regional anaesthesia in children. Methods: The aim of study was to compare the cardiocirculatory profile induced in two matched groups of young patients, submitted to caudal anaesthesia with levobupivacaine or ropivacaine for an elective subumbilical surgery. Sixty children were enrolled: thirty received levopubivacaine 0.25% and thirty ropivacaine 0.2%. Intraoperative heart rate (HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP were monitored at following times: Ta0 (after anaesthesia induction, Ta1 (after caudal anaesthesia, Ta2 (five minutes later, Ta3 (ten minutes later, Ts1 (at surgical incision, Ts2, Ts3, Ts4, Ts5 (every 10 minutes during surgery, Taw (at the awakening. Results: In both groups the cardiocirculatory trend remained within normal ranges at all times considered, demonstrating the safety of the method with both drugs. Both groups showed a similar trend at the different monitoring times: low decrease in HR, SBP and DBP after caudal block, slight increase in parameters after skin incision, slight decrease during surgery, increase at awakening. Regarding SBP and DBP, the levobupivacaine group children generally showed higher levels compared to the ropivacaine group, especially for DBP. Conclusions: Paediatric caudal anaesthesia is an effective method with an very infrequent complication rate. Possible hypotheses for differing haemodynamic behaviour could include a stronger vasoconstriction reflex of innervated areas during caudal anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and a lower levobupivacaine induced block of the sympathetic fibers, related to different pharmacokinetic profile of low concentrations of the local anaesthetics used in paediatric epidural space.

  17. Cardiopulmonary effects during anaesthesia induced and maintained with propofol in acepromazine pre-medicated donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Hadi; Baniadam, Ali; Rasekh, Abdolrahman; Arasteh, Abdolmajid; Sabiza, Soroush

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cardiopulmonary effects of anaesthesia induced and maintained with propofol in acepromazine pre-medicated donkeys. Prospective experimental study. Six healthy male donkeys weighing 78-144 kg. Donkeys were pre-medicated with intravenous (IV) acepromazine (0.04 mg kg(-1) ). Ten minutes later, anaesthesia was induced with IV propofol (2 mg kg(-1) ) and anaesthesia maintained by continuous IV infusion of the propofol (0.2 mg kg(-1)  minute(-1) ) for 30 minutes. Baseline measurements of physiological parameters, and arterial blood samples were taken before the acepromazine administration, then 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the induction of anaesthesia. Changes from baseline were analysed by anova for repeated measures. When compared with baseline (standing) values, during anaesthesia heart rate increased throughout: significant at 5 (p = 0.001) and 15 (p = 0.015) minutes. Mean arterial blood pressure increased significantly only at 15 minutes (p < 0.001). Respiratory rate and arterial pH did not change significantly. PaO2 was lower throughout anaethesia, but this only reached significance at 15 minutes (p = 0.041). PaCO2 was statistically (but not clinically) significantly reduced at the times of 30 (p = 0.02), 45 (p = 0.01) and 60 (p = 0.04). Rectal temperature decreased significantly at all times of the study. Administration of propofol by the continuous infusion rate for the maintenance of anaesthesia resulted in stable cardiopulmonary effects and could prove to be clinically useful in donkeys. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  18. Analysis of field reports from anaesthesia volunteers in low- to middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczynski, Lauren M; Laudanski, Krzysztof; Speck, Rebecca M; McCunn, Maureen

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this study was to identify key experiences and common motifs of volunteer doctors who have participated in anaesthesia-related volunteer experiences abroad through the Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) programme. An additional goal was to understand the effects of medical volunteerism in developing countries on the volunteers themselves. After a medical mission with HVO, anaesthesia volunteers submit a post-experience report. Twenty-five reports were randomly selected from the 58 available trip reports, including five from each of the five countries collaborating with HVO. Data in the reports were analysed using a modified grounded theory and constant comparative technique until thematic saturation was achieved. Three major discoveries emerged from the analysis of post-experience reports: (i) anaesthesia residents and attending physicians find their volunteer experiences in the developing world to be personally rewarding and positive; (ii) most participants feel their educational interventions have a positive impact on local students and anaesthesia providers, and (iii) global volunteerism poses challenges, primarily caused by lack of resource availability and communication issues. Our results give new insight into the experiences of and challenges faced by a cohort of HVO-sponsored anaesthesia volunteers while abroad and validates the positive effects these global health experiences have on the volunteers themselves. This group of anaesthesia volunteers was able to further their personal and professional growth, sharpen their physical diagnosis and clinical reasoning skills in resource-poor environments and, most importantly, provide education and promote an exchange of ideas and information. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Lumbar microdiscectomy under epidural anaesthesia with the patient in the sitting position: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicassio, Nicola; Bobicchio, Paolo; Umari, Marzia; Tacconi, Leonello

    2010-12-01

    In a prospective study we compared the surgical outcome, length of hospital stay, complications and patient satisfaction for patients undergoing lumbar microdiscectomy (LM) under spinal anaesthesia (SA) in the sitting position (23 patients) to those of another cohort who underwent LM under general anaesthesia (GA) in the prone or genu-pectoral position during the same time period (238 patients). We aimed to determine: (i) if epidural anaesthesia is safe for lumbar microdiscectomy; and (ii) if placing the patient in a sitting position confers an advantage in performing the operation. For all patients we calculated the time from the end of the operation to the first spontaneous urination and to the first administration of analgesic drugs. Before being discharged, patients were asked to give an opinion on the quality of analgesia obtained by epidural anaesthesia and on the sitting position used. No patient had any complications linked to epidural anaesthesia and only one patient experienced a small dural tear as a surgical complication. Twenty of 23 patients expressed satisfaction with the level of analgesia obtained and only three considered it poor. All patients found the sitting position comfortable. Advantages of the sitting position for surgery include better comfort for the patient, potential to recreate a load condition similar to the one that takes place during orthostasis and a "cleaner" operative field that uses gravity to drain blood. Of greatest concern is the possibility of the patient developing a dural tear and subsequent leaking of cerebrospinal fluid, which could also be a source of surgical complications. Currently, epidural anaesthesia allows a reduction in anaesthetic and surgical times, anaesthetic complications and, consequently, hospitalization period. Further analysis of the sitting position for the patient during surgery is required to fully assess the advantages and disadvantages of this method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  20. Effect of local anaesthesia and/or analgesia on pain responses induced by piglet castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyman Görel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical castration in male piglets is painful and methods that reduce this pain are requested. This study evaluated the effect of local anaesthesia and analgesia on vocal, physiological and behavioural responses during and after castration. A second purpose was to evaluate if herdsmen can effectively administer anaesthesia. Methods Four male piglets in each of 141 litters in five herds were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: castration without local anaesthesia or analgesia (C, controls, analgesia (M, meloxicam, local anaesthesia (L, lidocaine, or both local anaesthesia and analgesia (LM. Lidocaine (L, LM was injected at least three minutes before castration and meloxicam (M, LM was injected after castration. During castration, vocalisation was measured and resistance movements judged. Behaviour observations were carried out on the castration day and the following day. The day after castration, castration wounds were ranked, ear and skin temperature was measured, and blood samples were collected for analysis of acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A concentration (SAA. Piglets were weighed on the castration day and at three weeks of age. Sickness treatments and mortality were recorded until three weeks of age. Results Piglets castrated with lidocaine produced calls with lower intensity (p p p = 0.06, n.s. and the following day (p = 0.02. Controls had less swollen wounds compared to piglets assigned to treatments M, L and LM (p p = 0.005; p = 0.05 for C + L compared to M + LM. Ear temperature was higher (p Conclusions The study concludes that lidocaine reduced pain during castration and that meloxicam reduced pain after castration. The study also concludes that the herdsmen were able to administer local anaesthesia effectively.

  1. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF GRANISETRON AND ONDANSETRON IN THE PREVENTION OF POST OPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING IN LSCS PATIENTS UNDER SPINAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Babu

    2015-08-01

    grade I, they were divided into three groups. 25 patients (group – P received 10ml inj. Normal saline I.V, 25 patients (group – O received inj. Ondansetron 4 m g diluted in 10ml normal saline I.V & 25 patients (group - G inj. Granisetron 1mg I.V diluted in 10 ml normal saline . These drugs were administered 10 minutes before the administration of spinal anaesthesia. There were no significant differences between the three groups regarding patient characteristics (age, body weight, height and previous history of motion sickness and PONV, type of surgery, type of anaesthesia, and duration of pre - operative starvation, duration of surgery and administration of post - oper ative analgesics. Patient data were analysed by chi - square test and standard error or difference between proportions. P value of 0.05 or less was considered significant. CONCLUSION : By our placebo controlled clinical trial it has been proved that the incid ence of PONV is nearly 60% in caesarean deliveries performed under spinal anaesthesia. On the basis of the present study it can be concluded that injection Granisetron in a dose of 1 mg. I.V. is much more effective in minimizing severe nausea and vomiting than ondansetron in a dose of 4 mg. I.V. and is free from the side effect headache which is a drawback of ondansetron. The use of granisetron as prophylactic antiemetic for high risk group may be recommended. Granisetron seems to be useful alternative and relatively safe drug for effective anti - emetic prophylaxis.

  2. Thermal balance during transurethral resection of the prostate. A comparison of general anaesthesia and epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernström, H; Henneberg, S; Eklund, A

    1985-01-01

    Heat loss during anaesthesia and surgery is a common problem. In patients with restricted cardio-pulmonary reserves this may endanger the postoperative outcome. In order to compare thermal balance we studied 25 men undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), using either general...... of the prostate resulted in a peroperative heat loss which was not influenced by the anaesthetic technique used and averaged 370 kJ during the first hour of surgery. G.A. reduced heat production while this was uninfluenced by E.A. After termination of general anaesthesia, oxygen uptake and plasma catecholamines...

  3. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Suescun, M.; Rovira Canellas, A.; Coll Masfarre, S.; Castano Duque, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  4. Scandinavian Clinical Practice Guidelines on the diagnosis, management and follow-up of anaphylaxis during anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroigaard, M; Garvey, L H; Gillberg, L

    2007-01-01

    to the rare and unforeseeable nature of anaphylaxis, mainly includes case series and expert opinion (grade of evidence IV and V). These guidelines include an overview of the epidemiology of anaphylactic reactions during anaesthesia. A treatment algorithm is suggested, with emphasis on the incremental...... advice concerning follow-up procedures is provided. In addition, an algorithm is included with advice on how to manage patients with previous suspected anaphylaxis during anaesthesia. Lastly, Appendix 2 provides an overview of the incidence, mechanisms and possibilities for follow-up for some common drug...

  5. Cervical Epidural Anaesthesia for Radical Mastectomy and Chronic Regional Pain Syndrome of Upper Limb - A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Jadon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47-yrs-female patient presented with carcinoma right breast, swelling and allodynia of right upper limb. radical mastectomy with axillary clearance and skin grafting was done under cervical epidural anaesthesia through 18G epidural catheter placed at C6/C7 level. Postoperative analgesia and rehabilitation of affected right upper limb was managed by continuous epidural infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine and 2.5 µg/ml -1 clonidine solution through epidu-ral catheter for 5 days and physiotherapy. This case report highlights the usefulness of cervical epidural analgesia in managing a complex situation of carcinoma breast with associated periarthitis of shoulder joint and chronic regional pain syndrome (CRPS of right upper limb.

  6. COMPARISON OF ANTIEMETIC EFFICACY OF ONDANSETRON, GRANISETRON AND PALONOSETRON IN HIGH-RISK PATIENTS UNDERGOING ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY UNDER GENERAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Postoperative nausea and vomiting is (PONV a very distressing complication and preventive measures are justified when the risk of PONV is very high. Ondansetron is the first 5-HT3 antagonist used alone or in combination for prophylaxis of PONV due to its lower cost. Granisetron and palonosetron are recently introduced 5-HT3 antagonists with greater affinity for 5-HT3 receptor and having longer half-life. Aim of the present study is to compare the antiemetic efficacy of ondansetron, granisetron and palonosetron in high-risk patients undergoing abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia. METHODS After obtaining Institutional Ethical Committee approval and written informed consent from all the participants, 150 patients of ASA grade I & II, aged between 20-50 years and weight between 30-60 kg undergoing abdominal hysterectomy under general anaesthesia were assigned randomly in to three groups of 50 patients each using random number table receiving either ondansetron 4 mg (Group O or granisetron 2 mg (Group G or palonosetron 0.75 mg (Group P intravenously just before the induction of anaesthesia. Incidence and severity of nausea and frequency of retching and vomiting were recorded in each group at the end of 2-hour and then at 24-hour and 48-hour intervals. RESULTS The incidence of nausea during first two hours postoperatively was found to be 14(28% in Group O, which was found to be significantly higher than 6(12% in group G and 4(8% in group P (p value = 0.016. The incidence of vomiting was found to be 6(12% in group O, which was found to be significantly higher than 2(4% in both group G and group P (p value = 0.018. Number of complete responders was significantly higher in Group P and group G as compared to group O. Number of patients requiring rescue antiemetic treatment was significantly high in group O{10(20%} as compared to 3(6% in both the group G and group P. CONCLUSIONS Newly introduced 5-HT3 antagonists, granisetron and

  7. A case of severe ankylosing spondylitis posted for hip replacement surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Kotekar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old male patient with history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS for 30 years presented for hip replacement surgery. Airway management in ankylosing spondylitis patients presents the most serious array of intubation and airway hazards imagin-able, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporo-mandibular joint disease. Literatures support definitive airway management and many authors consider regional anaesthesia to be contraindicated. The reasons cited include inability to gain neuraxial access and the need for urgent airway control in case of complication of regional anaesthesia.

  8. Identifying research priorities in anaesthesia and perioperative care: final report of the joint National Institute of Academic Anaesthesia/James Lind Alliance Research Priority Setting Partnership

    OpenAIRE

    Boney, O.; Bell, M.; Bell, N.; Conquest, A.; Cumbers, M.; Drake, S.; Galsworthy, M.; Gath, J.; Grocott, M. P.; Harris, E.; Howell, S.; Ingold, A.; Nathanson, M. H.; Pinkney, T.; Metcalf, L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify research priorities for Anaesthesia and Perioperative Medicine. Design Prospective surveys and consensus meetings guided by an independent adviser. Setting UK. Participants 45 stakeholder organisations (25 professional, 20 patient/carer) affiliated as James Lind Alliance partners. Outcomes First ?ideas-gathering? survey: Free text research ideas and suggestions. Second ?prioritisation? survey: Shortlist of ?summary? research questions (derived from the first survey) rank...

  9. Assessing the depth of isoflurane anaesthesia during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ka Ting; Alston, R Peter; Just, George; McKenzie, Chris

    2018-03-01

    Bispectral index (BIS) and monitoring of end-tidal concentration may be associated with a reduction in the incidence of awareness during volatile-based general anaesthesia. An analogue of end-tidal concentration during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is measuring exhausted isoflurane concentration from the oxygenator as an estimate to blood and, so, brain concentration. The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between oxygenator exhaust and blood concentrations of isoflurane and the BIS score during CPB when administering isoflurane into the sweep gas supply to the oxygenator. Seventeen patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery using CPB and isoflurane with BIS monitoring were recruited in a single-centre university hospital. Isoflurane gas was delivered via a calibrated vaporiser at the beginning of anaesthetic induction. Radial arterial blood samples were collected after the initiation of CPB and before aortic cross-clamping, which were analysed for isoflurane by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The BIS score and the concentration of exhausted isoflurane from the oxygenator membrane, as measured by an anaesthetic gas analyser, were recorded at the time of blood sampling. The mean duration of anaesthetic induction to arterial blood sampling was 90 min (95%CI: 80,100). On CPB, the median BIS was 39 (range, 7-43) and the mean oxygenator exhaust isoflurane concentration was 1.24 ± 0.21%. No significant correlation was demonstrated between BIS with arterial isoflurane concentration (r=-0.19, p=0.47) or oxygenator exhaust isoflurane concentration (r=0.07, p=0.80). Mixed-venous blood temperature was moderately correlated to BIS (r=0.50, p=0.04). Oxygenator exhaust isoflurane concentration was moderately, positively correlated with its arterial concentration (r=0.64, p<0.01). In conclusion, in patients undergoing heart surgery with CPB, the findings of this study indicate that, whilst oxygenator exhaust concentrations were significantly

  10. Child related background factors affecting compliance with induction of anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie; Svedin, Carl Göran

    2004-03-01

    Factors such as age, sex, behaviour problems, fears, earlier traumatic hospital events and reactions to vaccination were assessed together with behaviour observed before premedication in order to evaluate their importance in predicting response to the anaesthetic process. The anaesthetic process was divided into four endpoints; compliance when given premedication, sedation, compliance during needle insertion or when an anaesthetic mask was put in place and behaviour when put to sleep. A total of 102 children who were undergoing day-stay surgery and overnight stay surgery were video-filmed during premedication and anaesthetic induction. Before premedication the children and parents answered questionnaires about behaviour [Preschool Behaviour Check List (PBCL)] and fears [Fears Survey Schedule for Children-Revised (FSSC-R)]. The films were analysed to assess behaviour before and after premedication and during induction of anaesthesia. A semistructured interview was conducted with the parents during the time the children were asleep. There was a significantly higher odds ratio for noncompliant behaviour during premedication if the child placed itself in the parent's lap or near the parent or had previously experienced traumatic hospital events. The odds ratio for not being sedated by premedication was higher if compliance was low when premedication was given or the child had experienced a traumatic hospital event in the past. A high odds ratio for noncompliant behaviour during venous access or placement of an anaesthetic mask was seen if the child was not sedated or the child had had a negative reaction when vaccinated. The odds ratio for falling asleep in an anxious or upset state was higher if the child had shown noncompliant behaviour during premedication, had not been sedated or had shown noncompliant behaviour during venous access or facemask placement. The overall most important factor that predicts noncompliant behaviour and a distressed state in the child

  11. Mini-craniotomy under local anaesthesia and sedation as a less ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mini-craniotomy under local anaesthesia and sedation as a less invasive procedure for spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage in a developing country. ... The ICH showed evidence of significant mass effect on brain computed tomography (CT) scan in 95% and was associated with intraventricular haemorrhage in 43%.

