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Sample records for neural tissue depending

  1. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrospun Nanofibrous Materials for Neural Tissue Engineering

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    Yee-Shuan Lee

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of biomaterials processed by the electrospinning technique has gained considerable interest for neural tissue engineering applications. The tissue engineering strategy is to facilitate the regrowth of nerves by combining an appropriate cell type with the electrospun scaffold. Electrospinning can generate fibrous meshes having fiber diameter dimensions at the nanoscale and these fibers can be nonwoven or oriented to facilitate neurite extension via contact guidance. This article reviews studies evaluating the effect of the scaffold’s architectural features such as fiber diameter and orientation on neural cell function and neurite extension. Electrospun meshes made of natural polymers, proteins and compositions having electrical activity in order to enhance neural cell function are also discussed.

  3. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

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    Michael Polanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes.

  4. Neural crest specification: tissues, signals, and transcription factors.

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    Rogers, C D; Jayasena, C S; Nie, S; Bronner, M E

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient population of multipotent and migratory cells unique to vertebrate embryos. Initially derived from the borders of the neural plate, these cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition to leave the central nervous system, migrate extensively in the periphery, and differentiate into numerous diverse derivatives. These include but are not limited to craniofacial cartilage, pigment cells, and peripheral neurons and glia. Attractive for their similarities to stem cells and metastatic cancer cells, neural crest cells are a popular model system for studying cell/tissue interactions and signaling factors that influence cell fate decisions and lineage transitions. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms required for neural crest formation in various vertebrate species, focusing on the importance of signaling factors from adjacent tissues and conserved gene regulatory interactions, which are required for induction and specification of the ectodermal tissue that will become neural crest. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adhesion molecule-modified biomaterials for neural tissue engineering

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    Shreyas S Rao

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion molecules (AMs represent one class of biomolecules that promote central nervous system regeneration. These tethered molecules provide cues to regenerating neurons that recapitulate the native brain environment. Improving cell adhesive potential of non-adhesive biomaterials is therefore a common goal in neural tissue engineering. This review discusses common AMs used in neural biomaterials and the mechanism of cell attachment to these AMs. Methods to modify materials with AMs are discussed and compared. Additionally, patterning of AMs for achieving specific neuronal responses is explored.

  6. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

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    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  7. Activity-dependent neural plasticity from bench to bedside.

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    Ganguly, Karunesh; Poo, Mu-Ming

    2013-10-30

    Much progress has been made in understanding how behavioral experience and neural activity can modify the structure and function of neural circuits during development and in the adult brain. Studies of physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying activity-dependent plasticity in animal models have suggested potential therapeutic approaches for a wide range of brain disorders in humans. Physiological and electrical stimulations as well as plasticity-modifying molecular agents may facilitate functional recovery by selectively enhancing existing neural circuits or promoting the formation of new functional circuits. Here, we review the advances in basic studies of neural plasticity mechanisms in developing and adult nervous systems and current clinical treatments that harness neural plasticity, and we offer perspectives on future development of plasticity-based therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  9. Neural Adaptation Leads to Cognitive Ethanol Dependence

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    Robinson, Brooks G.; Khurana, Sukant; Kuperman, Anna; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological alcohol dependence is a key adaptation to chronic ethanol consumption that underlies withdrawal symptoms, is thought to directly contribute to alcohol addiction behaviors, and is associated with cognitive problems such as deficits in learning and memory [1–3]. Based on the idea that an ethanol-adapted (dependent) animal will perform better in a learning assay than an animal experiencing ethanol withdrawal will, we have used a learning paradigm to detect physiological ethanol dep...

  10. Classifications of multispectral colorectal cancer tissues using convolution neural network

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    Hawraa Haj-Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer among men and women. Its diagnosis in early stages, typically done through the analysis of colon biopsy images, can greatly improve the chances of a successful treatment. This paper proposes to use convolution neural networks (CNNs to predict three tissue types related to the progression of CRC: benign hyperplasia (BH, intraepithelial neoplasia (IN, and carcinoma (Ca. Methods: Multispectral biopsy images of thirty CRC patients were retrospectively analyzed. Images of tissue samples were divided into three groups, based on their type (10 BH, 10 IN, and 10 Ca. An active contour model was used to segment image regions containing pathological tissues. Tissue samples were classified using a CNN containing convolution, max-pooling, and fully-connected layers. Available tissue samples were split into a training set, for learning the CNN parameters, and test set, for evaluating its performance. Results: An accuracy of 99.17% was obtained from segmented image regions, outperforming existing approaches based on traditional feature extraction, and classification techniques. Conclusions: Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of CNN for the classification of CRC tissue types, in particular when using presegmented regions of interest.

  11. Task-dependent modulation of oscillatory neural activity during movements

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    Herz, D. M.; Christensen, M. S.; Reck, C.

    2011-01-01

    -dependent modulation of frequency coupling within this network. To this end we recorded 122-multichannel EEG in 13 healthy subjects while they performed three simple motor tasks. EEG data source modeling using individual MR images was carried out with a multiple source beamformer approach. A bilateral motor network...... for inferring on architecture and coupling parameters of neural networks....

  12. Stimulus-dependent maximum entropy models of neural population codes.

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    Einat Granot-Atedgi

    Full Text Available Neural populations encode information about their stimulus in a collective fashion, by joint activity patterns of spiking and silence. A full account of this mapping from stimulus to neural activity is given by the conditional probability distribution over neural codewords given the sensory input. For large populations, direct sampling of these distributions is impossible, and so we must rely on constructing appropriate models. We show here that in a population of 100 retinal ganglion cells in the salamander retina responding to temporal white-noise stimuli, dependencies between cells play an important encoding role. We introduce the stimulus-dependent maximum entropy (SDME model-a minimal extension of the canonical linear-nonlinear model of a single neuron, to a pairwise-coupled neural population. We find that the SDME model gives a more accurate account of single cell responses and in particular significantly outperforms uncoupled models in reproducing the distributions of population codewords emitted in response to a stimulus. We show how the SDME model, in conjunction with static maximum entropy models of population vocabulary, can be used to estimate information-theoretic quantities like average surprise and information transmission in a neural population.

  13. Multifunctional nanowire scaffolds for neural tissue engineering applications

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    Bechara, Samuel Leo

    Unlike other regions of the body, the nervous system is extremely vulnerable to damage and injury because it has a limited ability to self-repair. Over 250,000 people in the United States have spinal cord injuries and due to the complicated pathophysiology of such injuries, there are few options available for functional regeneration of the spinal column. Furthermore, peripheral nerve damage is troublingly common in the United States, with an estimated 200,000 patients treated surgically each year. The current gold standard in treatment for peripheral nerve damage is a nerve autograft. This technique was pioneered over 45 years ago, but suffers from a major drawback. By transecting a nerve from another part of the body, function is regained at the expense of destroying a nerve connection elsewhere. Because of these issues, the investigation of different materials for regenerating nervous tissue is necessary. This work examines multi-functional nanowire scaffolds to provide physical and chemical guidance cues to neural stem cells to enhance cellular activity from a biomedical engineering perspective. These multi-functional scaffolds include a unique nanowire nano-topography to provide physical cues to guide cellular adhesion. The nanowires were then coated with an electrically conductive polymer to further enhance cellular activity. Finally, nerve growth factor was conjugated to the surface of the scaffolds to provide chemical cues for the neural stem cells. The results in this work suggest that these multifunctional nanowire scaffolds could be used in vivo to repair nervous system tissue.

  14. Expression of Intermediate Filament Nestin in Blood Vessels of Neural and Non-neural Tissues

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    Jaroslav Mokrý

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous findings performed in rat tissues demonstrated that intermediate filament nestin is expressed in endothelial cells of newly formed blood vessels of developing organs and neural transplants. The aim of the present study was to identify other cellular markers expressed in nestin-positive (nestin+ blood vessels. To reach this goal we performed double immunofluorescent study to co-localize nestin with endothelium-specific markers (CD31, CD34 II, vimentin or markers of perivascular cells (GFAP, SMA in paraffin-embedded sections of normal human brain tissue, low- and high-grade gliomas, postinfarcted heart and samples of non-neural tumours. Our findings documented that all the samples examined contained blood vessels with different ratio of nestin+ endothelial cells. Double immunostaining provided unambiguous evidence that endothelial cells expressed nestin and allowed them to distinguish from other nestin+ elements (perivascular astrocytic endfeet, undifferentiated tumour cells, smooth muscle cells and pericytes. Nestin+ endothelium was not confined only to newly formed capillaries but was also observed in blood vessels of larger calibres, frequently in arterioles and venules. We conclude that nestin represents a reliable vascular marker that is expressed in endothelial cells. Elevation of nestin expression likely corresponds to reorganization of intermediate filament network in the cytoskeleton of endothelial cells in the course of their maturation or adaptation to changes in growing tissues.

  15. Frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems

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    Guo, Daqing; Perc, Matjaž; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-08-01

    Biological neurons receive multiple noisy oscillatory signals, and their dynamical response to the superposition of these signals is of fundamental importance for information processing in the brain. Here we study the response of neural systems to the weak envelope modulation signal, which is superimposed by two periodic signals with different frequencies. We show that stochastic resonance occurs at the beat frequency in neural systems at the single-neuron as well as the population level. The performance of this frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance is influenced by both the beat frequency and the two forcing frequencies. Compared to a single neuron, a population of neurons is more efficient in detecting the information carried by the weak envelope modulation signal at the beat frequency. Furthermore, an appropriate fine-tuning of the excitation-inhibition balance can further optimize the response of a neural ensemble to the superimposed signal. Our results thus introduce and provide insights into the generation and modulation mechanism of the frequency-difference-dependent stochastic resonance in neural systems.

  16. Neural substrates of context- and person-dependent altruistic punishment.

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    Wang, Lili; Lu, Xiaping; Gu, Ruolei; Zhu, Ruida; Xu, Rui; Broster, Lucas S; Feng, Chunliang

    2017-11-01

    Human altruistic behaviors are heterogeneous across both contexts and people, whereas the neural signatures underlying the heterogeneity remain to be elucidated. To address this issue, we examined the neural signatures underlying the context- and person-dependent altruistic punishment, conjoining event-related fMRI with both task-based and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Acting as an impartial third party, participants decided how to punish norm violators either alone or in the presence of putative others. We found that the presence of others decreased altruistic punishment due to diffusion of responsibility. Those behavioral effects paralleled altered neural responses in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and putamen. Further, we identified modulation of responsibility diffusion on task-based functional connectivity of dACC with the brain regions implicated in reward processing (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala/orbital frontal cortex). Finally, the RSFC results revealed that (i) increased intrinsic connectivity strengths of the putamen with temporoparietal junction and dorsolateral PFC were associated with attenuated responsibility diffusion in altruistic punishment and (ii) increased putamen-dorsomedial PFC connectivity strengths were associated with reduced responsibility diffusion in self-reported responsibility. Taken together, our findings elucidate the context- and person-dependent altruistic behaviors as well as associated neural substrates and thus provide a potential neurocognitive mechanism of heterogeneous human altruistic behaviors. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5535-5550, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Deep convolutional neural network approach for forehead tissue thickness estimation

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    Manit Jirapong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presented a deep convolutional neural network (CNN approach for forehead tissue thickness estimation. We use down sampled NIR laser backscattering images acquired from a novel marker-less near-infrared laser-based head tracking system, combined with the beam’s incident angle parameter. These two-channel augmented images were constructed for the CNN input, while a single node output layer represents the estimated value of the forehead tissue thickness. The models were – separately for each subject – trained and tested on datasets acquired from 30 subjects (high resolution MRI data is used as ground truth. To speed up training, we used a pre-trained network from the first subject to bootstrap training for each of the other subjects. We could show a clear improvement for the tissue thickness estimation (mean RMSE of 0.096 mm. This proposed CNN model outperformed previous support vector regression (mean RMSE of 0.155 mm or Gaussian processes learning approaches (mean RMSE of 0.114 mm and eliminated their restrictions for future research.

  18. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

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    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  19. Analytic Modeling of Neural Tissue: I. A Spherical Bidomain.

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    Schwartz, Benjamin L; Chauhan, Munish; Sadleir, Rosalind J

    2016-12-01

    Presented here is a model of neural tissue in a conductive medium stimulated by externally injected currents. The tissue is described as a conductively isotropic bidomain, i.e. comprised of intra and extracellular regions that occupy the same space, as well as the membrane that divides them, and the injection currents are described as a pair of source and sink points. The problem is solved in three spatial dimensions and defined in spherical coordinates [Formula: see text]. The system of coupled partial differential equations is solved by recasting the problem to be in terms of the membrane and a monodomain, interpreted as a weighted average of the intra and extracellular domains. The membrane and monodomain are defined by the scalar Helmholtz and Laplace equations, respectively, which are both separable in spherical coordinates. Product solutions are thus assumed and given through certain transcendental functions. From these electrical potentials, analytic expressions for current density are derived and from those fields the magnetic flux density is calculated. Numerical examples are considered wherein the interstitial conductivity is varied, as well as the limiting case of the problem simplifying to two dimensions due to azimuthal independence. Finally, future modeling work is discussed.

  20. Polypyrrole-coated electrospun PLGA nanofibers for neural tissue applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Y; Bashur, Chris A; Goldstein, Aaron S; Schmidt, Christine E

    2009-09-01

    Electrospinning is a promising approach to create nanofiber structures that are capable of supporting adhesion and guiding extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, electrical stimulation of neurons in the absence of topographical features also has been shown to guide axonal extension. Therefore, the goal of this study was to form electrically conductive nanofiber structures and to examine the combined effect of nanofiber structures and electrical stimulation. Conductive meshes were produced by growing polypyrrole (PPy) on random and aligned electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, as confirmed by scanning electron micrographs and X-ray photon spectroscopy. PPy-PLGA electrospun meshes supported the growth and differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and hippocampal neurons comparable to non-coated PLGA control meshes, suggesting that PPy-PLGA may be suitable as conductive nanofibers for neuronal tissue scaffolds. Electrical stimulation studies showed that PC12 cells, stimulated with a potential of 10 mV/cm on PPy-PLGA scaffolds, exhibited 40-50% longer neurites and 40-90% more neurite formation compared to unstimulated cells on the same scaffolds. In addition, stimulation of the cells on aligned PPy-PLGA fibers resulted in longer neurites and more neurite-bearing cells than stimulation on random PPy-PLGA fibers, suggesting a combined effect of electrical stimulation and topographical guidance and the potential use of these scaffolds for neural tissue applications.

  1. Polypyrrole-Coated Electrospun PLGA Nanofibers for Neural Tissue Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Young; Bashur, Chris A.; Goldstein, Aaron S.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a promising approach to create nanofiber structures that are capable of supporting adhesion and guiding extension of neurons for nerve regeneration. Concurrently, electrical stimulation of neurons in the absence of topographical features also has been shown to guide axonal extension. Therefore, the goal of this study was to form electrically conductive nanofiber structures and to examine the combined effect of nanofiber structures and electrical stimulation. Conductive meshes were produced by growing polypyrrole (PPy) on random and aligned electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, as confirmed by scanning electron micrographs and X-ray photon spectroscopy. PPy-PLGA electrospun meshes supported the growth and differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells and hippocampal neurons comparable to non-coated PLGA control meshes, suggesting that PPy-PLGA may be suitable as conductive nanofibers for neuronal tissue scaffolds. Electrical stimulation studies showed that PC12 cells, stimulated with a potential of 10 mV/cm on PPy-PLGA scaffolds, exhibited 40–50% longer neurites and 40–90% more neurite formation compared to unstimulated cells on the same scaffolds. In addition, stimulation of the cells on aligned PPy-PLGA fibers resulted in longer neurites and more neurite-bearing cells than stimulation on random PPy-PLGA fibers, suggesting a combined effect of electrical stimulation and topographical guidance and the potential use of these scaffolds for neural tissue applications. PMID:19501901

  2. ChainMail based neural dynamics modeling of soft tissue deformation for surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-07-20

    Realistic and real-time modeling and simulation of soft tissue deformation is a fundamental research issue in the field of surgical simulation. In this paper, a novel cellular neural network approach is presented for modeling and simulation of soft tissue deformation by combining neural dynamics of cellular neural network with ChainMail mechanism. The proposed method formulates the problem of elastic deformation into cellular neural network activities to avoid the complex computation of elasticity. The local position adjustments of ChainMail are incorporated into the cellular neural network as the local connectivity of cells, through which the dynamic behaviors of soft tissue deformation are transformed into the neural dynamics of cellular neural network. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed neural network approach is capable of modeling the soft tissues' nonlinear deformation and typical mechanical behaviors. The proposed method not only improves ChainMail's linear deformation with the nonlinear characteristics of neural dynamics but also enables the cellular neural network to follow the principle of continuum mechanics to simulate soft tissue deformation.

  3. Effect of Ionic Diffusion on Extracellular Potentials in Neural Tissue.

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    Geir Halnes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recorded potentials in the extracellular space (ECS of the brain is a standard measure of population activity in neural tissue. Computational models that simulate the relationship between the ECS potential and its underlying neurophysiological processes are commonly used in the interpretation of such measurements. Standard methods, such as volume-conductor theory and current-source density theory, assume that diffusion has a negligible effect on the ECS potential, at least in the range of frequencies picked up by most recording systems. This assumption remains to be verified. We here present a hybrid simulation framework that accounts for diffusive effects on the ECS potential. The framework uses (1 the NEURON simulator to compute the activity and ionic output currents from multicompartmental neuron models, and (2 the electrodiffusive Kirchhoff-Nernst-Planck framework to simulate the resulting dynamics of the potential and ion concentrations in the ECS, accounting for the effect of electrical migration as well as diffusion. Using this framework, we explore the effect that ECS diffusion has on the electrical potential surrounding a small population of 10 pyramidal neurons. The neural model was tuned so that simulations over ∼100 seconds of biological time led to shifts in ECS concentrations by a few millimolars, similar to what has been seen in experiments. By comparing simulations where ECS diffusion was absent with simulations where ECS diffusion was included, we made the following key findings: (i ECS diffusion shifted the local potential by up to ∼0.2 mV. (ii The power spectral density (PSD of the diffusion-evoked potential shifts followed a 1/f2 power law. (iii Diffusion effects dominated the PSD of the ECS potential for frequencies up to several hertz. In scenarios with large, but physiologically realistic ECS concentration gradients, diffusion was thus found to affect the ECS potential well within the frequency range picked up in

  4. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

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    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  5. Implications of the dependence of neuronal activity on neural network states for the design of brain-machine interfaces

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    Stefano ePanzeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brains. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  6. Electric field effects in hyperexcitable neural tissue: A review

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    Durand, D.M

    2003-07-01

    Uniform electric fields applied to neural tissue can modulate neuronal excitability with a threshold value of about 1mV mm{sup -1} in normal physiological conditions. However, electric fields could have a lower threshold in conditions where field sensitivity is enhanced, such as those simulating epilepsy. Uniform electrical fields were applied to hippocampal brain slices exposed to picrotoxin, high potassium or low calcium solutions. The results in the low calcium medium show that neuronal activity can be completely blocked in 10% of the 30 slices tested with a field amplitude of 1mV mm{sup -1}. These results suggest that the threshold for this effect is clearly smaller than 1mV mm{sup -1}. The hypothesis that the extracellular resistance could affect the sensitivity to the electrical fields was tested by measuring the effect of the osmolarity of the extracellular solution on the efficacy of the field. A 10% decrease on osmolarity resulted in a 56% decrease (n=4) in the minimum field required for full suppression. A 14% in osmolarity produced an 81% increase in the minimum field required for full suppression. These results show that the extracellular volume can modulate the efficacy of the field and could lower the threshold field amplitudes to values lower than {approx}1mmV mm{sup -.} (author)

  7. Central neural control of thermoregulation and brown adipose tissue.

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    Morrison, Shaun F

    2016-04-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate the homeostatic repertoire that maintains body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and alters body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the experimental underpinnings of our current model of the CNS pathways controlling the principal thermoeffectors for body temperature regulation: cutaneous vasoconstriction controlling heat loss, and shivering and brown adipose tissue for thermogenesis. The activation of these effectors is regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific, core efferent pathways within the CNS that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. Via the lateral parabrachial nucleus, skin thermal afferent input reaches the hypothalamic preoptic area to inhibit warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control heat production by inhibiting thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to thermogenesis-controlling premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation of spinal circuits necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus sympathetic premotor neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction. The model proposed for central thermoregulatory control provides a useful platform for further understanding of the functional organization of central thermoregulation and elucidating the hypothalamic circuitry and neurotransmitters involved in body temperature regulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

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    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

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    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  10. Cellular neural network modelling of soft tissue dynamics for surgical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinao; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-07-20

    Currently, the mechanical dynamics of soft tissue deformation is achieved by numerical time integrations such as the explicit or implicit integration; however, the explicit integration is stable only under a small time step, whereas the implicit integration is computationally expensive in spite of the accommodation of a large time step. This paper presents a cellular neural network method for stable simulation of soft tissue deformation dynamics. The non-rigid motion equation is formulated as a cellular neural network with local connectivity of cells, and thus the dynamics of soft tissue deformation is transformed into the neural dynamics of the cellular neural network. Results show that the proposed method can achieve good accuracy at a small time step. It still remains stable at a large time step, while maintaining the computational efficiency of the explicit integration. The proposed method can achieve stable soft tissue deformation with efficiency of explicit integration for surgical simulation.

  11. Reward-related neural responses are dependent on the beneficiary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Barbara R; Güroğlu, Berna; de Water, Erik; Meuwese, Rosa; Koolschijn, P Cédric; Peper, Jiska S; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have suggested that positive social interactions are experienced as rewarding. Yet, it is not well understood how social relationships influence neural responses to other persons' gains. In this study, we investigated neural responses during a gambling task in which healthy participants (N = 31; 18 females) could win or lose money for themselves, their best friend or a disliked other (antagonist). At the moment of receiving outcome, person-related activity was observed in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), precuneus and temporal parietal junction (TPJ), showing higher activity for friends and antagonists than for self, and this activity was independent of outcome. The only region showing an interaction between the person-participants played for and outcome was the ventral striatum. Specifically, the striatum was more active following gains than losses for self and friends, whereas for the antagonist this pattern was reversed. Together, these results show that, in a context with social and reward information, social aspects are processed in brain regions associated with social cognition (mPFC, TPJ), and reward aspects are processed in primary reward areas (striatum). Furthermore, there is an interaction of social and reward information in the striatum, such that reward-related activity was dependent on social relationship. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Glucocorticoid control of gene transcription in neural tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morsink, Maarten Christian

    2007-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones exert modulatory effects on neural function in a delayed genomic fashion. The two receptor types that can bind glucocorticoids, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), are ligand-inducible transcription factors. Therefore, changes in gene

  13. Identification and target prediction of miRNAs specifically expressed in rat neural tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Kang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation. Several studies have indicated that some miRNAs are specifically expressed in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues. For example, miR-1 and miR-133 are specifically expressed in muscles. Tissue-specific miRNAs may have particular functions. Although previous studies have reported the presence of human, mouse and zebrafish tissue-specific miRNAs, there have been no detailed reports of rat tissue-specific miRNAs. In this study, Home-made rat miRNA microarrays which established in our previous study were used to investigate rat neural tissue-specific miRNAs, and mapped their target genes in rat tissues. This study will provide information for the functional analysis of these miRNAs. Results In order to obtain as complete a picture of specific miRNA expression in rat neural tissues as possible, customized miRNA microarrays with 152 selected miRNAs from miRBase were used to detect miRNA expression in 14 rat tissues. After a general clustering analysis, 14 rat tissues could be clearly classified into neural and non-neural tissues based on the obtained expression profiles with p values Conclusion Our work provides a global view of rat neural tissue-specific miRNA profiles and a target map of miRNAs, which is expected to contribute to future investigations of miRNA regulatory mechanisms in neural systems.

  14. Differentiation-Dependent Motility-Responses of Developing Neural Progenitors to Optogenetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tímea Köhidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During neural tissue genesis, neural stem/progenitor cells are exposed to bioelectric stimuli well before synaptogenesis and neural circuit formation. Fluctuations in the electrochemical potential in the vicinity of developing cells influence the genesis, migration and maturation of neuronal precursors. The complexity of the in vivo environment and the coexistence of various progenitor populations hinder the understanding of the significance of ionic/bioelectric stimuli in the early phases of neuronal differentiation. Using optogenetic stimulation, we investigated the in vitro motility responses of radial glia-like neural stem/progenitor populations to ionic stimuli. Radial glia-like neural stem cells were isolated from CAGloxpStoploxpChR2(H134-eYFP transgenic mouse embryos. After transfection with Cre-recombinase, ChR2(channelrhodopsin-2-expressing and non-expressing cells were separated by eYFP fluorescence. Expression of light-gated ion channels were checked by patch clamp and fluorescence intensity assays. Neurogenesis by ChR2-expressing and non-expressing cells was induced by withdrawal of EGF from the medium. Cells in different (stem cell, migrating progenitor and maturing precursor stages of development were illuminated with laser light (λ = 488 nm; 1.3 mW/mm2; 300 ms in every 5 min for 12 h. The displacement of the cells was analyzed on images taken at the end of each light pulse. Results demonstrated that the migratory activity decreased with the advancement of neuronal differentiation regardless of stimulation. Light-sensitive cells, however, responded on a differentiation-dependent way. In non-differentiated ChR2-expressing stem cell populations, the motility did not change significantly in response to light-stimulation. The displacement activity of migrating progenitors was enhanced, while the motility of differentiating neuronal precursors was markedly reduced by illumination.

  15. Activity-dependent modulation of neural circuit synaptic connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R Tessier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In many nervous systems, the establishment of neural circuits is known to proceed via a two-stage process; 1 early, activity-independent wiring to produce a rough map characterized by excessive synaptic connections, and 2 subsequent, use-dependent pruning to eliminate inappropriate connections and reinforce maintained synapses. In invertebrates, however, evidence of the activity-dependent phase of synaptic refinement has been elusive, and the dogma has long been that invertebrate circuits are “hard-wired” in a purely activity-independent manner. This conclusion has been challenged recently through the use of new transgenic tools employed in the powerful Drosophila system, which have allowed unprecedented temporal control and single neuron imaging resolution. These recent studies reveal that activity-dependent mechanisms are indeed required to refine circuit maps in Drosophila during precise, restricted windows of late-phase development. Such mechanisms of circuit refinement may be key to understanding a number of human neurological diseases, including developmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome (FXS and autism, which are hypothesized to result from defects in synaptic connectivity and activity-dependent circuit function. This review focuses on our current understanding of activity-dependent synaptic connectivity in Drosophila, primarily through analyzing the role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP in the Drosophila FXS disease model. The particular emphasis of this review is on the expanding array of new genetically-encoded tools that are allowing cellular events and molecular players to be dissected with ever greater precision and detail.

  16. Uniform neural tissue models produced on synthetic hydrogels using standard culture techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Christopher; Schmitz, Matthew T; Propson, Nicholas E; Hou, Zhonggang; Zhang, Jue; Nguyen, Bao K; Bolin, Jennifer M; Jiang, Peng; McIntosh, Brian E; Probasco, Mitchell D; Swanson, Scott; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A; Schwartz, Michael P; Murphy, William L

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to test sample reproducibility for model neural tissues formed on synthetic hydrogels. Human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived precursor cells were cultured on synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels to promote differentiation and self-organization into model neural tissue constructs. Neural progenitor, vascular, and microglial precursor cells were combined on PEG hydrogels to mimic developmental timing, which produced multicomponent neural constructs with 3D neuronal and glial organization, organized vascular networks, and microglia with ramified morphologies. Spearman's rank correlation analysis of global gene expression profiles and a comparison of coefficient of variation for expressed genes demonstrated that replicate neural constructs were highly uniform to at least day 21 for samples from independent experiments. We also demonstrate that model neural tissues formed on PEG hydrogels using a simplified neural differentiation protocol correlated more strongly to in vivo brain development than samples cultured on tissue culture polystyrene surfaces alone. These results provide a proof-of-concept demonstration that 3D cellular models that mimic aspects of human brain development can be produced from human pluripotent stem cells with high sample uniformity between experiments by using standard culture techniques, cryopreserved cell stocks, and a synthetic extracellular matrix. Impact statement Pluripotent stem (PS) cells have been characterized by an inherent ability to self-organize into 3D "organoids" resembling stomach, intestine, liver, kidney, and brain tissues, offering a potentially powerful tool for modeling human development and disease. However, organoid formation must be quantitatively reproducible for applications such as drug and toxicity screening. Here, we report a strategy to produce uniform neural tissue constructs with reproducible global gene expression profiles for replicate samples from multiple

  17. Wnt/Yes-Associated Protein Interactions During Neural Tissue Patterning of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejoy, Julie; Song, Liqing; Zhou, Yi; Li, Yan

    2017-08-31

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have special ability to self-assemble into neural spheroids or mini-brain-like structures. During the self-assembly process, Wnt signaling plays an important role in regional patterning and establishing positional identity of hiPSC-derived neural progenitors. Recently, the role of Wnt signaling in regulating Yes-associated protein (YAP) expression (nuclear or cytoplasmic), the pivotal regulator during organ growth and tissue generation, has attracted increasing interests. However, the interactions between Wnt and YAP expression for neural lineage commitment of hiPSCs remain poorly explored. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of Wnt signaling and YAP expression on the cellular population in three-dimensional (3D) neural spheroids derived from hiPSCs. In this study, Wnt signaling was activated using CHIR99021 for 3D neural spheroids derived from human iPSK3 cells through embryoid body formation. Our results indicate that Wnt activation induces nuclear localization of YAP and upregulates the expression of HOXB4, the marker for hindbrain/spinal cord. By contrast, the cells exhibit more rostral forebrain neural identity (expression of TBR1) without Wnt activation. Cytochalasin D was then used to induce cytoplasmic YAP and the results showed the decreased HOXB4 expression. In addition, the incorporation of microparticles in the neural spheroids was investigated for the perturbation of neural patterning. This study may indicate the bidirectional interactions of Wnt signaling and YAP expression during neural tissue patterning, which have the significance in neurological disease modeling, drug screening, and neural tissue regeneration.

  18. Temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification for soft tissue discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Schwendener, Nicole; Jackowski, Christian [University of Bern, From the Institute of Forensic Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Persson, Anders; Warntjes, Marcel J. [University of Linkoeping, The Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV), Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    To investigate and correct the temperature dependence of postmortem MR quantification used for soft tissue characterization and differentiation in thoraco-abdominal organs. Thirty-five postmortem short axis cardiac 3-T MR examinations were quantified using a quantification sequence. Liver, spleen, left ventricular myocardium, pectoralis muscle and subcutaneous fat were analysed in cardiac short axis images to obtain mean T1, T2 and PD tissue values. The core body temperature was measured using a rectally inserted thermometer. The tissue-specific quantitative values were related to the body core temperature. Equations to correct for temperature differences were generated. In a 3D plot comprising the combined data of T1, T2 and PD, different organs/tissues could be well differentiated from each other. The quantitative values were influenced by the temperature. T1 in particular exhibited strong temperature dependence. The correction of quantitative values to a temperature of 37 C resulted in better tissue discrimination. Postmortem MR quantification is feasible for soft tissue discrimination and characterization of thoraco-abdominal organs. This provides a base for computer-aided diagnosis and detection of tissue lesions. The temperature dependence of the T1 values challenges postmortem MR quantification. Equations to correct for the temperature dependence are provided. (orig.)