  12. Epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine and ropivacaine : effects of age on the pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, Mischa J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Epidural neural blockade results from processes after the administration of a local anaesthetic in the epidural space until the uptake in neural tissue. The pharmacokinetics, neural blockade and haemodynamics after epidural anaesthesia may be influenced by several factors, with age as the most

  13. Myocardial metabolism during anaesthesia with propofol--low dose fentanyl for coronary artery bypass surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeyen, K. M.; de Hert, S. G.; Erpels, F. A.; Adriaensen, H. F.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the haemodynamic and myocardial effects of propofol-fentanyl anaesthesia in 12 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery during the pre-bypass period. The induction dose of propofol was 1.5 mg kg-1 and mean infusion rate during maintenance was 4.48 mg kg-1 h-1 (range

  14. Pain assessment by children and adolescents during intraosseous anaesthesia using a computerized system (QuickSleeper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixou, Jean-Louis; Marie-Cousin, Alexia; Huet, Adeline; Hingant, Bernard; Robert, Jean-Claude

    2009-09-01

    Intraosseous (IO) anaesthesia has been shown to be effective in children. However, the pain associated with anaesthetic injections, and its acceptance by children, have never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the pain associated with the IO injection of 4% articaine with 1 : 200 000 epinephrine using the computerized QuickSleeper' system in a population of children and adolescents. IO anaesthesia was performed on patients aged 10.4 +/- 2.6 years of age. The patients assessed their pain on a faces pain scale (FPS) and on a visual analogue scale (VAS). The operators were also asked to assess signs of patient pain/discomfort. No pain or mild discomfort was reported by, respectively, 81.8% (FPS) and 83.9% (VAS) of the patients. Some 58.9% of children with previous experience of dental anaesthesia reported that computerized IO anaesthesia was more comfortable than traditional infiltration methods. Operators noted signs of discomfort during penetration and injection in 18.3% and 25.3% of the patients, respectively. This study showed that the majority of children reported no pain or mild pain when anaesthetic was administered by computerized needle rotation and solution deposition. This technique holds promise for use by trained paediatric dentists.

  15. The effects of Vitamin C on Xylazine anaesthesia in rabbits | Kisani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of vitamin C on zylazine anaesthesia in rabbits. Ten apparently healthy rabbits of both sexes, aged 6 months and weighing 0.8-1.3 kg were grouped into two of five each. Xylazine at a dose of 4 mg/kg was administered intramuscularly to rabbits in both groups. Ten minutes ...

  16. Peripheral regional anaesthesia and outcome: lessons learned from the last 10 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessler, J.; Marhofer, P.; Hopkins, P. M.; Hollmann, M. W.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to review the recent evidence for the efficacy of peripheral regional anaesthesia. Following a systematic literature search and selection of publications based on prospectively agreed upon criteria, we produced a narrative review of the most commonly performed peripheral regional

  17. Medication error in anaesthesia and critical care: A cause for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kothari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication error is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in medical profession, and anaesthesia and critical care are no exception to it. Man, medicine, machine and modus operandi are the main contributory factors to it. In this review, incidence, types, risk factors and preventive measures of the medication errors are discussed in detail.

  18. Recovery of older patients undergoing ambulatory anaesthesia with isoflurane or sevoflurane.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mahajan, V A

    2007-06-01

    Delayed recovery of cognitive function is a well-recognized phenomenon in older patients. The potential for the volatile anaesthetic used to contribute to alterations in postoperative cognitive function in older patients following minor surgical procedures has not been determined. We compared emergence from isoflurane and sevoflurane anaesthesia in older surgical patients undergoing urological procedures of short duration.

  19. Night shift fatigue among anaesthesia trainees at a major metropolitan teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, B M

    2016-05-01

    Night shifts expose anaesthesia trainees to the risk of fatigue and, potentially, fatigue-related performance impairment. This study examined the workload, fatigue and coping strategies of anaesthesia trainees during night shifts. A blinded survey-based study was undertaken at a major single centre metropolitan teaching hospital in Australia. All ten anaesthesia trainees who worked night shifts participated. The survey collected data on duration of night shifts, workload, and sleep patterns. Fatigue was assessed using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). There were 93 night shifts generating data out of a potential 165. Trainees tended to sleep an increasing amount before their shift as the nights progressed from 1 to 5. Night 1 was identified as an 'at risk' night due to the amount of time spent awake before arriving at work (32% awake for U+003E8 hours); on all other nights trainees were most likely to have slept 6-8 hours. The KSS demonstrated an increase in sleepiness of 3 to 4 points on the scale from commencement to conclusion of a night shift. The Night 1 conclusion sleepiness was markedly worse than any other night with 42% falling into an 'at-risk' category. The findings demonstrate fatigue and inadequate sleep in anaesthesia trainees during night shifts in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. The data obtained may help administrators prepare safer rosters, and junior staff develop improved strategies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue.

  20. Imaging and outcome in severe complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia: report of 16 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiapparini, L.; Savoiardo, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy); Sghirlanzoni, A.; Pareyson, D. [Department of Neurology, Istituto Nazionale Neurologico, Milano (Italy)

    2000-08-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological features in 16 patients with serious neurological complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia. We observed acute, transient or permanent and delayed complications. Four patients had symptoms immediately after the procedure. One patient developed a subacute flaccid paraparesis. Two other patients had infectious spondylodiscitis at lumbar puncture level. Eight patients had a delayed progressive spastic paraparesis and were found to have subarachnoid cysts and irregularities of the surface of the spinal cord consistent with arachnoiditis; six of them had an extensive, complex syrinx within the cord. One patient had a severe lumbar polyradiculopathy, and MRI showed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina. Although epidural anaesthesia is generally considered safe, rare but severe complications, such as radiculopathy, infectious disease, myelopathy from ischemia and arachnoiditis with a syrinx may occur. The patients with arachnoiditis had a relentless progression of the disease and a poor outcome: five are confined to a wheelchair, one is bedridden. Complications of epidural anaesthesia are easily recognised when they develop immediately; their relationship to the anaesthesia may be ignored or underestimated when they appear after a delay. Awareness of the possibility of delayed complications is important. (orig.)

  1. Imaging and outcome in severe complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia: report of 16 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapparini, L.; Savoiardo, M.; Sghirlanzoni, A.; Pareyson, D.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the clinical and neuroradiological features in 16 patients with serious neurological complications of lumbar epidural anaesthesia. We observed acute, transient or permanent and delayed complications. Four patients had symptoms immediately after the procedure. One patient developed a subacute flaccid paraparesis. Two other patients had infectious spondylodiscitis at lumbar puncture level. Eight patients had a delayed progressive spastic paraparesis and were found to have subarachnoid cysts and irregularities of the surface of the spinal cord consistent with arachnoiditis; six of them had an extensive, complex syrinx within the cord. One patient had a severe lumbar polyradiculopathy, and MRI showed adhesive arachnoiditis involving the cauda equina. Although epidural anaesthesia is generally considered safe, rare but severe complications, such as radiculopathy, infectious disease, myelopathy from ischemia and arachnoiditis with a syrinx may occur. The patients with arachnoiditis had a relentless progression of the disease and a poor outcome: five are confined to a wheelchair, one is bedridden. Complications of epidural anaesthesia are easily recognised when they develop immediately; their relationship to the anaesthesia may be ignored or underestimated when they appear after a delay. Awareness of the possibility of delayed complications is important. (orig.)

  2. Pharmacokinetics of rocuronium after bolus and continuous infusion during halothane anaesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, E.P; Mirakhur, R.K; Maddineni, V.R; Wierda, J.MKH; Proost, Hans

    We have studied the pharmacokinetics of a single bolus of rocuronium (Org 9426), followed by an infusion, in eight patients during anaesthesia with halothane and nitrous oxide in oxygen. Neuromuscular block was monitored using train-of-four (TOF) stimulation and recording the force of contraction of

  3. The feasibility, safety and cost of infiltration anaesthesia for hernia repair. Hvidovre Hospital Hernia Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, T; Bech, K; Kehlet, H

    1998-01-01

    Data from 400 consecutive elective ambulatory operations for inguinal hernia under unmonitored local anaesthesia with limited pre-operative testing were prospectively obtained by the use of standardised files and questionnaires to assess the feasibility, patient satisfaction and potential cost re...

  4. Anaesthesia for awake craniotomy: A report of two cases in national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthesia for neurosurgery while the patient remains awake requires a highly motivated patient and provision of high safety standard. Resection of brain tumours may cause neurological sequelae especially in the eloquent cortex depending on the site and size of tumour. Awake craniotomy which allows monitoring and ...

  5. Depth of anaesthesia monitoring in obese patients: a randomized study of propofol-remifentanil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyhoff, C S; Henneberg, S W; Jørgensen, B G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In obese patients, depth of anaesthesia monitoring could be useful in titrating intravenous anaesthetics. We hypothesized that depth of anaesthesia monitoring would reduce recovery time and use of anaesthetics in obese patients receiving propofol and remifentanil. METHODS: We investig......BACKGROUND: In obese patients, depth of anaesthesia monitoring could be useful in titrating intravenous anaesthetics. We hypothesized that depth of anaesthesia monitoring would reduce recovery time and use of anaesthetics in obese patients receiving propofol and remifentanil. METHODS: We...... investigated 38 patients with a body mass index >or=30 kg/m(2) scheduled for an abdominal hysterectomy. Patients were randomized to either titration of propofol and remifentanil according to a cerebral state monitor (CSM group) or according to usual clinical criteria (control group). The primary end point.......04). During surgery, when the cerebral state index was continuously between 40 and 60, the corresponding optimal propofol infusion rate was 10 mg/kg/h based on ideal body weight. CONCLUSION: No significant reduction in time to eye opening could be demonstrated when a CSM was used to titrate propofol...

  6. Etorphine-halothane anaesthesia in two five-year-old African elephants (Loxodonta africana : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.F. Stegmann

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Anaesthesia of 2 five-year-old femaleAfrican elephants (Loxodonta africana was required for dental surgery. The animals were each premedicated with 120 mg of azaperone 60 min before transportation to the hospital. Before offloading, 1 mg etorphine was administered intramuscularly (i.m. to each elephant to facilitate walking them to the equine induction / recovery room. For induction, 2 mg etorphine was administered i.m. to each animal. Induction was complete within 6 min. Surgical anaesthesia was induced with halothane-in-oxygen after intubation of the trunk. During surgery the mean heart rate was 61 and 45 beats / min respectively. Systolic blood pressures increased to 27.5 and 25.6 kPa respectively, and were treated with intravenous azaperone. Blood pressure decreased thereafter to a mean systolic pressure of 18.1 and 19.8 kPa, respectively. Rectal temperature was 35.6 and 33.9 oC at the onset of surgery, and decreased to 35.3 and 33.5 oC, respectively, at the end of anaesthesia. Etorphine anaesthesia was reversed with 5mg diprenorphine at the completion of 90 min of surgery.

  7. Impact of sleep deprivation on anaesthesia residents' non-technical skills: a pilot simulation-based prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuschwander, A; Job, A; Younes, A; Mignon, A; Delgoulet, C; Cabon, P; Mantz, J; Tesniere, A

    2017-07-01

    Sleep deprivation is common in anaesthesia residents, but its impact on performance remains uncertain. Non-technical skills (team working, situation awareness, decision making, and task management) are key components of quality of care in anaesthesia, particularly in crisis situations occurring in the operating room. The impact of sleep deprivation on non-technical skills is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that in anaesthesia residents sleep deprivation is associated with impaired non-technical skills. Twenty anaesthesia residents were randomly allocated to undergo a simulation session after a night shift [sleep-deprived (SLD) group, n =10] or after a night of rest [rested (R) group, n =10] from January to March 2015. The simulated scenario was a situation of crisis management in the operating room. The primary end point was a composite score of anaesthetists' non-technical skills (ANTS) assessed by two blinded evaluators. Non-technical skills were significantly impaired in the SLD group [ANTS score 12.2 (interquartile range 10.5-13)] compared with the R group [14.5 (14-15), P technical skills of anaesthesia residents in a simulated anaesthesia intraoperative crisis scenario. NCT02622217. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanovic, Ana; Rossaint, Rolf; Veldeman, Michael; Bilotta, Federico; Coburn, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy (AC) renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques. Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases), which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI]. We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS), twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC), one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA). Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA) were 2% [95%CI:1-3], 8% [95%CI:6-11], 17% [95%CI:12-23] and 2% [95%CI:2-3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36-2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52-1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35-3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22-3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was abolished in a sensitivity analysis of only

  9. Anaesthesia Management for Awake Craniotomy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Stevanovic

    Full Text Available Awake craniotomy (AC renders an expanded role in functional neurosurgery. Yet, evidence for optimal anaesthesia management remains limited. We aimed to summarise the latest clinical evidence of AC anaesthesia management and explore the relationship of AC failures on the used anaesthesia techniques.Two authors performed independently a systematic search of English articles in PubMed and EMBASE database 1/2007-12/2015. Search included randomised controlled trials (RCTs, observational trials, and case reports (n>4 cases, which reported anaesthetic approach for AC and at least one of our pre-specified outcomes: intraoperative seizures, hypoxia, arterial hypertension, nausea and vomiting, neurological dysfunction, conversion into general anaesthesia and failure of AC. Random effects meta-analysis was used to estimate event rates for four outcomes. Relationship with anaesthesia technique was explored using logistic meta-regression, calculating the odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals [95%CI].We have included forty-seven studies. Eighteen reported asleep-awake-asleep technique (SAS, twenty-seven monitored anaesthesia care (MAC, one reported both and one used the awake-awake-awake technique (AAA. Proportions of AC failures, intraoperative seizures, new neurological dysfunction and conversion into general anaesthesia (GA were 2% [95%CI:1-3], 8% [95%CI:6-11], 17% [95%CI:12-23] and 2% [95%CI:2-3], respectively. Meta-regression of SAS and MAC technique did not reveal any relevant differences between outcomes explained by the technique, except for conversion into GA. Estimated OR comparing SAS to MAC for AC failures was 0.98 [95%CI:0.36-2.69], 1.01 [95%CI:0.52-1.88] for seizures, 1.66 [95%CI:1.35-3.70] for new neurological dysfunction and 2.17 [95%CI:1.22-3.85] for conversion into GA. The latter result has to be interpreted cautiously. It is based on one retrospective high-risk of bias study and significance was abolished in a sensitivity analysis of

  10. Injection anaesthesia with fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine in adult female mice: importance of antagonization and perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Thea; Jirkof, Paulin; Henke, Julia; Arras, Margarete; Cesarovic, Nikola

    2016-08-01

    Injection anaesthesia is commonly used in laboratory mice; however, a disadvantage is that post-anaesthesia recovery phases are long. Here, we investigated the potential for shortening the recovery phase after injection anaesthesia with fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine by antagonization with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole. In order to monitor side-effects, the depth of anaesthesia, heart rate (HR), core body temperature (BT) and concentration of blood gases, as well as reflex responses, were assessed during a 50 min anaesthesia. Mice were allowed to recover from the anaesthesia in their home cages either with or without antagonization, while HR, core BT and spontaneous home cage behaviours were recorded for 24 h. Mice lost righting reflex at 330 ± 47 s after intraperitoneal injection of fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine. During anaesthesia, HR averaged 225 ± 23 beats/min, respiratory rate and core BT reached steady state at 131 ± 15 breaths/min and 34.3 ± 0.25℃, respectively. Positive pedal withdrawal reflex, movement triggered by tail pinch and by toe pinch, still occurred in 25%, 31.2% and 100% of animals, respectively. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia and a marked increase in glucose concentration. After anaesthesia reversal by injection with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole, animals regained consciousness after 110 ± 18 s and swiftly returned to physiological baseline values, yet they displayed diminished levels of locomotion and disrupted circadian rhythm. Without antagonization, mice showed marked hypothermia (22 ± 1.9℃) and bradycardia (119 ± 69 beats/min) for several hours. Fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine provided reliable anaesthesia in mice with reasonable intra-anaesthetic side-effects. Post-anaesthetic period and related adverse effects were both reduced substantially by antagonization with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Transurethral cystolithotripsy with a ureteroscope under local urethral anaesthesia and sedoanalgesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzun, H.; Tomak, Y.; Zorba, O.U.; Bostan, H.; Kalkan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate if transurethral cystolithotripsy with a ureteroscope is feasible under local urethral anaesthesia, intravenous sedation and analgesia (sedoanalgesia). Methods: The prospective study was conducted from December 2009 to October 2010 and comprised 18 male patients with bladder calculi over 10mm in widest diameter regardless of etiology. The patients underwent transurethral holmium laser cystolithotripsy with a 9.5f semi-rigid ureteroscope. All patients received 2% idocaine gel local urethral anaesthesia, intravenous 0.03mg/kg midazolam and 7 micro g/kg alfentanil before the start of lithotripsy. Patients were discharged 1-3 hours after removal of the urethral foley catheter. Patients were asked to scale the discomfort and/or pain level by using visual analogue pain scale. Patients were followed up for at least 6 months. Results: The overall success rate was 89% (n=16). The mean stone diameter and total number of stones in the 16 patients was 21,48 +-6.7 (12-35) mm and 21 stones, respectively. The average age of the 16 patients was 52.3+-17.6 (45-78) years and mean operative time from begin ing of intravenous sedoanalgesia until urethral foley catheter insertion was 19.2+-18.9 (4-60) minutes. Mean pain score of the 16 patients after ureteroscopic cystolithotripsy was 1.75+-0.6cm (1-6 ). No anaesthesia-related serious complications occurred. After a follow-up of 18 months, recurrent stone formation and urethral stricture was not located in any patient. Conclusions: Transurethral cystolithotripsy with a ureteroscope under local urethral anaesthesia and sedoanalgesia for stones less than 30mm might offer patients safer anaesthesia and shorter operative time with favourable results. (author)

  12. Chronic Renin-Angiotensin System (RAS) Blockade May Not Induce Hypotension During Anaesthesia for Bariatric Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvetti, Guido; Di Salvo, Claudio; Ceccarini, Giovanni; Abramo, Antonio; Fierabracci, Paola; Magno, Silvia; Piaggi, Paolo; Vitti, Paolo; Santini, Ferruccio

    2016-06-01

    The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) for the treatment of hypertensive obese patients is steadily increasing. Some studies have reported that the use of these drugs was associated with an increased risk of hypotensive episodes, during general anaesthesia. The number of bariatric procedures is also increasing worldwide, but there is a lack of studies investigating the hypotensive effect of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers in severely obese patients during general anaesthesia for bariatric surgery. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate hemodynamic changes induced by general anaesthesia in obese patients chronically treated with ACE-I or ARB compared to a control group not treated with antihypertensive therapy. Fourteen obese subjects (mean body mass index (BMI) 47.5 kg/m(2)) treated with ACE-I or ARB and twelve obese (mean BMI 45.7 kg/m2) controls not treated with antihypertensive therapy underwent general anaesthesia to perform laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate were monitored continuously and registered at different time points: T0 before induction, then at 2, 5, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min after induction, and the last time point taken following recovery from anaesthesia. A progressive reduction of both systolic and diastolic blood pressure values was observed without significant differences between the two groups. A similar trend of heart rate values was observed. In conclusion, our pilot study suggests that RAS blockers may be continued during the perioperative period in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, without increasing the risk of hypotensive episodes.