  19. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  20. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves. PMID:19939265

  1. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2009-11-25

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  2. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Use of Endothelial Progenitor Cells for the Regeneration of Musculoskeletal and Neural Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naosuke Kamei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs derived from bone marrow and blood can differentiate into endothelial cells and promote neovascularization. In addition, EPCs are a promising cell source for the repair of various types of vascularized tissues and have been used in animal experiments and clinical trials for tissue repair. In this review, we focused on the kinetics of endogenous EPCs during tissue repair and the application of EPCs or stem cell populations containing EPCs for tissue regeneration in musculoskeletal and neural tissues including the bone, skeletal muscle, ligaments, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. EPCs can be mobilized from bone marrow and recruited to injured tissue to contribute to neovascularization and tissue repair. In addition, EPCs or stem cell populations containing EPCs promote neovascularization and tissue repair through their differentiation to endothelial cells or tissue-specific cells, the upregulation of growth factors, and the induction and activation of endogenous stem cells. Human peripheral blood CD34(+ cells containing EPCs have been used in clinical trials of bone repair. Thus, EPCs are a promising cell source for the treatment of musculoskeletal and neural tissue injury.

  4. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylases from non-hepatic tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, C.; Hendrix, H.; Daemen, M.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of vitamin K-dependent carboxylase was investigated in the microsomal fraction of 20 different types of bovine tissue. Except for muscle, veins, lymphocytes and bone membrane, carboxylase was found in all these preparations, albeit in varying amounts. No differences could be detected

  5. Ultrasonic Characterization of Tissues via Backscatter Frequency Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.

    1997-01-01

    Phantom and patient studies were performed to assess the potential of backscatter frequency dependence as a useful parameter for tissue characterization. A commercial phased-array ultrasonic scanner was adapted to allow digitization of the intermediate-frequency ultrasonic data, Studies of agar...

  6. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  7. Self-Organizing 3D Human Neural Tissue Derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Recapitulate Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem K Raja

    Full Text Available The dismal success rate of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease (AD motivates us to develop model systems of AD pathology that have higher predictive validity. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs allows us to model pathology and study disease mechanisms directly in human neural cells from healthy individual as well as AD patients. However, two-dimensional culture systems do not recapitulate the complexity of neural tissue, and phenotypes such as extracellular protein aggregation are difficult to observe. We report brain organoids that use pluripotent stem cells derived from AD patients and recapitulate AD-like pathologies such as amyloid aggregation, hyperphosphorylated tau protein, and endosome abnormalities. These pathologies are observed in an age-dependent manner in organoids derived from multiple familial AD (fAD patients harboring amyloid precursor protein (APP duplication or presenilin1 (PSEN1 mutation, compared to controls. The incidence of AD pathology was consistent amongst several fAD lines, which carried different mutations. Although these are complex assemblies of neural tissue, they are also highly amenable to experimental manipulation. We find that treatment of patient-derived organoids with β- and γ-secretase inhibitors significantly reduces amyloid and tau pathology. Moreover, these results show the potential of this model system to greatly increase the translatability of pre-clinical drug discovery in AD.

  8. Context-dependent neural modulations in the perception of duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki eMurai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies have revealed that distinct brain networks are recruited in the perception of sub- and supra-second timescales, whereas psychophysical studies have suggested that there are common or continuous mechanisms for perceiving these two durations. The present study aimed to elucidate the neural implementation of such continuity by examining the neural correlates of peri-second timing.We measured neural activity during a duration reproduction task using fMRI. Our results replicate the findings of previous studies in showing that separate neural networks are recruited for sub- versus supra-second time perception: motor systems including the motor cortex and the supplementary motor area for sub-second perception, and the frontal, parietal, and auditory cortical areas for supra-second perception. We further found that the peri-second perception activated both the sub- and supra-second networks, and that the timing system that processed duration perception in previous trials was more involved in subsequent peri-second processing. These results indicate that the sub- and supra-second timing systems overlap at around 1 second, and cooperate to optimally encode duration based on the hysteresis of previous trials.

  9. Novel nanofibrous spiral scaffolds for neural tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Junping; Yu, Xiaojun

    2008-12-01

    Due to several drawbacks associated with autografts and allografts, tissue-engineering approaches have been widely used to repair peripheral nerve injuries. Most of the traditional tissue-engineered scaffolds in use are either tubular (single or multi-lumen) or hydrogel-based cylindrical grafts, which provide limited surface area for cell attachment and regeneration. Here, we show a novel poly(lactide-co-glycotide) (PLGA) microsphere-based spiral scaffold design with a nanofibrous surface that has enhanced surface areas and possesses sufficient mechanical properties and porosities to support the nerve regeneration process. These scaffolds have an open architecture that goes evenly throughout the scaffolds hence leaving enough volume for media influx and deeper cell penetration into the scaffolds. The in vitro tests conducted using Schwann cells show that the nanofibrous spiral scaffolds promote higher cell attachment and proliferation when compared to contemporary tubular scaffolds or nanofiber-based tubular scaffolds. Also, the nanofiber coating on the surfaces enhances the surface area, mimics the extracellular matrix and provides unidirectional alignment of cells along its direction. Hence, we propose that these scaffolds could alleviate some drawbacks in current nerve grafts and could potentially be used in nerve regeneration.

  10. Evaluation of Raman spectra of human brain tumor tissue using the learning vector quantization neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tuo; Chen, Changshui; Shi, Xingzhe; Liu, Chengyong

    2016-05-01

    The Raman spectra of tissue of 20 brain tumor patients was recorded using a confocal microlaser Raman spectroscope with 785 nm excitation in vitro. A total of 133 spectra were investigated. Spectra peaks from normal white matter tissue and tumor tissue were analyzed. Algorithms, such as principal component analysis, linear discriminant analysis, and the support vector machine, are commonly used to analyze spectral data. However, in this study, we employed the learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which is typically used for pattern recognition. By applying the proposed method, a normal diagnosis accuracy of 85.7% and a glioma diagnosis accuracy of 89.5% were achieved. The LVQ neural network is a recent approach to excavating Raman spectra information. Moreover, it is fast and convenient, does not require the spectra peak counterpart, and achieves a relatively high accuracy. It can be used in brain tumor prognostics and in helping to optimize the cutting margins of gliomas.

  11. Imaging regenerating bone tissue based on neural networks applied to micro-diffraction measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campi, G.; Pezzotti, G. [Institute of Crystallography, CNR, via Salaria Km 29.300, I-00015, Monterotondo Roma (Italy); Fratini, M. [Centro Fermi -Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' Enrico Fermi' , Roma (Italy); Ricci, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Burghammer, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B. P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Cancedda, R.; Mastrogiacomo, M. [Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, and Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale dell' Università di Genova and AUO San Martino Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Bukreeva, I.; Cedola, A. [Institute for Chemical and Physical Process, CNR, c/o Physics Dep. at Sapienza University, P-le A. Moro 5, 00185, Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-16

    We monitored bone regeneration in a tissue engineering approach. To visualize and understand the structural evolution, the samples have been measured by X-ray micro-diffraction. We find that bone tissue regeneration proceeds through a multi-step mechanism, each step providing a specific diffraction signal. The large amount of data have been classified according to their structure and associated to the process they came from combining Neural Networks algorithms with least square pattern analysis. In this way, we obtain spatial maps of the different components of the tissues visualizing the complex kinetic at the base of the bone regeneration.

  12. Neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation in the conductive PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuping; Guan, Shui; Xu, Jianqiang; Li, Wenfang; Ge, Dan; Sun, Changkai; Liu, Tianqing; Ma, Xuehu

    2017-09-26

    Engineering scaffolds with excellent electro-activity is increasingly important in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Herein, conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with hyaluronic acid (PEDOT-HA) nanoparticles were firstly synthesized via chemical oxidant polymerization. A three-dimensional (3D) PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was then developed by introducing PEDOT-HA nanoparticles into a chitosan/gelatin (Cs/Gel) matrix. HA, as a bridge, not only was used as a dopant, but also combined PEDOT into the Cs/Gel via chemical crosslinking. The PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold was used as a conductive substrate for neural stem cell (NSC) culture in vitro. The results demonstrated that the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold had excellent biocompatibility for NSC proliferation and differentiation. 3D confocal fluorescence images showed cells attached on the channel surface of Cs/Gel and PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffolds with a normal neuronal morphology. Compared to the Cs/Gel scaffold, the PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold not only promoted NSC proliferation with up-regulated expression of Ki67, but also enhanced NSC differentiation into neurons and astrocytes with up-regulated expression of β tubulin-III and GFAP, respectively. It is expected that this electro-active and bio-active PEDOT-HA/Cs/Gel scaffold will be used as a conductive platform to regulate NSC behavior for neural tissue engineering.

  13. Tissue type plasminogen activator regulates myeloid-cell dependent neoangiogenesis during tissue regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohki, Makiko; Ohki, Yuichi; Ishihara, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    tissue regeneration is not well understood. Bone marrow (BM)-derived myeloid cells facilitate angiogenesis during tissue regeneration. Here, we report that a serpin-resistant form of tPA by activating the extracellular proteases matrix metalloproteinase-9 and plasmin expands the myeloid cell pool...... and mobilizes CD45(+)CD11b(+) proangiogenic, myeloid cells, a process dependent on vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A) and Kit ligand signaling. tPA improves the incorporation of CD11b(+) cells into ischemic tissues and increases expression of neoangiogenesis-related genes, including VEGF......-A. Remarkably, transplantation of BM-derived tPA-mobilized CD11b(+) cells and VEGFR-1(+) cells, but not carrier-mobilized cells or CD11b(-) cells, accelerates neovascularization and ischemic tissue regeneration. Inhibition of VEGF signaling suppresses tPA-induced neovascularization in a model of hind limb...

  14. Knockdown of tissue nonspecific alkaline phosphatase impairs neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermer, Vanessa; Ritter, Mathias; Albuquerque, Boris; Leib, Christoph; Stanke, Matthias; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2010-11-26

    In the adult mammalian brain the subependymal layer of the lateral ventricles houses neural stem cells giving rise to young neurons migrating towards the olfactory bulb. The molecular cues controlling essential functions within the neurogenesis pathway such as proliferation, short and long distance migration, differentiation and functional integration are poorly understood. Neural progenitors in situ express the tissue nonspecific form of alkaline phosphatase (TNAP), a cell surface-located nonspecific phosphomonoesterase capable of hydrolyzing extracellular nucleotides. To gain insight into the functional role of TNAP in cultured multipotent neural stem cells we applied a knockdown protocol using RNA interference with shRNA and retroviral infection. We show that TNAP knockdown reduces cell proliferation and differentiation into neurons or oligodendrocytes. This effect is abrogated by addition of alkaline phosphatase to the culture medium. Our results suggest that TNAP is essential for NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro and possibly also in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Temperature dependence of thermal conductivity of biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, A; Mahajan, R L

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, we present our experimental results on the determination of the thermal conductivity of biological tissues using a transient technique based on the principles of the cylindrical hot-wire method. A novel, 1.45 mm diameter, 50 mm long hot-wire probe was deployed. Initial measurements were made on sponge, gelatin and Styrofoam insulation to test the accuracy of the probe. Subsequent experiments conducted on sheep collagen in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity to be a linear function of temperature. Further, these changes in the thermal conductivity were found to be reversible. However, when the tissue was heated beyond 55 degrees C, irreversible changes in thermal conductivity were observed. Similar experiments were also conducted for determining the thermal conductivity of cow liver. In this case, the irreversible effects were found to set in much later at around 90 degrees C. Below this temperature, in the range of 25 degrees C thermal conductivity, as for sheep collagen, varied linearly with temperature. In the second part of our study, in vivo measurements were taken on the different organs of a living pig. Comparison with reported values for dead tissues shows the thermal conductivities of living organs to be higher, indicating thereby the dominant role played by blood perfusion in enhancing the net heat transfer in living tissues. The degree of enhancement is different in different organs and shows a direct dependence on the blood flow rate.

  16. Determination of platinum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis in neural tissues from rats, monkeys and patients treated with cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietz, B.; Krarup-Hansen, A.; Rorth, M.

    2001-01-01

    of the animals mentioned and in the neural tissues of human patients. For the determination of platinum in the tissues radiochemical neutron activation analysis has been used. The detection limit is 1 ng Pt g(-1). The platinum results indicate that platinum becomes accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia......Cisplatin is one of the most used antineoplastic drugs, essential for the treatment of germ cell tumours. Its use in medical treatment of cancer patients often causes chronic peripheral neuropathy in these patients. The distribution of cisplatin in neural tissues is, therefore, of great interest....... Rats and monkeys were used as animal models for the study of sensory changes in different neural tissues, like spinal cord (ventral and dorsal part), dorsal root ganglia and sural nerve. The study was combined with quantitative measurements of the content of platinum in the neural tissues...

  17. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  18. Microinjection of membrane-impermeable molecules into single neural stem cells in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B; Taverna, Elena

    2014-05-01

    This microinjection protocol allows the manipulation and tracking of neural stem and progenitor cells in tissue at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate how to apply microinjection to organotypic brain slices obtained from mice and ferrets; however, our technique is not limited to mouse and ferret embryos, but provides a means of introducing a wide variety of membrane-impermeable molecules (e.g., nucleic acids, proteins, hydrophilic compounds) into neural stem and progenitor cells of any developing mammalian brain. Microinjection experiments are conducted by using a phase-contrast microscope equipped with epifluorescence, a transjector and a micromanipulator. The procedure normally takes ∼2 h for an experienced researcher, and the entire protocol, including tissue processing, can be performed within 1 week. Thus, microinjection is a unique and versatile method for changing and tracking the fate of a cell in organotypic slice culture.

  19. Rules of engagement: factors that regulate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity during neural network development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Emily T; Sanders, Erin M; Sanyal, Mohima; Dumas, Theodore C

    2010-10-01

    Overproduction and pruning during development is a phenomenon that can be observed in the number of organisms in a population, the number of cells in many tissue types, and even the number of synapses on individual neurons. The sculpting of synaptic connections in the brain of a developing organism is guided by its personal experience, which on a neural level translates to specific patterns of activity. Activity-dependent plasticity at glutamatergic synapses is an integral part of neuronal network formation and maturation in developing vertebrate and invertebrate brains. As development of the rodent forebrain transitions away from an over-proliferative state, synaptic plasticity undergoes modification. Late developmental changes in synaptic plasticity signal the establishment of a more stable network and relate to pronounced perceptual and cognitive abilities. In large part, activation of glutamate-sensitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors regulates synaptic stabilization during development and is a necessary step in memory formation processes that occur in the forebrain. A developmental change in the subunits that compose NMDA receptors coincides with developmental modifications in synaptic plasticity and cognition, and thus much research in this area focuses on NMDA receptor composition. We propose that there are additional, equally important developmental processes that influence synaptic plasticity, including mechanisms that are upstream (factors that influence NMDA receptors) and downstream (intracellular processes regulated by NMDA receptors) from NMDA receptor activation. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known and what is not well understood about developmental changes in functional plasticity at glutamatergic synapses, and in the end, attempt to relate these changes to maturation of neural networks.

  20. Trigger Points, Pressure Pain Hyperalgesia, and Mechanosensitivity of Neural Tissue in Women with Chronic Pelvic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Márquez, Pedro; Valenza, Marie Carmen; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Ríos-Sánchez, Ana; Ocón-Hernández, Olga

    2017-08-25

    This study aims to evaluate the presence of myofascial trigger points (TrPs), widespread pressure pain sensitivity, and mechanosensitivity of neural tissue in women with chronic pelvic pain. Case-control study. Faculty of Health Sciences. Forty women with chronic pelvic pain between age 18 and 60 years and 40 matched healthy controls were included in the study. TrPs were bilaterally explored in gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, gluteus minimus, quadratus lumborum, and adductor magnus muscles. The referred pain reproduced lumbopelvic symptoms. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were also bilaterally assessed over the Pfannenstiel incision point on the abdominal, C5-C6 zygapophyseal joint, second metacarpal, and tibialis anterior muscle. Mechanosensitivity of neural tissue was assessed with the neurodynamics tests of slump and the straight-leg raising. Significant between-group differences were found in TrP presence in patients with chronic pelvic pain (P Neurodynamics show a significantly decreased value in women with CPP. Patients with chronic pelvic pain presented a high percentage of TrPs that reproduce their symptoms. Patients also showed a widespread pressure pain hyperalgesia and more mechanosensitive neural tissue due to a decrease on the range of motion related to neurodynamics.

  1. On random walks and entropy in diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging studies of neural tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, Carson; Magin, Richard L; Colon-Perez, Luis; Triplett, William; Mareci, Thomas H

    2014-02-01

    In diffusion-weighted MRI studies of neural tissue, the classical model assumes the statistical mechanics of Brownian motion and predicts a monoexponential signal decay. However, there have been numerous reports of signal decays that are not monoexponential, particularly in the white matter. We modeled diffusion in neural tissue from the perspective of the continuous time random walk. The characteristic diffusion decay is represented by the Mittag-Leffler function, which relaxes a priori assumptions about the governing statistics. We then used entropy as a measure of the anomalous features for the characteristic function. Diffusion-weighted MRI experiments were performed on a fixed rat brain using an imaging spectrometer at 17.6 T with b-values arrayed up to 25,000 s/mm(2). Additionally, we examined the impact of varying either the gradient strength, q, or mixing time, Δ, on the observed diffusion dynamics. In white and gray matter regions, the Mittag-Leffler and entropy parameters demonstrated new information regarding subdiffusion and produced different image contrast from that of the classical diffusion coefficient. The choice of weighting on q and Δ produced different image contrast within the regions of interest. We propose these parameters have the potential as biomarkers for morphology in neural tissue. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Central regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis dependent on food availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2017-12-05

    Energy homeostasis of mammals is maintained by balancing energy expenditure within the body and energy intake through feeding. Several lines of evidence indicate that brown adipose tissue (BAT), a sympathetically activated thermogenic organ, turns excess energy into heat to maintain the energy balance in rodents and humans, in addition to its thermoregulatory role for the defense of body core temperature in cold environments. Elucidating the central circuit mechanism controlling BAT thermogenesis dependent on nutritional conditions and food availability in relation to energy homeostasis is essential to understand the etiology of symptoms caused by energy imbalance, such as obesity. The central thermogenic command outflow to BAT descends through an excitatory neural pathway mediated by hypothalamic, medullary and spinal sites. This sympathoexcitatory thermogenic drive is controlled by tonic GABAergic inhibitory signaling from the thermoregulatory center in the preoptic area, whose tone is altered by body core and cutaneous thermosensory inputs. This circuit controlling BAT thermogenesis for cold defense also functions for the development of fever and psychological stress-induced hyperthermia, indicating its important role in the defense from a variety of environmental stressors. When food is unavailable, hunger-driven neural signaling from the hypothalamus activates GABAergic neurons in the medullary reticular formation, which then block the sympathoexcitatory thermogenic outflow to BAT to reduce energy expenditure and simultaneously command the masticatory motor system to promote food intake-effectively commanding responses to survive starvation. This article reviews the central mechanism controlling BAT thermogenesis in relation to the regulation of energy and thermal homeostasis dependent on food availability.

  3. Arrhenius temperature dependence of in vitro tissue plasminogen activator thrombolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, George J [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Dhamija, Ashima [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Bavani, Nazli [Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Wagner, Kenneth R [Department of Neurology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States); Holland, Christy K [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0769 (United States)

    2007-06-07

    Stroke is a devastating disease and a leading cause of death and disability. Currently, the only FDA approved therapy for acute ischemic stroke is the intravenous administration of the thrombolytic medication, recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). However, this treatment has many contraindications and can have dangerous side effects such as intra-cerebral hemorrhage. These treatment limitations have led to much interest in potential adjunctive therapies, such as therapeutic hypothermia (T {<=} 35 deg. C) and ultrasound enhanced thrombolysis. Such interest may lead to combining these therapies with tPA to treat stroke, however little is known about the effects of temperature on the thrombolytic efficacy of tPA. In this work, we measure the temperature dependence of the fractional clot mass loss {delta}m(T) resulting from tPA exposure in an in vitro human clot model. We find that the temperature dependence is well described by an Arrhenius temperature dependence with an effective activation energy E{sub eff} of 42.0 {+-} 0.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. E{sub eff} approximates the activation energy of the plasminogen-to-plasmin reaction of 48.9 kJ mole{sup -1}. A model to explain this temperature dependence is proposed. These results will be useful in predicting the effects of temperature in future lytic therapies.

  4. Comparison of the acute effects of hemostatic agents on neural tissues in spine surgery: Histologic analysis in rat models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan Meric

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Both gelatin sponge and oxidized cellulose did not increase the cellular necrosis of neural tissues. However, oxidized cellulose may lead to an increased local inflammatory reaction. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2016; 5(1.000: 21-26

  5. Time- and task-dependent non-neural effects of real and sham TMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Duecker

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is widely used in experimental brain research to manipulate brain activity in humans. Next to the intended neural effects, every TMS pulse produces a distinct clicking sound and sensation on the head which can also influence task performance. This necessitates careful consideration of control conditions in order to ensure that behavioral effects of interest can be attributed to the neural consequences of TMS and not to non-neural effects of a TMS pulse. Surprisingly, even though these non-neural effects of TMS are largely unknown, they are often assumed to be unspecific, i.e. not dependent on TMS parameters. This assumption is inherent to many control strategies in TMS research but has recently been challenged on empirical grounds. Here, we further develop the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research. We investigated the time-dependence and task-dependence of the non-neural effects of TMS and compared real and sham TMS over vertex. Critically, we show that non-neural TMS effects depend on a complex interplay of these factors. Although TMS had no direct neural effects, both pre- and post-stimulus TMS time windows modulated task performance on both a sensory detection task and a cognitive angle judgment task. For the most part, these effects were quantitatively similar across tasks but effect sizes were clearly different. Moreover, the effects of real and sham TMS were almost identical with interesting exceptions that shed light on the relative contribution of auditory and somato-sensory aspects of a TMS pulse. Knowledge of such effects is of critical importance for the interpretation of TMS experiments and helps deciding what constitutes an appropriate control condition. Our results broaden the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research and point at potential pitfalls that should be avoided.

  6. 3-D Bioprinting of Neural Tissue for Applications in Cell Therapy and Drug Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of individuals in North America and cost the health-care industry billions of dollars for treatment. Current treatment options for degenerative diseases focus on physical rehabilitation or drug therapies, which temporarily mask the effects of cell damage, but quickly lose their efficacy. Cell therapies for the central nervous system remain an untapped market due to the complexity involved in growing neural tissues, controlling their differentiation, and protecting them from the hostile environment they meet upon implantation. Designing tissue constructs for the discovery of better drug treatments are also limited due to the resolution needed for an accurate cellular representation of the brain, in addition to being expensive and difficult to translate to biocompatible materials. 3-D printing offers a streamlined solution for engineering brain tissue for drug discovery or, in the future, for implantation. New microfluidic and bioplotting devices offer increased resolution, little impact on cell viability and have been tested with several bioink materials including fibrin, collagen, hyaluronic acid, poly(caprolactone, and poly(ethylene glycol. This review details current efforts at bioprinting neural tissue and highlights promising avenues for future work.

  7. 3-D Bioprinting of Neural Tissue for Applications in Cell Therapy and Drug Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michaela; Willerth, Stephanie M

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases affect millions of individuals in North America and cost the health-care industry billions of dollars for treatment. Current treatment options for degenerative diseases focus on physical rehabilitation or drug therapies, which temporarily mask the effects of cell damage, but quickly lose their efficacy. Cell therapies for the central nervous system remain an untapped market due to the complexity involved in growing neural tissues, controlling their differentiation, and protecting them from the hostile environment they meet upon implantation. Designing tissue constructs for the discovery of better drug treatments are also limited due to the resolution needed for an accurate cellular representation of the brain, in addition to being expensive and difficult to translate to biocompatible materials. 3-D printing offers a streamlined solution for engineering brain tissue for drug discovery or, in the future, for implantation. New microfluidic and bioplotting devices offer increased resolution, little impact on cell viability and have been tested with several bioink materials including fibrin, collagen, hyaluronic acid, poly(caprolactone), and poly(ethylene glycol). This review details current efforts at bioprinting neural tissue and highlights promising avenues for future work.

  8. [Robustness analysis of adaptive neural network model based on spike timing-dependent plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunzhi; Xu, Guizhi; Zhou, Qian; Guo, Miaomiao; Guo, Lei; Wan, Xiaowei

    2015-02-01

    To explore the self-organization robustness of the biological neural network, and thus to provide new ideas and methods for the electromagnetic bionic protection, we studied both the information transmission mechanism of neural network and spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) mechanism, and then investigated the relationship between synaptic plastic and adaptive characteristic of biology. Then a feedforward neural network with the Izhikevich model and the STDP mechanism was constructed, and the adaptive robust capacity of the network was analyzed. Simulation results showed that the neural network based on STDP mechanism had good rubustness capacity, and this characteristics is closely related to the STDP mechanisms. Based on this simulation work, the cell circuit with neurons and synaptic circuit which can simulate the information processing mechanisms of biological nervous system will be further built, then the electronic circuits with adaptive robustness will be designed based on the cell circuit.

  9. 3D bioprinting: A new insight into the therapeutic strategy of neural tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    Acute traumatic injuries and chronic degenerative diseases represent the world's largest unmet medical need. There are over 50 million people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, there are only a few treatment options available for acute traumatic injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. In this commentary, the newly developed 3D bioprinting technique involving neural stem cells (NSCs) embedded in the thermoresponsive biodegradable polyurethane (PU) bioink is reviewed. The thermoresponsive and biodegradable PU dispersion can form gel near 37 °C without any crosslinker. NSCs embedded within the water-based PU hydrogel with appropriate stiffness showed comparable viability and differentiation after printing. Moreover, in the zebrafish embryo neural deficit model, injection of the NSC-laden PU hydrogels promoted the repair of damaged CNS. In addition, the function of adult zebrafish with traumatic brain injury was rescued after implantation of the 3D-printed NSC-laden constructs. Therefore, the newly developed 3D bioprinting technique may offer new possibilities for future therapeutic strategy of neural tissue regeneration.

  10. Improved Selectivity From a Wavelength Addressable Device for Wireless Stimulation of Neural Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ç. Seymour

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrical neural stimulation with micro electrodes is a promising technique for restoring lost functions in the central nervous system as a result of injury or disease. One of the problems related to current neural stimulators is the tissue response due to the connecting wires and the presence of a rigid electrode inside soft neural tissue. We have developed a novel, optically activated, microscale photovoltaic neurostimulator based on a custom layered compound semiconductor heterostructure that is both wireless and has a comparatively small volume. Optical activation provides a wireless means of energy transfer to the neurostimulator, eliminating wires and the associated complications. This neurostimulator was shown to evoke action potentials and a functional motor response in the rat spinal cord. In this work, we extend our design to include wavelength selectivity and thus allowing independent activation of devices. As a proof of concept, we fabricated two different microscale devices with different spectral responsivities in the near-infrared region. We assessed the improved addressability of individual devices via wavelength selectivity as compared to spatial selectivity alone through on-bench optical measurements of the devices in combination with an in vivo light intensity profile in the rat cortex obtained in a previous study. We show that wavelength selectivity improves the individual addressability of the floating stimulators, thus increasing the number of devices that can be implanted in close proximity to each other.

  11. 3D bioprinting: A new insight into the therapeutic strategy of neural tissue regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Fu-Yu; Hsu, Shan-hui

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acute traumatic injuries and chronic degenerative diseases represent the world’s largest unmet medical need. There are over 50 million people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. However, there are only a few treatment options available for acute traumatic injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. In this commentary, the newly developed 3D bioprinting technique involving neural stem cells (NSCs) embedded in the thermoresponsive biodegradable polyurethane (PU) bioink is reviewed. The thermoresponsive and biodegradable PU dispersion can form gel near 37°C without any crosslinker. NSCs embedded within the water-based PU hydrogel with appropriate stiffness showed comparable viability and differentiation after printing. Moreover, in the zebrafish embryo neural deficit model, injection of the NSC-laden PU hydrogels promoted the repair of damaged CNS. In addition, the function of adult zebrafish with traumatic brain injury was rescued after implantation of the 3D-printed NSC-laden constructs. Therefore, the newly developed 3D bioprinting technique may offer new possibilities for future therapeutic strategy of neural tissue regeneration. PMID:26709633

  12. PANP is a novel O-glycosylated PILR{alpha} ligand expressed in neural tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kogure, Amane [Department of Immunochemistry, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Immunochemistry, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shiratori, Ikuo [Department of Immunochemistry, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Wang, Jing [Department of Immunochemistry, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Immunochemistry, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Lanier, Lewis L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Cancer Research Institute, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States); Arase, Hisashi, E-mail: arase@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Immunochemistry, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Laboratory of Immunochemistry, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST CREST, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} A Novel molecule, PANP, was identified to be a PILR{alpha} ligand. {yields} Sialylated O-glycan structures on PANP were required for PILR{alpha} recognition. {yields} Transcription of PANP was mainly observed in neural tissues. {yields} PANP seems to be involved in immune regulation as a ligand for PILR{alpha}. -- Abstract: PILR{alpha} is an immune inhibitory receptor possessing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) in its cytoplasmic domain enabling it to deliver inhibitory signals. Binding of PILR{alpha} to its ligand CD99 is involved in immune regulation; however, whether there are other PILR{alpha} ligands in addition to CD99 is not known. Here, we report that a novel molecule, PILR-associating neural protein (PANP), acts as an additional ligand for PILR{alpha}. Transcription of PANP was mainly observed in neural tissues. PILR{alpha}-Ig fusion protein bound cells transfected with PANP and the transfectants stimulated PILR{alpha} reporter cells. Specific O-glycan structures on PANP were found to be required for PILR recognition of this ligand. These results suggest that PANP is involved in immune regulation as a ligand of the PILR{alpha}.