  13. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  14. Intraoperative dreams reported after general anaesthesia are not early interpretations of delayed awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsson, P; Brudin, L; Sandin, R H

    2008-07-01

    Dreams are more frequently reported than awareness after surgery. We define awareness as explicit recall of real intraoperative events during anaesthesia. The importance of intraoperative dreaming is poorly understood. This study was performed to evaluate whether intraoperative dreams can be associated with, or precede, awareness. We also studied whether dreams can be related to case-specific parameters. A cohort of 6991 prospectively included patients given inhalational anaesthesia were interviewed for dreams and awareness at three occasions; before they left the post-anaesthesia care unit, days 1-3 and days 7-14 after the operation. Uni- and multivariate statistical relations between dreams, awareness and case-specific parameters were assessed. Two hundred and thirty-two of 6991 patients (3.3%) reported a dream. Four of those also reported awareness and remembered real events that were distinguishable from their dream. Awareness was 19 times more common among patients who after surgery reported a dream [1.7% vs. 0.09%; odds ratio (OR) 18.7; P=0.000007], but memories of dreams did not precede memories of awareness in any of the 232 patients reporting a dream. Unpleasant dreams were significantly more common when thiopentone was used compared with propofol (OR 2.22; P=0.005). Neutral or pleasant dreams were related to lower body mass index, female gender and shorter duration of anaesthesia. We found a statistically significant association between dreams reported after general anaesthesia and awareness, although intraoperative dreams were not an early interpretation of delayed awareness in any case. A typical dreamer in this study is a lean female having a short procedure.

  15. The baboon model under anaesthesia for in vivo cerebral blood flow studies using single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormehl, I.; Redelinghuys, F.; Hugo, N.; Oliver, D.; Pilloy, W.

    1992-01-01

    Single photon computed tomography of the brain can be useful in animal experimentation directed towards cerebral conditions. A well established and understood baboon model, necessarily under anaesthesia, could especially be valuable in such investigations. Six normal baboons were studied under various anesthetic agents and their combinations: ketamine, thiopentone, pentobarbitone and halothane. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies were performed with 99m Tc-HMPAO. CBF effects from various anaesthesia were detected, requiring careful choice of the anaesthesia for cerebral investigations. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  16. The baboon model under anaesthesia for in vivo cerebral blood flow studies using single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dormehl, I.; Redelinghuys, F.; Hugo, N. [Pretoria Univ. (South Africa); Oliver, D.; Pilloy, W. [Medical Univ. of Southern Africa (MEDUNSA), Pretoria (South Africa)

    1992-12-31

    Single photon computed tomography of the brain can be useful in animal experimentation directed towards cerebral conditions. A well established and understood baboon model, necessarily under anaesthesia, could especially be valuable in such investigations. Six normal baboons were studied under various anesthetic agents and their combinations: ketamine, thiopentone, pentobarbitone and halothane. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) studies were performed with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. CBF effects from various anaesthesia were detected, requiring careful choice of the anaesthesia for cerebral investigations. (author). 13 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs.

  17. On-line analysis of middle latency auditory evoked potentials (MLAEP) for monitoring depth of anaesthesia in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E W; Nygaard, M; Henneberg, S W

    1998-01-01

    In laboratory animals as well as in human beings a depth of anaesthesia, where the subject has no pain or recall of events from the surgery, should be provided. Haemodynamic parameters such as heart rate and blood pressure are not a guarantee for an optimal depth of anaesthesia, especially when...... and decreasing gradually to a level between 50 and 20 as the rat was anaesthetised. Nine rats were anaesthetised and included in the study. Four doses of Hypnorm vet. and Dormicum were given as a total, each with 5 minutes interval. Clinical signs of the level of anaesthesia were observed simultaneously...

  18. A national survey of the effects of fatigue on trainees in anaesthesia in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, L; Holland, J; Lomas, J-P; Redfern, N; Plunkett, E

    2017-09-01

    Long daytime and overnight shifts remain a major feature of working life for trainees in anaesthesia. Over the past 10 years, there has been an increase in awareness and understanding of the potential effects of fatigue on both the doctor and the patient. The Working Time Regulations (1998) implemented the European Working Time Directive into UK law, and in August 2009 it was applied to junior doctors, reducing the maximum hours worked from an average of 56 per week to 48. Despite this, there is evidence that problems with inadequate rest and fatigue persist. There is no official guidance regarding provision of a minimum standard of rest facilities for doctors in the National Health Service, and the way in which rest is achieved by trainee anaesthetists during their on-call shift depends on rota staffing and workload. We conducted a national survey to assess the incidence and effects of fatigue among the 3772 anaesthetists in training within the UK. We achieved a response rate of 59% (2231/3772 responses), with data from 100% of NHS trusts. Fatigue remains prevalent among junior anaesthetists, with reports that it has effects on physical health (73.6% [95%CI 71.8-75.5]), psychological wellbeing (71.2% [69.2-73.1]) and personal relationships (67.9% [65.9-70.0]). The most problematic factor remains night shift work, with many respondents commenting on the absence of breaks, inadequate rest facilities and 57.0% (55.0-59.1) stating they had experienced an accident or near-miss when travelling home from night shifts. We discuss potential explanations for the results, and present a plan to address the issues raised by this survey, aiming to change the culture around fatigue for the better. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. An introduction to predictive modelling of drug concentration in anaesthesia monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, J; Johnson, K

    2017-01-01

    A significant amount of anaesthetists' work involves the prediction of drug effects and interactions to produce a smooth general anaesthetic that minimises drug side effects and promotes rapid emergence. Successfully managing this process requires a basic understanding of drug effects, experience and inevitably some guesswork, since it is difficult (and in some cases impossible) to anticipate all relevant patient and surgical factors. Although data are generally available to allow calculation of plasma drug and effect site concentrations, this is often difficult to apply in complex clinical contexts, particularly when multiple drug types are used. In recent years, manufacturers have developed and incorporated into anaesthetic workstations technologies that use drug pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data to predict drug effects and interactions. Such systems can predict the duration and effects of drugs during anaesthesia and assist the anaesthetist to understand complex drug interactions. With this information available, different drug types, doses and combinations may be tailored in a scientific way to maximise useful effects whilst minimising overdose and side-effects, particularly in high-risk patients. Examples are used to illustrate how such systems can be used in practice, and how drug effects and interactions can be simulated to "rehearse" an anaesthetic before any drugs are actually administered. At present only a small number of anaesthetic workstations use this technology, and as yet they are not able to manage all drugs used in anaesthetic practice. However, such systems have the potential to help anaesthetists manage the complexity of their work, and to provide information on predicted drug effects in a way that is useful and relevant to both experienced anaesthetists and trainees. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Monitored anaesthesia care – Comparison of nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine versus nalbuphine/propofol for middle ear surgeries: A double-blind randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Nallam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Middle ear surgeries (MESs are usually performed under sedation with local anaesthesia and can be well tolerated by the patient with minimal discomfort. In the present study, we compare the effect of nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine combination with nalbuphine/propofol on sedation and analgesia in monitored anaesthesia care. Methods: One hundred adult patients undergoing MESs under monitored anaesthesia care (MAC were randomly allocated into two groups. All patients in both groups received injection nalbuphine 50 μg/kg intravenously (IV. Group D received a bolus dose of injection dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg IV over 10 min followed by an infusion started at 0.4 μg/kg/h IV. Group P received a bolus dose of injection propofol 0.75 mg/kg followed by an infusion started at 0.025 mg/kg/min IV. Sedation was titrated to Ramsay Sedation Score (RSS of 3. Patient's mean arterial pressure, heart rate, saturation peripheral pulse and need for intraoperative rescue sedation/analgesia were recorded and compared. The data analysis was carried out with Z test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean RSS was significantly more in Group D (4.24 ± 1.54 as compared to Group P (2.58 ± 0.95. Overall VAS score was also significantly less in Group D (3.5 ± 1.7 than in Group P (5.4 ± 1.8. In total, 16 patients (32% in Group D had hypotension whereas 7 patients (14% only in Group P had hypotension. Conclusion: Nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine combination is superior to nalbuphine/propofol in producing sedation and decreasing VAS in patients undergoing MESs under MAC. Better surgeon and patient satisfaction were observed with nalbuphine/dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamics need to be closely monitored.

  1. [Prevention of medical device-related adverse events in hospitals: Specifying the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnet-Joschko, Sabine; Zippel, Claus; Siebert, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    The use and organisation of medical technology has an important role to play for patient and user safety in anaesthesia. Specification of the recommendations of the German Coalition for Patient Safety (APS) for users and operators of anaesthesia equipment, explore opportunities and challenges for the safe use and organisation of anaesthesia devices. We conducted a literature search in Medline/PubMed for studies dealing with the APS recommendations for the prevention of medical device-related risks in the context of anaesthesia. In addition, we performed an internet search for reports and recommendations focusing on the use and organisation of medical devices in anaesthesia. Identified studies were grouped and assigned to the recommendations. The division into users and operators was maintained. Instruction and training in anaesthesia machines is sometimes of minor importance. Failure to perform functional testing seems to be a common cause of critical incidents in anaesthesia. There is a potential for reporting to the federal authority. Starting points for the safe operation of anaesthetic devices can be identified, in particular, at the interface of staff, organisation, and (anaesthesia) technology. The APS recommendations provide valuable information on promoting the safe use of medical devices and organisation in anaesthesia. The focus will be on risks relating to the application as well as on principles and materials for the safe operation of anaesthesia equipment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Pulmonary effects of bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and levobupivacaine in parturients undergoing spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean delivery: a randomised controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lirk, P.; Kleber, N.; Mitterschiffthaler, G.; Keller, C.; Benzer, A.; Putz, G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal anaesthesia is the method of choice for elective caesarean delivery, but has been reported to worsen dynamic pulmonary function when using bupivacaine. Similar investigations are lacking for ropivacaine and levobupivacaine. We have therefore compared the pulmonary effects of

  3. Differential effects of phenylephrine and norepinephrine on peripheral tissue oxygenation during general anaesthesia : A randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poterman, Marieke; Vos, Jaap Jan; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Vanoverschelde, Henk; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kalmar, Alain F.

    BACKGROUND Phenylephrine and norepinephrine are two vasopressors commonly used to counteract anaesthesia-induced hypotension. Their dissimilar working mechanisms may differentially affect the macro and microcirculation, and ultimately tissue oxygenation. OBJECTIVES We investigated the differential

  4. Alfaxalone for maintenance of anaesthesia in ponies undergoing field castration: continuous infusion compared with intravenous boluses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Julia; Ekiri, Abel; de Vries, Annemarie

    2017-07-01

    To compare alfaxalone as continuous intravenous (IV) infusion with intermittent IV injections for maintenance of anaesthesia in ponies undergoing castration. Prospective, randomized, 'blinded' clinical study. A group of 33 entire male Welsh ponies undergoing field castration. After preanaesthetic medication with IV detomidine (10 μg kg -1 ) and butorphanol (0.05 mg kg -1 ), anaesthesia was induced with IV diazepam (0.05 mg kg -1 ) followed by alfaxalone (1 mg kg -1 ). After random allocation, anaesthesia was maintained with either IV alfaxalone 2 mg kg -1  hour -1 (group A; n = 16) or saline administered at equal volume (group S; n = 17). When necessary, additional alfaxalone (0.2 mg kg -1 ) was administered IV. Ponies were breathing room air. Using simple descriptive scales, surgical conditions and anaesthesia recovery were scored. Total amount of alfaxalone, ponies requiring additional alfaxalone and time to administration, time from induction to end of infusion and end of infusion to standing were noted. Indirect arterial blood pressure, pulse and respiratory rates, end-expiratory carbon dioxide partial pressure and arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation were recorded every 5 minutes. Data were analysed using Student t, Mann-Whitney U and chi-square tests, where appropriate (p < 0.05). Total amount of alfaxalone administered after induction of anaesthesia (0.75 ± 0.27 versus 0.17 ± 0.23 mg kg -1 ; p < 0.0001) and time to standing (14.8 ± 4 versus 11.6 ± 4 minutes; p = 0.044) were higher in group A compared to group S. Ponies requiring additional alfaxalone boluses [four (group A) versus seven (group S)] and other measured variables were similar between groups; five ponies required oxygen supplementation [three (group A) versus two (group S)]. Continuous IV infusion and intermittent administration of alfaxalone provided similar anaesthesia quality and surgical conditions in ponies undergoing field castration. Less alfaxalone

  5. Psychological impact of unexpected explicit recall of events occurring during surgery performed under sedation, regional anaesthesia, and general anaesthesia: data from the Anesthesia Awareness Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, C D; Mashour, G A; Metzger, N A; Posner, K L; Domino, K B

    2013-03-01

    Anaesthetic awareness is a recognized complication of general anaesthesia (GA) and is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although complete amnesia for intraprocedural events during sedation and regional anaesthesia (RA) may occur, explicit recall is expected by anaesthesia providers. Consequently, the possibility that there could be psychological consequences associated with unexpected explicit recall of events during sedation and RA has not been investigated. This study investigated the psychological sequelae of unexpected explicit recall of events during sedation/RA that was reported to the Anesthesia Awareness Registry. The Registry recruited subjects who self-identified as having had anaesthetic awareness. Inclusion criteria were a patient-reported awareness experience in 1990 or later and availability of medical records. The sensations experienced by the subjects during their procedure and the acute and persistent psychological sequelae attributed to this explicit recall were assessed for patients receiving sedation/RA and those receiving GA. Among the patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria, medical record review identified 27 sedation/RA and 50 GA cases. Most patients experienced distress (78% of sedation/RA vs 94% of GA). Approximately 40% of patients with sedation/RA had persistent psychological sequelae, similar to GA patients. Some sedation/RA patients reported an adverse impact on their job performance (15%), family relationships (11%), and friendships (11%), and 15% reported being diagnosed with PTSD. Patients who self-reported to the Registry unexpected explicit recall of events during sedation/RA experienced distress and persistent psychological sequelae comparable with those who had reported anaesthetic awareness during GA. Further study is warranted to determine if patients reporting distress with explicit recall after sedation/RA require psychiatric follow-up.

  6. Total intravenous anaesthesia by boluses or by continuous rate infusion of propofol in mute swans (Cygnus olor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Kerstin; Holzapfel, Judith; Brunnberg, Leo

    2011-07-01

    To investigate intravenous (IV) propofol given by intermittent boluses or by continuous rate infusion (CRI) for anaesthesia in swans. Prospective randomized clinical study. Twenty mute swans (Cygnus olor) (eight immature and 12 adults) of unknown sex undergoing painless diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Induction of anaesthesia was with 8 mg kg(-1) propofol IV. To maintain anaesthesia, ten birds (group BOLI) received propofol as boluses, whilst 10 (group CRI) received propofol as a CRI. Some physiological parameters were measured. Anaesthetic duration was 35 minutes. Groups were compared using Mann-Whitney U-test. Results are median (range). Anaesthetic induction was smooth and tracheal intubation was achieved easily in all birds. Bolus dose in group BOLI was 2.9 (1.3-4.3) mg kg(-1); interval between and number of boluses required were 4 (1-8) minutes and 6 (4-11) boluses respectively. Total dose of propofol was 19 (12.3-37.1) mg kg(-1). Awakening between boluses was very abrupt. In group CRI, propofol infusion rate was 0.85 (0.8-0.9) mg kg(-1) minute(-1), and anaesthesia was stable. Body temperature, heart and respiratory rates, oxygen saturation (by pulse oximeter) and reflexes did not differ between groups. Oxygen saturations (from pulse oximeter readings) were low in some birds. Following anaesthesia, all birds recovered within 40 minutes. In 55% of all, transient signs of central nervous system excitement occurred during recovery. 8 mg kg(-1) propofol appears an adequate induction dose for mute swans. For maintenance, a CRI of 0.85 mg kg(-1) minute(-1) produced stable anaesthesia suitable for painless clinical procedures. In contrast bolus administration, was unsatisfactory as birds awoke very suddenly, and the short intervals between bolus requirements hampered clinical procedures. Administration of additional oxygen throughout anaesthesia might reduce the incidence of low arterial haemoglobin saturation. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and

  7. The Influence of Oral Carbohydrate Solution Intake on Stress Response before Total Hip Replacement Surgery during Epidural and General Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çeliksular, M Cem; Saraçoğlu, Ayten; Yentür, Ercüment

    2016-06-01

    The effects of oral carbohydrate solutions, ingested 2 h prior to operation, on stress response were studied in patients undergoing general or epidural anaesthesia. The study was performed on 80 ASA I-II adult patients undergoing elective total hip replacement, which were randomized to four groups (n=20). Group G patients undergoing general anaesthesia fasted for 8 h preoperatively; Group GN patients undergoing general anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively; Group E patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia fasted for 8 h and Group EN patients undergoing epidural anaesthesia drank oral carbohydrate solutions preoperatively. Groups GN and EN drank 800 mL of 12.5% oral carbohydrate solution at 24:00 preoperatively and 400 mL 2 h before the operation. Blood samples were taken for measurements of glucose, insulin, cortisol and IL-6 levels. The effect of preoperative oral carbohydrate ingestion on blood glucose levels was not significant. Insulin levels 24 h prior to surgery were similar; however, insulin levels measured just before surgery were 2-3 times higher in groups GN and EN than in groups G and E. Insulin levels at the 24(th) postoperative hour in epidural groups were increased compared to those at basal levels, although general anaesthesia groups showed a decrease. From these measurements, only the change in Group EN was statistically significant (poral carbohydrate nutrition did not reveal a significant effect on surgical stress response.

  8. No cases of perioperative allergy to local anaesthetics in the Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisselgaard, A D; Krøigaard, M; Mosbech, H F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Local anaesthetics (LA) are often suspected as possible causes of allergic reactions. The Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre (DAAC) is the national reference centre for investigation of perioperative allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of Ig......E-mediated immediate type perioperative allergic reactions to LA. METHODS: In the period 2004-2013, a total of 409 patients (244 women/165 men; median age 49 years, range 1-86 years) were investigated in DAAC on suspicion of allergy associated with anaesthesia and surgery. A total of 162 (40%) patients were exposed...... were carried out on 162 patients (89 women/73 men; mean age 49 years, range 2-85 years) with the following drugs: Lidocaine n = 80 (49%), bupivacaine n = 82 (51%), ropivacaine n = 31 (19%) and mepivacaine n = 10 (6%). All 162 patients had negative subcutaneous provocation for all tested LA (95% CI: 0...

  9. National critical incident reporting systems relevant to anaesthesia: a European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S; Arnal, D; Frank, O; Gomez-Arnau, J I; Hansen, J; Lester, O; Mikkelsen, K L; Rhaiem, T; Rosenberg, P H; St Pierre, M; Schleppers, A; Staender, S; Smith, A F

    2014-03-01

    Critical incident reporting is a key tool in the promotion of patient safety in anaesthesia. We surveyed representatives of national incident reporting systems in six European countries, inviting information on scope and organization, and intelligence on factors determining success and failure. Some systems are government-run and nationally conceived; others started out as small, specialty-focused initiatives, which have since acquired a national reach. However, both national co-ordination and specialty enthusiasts seem to be necessary for an optimally functioning system. The role of reporting culture, definitional issues, and dissemination is discussed. We make recommendations for others intending to start new systems and speculate on the prospects for sharing patient safety lessons relevant to anaesthesia at European level.

  10. Bilateral primary spontaneous pneumothoraces postcaesarean section – another reason to avoid general anaesthesia in pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Christina Yi Ling; McKean, David; Dark, Allan; Akinsola, S Adeyemi

    2012-01-01

    A 36-year-old, healthy, primiparous female underwent a caesarean section under general anaesthetic. She had previously had a severe reaction to dye during a myelogram and therefore, had declined epidural analgesia or regional anaesthesia. Induction and maintenance of anaesthesia was uneventful, but on emergence, and before tracheal extubation, the patient coughed on the endotracheal tube and almost immediately developed right-sided subcutaneous emphysema of the face and neck. At this point her oxygen saturation began to fall and she was noted to be difficult to ventilate. Clinically and radiologically, she had a right-sided pneumothorax which was treated immediately with intercostal drain insertion. She went on to develop a left pneumothorax which also required intercostal drain insertion. She made an uneventful recovery and was discharged 8 days later. A subsequent CT scan of her chest revealed no pre-existing primary pulmonary pathology that would have accounted for the pneumothoraces. PMID:22927264

  11. Uteroplacental blood flow measured by placental scintigraphy during epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjoeldebrand, A.; Eklund, J.; Johansson, H.; Lunell, N.-O.; Nylund, L.; Sarby, B.; Thornstroem, S. (Departments of Anaesthesiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Medical Physics, Karolinska Institute at Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1990-01-01

    The uteroplacental blood flow was measured before and during epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in 11 woman. The blood flow was measured with dynamic placental scintigraphy. After an i.v. injection of indium-113m chloride, the gamma radiation over the placenta was recorded with a computer-linked scintillation camera. The uteroplacental blood flow could be calculated from the isotope accumulation curve. The anaesthesia was performed with bupivacaine plain 0.5%, 18-22 ml and a preload of a balanced electrolyte solution 10 ml/kg b.w. was given. The placental blood flow decreased in eight patients and increased in three with a median change of -21%, not being statistically significant. No correlation between maternal blood pressure and placental blood flow was found. (author).

  12. Uteroplacental blood flow measured by placental scintigraphy during epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjoeldebrand, A.; Eklund, J.; Johansson, H.; Lunell, N.-O.; Nylund, L.; Sarby, B.; Thornstroem, S.

    1990-01-01

    The uteroplacental blood flow was measured before and during epidural anaesthesia for caesarean section in 11 woman. The blood flow was measured with dynamic placental scintigraphy. After an i.v. injection of indium-113m chloride, the gamma radiation over the placenta was recorded with a computer-linked scintillation camera. The uteroplacental blood flow could be calculated from the isotope accumulation curve. The anaesthesia was performed with bupivacaine plain 0.5%, 18-22 ml and a preload of a balanced electrolyte solution 10 ml/kg b.w. was given. The placental blood flow decreased in eight patients and increased in three with a median change of -21%, not being statistically significant. No correlation between maternal blood pressure and placental blood flow was found. (author)

  13. Intravenous anaesthesia using detomidine, ketamine and guaiphenesin for laparotomy in pregnant pony mares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Polly M; Luna, Stelio Pl; White, Kate L; Bloomfield, Malcolm; Fowden, Abigail L

    2001-07-01

    Objective To characterize intravenous anaesthesia with detomidine, ketamine and guaiphenesin in pregnant ponies. Animals Twelve pony mares, at 260-320 days gestation undergoing abdominal surgery to implant fetal and maternal vascular catheters. Materials and methods Pre-anaesthetic medication with intravenous (IV) acepromazine (30 µg kg -1 ), butorphanol (20 µg kg -1 ) and detomidine (10 µg kg -1 ) preceded induction of anaesthesia with detomidine (10 µg kg -1 ) and ketamine (2 mg kg -1 ) IV Maternal arterial blood pressure was measured directly throughout anaesthesia and arterial blood samples were taken at 20-minute intervals for measurement of blood gases and plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose and lactate. Anaesthesia was maintained with an IV infusion of detomidine (0.04 mg mL -1 ), ketamine (4 mg mL -1 ) and guaiphenesin (100 mg mL -1 ) (DKG) for 140 minutes. Oxygen was supplied by intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) adjusted to maintain PaCO 2 between 5.0 and 6.0 kPa (38 and 45 mm Hg), while PaO 2 was kept close to 20.0 kPa (150 mm Hg) by adding nitrous oxide. Simultaneous fetal and maternal blood samples were withdrawn at 90 minutes. Recovery quality was assessed. Results DKG was infused at 0.67 ± 0.17 mL kg -1 hour -1 for 1 hour then reduced, reaching 0.28 ± 0.14 mL kg -1 hour -1 at 140 minutes. Arterial blood gas values and pH remained within intended limits. During anaesthesia there was no change in heart rate, but arterial blood pressure decreased by 10%. Plasma glucose and lactate increased (10-fold and 2-fold, respectively) and cortisol decreased by 50% during anaesthesia. Fetal umbilical venous pH, PO 2 and PCO 2 were 7.34 ± 0.06, 5.8 ± 0.9 kPa (44 ± 7 mm Hg) and 6.7 ± 0.8 kPa (50 ± 6 mm Hg); and fetal arterial pH, PO 2 and PCO 2 were 7.29 ± 0.06, 4.0 ± 0.7 kPa (30 ± 5 mm Hg) and 7.8 ± 1.7 kPa (59 ± 13 mm Hg), respectively. Surgical conditions were good but four ponies required a single additional dose of ketamine

  14. Interscalene plexus block versus general anaesthesia for shoulder surgery: a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Lars J; Loosen, Gregor; Weiss, Christel; Schmittner, Marc D

    2015-02-01

    This randomized clinical trial evaluates interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB), general anaesthesia (GA) and the combination of both anaesthetic methods (GA + ISB) in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. From July 2011 until May 2012, 120 patients (male/female), aged 20-80 years, were allocated randomly to receive ISB (10 ml mepivacaine 1 % and 20 ml ropivacaine 0.375%), GA (propofol, sunfentanil, desflurane) or ISB + GA. The primary outcome variable was opioid consumption at the day of surgery. Anaesthesia times were analysed as secondary endpoints. After surgery, 27 of 40 patients with a single ISB bypassed the recovery room (p surgery [GA: n = 25 vs. GA + ISB: n = 10 vs. ISB: n = 10, p = 0.0037]. ISB is superior to GA and GA + ISB in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in terms of faster recovery and analgesics consumption.

  15. Thermal balance during transurethral resection of the prostate. A comparison of general anaesthesia and epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stjernström, H; Henneberg, S; Eklund, A

    1985-01-01

    of the prostate resulted in a peroperative heat loss which was not influenced by the anaesthetic technique used and averaged 370 kJ during the first hour of surgery. G.A. reduced heat production while this was uninfluenced by E.A. After termination of general anaesthesia, oxygen uptake and plasma catecholamines...... anaesthesia (G.A.) or epidural analgesia (E.A.). Oxygen uptake, catecholamines, peripheral and central temperatures were followed in the per- and postoperative period. Heat production and total body heat were calculated from oxygen uptake and temperature measurements, respectively. Transurethral resection...... increased, while no such changes could be detected using epidural analgesia. The ability to increase mean body temperature by increasing heat production was negatively correlated to age....

  16. Anaesthesia of gemsbok (Oryx gazella with a combination of A3080, medetomidine and ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Grobler

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available An effective anaesthesia protocol was developed for adult free-ranging gemsbok (Oryx gazella using a combination of A3080, medetomidine and ketamine. Ashort induction time; good muscle relaxation, adequate oxygenation and stable heart rate and respiration rate characterised this anaesthetic regime. Equal doses of A3080 and medetomidine (22-45 µg/kg plus 200 mg of ketamine were administered to each animal. The anaesthesia was rapidly and completely reversed by intramuscular naltrexone at a dose of X = 0.9 ± 0.2 mg/kg and atipamezole at a dose X±90 ±20 µg/kg. No mortality or morbidity occurred with this protocol.

  17. Lumbar Discectomy of a Patient of Mitral Stenosis with Chronic Atrial Fibrillation Under Epidural Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya R Kulkarni

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old female patient posted for discectomy of lumbar region L 3 -L 4 was accidently diagnosed to have chronic atrial fibrillation of rheumatic aetiology.This is a case report of this patient of critical mitral stenosis with mild mitral regurgitation with chronic atrial fibrillation managed successfully under lower thoracic epidural anaesthesia,in prone position without any compli-cation.

  18. An Audit of Anaesthesia Record-keeping at the Lagos University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An Audit of Anaesthesia Record-keeping at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. ... in the re-audit were Pre-operative history (51% to 91% p<0.0001), blood pressure (65% to 78% p=0.04), pulse rate (47% to 65% p=0.015), administration of premedication (30% to 63% p<0.001), and ASA score (60% to 78%, p=0.009).

  19. Systematic review of the neurocognitive outcomes used in studies of paediatric anaesthesia neurotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Nicola Groes

    2018-01-01

    Summary Neurotoxicity of anaesthetics in developing brain cells is well documented in preclinical studies, yet results are conflicting in humans. The use of many and different outcome measures in human studies may contribute to this disagreement. We conducted a systematic review to identify all...... for studies investigating neurocognitive outcome after GA in children countries during 1990-2017. Most assessments were performed within cognition, sensory-motor development, academic achievement or neuropsychological diagnosis. Few studies assessed other...... Anaesthesia, General; Child Development; Infant; Review...

  20. Comparison of Bispectral Index and Entropy values with electroencephalogram during surgical anaesthesia with sevoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aho, A J; Kamata, K; Jäntti, V; Kulkas, A; Hagihira, S; Huhtala, H; Yli-Hankala, A

    2015-08-01

    Concomitantly recorded Bispectral Index® (BIS) and Entropy™ values sometimes show discordant trends during general anaesthesia. Previously, no attempt had been made to discover which EEG characteristics cause discrepancies between BIS and Entropy. We compared BIS and Entropy values, and analysed the changes in the raw EEG signal during surgical anaesthesia with sevoflurane. In this prospective, open-label study, 65 patients receiving general anaesthesia with sevoflurane were enrolled. BIS, Entropy and multichannel digital EEG were recorded. Concurrent BIS and State Entropy (SE) values were selected. Whenever BIS and SE values showed ≥10-unit disagreement for ≥60 s, the raw EEG signal was analysed both in time and frequency domain. A ≥10-unit disagreement ≥60 s was detected 428 times in 51 patients. These 428 episodes accounted for 5158 (11%) out of 45 918 analysed index pairs. During EEG burst suppression, SE was higher than BIS in 35 out of 49 episodes. During delta-theta dominance, BIS was higher than SE in 141 out of 157 episodes. During alpha or beta activity, SE was higher than BIS in all 49 episodes. During electrocautery, both BIS and SE changed, sometimes in the opposite direction, but returned to baseline values after electrocautery. Electromyography caused index disagreement four times (BIS > SE). Certain specific EEG patterns, and artifacts, are associated with discrepancies between BIS and SE. Time and frequency domain analyses of the original EEG improve the interpretation of studies involving BIS, Entropy and other EEG-based indices. NCT01077674. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Delivery of tidal volume from four anaesthesia ventilators during volume-controlled ventilation: a bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallon, G; Bonnet, A; Guérin, C

    2013-06-01

    Tidal volume (V(T)) must be accurately delivered by anaesthesia ventilators in the volume-controlled ventilation mode in order for lung protective ventilation to be effective. However, the impact of fresh gas flow (FGF) and lung mechanics on delivery of V(T) by the newest anaesthesia ventilators has not been reported. We measured delivered V(T) (V(TI)) from four anaesthesia ventilators (Aisys™, Flow-i™, Primus™, and Zeus™) on a pneumatic test lung set with three combinations of lung compliance (C, ml cm H2O(-1)) and resistance (R, cm H2O litre(-1) s(-2)): C60R5, C30R5, C60R20. For each CR, three FGF rates (0.5, 3, 10 litre min(-1)) were investigated at three set V(T)s (300, 500, 800 ml) and two values of PEEP (0 and 10 cm H2O). The volume error = [(V(TI) - V(Tset))/V(Tset)] ×100 was computed in body temperature and pressure-saturated conditions and compared using analysis of variance. For each CR and each set V(T), the absolute value of the volume error significantly declined from Aisys™ to Flow-i™, Zeus™, and Primus™. For C60R5, these values were 12.5% for Aisys™, 5% for Flow-i™ and Zeus™, and 0% for Primus™. With an increase in FGF, absolute values of the volume error increased only for Aisys™ and Zeus™. However, in C30R5, the volume error was minimal at mid-FGF for Aisys™. The results were similar at PEEP 10 cm H2O. Under experimental conditions, the volume error differed significantly between the four new anaesthesia ventilators tested and was influenced by FGF, although this effect may not be clinically relevant.