  13. Dissociated neural effects of cortisol depending on threat escapability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montoya, Estrella R; van Honk, Jack; Bos, Peter A; Terburg, David

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has provided us with a highly flexible neuroendocrine threat system which, depending on threat imminence, switches between active escape and passive freezing. Cortisol, the "stress-hormone", is thought to play an important role in both fear behaviors, but the exact mechanisms are not

  14. Binary tissue classification on wound images with neural networks and bayesian classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veredas, Francisco; Mesa, Héctor; Morente, Laura

    2010-02-01

    A pressure ulcer is a clinical pathology of localized damage to the skin and underlying tissue caused by pressure, shear, or friction. Diagnosis, treatment, and care of pressure ulcers are costly for health services. Accurate wound evaluation is a critical task for optimizing the efficacy of treatment and care. Clinicians usually evaluate each pressure ulcer by visual inspection of the damaged tissues, which is an imprecise manner of assessing the wound state. Current computer vision approaches do not offer a global solution to this particular problem. In this paper, a hybrid approach based on neural networks and Bayesian classifiers is used in the design of a computational system for automatic tissue identification in wound images. A mean shift procedure and a region-growing strategy are implemented for effective region segmentation. Color and texture features are extracted from these segmented regions. A set of k multilayer perceptrons is trained with inputs consisting of color and texture patterns, and outputs consisting of categorical tissue classes which are determined by clinical experts. This training procedure is driven by a k-fold cross-validation method. Finally, a Bayesian committee machine is formed by training a Bayesian classifier to combine the classifications of the k neural networks. Specific heuristics based on the wound topology are designed to significantly improve the results of the classification. We obtain high efficiency rates from a binary cascade approach for tissue identification. Results are compared with other similar machine-learning approaches, including multiclass Bayesian committee machine classifiers and support vector machines. The different techniques analyzed in this paper show high global classification accuracy rates. Our binary cascade approach gives high global performance rates (average sensitivity =78.7% , specificity =94.7% , and accuracy =91.5% ) and shows the highest average sensitivity score ( =86.3%) when detecting

  15. Principles of Experience-Dependent Neural Plasticity: Implications for Rehabilitation after Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleim, Jeffrey A.; Jones, Theresa A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reviews 10 principles of experience-dependent neural plasticity and considerations in applying them to the damaged brain. Method: Neuroscience research using a variety of models of learning, neurological disease, and trauma are reviewed from the perspective of basic neuroscientists but in a manner intended to be useful for the…

  16. A tissue-dependent hypothesis of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Soro, A; Belda-Ferre, P; Cabrera-Rubio, R; Alcaraz, L D; Mira, A

    2013-01-01

    Current understanding of dental caries considers this disease a demineralization of the tooth tissues due to the acid produced by sugar-fermenting microorganisms. Thus, caries is considered a diet- and pH-dependent process. We present here the first metagenomic analysis of the bacterial communities present at different stages of caries development, with the aim of determining whether the bacterial composition and biochemical profile are specific to the tissue affected. The data show that microbial composition at the initial, enamel-affecting stage of caries is significantly different from that found at subsequent stages, as well as from dental plaque of sound tooth surfaces. Although the relative proportion of Streptococcus mutans increased from 0.12% in dental plaque to 0.72% in enamel caries, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus sanguinis were the dominant streptococci in these lesions. The functional profile of caries-associated bacterial communities indicates that genes involved in acid stress tolerance and dietary sugar fermentation are overrepresented only at the initial stage (enamel caries), whereas other genes coding for osmotic stress tolerance as well as collagenases and other proteases enabling dentin degradation are significantly overrepresented in dentin cavities. The results support a scenario in which pH and diet are determinants of the disease during the degradation of enamel, but in dentin caries lesions not only acidogenic but also proteolytic bacteria are involved. We propose that caries disease is a process of varying etiology, in which acid-producing bacteria are the vehicle to penetrate enamel and allow dentin degrading microorganisms to expand the cavity. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Attenuated neural response to emotional cues in cocaine-dependence: a preliminary analysis of gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canterberry, Melanie; Peltier, MacKenzie R; Brady, Kathleen T; Hanlon, Colleen A

    2016-09-01

    Cocaine users often report a loss of arousal for nondrug-related stimuli, which may contribute to their response to drug-related rewards. However, little is known about users' neural reactivity to emotional nondrug-related stimuli and the potential influence of gender. Test the hypotheses that cocaine-dependent individuals have an attenuated neural response to arousing stimuli relative to controls and that this difference is amplified in women. The brain response to typically arousing positive and negative images as well as neutral images from the International Affective Picture System was measured in 40 individuals (20 non-treatment seeking cocaine-dependent and 20 age- and gender-matched control participants; 50% of whom were women). Images were displayed for 4 s each in blocks of five across two 270-second runs. General linear models assessed within and between group activation differences for the emotional images. Cocaine-dependent individuals had a significantly lower response to typically arousing positive and negative images than controls, with attenuated neural activity present in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Analyses by gender revealed less mPFC/ACC activation among female users, but not males, for both positive and negative images. The dampened neural response to typically arousing stimuli among cocaine-dependent polydrug users suggests decreased salience processing for nondrug stimuli, particularly among female users. This decreased responding is consistent with data from other substance using populations and suggests that this may be a general feature of addiction. Amplifying the neural response to naturally arousing nondrug-related reinforcers may present an opportunity for unique behavioral and brain stimulation therapies.

  18. Bias-dependent hybrid PKI empirical-neural model of microwave FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Zlatica; Pronić-Rančić, Olivera; Marković, Vera

    2011-10-01

    Empirical models of microwave transistors based on an equivalent circuit are valid for only one bias point. Bias-dependent analysis requires repeated extractions of the model parameters for each bias point. In order to make model bias-dependent, a new hybrid empirical-neural model of microwave field-effect transistors is proposed in this article. The model is a combination of an equivalent circuit model including noise developed for one bias point and two prior knowledge input artificial neural networks (PKI ANNs) aimed at introducing bias dependency of scattering (S) and noise parameters, respectively. The prior knowledge of the proposed ANNs involves the values of the S- and noise parameters obtained by the empirical model. The proposed hybrid model is valid in the whole range of bias conditions. Moreover, the proposed model provides better accuracy than the empirical model, which is illustrated by an appropriate modelling example of a pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistor device.

  19. On the tissue/species dependence of cathepsin B isozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, S D; Lamsal, M; Agarwal, S K; Sharma, R; Khan, M Y

    1997-12-01

    Characterization of cathepsin B from buffalo kidney and goat spleen showed the presence of isozymes in case of the goat spleen (GSCB-I and GSCB-II) whereas cathepsin B from buffalo kidney exhibited only one form (BKCB). The molecular weights determined by SDS-PAGE for GSCB-I, GSCB-II, and BKCB were 25.7, 26.6 and 25.5 kDa respectively. The kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) of GSCB-I showed close similarities with BKCB against alpha-N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-2-napthylamide whereas GSCB-II was closer to the buffalo enzyme with regards to its activity against Z-Arg-Arg-MCA and Z-Phe-Arg-MCA. All the three enzymes had similar sensitivities towards urea, antipain and leupeptin. However, clear differences were observed in the inhibition patterns of the enzyme with iodoacetic acid and iodoacetamide. Differences in the kinetic, immunogenic and some catalytic properties of GSCB-I and II, which had similarities with regard to most of their physico-chemical properties, were considered to be due to the existence of two isozyme forms in goat spleen cathepsin B preparations. Absence of such a multiplicity in forms of the enzyme from buffalo kidney was accordingly attributed to the absence of cathepsin B isozymes in this species. These observations taken together therefore, indicate a probable species/tissue dependence of cathepsin B.

  20. Determination of relaxation modulus of time-dependent materials using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulova, Alexandra; Govekar, Edvard; Emri, Igor

    2017-08-01

    Health monitoring systems for plastic based structures require the capability of real time tracking of changes in response to the time-dependent behavior of polymer based structures. The paper proposes artificial neural networks as a tool of solving inverse problem appearing within time-dependent material characterization, since the conventional methods are computationally demanding and cannot operate in the real time mode. Abilities of a Multilayer Perceptron (MLP) and a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFN) to solve ill-posed inverse problems on an example of determination of a time-dependent relaxation modulus curve segment from constant strain rate tensile test data are investigated. The required modeling data composed of strain rate, tensile and related relaxation modulus were generated using existing closed-form solution. Several neural networks topologies were tested with respect to the structure of input data, and their performance was compared to an exponential fitting technique. Selected optimal topologies of MLP and RBFN were tested for generalization and robustness on noisy data; performance of all the modeling methods with respect to the number of data points in the input vector was analyzed as well. It was shown that MLP and RBFN are capable of solving inverse problems related to the determination of a time dependent relaxation modulus curve segment. Particular topologies demonstrate good generalization and robustness capabilities, where the topology of RBFN with data provided in parallel proved to be superior compared to other methods.

  1. Stem Cell Bioprinting: Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    On page 1429 G. G. Wallace, J. M. Crook, and co-workers report the first example of fabricating neural tissue by 3D bioprinting human neural stem cells. A novel polysaccharide based bioink preserves stem cell viability and function within the printed construct, enabling self-renewal and differentiation to neurons and supporting neuroglia. Neurons are predominantly GABAergic, establish networks, are spontaneously active, and show a bicuculline induced increased calcium response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Neural Correlates of Impulsive Aggressive Behavior in Subjects With a History of Alcohol Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Kose,Samet; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L.; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N.; Schmitz, Joy M.; Scott D. Lane

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM–IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, o...

  3. Delay-Dependent Stability Criteria of Uncertain Periodic Switched Recurrent Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Yin

    2011-01-01

    uncertain periodic switched recurrent neural networks with time-varying delays. When uncertain discrete-time recurrent neural network is a periodic system, it is expressed as switched neural network for the finite switching state. Based on the switched quadratic Lyapunov functional approach (SQLF and free-weighting matrix approach (FWM, some linear matrix inequality criteria are found to guarantee the delay-dependent asymptotical stability of these systems. Two examples illustrate the exactness of the proposed criteria.

  4. Enhancement of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity in Spiking Neural Systems with Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobukawa, Sou; Nishimura, Haruhiko

    2016-08-01

    Synaptic plasticity is widely recognized to support adaptable information processing in the brain. Spike-timing-dependent plasticity, one subtype of plasticity, can lead to synchronous spike propagation with temporal spiking coding information. Recently, it was reported that in a noisy environment, like the actual brain, the spike-timing-dependent plasticity may be made efficient by the effect of stochastic resonance. In the stochastic resonance, the presence of noise helps a nonlinear system in amplifying a weak (under barrier) signal. However, previous studies have ignored the full variety of spiking patterns and many relevant factors in neural dynamics. Thus, in order to prove the physiological possibility for the enhancement of spike-timing-dependent plasticity by stochastic resonance, it is necessary to demonstrate that this stochastic resonance arises in realistic cortical neural systems. In this study, we evaluate this stochastic resonance phenomenon in the realistic cortical neural system described by the Izhikevich neuron model and compare the characteristics of typical spiking patterns of regular spiking, intrinsically bursting and chattering experimentally observed in the cortex.

  5. Tissue transglutaminase inhibits the TRPV5-dependent calcium transport in an N-glycosylation-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boros, Sandor; Xi, Qi; Dimke, Henrik Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (tTG) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-dependent enzyme, catalyzing protein crosslinking. The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) family of cation channels was recently shown to contribute to the regulation of TG activities in keratinocytes and hence skin barrier...... of polarized cultures of rabbit connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct (CNT/CCD) cells. Extracellular application of tTG significantly reduced TRPV5 activity in human embryonic kidney cells transiently expressing the channel. Similarly, a strong inhibition of transepithelial Ca(2+) transport...... was observed after apical application of purified tTG to polarized rabbit CNT/CCD cells. Furthermore, tTG promoted the aggregation of the plasma membrane-associated fraction of TRPV5. Using patch clamp analysis, we observed a reduction in the pore diameter after tTG treatment, suggesting distinct structural...

  6. Folate-dependent methylation of septins governs ciliogenesis during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriyama, Manami; Toriyama, Michinori; Wallingford, John B; Finnell, Richard H

    2017-08-01

    Periconception maternal folic acid (vitamin B9) supplementation can reduce the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs), although just how folates benefit the developing embryo and promote closing of the neural tube and other morphologic processes during development remains unknown. Folate contributes to a 1-carbon metabolism, which is essential for purine biosynthesis and methionine recycling and affects methylation of DNA, histones, and nonhistone proteins. Herein, we used animal models and cultured mammalian cells to demonstrate that disruption of the methylation pathway mediated by folate compromises normal neural tube closure (NTC) and ciliogenesis. We demonstrate that the embryos with NTD failed to adequately methylate septin2, a key regulator of cilium structure and function. We report that methylation of septin2 affected its GTP binding activity and formation of the septin2-6-7 complex. We propose that folic acid promotes normal NTC in some embryos by regulating the methylation of septin2, which is critical for normal cilium formation during early embryonic development.-Toriyama, M., Toriyama, M., Wallingford, J. B., Finnell, R. H. Folate-dependent methylation of septins governs ciliogenesis during neural tube closure. © FASEB.

  7. Neural Correlates of Math Gains Vary Depending on Parental Socioeconomic Status (SES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Prado, Jérôme; Booth, James R

    2016-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural predictors of math development, and asked whether these predictors vary as a function of parental socioeconomic status (SES) in children ranging in age from 8 to 13 years. We independently localized brain regions subserving verbal versus spatial processing in order to characterize relations between activation in these regions during an arithmetic task and long-term change in math skill (up to 3 years). Neural predictors of math gains encompassed brain regions subserving both verbal and spatial processing, but the relation between relative reliance on these regions and math skill growth varied depending on parental SES. Activity in an area of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) identified by the verbal localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the higher end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the lower end. Activity in an area of the right superior parietal cortex identified by the spatial localizer was related to greater growth in math skill at the lower end of the SES continuum, but lesser improvements at the higher end. Results highlight early neural mechanisms as possible neuromarkers of long-term arithmetic learning and suggest that neural predictors of math gains vary with parental SES.

  8. A Neural Model of Distance-Dependent Percept of Object Size Constancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehui Qian

    Full Text Available Size constancy is one of the well-known visual phenomena that demonstrates perceptual stability to account for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. Although theories involving distance scaling to achieve size constancy have flourished based on psychophysical studies, its underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Single cell recordings show that distance-dependent size tuned cells are common along the ventral stream, originating from V1, V2, and V4 leading to IT. In addition, recent research employing fMRI demonstrates that an object's perceived size, associated with its perceived egocentric distance, modulates its retinotopic representation in V1. These results suggest that V1 contributes to size constancy, and its activity is possibly regulated by feedback of distance information from other brain areas. Here, we propose a neural model based on these findings. First, we construct an egocentric distance map in LIP by integrating horizontal disparity and vergence through gain-modulated MT neurons. Second, LIP neurons send modulatory feedback of distance information to size tuned cells in V1, resulting in a spread of V1 cortical activity. This process provides V1 with distance-dependent size representations. The model supports that size constancy is preserved by scaling retinal image size to compensate for changes in perceived distance, and suggests a possible neural circuit capable of implementing this process.

  9. [Progress in activity-dependent structural plasticity of neural circuits in cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    Neural circuits of mammalian cerebral cortex have exhibited amazing abilities of structural and functional plasticity in development, learning and memory, neurological and psychiatric diseases. With the new imaging techniques and the application of molecular biology methods, observation neural circuits' structural dynamics within the cortex in vivo at the cellular and synaptic level was possible, so there were many great progresses in the field of the activity-dependent structural plasticity over the past decade. This paper reviewed some of the aspects of the experimental results, focused on the characteristics of dendritic structural plasticity in individual growth and development, rich environment, sensory deprivation, and pathological conditions, as well as learning and memory, especially the dynamics of dendritic spines on morphology and quantity; after that, we introduced axonal structural plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of structural plasticity, and proposed some future problems to be solved at last.

  10. Self-organized noise resistance of oscillatory neural networks with spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovych, Oleksandr V; Yanchuk, Serhiy; Tass, Peter A

    2013-10-11

    Intuitively one might expect independent noise to be a powerful tool for desynchronizing a population of synchronized neurons. We here show that, intriguingly, for oscillatory neural populations with adaptive synaptic weights governed by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) the opposite is true. We found that the mean synaptic coupling in such systems increases dynamically in response to the increase of the noise intensity, and there is an optimal noise level, where the amount of synaptic coupling gets maximal in a resonance-like manner as found for the stochastic or coherence resonances, although the mechanism in our case is different. This constitutes a noise-induced self-organization of the synaptic connectivity, which effectively counteracts the desynchronizing impact of independent noise over a wide range of the noise intensity. Given the attempts to counteract neural synchrony underlying tinnitus with noisers and maskers, our results may be of clinical relevance.

  11. Task-dependent neural and behavioral effects of verb argument structure features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Svetlana; den Ouden, Dirk-Bart

    2017-05-01

    Understanding which verb argument structure (VAS) features (if any) are part of verbs' lexical entries and under which conditions they are accessed provides information on the nature of lexical representations and sentence construction. We investigated neural and behavioral effects of three understudied VAS characteristics (number of subcategorization options, number of thematic options and overall number of valency frames) in lexical decision and sentence well-formedness judgment in healthy adults. VAS effects showed strong dependency on processing conditions. As reflected by behavioral performance and neural recruitment patterns, increased VAS complexity in terms of subcategorization options and thematic options had a detrimental effect on sentence processing, but facilitated lexical access to single words, possibly by providing more lexico-semantic associations and access routes (facilitation through complexity). Effects of the number of valency frames are equivocal. We suggest that VAS effects may be mediated semantically rather than by a dedicated VAS module in verbs' representations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A time-delay neural network for solving time-dependent shortest path problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Yan, Chunwang; Wang, Jinsong; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    This paper concerns the time-dependent shortest path problem, which is difficult to come up with global optimal solution by means of classical shortest path approaches such as Dijkstra, and pulse-coupled neural network (PCNN). In this study, we propose a time-delay neural network (TDNN) framework that comes with the globally optimal solution when solving the time-dependent shortest path problem. The underlying idea of TDNN comes from the following mechanism: the shortest path depends on the earliest auto-wave (from start node) that arrives at the destination node. In the design of TDNN, each node on a network is considered as a neuron, which comes in the form of two units: time-window unit and auto-wave unit. Time-window unit is used to generate auto-wave in each time window, while auto-wave unit is exploited here to update the state of auto-wave. Whether or not an auto-wave leaves a node (neuron) depends on the state of auto-wave. The evaluation of the performance of the proposed approach was carried out based on online public Cordeau instances and New York Road instances. The proposed TDNN was also compared with the quality of classical approaches such as Dijkstra and PCNN. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Placental vascular responses are dependent on surrounding tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøgger, Torbjørn Halle

    . Materials and methods. From fresh born placentas, stem villi arteries were carefully dissected. The artery branches were divided. The surrounding tissue was removed from one end and was left untouched in the other end.Then, using wire myography, they were investigated in terms of contractility...

  14. How Do Efficient Coding Strategies Depend on Origins of Noise in Neural Circuits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Braden A W; Weber, Alison I; Rieke, Fred; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Neural circuits reliably encode and transmit signals despite the presence of noise at multiple stages of processing. The efficient coding hypothesis, a guiding principle in computational neuroscience, suggests that a neuron or population of neurons allocates its limited range of responses as efficiently as possible to best encode inputs while mitigating the effects of noise. Previous work on this question relies on specific assumptions about where noise enters a circuit, limiting the generality of the resulting conclusions. Here we systematically investigate how noise introduced at different stages of neural processing impacts optimal coding strategies. Using simulations and a flexible analytical approach, we show how these strategies depend on the strength of each noise source, revealing under what conditions the different noise sources have competing or complementary effects. We draw two primary conclusions: (1) differences in encoding strategies between sensory systems-or even adaptational changes in encoding properties within a given system-may be produced by changes in the structure or location of neural noise, and (2) characterization of both circuit nonlinearities as well as noise are necessary to evaluate whether a circuit is performing efficiently.

  15. Could LC-NE-Dependent Adjustment of Neural Gain Drive Functional Brain Network Reorganization?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Guedj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE system is thought to act at synaptic, cellular, microcircuit, and network levels to facilitate cognitive functions through at least two different processes, not mutually exclusive. Accordingly, as a reset signal, the LC-NE system could trigger brain network reorganizations in response to salient information in the environment and/or adjust the neural gain within its target regions to optimize behavioral responses. Here, we provide evidence of the co-occurrence of these two mechanisms at the whole-brain level, in resting-state conditions following a pharmacological stimulation of the LC-NE system. We propose that these two mechanisms are interdependent such that the LC-NE-dependent adjustment of the neural gain inferred from the clustering coefficient could drive functional brain network reorganizations through coherence in the gamma rhythm. Via the temporal dynamic of gamma-range band-limited power, the release of NE could adjust the neural gain, promoting interactions only within the neuronal populations whose amplitude envelopes are correlated, thus making it possible to reorganize neuronal ensembles, functional networks, and ultimately, behavioral responses. Thus, our proposal offers a unified framework integrating the putative influence of the LC-NE system on both local- and long-range adjustments of brain dynamics underlying behavioral flexibility.

  16. How Do Efficient Coding Strategies Depend on Origins of Noise in Neural Circuits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden A W Brinkman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits reliably encode and transmit signals despite the presence of noise at multiple stages of processing. The efficient coding hypothesis, a guiding principle in computational neuroscience, suggests that a neuron or population of neurons allocates its limited range of responses as efficiently as possible to best encode inputs while mitigating the effects of noise. Previous work on this question relies on specific assumptions about where noise enters a circuit, limiting the generality of the resulting conclusions. Here we systematically investigate how noise introduced at different stages of neural processing impacts optimal coding strategies. Using simulations and a flexible analytical approach, we show how these strategies depend on the strength of each noise source, revealing under what conditions the different noise sources have competing or complementary effects. We draw two primary conclusions: (1 differences in encoding strategies between sensory systems-or even adaptational changes in encoding properties within a given system-may be produced by changes in the structure or location of neural noise, and (2 characterization of both circuit nonlinearities as well as noise are necessary to evaluate whether a circuit is performing efficiently.

  17. Thymidine Kinase-Negative Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Can Efficiently Establish Persistent Infection in Neural Tissues of Nude Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Yu; Yao, Hui-Wen; Wang, Li-Chiu; Shen, Fang-Hsiu; Hsu, Sheng-Min; Chen, Shun-Hua

    2017-02-15

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes latency in neural tissues of immunocompetent mice but persists in both peripheral and neural tissues of lymphocyte-deficient mice. Thymidine kinase (TK) is believed to be essential for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues of immunocompromised mice, because infectious virus of a mutant with defects in both TK and UL24 is detected only in peripheral tissues, but not in neural tissues, of severe combined immunodeficiency mice (T. Valyi-Nagy, R. M. Gesser, B. Raengsakulrach, S. L. Deshmane, B. P. Randazzo, A. J. Dillner, and N. W. Fraser, Virology 199:484-490, 1994, https://doi.org/10.1006/viro.1994.1150). Here we find infiltration of CD4 and CD8 T cells in peripheral and neural tissues of mice infected with a TK-negative mutant. We therefore investigated the significance of viral TK and host T cells for HSV-1 to persist in neural tissues using three genetically engineered mutants with defects in only TK or in both TK and UL24 and two strains of nude mice. Surprisingly, all three mutants establish persistent infection in up to 100% of brain stems and 93% of trigeminal ganglia of adult nude mice at 28 days postinfection, as measured by the recovery of infectious virus. Thus, in mouse neural tissues, host T cells block persistent HSV-1 infection, and viral TK is dispensable for the virus to establish persistent infection. Furthermore, we found 30- to 200-fold more virus in neural tissues than in the eye and detected glycoprotein C, a true late viral antigen, in brainstem neurons of nude mice persistently infected with the TK-negative mutant, suggesting that adult mouse neurons can support the replication of TK-negative HSV-1. Acyclovir is used to treat herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected immunocompromised patients, but treatment is hindered by the emergence of drug-resistant viruses, mostly those with mutations in viral thymidine kinase (TK), which activates acyclovir. TK mutants are detected in brains of immunocompromised

  18. Calcium dependent plasticity applied to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with a neural field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, M T; Fung, P K; Robinson, P A; Shemmell, J; Reynolds, J N J

    2016-08-01

    The calcium dependent plasticity (CaDP) approach to the modeling of synaptic weight change is applied using a neural field approach to realistic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protocols. A spatially-symmetric nonlinear neural field model consisting of populations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons is used. The plasticity between excitatory cell populations is then evaluated using a CaDP approach that incorporates metaplasticity. The direction and size of the plasticity (potentiation or depression) depends on both the amplitude of stimulation and duration of the protocol. The breaks in the inhibitory theta-burst stimulation protocol are crucial to ensuring that the stimulation bursts are potentiating in nature. Tuning the parameters of a spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) window with a Monte Carlo approach to maximize agreement between STDP predictions and the CaDP results reproduces a realistically-shaped window with two regions of depression in agreement with the existing literature. Developing understanding of how TMS interacts with cells at a network level may be important for future investigation.

  19. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caleb Andrew Doll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanisms go awry in specific genetic conditions. The monogenic Fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common cause of heritable ASD and intellectual disability, has been particularly well linked to defects in activity-dependent critical period processes. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP is positively activity-regulated in expression and function, in turn regulates excitability and activity in a negative feedback loop, and appears to be required for the activity-dependent remodeling of synaptic connectivity during early-use critical periods. The Drosophila FXS model has been shown to functionally conserve the roles of human FMRP in synaptogenesis, and has been centrally important in generating our current mechanistic understanding of the FXS disease state. Recent advances in Drosophila optogenetics, transgenic calcium reporters, highly-targeted transgenic drivers for individually-identified neurons, and a vastly improved connectome of the brain are now being combined to provide unparalleled opportunities to both manipulate and monitor activity-dependent processes during critical period brain development in defined neural circuits. The field is now poised to exploit this new Drosophila transgenic toolbox for the systematic dissection of activity-dependent mechanisms in normal versus ASD brain development, particularly utilizing the well-established Drosophila FXS disease model.

  20. A stimulus-dependent spike threshold is an optimal neural coder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas L Jones

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A neural code based on sequences of spikes can consume a significant portion of the brain’s energy budget. Thus, energy considerations would dictate that spiking activity be kept as low as possible. However, a high spike-rate improves the coding and representation of signals in spike trains, particularly in sensory systems. These are competing demands, and selective pressure has presumably worked to optimize coding by apportioning a minimum number of spikes so as to maximize coding fidelity. The mechanisms by which a neuron generates spikes while maintaining a fidelity criterion are not known. Here, we show that a signal-dependent neural threshold, similar to a dynamic or adapting threshold, optimizes the trade-off between spike generation (encoding and fidelity (decoding. The threshold mimics a post-synaptic membrane (a low-pass filter and serves as an internal decoder. Further, it sets the average firing rate (the energy constraint. The decoding process provides an internal copy of the coding error to the spike-generator which emits a spike when the error equals or exceeds a spike threshold. When optimized, the trade-off leads to a deterministic spike firing-rule that generates optimally timed spikes so as to maximize fidelity. The optimal coder is derived in closed-form in the limit of high spike-rates, when the signal can be approximated as a piece-wise constant signal. The predicted spike-times are close to those obtained experimentally in the primary electrosensory afferent neurons of weakly electric fish (Apteronotus leptorhynchus and pyramidal neurons from the somatosensory cortex of the rat. We suggest that KCNQ/Kv7 channels (underlying the M-current are good candidates for the decoder. They are widely coupled to metabolic processes and do not inactivate. We conclude that the neural threshold is optimized to generate an energy-efficient and high-fidelity neural code.

  1. Delay-distribution-dependent H∞ state estimation for delayed neural networks with (x,v)-dependent noises and fading channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Li; Wang, Zidong; Tian, Engang; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the H∞ state estimation problem for a class of discrete-time neural networks with stochastic delays subject to state- and disturbance-dependent noises (also called (x,v)-dependent noises) and fading channels. The time-varying stochastic delay takes values on certain intervals with known probability distributions. The system measurement is transmitted through fading channels described by the Rice fading model. The aim of the addressed problem is to design a state estimator such that the estimation performance is guaranteed in the mean-square sense against admissible stochastic time-delays, stochastic noises as well as stochastic fading signals. By employing the stochastic analysis approach combined with the Kronecker product, several delay-distribution-dependent conditions are derived to ensure that the error dynamics of the neuron states is stochastically stable with prescribed H∞ performance. Finally, a numerical example is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. New tissue dissociation protocol for scaled-up production of neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2004-01-01

    The successful dissociation of mammalian neural stem cell (NSC) aggregates (neurospheres) into a single-cell suspension is an important procedure when expanding NSCs for clinical use, or when performing important assays such as clonal analyses. Until now, researchers have had to rely primarily on destructive mechanical methods such as trituration with a pipette tip to break apart the aggregates. In this study we report on a new chemical dissociation procedure that is efficient, cost effective, reproducible, and much less harmful to murine NSCs than both mechanical and enzymatic techniques. This method, involving the manipulation of environmental pH levels, resulted in 40% higher measured cell densities and 15-20% higher viabilities compared with mechanical dissociation. Moreover, chemical dissociation resulted in the production of significantly less cellular debris. Chemical dissociation was found to have no adverse effects on the long-term proliferation of the NSCs, which retained the ability to proliferate, form neurospheres, self-renew, and exhibit multipotentiality. This chemical method represents a new approach for the dissociation of tissues.

  3. 3D Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model of Persistent VZV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a neurotropic human alphaherpesvirus that causes varicella upon primary infection, establishes latency in multiple ganglionic neurons, and can reactivate to cause zoster. Live attenuated VZV vaccines are available; however, they can also establish latent infections and reactivate. Studies of VZV latency have been limited to the analyses of human ganglia removed at autopsy, as the virus is strictly a human pathogen. Recently, terminally differentiated human neurons have received much attention as a means to study the interaction between VZV and human neurons; however, the short life-span of these cells in culture has limited their application. Herein, we describe the construction of a model of normal human neural progenitor cells (NHNP) in tissue-like assemblies (TLAs), which can be successfully maintained for at least 180 days in three-dimensional (3D) culture, and exhibit an expression profile similar to that of human trigeminal ganglia. Infection of NHNP TLAs with cell-free VZV resulted in a persistent infection that was maintained for three months, during which the virus genome remained stable. Immediate-early, early and late VZV genes were transcribed, and low-levels of infectious VZV were recurrently detected in the culture supernatant. Our data suggest that NHNP TLAs are an effective system to investigate long-term interactions of VZV with complex assemblies of human neuronal cells.

  4. Maternal Antiviral Immunoglobulin Accumulates in Neural Tissue of Neonates To Prevent HSV Neurological Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yike Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While antibody responses to neurovirulent pathogens are critical for clearance, the extent to which antibodies access the nervous system to ameliorate infection is poorly understood. In this study on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1, we demonstrate that HSV-specific antibodies are present during HSV-1 latency in the nervous systems of both mice and humans. We show that antibody-secreting cells entered the trigeminal ganglion (TG, a key site of HSV infection, and persisted long after the establishment of latent infection. We also demonstrate the ability of passively administered IgG to enter the TG independently of infection, showing that the naive TG is accessible to antibodies. The translational implication of this finding is that human fetal neural tissue could contain HSV-specific maternally derived antibodies. Exploring this possibility, we observed HSV-specific IgG in HSV DNA-negative human fetal TG, suggesting passive transfer of maternal immunity into the prenatal nervous system. To further investigate the role of maternal antibodies in the neonatal nervous system, we established a murine model to demonstrate that maternal IgG can access and persist in neonatal TG. This maternal antibody not only prevented disseminated infection but also completely protected the neonate from neurological disease and death following HSV challenge. Maternal antibodies therefore have a potent protective role in the neonatal nervous system against HSV infection. These findings strongly support the concept that prevention of prenatal and neonatal neurotropic infections can be achieved through maternal immunization.