  2. Pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia in awake hypotensive trauma patients: beneficial or detrimental?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crewdson, K; Rehn, M; Brohi, K; Lockey, D J

    2018-04-01

    The benefits of pre-hospital emergency anaesthesia (PHEA) are controversial. Patients who are hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia are at risk of severe cardiovascular instability post-induction. This study compared mortality for hypovolaemic trauma patients (without major neurological injury) undergoing PHEA with a patient cohort with similar physiology transported to hospital without PHEA. A retrospective database review was performed to identify patients who were hypotensive on scene [systolic blood pressure (SBP) < 90 mmHg], and GCS 13-15. Patient records were reviewed independently by two pre-hospital clinicians to identify the likelihood of hypovolaemia. Primary outcome measure was mortality defined as death before hospital discharge. Two hundred and thirty-six patients were included; 101 patients underwent PHEA. Fifteen PHEA patients died (14.9%) compared with six non-PHEA patients (4.4%), P = 0.01; unadjusted OR for death was 3.73 (1.30-12.21; P = 0.01). This association remained after adjustment for age, injury mechanism, heart rate and hypovolaemia (adjusted odds ratio 3.07 (1.03-9.14) P = 0.04). Fifty-eight PHEA patients (57.4%) were hypovolaemic prior to induction of anaesthesia, 14 died (24%). Of 43 PHEA patients (42.6%) not meeting hypovolaemia criteria, one died (2%); unadjusted OR for mortality was 13.12 (1.84-578.21). After adjustment for age, injury mechanism and initial heart rate, the odds ratio for mortality remained significant at 9.99 (1.69-58.98); P = 0.01. Our results suggest an association between PHEA and in-hospital mortality in awake hypotensive trauma patients, which is strengthened when hypotension is due to hypovolaemia. If patients are hypovolaemic and awake on scene it might, where possible, be appropriate to delay induction of anaesthesia until hospital arrival. © 2018 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Criteria for selecting children with special needs for dental treatment under general anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Nova García, M. Joaquín de; Gallardo López, Nuria E.; Martín Sanjuán, Carmen; Mourelle Martínez, M. Rosa; Alonso García, Yolanda; Carracedo Cabaleiro, Esther

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study criteria for helping to select children with special needs for dental treatment under general anaesthesia. Materials and methods: Group of 30 children (aged under 18) examined on the Course at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) (Specialisation on holistic dental treatment of children with special needs) and subsequently referred to the Disabled Children’s Oral Health Unit (DCOHU) within Primary Health Care Area 2 of the Madrid Health Service (SERMAS) where dental ...

  4. Percutaneous vertebroplasty under local anaesthesia: feasibility regarding patients' experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, Eric; Foti, Pauline; Amoretti, Nicolas [Nice University Hospital, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology Unit, Nice (France); Kastler, Adrian [Grenoble University Hospital, Neuroradiology and MRI Unit, CLUNI, Grenoble (France)

    2017-04-15

    Evaluate patients' intraoperative experience of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) performed without general anaesthesia in order to assess the feasibility of local anaesthesia and simple analgesic medication as pain control protocol. Ninety-five patients who underwent single-site PV were consecutively included in the study between 2011 and 2013. Each procedure was achieved under local anaesthesia and perfusion of paracetamol, tramadol and dolasetron, with combined CT and fluoroscopy guidance. Numeric pain scale (NPS) was collected before, during and after intervention. After intervention, patients were asked to evaluate their experience as ''very bad'', ''bad'', ''fair'', ''good'' or ''very good'', independently of the pain. Indications for vertebroplasty were osteopenic fractures (78 %), aggressive angiomas (13 %) and somatic tumours (9 %). In 76 % of cases, patients' experience was described as ''very good'' (44 %) or ''good'' (32 %), whereas 19 % described it as ''fair'' and 5 % as ''very bad''. Mean operative NPS was 5.5. After intervention, NPS was significantly lower with a decrease of 4.5 points. No differences were found according to the localization, type of lesion, age or sex either in terms of experience or NPS. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is feasible under local anaesthesia alone, with a very good or good experience in 76 % of the patients. (orig.)

  5. Unplanned intensive care unit admission after general anaesthesia in children: A single centre retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John; Clément de Clety, Stephan; Collard, Edith; De Kock, Marc; Detaille, Thierry; Houtekie, Laurent; Jadin, Laurence; Bairy, Laurent; Veyckemans, Francis

    2016-06-01

    To determine the main causes for unplanned admission of children to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) following anaesthesia in our centre. To compare the results with previous publications and propose a data sheet for the prospective collection of such information. Inclusion criteria were any patient under 16 years who had an unplanned post-anaesthetic admission to the PICU from 1999 to 2010 in our university hospital. Age, ASA score, type of procedure, origin and causes of the incident(s) that prompted admission and time of the admission decision were recorded. Out of a total of 44,559 paediatric interventions performed under anaesthesia during the study period, 85 were followed with an unplanned admission to the PICU: 67% of patients were younger than 5 years old. Their ASA status distribution from I to IV was 13, 47, 39 and 1%, respectively. The cause of admission was anaesthetic, surgical or mixed in 50, 37 and 13% of cases, respectively. The main causes of anaesthesia-related admission were respiratory or airway management problems (44%) and cardiac catheterisation complications (29%). In 62%, the admission decision was taken in the operating room. Unplanned admission to the PICU after general anaesthesia is a rare event. In our series, most cases were less than 5 years old and were associated with at least one comorbidity. The main cause of admission was respiratory distress and the main type of procedure associated with admission was cardiac catheterisation. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Horses Auto-Recruit Their Lungs by Inspiratory Breath Holding Following Recovery from General Anaesthesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Mosing

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the breathing pattern and distribution of ventilation in horses prior to and following recovery from general anaesthesia using electrical impedance tomography (EIT. Six horses were anaesthetised for 6 hours in dorsal recumbency. Arterial blood gas and EIT measurements were performed 24 hours before (baseline and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 hours after horses stood following anaesthesia. At each time point 4 representative spontaneous breaths were analysed. The percentage of the total breath length during which impedance remained greater than 50% of the maximum inspiratory impedance change (breath holding, the fraction of total tidal ventilation within each of four stacked regions of interest (ROI (distribution of ventilation and the filling time and inflation period of seven ROI evenly distributed over the dorso-ventral height of the lungs were calculated. Mixed effects multi-linear regression and linear regression were used and significance was set at p<0.05. All horses demonstrated inspiratory breath holding until 5 hours after standing. No change from baseline was seen for the distribution of ventilation during inspiration. Filling time and inflation period were more rapid and shorter in ventral and slower and longer in most dorsal ROI compared to baseline, respectively. In a mixed effects multi-linear regression, breath holding was significantly correlated with PaCO2 in both the univariate and multivariate regression. Following recovery from anaesthesia, horses showed inspiratory breath holding during which gas redistributed from ventral into dorsal regions of the lungs. This suggests auto-recruitment of lung tissue which would have been dependent and likely atelectic during anaesthesia.

  7. Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Peker, Kevser; Ergil, Julide; Öztürk, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that may cause hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, neurocristopathy and partial albinism. Incidence is estimated as 2%–3% among the cases of congenital deafness and 1/42,000 of the general population. Children with Waardenburg syndrome usually require anaesthesia for the cochlear implant operation in early age. The features of the syndrome that may bear importance for anaesthetic management are laryngomalacia, multiple muscle contr...

  8. Neurolinguistic programming used to reduce the need for anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients undergoing MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Bigley, J; Griffiths, P D; Prydderch, A; Romanowski, C A J; Miles, L; Lidiard, H; Hoggard, N

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the success of neurolinguistic programming in reducing the need for general anaesthesia in claustrophobic patients who require MRI and to consider the financial implications for health providers. This was a prospective study performed in 2006 and 2007 at a teaching hospital in England and comprised 50 adults who had unsuccessful MR examinations because of claustrophobia. The main outcome measures were the ability to tolerate a successful MR examination ...

  9. A mobile telephone-based SMS and internet survey system for self-assessment in Australian anaesthesia: experience of a single practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belavy, D

    2014-11-01

    Self-assessment and audit in anaesthesia require a systematic approach to postoperative data collection. The increasing prevalence of mobile internet technology offers a new data collection method for anaesthetists. In this paper, a system for mobile internet data collection is described and the preliminary experience with its use is presented. The system was developed by the author and combined an open source survey application and a short message service (SMS) gateway to send SMS messages to patients after their anaesthesia and surgery. The messages requested patients to complete an online Quality of Recovery survey questionnaire if they had a smartphone. The results were immediately available. A preliminary survey of consenting patients with available mobile telephone numbers in a private practice was undertaken by the author. A total of 123 procedures were eligible for follow-up and survey requests were sent to 94 patients. Sixty-five surveys were completed. This represents 69% of surveys requested, demonstrating that mobile phone technology can be used to provide significant amounts of data for quality assurance. However, the implementation of a mobile internet data collection system requires consideration of privacy principles, security and ethical handling of data.

  10. A survey on the knowledge and attitudes of anaesthesia providers in the United States of America, United Kingdom and Singapore on visual experiences during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, C S H; Kumar, C M; Fanning, G L; Lai, Y C; Au Eong, K G

    2006-04-01

    To assess the knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of anaesthesia providers on the patients' possible intraoperative visual experiences during cataract surgery under local anaesthesia. Anaesthesia providers from the Ophthalmic Anaesthesia Society (USA); British Ophthalmic Anaesthesia Society (UK); Alexandra Hospital, National University Hospital, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore General Hospital and Changi General Hospital (Singapore) were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. A total of 146 anaesthesiologists (81.6%), 10 ophthalmologists (5.6%) and 23 nurse anaesthetists (12.8%) responded to the survey. Most respondents believed that patients would experience light perception and many also felt that patients might encounter other visual sensations such as movements, flashes, colours, surgical instruments, hands/fingers and the surgeon during the surgery. A significantly higher proportion of anaesthesia providers with previous experience of monitoring patients under topical anaesthesia believed that patients might experience the various visual sensations compared to those who have not previously monitored. For both topical and regional anaesthesia, anaesthesia providers who routinely counsel their patients are (1) more likely to believe that preoperative counselling helps or (2) were previously told by patients that they could see intraoperatively and/or that they were frightened by their visual sensations. These findings were statistically significant. The majority of anaesthesia providers in the USA, UK and Singapore are aware that patients may experience a variety of visual sensations during cataract surgery under regional or topical anaesthesia. Those who have previously managed patients undergoing cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia are more likely to believe this compared to those who have not.

  11. Anaesthesia of nyala (Tragelaphus angasi with a combination of thiafentanil (A3080, medetomidine and ketamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Cooper

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A combination of thiafentanil (A3080, medetomidine hydrochloride (MED and ketamine hydrochloride (KET was evaluated in 19 boma-habituated (12 female and 7 males and 9 free-ranging nyala (7 male and 2 females (Tragelaphus angasi to develop a safe and reliable anaesthesia protocol. Wide dosages were used safely during this study with ranges for A3080 of 45 + 8 mg/kg with MED of 69 + 19 mg/kg and KET of 3.7 + 1.0 mg/kg (200 mg/ animal. The dosages developed on boma-habituated nyala proved to be equally effective in 9 adult free-ranging nyala (7 males and 2 females. The optimum dosage for nyala was a combination of A3080 (40-50 mg/kg, MED (60-80 mg/kg plus 200 mg of KET/animal. The anaesthesia was characterised by a short induction, good muscle relaxation and mild hypoxaemia during monitoring the anaesthesia was rapidly and completely reversed by naltrexone hydrochloride (30mg/mgof A3080 and atipamezole hydrochloride (5mg/mg of MED given intramuscularly. There was no mortality or morbidity associated with this protocol.

  12. Subcutaneous blood flow in man during sleep with continous epdural anaesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sindrup, JH; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Kastrup, Jens

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous blood flow increases during sleep and we evaluated if this increase is affected by epidural anaesthesia. METHODS: Lower leg subcutaneous blood flow was determined by 133Xenon clearance in ten subjects during continous epidural anaesthesia at L2-L3 including eight hours...... of sleep, while the opper abdominal subcutaneous blood flow served as control. RESULTS: Epidural anaesthesia to the level of the umbilicus was followed by an increase in the lower leg subcutaneous blood flow fra 3.4 (1.8-6.3) to 7.8 (3.6-16.9) ml min-1 (median and range; P....4-7.6) ml min-1 100 g-1 after 88 (45-123) min. In contrast, until the period of sleep the upper abdominal region blood flow remained at 5.2 (3.2-6.4) ml min-1 100 g-1. During sleep, lower leg subcutaneous blood flow did not change significantly, but the upper abdominal flow increased to 6.2 (5.2-7.2) ml min...

  13. Effect of preoperative multimedia information on perioperative anxiety in patients undergoing procedures under regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jlala, H A; French, J L; Foxall, G L; Hardman, J G; Bedforth, N M

    2010-03-01

    Provision of preoperative information can alleviate patients' anxiety. However, the ideal method of delivering this information is unknown. Video information has been shown to reduce patients' anxiety, although little is known regarding the effect of preoperative multimedia information on anxiety in patients undergoing regional anaesthesia. We randomized 110 patients undergoing upper or lower limb surgery under regional anaesthesia into the study and control groups. The study group watched a short film (created by the authors) depicting the patient's in-hospital journey including either a spinal anaesthetic or a brachial plexus block. Patients' anxiety was assessed before and after the film and 1 h before and within 8 h after their operation, using the Spielberger state trait anxiety inventory and a visual analogue scale. There was no difference in state and trait anxiety between the two groups at enrollment. Women had higher baseline state and trait anxiety than men (P=0.02). Patients in the control group experienced an increase in state anxiety immediately before surgery (P<0.001), and patients in the film group were less anxious before operation than those in the control group (P=0.04). After operation, there was a decrease in state anxiety from baseline in both groups, but patients in the film group were less anxious than the control group (P=0.005). Preoperative multimedia information reduces the anxiety of patients undergoing surgery under regional anaesthesia. This type of information is easily delivered and can benefit many patients.

  14. Effect of Day and Night Desflurane Anaesthesia on Melatonin Levels in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özer, Figen Datlı; Öçmen, Elvan; Akan, Pınar; Erdost, Hale Aksu; Korkut, Sezen; Gökmen, Ali Necati

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of day and night administration of desflurane anaesthesia on melatonin levels in rats. Twenty-four 15-day-old rats were included in the study and were divided into four groups. The rats were anaesthetised between 19:00-01:00 (night group) and 07:00-13:00 (day group) with 5.7% desflurane concentration in 6 L min -1 100% oxygen. 6 L min -1 oxygen was administered to the control groups. At the end of 6 h of anaesthesia, blood samples were taken, and rats were sacrificed. Blood samples were centrifuged and melatonin levels from plasma samples were measured with radioimmunoassay. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups (p=0.007). Between group day control and group night control there was a statistically significant difference (p=0.042). Further, there was a significant difference between group day control and night desfluran as well (p=0.024). We could not find any difference between other groups. This study showed that 6 hours of 5.7% desflurane anaesthesia during day and night hours did not significantly change melatonin levels.

  15. Compliance with preventive care following dental treatment of children under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerbhay, F B M

    2009-11-01

    This study evaluated the self-reported preventive dental care compliance of parents/families whose children received dental treatment under general anaesthesia. Complete records of 68 pediatric patients who attended the University of Stellenbosch's Paediatric Dentistry Department for dental treatment were included in the survey. Parents of 41 (60%) patients were interviewed telephonically to evaluate parental dental health knowledge and preventive practices. The majority (85%) of parents had a good idea about the aetiology of dental caries. An assessment of the children's dental health behaviour reveals that parents were mostly responsible for brushing the childs' teeth (44%).The majority of parents (51%) reported that following dental treatment of the child under general anaesthesia, there was no change in their child's frequency of sugar consumption. Sixty-three percent of children treated under GA had returned for the one-week follow-up. However, only 22% of children returned for the three-month follow up appointment. Parents were informed about the importance of these follow-up appointments. Parental belief that proper dental health behaviour helps maintain the teeth, did not influence parents preventive compliance, despite them having received preventive instruction. Parents were mostly responsible for brushing their child's teeth following dental treatment of their children under general anaesthesia. This research found however that, in the majority of cases there was no change in the children's frequency of sugar intake.

  16. Compliance with the CONSORT checklist in obstetric anaesthesia randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, S H; Darani, R; Douglas, M J; Wight, W; Yee, J

    2004-10-01

    The Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) checklist is an evidence-based approach to help improve the quality of reporting randomised controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine how closely randomised controlled trials in obstetric anaesthesia adhere to the CONSORT checklist. We retrieved all randomised controlled trials pertaining to the practice of obstetric anaesthesia and summarised in Obstetric Anesthesia Digest between March 2001 and December 2002 and compared the quality of reporting to the CONSORT checklist. The median number of correctly described CONSORT items was 65% (range 36% to 100%). Information pertaining to randomisation, blinding of the assessors, sample size calculation, reliability of measurements and reporting of the analysis were often omitted. It is difficult to determine the value and quality of many obstetric anaesthesia clinical trials because journal editors do not insist that this important information is made available to readers. Both clinicians and clinical researchers would benefit from uniform reporting of randomised trials in a manner that allows rapid data retrieval and easy assessment for relevance and quality.