  5. Expression of the synaptic vesicle proteins VAMPs/synaptobrevins 1 and 2 in non-neural tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ralston, E; Beushausen, S; Ploug, Thorkil

    1994-01-01

    for Vp/Syb 2 detected a protein in the endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi area of skeletal muscle. Thus Vp/Sybs 1 and 2 are not restricted to the nervous system but appear to be co-expressed with cellubrevin in many different tissues. This redundancy of Vp/Sybs in a single cell may be required to control......The VAMPs/synaptobrevins (Vp/Sybs) are small integral membrane proteins. Two isoforms, Vp/Syb 1 and Vp/Syb 2, are considered to be specific to neural tissue. They are associated with synaptic vesicles and are believed to play an important role in neurotransmitter release. A third isoform......, cellubrevin, has recently been found in non-neural tissues. We now report that the distribution of Vp/Syb 1 and Vp/Syb 2 is wider than previously thought. RNA transcripts for both Vp/Syb 1 and Vp/Syb 2 were found in rat skeletal muscle and in several other rat non-neural tissues, and antibodies specific...

  6. Reduced Neural Recruitment for Bayesian Adjustment of Inhibitory Control in Methamphetamine Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlé, Katia M; Zhang, Shunan; Ma, Ning; Yu, Angela J; Paulus, Martin P

    2016-09-01

    Delineating the processes that contribute to the progression and maintenance of substance dependence is critical to understanding and preventing addiction. Several previous studies have shown inhibitory control deficits in individuals with stimulant use disorder. We used a Bayesian computational approach to examine potential neural deficiencies in the dynamic predictive processing underlying inhibitory function among recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent individuals (MDIs), a population at high risk of relapse. Sixty-two MDIs were recruited from a 28-day inpatient treatment program at the San Diego Veterans Affairs Medical Center and compared with 34 healthy control subjects. They completed a stop-signal task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. A Bayesian ideal observer model was used to predict individuals' trial-to-trial probabilistic expectations of inhibitory response, P(stop), to identify group differences specific to Bayesian expectation and prediction error computation. Relative to control subjects, MDIs were more likely to make stop errors on difficult trials and had attenuated slowing following stop errors. MDIs further exhibited reduced sensitivity as measured by the neural tracking of a Bayesian measure of surprise (unsigned prediction error), which was evident across all trials in the left posterior caudate and orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11), and selectively on stop error trials in the right thalamus and inferior parietal lobule. MDIs are less sensitive to surprising task events, both across trials and upon making commission errors, which may help explain why these individuals may not engage in switching strategy when the environment changes, leading to adverse consequences.

  7. Static stretch affects neural stem cell differentiation in an extracellular matrix-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulmoli, Janahan; Pathak, Medha M; McDonnell, Lisa P; Nourse, Jamison L; Tombola, Francesco; Earthman, James C; Flanagan, Lisa A

    2015-02-17

    Neural stem and progenitor cell (NSPC) fate is strongly influenced by mechanotransduction as modulation of substrate stiffness affects lineage choice. Other types of mechanical stimuli, such as stretch (tensile strain), occur during CNS development and trauma, but their consequences for NSPC differentiation have not been reported. We delivered a 10% static equibiaxial stretch to NSPCs and examined effects on differentiation. We found static stretch specifically impacts NSPC differentiation into oligodendrocytes, but not neurons or astrocytes, and this effect is dependent on particular extracellular matrix (ECM)-integrin linkages. Generation of oligodendrocytes from NSPCs was reduced on laminin, an outcome likely mediated by the α6 laminin-binding integrin, whereas similar effects were not observed for NSPCs on fibronectin. Our data demonstrate a direct role for tensile strain in dictating the lineage choice of NSPCs and indicate the dependence of this phenomenon on specific substrate materials, which should be taken into account for the design of biomaterials for NSPC transplantation.

  8. New Delay-Dependent Exponential Stability Criteria for Neural Networks with Mixed Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the problem of new delay-dependent exponential stability criteria for neural networks (NNs with mixed time-varying delays via introducing a novel integral inequality approach. Specifically, first, by taking fully the relationship between the terms in the Leibniz-Newton formula into account, several improved delay-dependent exponential stability criteria are obtained in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs. Second, together with some effective mathematical techniques and a convex optimization approach, less conservative conditions are derived by constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF. Third, the proposed methods include the least numbers of decision variables while keeping the validity of the obtained results. Finally, three numerical examples with simulations are presented to illustrate the validity and advantages of the theoretical results.

  9. Time-dependent prediction degredation assessment of neural-networks-based TEC forecasting models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. D. Xenos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An estimation of the difference in TEC prediction accuracy achieved when the prediction varies from 1 h to 7 days in advance is described using classical neural networks. Hourly-daily Faraday-rotation derived TEC measurements from Florence are used. It is shown that the prediction accuracy for the examined dataset, though degrading when time span increases, is always high. In fact, when a relative prediction error margin of ± 10% is considered, the population percentage included therein is almost always well above the 55%. It is found that the results are highly dependent on season and the dataset wealth, whereas they highly depend on the foF2 - TEC variability difference and on hysteresis-like effect between these two ionospheric characteristics.

  10. Advanced biomaterial strategies to transplant preformed micro-tissue engineered neural networks into the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. P.; Struzyna, L. A.; Murphy, P. L.; Adewole, D. O.; Kuo, E.; Cullen, D. K.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Connectome disruption is a hallmark of many neurological diseases and trauma with no current strategies to restore lost long-distance axonal pathways in the brain. We are creating transplantable micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), which are preformed constructs consisting of embedded neurons and long axonal tracts to integrate with the nervous system to physically reconstitute lost axonal pathways. Approach. We advanced micro-tissue engineering techniques to generate micro-TENNs consisting of discrete populations of mature primary cerebral cortical neurons spanned by long axonal fascicles encased in miniature hydrogel micro-columns. Further, we improved the biomaterial encasement scheme by adding a thin layer of low viscosity carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) to enable needle-less insertion and rapid softening for mechanical similarity with brain tissue. Main results. The engineered architecture of cortical micro-TENNs facilitated robust neuronal viability and axonal cytoarchitecture to at least 22 days in vitro. Micro-TENNs displayed discrete neuronal populations spanned by long axonal fasciculation throughout the core, thus mimicking the general systems-level anatomy of gray matter—white matter in the brain. Additionally, micro-columns with thin CMC-coating upon mild dehydration were able to withstand a force of 893 ± 457 mN before buckling, whereas a solid agarose cylinder of similar dimensions was predicted to withstand less than 150 μN of force. This thin CMC coating increased the stiffness by three orders of magnitude, enabling needle-less insertion into brain while significantly reducing the footprint of previous needle-based delivery methods to minimize insertion trauma. Significance. Our novel micro-TENNs are the first strategy designed for minimally invasive implantation to facilitate nervous system repair by simultaneously providing neuronal replacement and physical reconstruction of long-distance axon pathways in the brain

  11. New bioactive motifs and their use in functionalized self-assembling peptides for NSC differentiation and neural tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelain, F.; Cigognini, D.; Caprini, A.; Silva, D.; Colleoni, B.; Donegá, M.; Antonini, S.; Cohen, B. E.; Vescovi, A.

    2012-04-01

    Developing functionalized biomaterials for enhancing transplanted cell engraftment in vivo and stimulating the regeneration of injured tissues requires a multi-disciplinary approach customized for the tissue to be regenerated. In particular, nervous tissue engineering may take a great advantage from the discovery of novel functional motifs fostering transplanted stem cell engraftment and nervous fiber regeneration. Using phage display technology we have discovered new peptide sequences that bind to murine neural stem cell (NSC)-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs), and promote their viability and differentiation in vitro when linked to LDLK12 self-assembling peptide (SAPeptide). We characterized the newly functionalized LDLK12 SAPeptides via atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and rheology, obtaining nanostructured hydrogels that support human and murine NSC proliferation and differentiation in vitro. One functionalized SAPeptide (Ac-FAQ), showing the highest stem cell viability and neural differentiation in vitro, was finally tested in acute contusive spinal cord injury in rats, where it fostered nervous tissue regrowth and improved locomotor recovery. Interestingly, animals treated with the non-functionalized LDLK12 had an axon sprouting/regeneration intermediate between Ac-FAQ-treated animals and controls. These results suggest that hydrogels functionalized with phage-derived peptides may constitute promising biomimetic scaffolds for in vitro NSC differentiation, as well as regenerative therapy of the injured nervous system. Moreover, this multi-disciplinary approach can be used to customize SAPeptides for other specific tissue engineering applications.Developing functionalized biomaterials for enhancing transplanted cell engraftment in vivo and stimulating the regeneration of injured tissues requires a multi-disciplinary approach customized for the tissue to be regenerated. In particular, nervous tissue engineering may take a great advantage from the

  12. A neural measure of behavioral engagement: Task-residual low frequency blood oxygenation level dependent activity in the precuneus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sheng; Li, Chiang-shan Ray

    2009-01-01

    Brain imaging has provided a useful tool to examine the neural processes underlying human cognition. A critical question is whether and how task engagement influences the observed regional brain activations. Here we highlighted this issue and derived a neural measure of task engagement from the task-residual low frequency blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activity in the precuneus. Using independent component analysis, we identified brain regions in the default circuit – including the ...

  13. Attenuated Neural Processing of Risk in Young Adults at Risk for Stimulant Dependence.

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    Martina Reske

    Full Text Available Approximately 10% of young adults report non-medical use of stimulants (cocaine, amphetamine, methylphenidate, which puts them at risk for the development of dependence. This fMRI study investigates whether subjects at early stages of stimulant use show altered decision making processing.158 occasional stimulants users (OSU and 50 comparison subjects (CS performed a "risky gains" decision making task during which they could select safe options (cash in 20 cents or gamble them for double or nothing in two consecutive gambles (win or lose 40 or 80 cents, "risky decisions". The primary analysis focused on risky versus safe decisions. Three secondary analyses were conducted: First, a robust regression examined the effect of lifetime exposure to stimulants and marijuana; second, subgroups of OSU with >1000 (n = 42, or <50 lifetime marijuana uses (n = 32, were compared to CS with <50 lifetime uses (n = 46 to examine potential marijuana effects; third, brain activation associated with behavioral adjustment following monetary losses was probed.There were no behavioral differences between groups. OSU showed attenuated activation across risky and safe decisions in prefrontal cortex, insula, and dorsal striatum, exhibited lower anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and dorsal striatum activation for risky decisions and greater inferior frontal gyrus activation for safe decisions. Those OSU with relatively more stimulant use showed greater dorsal ACC and posterior insula attenuation. In comparison, greater lifetime marijuana use was associated with less neural differentiation between risky and safe decisions. OSU who chose more safe responses after losses exhibited similarities with CS relative to those preferring risky options.Individuals at risk for the development of stimulant use disorders presented less differentiated neural processing of risky and safe options. Specifically, OSU show attenuated brain response in regions critical for performance monitoring

  14. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, Heather; Jantzen, Kelly; Kelso, J A Scott; Steinberg, Fred; Large, Edward

    2010-12-16

    Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence) as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  15. Dynamic emotional and neural responses to music depend on performance expression and listener experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Chapin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Apart from its natural relevance to cognition, music provides a window into the intimate relationships between production, perception, experience, and emotion. Here, emotional responses and neural activity were observed as they evolved together with stimulus parameters over several minutes. Participants listened to a skilled music performance that included the natural fluctuations in timing and sound intensity that musicians use to evoke emotional responses. A mechanical performance of the same piece served as a control. Before and after fMRI scanning, participants reported real-time emotional responses on a 2-dimensional rating scale (arousal and valence as they listened to each performance. During fMRI scanning, participants listened without reporting emotional responses. Limbic and paralimbic brain areas responded to the expressive dynamics of human music performance, and both emotion and reward related activations during music listening were dependent upon musical training. Moreover, dynamic changes in timing predicted ratings of emotional arousal, as well as real-time changes in neural activity. BOLD signal changes correlated with expressive timing fluctuations in cortical and subcortical motor areas consistent with pulse perception, and in a network consistent with the human mirror neuron system. These findings show that expressive music performance evokes emotion and reward related neural activations, and that music's affective impact on the brains of listeners is altered by musical training. Our observations are consistent with the idea that music performance evokes an emotional response through a form of empathy that is based, at least in part, on the perception of movement and on violations of pulse-based temporal expectancies.

  16. Brain tissue aspiration neural tube defect Aspiração de tecido cerebral em casos de defeitos de fechamento do tubo neural

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    Luiz Cesar Peres

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to find out how frequent is brain tissue aspiration and if brain tissue heterotopia could be found in the lung of human neural tube defect cases. Histological sections of each lobe of both lungs of 22 fetuses and newborn with neural tube defect were immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. There were 15 (68.2% females and 7 (31.8% males. Age ranged from 18 to 40 weeks of gestation (mean= 31.8. Ten (45.5% were stillborn, the same newborn, and 2 (9.1% were abortuses. Diagnosis were: craniorrhachischisis (9 cases, 40.9%, anencephaly (8 cases, 36,4%, ruptured occipital encephalocele and rachischisis (2 cases, 9.1% each, and early amniotic band disruption sequence (1 case, 4.5%. Only one case (4.5% exhibited GFAP positive cells inside bronchioles and alveoli admixed to epithelial amniotic squames. No heterotopic tissue was observed in the lung interstitium. We concluded that aspiration of brain tissue from the amniotic fluid in neural tube defect cases may happen but it is infrequent and heterotopia was not observed.O objetivo do estudo foi identificar qual a freqüência de aspiração de tecido cerebral e a existência de heterotopia nos pulmões de casos humanos de defeito de fechamento do tubo neural através da reação imuno-histoquímica para proteína fibrilar glial ácida (GFAP em cortes histológicos de todos os lobos de ambos os pulmões de 22 casos de fetos e neonatos com defeito de fechamento do tubo neural. Havia 15 casos femininos (68,2% e 7 masculinos (31,8%, com idade gestacional variando de 18 a 40 semanas (média= 31,8, sendo natimortos e neomortos 10 (45,5% cada e 2 (9,1% abortos. Os diagnósticos foram: Craniorraquisquise (9 casos, 40,9%, anencefalia (8 casos, 36,4%, encefalocele occipital rota e raquisquise (2 casos, 9,1% e 1 (4,5%caso de seqüência de disruptura amniótica precoce. Somente 1 caso (4,5% apresentou células positivas dentro de bronquíolos e alvéolos em meio a células epiteliais

  17. Discriminating solitary cysts from soft tissue lesions in mammography using a pretrained deep convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Thijs; van Ginneken, Bram; Karssemeijer, Nico; den Heeten, Ard

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that 7% of women in the western world will develop palpable breast cysts in their lifetime. Even though cysts have been correlated with risk of developing breast cancer, many of them are benign and do not require follow-up. We develop a method to discriminate benign solitary cysts from malignant masses in digital mammography. We think a system like this can have merit in the clinic as a decision aid or complementary to specialized modalities. We employ a deep convolutional neural network (CNN) to classify cyst and mass patches. Deep CNNs have been shown to be powerful classifiers, but need a large amount of training data for which medical problems are often difficult to come by. The key contribution of this paper is that we show good performance can be obtained on a small dataset by pretraining the network on a large dataset of a related task. We subsequently investigate the following: (a) when a mammographic exam is performed, two different views of the same breast are recorded. We investigate the merit of combining the output of the classifier from these two views. (b) We evaluate the importance of the resolution of the patches fed to the network. (c) A method dubbed tissue augmentation is subsequently employed, where we extract normal tissue from normal patches and superimpose this onto the actual samples aiming for a classifier invariant to occluding tissue. (d) We combine the representation extracted using the deep CNN with our previously developed features. We show that using the proposed deep learning method, an area under the ROC curve (AUC) value of 0.80 can be obtained on a set of benign solitary cysts and malignant mass findings recalled in screening. We find that it works significantly better than our previously developed approach by comparing the AUC of the ROC using bootstrapping. By combining views, the results can be further improved, though this difference was not found to be significant. We find no significant difference between

  18. Transplantation of tissue engineering neural network and formation of neuronal relay into the transected rat spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Bi-Qin; Che, Ming-Tian; Du, Bao-Ling; Zeng, Xiang; Ma, Yuan-Huan; Feng, Bo; Qiu, Xue-Chen; Zhang, Ke; Liu, Shu; Shen, Hui-Yong; Wu, Jin-Lang; Ling, Eng-Ang; Zeng, Yuan-Shan

    2016-12-01

    Severe spinal cord injury (SCI) causes loss of neural connectivity and permanent functional deficits. Re-establishment of new neuronal relay circuits after SCI is therefore of paramount importance. The present study tested our hypothesis if co-culture of neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) gene-modified Schwann cells (SCs, NT-3-SCs) and TrkC (NT-3 receptor) gene-modified neural stem cells (NSCs, TrkC-NSCs) in a gelatin sponge scaffold could construct a tissue engineering neural network for re-establishing an anatomical neuronal relay after rat spinal cord transection. Eight weeks after transplantation, the neural network created a favorable microenvironment for axonal regeneration and for survival and synaptogenesis of NSC-derived neurons. Biotin conjugates of cholera toxin B subunit (b-CTB, a transneuronal tracer) was injected into the crushed sciatic nerve to label spinal cord neurons. Remarkably, not only ascending and descending nerve fibers, but also propriospinal neurons, made contacts with b-CTB positive NSC-derived neurons. Moreover, b-CTB positive NSC-derived neurons extended their axons making contacts with the motor neurons located in areas caudal to the injury/graft site of spinal cord. Further study showed that NT-3/TrkC interactions activated the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and PI3K/AKT/CREB pathway affecting synaptogenesis of NSC-derived neurons. Together, our findings suggest that NT-3-mediated TrkC signaling plays an essential role in constructing a tissue engineering neural network thus representing a promising avenue for effective exogenous neuronal relay-based treatment for SCI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Stability analysis of switched cellular neural networks: A mode-dependent average dwell time approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuangxia; Cao, Jie; Cao, Jinde

    2016-10-01

    This paper addresses the exponential stability of switched cellular neural networks by using the mode-dependent average dwell time (MDADT) approach. This method is quite different from the traditional average dwell time (ADT) method in permitting each subsystem to have its own average dwell time. Detailed investigations have been carried out for two cases. One is that all subsystems are stable and the other is that stable subsystems coexist with unstable subsystems. By employing Lyapunov functionals, linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), Jessen-type inequality, Wirtinger-based inequality, reciprocally convex approach, we derived some novel and less conservative conditions on exponential stability of the networks. Comparing to ADT, the proposed MDADT show that the minimal dwell time of each subsystem is smaller and the switched system stabilizes faster. The obtained results extend and improve some existing ones. Moreover, the validness and effectiveness of these results are demonstrated through numerical simulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Learning and retrieval behavior in recurrent neural networks with pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusaki, Beatriz E. P.; Agnes, Everton J.; Erichsen, Rubem; Brunnet, Leonardo G.

    2017-08-01

    The plastic character of brain synapses is considered to be one of the foundations for the formation of memories. There are numerous kinds of such phenomenon currently described in the literature, but their role in the development of information pathways in neural networks with recurrent architectures is still not completely clear. In this paper we study the role of an activity-based process, called pre-synaptic dependent homeostatic scaling, in the organization of networks that yield precise-timed spiking patterns. It encodes spatio-temporal information in the synaptic weights as it associates a learned input with a specific response. We introduce a correlation measure to evaluate the precision of the spiking patterns and explore the effects of different inhibitory interactions and learning parameters. We find that large learning periods are important in order to improve the network learning capacity and discuss this ability in the presence of distinct inhibitory currents.

  1. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks for improving optrode-neural tissue interface in optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Li, Yanling; Pan, Jianqing; Wei, Pengfei; Liu, Nan; Wu, Bifeng; Cheng, Jinbo; Lu, Caiyi; Wang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The field of optogenetics has been successfully used to understand the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric diseases through the precise spatial and temporal control of specific groups of neurons in a neural circuitry. However, it remains a great challenge to integrate optogenetic modulation with electrophysiological and behavioral read out methods as a means to explore the causal, temporally precise, and behaviorally relevant interactions of neurons in the specific circuits of freely behaving animals. In this study, an eight-channel chronically implantable optrode array was fabricated and modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks (PEDOT/PSS-PVA/PAA IPNs) for improving the optrode-neural tissue interface. The conducting polymer-hydrogel IPN films exhibited a significantly higher capacitance and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz as compared to unmodified optrode sites and showed significantly improved mechanical and electrochemical stability as compared to pure conducting polymer films. The cell attachment and neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells on the IPN films were clearly observed through calcein-AM staining. Furthermore, the optrode arrays were chronically implanted into the hippocampus of SD rats after the lentiviral expression of synapsin-ChR2-EYFP, and light-evoked, frequency-dependant action potentials were obtained in freely moving animals. The electrical recording results suggested that the modified optrode arrays showed significantly reduced impedance and RMS noise and an improved SNR as compared to unmodified sites, which may have benefited from the improved electrochemical performance and biocompatibility of the deposited IPN films. All these characteristics are greatly desired in optogenetic applications, and the fabrication method of conducting polymer-hydrogel IPNs can be easily integrated with other modification methods to build a

  2. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of EGFP-Labeled Neural Crest Cells From Murine Embryonic Craniofacial Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the early stages of embryogenesis, pluripotent neural crest cells (NCC are known to migrate from the neural folds to populate multiple target sites in the embryo where they differentiate into various derivatives, including cartilage, bone, connective tissue, melanocytes, glia, and neurons of the peripheral nervous system. The ability to obtain pure NCC populations is essential to enable molecular analyses of neural crest induction, migration, and/or differentiation. Crossing Wnt1-Cre and Z/EG transgenic mouse lines resulted in offspring in which the Wnt1-Cre transgene activated permanent EGFP expression only in NCC. The present report demonstrates a flow cytometric method to sort and isolate populations of EGFP-labeled NCC. The identity of the sorted neural crest cells was confirmed by assaying expression of known marker genes by TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR. The molecular strategy described in this report provides a means to extract intact RNA from a pure population of NCC thus enabling analysis of gene expression in a defined population of embryonic precursor cells critical to development.

  3. Mdm2 mediates FMRP- and Gp1 mGluR-dependent protein translation and neural network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dai-Chi; Seimetz, Joseph; Lee, Kwan Young; Kalsotra, Auinash; Chung, Hee Jung; Lu, Hua; Tsai, Nien-Pei

    2017-10-15

    Activating Group 1 (Gp1) metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including mGluR1 and mGluR5, elicits translation-dependent neural plasticity mechanisms that are crucial to animal behavior and circuit development. Dysregulated Gp1 mGluR signaling has been observed in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the molecular pathways underlying Gp1 mGluR-dependent plasticity mechanisms are complex and have been elusive. In this study, we identified a novel mechanism through which Gp1 mGluR mediates protein translation and neural plasticity. Using a multi-electrode array (MEA) recording system, we showed that activating Gp1 mGluR elevates neural network activity, as demonstrated by increased spontaneous spike frequency and burst activity. Importantly, we validated that elevating neural network activity requires protein translation and is dependent on fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the protein that is deficient in the most common inherited form of mental retardation and autism, fragile X syndrome (FXS). In an effort to determine the mechanism by which FMRP mediates protein translation and neural network activity, we demonstrated that a ubiquitin E3 ligase, murine double minute-2 (Mdm2), is required for Gp1 mGluR-induced translation and neural network activity. Our data showed that Mdm2 acts as a translation suppressor, and FMRP is required for its ubiquitination and down-regulation upon Gp1 mGluR activation. These data revealed a novel mechanism by which Gp1 mGluR and FMRP mediate protein translation and neural network activity, potentially through de-repressing Mdm2. Our results also introduce an alternative way for understanding altered protein translation and brain circuit excitability associated with Gp1 mGluR in neurological diseases such as FXS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. The characterization of neural tissue ablation rate and corresponding heat affected zone of a 2 micron Tm3+ doped fiber laser(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Andrew J.; Jivraj, Jamil; Reyes, Robnier; Ramjist, Joel; Gu, Xijia J.; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    Tissue removal using electrocautery is standard practice in neurosurgery since tissue can be cut and cauterized simultaneously. Thermally mediated tissue ablation using lasers can potentially possess the same benefits but with increased precision. However, given the critical nature of the spine, brain, and nerves, the effects of direct photo-thermal interaction on neural tissue needs to be known, yielding not only high precision of tissue removal but also increased control of peripheral heat damage. The proposed use of lasers as a neurosurgical tool requires that a common ground is found between ablation rates and resulting peripheral heat damage. Most surgical laser systems rely on the conversion of light energy into heat resulting in both desirable and undesirable thermal damage to the targeted tissue. Classifying the distribution of thermal energy in neural tissue, and thus characterizing the extent of undesirable thermal damage, can prove to be exceptionally challenging considering its highly inhomogenous composition when compared to other tissues such as muscle and bone. Here we present the characterization of neural tissue ablation rate and heat affected zone of a 1.94 micron thulium doped fiber laser for neural tissue ablation. In-Vivo ablation of porcine cerebral cortex is performed. Ablation volumes are studied in association with laser parameters. Histological samples are taken and examined to characterize the extent of peripheral heat damage.

  6. ALK5-mediated transforming growth factor β signaling in neural crest cells controls craniofacial muscle development via tissue-tissue interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Arum; Zhao, Hu; Li, Jingyuan; Pelikan, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The development of the craniofacial muscles requires reciprocal interactions with surrounding craniofacial tissues that originate from cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). However, the molecular mechanism involved in the tissue-tissue interactions between CNCCs and muscle progenitors during craniofacial muscle development is largely unknown. In the current study, we address how CNCCs regulate the development of the tongue and other craniofacial muscles using Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice, in which loss of Alk5 in CNCCs results in severely disrupted muscle formation. We found that Bmp4 is responsible for reduced proliferation of the myogenic progenitor cells in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice during early myogenesis. In addition, Fgf4 and Fgf6 ligands were reduced in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice and are critical for differentiation of the myogenic cells. Addition of Bmp4 or Fgf ligands rescues the proliferation and differentiation defects in the craniofacial muscles of Alk5 mutant mice in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that CNCCs play critical roles in controlling craniofacial myogenic proliferation and differentiation through tissue-tissue interactions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Neural network-based brain tissue segmentation in MR images using extracted features from intraframe coding in H.264

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Kasaei, Shohreh

    2012-01-01

    Automatic brain tissue segmentation is a crucial task in diagnosis and treatment of medical images. This paper presents a new algorithm to segment different brain tissues, such as white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), background (BKG), and tumor tissues. The proposed technique uses the modified intraframe coding yielded from H.264/(AVC), for feature extraction. Extracted features are then imposed to an artificial back propagation neural network (BPN) classifier to assign each block to its appropriate class. Since the newest coding standard, H.264/AVC, has the highest compression ratio, it decreases the dimension of extracted features and thus yields to a more accurate classifier with low computational complexity. The performance of the BPN classifier is evaluated using the classification accuracy and computational complexity terms. The results show that the proposed technique is more robust and effective with low computational complexity compared to other recent works.

  8. NMDA Receptors Mediate Stimulus-Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Neural Synchrony in the Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, Roxana A; Shore, Susan E

    2015-01-01

    Auditory information relayed by auditory nerve fibers and somatosensory information relayed by granule cell parallel fibers converge on the fusiform cells (FCs) of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the first brain station of the auditory pathway. In vitro, parallel fiber synapses on FCs exhibit spike-timing-dependent plasticity with Hebbian learning rules, partially mediated by the NMDA receptor (NMDAr). Well-timed bimodal auditory-somatosensory stimulation, in vivo equivalent of spike-timing-dependent plasticity, can induce stimulus-timing-dependent plasticity (StTDP) of the FCs spontaneous and tone-evoked firing rates. In healthy guinea pigs, the resulting distribution of StTDP learning rules across a FC neural population is dominated by a Hebbian profile while anti-Hebbian, suppressive and enhancing LRs are less frequent. In this study, we investigate in vivo, the NMDAr contribution to FC baseline activity and long term plasticity. We find that blocking the NMDAr decreases the synchronization of FC- spontaneous activity and mediates differential modulation of FC rate-level functions such that low, and high threshold units are more likely to increase, and decrease, respectively, their maximum amplitudes. Three significant alterations in mean learning-rule profiles were identified: transitions from an initial Hebbian profile towards (1) an anti-Hebbian; (2) a suppressive profile; and (3) transitions from an anti-Hebbian to a Hebbian profile. FC units preserving their learning rules showed instead, NMDAr-dependent plasticity to unimodal acoustic stimulation, with persistent depression of tone-evoked responses changing to persistent enhancement following the NMDAr antagonist. These results reveal a crucial role of the NMDAr in mediating FC baseline activity and long-term plasticity which have important implications for signal processing and auditory pathologies related to maladaptive plasticity of dorsal cochlear nucleus circuitry.

  9. Phase-dependent stimulation effects on bursting activity in a neural network cortical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William S; Kudela, Pawel; Weinberg, Seth; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-03-01

    A neural network simulation with realistic cortical architecture has been used to study synchronized bursting as a seizure representation. This model has the property that bursting epochs arise and cease spontaneously, and bursting epochs can be induced by external stimulation. We have used this simulation to study the time-frequency properties of the evolving bursting activity, as well as effects due to network stimulation. The model represents a cortical region of 1.6 mm x 1.6mm, and includes seven neuron classes organized by cortical layer, inhibitory or excitatory properties, and electrophysiological characteristics. There are a total of 65,536 modeled single compartment neurons that operate according to a version of Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics. The intercellular wiring is based on histological studies and our previous modeling efforts. The bursting phase is characterized by a flat frequency spectrum. Stimulation pulses are applied to this modeled network, with an electric field provided by a 1mm radius circular electrode represented mathematically in the simulation. A phase dependence to the post-stimulation quiescence is demonstrated, with local relative maxima in efficacy occurring before or during the network depolarization phase in the underlying activity. Brief periods of network insensitivity to stimulation are also demonstrated. The phase dependence was irregular and did not reach statistical significance when averaged over the full 2.5s of simulated bursting investigated. This result provides comparison with previous in vivo studies which have also demonstrated increased efficacy of stimulation when pulses are applied at the peak of the local field potential during cortical after discharges. The network bursting is synchronous when comparing the different neuron classes represented up to an uncertainty of 10 ms. Studies performed with an excitatory chandelier cell component demonstrated increased synchronous bursting in the model, as predicted from

  10. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaal, L; Goudriaan, A E; Joos, L; Dom, G; Pattij, T; van den Brink, W; Veltman, D J

    2014-10-01

    Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in various psychiatric disorders. However, the effects of modafinil on delay discounting and its underlying neural correlates have not been investigated as yet. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of modafinil on neural correlates of impulsive decision making in abstinent AD patients and healthy control (HC) subjects. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects cross-over study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted in 14 AD patients and 16 HC subjects. All subjects participated in two fMRI sessions in which they either received a single dose of placebo or 200 mg of modafinil 2 h before the session. During fMRI, subjects completed a delay-discounting task to measure impulsive decision making. Modafinil improved impulsive decision making in AD pateints, which was accompanied by enhanced recruitment of frontoparietal regions and reduced activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, modafinil-induced enhancement of functional connectivity between the superior frontal gyrus and ventral striatum was specifically associated with improvement in impulsive decision making. These findings indicate that modafinil can improve impulsive decision making in AD patients through an enhanced coupling of prefrontal control regions and brain regions coding the subjective value of rewards. Therefore, the current study supports the implementation of modafinil in future clinical trials for AD.

  11. Eveningness among late adolescent males predicts neural reactivity to reward and alcohol dependence 2 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, Brant P; Casement, Melynda D; Sitnick, Stephanie L; Shaw, Daniel S; Forbes, Erika E

    2017-06-01

    Eveningness, a preference for later sleep-wake timing, is linked to altered reward function, which may explain a consistent association with substance abuse. Notably, the extant literature rests largely on cross-sectional data, yet both eveningness and reward function show developmental changes. We examined whether circadian preference during late adolescence predicted the neural response to reward 2 years later. A sample of 93 males reported circadian preference and completed a monetary reward fMRI paradigm at ages 20 and 22. Primary analyses examined longitudinal paths from circadian preference to medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and ventral striatal (VS) reward responses. We also explored whether reward responses mediated longitudinal associations between circadian preference and alcohol dependence, frequency of alcohol use, and/or frequency of cannabis use. Age 20 eveningness was positively associated with age 22 mPFC and VS responses to win, but not associated with age 22 reactivity to reward anticipation. Age 20 eveningness was indirectly related to age 22 alcohol dependence via age 22 mPFC response to win. Our findings provide novel evidence that altered reward-related brain function could underlie associations between eveningness and alcohol use problems. Eveningness may be an under-recognized but modifiable risk factor for reward-related problems such as mood and substance use disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PARP inhibitors protect against sex- and AAG-dependent alkylation-induced neural degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allocca, Mariacarmela; Corrigan, Joshua J; Fake, Kimberly R; Calvo, Jennifer A; Samson, Leona D

    2017-09-15

    Alkylating agents are commonly used to treat cancer. Although base excision repair (BER) is a major pathway for repairing DNA alkylation damage, under certain conditions, the initiation of BER produces toxic repair intermediates that damage healthy tissues. The initiation of BER by the alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG, a.k.a. MPG) can mediate alkylation-induced cytotoxicity in specific cells in the retina and cerebellum of male mice. Cytotoxicity in both wild-type and Aag-transgenic (AagTg) mice is abrogated in the absence of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). Here, we tested whether PARP inhibitors can also prevent alkylation-induced retinal and cerebellar degeneration in male and female WT and AagTg mice. Importantly, we found that WT mice display sex-dependent alkylation-induced retinal damage (but not cerebellar damage), with WT males being more sensitive than females. Accordingly, estradiol treatment protects males against alkylation-induced retinal degeneration. In AagTg male and female mice, the alkylation-induced tissue damage in both the retina and cerebellum is exacerbated and the sex difference in the retina is abolished. PARP inhibitors, much like Parp1 gene deletion, protect against alkylation-induced AAG-dependent neuronal degeneration in WT and AagTg mice, regardless of the gender, but their efficacy in preventing alkylation-induced neuronal degeneration depends on PARP inhibitor characteristics and doses. The recent surge in the use of PARP inhibitors in combination with cancer chemotherapeutic alkylating agents might represent a powerful tool for obtaining increased therapeutic efficacy while avoiding the collateral effects of alkylating agents in healthy tissues.

  13. The influence of a depressed scapular alignment on upper limb neural tissue mechanosensitivity and local pressure pain sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Merinero, Patricia; Lluch, Enriqe; Gallezo-Izquierdo, Tomas; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Nuñez-Nagy, Susana; Falla, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    A depressed scapular alignment could lead to prolonged and repetitive stress or compression of the brachial plexus, resulting in sensitization of neural tissue. However, no study has investigated the influence of alignment of the scapulae on sensitization of upper limb neural tissue in otherwise asymptomatic people. In this case-control study, we investigate the influence of a depressed scapular alignment on mechanosensitivity of the upper limb peripheral nervous system as well as pressure pain thresholds (PPT). Asymptomatic individuals with neutral vertical scapular alignment (n = 25) or depressed scapular alignment (n = 25) participated. We measured the upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT1), including assessment of symptom response and elbow range of motion (ROM), and PPT measured over upper limb peripheral nerve trunks, the upper trapezius muscle and overlying cervical zygapophyseal joints. Subjects with a depressed scapular reported significantly greater pain intensity (t = 5.7, p < 0.0001) and reduced elbow extension ROM (t = -2.7, p < 0.01) during the ULNT1 compared to those with a normal scapular orientation. Regardless of the location tested, the group presenting with a depressed scapular had significantly lower PPT compared to those with a normal scapular orientation (PPT averaged across all sites: normal orientation: 3.3 ± 0.6 kg/cm(2), depressed scapular: 2.1 ± 0.5 kg/cm(2), p < 0.00001). Despite being asymptomatic, people with a depressed scapular have greater neck and upper limb neural tissue mechanosensitivity when compared to people with a normal scapular orientation. This study offers insight into the potential development of neck-arm pain due to a depressed scapular position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Delay-Dependent Exponential Stability for Discrete-Time BAM Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the delay-dependent exponential stability for discrete-time BAM neural networks with time-varying delays. By constructing the new Lyapunov functional, the improved delay-dependent exponential stability criterion is derived in terms of linear matrix inequality (LMI. Moreover, in order to reduce the conservativeness, some slack matrices are introduced in this paper. Two numerical examples are presented to show the effectiveness and less conservativeness of the proposed method.

  15. Optical study on the dependence of breast tissue composition and structure on subject anamnesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-07-01

    Time domain multi-wavelength (635 to 1060 nm) optical mammography was performed on 200 subjects to estimate their average breast tissue composition in terms of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin, water, lipid and collagen, and structural information, as provided by scattering parameters (amplitude and power). Significant (and often marked) dependence of tissue composition and structure on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives was demonstrated.

  16. Travelling waves in models of neural tissue: from localised structures to periodic waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Coombes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We consider travelling waves (fronts, pulses and periodics) in spatially extended one dimensional neural field models. We demonstrate for an excitatory field with linear adaptation that, in addition to an expected stable pulse solution, a stable anti-pulse can exist. Varying the adaptation strength

  17. Spectral signatures of activity-dependent neural feedback in the corticothalamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, N.; Sanz-Leon, P.; Robinson, P. A.

    2017-11-01

    The modulation of neural quantities by presynaptic and postsynaptic activities via local feedback processes is investigated by incorporating nonlinear phenomena such as relative refractory period, synaptic enhancement, synaptic depression, and habituation. This is done by introducing susceptibilities, which quantify the response in either firing threshold or synaptic strength to unit change in either presynaptic or postsynaptic activity. Effects on the power spectra are then analyzed for a realistic corticothalamic model to determine the spectral signatures of various nonlinear processes and to what extent these are distinct. Depending on the feedback processes, there can be enhancements or reductions in low-frequency and/or alpha power, splitting of the alpha resonance, and/or appearance of new resonances at high frequencies. These features in the power spectra allow processes to be fully distinguished where they are unique, or partly distinguished if they are common to only a subset of feedbacks, and can potentially be used to constrain the types, strengths, and dynamics of feedbacks present.

  18. Cell density-dependent differential proliferation of neural stem cells on omnidirectional nanopore-arrayed surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyoung Je; Kong, Sun-Young; Lee, Ji Soo; Kim, Hyung Woo; Shin, Jae-Yeon; La, Moonwoo; Han, Byung Woo; Kim, Dong Sung; Kim, Hyun-Jung

    2017-10-12

    Recently, the importance of surface nanotopography in the determination of stem cell fate and behavior has been revealed. In the current study, we generated polystyrene cell-culture dishes with an omnidirectional nanopore arrayed surface (ONAS) (diameter: 200 nm, depth: 500 nm, center-to-center distance: 500 nm) and investigated the effects of nanotopography on rat neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs cultured on ONAS proliferated better than those on the flat surface when cell density was low and showed less spontaneous differentiation during proliferation in the presence of mitogens. Interestingly, NSCs cultured on ONAS at clonal density demonstrated a propensity to generate neurospheres, whereas those on the flat surface migrated out, proliferated as individuals, and spread out to attach to the surface. However, the differential patterns of proliferation were cell density-dependent since the distinct phenomena were lost when cell density was increased. ONAS modulated cytoskeletal reorganization and inhibited formation of focal adhesion, which is generally observed in NSCs grown on flat surfaces. ONAS appeared to reinforce NSC-NSC interaction, restricted individual cell migration and prohibited NSC attachment to the nanopore surface. These data demonstrate that ONAS maintains NSCs as undifferentiated while retaining multipotency and is a better topography for culturing low density NSCs.

  19. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-21

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  20. Topological dynamics in spike-timing dependent plastic model neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Stone

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP is a biologically constrained unsupervised form of learning that potentiates or depresses synaptic connections based on the precise timing of pre-synaptic and post-synaptic firings. The effects of on-going STDP on the topology of evolving model neural networks were assessed in 50 unique simulations which modeled two hours of activity. After a period of stabilization, a number of global and local topological features were monitored periodically to quantify on-going changes in network structure. Global topological features included the total number of remaining synapses, average synaptic strengths, and average number of synapses per neuron (degree. Under a range of different input regimes and initial network configurations, each network maintained a robust and highly stable global structure across time. Local topology was monitored by assessing state changes of all three-neuron subgraphs (triads present in the networks. Overall counts and the range of triad configurations varied little across the simulations; however, a substantial set of individual triads continued to undergo rapid state changes and revealed a dynamic local topology. In addition, specific small-world properties also fluctuated across time. These findings suggest that on-going STDP provides an efficient means of selecting and maintaining a stable yet flexible network organization.

  1. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K. V. Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-01

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  2. A fully-automated neural network analysis of AFM force-distance curves for cancer tissue diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Eleonora; Ciasca, Gabriele; Sassun, Tanya Enny; Antonelli, Manila; Palmieri, Valentina; Papi, Massimiliano; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Santoro, Antonio; Giangaspero, Felice; Delfini, Roberto; Campi, Gaetano; De Spirito, Marco

    2017-10-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has the unique capability of probing the nanoscale mechanical properties of biological systems that affect and are affected by the occurrence of many pathologies, including cancer. This capability has triggered growing interest in the translational process of AFM from physics laboratories to clinical practice. A factor still hindering the current use of AFM in diagnostics is related to the complexity of AFM data analysis, which is time-consuming and needs highly specialized personnel with a strong physical and mathematical background. In this work, we demonstrate an operator-independent neural-network approach for the analysis of surgically removed brain cancer tissues. This approach allowed us to distinguish—in a fully automated fashion—cancer from healthy tissues with high accuracy, also highlighting the presence and the location of infiltrating tumor cells.

  3. Neural correlates of impulsive aggressive behavior in subjects with a history of alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Samet; Steinberg, Joel L; Moeller, F Gerard; Gowin, Joshua L; Zuniga, Edward; Kamdar, Zahra N; Schmitz, Joy M; Lane, Scott D

    2015-04-01

    Alcohol-related aggression is a complex and problematic phenomenon with profound public health consequences. We examined neural correlates potentially moderating the relationship between human aggressive behavior and chronic alcohol use. Thirteen subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for past alcohol-dependence in remission (AD) and 13 matched healthy controls (CONT) participated in an fMRI study adapted from a laboratory model of human aggressive behavior (Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm, or PSAP). Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation was measured during bouts of operationally defined aggressive behavior, during postprovocation periods, and during monetary-reinforced behavior. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses found group differences in brain regions relevant to chronic alcohol use and aggressive behavior (e.g., emotional and behavioral control). Behaviorally, AD subjects responded on both the aggressive response and monetary response options at significantly higher rates than CONT. Whole brain voxelwise random-effects analyses revealed significant group differences in response to provocation (monetary subtractions), with CONT subjects showing greater activation in frontal and prefrontal cortex, thalamus, and hippocampus. Collapsing data across all subjects, regression analyses of postprovocation brain activation on aggressive response rate revealed significant positive regression slopes in precentral gyrus and parietal cortex; and significant negative regression slopes in orbitofrontal cortex, prefrontal cortex, caudate, thalamus, and middle temporal gyrus. In these collapsed analyses, response to provocation and aggressive behavior were associated with activation in brain regions subserving inhibitory and emotional control, sensorimotor integration, and goal directed motor activity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A novel Fizzy/Cdc20-dependent mechanism suppresses necrosis in neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Chaoyuan; Golden, Krista L.; Simon, Claudio R.; Damrath, John; Buttitta, Laura; Gamble, Caitlin E.; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells likely survive chemotherapy or radiotherapy by acquiring mutations that inactivate the endogenous apoptotic machinery or by cycling slowly. Thus, knowledge about the mechanisms linking the activation of an alternative cell death modality and the cell cycle machinery could have a transformative impact on the development of new cancer therapies, but the mechanisms remain completely unknown. We investigated the regulation of alternative cell death in Drosophila larval brain neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in which apoptosis is normally repressed. From a screen, we identified two novel loss-of-function alleles of the Cdc20/fizzy (fzy) gene that lead to premature brain neuroblast loss without perturbing cell proliferation in other diploid cell types. Fzy is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Neuroblasts carrying the novel fzy allele or exhibiting reduced APC/C function display hallmarks of necrosis. By contrast, neuroblasts overexpressing the non-degradable form of canonical APC/C substrates required for cell cycle progression undergo mitotic catastrophe. These data strongly suggest that Fzy can elicit a novel pro-survival function of APC/C by suppressing necrosis. Neuroblasts experiencing catastrophic cellular stress, or overexpressing p53, lose Fzy expression and undergo necrosis. Co-expression of fzy suppresses the death of these neuroblasts. Consequently, attenuation of the Fzy-dependent survival mechanism functions downstream of catastrophic cellular stress and p53 to eliminate neuroblasts by necrosis. Strategies that target the Fzy-dependent survival mechanism might lead to the discovery of new treatments or complement the pre-existing therapies to eliminate apoptosis-resistant cancer stem cells by necrosis. PMID:24598157

  5. Alcohol Dependence and Altered Engagement of Neural Networks in Risky Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi eZhu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol dependence is associated with heightened risk tolerance and altered decision- making. This raises the question as to whether alcohol dependent patients (ADP are incapable of proper risk assessment. We investigated how healthy controls (HC and ADP engage neural networks to cope with the increased cognitive demands of risky decisions. We collected fMRI data while 34 HC and 16 ADP played a game that included safe and risky trials. In safe trials, participants accrued money at no risk of a penalty. In risky trials, reward and risk simultaneously increased as participants were instructed to decide when to stop a reward accrual period. If the participant failed to stop before an undisclosed time, the trial would bust and participants would not earn the money from that trial. Independent Component Analysis was used to identify networks engaged during the anticipation and the decision execution of risky compared with safe trials. Like HC, ADP demonstrated distinct network engagement for safe and risky trials at anticipation. However, at decision execution, ADP exhibited severely reduced discrimination in network engagement between safe and risky trials. Although ADP behaviorally responded to risk they failed to appropriately modify network engagement as the decision continued, leading ADP to assume similar network engagement regardless of risk prospects. This may reflect disorganized network switching and a facile response strategy uniformly adopted by ADP across risk conditions. We propose that aberrant salience network (SN engagement in ADP might contribute to ineffective network switching and that the role of the SN in risky decisions warrants further investigation.

  6. Light evokes melanopsin-dependent vocalization and neural activation associated with aversive experience in neonatal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Delwig

    Full Text Available Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs are the only functional photoreceptive cells in the eye of newborn mice. Through postnatal day 9, in the absence of functional rods and cones, these ipRGCs mediate a robust avoidance behavior to a light source, termed negative phototaxis. To determine whether this behavior is associated with an aversive experience in neonatal mice, we characterized light-induced vocalizations and patterns of neuronal activation in regions of the brain involved in the processing of aversive and painful stimuli. Light evoked distinct melanopsin-dependent ultrasonic vocalizations identical to those emitted under stressful conditions, such as isolation from the litter. In contrast, light did not evoke the broad-spectrum calls elicited by acute mechanical pain. Using markers of neuronal activation, we found that light induced the immediate-early gene product Fos in the posterior thalamus, a brain region associated with the enhancement of responses to mechanical stimulation of the dura by light, and thought to be the basis for migrainous photophobia. Additionally, light induced the phosphorylation of extracellular-related kinase (pERK in neurons of the central amygdala, an intracellular signal associated with the processing of the aversive aspects of pain. However, light did not activate Fos expression in the spinal trigeminal nucleus caudalis, the primary receptive field for painful stimulation to the head. We conclude that these light-evoked vocalizations and the distinct pattern of brain activation in neonatal mice are consistent with a melanopsin-dependent neural pathway involved in processing light as an aversive but not acutely painful stimulus.

  7. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    CERN Document Server

    Suomi, Visa; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with ...

  8. Temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues measured with the shear wave elastography method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Lin; Li, Guo-Yang; He, Ping; Mao, Ze-Qi; Cao, Yanping

    2017-01-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of brain tissues is essential in such cases as the surgery planning and surgical training using virtual reality based simulators, trauma research and the diagnosis of some diseases that alter the elastic properties of brain tissues. Here, we suggest a protocol to measure the temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues in physiological saline using the shear wave elastography method. Experiments have been conducted on six porcine brains. Our results show that the shear moduli of brain tissues decrease approximately linearly with a slope of -0.041±0.006kPa/°C when the temperature T increases from room temperature (~23°C) to body temperature (~37°C). A case study has been further conducted which shows that the shear moduli are insensitive to the temperature variation when T is in the range of 37 to 43°C and will increase when T is higher than 43°C. With the present experimental setup, temperature-dependent elastic properties of brain tissues can be measured in a simulated physiological environment and a non-destructive manner. Thus the method suggested here offers a unique tool for the mechanical characterization of brain tissues with potential applications in brain biomechanics research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Sampled-Data Synchronization of Markovian Coupled Neural Networks With Mode Delays Based on Mode-Dependent LKF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junyi; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Zhanshan; Liu, Zhenwei

    This paper investigates sampled-data synchronization problem of Markovian coupled neural networks with mode-dependent interval time-varying delays and aperiodic sampling intervals based on an enhanced input delay approach. A mode-dependent augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is utilized, which makes the LKF matrices mode-dependent as much as possible. By applying an extended Jensen's integral inequality and Wirtinger's inequality, new delay-dependent synchronization criteria are obtained, which fully utilizes the upper bound on variable sampling interval and the sawtooth structure information of varying input delay. In addition, the desired stochastic sampled-data controllers can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.This paper investigates sampled-data synchronization problem of Markovian coupled neural networks with mode-dependent interval time-varying delays and aperiodic sampling intervals based on an enhanced input delay approach. A mode-dependent augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional (LKF) is utilized, which makes the LKF matrices mode-dependent as much as possible. By applying an extended Jensen's integral inequality and Wirtinger's inequality, new delay-dependent synchronization criteria are obtained, which fully utilizes the upper bound on variable sampling interval and the sawtooth structure information of varying input delay. In addition, the desired stochastic sampled-data controllers can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, two examples are provided to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  10. Automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation of neural circuits in neonatal brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Hayes, John A; Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of neurodegenerative disease is the pathological loss of neurons that participate in generating behaviour. To investigate network properties of neural circuits and provide a complementary tool to study neurodegeneration in vitro or in situ, we developed an automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation system. The instrument consists of a two-photon and visible-wavelength confocal imaging setup, controlled by executive software, that identifies neurons in preparations based on genetically encoded fluorescent proteins or Ca2+ imaging, and then sequentially ablates cell targets while monitoring network function concurrently. Pathological changes in network function can be directly attributed to ablated cells, which are logged in real time. Here, we investigated brainstem respiratory circuits to demonstrate single-cell precision in ablation during physiological network activity, but the technique could be applied to interrogate network properties in neural systems that retain network functionality in reduced preparations in vitro or in situ. PMID:23440965

  11. Method of Creation of “Core-Gisseismic Attributes” Dependences With Use of Trainable Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gafurov Denis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes methodological techniques and results of geophysical well logging and seismic data interpretation by means of trainable neural networks. Objects of research are wells and seismic materials of Talakan field. The article also presents forecast of construction and reservoir properties of Osa horizon. The paper gives an example of creation of geological (lithological -facial model of the field based on developed methodical techniques of complex interpretation of geologicgeophysical data by trainable neural network. The constructed lithological -facial model allows specifying a geological structure of the field. The developed methodical techniques and the trained neural networks may be applied to adjacent sites for research of carbonate horizons.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Neuroblastoma Cells Adhesion on Hyaluronic Acid-Based Surface for Neural Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment of neuron cells plays a crucial role in regulating neural development and regeneration. Hyaluronic acid (HA biomaterial has been applied in a wide range of medical and biological fields and plays important roles in neural regeneration. PC12 cells have been reported to be capable of endogenous NGF synthesis and secretion. The purpose of this research was to assess the effect of HA biomaterial combining with PC12 cells conditioned media (PC12 CM in neural regeneration. Using SH-SY5Y cells as an experimental model, we found that supporting with PC12 CM enhanced HA function in SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Through RP-nano-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses, we identified increased expression of HSP60 and RanBP2 in SH-SY5Y cells grown on HA-modified surface with cotreatment of PC12 CM. Moreover, we also identified factors that were secreted from PC12 cells and may promote SH-SY5Y cell proliferation and adhesion. Here, we proposed a biomaterial surface enriched with neurotrophic factors for nerve regeneration application.

  13. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  14. Neural correlates of reward-based spatial learning in persons with cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tau, Gregory Z; Marsh, Rachel; Wang, Zhishun; Torres-Sanchez, Tania; Graniello, Barbara; Hao, Xuejun; Xu, Dongrong; Packard, Mark G; Duan, Yunsuo; Kangarlu, Alayar; Martinez, Diana; Peterson, Bradley S

    2014-02-01

    Dysfunctional learning systems are thought to be central to the pathogenesis of and impair recovery from addictions. The functioning of the brain circuits for episodic memory or learning that support goal-directed behavior has not been studied previously in persons with cocaine dependence (CD). Thirteen abstinent CD and 13 healthy participants underwent MRI scanning while performing a task that requires the use of spatial cues to navigate a virtual-reality environment and find monetary rewards, allowing the functional assessment of the brain systems for spatial learning, a form of episodic memory. Whereas both groups performed similarly on the reward-based spatial learning task, we identified disturbances in brain regions involved in learning and reward in CD participants. In particular, CD was associated with impaired functioning of medial temporal lobe (MTL), a brain region that is crucial for spatial learning (and episodic memory) with concomitant recruitment of striatum (which normally participates in stimulus-response, or habit, learning), and prefrontal cortex. CD was also associated with enhanced sensitivity of the ventral striatum to unexpected rewards but not to expected rewards earned during spatial learning. We provide evidence that spatial learning in CD is characterized by disturbances in functioning of an MTL-based system for episodic memory and a striatum-based system for stimulus-response learning and reward. We have found additional abnormalities in distributed cortical regions. Consistent with findings from animal studies, we provide the first evidence in humans describing the disruptive effects of cocaine on the coordinated functioning of multiple neural systems for learning and memory.

  15. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work was performed to investigate the ability of two different embryonic stem (ES cell-derived neural precursor populations to generate functional neuronal networks in vitro. The first ES cell-derived neural precursor population was cultivated as free-floating neural aggregates which are known to form a developmental niche comprising different types of neural cells, including neural precursor cells (NPCs, progenitor cells and even further matured cells. This niche provides by itself a variety of different growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins that influence the proliferation and differentiation of neural precursor and progenitor cells. The second population was cultivated adherently in monolayer cultures to control most stringently the extracellular environment. This population comprises highly homogeneous NPCs which are supposed to represent an attractive way to provide well-defined neuronal progeny. However, the ability of these different ES cell-derived immature neural cell populations to generate functional neuronal networks has not been assessed so far. Results While both precursor populations were shown to differentiate into sufficient quantities of mature NeuN+ neurons that also express GABA or vesicular-glutamate-transporter-2 (vGlut2, only aggregate-derived neuronal populations exhibited a synchronously oscillating network activity 2–4 weeks after initiating the differentiation as detected by the microelectrode array technology. Neurons derived from homogeneous NPCs within monolayer cultures did merely show uncorrelated spiking activity even when differentiated for up to 12 weeks. We demonstrated that these neurons exhibited sparsely ramified neurites and an embryonic vGlut2 distribution suggesting an inhibited terminal neuronal maturation. In comparison, neurons derived from heterogeneous populations within neural aggregates appeared as fully mature with a dense neurite network and punctuated

  16. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christopoulou, Maria; Kühn, Sven; Kuster, Niels

    2010-04-01

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  17. Age-dependent tissue-specific exposure of cell phone users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ, Andreas; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Kuehn, Sven; Kuster, Niels [Foundation for Research on Information Technologies in Society (IT' IS), Zeughausstr. 43, 8004 Zuerich (Switzerland); Christopoulou, Maria [National Technical University of Athens, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Str., 15780 Athens (Greece)], E-mail: christ@itis.ethz.ch

    2010-04-07

    The peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) assessed with the standardized specific anthropometric mannequin head phantom has been shown to yield a conservative exposure estimate for both adults and children using mobile phones. There are, however, questions remaining concerning the impact of age-dependent dielectric tissue properties and age-dependent proportions of the skull, face and ear on the global and local absorption, in particular in the brain tissues. In this study, we compare the absorption in various parts of the cortex for different magnetic resonance imaging-based head phantoms of adults and children exposed to different models of mobile phones. The results show that the locally induced fields in children can be significantly higher (>3 dB) in subregions of the brain (cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus) and the eye due to the closer proximity of the phone to these tissues. The increase is even larger for bone marrow (>10 dB) as a result of its significantly high conductivity. Tissues such as the pineal gland show no increase since their distances to the phone are not a function of age. This study, however, confirms previous findings saying that there are no age-dependent changes of the peak spatial SAR when averaged over the entire head.

  18. Reorganization of pathological control functions of memory-A neural model for tissue healing by shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wess, Othmar

    2005-04-01

    Since 1980 shock waves have proven effective in the field of extracorporeal lithotripsy. More than 10 years ago shock waves were successfully applied for various indications such as chronic pain, non-unions and, recently, for angina pectoris. These fields do not profit from the disintegration power but from stimulating and healing effects of shock waves. Increased metabolism and neo-vascularization are reported after shock wave application. According to C. J. Wang, a biological cascade is initiated, starting with a stimulating effect of physical energy resulting in increased circulation and metabolism. Pathological memory of neural control patterns is considered the reason for different pathologies characterized by insufficient metabolism. This paper presents a neural model for reorganization of pathological reflex patterns. The model acts on associative memory functions of the brain based on modification of synaptic junctions. Accordingly, pathological memory effects of the autonomous nervous system are reorganized by repeated application of shock waves followed by development of normal reflex patterns. Physiologic control of muscle and vascular tone is followed by increased metabolism and tissue repair. The memory model may explain hyper-stimulation effects in pain therapy.

  19. Computational modeling of 915 MHz microwave ablation: Comparative assessment of temperature-dependent tissue dielectric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshazer, Garron; Hagmann, Mark; Merck, Derek; Sebek, Jan; Moore, Kent B; Prakash, Punit

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational model for simulating 915 MHz microwave ablation (MWA), and verify the simulation predictions of transient temperature profiles against experimental measurements. Due to the limited experimental data characterizing temperature-dependent changes of tissue dielectric properties at 915 MHz, we comparatively assess two temperature-dependent approaches of modeling of dielectric properties: model A- piecewise linear temperature dependencies based on existing, but limited, experimental data, and model B- similar to model A, but augmented with linear decrease in electrical conductivity above 95 °C, as guided by our experimental measurements. The finite element method was used to simulate MWA procedures in liver with a clinical 915 MHz ablation applicator. A coupled electromagnetic-thermal solver incorporating temperature-dependent tissue biophysical properties of liver was implemented. Predictions of the transient temperature profiles and ablation zone dimensions for both model A and model B were compared against experimental measurements in ex vivo bovine liver tissue. Broadband dielectric properties of tissue within different regions of the ablation zone were measured and reported at 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. Model B yielded peak tissue temperatures in closer agreement with experimental measurements, attributed to the inclusion of decrease in electrical conductivity at elevated temperature. The simulated transverse diameters of the ablation zone predicted by both models were greater than experimental measurements, which may be in part due to the lack of a tissue shrinkage model. At both considered power levels, predictions of transverse ablation zone diameters were in closer agreement with measurements for model B (max. discrepancy of 5 mm at 60 W, and 3 mm at 30 W), compared to model A (max. discrepancy of 9 mm at 60 W, and 6 mm at 30 W). Ablation zone lengths with both models were within 2 mm at 30 W, but

  20. Neural song preference during vocal learning in the zebra finch depends on age and state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Teresa A; Konishi, Masakazu

    2005-02-05

    The zebra finch acquires its song by first memorizing a model song from a tutor and then matching its own vocalizations to the memory trace of the tutor song, called a template. Neural mechanisms underlying this process require a link between the neural memory trace and the premotor song circuitry, which drives singing. We now report that a premotor song nucleus responds more to the tutor song model than to every other stimulus examined, including the bird's own song (BOS). Neural tuning to the song model occurred only during waking and peaked during the template-matching period of development, when the vocal motor output is sculpted to match the tutor song. During the same developmental phase, the BOS was the most effective excitatory stimulus during sleep. The preference for BOS compared to tutor song inverted with sleep/wake state. Thus, song preference shifts with development and state. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Neural correlates of effort-dependent and effort-independent cognitive fatigue components in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiteri, Stefan; Hassa, Thomas; Claros-Salinas, Dolores; Dettmers, Christian; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2017-11-01

    Among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom. It can be subdivided into an effort-dependent (fatigability) and an effort-independent component (trait-fatigue). The objective was to disentangle activity changes associated with effort-independent "trait-fatigue" from those associated with effort-dependent fatigability in MS patients. This study employed behavioral measures and functional magnetic imaging to investigate neural changes in MS patients associated with fatigue. A total of 40 MS patients and 22 age-matched healthy controls performed in a fatigue-inducing N-back task. Effort-independent fatigue was assessed using the Fatigue Scale of Motor and Cognition (FSMC) questionnaire. Effort-independent fatigue was observed to be reflected by activity increases in fronto-striatal-subcortical networks primarily involved in the maintenance of homeostatic processes and in motor and cognitive control. Effort-dependent fatigue (fatigability) leads to activity decreases in attention-related cortical and subcortical networks. These results indicate that effort-independent (fatigue) and effort-dependent fatigue (fatigability) in MS patients have functionally related but fundamentally different neural correlates. Fatigue in MS as a general phenomenon is reflected by complex interactions of activity increases in control networks (effort-independent component) and activity reductions in executive networks (effort-dependent component) of brain areas.