  17. Establishment of the Department of Anaesthesia at Harvard Medical School-1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Ilan; Desai, Sukumar P

    2016-02-01

    The first academic departments of anesthesia were established in the United States at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1927, with Ralph M. Waters named as chairman, and in the UK at Oxford University in 1937, with Robert Macintosh as chairman. Compared to these early departments, more than 3 decades would pass before Harvard Medical School decided it was time to establish a department of anaesthesia, in 1969. We examine the forces on both sides of the issue, for and against, and how they played out in the late 1960s. Published articles, books, interviews, and biographical and autobiographical notes as well as primary source documents such as reports of department and medical school committee meetings were examined to obtain information relevant to our investigation. The late 1960s were an ideal time for the chiefs of anesthesia at the various Harvard teaching hospitals to make a strong argument in favor of establishment of an independent department of anaesthesia. Although strongly opposed by Francis Daniels Moore, Chief of Surgery at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, an independent department at Harvard was established in 1969. The recognition of anesthesia as a distinctive specialty at universities across the country as well as the specific concerns over administration, hiring, and the future of the clinical service in the 1960s provided overwhelming support for the establishment of a separate, free-standing department of anaesthesia at one of the most tradition-bound universities in the United States-Harvard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of prophylactic ondansetron for prevention of spinal anaesthesia induced hypotension in lower segment caesarean section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy of prophylactic administration of intravenous Ondansetron for prevention of spinal anaesthesia induced hypotension in lower segment caesarean section. Study Design: Double blinded randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: It was conducted in Anesthesiology department, CMH Rawalakot; from 3 Mar to 4 Jun 2014. Material and Methods: One hundred patients were selected for this study, and randomly divided in two groups of 50 each, using random numbers table. Both groups were preloaded with Ringer's lactate at dose of 10ml/kg. Group A received 04 mg of IV ondansetron 5 min prior to spinal anaesthesia, whereas Group B received normal saline 05 minutes before administration of Spinal Anaesthesia. Results: Average age of Group A was 28.62 +- 4.64 years, whereas that of Group B was 27.88 +- 3.98 (p-value= 0.394). Average weight of Group A was 70.30 +- 6.25 kg, whereas that of Group B was 70.74 +- 6.17 kg (p-value= 0.724). Hypotension was noted in 21 patients in group A (42 percent), whereas it was observed in 34 Patients in Group B (68 percent) (p-value= 0.009). Bradycardia was noted in 9 patients in Group A (18 percent) and 19 patients in Group B (p=0.026). Conclusion: Intravenous administration of 04 mg of intravenous ondansetron, 05 minutes prior to subarachnoid block, is effective in decreasing frequency of hypotension. (author)

  19. Real-time ultrasound-guided spinal anaesthesia: a prospective observational study of a new approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, P H

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the subarachnoid space has traditionally been achieved by either a blind landmark-guided approach or using prepuncture ultrasound assistance. To assess the feasibility of performing spinal anaesthesia under real-time ultrasound guidance in routine clinical practice we conducted a single center prospective observational study among patients undergoing lower limb orthopaedic surgery. A spinal needle was inserted unassisted within the ultrasound transducer imaging plane using a paramedian approach (i.e., the operator held the transducer in one hand and the spinal needle in the other). The primary outcome measure was the success rate of CSF acquisition under real-time ultrasound guidance with CSF being located in 97 out of 100 consecutive patients within median three needle passes (IQR 1-6). CSF was not acquired in three patients. Subsequent attempts combining landmark palpation and pre-puncture ultrasound scanning resulted in successful spinal anaesthesia in two of these patients with the third patient requiring general anaesthesia. Median time from spinal needle insertion until intrathecal injection completion was 1.2 minutes (IQR 0.83-4.1) demonstrating the feasibility of this technique in routine clinical practice.

  20. Anaesthesia care with and without tracheal intubation during emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, N; Lundstrøm, L H; Vestergaard, T R

    2015-01-01

    index score, BMI, age, sex, alcohol use, referral origin (home or in-hospital), Forrest classification, ulcer localization, and postoperative care. RESULTS: The study group comprised 3580 patients under anaesthesia care: 2101 (59%) for the TI group and 1479 (41%) for the MAC group. During the first 90...... with tracheal intubation (TI group) and without airway instrumentation (monitored anaesthesia care, MAC group) during emergency OGD. METHODS: This was a prospective, nationwide, population-based cohort study during 2006-13. Emergency OGDs performed under anaesthesia care were included. End points were 90 day...... days after OGD, 18.9% in the TI group and 18.4% in the MAC group died, crude odds ratio=1.03 [95% confidence interval (CI)=0.87-1.23, P=0.701], adjusted odds ratio=0.95 (95% CI=0.79-1.15, P=0.590). Patients in the TI group stayed slightly longer in hospital [mean 8.16 (95% CI=7.63-8.60) vs 7.63 days...

  1. Treatment of malignant central airway obstruction with Y-type metallic stent placement under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhengqiang; Shi Haibin; Zhou Weizhong; Leng Derong; Li Linsun

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical experience in treating malignant central airway obstruction with the placement of a domestic Y-shaped stent under general anaesthesia. Methods: The placement of a domestic Y-stent under general anaesthesia together with tracheal intubation was performed in three male patients of central lung cancer with the involvement of carina and subsequent malignant airway stenosis. The combination of Y-stent delivering and tracheal intubation had not been reported in the literature so far, so the technical experience was introduced in this paper. Results: The placement of Y-stent was successfully completed in all 3 patients. The whole procedure was smoothly carried out with no severe complications. After the operation the dyspnea was markedly relieved in all the patients. Conclusion: As a safe and effective treatment for malignant central airway obstructions, the placement of a domestic Y-stent under general anaesthesia can reduce patient's discomfort during the stent delivering process. A large cohort of patients is required in order to evaluate the long-term efficacy and related complications of this technique. (authors)

  2. Validity evidence of non-technical skills assessment instruments in simulated anaesthesia crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirativanont, T; Raksamani, K; Aroonpruksakul, N; Apidechakul, P; Suraseranivongse, S

    2017-07-01

    We sought to evaluate the validity of two non-technical skills evaluation instruments, the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) behavioural marker system and the Ottawa Global Rating Scale (GRS), to apply them to anaesthesia training. The content validity, response process, internal structure, relations with other variables and consequences were described for validity evidence. Simulated crisis management sessions were initiated during which two trained raters evaluated the performance of postgraduate first-, second- and third-year (PGY-1, PGY-2 and PGY-3) anaesthesia residents. The study included 70 participants, composed of 24 PGY-1, 24 PGY-2 and 22 PGY-3 residents. Both instruments differentiated the non-technical skills of PGY-1 from PGY-3 residents ( P skills were 0.86, 0.83, 0.84, 0.87, 0.80 and 0.86, respectively. The Cronbach's alpha for internal consistency of the ANTS instrument was 0.93, and was 0.96 for the Ottawa GRS. There was a high correlation between the ANTS and Ottawa GRS. The raters reported the ease of use of the Ottawa GRS compared to the ANTS. We found sufficient evidence of validity in the ANTS instrument and the Ottawa GRS for the evaluation of non-technical skills in a simulated anaesthesia setting, but the Ottawa GRS was more practical and had higher reliability.

  3. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Peer teaching as a means of enhancing communication skills in anaesthesia training: trainee perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, S M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce peer teaching of communication skills to first-year anaesthesia trainees in Ireland and to evaluate their perception of this teaching modality. Seventy-nine first-year anaesthesia trainees participated in a novel peer-led communication skills programme over a 2-year period (Y1, Y2). A Likert scaling questionnaire was developed to explore trainee perception of the peer teaching programme. Of the 79 respondents (36 in Y1 and 43 in Y2), 99% either agreed or strongly agreed that the peer teachers were successful in their role. Ninety-two percent requested formal peer teaching in other areas of training. The trainees regarded a peer teacher as an appropriate information provider (92%), role model (88%), planner (88%) and facilitator (94%), but less so as an assessor (70%). The most consistently stated strength of peer teaching was the relatability of peer teachers with their lack of experience cited as the main weakness. Eighty percent of participants preferred peer teaching to regular expert teaching. This study highlights the positive attitudes of first-year anaesthesia trainees towards a novel peer teaching programme in communication skills. This author recommends that peer teaching is further developed within postgraduate medical programmes to maximise learning for trainees in the student and teacher roles and to redistribute the teaching burden within clinical departments.

  5. Comparative Assessment of Oral Health Related Quality of Life of Children Before and After Full Mouth Rehabilitation under General Anaesthesia and Local Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Jaai Vinod; Winnier, Jasmin; Bhatia, Rupinder

    2017-01-01

    Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is an aggressive form of caries in a child who is 71 months of age or younger. If the child is cooperative, the treatment may be completed under Local Anaesthesia (LA). General Anaesthesia (GA) is considered if the child is uncooperative, medically compromised or if the parents are unable to return for regular visits and requests treatment under GA. Improved Oral health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) has been reported after dental treatment under GA. To assess and compare the improvements in OHRQoL of children who have undergone dental treatment under GA or LA. To study the preoperative severity of events that may prompt the parents to consider treatment under GA. Parents of paediatric patients who had to undergo full mouth rehabilitation under GA and LA were selected for this study. Parents were given a questionnaire to evaluate OHRQoL of children before and after completion of treatment. Preoperative and postoperative assessments were analyzed using paired t-test. Dental disease was found to have a significant impact on children's overall well being. There was a considerable improvement with relation to eating preferences, amount of food intake, sleep and pain relief before and after dental treatment. There was no significant difference if the child was treated under GA or LA. Severe caries affects the quality of life of preschool children and improvement on quality of life is significant regardless of treatment performed under GA or LA.

  6. The Effects of General and Epidural Anaesthesia in Maternal’s Stress Hormones and Blood Gases in Elective Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral EZBERCI

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of general and epidural anaesthesia in maternal’s stress hormones and blood gases in elective cesarean section.\tMATERIALS-METHODS: 50 patients in ASA II (American Society of Anesthesiology class who would undergo elective cesarean section in University of Kahramanmaras Sutcuimam, Department of Anaesthesiology and Reanimation included in the study and randomized into two equal groups (General anaesthesia: Group G and Epidural anaesthesia: Group E. In both groups, maternal stress hormones (TSH, cortisol, and insulin and blood gases were studied. All patients received famotidine and granisetron iv 30 min before operations in premedication room. In the general anaesthesia group; aritmal, propofol, and succinylcholine was used for induction and muscle relaxation. Following the induction, positive pressure ventilation of the lungs was started immediately using a 50% N2O + O2 mixture. After delivery of the baby, anaesthesia and muscle relaxation was maintained by 50% N2O +O2, 0,5-1% MAC isoflurane, and cisatracurium. In the epidural anaesthesia group; epidural anaesthesia was performed with 0,375 % bupivacaine. The epidural needle inserted through L2-3 or L3-4 interspace. After achieving T4-5 neural blockade, the operation was started. In general anaesthesia group; blood samples for maternal stres hormones were taken before induction and after delivery of the baby. In epidural anaesthesia group; blood samples for maternal stres hormones were taken catheter placement and after delivery of the baby. Blood samples for maternal blood gases were taken after the delivery of the baby.\tRESULTS: In both groups; there were statistically significant decrease in maternal TSH and insulin and there were no statistically significant changes in maternal cortisol. In maternal blood gases analyses, only PO2 and SO2 changes were statistically significant between two groups.\tCONCLUSION: With these results

  7. Risk of autistic disorder after exposure to general anaesthesia and surgery: a nationwide, retrospective matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wen-Ru; Huang, Jing-Yang; Chiang, Yi-Chen; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Jan, Shiou-Rung; Lung, Chia-Chi; Chang, Hui-Chin; Lin, Long-Yau; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2015-05-01

    Deficits of learning, memory and cognition have been observed in newborn animals exposed to general anaesthetics. However, conclusions from clinical studies conducted in humans to investigate the relationship between anaesthesia and neurodevelopmental disorders have been inconsistent. Autistic disorder is typically recognised earlier than other neurobehavioural disorders. Although certain genes apparently contribute to autistic disorder susceptibility, other factors such as perinatal insults and exposure to neurotoxic agents may play a crucial role in gene-environmental interaction. This study was designed to investigate the association of exposure to general anaesthesia/surgery with autistic disorder. We hypothesised that exposure to general anaesthesia and surgery before 2 years of age is associated with an increased risk of developing autistic disorder. A retrospective matched-cohort study. A medical university. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2001 to 2010 were analysed. The birth cohort included 114,435 children, among whom 5197 were exposed to general anaesthesia and surgery before the age of 2 years. The 1 : 4 matched controls comprised 20,788 children. The primary endpoint was the diagnosis of autistic disorder after the first exposure to general anaesthesia and surgery. No differences were found in the incidence of autistic disorder between the exposed group (0.96%) and the unexposed controls (0.89%) (P = 0.62). Cox proportional regression showed that the hazard ratio of exposure to general anaesthesia and surgery was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.57 to 1.53] after adjusting for potential confounders. Age at first exposure did not influence the risk of autistic disorder. No relationship was found between the total number of exposures and the risk of autistic disorder. Exposure to general anaesthesia and surgery before the age of 2 years age at first exposure and number of exposures were not

  8. Nitrous oxide-based techniques versus nitrous oxide-free techniques for general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rao; Jia, Wen Qin; Zhang, Peng; Yang, KeHu; Tian, Jin Hui; Ma, Bin; Liu, Yali; Jia, Run H; Luo, Xiao F; Kuriyama, Akira

    2015-11-06

    Nitrous oxide has been used for over 160 years for the induction and maintenance of general anaesthesia. It has been used as a sole agent but is most often employed as part of a technique using other anaesthetic gases, intravenous agents, or both. Its low tissue solubility (and therefore rapid kinetics), low cost, and low rate of cardiorespiratory complications have made nitrous oxide by far the most commonly used general anaesthetic. The accumulating evidence regarding adverse effects of nitrous oxide administration has led many anaesthetists to question its continued routine use in a variety of operating room settings. Adverse events may result from both the biological actions of nitrous oxide and the fact that to deliver an effective dose, nitrous oxide, which is a relatively weak anaesthetic agent, needs to be given in high concentrations that restrict oxygen delivery (for example, a common mixture is 30% oxygen with 70% nitrous oxide). As well as the risk of low blood oxygen levels, concerns have also been raised regarding the risk of compromising the immune system, impaired cognition, postoperative cardiovascular complications, bowel obstruction from distention, and possible respiratory compromise. To determine if nitrous oxide-based anaesthesia results in similar outcomes to nitrous oxide-free anaesthesia in adults undergoing surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014 Issue 10); MEDLINE (1966 to 17 October 2014); EMBASE (1974 to 17 October 2014); and ISI Web of Science (1974 to 17 October 2014). We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles, conference proceedings, and ongoing trials up to 17 October 2014 on specific websites (http://clinicaltrials.gov/, http://controlled-trials.com/, and http://www.centerwatch.com). We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing general anaesthesia where nitrous oxide was part of the anaesthetic technique used for the induction or maintenance of general

  9. Preventive aspects in children's caries treatments preceding dental care under general anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savanheimo, Nora; Vehkalahti, Miira M

    2008-03-01

    In Helsinki Public Dental Service (PDS) the Special Oral Health Care Unit (SOHCU) provides comprehensive dental treatments under general anaesthesia (GA). For the present study, all dental treatment given under GA for generally healthy children (n = 102) below 16 years of age (range 2.3-15.8) during a 1-year period and dental treatment and visits of these children in the preceding 2 years in Helsinki PDS was recorded in detail. These children were referred to the SOHCU because of serious difficulties in dental care due to large treatment needs or failures in psychological and chemical management, including sedation. To describe treatments given to generally healthy children under GA and to evaluate preventive aspects of their dental care in the preceding 2 years. The study was cross-sectional and retrospective. Data came from the patients' individual records. Treatments under GA included an average of 6.0 restorations (SD = 2.7, range 0-12) and 1.7 extractions (SD = 2.1, range 0-10). In the 2 preceding years, these children had visited dentist an average of 5.1 times (SD = 2.7, range 1-14) with an average of 2.4 restorations (SD = 1.9, range 0-12) and 0.5 extractions (SD = 1.4, range 0-10). Of the restorations made, 36% were temporary. Of all visits, those with an operative approach accounted for 35%, preventive for 37%, operative and preventive for 5%, and visits with total uncooperation for 23%. Of the children, 90% had at least one preventive visit. Children treated under conscious sedation in the preceding 2 years received less prevention (P = 0.02). Remaining without preventive measures was most likely for those children exhibiting visits with total uncooperation (odds ratio = 4.6; P = 0.004) and for those receiving numerous temporary fillings (odds ratio = 4.1; P = 0.0005). The uncooperative high-caries children pose a demanding challenge to PDS. The early identification of high-caries risk and efforts of intensive preventive care are in key position to

  10. Effects of single-shot and steady-state propofol anaesthesia on rocuronium dose-response relationship: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stäuble, C G; Stäuble, R B; Schaller, S J; Unterbuchner, C; Fink, H; Blobner, M

    2015-08-01

    Similar to volatile anaesthetics, propofol may influence neuromuscular transmission. We hypothesised that the administration of propofol influenced the potency of rocuronium depending on the duration of the administration. After consent, patients scheduled for elective surgery randomly received rocuronium either after induction of anaesthesia with propofol (2 min of propofol, n = 36) or after 30 min of propofol infusion (30 min of propofol, n = 36). Remifentanil was given in both groups. Neuromuscular monitoring was performed by calibrated electromyography. The dose-response relationship of rocuronium was determined with a single-bolus technique (0.07, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.45 mg/kg rocuronium). The primary endpoints were the ED50 and ED95 of rocuronium after 2 and 30 min propofol. Data are presented as means with (95% confidence interval). The trial is registered with the Eudra-CT: 2009-012815-16. A total of 72 patients were included. Time to maximal neuromuscular blockade was significantly shorter in patients after 30 min of propofol [3.3 min (2.9-3.7)] compared with patients anaesthetised with 2 min of propofol [4.6 min (4.0-5.2)]. After 30 min of propofol, the slope of the dose-response curve was significantly steeper (30 min of propofol: 4.34 [3.62-5.05]; 2 min of propofol: [3.34 (2.72-3.96)], resulting in lower ED95 values of rocuronium (30 min of propofol: 0.287 mg/kg [0.221-0.368]; 2 min of propofol [0.391 mg/kg (0.296-0.520)]. The ED50 were not different between groups. The potency of rocuronium was significantly enhanced after propofol infusion for 30 min. Estimates of potency those are usually determined during steady-state anaesthesia might underestimate rocuronium requirements for endotracheal intubation at the time of induction. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  12. Evaluation of two different dosages of local anesthetic solution used for ultrasound-guided femoral nerve block for pain relief and positioning for central neuraxial block in patients of fracture neck of the femur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit A Karmarkar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical management of the fracture femur is preferred so as to prevent complications associated with prolonged immobilization. Central neuraxial blockade (CNB is an attractive option for these patients, and an optimal positioning of the patient is a definite requirement. Owing to the pain associated with movement of the fractured limb, it becomes difficult for the patients to give suitable positioning. Femoral nerve block (FNB features as a rescue analgesia so as to provide adequate analgesia for facilitation of satisfactory positioning. Aim: This study aims to compare analgesic effect of two different dosages of local anesthetic (LA solution administered for ultrasonography (USG-guided FNB given to facilitate optimal positioning for conduct of CNB. Materials and Methods: After taking permission from the institutional review board, eighty patients were enrolled in the study to find out the efficacy of dosage of LA solution for FNB in providing pain relief caused by movement of fractured limb during conduct of regional anesthesia. Informed consent was taken. All patients were given USG-guided FNB. Patients were randomized using a computer-generated random number table, into two groups of forty patients each. Group A patients received USG-guided 12 ml of LA solution containing 10 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml normal saline (NS, while Group B patients received USG-guided 15 ml of LA solution containing 13 ml lignocaine solution without preservative (2% plus 2 ml NS for positioning before combined spinal epidural. Results: A total of eighty patients, divided randomly into two groups, were enrolled in the study. Demographics (age, sex, weight, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grades were similar in both groups. No statistical significance was found in the numeric rating scale scores at baseline, zero minutes, 5, and 15 min in both the groups. Conclusion: USG-guided FNB with 12 ml of LA solution was

  13. Impact of spinal anaesthesia on peri-operative lung volumes in obese and morbidly obese female patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regli, A; von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Reber, A; Schneider, M C

    2006-03-01

    Although obesity predisposes to postoperative pulmonary complications, data on the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and peri-operative respiratory performance are limited. We prospectively studied the impact of spinal anaesthesia, obesity and vaginal surgery on lung volumes measured by spirometry in 28 patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and in 13 patients with BMI > or = 40 kg.m(-2). Vital capacity, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s, mid-expiratory and peak expiratory flows were measured during the pre-operative visit (baseline), after effective spinal anaesthesia with premedication, and after the operation at 20 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h (after mobilisation). Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters. Spinal anaesthesia and premedication were associated with a significant decrease in spirometric parameters; mean (SD) vital capacities were - 19% (6.4) in patients with BMI 30-40 kg.m(-2) and - 33% (9.0) in patients with BMI > 40 kg.m(-2). The decrease of lung volumes remained constant for 2 h, whereas 3 h after the operation and after mobilisation, spirometric parameters significantly improved in all patients. This study showed that both spinal anaesthesia and obesity significantly impaired peri-operative respiratory function.