  2. Neural network activation during a stop-signal task discriminates cocaine-dependent from non-drug-abusing men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Amanda; Young, Jonathan; Smitherman, Sonet; Gross, Robin E; Mletzko, Tanja; Kilts, Clinton D

    2014-05-01

    Cocaine dependence is defined by a loss of inhibitory control over drug-use behaviors, mirrored by measurable impairments in laboratory tasks of inhibitory control. The current study tested the hypothesis that deficits in multiple subprocesses of behavioral control are associated with reliable neural-processing alterations that define cocaine addiction. While undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 38 cocaine-dependent men and 27 healthy control men performed a stop-signal task of motor inhibition. An independent component analysis on fMRI time courses identified task-related neural networks attributed to motor, visual, cognitive and affective processes. The statistical associations of these components with five different stop-signal task conditions were selected for use in a linear discriminant analysis to define a classifier for cocaine addiction from a subsample of 26 cocaine-dependent men and 18 controls. Leave-one-out cross-validation accurately classified 89.5% (39/44; chance accuracy = 26/44 = 59.1%) of subjects with 84.6% (22/26) sensitivity and 94.4% (17/18) specificity. The remaining 12 cocaine-dependent and 9 control men formed an independent test sample, for which accuracy of the classifier was 81.9% (17/21; chance accuracy = 12/21 = 57.1%) with 75% (9/12) sensitivity and 88.9% (8/9) specificity. The cocaine addiction classification score was significantly correlated with a measure of impulsiveness as well as the duration of cocaine use for cocaine-dependent men. The results of this study support the ability of a pattern of multiple neural network alterations associated with inhibitory motor control to define a binary classifier for cocaine addiction. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  3. The effect of ionic diffusion on extracellular potentials in neural tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Halnes, Geir; Keller, Daniel; Pettersen, Klas H; Eivenoll, Gaute T

    2015-01-01

    In computational neuroscience, it is common to use the simplifying assumption that diffusive currents are negligible compared to Ohmic currents. However, endured periods of intense neural signaling may cause local ion concentration changes in the millimolar range. Theoretical studies have identified scenarios where steep concentration gradients give rise to diffusive currents that are of comparable magnitude with Ohmic currents, and where the simplifying assumption that diffusion can be neglected does not hold. We here propose a novel formalism for computing (1) the ion concentration dynamics and (2) the electrical potential in the extracellular space surrounding multi-compartmental neuron models or networks of such (e.g., the Blue-Brain simulator). We use this formalism to explore the effects that diffusive currents can have on the extracellular (ECS) potential surrounding a small population of active cortical neurons. Our key findings are: (i) Sustained periods of neuronal output (simulations were run for 8...

  4. Outsourcing neural active control to passive composite mechanics: a tissue engineered cyborg ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzola, Mattia; Park, Sung Jin; Park, Kyung Soo; Park, Shirley; di Santo, Valentina; Deisseroth, Karl; Lauder, George V.; Mahadevan, L.; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-11-01

    Translating the blueprint that stingrays and skates provide, we create a cyborg swimming ray capable of orchestrating adaptive maneuvering and phototactic navigation. The impossibility of replicating the neural system of batoids fish is bypassed by outsourcing algorithmic functionalities to the body composite mechanics, hence casting the active control problem into a design, passive one. We present a first step in engineering multilevel "brain-body-flow" systems that couple sensory information to motor coordination and movement, leading to behavior. This work paves the way for the development of autonomous and adaptive artificial creatures able to process multiple sensory inputs and produce complex behaviors in distributed systems and may represent a path toward soft-robotic "embodied cognition".

  5. Hippocampal Adult Neurogenesis Is Maintained by Neil3-Dependent Repair of Oxidative DNA Lesions in Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Elisabeth Regnell

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of oxidative DNA damage has been proposed as a potential cause of age-related cognitive decline. The major pathway for removal of oxidative DNA base lesions is base excision repair, which is initiated by DNA glycosylases. In mice, Neil3 is the main DNA glycosylase for repair of hydantoin lesions in single-stranded DNA of neural stem/progenitor cells, promoting neurogenesis. Adult neurogenesis is crucial for maintenance of hippocampus-dependent functions involved in behavior. Herein, behavioral studies reveal learning and memory deficits and reduced anxiety-like behavior in Neil3−/− mice. Neural stem/progenitor cells from aged Neil3−/− mice show impaired proliferative capacity and reduced DNA repair activity. Furthermore, hippocampal neurons in Neil3−/− mice display synaptic irregularities. It appears that Neil3-dependent repair of oxidative DNA damage in neural stem/progenitor cells is required for maintenance of adult neurogenesis to counteract the age-associated deterioration of cognitive performance.

  6. Multiple tooth-losses during development suppress age-dependent emergence of oscillatory neural activities in the oral somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Honjo, Makoto; Mashiyama, Yuichi; Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Sato, Jun; Sugai, Tokio; Kato, Nobuo; Onoda, Norihiko

    2008-08-11

    Tooth and tooth-related organs play important roles in not only mastication, but also sensory perception in the oral region. In general, sensory neural inputs during the developmental period are required for the maturation of functions in the sensory cortex. However, whether maturations of oral somatosensory cortex (OSC) require certain levels of sensory input from oral regions has been unclear. The present study investigated the influence of multiple tooth-losses during the developmental period on age-dependent emergence of rhythmic activities of population neurons in the OSC. Low-frequency electrical stimulation was delivered to layer IV and field potentials were recorded from layer II/III in the OSC of rat brain slices. In control rats, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent oscillation at 8-10 Hz appeared during postnatal weeks 2-3. In rats with extraction of multiple teeth at 17-18 days old, oscillation did not appear even at maturity, whereas in rats with multiple teeth extracted at 37-38 days old, oscillation appearances were maintained in maturity. Thus, emergence of oscillation in the OSC was suppressed by multiple tooth-losses during postnatal 2-3 weeks. These results suggest that sufficient neural inputs from the teeth and tooth-related organs during developmental periods are essential for maturation of neural functions in the OSC.

  7. Sleep as a window into early neural development: Shifts in sleep-dependent learning effects across early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Rebecca L; Edgin, Jamie O

    2015-09-01

    Sleep is an important physiological state for the consolidation and generalization of new learning in children and adults. We review the literature on sleep-dependent memory consolidation and generalization in infants and preschool children and place the findings in the context of the development of the neural systems underlying memory (hippocampus and its connections to cortex). Based on the extended trajectory of hippocampal development, transitions in the nature of sleep-dependent learning are expected. The studies reviewed here show shifts in the nature of sleep-dependent learning across early childhood, with sleep facilitating generalization in infants but enhancing precise memory after 18-24 months of age. Future studies on sleep-dependent learning in infants and young children must take these transitions in early brain development into account.

  8. Deep convolutional neural network and 3D deformable approach for tissue segmentation in musculoskeletal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Zhou, Zhaoye; Jang, Hyungseok; Samsonov, Alexey; Zhao, Gengyan; Kijowski, Richard

    2017-07-21

    To describe and evaluate a new fully automated musculoskeletal tissue segmentation method using deep convolutional neural network (CNN) and three-dimensional (3D) simplex deformable modeling to improve the accuracy and efficiency of cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. A fully automated segmentation pipeline was built by combining a semantic segmentation CNN and 3D simplex deformable modeling. A CNN technique called SegNet was applied as the core of the segmentation method to perform high resolution pixel-wise multi-class tissue classification. The 3D simplex deformable modeling refined the output from SegNet to preserve the overall shape and maintain a desirable smooth surface for musculoskeletal structure. The fully automated segmentation method was tested using a publicly available knee image data set to compare with currently used state-of-the-art segmentation methods. The fully automated method was also evaluated on two different data sets, which include morphological and quantitative MR images with different tissue contrasts. The proposed fully automated segmentation method provided good segmentation performance with segmentation accuracy superior to most of state-of-the-art methods in the publicly available knee image data set. The method also demonstrated versatile segmentation performance on both morphological and quantitative musculoskeletal MR images with different tissue contrasts and spatial resolutions. The study demonstrates that the combined CNN and 3D deformable modeling approach is useful for performing rapid and accurate cartilage and bone segmentation within the knee joint. The CNN has promising potential applications in musculoskeletal imaging. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Cytokine gene signatures in neural tissue of horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis or equine herpes type 1 myeloencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusterla, N; Wilson, W D; Conrad, P A; Barr, B C; Ferraro, G L; Daft, B M; Leutenegger, C M

    2006-09-09

    This study was designed to determine the relative levels of gene transcription of selected pathogens and cytokines in the brain and spinal cord of 12 horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM), 11 with equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) myeloencephalopathy, and 12 healthy control horses by applying a real time pcr to the formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues. Total rna was extracted from each tissue, transcribed to complementary dna (cDNA) and assayed for Sarcocystis neurona, Neospora hughesi, EHV-1, equine GAPDH (housekeeping gene), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interferon (IFN)-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 AND IL-12 p40. S neurona cdna was detected in the neural tissue from all 12 horses with EPM, and two of them also had amplifiable cDNA of N hughesi. The relative levels of transcription of protozoal cdna ranged from 1 to 461 times baseline (mean 123). All the horses with ehv-1 myeloencephalopathy had positive viral signals by PCR with relative levels of transcription ranging from 1 to 1618 times baseline (mean 275). All the control horses tested negative for S neurona, N hughesi and EHV-1 cdna. The cytokine profiles of each disease indicated a balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. In the horses with epm the pro-inflammatory Th1 cytokines (IL-8, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma) were commonly expressed but the anti-inflammatory Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-6 AND IL-10) were absent or rare. In the horses with ehv-1 the proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 was commonly expressed, but IL-10 and IFN-gamma were not, and TNF-alpha was rare. Tissue from the control horses expressed only the gene GAPDH.

  10. Cytokine profiles in the joint depend on pathology, but are different between synovial fluid, cartilage tissue and cultured chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, Anika I; Beekhuizen, Michiel; T Hart, Marieke C; Radstake, Timothy; Dhert, Wouter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10261847X; Saris, Daniel; van Osch, Gerjo; Creemers, Laura B

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThis study aimed to evaluate whether profiles of several soluble mediators in synovial fluid and cartilage tissue are pathology-dependent and how their production is related to in vitro tissue formation by chondrocytes from diseased and healthy tissue.MethodsSamples were obtained from

  11. Cytokine profiles in the joint depend on pathology, but are different between synovial fluid, cartilage tissue and cultured chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsuchida, A.I.; Beekhuizen, M.; 't Hart, M.C.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Dhert, W.J.A.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; van Osch, G.J.V.M.; Creemers, L.B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study aimed to evaluate whether profiles of several soluble mediators in synovial fluid and cartilage tissue are pathology-dependent and how their production is related to in vitro tissue formation by chondrocytes from diseased and healthy tissue. Methods Samples were obtained from

  12. Cytokine profiles in the joint depend on pathology, but are different between synovial fluid, cartilage tissue and cultured chondrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.I. Tsuchida (Anika); M. Beekhuizen (Michiel); M.C. 't Hart (Marieke); T.R.D.J. Radstake (Timothy); W.J.A. Dhert (Wouter); D.B.F. Saris (Daniel); G.J.V.M. van Osch (Gerjo); L.B. Creemers (Laura)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Introduction:__ This study aimed to evaluate whether profiles of several soluble mediators in synovial fluid and cartilage tissue are pathology-dependent and how their production is related to in vitro tissue formation by chondrocytes from diseased and healthy tissue.

  13. Delay-dependent asymptotic stability for neural networks with time-varying delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Liao

    2006-01-01

    ensure local and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium of the neural network. Our results are applied to a two-neuron system with delayed connections between neurons, and some novel asymptotic stability criteria are also derived. The obtained conditions are shown to be less conservative and restrictive than those reported in the known literature. Some numerical examples are included to demonstrate our results.

  14. Numerical bifurcation analysis of distance-dependent on-center off-surround shunting neural networks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.C.M.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; van der Maas, H.L.J.

    1996-01-01

    On-center off-surround shunting neural networks are often applied as models for content-addressable memory (CAM), the equilibria being the stored memories. One important demand of biological plausible CAMs is that they function under a broad range of parameters, since several parameters vary due to

  15. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    important for cognitive function. However, the neural substrates involved in these effects remain elusive. Here we identify cortically projecting cholinergic neurons in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) in the basal forebrain (BF) as important targets for alpha(7) nAChR activation...

  16. Functional dissociations in top-down control dependent neural repetition priming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, P.; Schnaidt, M.; Fell, J.; Ruhlmann, J.; Elger, C.E.; Fernandez, G.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying top-down control of repetition priming. Here, we use functional brain imaging to investigate these mechanisms. Study and repetition tasks used a natural/man-made forced choice task. In the study phase subjects were required to respond to either

  17. Neural Differences in Bilingual Children's Arithmetic Processing Depending on Language of Instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mondt, K.; Struys, E.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Balériaux, D.; Metens, T.; Paquier, P.; Craen, P. van de; Bosch, M.P.C.; Denolin, V.

    2011-01-01

    Many children in bilingual regions follow lessons in a language at school (school-language) that they hardly ever speak at home or in other informal settings. What are the neural effects of this phenomenon? This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigates the effects of using

  18. Intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity elicit spinal TNF-α-independent, atypical PKC-dependent inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertsch, Nathan A.

    2015-01-01

    In many neural networks, mechanisms of compensatory plasticity respond to prolonged reductions in neural activity by increasing cellular excitability or synaptic strength. In the respiratory control system, a prolonged reduction in synaptic inputs to the phrenic motor pool elicits a TNF-α- and atypical PKC-dependent form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). Although iPMF may be elicited by a prolonged reduction in respiratory neural activity, iPMF is more efficiently induced when reduced respiratory neural activity (neural apnea) occurs intermittently. Mechanisms giving rise to iPMF following intermittent neural apnea are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that iPMF following intermittent reductions in respiratory neural activity requires spinal TNF-α and aPKC. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized and ventilated rats exposed to brief intermittent (5, ∼1.25 min), brief sustained (∼6.25 min), or prolonged sustained (30 min) neural apnea. iPMF was elicited following brief intermittent and prolonged sustained neural apnea, but not following brief sustained neural apnea. Unlike iPMF following prolonged neural apnea, spinal TNF-α was not required to initiate iPMF during intermittent neural apnea; however, aPKC was still required for its stabilization. These results suggest that different patterns of respiratory neural activity induce iPMF through distinct cellular mechanisms but ultimately converge on a similar downstream pathway. Understanding the diverse cellular mechanisms that give rise to inactivity-induced respiratory plasticity may lead to development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat devastating respiratory control disorders when endogenous compensatory mechanisms fail. PMID:25673781

  19. Polypyrrole/Alginate Hybrid Hydrogels: Electrically Conductive and Soft Biomaterials for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture and Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sumi; Jang, LindyK; Kim, Semin; Yang, Jongcheol; Yang, Kisuk; Cho, Seung-Woo; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-11-01

    Electrically conductive biomaterials that can efficiently deliver electrical signals to cells or improve electrical communication among cells have received considerable attention for potential tissue engineering applications. Conductive hydrogels are desirable particularly for neural applications, as they can provide electrical signals and soft microenvironments that can mimic native nerve tissues. In this study, conductive and soft polypyrrole/alginate (PPy/Alg) hydrogels are developed by chemically polymerizing PPy within ionically cross-linked alginate hydrogel networks. The synthesized hydrogels exhibit a Young's modulus of 20-200 kPa. Electrical conductance of the PPy/Alg hydrogels could be enhanced by more than one order of magnitude compared to that of pristine alginate hydrogels. In vitro studies with human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) reveal that cell adhesion and growth are promoted on the PPy/Alg hydrogels. Additionally, the PPy/Alg hydrogels support and greatly enhance the expression of neural differentiation markers (i.e., Tuj1 and MAP2) of hMSCs compared to tissue culture plate controls. Subcutaneous implantation of the hydrogels for eight weeks induces mild inflammatory reactions. These soft and conductive hydrogels will serve as a useful platform to study the effects of electrical and mechanical signals on stem cells and/or neural cells and to develop multifunctional neural tissue engineering scaffolds. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Spatio-temporal regulation of ADAR editing during development in porcine neural tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Editing by ADAR enzymes is essential for mammalian life. Still, knowledge of the spatio-temporal editing patterns in mammals is limited. By use of 454 amplicon sequencing we examined the editing status of 12 regionally extracted mRNAs from porcine developing brain encompassing a total of 64...... putative ADAR editing sites. In total 24 brain tissues, dissected from up to five regions from embryonic gestation day 23, 42, 60, 80, 100 and 115, were examined for editing....

  1. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, L [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Salvador, R [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Basser, P J [Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics, NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m{sup -1} to 0.333 S m{sup -1}, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  2. Engineered neural tissue with Schwann cell differentiated human dental pulp stem cells: potential for peripheral nerve repair?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanen, Kathleen; Martens, Wendy; Georgiou, Melanie; Ameloot, Marcel; Lambrichts, Ivo; Phillips, James

    2017-01-04

    Despite the spontaneous regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, large gap peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs) require bridging strategies. The limitations and suboptimal results obtained with autografts or hollow nerve conduits in the clinic urge the need for alternative treatments. Recently, we have described promising neuroregenerative capacities of Schwann cells derived from differentiated human dental pulp stem cells (d-hDPSCs) in vitro. Here, we extended the in vitro assays to show the pro-angiogenic effects of d-hDPSCs, such as enhanced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. In addition, for the first time we evaluated the performance of d-hDPSCs in an in vivo rat model of PNI. Eight weeks after transplantation of NeuraWrap™ conduits filled with engineered neural tissue (EngNT) containing aligned d-hDPSCs in 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defects, immunohistochemistry and ultrastructural analysis revealed ingrowing neurites, myelinated nerve fibres and blood vessels along the construct. Although further research is required to optimize the delivery of this EngNT, our findings suggest that d-hDPSCs are able to exert a positive effect in the regeneration of nerve tissue in vivo. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Expandable and Rapidly Differentiating Human Induced Neural Stem Cell Lines for Multiple Tissue Engineering Applications

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    Dana M. Cairns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Limited availability of human neurons poses a significant barrier to progress in biological and preclinical studies of the human nervous system. Current stem cell-based approaches of neuron generation are still hindered by prolonged culture requirements, protocol complexity, and variability in neuronal differentiation. Here we establish stable human induced neural stem cell (hiNSC lines through the direct reprogramming of neonatal fibroblasts and adult adipose-derived stem cells. These hiNSCs can be passaged indefinitely and cryopreserved as colonies. Independently of media composition, hiNSCs robustly differentiate into TUJ1-positive neurons within 4 days, making them ideal for innervated co-cultures. In vivo, hiNSCs migrate, engraft, and contribute to both central and peripheral nervous systems. Lastly, we demonstrate utility of hiNSCs in a 3D human brain model. This method provides a valuable interdisciplinary tool that could be used to develop drug screening applications as well as patient-specific disease models related to disorders of innervation and the brain.

  4. Metabolism of selenite to selenosugar and trimethylselenonium in vivo: tissue dependency and requirement for S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Matthew I; Lunøe, Kristoffer; Gabel-Jensen, Charlotte; Gammelgaard, Bente; Combs, Gerald F

    2013-12-01

    Impaired S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent transmethylation and methylation capacity feature in diseases related to obesity or aging, and selenium (Se) metabolism is altered in these states. We tested the hypothesis that SAM metabolism is required for methylation and excretion of Se in a rat model. Four hours after selenite and periodate-oxidized adenosine (POA; an inhibitor of SAM metabolism) were administered, circulating markers of single-carbon status were unchanged, except for decreased circulating phosphatidylcholine (PRed blood cell Se levels were decreased (P=.01). Trimethylselenonium levels were decreased in liver and kidney (P=.001 for both tissues) and Se-methyl-N-acetylselenohexosamine selenosugar was decreased in liver (P=.001). Urinary output of both trimethylselenonium (P=.001) and selenosugar (P=.01) was decreased as well. Trimethylselenonium production is more inhibited by POA than is selenosugar production (Pwork indicates that low molecular weight Se metabolism requires SAM-dependent methylation, and disrupting the conversion of SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine prevents conversion of selenite and intermediate metabolites to final excretory forms, suggesting implications for selenium supplementation under conditions where transmethylation is suboptimal, such as in the case of obese or aging individuals. © 2013.

  5. Time-Dependent Diffusion MRI in Cancer: Tissue Modeling and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Reynaud

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC has been recognized as a useful and sensitive surrogate for cell density, paving the way for non-invasive tumor staging, and characterization of treatment efficacy in cancer. However, microstructural parameters, such as cell size, density and/or compartmental diffusivities affect diffusion in various fashions, making of conventional DWI a sensitive but non-specific probe into changes happening at cellular level. Alternatively, tissue complexity can be probed and quantified using the time dependence of diffusion metrics, sometimes also referred to as temporal diffusion spectroscopy when only using oscillating diffusion gradients. Time-dependent diffusion (TDD is emerging as a strong candidate for specific and non-invasive tumor characterization. Despite the lack of a general analytical solution for all diffusion times/frequencies, TDD can be probed in various regimes where systems simplify in order to extract relevant information about tissue microstructure. The fundamentals of TDD are first reviewed (a in the short time regime, disentangling structural and diffusive tissue properties, and (b near the tortuosity limit, assuming weakly heterogeneous media near infinitely long diffusion times. Focusing on cell bodies (as opposed to neuronal tracts, a simple but realistic model for intracellular diffusion can offer precious insight on diffusion inside biological systems, at all times. Based on this approach, the main three geometrical models implemented so far (IMPULSED, POMACE, VERDICT are reviewed. Their suitability to quantify cell size, intra- and extracellular spaces (ICS and ECS and diffusivities are assessed. The proper modeling of tissue membrane permeability—hardly a newcomer in the field, but lacking applications—and its impact on microstructural estimates are also considered. After discussing general issues with tissue modeling and microstructural parameter

  6. Floral induction in tissue culture: a system for the analysis of LEAFY-dependent gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Doris; Wellmer, Frank; Dilks, Kieran; William, Dilusha; Smith, Michael R; Kumar, Prakash P; Riechmann, José Luis; Greenland, Andrew J; Meyerowitz, Elliot M

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a versatile floral induction system that is based on ectopic overexpression of the transcription factor LEAFY (LFY) in callus. During shoot regeneration, flowers or floral organs are formed directly from root explants without prior formation of rosette leaves. Morphological and reporter gene analyses show that leaf-like structures are converted to floral organs in response to LFY activity. Thus, increased levels of LFY activity are sufficient to bypass normal vegetative development and to direct formation of flowers in tissue culture. We found that about half of the cultured cells respond to inducible LFY activity with a rapid upregulation of the known direct target gene of LFY, APETALA1 (AP1). This dramatic increase in the number of LFY-responsive cells compared to whole plants suggested that the tissue culture system could greatly facilitate the analysis of LFY-dependent gene regulation by genomic approaches. To test this, we monitored the gene expression changes that occur in tissue culture after activation of LFY using a flower-specific cDNA microarray. Induction of known LFY target genes was readily detected in these experiments. In addition, several other genes were identified that had not been implicated in signaling downstream of LFY before. Thus, the floral induction system is suitable for the detection of low abundance transcripts whose expression is controlled in an LFY-dependent manner.

  7. HZE particle radiation induces tissue-specific and p53-dependent mutagenesis in transgenic animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, P. Y.; Kanazawa, N.; Lutze-Mann, L.; Winegar, R.

    2001-01-01

    Transgenic animals, with the integrated target gene, provide a unique approach for measuring and characterizing mutations in any tissue of the animal. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mice with different p53 genetic background to examine radiation-induced genetic damage resulting from exposure to heavy particle radiation. We measured lacZ mutation frequencies (MF) in the brain and spleen tissues at various times after exposing animals to an acute dose of 1 Gy of 1GeV/amu iron particles. MF in the spleen of p53+/+ animals increased up to 2.6-fold above spontaneous levels at 8 weeks post irradiation. In contrast, brain MF from the same animals increased 1.7-fold above controls in the same period. In the p53-/- animals, brain MF increased to 2.2-fold above spontaneous levels at 1 week after treatment, but returned to control levels thereafter. Radiation also induced alterations in the spectrum of mutants in both tissues, accompanied by changes in the frequency of mutants with deletions extending past the transgene into mouse genomic DNA. Our results indicate that the accumulation of transgene MF after radiation exposure is dependant on the tissue examined as well as the p53 genetic background of the animals.

  8. EFFECTIVENESS OF NEURAL TISSUE MOBILISATION ON PAIN, PAIN FREE PASSIVE SLR RANGE OF MOTION AND FUNCTIONAL DISABILITY IN LOW BACK ACHE SUBJECTS WITH SCIATICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Geethika

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low back pain is a common, benign, and self-limiting disease that affects almost all persons, with a lifetime prevalence of up to 84%. In contrast, sciatica affects only 40 % of all persons in the Western industrialized countries. In sciatica, pain radiates down the legs, below the knee along the distribution of sciatic nerve. Nerve root compression is the most common cause of sciatica. Neuro dynamics or Neural Tissue Mobilization is relatively new approach in treatment of neuro musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of the study to determine the effectiveness of Neural Tissue mobilization on pain, pain free passive SLR ROM &functional disability in LBA subjects with Sciatica. Objective of the study is to study and compare the effectiveness of Neural tissue mobilization in LBA subjects with sciatica in terms of pain, pain free SLR ROM and Oswestry Disability Index. Methods: 30 subjects were selected by simple random sampling and assigned in to Control(n=15 &Experimental group(n=15.The subjects in control group were given conventional physiotherapy and those in Experimental group were given Neural Tissue Mobilization in addition to conventional therapy. All the participants were assessed with VAS, ODI and pain free passive SLR ROM. Results: After the analysis, the results were found to be significant improvement in pain, pain free SLR ROM, ODI in both groups (p< 0.00.But there is a high significance in Experimental group when compared to control group. Conclusion: Results suggest that NEURAL TISSUE MOBILIZATION along with conventional therapy is more effective in reducing pain, decreasing disability and improving SLR ROM.

  9. Neural substrates involved in anger induced by audio-visual film clips among patients with alcohol dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Sook; Lee, Bae Hwan; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2016-07-08

    Very little is known about the neural circuitry underlying anger processing among alcoholics. The purpose of this study was to examine the altered brain activity of alcoholic individuals during transient anger emotion. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 18 male patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence in an inpatient alcohol treatment facility and 16 social drinkers with similar demographics were scanned during the viewing of anger-provoking film clips. While there was no significant difference in the level of experienced anger between alcohol-dependent patients and non-alcoholic controls, significantly greater activation was observed in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the right precentral gyrus among alcoholic patients compared to the normal controls. In summary, specific brain regions were identified that are associated with anger among patients with alcohol dependency.

  10. Experience-dependent neural plasticity, learning, and memory in the era of epitranscriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, L J; Ke, K; Zajaczkowski, E L; Edmunds, J; Spitale, R C; Bredy, T W

    2017-09-19

    In this short review, we highlight recent findings in the emerging field of epitranscriptomic mechanisms and discuss their potential role in neural plasticity, learning and memory. These include the influence of RNA modifications on activity-induced RNA structure states, RNA editing and RNA localization, and how qualitative state changes in RNA increase the functional diversity and information-carrying capacity of RNA molecules. We predict that RNA modifications may be just as important for synaptic plasticity and memory as quantitative changes in transcript and protein abundance, but with the added advantage of not being required to signal back to the nucleus, and therefore better suited to be coordinated with the temporal dynamics of learning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  11. Pennation angle dependency in skeletal muscle tissue doppler strain in dynamic contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Frida; Öhberg, Fredrik; Granåsen, Gabriel; Brodin, Lars-Åke; Grönlund, Christer

    2011-07-01

    Tissue velocity imaging (TVI) is a Doppler based ultrasound technique that can be used to study regional deformation in skeletal muscle tissue. The aim of this study was to develop a biomechanical model to describe the TVI strain's dependency on the pennation angle. We demonstrate its impact as the subsequent strain measurement error using dynamic elbow contractions from the medial and the lateral part of biceps brachii at two different loadings; 5% and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC). The estimated pennation angles were on average about 4° in extended position and increased to a maximal of 13° in flexed elbow position. The corresponding relative angular error spread from around 7% up to around 40%. To accurately apply TVI on skeletal muscles, the error due to angle changes should be compensated for. As a suggestion, this could be done according to the presented model. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rice tissue-specific promoters and condition-dependent promoters for effective translational application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important staple food crops for more than half of the world's population. The demand is increasing for food security because of population growth and environmental challenges triggered by climate changes. This scenario has led to more interest in developing crops with greater productivity and sustainability. The process of genetic transformation, a major tool for crop improvement, utilizes promoters as one of its key elements. Those promoters are generally divided into three types: constitutive, spatiotemporal, and condition-dependent. Transcriptional control of a constitutive promoter often leads to reduced plant growth, due to a negative effect of accumulated molecules during cellular functions or energy consumption. To maximize the effect of a transgene on transgenic plants, it is better to use condition-dependent or tissue-specific promoters. However, until now, those types have not been as widely applied in crop biotechnology. In this review, we introduce and discuss four groups of tissue-specific promoters (50 promoters in total) and six groups of condition-dependent promoters (27 promoters). These promoters can be utilized to fine-tune desirable agronomic traits and develop crops with tolerance to various stresses, enhanced nutritional value, and advanced productivity. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Changes in the spinal neural circuits are dependent on the movement speed of the visuomotor task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji eKubota

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that spinal neural circuits are modulated by motor skill training. However, the effects of task movement speed on changes in spinal neural circuits have not been clarified. The aim of this research was to investigate whether spinal neural circuits were affected by task movement speed. Thirty-eight healthy subjects participated in this study. In experiment 1, the effects of task movement speed on the spinal neural circuits were examined. 18 subjects performed a visuomotor task involving ankle muscle slow (9 subjects or fast (9 subjects movement speed. Another 9 subjects performed a non-visuomotor task (controls in fast movement speed. The motor task training lasted for 20 min. The amounts of D1 inhibition and reciprocal Ia inhibition were measured using H-relfex condition-test paradigm and recorded before, and at 5, 15, and 30 min after the training session. In experiment 2, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, the effects of corticospinal descending inputs on the presynaptic inhibitory pathway were examined before and after performing either a visuomotor (8 subjects or a control task (8 subjects. All measurements were taken under resting conditions. The amount of D1 inhibition increased after the visuomotor task irrespective of movement speed (P < 0.01. The amount of reciprocal Ia inhibition increased with fast movement speed conditioning (P < 0.01, but was unchanged by slow movement speed conditioning. These changes lasted up to 15 min in D1 inhibition and 5 min in reciprocal Ia inhibition after the training session. The control task did not induce changes in D1 inhibition and reciprocal Ia inhibition. The TMS conditioned inhibitory effects of presynaptic inhibitory pathways decreased following visuomotor tasks (P < 0.01. The size of test H-reflex was almost the same size throughout experiments. The results suggest that supraspinal descending inputs for controlling joint movement are responsible for changes

  14. Neural Crest Cell Implantation Restores Enteric Nervous System Function and Alters the Gastrointestinal Transcriptome in Human Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieve, Christopher R; Fowler, Kathryn L; Thornton, Matthew; Huang, Sha; Hajjali, Ibrahim; Hou, Xiaogang; Grubbs, Brendan; Spence, Jason R; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2017-09-12

    Acquired or congenital disruption in enteric nervous system (ENS) development or function can lead to significant mechanical dysmotility. ENS restoration through cellular transplantation may provide a cure for enteric neuropathies. We have previously generated human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from human intestinal organoids (HIOs). However, HIO-TESI fails to develop an ENS. The purpose of our study is to restore ENS components derived exclusively from hPSCs in HIO-TESI. hPSC-derived enteric neural crest cell (ENCC) supplementation of HIO-TESI establishes submucosal and myenteric ganglia, repopulates various subclasses of neurons, and restores neuroepithelial connections and neuron-dependent contractility and relaxation in ENCC-HIO-TESI. RNA sequencing identified differentially expressed genes involved in neurogenesis, gliogenesis, gastrointestinal tract development, and differentiated epithelial cell types when ENS elements are restored during in vivo development of HIO-TESI. Our findings validate an effective approach to restoring hPSC-derived ENS components in HIO-TESI and may implicate their potential for the treatment of enteric neuropathies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Acute D3 Antagonist GSK598809 Selectively Enhances Neural Response During Monetary Reward Anticipation in Drug and Alcohol Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Anna; Nestor, Liam J; McGonigle, John; Paterson, Louise; Boyapati, Venkataramana; Ersche, Karen D; Flechais, Remy; Kuchibatla, Shankar; Metastasio, Antonio; Orban, Csaba; Passetti, Filippo; Reed, Laurence; Smith, Dana; Suckling, John; Taylor, Eleanor; Robbins, Trevor W; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Nutt, David J; Deakin, John Fw; Elliott, Rebecca

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that disturbances in neurobiological mechanisms of reward and inhibitory control maintain addiction and provoke relapse during abstinence. Abnormalities within the dopamine system may contribute to these disturbances and pharmacologically targeting the D3 dopamine receptor (DRD3) is therefore of significant clinical interest. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the acute effects of the DRD3 antagonist GSK598809 on anticipatory reward processing, using the monetary incentive delay task (MIDT), and response inhibition using the Go/No-Go task (GNGT). A double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover design approach was used in abstinent alcohol dependent, abstinent poly-drug dependent and healthy control volunteers. For the MIDT, there was evidence of blunted ventral striatal response to reward in the poly-drug-dependent group under placebo. GSK598809 normalized ventral striatal reward response and enhanced response in the DRD3-rich regions of the ventral pallidum and substantia nigra. Exploratory investigations suggested that the effects of GSK598809 were mainly driven by those with primary dependence on alcohol but not on opiates. Taken together, these findings suggest that GSK598809 may remediate reward deficits in substance dependence. For the GNGT, enhanced response in the inferior frontal cortex of the poly-drug group was found. However, there were no effects of GSK598809 on the neural network underlying response inhibition nor were there any behavioral drug effects on response inhibition. GSK598809 modulated the neural network underlying reward anticipation but not response inhibition, suggesting that DRD3 antagonists may restore reward deficits in addiction.

  16. Anomalous frequency-dependent ionic conductivity of lesion-laden human-brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Fallah, Aria; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2017-10-01

    We study the effect of lesions on our four-electrode measurements of the ionic conductivity of (˜1 cm3) samples of human brain excised from patients undergoing pediatric epilepsy surgery. For most (˜94%) samples, the low-frequency ionic conductivity rises upon increasing the applied frequency. We attributed this behavior to the long-range (˜0.4 mm) diffusion of solvated sodium cations before encountering intrinsic impenetrable blockages such as cell membranes, blood vessels, and cell walls. By contrast, the low-frequency ionic conductivity of some (˜6%) brain-tissue samples falls with increasing applied frequency. We attribute this unusual frequency-dependence to the electric-field induced liberation of sodium cations from traps introduced by the unusually severe pathology observed in samples from these patients. Thus, the anomalous frequency-dependence of the ionic conductivity indicates trap-producing brain lesions.

  17. The neural code for auditory space depends on sound frequency and head size in an optimal manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol S Harper

    Full Text Available A major cue to the location of a sound source is the interaural time difference (ITD-the difference in sound arrival time at the two ears. The neural representation of this auditory cue is unresolved. The classic model of ITD coding, dominant for a half-century, posits that the distribution of best ITDs (the ITD evoking a neuron's maximal response is unimodal and largely within the range of ITDs permitted by head-size. This is often interpreted as a place code for source location. An alternative model, based on neurophysiology in small mammals, posits a bimodal distribution of best ITDs with exquisite sensitivity to ITDs generated by means of relative firing rates between the distributions. Recently, an optimal-coding model was proposed, unifying the disparate features of these two models under the framework of efficient coding by neural populations. The optimal-coding model predicts that distributions of best ITDs depend on head size and sound frequency: for high frequencies and large heads it resembles the classic model, for low frequencies and small head sizes it resembles the bimodal model. The optimal-coding model makes key, yet unobserved, predictions: for many species, including humans, both forms of neural representation are employed, depending on sound frequency. Furthermore, novel representations are predicted for intermediate frequencies. Here, we examine these predictions in neurophysiological data from five mammalian species: macaque, guinea pig, cat, gerbil and kangaroo rat. We present the first evidence supporting these untested predictions, and demonstrate that different representations appear to be employed at different sound frequencies in the same species.

  18. Star poly(ethylene glycol) as a tunable scaffold for neural tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustiak, Silviya Petrova

    The primary focus of this work was to develop a novel synthetic hydrogel scaffold as an in vitro model to enable future detailed studies of how neurons grow in environments with controllable diffusion profiles of soluble cues and tunable neuronmatrix interactions. The development of in vitro models that enable elucidation of the mechanisms of system performance is a recently emerging goal of tissue engineering. The design of three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds in particular, is motivated by the need to develop model systems that better mimic native tissue as compared to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture substrates. An ideal scaffold is degradable, porous, biocompatible, with mechanical properties to match those of the tissues of interest and with a suitable surface chemistry for cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. Although naturally derived materials are more versatile in providing complex biological cues, synthetic polymers are preferable for the design of in vitro models as they provide wider range of properties, controllable degradation rates, and easier processing. Most importantly, their mechanical properties can be decoupled from their biological properties, a crucial issue in interpreting cell responses. The synthetic material provides the structural backbone of the scaffold while biochemical function is added via incorporation of ligands or proteins aimed at triggering specific cell behaviors. As presented in this dissertation, we have developed and characterized a new synthetic 3D hydrogel scaffold from cross-linked poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). PEG was selected because it is hydrophilic, non-toxic, biocompatible, and inert to protein adhesion. The chosen cross-linking chemistry was a highly specific reaction that occurred under physiological conditions so that cells could be embedded within the gel prior to cross-linking. Controllable degradability was imparted via series of hydrolytically degradable PEG cross-linkers. Thorough

  19. The effect of temperature dependent tissue parameters on acoustic radiation force induced displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suomi, Visa; Han, Yang; Konofagou, Elisa; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2016-10-01

    Multiple ultrasound elastography techniques rely on acoustic radiation force (ARF) in monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. However, ARF is dependent on tissue attenuation and sound speed, both of which are also known to change with temperature making the therapy monitoring more challenging. Furthermore, the viscoelastic properties of tissue are also temperature dependent, which affects the displacements induced by ARF. The aim of this study is to quantify the temperature dependent changes in the acoustic and viscoelastic properties of liver and investigate their effect on ARF induced displacements by using both experimental methods and simulations. Furthermore, the temperature dependent viscoelastic properties of liver are experimentally measured over a frequency range of 0.1-200 Hz at temperatures reaching 80 °C, and both conventional and fractional Zener models are used to fit the data. The fractional Zener model was found to fit better with the experimental viscoelasticity data with respect to the conventional model with up to two orders of magnitude lower sum of squared errors (SSE). The characteristics of experimental displacement data were also seen in the simulations due to the changes in attenuation coefficient and lesion development. At low temperatures before thermal ablation, attenuation was found to affect the displacement amplitude. At higher temperature, the decrease in displacement amplitude occurs approximately at 60-70 °C due to the combined effect of viscoelasticity changes and lesion growth overpowering the effect of attenuation. The results suggest that it is necessary to monitor displacement continuously during HIFU therapy in order to ascertain when ablation occurs.

  20. Modeling HMI measurement of HIFU lesion formation with temperature-dependent tissue properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draudt, Andrew B.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring tissue stiffness changes during HIFU lesion formation may be possible by measuring the motion induced by the amplitude-modulation of the HIFU beam. As a lesion forms both the stiffness and the acoustic absorption increase. Nominally the increase in tissue stiffness results in less motion, whilst the increase in acoustic absorption results in more forcing and hence more displacement. To investigate whether these two effects cancel out, a finite element model was developed which allowed the temperature dependence of absorption and shear modulus to affect the simultaneous evolution of the acoustic, thermal, and displacement fields. For the displacement the tissue surface was assumed to be in contact with water and was therefore free to move. Measurements of bovine liver and chicken breast indicated that after lesion formation attenuation increased by 200-500% and stiffness increased by 230% for chicken, and by a factor of 40 for liver. The model results showed that, until the lesion grew well outside of the focal region, the increase in attenuation dominated and the displacement increased by 30% after lesion formation. Experimental measurement of displacement vs depth in excised bovine liver and chicken breast subject to 1.1 MHz HIFU were consistent with the predictions of the model. However, sample-to-sample variation in displacement was greater than the predicted change due to lesion formation, suggesting that changes may be difficult to detect in practice. [Work supported in part by NSF through award EEC-9986821

  1. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James E. M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli. PMID:26308406

  2. Design porosity osmotic tablet for delivering low and pH-dependent soluble drug using an artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Alpesh; Mehta, Tarak; Patel, Mukesh; Patel, Kanu; Patel, Natvarlal

    2012-09-01

    In this paper formulation of porosity osmotic tablet containing isradipine (model drug) as a low and pH dependent solubility was optimized based on the simultaneous optimization technique in which an artificial neural network (ANN) was incorporated. Nonlinear relationships between the causal factors and the response variables were represented well with the response surface predicted by ANN. Three causal factors, i.e., drug, osmotic pressure promoting agent rate (Lactose: Fructose), PEG400 content in coating solution and coating weight, were evaluated based on their effects on drug release rate. In vitro dissolution profile time profiles at four different sampling times (1, 12, 20 and 24h) were chosen as output variables. Commercially available STATISTICA 7 (Stat soft, USA) was used throughout the study. The optimize values for the factors X1-X3 were 1.25:0.75, 22% and 2.5% respectively. Calculated difference (f1 = 11.19) and similarity (f2 = 70.07) factors indicate that there is no difference between predicted and experimental observed drug release profile. Artificial neural network technique can be particularly suitable in the pharmaceutical technology of controlled release dosage forms where systems are complex and nonlinear relationships between independent and dependent variables often exist.

  3. Temperature dependence of the shear modulus of soft tissues assessed by ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapin-de Brosses, E; Gennisson, J-L; Pernot, M; Fink, M; Tanter, M [Langevin Institute (CNRS UMR 7587), INSERM ERL U979, ESPCI ParisTech, 10 rue Vauquelin, 75 005 Paris (France)], E-mail: emilie.sapin@espci.fr

    2010-03-21

    Soft tissue stiffness was shown to significantly change after thermal ablation. To better understand this phenomenon, the study aims (1) to quantify and explain the temperature dependence of soft tissue stiffness for different organs, (2) to investigate the potential relationship between stiffness changes and thermal dose and (3) to study the reversibility or irreversibility of stiffness changes. Ex vivo bovine liver and muscle samples (N = 3 and N = 20, respectively) were slowly heated and cooled down into a thermally controlled saline bath. Temperatures were assessed by thermocouples. Sample stiffness (shear modulus) was provided by the quantitative supersonic shear imaging technique. Changes in liver stiffness are observed only after 45 deg. C. In contrast, between 25 deg. C and 65 deg. C, muscle stiffness varies in four successive steps that are consistent with the thermally induced proteins denaturation reported in the literature. After a 6 h long heating and cooling process, the final muscle stiffness can be either smaller or bigger than the initial one, depending on the stiffness at the end of the heating. Another important result is that stiffness changes are linked to thermal dose. Given the high sensitivity of ultrasound to protein denaturation, this study gives promising prospects for the development of ultrasound-guided HIFU systems.

  4. Dependence of rate of physical erosion on orientation and density in mineralised tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, A

    1984-01-01

    Bone, dentine and enamel samples were treated with a gas-propelled jet of an abrasive, NaHCO3, which is physically much softer than any of these tissues in their fully mineralised condition. It was nevertheless found that they are all eroded by this treatment, which can therefore be used as a new kind of qualitative test of physical properties relating to wear resistance. General correlations were found between both degree of mineralisation and between structure orientation and erosion rate, surface-parallel-feature zones being worn more rapidly. Bone domains with surface-parallel collagen were eroded faster than those with perpendicular lamellae even if they were more densely mineralised. Rates of dentine wear depended on both density and tubule orientation, with peritubular zones and better mineralised incremental layers being more resistant. Enamel tufts wear more rapidly than the surrounding well mineralised regions. Enamel diazones wear less than parazones (areas with surface parallel prisms). At the prism scale, enamel is removed more rapidly near prism boundary discontinuities and in tubular enamel, at tubule walls. As regards the common orientation dependent effects seen in these three tissues, a cohesive explanation would be that structure discontinuities can be better exploited in a wear process if they allow cleavage from the surface; which tendency will increase with parallelism to the surface.

  5. Age-Dependent Accumulation of 8-Oxoguanine in the DNA and RNA in Various Rat Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Nie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the oxidative damage of nucleic acids and aging of animals was investigated by analyzing the nucleic acids derived from various tissue specimens of naturally aged Sprague-Dawley (SD rats. For this purpose, we established an accurate and sensitive isotope-diluted LC-MS/MS method to determine the levels of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGsn in DNA and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxo-Gsn in RNA. An age-dependent increase in oxidative DNA and RNA damage was observed in the various organs examined, including the brain, liver, kidneys, and testes. Similar increases in the 8-oxo-dGsn and 8-oxo-Gsn contents were observed in three parts of the brain, the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum, among which, the values for the hippocampus were always the highest. When the oxidized guanosine metabolites were quantified with urine, a similar age-dependent increase was observed for both 8-oxo-dGsn and 8-oxo-Gsn. However, unlike the results of nucleic acid samples derived from the tissues, the amount of 8-oxo-Gsn was significantly higher compared to that of 8-oxo-dGsn, probably reflecting the fact that RNA degradation occurs more frequently than DNA degradation. Our finding indicates that the amount of urinary 8-oxo-Gsn could be considered as a biomarker for the sensitive measurement of oxidative stress and aging.

  6. An approach for tissue density classification in mammographic images using artificial neural network based on wavelet and curvelet transforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaşar, Hüseyin; Ceylan, Murat

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the types of cancer which is most commonly seen in women. Density of breast is an important indicator for the risk of cancer. In addition, densities of tissue may harden the diagnosis by hiding the abnormalities occurring on the breast. For this reason, during the process of diagnosis, the process of automatic classification of breast density has a significant importance. In this study, a new system with the base of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and multiple resolution analysis is suggested. Wavelet and curvelet analyses having the most common use have been used as multi resolution analysis. 4 pieces of statistics which are minimum value, maximum value, mean value and standard deviation have been extracted from the images which have been eluted to their sub-bands via multi resolution analysis. For the purpose of testing the success of the system, 322 pieces of images which are in MIAS database have been used. The obtained results for different backgrounds are so satisfying; and the highest classification values have been obtained as 97.16 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty background and 79.80 % with Wavelet transform and ANN for fatty-glanduar background. The same results have been obtained using Wavelet transform and ANN and Curvelet transform and ANN for dense background and accuracy rate of 84.82 % have been reached. The results of mean classification have been obtained, for three pieces of tissue types (fatty, fatty-glanduar, dense), in sequence as 84.47 % with the use of ANN, 85.71 % with the use of curvelet analysis and ANN; and 87.26 % with the use of wavelet analysis and ANN.

  7. Convolutional neural networks for an automatic classification of prostate tissue slides with high-grade Gleason score

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez del Toro, Oscar; Atzori, Manfredo; Otálora, Sebastian; Andersson, Mats; Eurén, Kristian; Hedlund, Martin; Rönnquist, Peter; Müller, Henning

    2017-03-01

    The Gleason grading system was developed for assessing prostate histopathology slides. It is correlated to the outcome and incidence of relapse in prostate cancer. Although this grading is part of a standard protocol performed by pathologists, visual inspection of whole slide images (WSIs) has an inherent subjectivity when evaluated by different pathologists. Computer aided pathology has been proposed to generate an objective and reproducible assessment that can help pathologists in their evaluation of new tissue samples. Deep convolutional neural networks are a promising approach for the automatic classification of histopathology images and can hierarchically learn subtle visual features from the data. However, a large number of manual annotations from pathologists are commonly required to obtain sufficient statistical generalization when training new models that can evaluate the daily generated large amounts of pathology data. A fully automatic approach that detects prostatectomy WSIs with high-grade Gleason score is proposed. We evaluate the performance of various deep learning architectures training them with patches extracted from automatically generated regions-of-interest rather than from manually segmented ones. Relevant parameters for training the deep learning model such as size and number of patches as well as the inclusion or not of data augmentation are compared between the tested deep learning architectures. 235 prostate tissue WSIs with their pathology report from the publicly available TCGA data set were used. An accuracy of 78% was obtained in a balanced set of 46 unseen test images with different Gleason grades in a 2-class decision: high vs. low Gleason grade. Grades 7-8, which represent the boundary decision of the proposed task, were particularly well classified. The method is scalable to larger data sets with straightforward re-training of the model to include data from multiple sources, scanners and acquisition techniques. Automatically

  8. Brightness in human rod vision depends on slow neural adaptation to quantum statistics of light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E; Rieke, Fred

    2016-11-01

    In human rod-mediated vision, threshold for small, brief flashes rises in proportion to the square root of adapting luminance at all but the lowest and highest adapting intensities. A classical signal detection theory from Rose (1942, 1948) and de Vries (1943) attributed this rise to the perceptual masking of weak flashes by Poisson fluctuations in photon absorptions from the adapting field. However, previous work by Brown and Rudd (1998) demonstrated that the square-root law also holds for suprathreshold brightness judgments, a finding that supports an alternative explanation of the square-root sensitivity changes as a consequence of physiological adaptation (i.e., neural gain control). Here, we employ a dichoptic matching technique to investigate the properties of this brightness gain control. We show that the brightness gain control: 1) affects the brightness of high-intensity suprathreshold flashes for which assumptions of the de Vries-Rose theory are strongly violated; 2) exhibits a long time course of 100-200 s; and 3) is subject to modulation by temporal contrast noise when the mean adapting luminance is held constant. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the square-root law results from a slow neural adaptation to statistical noise in the rod pool. We suggest that such adaptation may function to reduce the probability of spurious ganglion cell spiking activity due to photon fluctuation noise as the ambient illumination level is increased.

  9. Neural response in obsessive-compulsive washers depends on individual fit of triggers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eBaioui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPatients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD have highly idiosyncratic triggers. To fully understand which role this idiosyncrasy plays in the neurobiological mechanisms behind OCD, it is necessary to elucidate the impact of individualization regarding the applied investigation methods.This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study explores the neural correlates of contamination/washing-related OCD with a highly individualized symptom provocation paradigm. Additionally, it is the first study to directly compare individualized and standardized symptom provocation. MethodsNineteen patients with washing compulsions created individual OCD hierarchies, which later served as instructions to photograph their own individualized stimulus sets. The patients and 19 case-by-case matched healthy controls participated in a symptom provocation fMRI experiment with individualized and standardized stimulus sets created for each patient. ResultsOCD patients compared to healthy controls displayed stronger activation in the basal ganglia (nucleus accumbens, nucleus caudatus, pallidum for individualized symptom provocation. Using standardized symptom provocation, this group comparison led to stronger activation in the nucleus caudatus. The direct comparison of between-group effects for both symptom provocation approaches revealed stronger activation of the orbitofronto-striatal network for individualized symptom provocation.ConclusionsThe present study provides insight into the differential impact of individualized and standardized symptom provocation on the orbitofronto-striatal network of OCD washers. Behavioral and neural responses imply a higher symptom-specificity of individualized symptom provocation.

  10. Neural mechanisms underlying contextual dependency of subjective values: converging evidence from monkeys and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitbol, Raphaëlle; Lebreton, Maël; Hollard, Guillaume; Richmond, Barry J; Bouret, Sébastien; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2015-02-04

    A major challenge for decision theory is to account for the instability of expressed preferences across time and context. Such variability could arise from specific properties of the brain system used to assign subjective values. Growing evidence has identified the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) as a key node of the human brain valuation system. Here, we first replicate this observation with an fMRI study in humans showing that subjective values of painting pictures, as expressed in explicit pleasantness ratings, are specifically encoded in the VMPFC. We then establish a bridge with monkey electrophysiology, by comparing single-unit activity evoked by visual cues between the VMPFC and the orbitofrontal cortex. At the neural population level, expected reward magnitude was only encoded in the VMPFC, which also reflected subjective cue values, as expressed in Pavlovian appetitive responses. In addition, we demonstrate in both species that the additive effect of prestimulus activity on evoked activity has a significant impact on subjective values. In monkeys, the factor dominating prestimulus VMPFC activity was trial number, which likely indexed variations in internal dispositions related to fatigue or satiety. In humans, prestimulus VMPFC activity was externally manipulated through changes in the musical context, which induced a systematic bias in subjective values. Thus, the apparent stochasticity of preferences might relate to the VMPFC automatically aggregating the values of contextual features, which would bias subsequent valuation because of temporal autocorrelation in neural activity. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352308-13$15.00/0.

  11. Neural basis of stimulus-angle-dependent motor control of wind-elicited walking behavior in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momoko Oe

    Full Text Available Crickets exhibit oriented walking behavior in response to air-current stimuli. Because crickets move in the opposite direction from the stimulus source, this behavior is considered to represent 'escape behavior' from an approaching predator. However, details of the stimulus-angle-dependent control of locomotion during the immediate phase, and the neural basis underlying the directional motor control of this behavior remain unclear. In this study, we used a spherical-treadmill system to measure locomotory parameters including trajectory, turn angle and velocity during the immediate phase of responses to air-puff stimuli applied from various angles. Both walking direction and turn angle were correlated with stimulus angle, but their relationships followed different rules. A shorter stimulus also induced directionally-controlled walking, but reduced the yaw rotation in stimulus-angle-dependent turning. These results suggest that neural control of the turn angle requires different sensory information than that required for oriented walking. Hemi-severance of the ventral nerve cords containing descending axons from the cephalic to the prothoracic ganglion abolished stimulus-angle-dependent control, indicating that this control required descending signals from the brain. Furthermore, we selectively ablated identified ascending giant interneurons (GIs in vivo to examine their functional roles in wind-elicited walking. Ablation of GI8-1 diminished control of the turn angle and decreased walking distance in the initial response. Meanwhile, GI9-1b ablation had no discernible effect on stimulus-angle-dependent control or walking distance, but delayed the reaction time. These results suggest that the ascending signals conveyed by GI8-1 are required for turn-angle control and maintenance of walking behavior, and that GI9-1b is responsible for rapid initiation of walking. It is possible that individual types of GIs separately supply the sensory signals

  12. A reduction in DNA damage in neural tissue and peripheral blood of old mice treated with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Garcez, Michelle Lima; Letieli de Abreu, Larissa; Tavares, Taís Helena; Rodrigues Boeck, Carina; Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Studies on caffeine consumption have shown a negative correlation with development of some diseases with subsequent beneficial manifestations. Our aim was to assess the effects of caffeine on peripheral blood and neural tissue DNA in young adult and aged mice. Male Swiss mice (age 2-3 or 16-18 months, respectively) were treated with a caffeine solution (0.3 g/l) for 4 weeks, while controls received water. After the treatments, blood and hippocampal cells (for a comet assay) and femurs (for a micronucleus [MN] test) were collected. The comet assay of peripheral blood and hippocampal cells demonstrated no significant differences between caffeine-treated and control young adult mice in terms of DNA damage index (DI) and frequency. In contrast, when comparing young adult with aged animals, significant differences were observed in DNA damage in blood and hippocampal cells. The differences between aged animals (with or without caffeine) consisted of a significant decrease in DNA DI in the group that received caffeine. In the MN test, an increase in frequency of micronucleated polychromatic (PCE) erythrocytes was noted in aged animals that received water compared to young adult mice. In addition, comparing treated with control aged murine groups, a decrease in frequency of MN was found in PCE erythrocytes of caffeine-treated mice. Chronic caffeine consumption was neither genotoxic nor mutagenic at the dose tested; however, it appears that caffeine actually protected mice from genotoxicity and mutagenicity, consequences attributed to aging.

  13. Neural restrictive silencer factor and choline acetyltransferase expression in cerebral tissue of Alzheimer’s Disease patients: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castañeda, Rocío E.; Sánchez-González, Víctor J.; Flores-Soto, Mario; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Macías-Islas, Miguel A.; Ortiz, Genaro G.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased Choline Acetyltransferase (ChAT) brain level is one of the main biochemical disorders in Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). In rodents, recent data show that the CHAT gene can be regulated by a neural restrictive silencer factor (NRSF). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the gene and protein expression of CHAT and NRSF in frontal, temporal, entorhinal and parietal cortices of AD patient brains. Four brains from patients with AD and four brains from subjects without dementia were studied. Cerebral tissues were obtained and processed by the guanidine isothiocyanate method for RNA extraction. CHAT and NRSF gene and protein expression were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. CHAT gene expression levels were 39% lower in AD patients as compared to the control group (p 0.05, U test) than in the control subjects. These findings suggest for the first time that in the brain of AD patients high NRSF protein levels are related to low CHAT gene expression levels. PMID:23569405

  14. Development of a Multi-Functional Biopolymer Scaffold for Neural Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nicola Louise

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects approximately 270,000 people in the U.S., with approximately 12,000 new cases occurring every year. Several strategies have been investigated to enhance axonal regeneration after SCI, however, the resulting growth can be random and disorganized. Bioengineered scaffolds provide a physical substrate for the guidance of regenerating axons towards their targets, and can be produced by freeze casting. This technique involves the controlled directional solidification of an aqueous solution or suspension, resulting in a linearly aligned porous structure caused by ice templating. In this thesis, freeze casting was used to create novel porous chitosan-alginate (C/A) scaffolds with longitudinally aligned channels and a compressive modulus (5.08 ± 0.61 kPa) comparable to that of native spinal cord tissue. These C/A scaffolds supported the viability, attachment, and directionally oriented growth of chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurites in vitro, with surface adsorptions of polycations and laminin promoting significantly longer neurite growth than the uncoated scaffolds (pvitro, while chABC was released for up to 35 days. However, up to 85% of biomolecules emained entrapped within the scaffold walls, due to limitation of diffusion by the scaffold wall mesh size. Release of bioactive chABC and neurotrophins from the multifunctional scaffolds promoted the growth of DRG neurites through an in vitro barrier of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, a main inhibitory component of the growth-inhibiting glial scar in the injured spinal cord. The present data suggest these multi-functional scaffolds are suitable for use and future testing in vivo as a combination strategy for spinal cord repair due to their ability to promote the directionally oriented growth of neurites and their ability to provide the sustained release of therapeutic bioactive molecules for the stimulation of axonal growth through the glial scar.

  15. 25-Hydroxycholesterol promotes fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling through NF-κB dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tomohiro [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-8509 (Japan); Sugiura, Hisatoshi, E-mail: sugiura@rm.med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan); Koarai, Akira; Kikuchi, Takashi; Hiramatsu, Masataka; Kawabata, Hiroki; Akamatsu, Keiichiro; Hirano, Tsunahiko; Nakanishi, Masanori; Matsunaga, Kazuto; Minakata, Yoshiaki [Third Department of Internal Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama 641-8509 (Japan); Ichinose, Masakazu [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8574 (Japan)

    2013-05-01

    Abnormal structural alterations termed remodeling, including fibrosis and alveolar wall destruction, are important features of the pathophysiology of chronic airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. 25-hydroxycholesterol (25-HC) is enzymatically produced by cholesterol 25-hydorxylase (CH25H) in macrophages and is reported to be involved in the formation of arteriosclerosis. We previously demonstrated that the expression of CH25H and production of 25HC were increased in the lungs of COPD. However, the role of 25-HC in lung tissue remodeling is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of 25-HC on fibroblast-mediated tissue remodeling using human fetal lung fibroblasts (HFL-1) in vitro. 25-HC significantly augmented α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) (P<0.001) and collagen I (P<0.001) expression in HFL-1. 25-HC also significantly enhanced the release and activation of matrix metallaoproteinase (MMP)-2 (P<0.001) and MMP-9 (P<0.001) without any significant effect on the production of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 and TIMP-2. 25-HC stimulated transforming growth factor (TGF)-β{sub 1} production (P<0.01) and a neutralizing anti-TGF-β antibody restored these 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses. 25-HC significantly promoted the translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 into the nuclei (P<0.01), but not phospholylated-c-jun, a complex of activator protein-1. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB restored the 25-HC-augmented pro-fibrotic responses and TGF-β{sub 1} release. These results suggest that 25-HC could contribute to fibroblast-mediated lung tissue remodeling by promoting myofibroblast differentiation and the excessive release of extracellular matrix protein and MMPs via an NF-κB-TGF-β dependent pathway.

  16. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  17. Antagonistic Serotonergic and Octopaminergic Neural Circuits Mediate Food-Dependent Locomotory Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgin, Matthew A; McCloskey, Richard J; Peters, Emily; Fang-Yen, Christopher

    2017-08-16

    Biogenic amines are conserved signaling molecules that link food cues to behavior and metabolism in a wide variety of organisms. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the biogenic amines serotonin (5-HT) and octopamine regulate a number of food-related behaviors. Using a novel method for long-term quantitative behavioral imaging, we show that 5-HT and octopamine jointly influence locomotor activity and quiescence in feeding and fasting hermaphrodites, and we define the neural circuits through which this modulation occurs. We show that 5-HT produced by the ADF neurons acts via the SER-5 receptor in muscles and neurons to suppress quiescent behavior and promote roaming in fasting worms, whereas 5-HT produced by the NSM neurons acts on the MOD-1 receptor in AIY neurons to promote low-amplitude locomotor behavior characteristic of well fed animals. Octopamine, produced by the RIC neurons, acts via SER-3 and SER-6 receptors in SIA neurons to promote roaming behaviors characteristic of fasting animals. We find that 5-HT signaling is required for animals to assume food-appropriate behavior, whereas octopamine signaling is required for animals to assume fasting-appropriate behavior. The requirement for both neurotransmitters in both the feeding and fasting states enables increased behavioral adaptability. Our results define the molecular and neural pathways through which parallel biogenic amine signaling tunes behavior appropriately to nutrient conditions.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animals adjust behavior in response to environmental changes, such as fluctuations in food abundance, to maximize survival and reproduction. Biogenic amines, such as like serotonin, are conserved neurotransmitters that regulate behavior and metabolism in relation to energy status. Disruptions of biogenic amine signaling contribute to human neurological diseases of mood, appetite, and movement. In this study, we investigated the roles of the biogenic amines serotonin and octopamine in regulating

  18. Bone tissue stiffness in the mandibular condyle is dependent on the direction and density of the cancellous structure.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijden, T.M. van; Ruijven, L.J. van; Giesen, E.B.W.