  14. Unsweetened ice popsicles impart a positive feeling and reduce self-mutilation after paediatric dental treatment with local anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Diana; Berson, Tamar; Moskovitz, Moti; Efrat, Jacob

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to assess whether an unsweetened ice-popsicle imparts a positive feeling to children after dental treatment in which local anaesthesia is administered, and whether it reduces the tendency of children to self-mutilate (bite the lip, cheek or tongue) after the administration of local anaesthesia. Crossover study of 31 children aged 4-11 years old who needed similar dental treatments on both sides of the mandible or maxilla under local anaesthesia. At the end of each appointment the child received a toy or an ice-popsicle especially made for this study. Patients and parents answered a questionnaire regarding the children's behaviour and feeling immediately after the treatment, and 10 and 30 min after receiving the ice-popsicle or toy. Children who received ice-popsicles after dental treatment under local anaesthesia felt less discomfort and suffered less soft tissue trauma than they did when they received a toy. Reduction in soft tissue trauma was evident 10 min after receiving the ice-popsicles. Licking of an ice-popsicle after dental treatment with local anaesthesia reduces the feeling of discomfort and the biting of soft tissue and self- mutilation.

  15. Case Report: Anaesthesia for Marfan's Syndrome | Bösenberg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 35 year-old female with Marfan's Syndrome, presented for medical termination of pregnancy at 8 weeks' gestation. She had no family history of Marfan's. Despite having undergone dental work for teeth overcrowding, her first medical presentation was with severe aortic regurgitation and cardiac failure in 2003. At that time ...

  16. Innovative Approaches to Neuraxial Blockade in Children: The Introduction of Epidural Nerve Root Stimulation and Ultrasound Guidance for Epidural Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ban CH Tsui

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous epidural blockade remains the cornerstone of pediatric regional anesthesia. However, the risk of catastrophic trauma to the spinal cord when inserting direct thoracic and high lumbar epidural needles in anesthetized or heavily sedated pediatric patients is a concern. To reduce this risk, research has focused on low lumbar or caudal blocks (ie, avoiding the spinal cord and threading catheters from distal puncture sites in a cephalad direction. However, with conventional epidural techniques, including loss-of-resistance for localization of the needle, optimal catheter tip placement is difficult to assess because considerable distances are required during threading. Novel approaches include electrical epidural stimulation for physiological confirmation and segmental localization of epidural catheters, and ultrasound guidance for assessing related neuroanatomy and real-time observation of the needle puncture and, potentially, catheter advancement. The present article provides a brief and focused review of these two advances, and outlines recent clinical experiences relevant to pediatric epidural anesthesia.

  17. Do heat and moisture exchangers in the anaesthesia breathing circuit preserve body temperature in dogs undergoing anaesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khenissi, Latifa; Covey-Crump, Gwen; Knowles, Toby G; Murrell, Joanna

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether the use of a heat and moisture exchanger (HME) preserves body temperature in dogs weighing dogs. Dogs were assigned randomly to a treatment group [HME (n = 16) or no HME (n = 15)]. Dogs were pseudorandomised according to the premedication they were administered, either dexmedetomidine or no dexmedetomidine. Induction agents were not standardised. General anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane vaporised in 100% oxygen delivered using a T-piece and a fresh gas flow of 600 mL kg -1 minute -1 . Rectal temperature was measured before premedication (T1), after induction (T2), before moving to the MRI unit (T3) and at the end of the MRI scan (T4). Ambient temperatures were measured in the induction room, outside and inside the MRI unit. Data were analysed using a general linear model with T4 as the outcome variable. Linear correlations were performed between T1, T2, T3 and T4, and variables that predicted T4 were investigated. Sex, age and body mass were not significantly different between groups. There were no significant differences in rectal temperature between groups at any time point (group with HME at the end of MRI = 36.3 ± 1.1 °C; group with no HME at the end of MRI = 36.2 ± 1.4 °C) but at the end of the MRI, dogs administered dexmedetomidine (36.6 ± 0.7 °C) had a higher rectal temperature compared with dogs not administered dexmedetomidine (35.9 ± 1.6 °C) for premedication. Rectal temperature varied directly with ambient temperature in MRI scanning room and inversely with anaesthetic duration. Using an HME did not alter body temperature in dogs weighing temperature during anaesthesia. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative study between magnesium sulphate and L-hyoscyamine on duodenal motility during ERCP under general anaesthesia: A prospective randomized study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad El Hefnawy, MD

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Magnesium sulphate is a safe spasmolytic agent during general anaesthesia that improves the success rate of ERCP and it allows easy completion of the procedure by decreasing the duodenal motility. It decreases the duration of the procedure, subsequently shortens the period of anaesthesia and improves post procedure recovery. It reduces post ERCP pancreatitis, nausea and vomiting.

  19. Training responsibly to improve global surgical and anaesthesia capacity through institutional health partnerships: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Laura; Collins, Maggie

    2017-01-01

    Urgent investment in human resources for surgical and anaesthesia care is needed globally. Responsible training and education is required to ensure healthcare providers are confident and skilled in the delivery of this care in both the rural and the urban setting. The Tropical Health and Education Trust (THET), a UK-based specialist global health organisation, is working with health training institutions, health professionals, Ministries of Health and Health Partnerships or 'links' between healthcare institutions in the UK and low- or middle-income country (LMIC) counterparts. These institutions may be hospitals, professional associations or universities whose primary focus is delivery of health services or the training and education of health workers. Since 2011, THET has been delivering the Health Partnership Scheme (HPS), a UK government-funded programme that provides grants and guidance to health partnerships and promotes the voluntary engagement of UK health professionals overseas. To date, the £30 million Scheme has supported peer-to-peer collaborations involving more than 200 UK and overseas hospitals, universities and professional associations across 25 countries in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. In this paper, we focus on four partnerships that are undertaking training initiatives focused on building capacity for surgery and anaesthesia. In order to do so, we discuss their role as a responsible and effective approach to harnessing the expertise available in the UK in order to increase surgical and anaesthesia capacity in LMICs. Specifically, how well they: (1) respond to locally identified needs; (2) are appropriate to the local context and are of high quality; and (3) have an overarching goal of making a sustainable contribution to the development of the health workforce through education and training. The HPS has now supported 24 training initiatives focused on building capacity for surgery and anaesthesia in 16 countries across sub-Saharan Africa

  20. Split-mouth and parallel-arm trials to compare pain with intraosseous anaesthesia delivered by the computerised Quicksleeper system and conventional infiltration anaesthesia in paediatric oral healthcare: protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaïl-Faugeron, Violaine; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Sixou, Jean-Louis; Courson, Frédéric

    2015-07-10

    Local anaesthesia is commonly used in paediatric oral healthcare. Infiltration anaesthesia is the most frequently used, but recent developments in anaesthesia techniques have introduced an alternative: intraosseous anaesthesia. We propose to perform a split-mouth and parallel-arm multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the pain caused by the insertion of the needle for the injection of conventional infiltration anaesthesia, and intraosseous anaesthesia by the computerised QuickSleeper system, in children and adolescents. Inclusion criteria are patients 7-15 years old with at least 2 first permanent molars belonging to the same dental arch (for the split-mouth RCT) or with a first permanent molar (for the parallel-arm RCT) requiring conservative or endodontic treatment limited to pulpotomy. The setting of this study is the Department of Paediatric Dentistry at 3 University dental hospitals in France. The primary outcome measure will be pain reported by the patient on a visual analogue scale concerning the insertion of the needle and the injection/infiltration. Secondary outcomes are latency, need for additional anaesthesia during the treatment and pain felt during the treatment. We will use a computer-generated permuted-block randomisation sequence for allocation to anaesthesia groups. The random sequences will be stratified by centre (and by dental arch for the parallel-arm RCT). Only participants will be blinded to group assignment. Data will be analysed by the intent-to-treat principle. In all, 160 patients will be included (30 in the split-mouth RCT, 130 in the parallel-arm RCT). This protocol has been approved by the French ethics committee for the protection of people (Comité de Protection des Personnes, Ile de France I) and will be conducted in full accordance with accepted ethical principles. Findings will be reported in scientific publications and at research conferences, and in project summary papers for participants. Clinical

  1. Anaesthesia and analgesia in Göttingen minipigs - examples of protocols used for neurosurgery and scanning procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen

    Neurosurgery in Göttingen minipigs is often a welfare challenge, and therefore, the main goal of my talk will be to discuss how to improve animal welfare during brain surgery and the days following surgery. A combination of inhalation/infusion anaesthesia with opioids such as injections with bupr......Neurosurgery in Göttingen minipigs is often a welfare challenge, and therefore, the main goal of my talk will be to discuss how to improve animal welfare during brain surgery and the days following surgery. A combination of inhalation/infusion anaesthesia with opioids such as injections......, especially ensuring sufficient analgesia and water/food intake during the first hours and days. Compared to neurosurgery, scanning procedures are normally unproblematic from a welfare point of view. However, anaesthesia may influence the results of brain scans, particularly functional scans, such as positron...

  2. [Evaluation of the scales used to measure anxiety and child behaviour during the induction of anaesthesia. Literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez, C; Lázaro, J J; Ullán, A M

    2016-02-01

    The assessment of children's anxiety during anaesthetic induction is useful to determine if pre-operative strategies have been effective in reducing anxiety. The aim of this study is to review the different tools used to evaluate child anxiety or behaviour during the induction of anaesthesia. The electronic databases with no date limits were reviewed in December 2013, with a second review repeated in September 2014. A data extraction template was applied to find the scales used in the articles. Eight observational scales were found. Six of them can only be used during induction of anaesthesia, and two of those could be applied at various perioperative times, before surgery and during induction of anaesthesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Reversible anaesthesia of free-ranging lions (Panthera leo in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fahlman

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of medetomidine-zolazepam-tiletamine with subsequent antagonism by atipamezole was evaluated for reversible anaesthesia of free-ranging lions (Panthera leo. Twenty-one anaesthetic events of 17 free-ranging lions (5 males and 12 females, body weight 105-211 kg were studied in Zimbabwe. Medetomidine at 0.027-0.055 mg / kg (total dose 4-11 mg and zolazepam-tiletamine at 0.38-1.32 mg / kg (total dose 50-275 mg were administered i.m. by dart injection. The doses were gradually decreased to improve recovery. Respiratory and heart rates, rectal temperature and relative haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2 were recorded every 15 min. Arterial blood samples were collected from 5 lions for analysis of blood gases and acid-base status. For anaesthetic reversal, atipamezole was administered i.m. at 2.5 or 5 times the medetomidine dose. Induction was smooth and all lions were anaesthetised with good muscle relaxation within 3.4-9.5 min after darting. The predictable working time was a minimum of 1 h and no additional drug doses were needed. Respiratory and heart rates and SpO2 were stable throughout anaesthesia, whereas rectal temperature changed significantly over time. Atipamezole at 2.5 times the medetomidine dose was sufficient for reversal and recoveries were smooth and calm in all lions independent of the atipamezole dose. First sign of recovery was observed 3-27 min after reversal. The animals were up walking 8-26 min after reversal when zolazepamtiletamine doses <1 mg / kg were used. In practice, a total dose of 6 mg medetomidine and 80 mg zolazepam-tiletamine and reversal with 15 mg atipamezole can be used for either sex of an adult or subadult lion. The drugs and doses used in this study provided a reliable, safe and reversible anaesthesia protocol for free-ranging lions.

  4. Bicarbonate-buffered ropivacaine-mepivacaine solution for medial caruncle anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrier, Gilles; Boutboul, David; Chanat, Cédric; Samama, Charles Marc; Baillard, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    To compare self-reported pain during injection of plain versus alkalinised 0.75% ropivacaine-2% mepivacaine solution for anaesthesia performed at the medial caruncle site for eye surgery. This prospective, monocentric, double blind, randomised, controlled trial involved 40 consecutive patients who received either a standard local anaesthetic solution (0.75% ropivacaine 5ml and 2% mepivacaine 5ml with a pH of 5.9), or an alkalinised solution composed with a pH-adjusted solution of 7.0 through adjunction of 0.15mEq sodium bicarbonate per 10ml of the same mixture. Before anaesthesia, patients received intravenous midazolam (0.03mg/kg) to ease potential anxiety. During injection performed at the medial caruncle site, patients were asked to grade a pain VRS (0 to 10) for the injection using a verbal analogue scale. The primary end point was to investigate pain during injection of local anaesthetics. Anxiety levels before anaesthesia were low and similar for both groups. The mean pain score for the alkalinised group was significantly reduced compared to the control group (6 [25-75%, IQR 4-9] versus 3 [25-75%, IQR 1-5]; P=0.02; 95% CI for the difference in median pain scores [1.9-3.3]). Buffering local anaesthetics used in caruncular injection for eye surgery significantly reduces pain during injection. This simple strategy should be tested in routine clinical practice to improve patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Société française d'anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of ropivacaine and bupivacaine as single-shot epidural anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, A.; Khan, A.S.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and side-effects of 0.5% ropivacaine with that of 0.5% bupivacaine when used for single-shot epidural anaesthesia for orthopaedic surgery. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Anesthesiology, Combined Military Hospital Rawalpindi, over a period of eight months from June 2013 to January 2014. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in 60 ASA physical status I, II or III patients undergoing elective lower extremity orthopedic surgery. Two groups of 30 patients each received single-shot epidural anaesthesia either with ropivacaine 0.5% (ropivacaine group) or bupivacaine 0.5% (bupivacaine group). Onset, time for maximum height and median height of sensory block was assessed as well as time to two segment recession. Modified Bromage scale was used for motor blockade. Total duration of motor block and common side effects were also recorded. Results: The patients in both groups were similar in age, height, weight, gender and ASA status. There was no significant difference in onset of sensory block and time for maximum height of sensory block. The median heighest level of sensory block was T6 (T5-T8) for ropivacaine group and T5 (T4-T7) for bupivacaine group. Time for two segment regression and duration of sensory block were also comparable for both groups. The total duration of motor block was significantly more in bupivacaine group (159 min vs 134.2 min, p< 0.001). Modified Bromage scale was also significantly higher in bupivacaine group (2.86 vs 1.96 min, p<0.001). Side effects like hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, vomiting and shivering were similar in both groups. Conclusion: Epidural administration of 0.5% ropivacaine provided effective and good quality anaesthesia. Motor blockade was of less duration as compared to equivalent dose of 0.5% bupivacaine, which may offer potential benefit of early patient mobilization after orthopaedic surgery. (author)

  6. Influence of transactive memory on perceived performance, job satisfaction and identification in anaesthesia teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinov, E; Olivier-Chiron, E; Rusch, E; Chiron, B

    2008-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness in the medical community that human factors are involved in effectiveness of anaesthesia teams. Communication and coordination between physicians and nurses seems to play a crucial role in maintaining a good level of performance under time pressure, particularly for anaesthesia teams, who are confronted with uncertainty, rapid changes in the environment, and multi-tasking. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between a specific form of implicit coordination--the transactive memory system--and perceptions of team effectiveness and work attitudes such as job satisfaction and team identification. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 193 nurse and physician anaesthetists from eight French public hospitals. The questionnaire included some measures of transactive memory system (coordination, specialization, and credibility components), perception of team effectiveness, and work attitudes (Minnesota Job Satisfaction Questionnaire, team identification scale). The questionnaire was designed to be filled anonymously, asking only biographical data relating to sex, age, status, and tenure. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed as predicted that transactive memory system predicted members' perceptions of team effectiveness, and also affective outcomes such as job satisfaction and team identification. Moreover, the results demonstrated that transactive memory processes, and especially the coordination component, were a better predictor of teamwork perceptions than socio-demographic (i.e. gender or status) or contextual variables (i.e. tenure and size of team). These findings provided empirical evidence of the existence of a transactive memory system among real anaesthesia teams, and highlight the need to investigate whether transactive memory is actually linked with objective measures of performance.

  7. [Anaesthesia education at german university hospitals: the teachers' perspective -- results of a nationwide survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, K; Steinfeldt, T; Wulf, H

    2006-04-01

    The principle purpose of this study was to collect data on the conditions and practice of anaesthesia education as well as the teaching qualification of consultants at German university hospitals. Based upon the collected data, areas of weakness and strength as well as measures required to improve anaesthesia training are described. A questionnaire containing 26 items was mailed to 607 consultants employed at 41 German university hospitals in June 2003. A total of 255 questionnaires was analysed (response rate: 43 %). Genuine training activities account for 14 % of the working hours of the participating consultants. On average, at the institutions of participating consultants, novices work for a duration of 1 month together with a consultant anaesthetist before they give anaesthetics without direct and constant supervision. When asked to describe the predominant method of training at their institution 71 % indicated "case-oriented teaching"; however, 53 % chose "see one, do one, teach one" and 49 % "learning by doing" as method of training as well (multiple choice). According to 63 % of respondents, departmental educational activities usually happen after their regular working hours. "Daily workload" (96 %), "time pressure" (96 %), "lack of time" (96 %) and "lack of personnel" (90 %) were indicated as the main obstacles of teaching. According to 80 % of respondents, a dedicated financial budget for education does not exist; instead, financial resources of third parties (industry) (58 %), of the state (for research und undergraduate education) (60 %) and of patients service (66 %) are used to ensure training of anaesthesia residents. Due to a lack of a dedicated financial budget for resident training and an increasing economic pressure, "lack of time" and "lack of personnel" are the main factors leading to the situation at German university hospitals that consultants can only spend 14 % of their working hours for teaching purposes despite of sufficient qualification

  8. Long-term weight gain and economic impact in pigs castrated under local anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Telles

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Castration is a controversial practice in swine production because in some countries is still performed without anaesthesia, and therefore causes intense suffering and stress to animals. This study investigated the effect of pre-surgical administration of local anaesthesia (LA on the growth performance of piglets until the end of the growth phase (102 days. Piglets aged 3 to 5 days were selected in pairs of similar weights and same age. They were originated from 22 litters. The groups were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Castration was performed with (LA; n = 45 or without (NLA; n = 45 intra-testicular administration of 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine plus adrenaline per testicle, administered by an automatic repeating vaccinator. Castration was performed 10 min later. Average daily weight gain and economic impact were evaluated between the intervals before castration until 21 (weaning phase, before castration until 60 (end of the initial nursery phase and before castration until 102 (growth phase days of age. Average daily weight gain data were analyzed by comparing the average daily weight gain between the weaning phase, 60 and 102 days of age versus the initial weight (pre-castration. At the end of the growing phase, animals treated with LA showed greater weight gain than animals castrated without anaesthesia. LA also showed improved cost:benefit ratio and theore might provide greater economic benefit under the conditions used in this study. Our findings have proved that castration with LA improves long-term weight gain of piglets.

  9. A Prospective Study of Postoperative Vomiting in Children Undergoing Different Surgical Procedures under General Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Choudhary

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the risk factors associated with postoperative vomiting (POV in paediatric population undergoing common surgeries. The risk factors studied for association with POV were age> 5 years, female gender, previous history of POV/motion sickness, type of surgery and duration of anaesthesia> 45 min. A total of 100 ASA grade I and II patients of either sex aged between 2-12 years undergoing elective surgical procedures were screened for the study. All patients underwent similar anaesthe-sia protocol and received two antiemetic agents (ondansetron 0.05mg.kg-1 and dexamethasone 0.15mg.kg-1 in premedication. The patients were observed for 24 hours postoperatively for the incidence of vomiting, number of times rescue antiemetic given and any adverse reaction to antiemetic.Overall 34% patients (34/100 developed POV of which 26 had only one episode and 8 patients had 2 episodes during first 24 h. Incidence of POV was 13% (13/100 in first 4 h whereas it was 29% (29/100 in late postoperative period. In early post operative period, POV was not associated significantly with any predicted risk factors. However, age>5years, duration of anaesthesia>45 minutes and history of motion sickness/POV were significantly associated in late postoperative period(4-24h. Female gender and type of surgery were not associated with increased POV. The combination antiemetic effectively prevented POV in early postoperative period (0-4h only but not in late postoperative period(0-24h.

  10. COMPARISON OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE, BUPRENORPHINE AND FENTANYL AS AN ADJUVANT TO BUPIVACAINE DURING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA FOR HEMIARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opioids such as fentanyl or buprenorphine are being added as adjuvant to local anaesthetic for spinal anaesthesia. Dexmedetomidine, a new α2 agonist is being tried as an adjuvant in the recent times. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients were randomised into three Groups (n=30 each by closed envelope technique. Patients in Group 1 received 10 µg fentanyl with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, Group 2 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine supplemented with 30 µg of buprenorphine and Group 3 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 5 µg dexmedetomidine intrathecally. The time to reach maximum sensory and motor level, the regression time of the same, any adverse effects were recorded. Data were analysed using chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test for categorical data and analysis of variance for continuous data. A value of P<0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Settings and Design- The study was conducted in a prospective, randomised and double-blind manner. It included ninety American Society of Anaesthesiologists class I and II patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia. RESULTS In this study, the patients in dexmedetomidine group showed significantly longer duration of motor block (240±20 mins. and sensory blockade (180±22.2 mins. compared to other groups, which is statistically significant (P=0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively. The time to first request of analgesic postoperatively was also longer (260±30.2 in dexmedetomidine group when compared with other groups (P=0.0001. Haemodynamic parameters were stable and there were no complications in any group. CONCLUSIONS We concluded that intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg with bupivacaine provides significantly longer duration of sensory and motor blockade and longer duration for first request of analgesia in the recovery than intrathecal buprenorphine (30 µg or fentanyl (10 µg with bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for

  11. Anaesthesia of the posterior urethra and pain reduction during cystoscopy - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletajew, Sławomir; Bender, Sylwia; Pudełko, Paweł; Łykowski, Marcin; Piecha, Tomasz; Sutkowski, Bartosz; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Standard intra-urethral instillation of anaesthetic gel may not sufficiently exclude pain perception during cystoscopy. To evaluate the impact of the anaesthesia within the posterior urethra on pain intensity related to cystoscopy in men. One hundred and twenty-seven men undergoing cystoscopy were prospectively enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group (66 vs. 61 patients). Intra-urethral instillation of 2% lidocaine gel was done in both groups. In the experimental group, the posterior urethra was additionally anaesthetized with distribution of the lidocaine gel by catheterisation. The study endpoints were pain intensity at successive time points of the procedure assessed on a numeric rating scale, overall pain intensity assessed on a Likert scale, the need for analgesics during 6 h after the procedure, and the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) during 14 days after the procedure. Pain perception during cystoscopy did not differ significantly between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, after 6 h patients in the experimental group were more likely to declare that the cystoscopy was painless (81.8% vs. 70.2%, relative risk = 1.17). The need for analgesics and the incidence of UTI were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Statistically significant differences regarding pain perception were observed depending on patients' age and the number of transurethral procedures performed in the past, with no relation to type of anaesthesia (p < 0.05). Anaesthesia of the posterior urethra is not more efficacious in reducing pain related to cystoscopy than standard instillation of anaesthetic gel. However, it improves the general perception of the procedure, and hence may positively influence patients' compliance.

  12. Introduction of a paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet reduced preoperative anxiety in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassai, B; Rabilloud, M; Dantony, E; Grousson, S; Revol, O; Malik, S; Ginhoux, T; Touil, N; Chassard, D; Pereira de Souza Neto, E

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the introduction of a paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet reduced preoperative anxiety levels of children undergoing major surgery. Secondary objectives were to determine whether the level of understanding of participants and other risk factors influence STAIC-S (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children-State subscale) score in children. We performed a randomized controlled parallel-group trial comparing preoperative anxiety between two groups of children aged >6 and comic information leaflet at home in addition to routine information given by the anaesthetist at least 1 day before surgery. The control group received the routine information only. The outcome measure was the difference between STAIC-S scores measured before any intervention and after the anaesthetist's visit. A multiple regression analysis was performed to explore the influence of the level of education, the anxiety of parents, and the childrens' intelligence quotient on STAIC-S scores. One hundred and fifteen children were randomized between April 2009 and April 2013. An intention-to-treat analysis on data from 111 patients showed a significant reduction (P=0.002) in STAIC-S in the intervention group (n=54, mean=-2.2) compared with the control group (n=57, mean=0.90). The multiple regression analysis did not show any influence on STAIC-S scores of the level of education, parental anxiety, or the intelligence quotient of the children. A paediatric anaesthesia comic information leaflet was a cheap and effective means of reducing preoperative anxiety, measured by STAIC-S, in children. NCT 00841022. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Perceptions and opinions of Canadian pet owners about anaesthesia, pain and surgery in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, P V; Monteiro, B P; Ruel, H L M; Beauchamp, G; Luca, G; Berry, J; Little, S; Stiles, E; Hamilton, S; Pang, D

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the perceptions and opinions of Canadian pet owners about anaesthesia, pain and surgery in dogs and cats. Six Canadian veterinary hospitals participated. Each practice received 200 copies of a questionnaire that were distributed to pet owners. Questions regarding the use of analgesics, anaesthesia, surgery and onychectomy (cats) were included. Responses were transformed into ordinal scores and analysed with a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. A total of 849 out of 1200 questionnaires were returned. Owners believed more frequently that analgesics are needed for surgical procedures than for the medical conditions. Owners rated as very important/important: "knowing what to expect during illness/injury/surgery" (99·3%), "being assured that all necessary analgesic drugs/techniques will be used" (98·6%), "being informed about procedures/risk" (98·5%), and having a board-certified anaesthesiologist (90·5%). Most owners agreed/partly agreed that pain impacts quality of life (94·2%), and affects their pet's behaviour (89·5%). Most respondents (69%) were women; they were significantly more concerned than men about anaesthesia, pain, cost and client-communication. Cat owners believed that analgesics were necessary for some procedures/conditions significantly more often than canine-only owners. Pet owners with previous surgery disagreed more frequently that "pain after surgery can be helpful" and that "pain in animals is easy to recognize" than those without previous surgery. Most owners think onychectomy should be banned in cats (56·4%). This study identified important areas of client communication regarding pain and its control in pets. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  14. The role of melatonin in anaesthesia and critical care

    OpenAIRE

    Kurdi, Madhuri S; Patel, Tushar

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland. It is widely present in both plant and animal sources. In several countries, it is sold over the counter as tablets and as food supplement or additive. Currently, it is most often used to prevent jet lag and to induce sleep. It has been and is being used in several clinical trials with different therapeutic approaches. It has sedative, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and chronobiotic effects. In the present review, the pot...

  15. Anaesthesia Management in a Patient with Waardenburg Syndrome and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peker, Kevser; Ergil, Julide; Öztürk, İbrahim

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that may cause hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities, neurocristopathy and partial albinism. Incidence is estimated as 2%-3% among the cases of congenital deafness and 1/42,000 of the general population. Children with Waardenburg syndrome usually require anaesthesia for the cochlear implant operation in early age. The features of the syndrome that may bear importance for anaesthetic management are laryngomalacia, multiple muscle contractures, limited neck movements, cyanotic cardiopathy and electrolyte imbalance. Patients with Waardenburg syndrome stand for difficult airway. We aimed to report anaesthetic management of a child with Waardenburg syndrome who underwent surgery for cochlear implantation.

  16. Effects of awareness and nociception on heart rate variability during general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhle, R; Zaunseder, S; Malberg, H; Burghardt, M; Koch, T; Heller, A R; Wessel, N

    2012-01-01

    During anaesthesia awareness and nociception are serious complications that may further lead to haemodynamic instability. Specific monitoring of depth of hypnosis and depth of analgesia based on heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is eligible to improve patient safety and reduce efforts in post-operative care. Consequently, in this analysis we assess the applicability of HRV parameters during surgical interventions with standardized intravenous propofol-remifentanil-anaesthesia. Peri-operative electrocardiograms were recorded from cardiovascular stable patients (ASA Score I/II, N = 32, age: 36.4 ± 11.23 a, BMI: 25.2 ± 3.16) scheduled for trauma and dentofacial surgery. HRV time- and frequency-domain parameters, measures of complexity and nonlinear dynamics were compared by analysing longitudinally distributed 300 s intervals preceding/following induction of anaesthesia (BL–I1), intubation (I1–I2) and extubation (E1–E2). Mean value (meanNN) and standard deviation (sdNN) of the heart rate are influenced in BL–I1 (p < 0.001), I1–I2 (p < 0.05) and E1–E2 (p < 0.001). The number of forbidden words of symbolic dynamics changes significantly for BL–I1 (p < 0.001) and not for I1–I2 and E1–E2 (p > 0.05). Probability of low-variability POLVAR10 is significantly altered in all comparisons (BL–I1: Δ = 0.032, p < 0.01, I1–I2: Δ = 0.12, p < 0.05, E1–E2: Δ = 0.169, p < 0.01) but especially during nociception. While standard time-domain parameters lacked selectivity, parameters of symbolic dynamics appear to be specifically influenced by changes in depth of hypnosis and nociception, respectively. However, the lack of steady-state ventilation/breathing in this study needs to be considered in future research. To be used for clinical anaesthesia monitoring our results have to be prospectively validated in clinical studies. (paper)

  17. Spinal Anaesthesia for Cesarean Section in a Patient with Vascular Type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Carness

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the administration of spinal anaesthesia for cesarean delivery in a parturient with vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Parturients who genetically inherit this disorder are at risk for significant morbidity and mortality. Risks during pregnancy include premature labor, uterine prolapse, and uterine rupture. Additionally, such laboring parturients are at increased risk of hemodynamic volatility, vascular stress, and severe postpartum hemorrhage. Instrumented delivery and cesarean delivery bring additional risks. Nonpregnancy-related complications include excessive bleeding, intestinal rupture, cardiac valvular dysfunction, and arterial dissection. Despite the complexity of this condition, literature focusing on specific intraoperative anaesthetic management is sparse.

  18. Time course of cognitive recovery after propofol anaesthesia: a level of processing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Kaoua, Bernard; Véron, Anne-Lise H; Lespinet, Véronique C; Claverie, Bernard; Sztark, François

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the time course of recovery of verbal memory after general anaesthesia, as a function of the level (shallow or deep) of processing induced at the time of encoding. Thirty-one patients anaesthetized with propofol and alfentanil were compared with 28 control patients receiving only alfentanil. Memory functions were assessed the day before and 1, 6 and 24 hr after operation. Results show that for the anaesthetized group, shallow processing was impaired for 6 hr after surgery whereas the deeper processing was not recovered even at 24 hr. In addition, no specific effect of age was found.

  19. Peak and averaged bicoherence for different EEG patterns during general anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myles Paul

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in nonlinear neuronal mechanisms of EEG generation in the course of general anaesthesia have been extensively investigated in research literature. A number of EEG signal properties capable of tracking these changes have been reported and employed in anaesthetic depth monitors. The degree of phase coupling between different spectral components is a marker of nonlinear EEG generators and is claimed to be an important aspect of BIS. While bicoherence is the most direct measure of phase coupling, according to published research it is not directly used in the calculation of BIS, and only limited studies of its association with anaesthetic depth and level of consciousness have been published. This paper investigates bicoherence parameters across equal band and unequal band bifrequency regions, during different states of anaesthetic depth relating to routine clinical anaesthesia, as determined by visual inspection of EEG. Methods 41 subjects scheduled for day surgery under general anaesthesia were recruited into this study. EEG bicoherence was analysed using average and smoothed-peak estimates calculated over different regions on the bifrequency plane. Statistical analysis of associations between anaesthetic depth/state of consciousness and bicoherence estimates included linear regression using generalised linear mixed effects models (GLMs, ROC curves and prediction probability (Pk. Results Bicoherence estimates for the δ_θ region on the bifrequency plane were more sensitive to anaesthetic depth changes compared to other bifrequency regions. Smoothed-peak bicoherence displayed stronger associations than average bicoherence. Excluding burst suppression and large transients, the δ_θ peak bicoherence was significantly associated with level of anaesthetic depth (z = 25.74, p 2 = 0.191. Estimates of Pk for this parameter were 0.889(0.867-0.911 and 0.709(0.689-0.729 respectively for conscious states and anaesthetic depth

  20. Ultrasound-guided truncal blocks: A new frontier in regional anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunangshu Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of regional anaesthesia is rapidly changing with the introduction of ultrasound into the working domain of the anaesthesiologist. New techniques are being pioneered. Among the recent techniques, notable are the truncal blocks, for example, the transversus abdominis plane block, rectus sheath block, hernia block and quadratus lumborum block in the abdomen and the pectoral nerves (Pecs block 1 and 2, serratus anterior plane block and intercostal nerve block. This narrative review covers the brief anatomical discourse along with technical description of the ultrasound-guided truncal blocks.