    2004-01-01

    Variation in the apparent stiffness of cancellous bone is generally ascribed to variation in cancellous structure and density, while the bone tissue stiffness is assumed to be constant. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the bone tissue stiffness is dependent on the direction

  19. Neural Architecture of Hunger-Dependent Multisensory Decision Making in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, D Dipon; Sanders, Tom; Hong, Soonwook; McCurdy, Li Yan; Chase, Daniel L; Cohen, Netta; Koelle, Michael R; Nitabach, Michael N

    2016-12-07

    Little is known about how animals integrate multiple sensory inputs in natural environments to balance avoidance of danger with approach to things of value. Furthermore, the mechanistic link between internal physiological state and threat-reward decision making remains poorly understood. Here we confronted C. elegans worms with the decision whether to cross a hyperosmotic barrier presenting the threat of desiccation to reach a source of food odor. We identified a specific interneuron that controls this decision via top-down extrasynaptic aminergic potentiation of the primary osmosensory neurons to increase their sensitivity to the barrier. We also establish that food deprivation increases the worm's willingness to cross the dangerous barrier by suppressing this pathway. These studies reveal a potentially general neural circuit architecture for internal state control of threat-reward decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neural evidence for description dependent reward processing in the framing effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun eYu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human decision making can be influenced by emotionally valenced contexts, known as the framing effect. We used event-related brain potentials to investigate how framing influences the encoding of reward. We found that the feedback related negativity (FRN, which indexes the worse than expected negative prediction error in the anterior cingulate cortex, was more negative for the negative frame than for the positive frame in the win domain. Consistent with previous findings that the FRN is not sensitive to better than expected positive prediction error, the FRN did not differentiate the positive and negative frame in the loss domain. Our results provide neural evidence that the description invariance principle which states that reward representation and decision making are not influenced by how options are presented is violated in the framing effect.

  1. Multisensory Bayesian Inference Depends on Synapse Maturation during Training: Theoretical Analysis and Neural Modeling Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursino, Mauro; Cuppini, Cristiano; Magosso, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that in multisensory conditions, the brain performs a near-optimal Bayesian estimate of external events, giving more weight to the more reliable stimuli. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for this behavior, and its progressive maturation in a multisensory environment, are still insufficiently understood. The aim of this letter is to analyze this problem with a neural network model of audiovisual integration, based on probabilistic population coding-the idea that a population of neurons can encode probability functions to perform Bayesian inference. The model consists of two chains of unisensory neurons (auditory and visual) topologically organized. They receive the corresponding input through a plastic receptive field and reciprocally exchange plastic cross-modal synapses, which encode the spatial co-occurrence of visual-auditory inputs. A third chain of multisensory neurons performs a simple sum of auditory and visual excitations. The work includes a theoretical part and a computer simulation study. We show how a simple rule for synapse learning (consisting of Hebbian reinforcement and a decay term) can be used during training to shrink the receptive fields and encode the unisensory likelihood functions. Hence, after training, each unisensory area realizes a maximum likelihood estimate of stimulus position (auditory or visual). In cross-modal conditions, the same learning rule can encode information on prior probability into the cross-modal synapses. Computer simulations confirm the theoretical results and show that the proposed network can realize a maximum likelihood estimate of auditory (or visual) positions in unimodal conditions and a Bayesian estimate, with moderate deviations from optimality, in cross-modal conditions. Furthermore, the model explains the ventriloquism illusion and, looking at the activity in the multimodal neurons, explains the automatic reweighting of auditory and visual inputs

  2. Uncertainty-Dependent Extinction of Fear Memory in an Amygdala-mPFC Neural Circuit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhe; Nakae, Ken; Ishii, Shin; Naoki, Honda

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty of fear conditioning is crucial for the acquisition and extinction of fear memory. Fear memory acquired through partial pairings of a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) is more resistant to extinction than that acquired through full pairings; this effect is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). Although the PREE has been explained by psychological theories, the neural mechanisms underlying the PREE remain largely unclear. Here, we developed a neural circuit model based on three distinct types of neurons (fear, persistent and extinction neurons) in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In the model, the fear, persistent and extinction neurons encode predictions of net severity, of unconditioned stimulus (US) intensity, and of net safety, respectively. Our simulation successfully reproduces the PREE. We revealed that unpredictability of the US during extinction was represented by the combined responses of the three types of neurons, which are critical for the PREE. In addition, we extended the model to include amygdala subregions and the mPFC to address a recent finding that the ventral mPFC (vmPFC) is required for consolidating extinction memory but not for memory retrieval. Furthermore, model simulations led us to propose a novel procedure to enhance extinction learning through re-conditioning with a stronger US; strengthened fear memory up-regulates the extinction neuron, which, in turn, further inhibits the fear neuron during re-extinction. Thus, our models increased the understanding of the functional roles of the amygdala and vmPFC in the processing of uncertainty in fear conditioning and extinction. PMID:27617747

  3. Effects of Modafinil on Neural Correlates of Response Inhibition in Alcohol-Dependent Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Joos, L.; Koeleman, M.; Veltman, D.J.; van den Brink, W.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Impaired response inhibition is a key feature of patients with alcohol dependence. Improving impulse control is a promising target for the treatment of alcohol dependence. The pharmacologic agent modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in both healthy subjects and in patients with

  4. Effects of modafinil on neural correlates of response inhibition in alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, Lianne; Joos, Leen; Koeleman, Marte; Veltman, Dick J.; van den Brink, Wim; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2013-01-01

    Impaired response inhibition is a key feature of patients with alcohol dependence. Improving impulse control is a promising target for the treatment of alcohol dependence. The pharmacologic agent modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in both healthy subjects and in patients with various

  5. A novel culture method reveals unique neural stem/progenitors in mature porcine iris tissues that differentiate into neuronal and rod photoreceptor-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, Lars N; Lea, Daniel; Matsushita, Tamami; Takeda, Taka-Aki; Taketani, Shigeru; Araki, Masasuke

    2017-11-15

    Iris neural stem/progenitor cells from mature porcine eyes were investigated using a new protocol for tissue culture, which consists of dispase treatment and Matrigel embedding. We used a number of culture conditions and found an intense differentiation of neuronal cells from both the iris pigmented epithelial (IPE) cells and the stroma tissue cells. Rod photoreceptor-like cells were also observed but mostly in a later stage of culture. Neuronal differentiation does not require any additives such as fetal bovine serum or FGF2, although FGF2 and IGF2 appeared to promote neural differentiation in the IPE cultures. Furthermore, the stroma-derived cells were able to be maintained in vitro indefinitely. The evolutionary similarity between humans and domestic pigs highlight the potential for this methodology in the modeling of human diseases and characterizing human ocular stem cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of a Treatment Involving Soft Tissue Techniques and/or Neural Mobilization Techniques in the Management of Tension-Type Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Velasco-Roldán, Olga; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Jesús; Llabrés-Bennasar, Bartomeu; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of a protocol involving soft tissue techniques and/or neural mobilization techniques in the management of patients with frequent episodic tension-type headache (FETTH) and those with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled before and after trial. Rehabilitation area of the local hospital and a private physiotherapy center. Patients (N=97; 78 women, 19 men) diagnosed with FETTH or CTTH were randomly assigned to groups A, B, C, or D. (A) Placebo superficial massage; (B) soft tissue techniques; (C) neural mobilization techniques; (D) a combination of soft tissue and neural mobilization techniques. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the temporal muscles (points 1 and 2) and supraorbital region (point 3), the frequency and maximal intensity of pain crisis, and the score in the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) were evaluated. All variables were assessed before the intervention, at the end of the intervention, and 15 and 30 days after the intervention. Groups B, C, and D had an increase in PPT and a reduction in frequency, maximal intensity, and HIT-6 values in all time points after the intervention as compared with baseline and group A (P<.001 for all cases). Group D had the highest PPT values and the lowest frequency and HIT-6 values after the intervention. The application of soft tissue and neural mobilization techniques to patients with FETTH or CTTH induces significant changes in PPT, the characteristics of pain crisis, and its effect on activities of daily living as compared with the application of these techniques as isolated interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Histological characterization and quantification of cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healty and demyelinated CNS tissue

    OpenAIRE

    Praet, J.; SANTERMANS, Eva; Reekmans, K.; de Vocht, N.; Le Blon, D.; Hoornaert, C.; Daans, J.; Goossens, H.; Berneman, Z.; HENS, Niel; Van der Linden, A.; Ponsaerts, P.

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies involving intracerebral (stem) cell grafting are gaining popularity in many laboratories due to the reported beneficial effects of cell grafting on various diseases or traumata of the central nervous system (CNS). In this chapter, we describe a histological workflow to characterize and quantify cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue. First, we provide standardized protocols to isolate and cult...

  8. Natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior due to a cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Dawson-Scully

    Full Text Available Although it is acknowledged that genetic variation contributes to individual differences in thermotolerance, the specific genes and pathways involved and how they are modulated by the environment remain poorly understood. We link natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster to the foraging gene (for, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG as well as to its downstream target, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations revealed that reduced PKG (or PP2A activity caused increased thermotolerance of synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction. Like synaptic transmission, feeding movements were preserved at higher temperatures in larvae with lower PKG levels. In a comparative assay, pharmacological manipulations altering thermotolerance in a central circuit of Locusta migratoria demonstrated conservation of this neuroprotective pathway. In this circuit, either the inhibition of PKG or PP2A induced robust thermotolerance of neural function. We suggest that PKG and therefore the polymorphism associated with the allelic variation in for may provide populations with natural variation in heat stress tolerance. for's function in behavior is conserved across most organisms, including ants, bees, nematodes, and mammals. PKG's role in thermotolerance may also apply to these and other species. Natural variation in thermotolerance arising from genes involved in the PKG pathway could impact the evolution of thermotolerance in natural populations.

  9. Tissue- and stage-dependent dosage compensation on the Neo-X chromosome in drosophila pseudoobscura

    KAUST Repository

    Nozawa, Masafumi

    2013-12-03

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation (DC) is widely accepted in various organisms. This concept is mostly supported by comparisons of gene expression between chromosomes and between sexes. However, genes on the X chromosome and autosomes are mostly not homologous, and the average gene expression level on these chromosomes may not be the same even under DC, which complicates comparisons between chromosomes. Many genes with sex-biased expression also make comparisons between sexes difficult. To overcome these issues, we investigated DC by comparing the expression of neo-X-linked genes in Drosophila pseudoobscura with those of their autosomal orthologs in other Drosophila species. The ratio of the former to the latter in males would be 1 under DC, whereas it becomes 0.5 without DC. We found that the ratio was ∼0.85 for adult whole bodies, indicating that the DC is incomplete on the neo-X chromosome in adults as a whole. The ratio (∼0.90) was also significantly less than 1 for adult bodies without gonads, whereas it was ∼1.0 for adult heads. These results indicate that DC varies among tissues. Our sliding-window analysis of the ratio also revealed that the upregulation of neo-X-linked genes in males occurred chromosome wide in all tissues analyzed, indicating global upregulation mechanisms. However, we found that gene functions also affected the levels of DC. Furthermore, most of the genes recently moved to the X were already under DC at the larval stage but not at the adult stage. These results suggest that DC in Drosophila species operates in a tissue/stage-dependent manner. © 2013 The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved.

  10. Tissue distribution, gender- and genotype-dependent expression of autophagy-related genes in avian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa Piekarski

    Full Text Available As a result of the genetic selection of broiler (meat-type breeders chickens for enhanced growth rate and lower feed conversion ratio, it has become necessary to restrict feed intake. When broilers are fed ad libitum, they would become obese and suffer from several health-related problems. A vital adaptation to starvation is autophagy, a self-eating mechanism for recycling cellular constituents. The autophagy pathway has witnessed dramatic growth in the last few years and extensively studied in yeast and mammals however, there is a paucity of information in avian (non-mammalian species. Here we characterized several genes involved in autophagosome initiation and elongation in Red Jungle fowl (Gallus gallus and Japanese quail (coturnix coturnix Japonica. Both complexes are ubiquitously expressed in chicken and quail tissues (liver, leg and breast muscle, brain, gizzard, intestine, heart, lung, kidney, adipose tissue, ovary and testis. Alignment analysis showed high similarity (50.7 to 91.5% between chicken autophagy-related genes and their mammalian orthologs. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the evolutionary relationship between autophagy genes is consistent with the consensus view of vertebrate evolution. Interestingly, the expression of autophagy-related genes is tissue- and gender-dependent. Furthermore, using two experimental male quail lines divergently selected over 40 generations for low (resistant, R or high (sensitive, S stress response, we found that the expression of most studied genes are higher in R compared to S line. Together our results indicate that the autophagy pathway is a key molecular signature exhibited gender specific differences and likely plays an important role in response to stress in avian species.

  11. Nutrient-Dependent Endocycling in Steroidogenic Tissue Dictates Timing of Metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohhara, Yuya; Kobayashi, Satoru; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    Many animals have an intrinsic growth checkpoint during juvenile development, after which an irreversible decision is made to upregulate steroidogenesis, triggering the metamorphic juvenile-to-adult transition. However, a molecular process underlying such a critical developmental decision remains obscure. Here we show that nutrient-dependent endocycling in steroidogenic cells provides the machinery necessary for irreversible activation of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Endocycle progression in cells of the prothoracic gland (PG) is tightly coupled with the growth checkpoint, and block of endocycle in PG cells causes larval developmental arrest due to reduction in biosynthesis of the steroid hormone ecdysone. Moreover, inhibition of the nutrient sensor target of rapamycin (TOR) in the PG during the checkpoint period causes endocycle inhibition and developmental arrest, which can be rescued by inducing additional rounds of endocycles by Cyclin E. We propose that a TOR-mediated cell cycle checkpoint in steroidogenic tissue provides a systemic growth checkpoint for reproductive maturation.

  12. Nutrient-Dependent Endocycling in Steroidogenic Tissue Dictates Timing of Metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuya Ohhara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Many animals have an intrinsic growth checkpoint during juvenile development, after which an irreversible decision is made to upregulate steroidogenesis, triggering the metamorphic juvenile-to-adult transition. However, a molecular process underlying such a critical developmental decision remains obscure. Here we show that nutrient-dependent endocycling in steroidogenic cells provides the machinery necessary for irreversible activation of metamorphosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Endocycle progression in cells of the prothoracic gland (PG is tightly coupled with the growth checkpoint, and block of endocycle in PG cells causes larval developmental arrest due to reduction in biosynthesis of the steroid hormone ecdysone. Moreover, inhibition of the nutrient sensor target of rapamycin (TOR in the PG during the checkpoint period causes endocycle inhibition and developmental arrest, which can be rescued by inducing additional rounds of endocycles by Cyclin E. We propose that a TOR-mediated cell cycle checkpoint in steroidogenic tissue provides a systemic growth checkpoint for reproductive maturation.

  13. Dependence of Brown Adipose Tissue Function on CD36-Mediated Coenzyme Q Uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney M. Anderson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT possesses the inherent ability to dissipate metabolic energy as heat through uncoupled mitochondrial respiration. An essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain is coenzyme Q (CoQ. While cells synthesize CoQ mostly endogenously, exogenous supplementation with CoQ has been successful as a therapy for patients with CoQ deficiency. However, which tissues depend on exogenous CoQ uptake as well as the mechanism by which CoQ is taken up by cells and the role of this process in BAT function are not well understood. Here, we report that the scavenger receptor CD36 drives the uptake of CoQ by BAT and is required for normal BAT function. BAT from mice lacking CD36 displays CoQ deficiency, impaired CoQ uptake, hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction, and defective nonshivering thermogenesis. Together, these data reveal an important new role for the systemic transport of CoQ to BAT and its function in thermogenesis.

  14. IFNγ-Dependent Tissue-Immune Homeostasis Is Co-opted in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirschl, Christopher J; Suárez-Fariñas, Mayte; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay; Dannenfelser, Ruth; Tirosh, Itay; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Qian; Devi, K Sanjana P; Carroll, Shaina L; Chau, David; Rezaee, Melika; Kim, Tae-Gyun; Huang, Ruiqi; Fuentes-Duculan, Judilyn; Song-Zhao, George X; Gulati, Nicholas; Lowes, Michelle A; King, Sandra L; Quintana, Francisco J; Lee, Young-Suk; Krueger, James G; Sarin, Kavita Y; Yoon, Charles H; Garraway, Levi; Regev, Aviv; Shalek, Alex K; Troyanskaya, Olga; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana

    2017-06-29

    Homeostatic programs balance immune protection and self-tolerance. Such mechanisms likely impact autoimmunity and tumor formation, respectively. How homeostasis is maintained and impacts tumor surveillance is unknown. Here, we find that different immune mononuclear phagocytes share a conserved steady-state program during differentiation and entry into healthy tissue. IFNγ is necessary and sufficient to induce this program, revealing a key instructive role. Remarkably, homeostatic and IFNγ-dependent programs enrich across primary human tumors, including melanoma, and stratify survival. Single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) reveals enrichment of homeostatic modules in monocytes and DCs from human metastatic melanoma. Suppressor-of-cytokine-2 (SOCS2) protein, a conserved program transcript, is expressed by mononuclear phagocytes infiltrating primary melanoma and is induced by IFNγ. SOCS2 limits adaptive anti-tumoral immunity and DC-based priming of T cells in vivo, indicating a critical regulatory role. These findings link immune homeostasis to key determinants of anti-tumoral immunity and escape, revealing co-opting of tissue-specific immune development in the tumor microenvironment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptomic gene profiling of porcine muscle tissue depending on histological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna; Bereta, Anna; Żukowski, Kacper; Piórkowska, Katarzyna; Gurgul, Artur; Żak, Grzegorz

    2017-08-01

    In pig, the histological profile of muscle tissue, especially the proportion of individual fiber types, is one of the main factors affecting meat quality properties. In the present research, RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) by using next generation sequencing method was applied to estimate the whole gene expression profile of Longissimus lumborum muscle of pigs (Large White breed) differing in the percentage of two fiber types (slow-twitch (type I) fibers and fast-twitch glycolytic (type IIB) fibers). The RNA-seq approach allowed us to identify 355 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) indicated as significant (false discovery rate-adjusted P < 0.05) using three types of software: DESeq2, edgeR and baySeq. Detected genes and pathways deregulated in muscle depending on tissue microstructure were associated with: metabolic processes - 158 genes; cellular processes - 122; biological regulation - 62; localization - 51; and 35 genes with developmental processes. The DEGs were included in: PI3K-Akt; FoxO and MAPK signaling pathways, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, lysine degradation and insulin signaling pathway as well as mTOR and Hippo signaling pathways. These results highlight the mainly metabolic pathways related to glucose metabolism and contraction processes of muscle cells. Detection of genes involved in variation of fiber-type distribution will be useful in understanding of the genetic factors affecting muscle structure, metabolic process and indirectly, meat quality traits. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Body mass index is associated with region-dependent metabolic reprogramming of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marco G; Moreira, Ângela; Guimarães, Marta; Nora, Mário; Sousa, Mario; Oliveira, Pedro F; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2017-12-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) is involved in dysmetabolism pathogenesis. Regional fat distribution and functioning may contribute to obesity-related metabolic disorders and adverse health outcomes. Specific fat depots are suggested to possess unique biological properties, but specific metabolic profiles of subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) remain unknown. We aimed to characterize VAT and SAT glucose metabolism, and their correlation with body mass index (BMI). AT samples from patients (n = 12; F:M, 9:3) with a mean age of 46 years (26-83 years) and an average BMI of 29.6 kg/m(2) (18-37 kg/m(2)) were used. VAT and SAT explants were obtained during elective laparoscopy, either cholecystectomy for uncomplicated cholelithiasis or gastric bypass for severe obesity. Explants were placed in insulin-free cell culture media and their metabolic profile was established by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. AT explants display a glucose and pyruvate consumption and acetate production that is region-dependent according to the patients BMI. In VAT, glucose consumption was positively correlated with BMI, while alanine and lactate production were negatively correlated with BMI, whereas in SAT the patients BMI did not affect AT secretome suggesting that increased BMI promotes a metabolic reprogramming of VAT towards de novo lipogenesis. This region-dependent metabolic reprogramming of AT associated with BMI was autonomous of insulin. This data, although preliminary, suggests that there is a BMI-related remodeling of glucose metabolism in VAT. Targeting this BMI-induced metabolic shift may represent a potential target to counteract unwanted consequences derived from visceral adiposity.

  17. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants.

  18. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Goudriaan, A.E.; Joos, L.; Dom, G.; Pattij, T.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control

  19. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Goudriaan, A. E.; Joos, L.; Dom, G.; Pattij, T.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in

  20. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  1. Effects of bursting dynamic features on the generation of multi-clustered structure of neural network with symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning rule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui; Song, Yongduan; Xue, Fangzheng; Li, Xiumin, E-mail: xmli@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Dependable Service Computing in Cyber Physical Society of Ministry of Education, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); College of Automation, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, the generation of multi-clustered structure of self-organized neural network with different neuronal firing patterns, i.e., bursting or spiking, has been investigated. The initially all-to-all-connected spiking neural network or bursting neural network can be self-organized into clustered structure through the symmetric spike-timing-dependent plasticity learning for both bursting and spiking neurons. However, the time consumption of this clustering procedure of the burst-based self-organized neural network (BSON) is much shorter than the spike-based self-organized neural network (SSON). Our results show that the BSON network has more obvious small-world properties, i.e., higher clustering coefficient and smaller shortest path length than the SSON network. Also, the results of larger structure entropy and activity entropy of the BSON network demonstrate that this network has higher topological complexity and dynamical diversity, which benefits for enhancing information transmission of neural circuits. Hence, we conclude that the burst firing can significantly enhance the efficiency of clustering procedure and the emergent clustered structure renders the whole network more synchronous and therefore more sensitive to weak input. This result is further confirmed from its improved performance on stochastic resonance. Therefore, we believe that the multi-clustered neural network which self-organized from the bursting dynamics has high efficiency in information processing.

  2. Neural responses to unfairness and fairness depend on self-contribution to the income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiuyan; Zheng, Li; Cheng, Xuemei; Chen, Menghe; Li, Jianqi; Chen, Luguang; Yang, Zhiliang

    2014-01-01

    Self-contribution to the income (individual achievement) was an important factor which needs to be taken into individual’s fairness considerations. This study aimed at elucidating the modulation of self-contribution to the income, on recipient’s responses to unfairness in the Ultimatum Game. Eighteen participants were scanned while they were playing an adapted version of the Ultimatum Game as responders. Before splitting money, the proposer and the participant (responder) played the ball-guessing game. The responder’s contribution to the income was manipulated by both the participant’s and the proposer’s accuracy in the ball-guessing game. It turned out that the participants more often rejected unfair offers and gave lower fairness ratings when they played a more important part in the earnings. At the neural level, anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction showed greater activities to unfairness when self-contribution increased, whereas ventral striatum and medial orbitofrontal gyrus showed higher activations to fair (vs unfair) offers in the other-contributed condition relative to the other two. Besides, the activations of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during unfair offers showed positive correlation with rejection rates in the self-contributed condition. These findings shed light on the significance of self-contribution in fairness-related social decision-making processes. PMID:23946001

  3. Chymase-dependent generation of angiotensin II from angiotensin-(1-12 in human atrial tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Since angiotensin-(1-12 [Ang-(1-12] is a non-renin dependent alternate precursor for the generation of cardiac Ang peptides in rat tissue, we investigated the metabolism of Ang-(1-12 by plasma membranes (PM isolated from human atrial appendage tissue from nine patients undergoing cardiac surgery for primary control of atrial fibrillation (MAZE surgical procedure. PM was incubated with highly purified ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 at 37°C for 1 h with or without renin-angiotensin system (RAS inhibitors [lisinopril for angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, SCH39370 for neprilysin (NEP, MLN-4760 for ACE2 and chymostatin for chymase; 50 µM each]. ¹²⁵I-Ang peptide fractions were identified by HPLC coupled to an inline γ-detector. In the absence of all RAS inhibitor, ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 was converted into Ang I (2±2%, Ang II (69±21%, Ang-(1-7 (5±2%, and Ang-(1-4 (2±1%. In the absence of all RAS inhibitor, only 22±10% of ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 was unmetabolized, whereas, in the presence of the all RAS inhibitors, 98±7% of ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 remained intact. The relative contribution of selective inhibition of ACE and chymase enzyme showed that ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 was primarily converted into Ang II (65±18% by chymase while its hydrolysis into Ang II by ACE was significantly lower or undetectable. The activity of individual enzyme was calculated based on the amount of Ang II formation. These results showed very high chymase-mediated Ang II formation (28±3.1 fmol × min⁻¹ × mg⁻¹, n = 9 from ¹²⁵I-Ang-(1-12 and very low or undetectable Ang II formation by ACE (1.1±0.2 fmol×min⁻¹ × mg⁻¹. Paralleling these findings, these tissues showed significant content of chymase protein that by immunocytochemistry were primarily localized in atrial cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time in human cardiac tissue a dominant role of cardiac chymase in the formation of Ang II from Ang-(1-12.

  4. Anatomically Inspired Three-dimensional Micro-tissue Engineered Neural Networks for Nervous System Reconstruction, Modulation, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struzyna, Laura A; Adewole, Dayo O; Gordián-Vélez, Wisberty J; Grovola, Michael R; Burrell, Justin C; Katiyar, Kritika S; Petrov, Dmitriy; Harris, James P; Cullen, D Kacy

    2017-05-31

    Functional recovery rarely occurs following injury or disease-induced degeneration within the central nervous system (CNS) due to the inhibitory environment and the limited capacity for neurogenesis. We are developing a strategy to simultaneously address neuronal and axonal pathway loss within the damaged CNS. This manuscript presents the fabrication protocol for micro-tissue engineered neural networks (micro-TENNs), implantable constructs consisting of neurons and aligned axonal tracts spanning the extracellular matrix (ECM) lumen of a preformed hydrogel cylinder hundreds of microns in diameter that may extend centimeters in length. Neuronal aggregates are delimited to the extremes of the three-dimensional encasement and are spanned by axonal projections. Micro-TENNs are uniquely poised as a strategy for CNS reconstruction, emulating aspects of brain connectome cytoarchitecture and potentially providing means for network replacement. The neuronal aggregates may synapse with host tissue to form new functional relays to restore and/or modulate missing or damaged circuitry. These constructs may also act as pro-regenerative "living scaffolds" capable of exploiting developmental mechanisms for cell migration and axonal pathfinding, providing synergistic structural and soluble cues based on the state of regeneration. Micro-TENNs are fabricated by pouring liquid hydrogel into a cylindrical mold containing a longitudinally centered needle. Once the hydrogel has gelled, the needle is removed, leaving a hollow micro-column. An ECM solution is added to the lumen to provide an environment suitable for neuronal adhesion and axonal outgrowth. Dissociated neurons are mechanically aggregated for precise seeding within one or both ends of the micro-column. This methodology reliably produces self-contained miniature constructs with long-projecting axonal tracts that may recapitulate features of brain neuroanatomy. Synaptic immunolabeling and genetically encoded calcium

  5. Experience dependence of neural responses to different classes of male songs in the primary auditory forebrain of female songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauber, Mark E; Woolley, Sarah M N; Cassey, Phillip; Theunissen, Frédéric E

    2013-04-15

    There is both extensive species-specificity and critical experience-dependence in the recognition of own species songs in many songbird species. For example, female zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata raised by their parents show behavioral preferences for the songs of the father over unfamiliar conspecific males and for unfamiliar songs of conspecifics over heterospecifics. Behavioral discrimination between different species' songs is also displayed by females raised without exposure to any male songs but it is diminished in females raised by heterospecific foster parents. We tested whether neural responses in the female auditory forebrain paralleled each of these known behavioral patterns in song-class discrimination. We analyzed spike rates, above background levels, recorded from single units in the L2a subregion of the field L complex of female zebra finches. In subjects raised by genetic parents, spike rates were similar to songs of fathers and unfamiliar male zebra finches, and higher to unfamiliar conspecific over unfamiliar heterospecific songs. In females raised in isolation from male songs, we also found higher spike rates to unfamiliar conspecific over heterospecific songs. In females raised by heterospecific foster parents, spike rates were similar in response to songs of the foster father and unfamiliar males of the foster species, similar between unfamiliar songs of conspecifics and the heterospecific foster species, and higher to unfamiliar songs of the foster species over a third finch species. Thus, in parallel to the experience-dependence of females' behaviors in response to different male song classes, differences in social experiences can also alter neural response patterns to male song classes in the auditory forebrain of female zebra finches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and tissue-specific expression of a NADH-dependent activity of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuilenburg, A. B.; van Lenthe, H.; van Gennip, A. H.

    1996-01-01

    Homogenates of human liver and human fibroblasts were able to convert thymine into dihydrothymine in the presence of NADH whereas almost no NADH-dependent activity could be detected in human lymphocytes. The different tissue distribution of the NADH-dependent activity suggests that different types

  7. Contributions of thrombin targets to tissue factor-dependent metastasis in hyperthrombotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, N; Zarpellon, A; Chakrabarty, S; Bogdanov, V Y; Gruber, A; Castellino, F J; Mackman, N; Ellies, L G; Weiler, H; Ruggeri, Z M; Ruf, W

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cell tissue factor (TF)-initiated coagulation supports hematogenous metastasis by fibrin formation, platelet activation and monocyte/macrophage recruitment. Recent studies identified host anticoagulant mechanisms as a major impediment to successful hematogenous tumor cell metastasis. Here we address mechanisms that contribute to enhanced metastasis in hyperthrombotic mice with functional thrombomodulin deficiency (TM(Pro) mice). Pharmacological and genetic approaches were combined to characterize relevant thrombin targets in a mouse model of experimental hematogenous metastasis. TF-dependent, but contact pathway-independent, syngeneic breast cancer metastasis was associated with marked platelet hyperreactivity and formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates in immune-competent TM(Pro) mice. Blockade of CD11b or genetic deletion of platelet glycoprotein Ibα excluded contributions of these receptors to enhanced platelet-dependent metastasis in hyperthrombotic mice. Mice with very low levels of the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) did not phenocopy the enhanced metastasis seen in TM(Pro) mice. Genetic deletion of the thrombin receptor PAR1 or endothelial thrombin signaling targets alone did not diminish enhanced metastasis in TM(Pro) mice. Combined deficiency of PAR1 on tumor cells and the host reduced metastasis in TM(Pro) mice. Metastasis in the hyperthrombotic TM(Pro) mouse model is mediated by platelet hyperreactivity and contributions of PAR1 signaling on tumor and host cells. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  8. Neural tissue-spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke K; Johansen, Mathias; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2007-01-01

    -spheres (NTS) in EGF and FGF2 containing medium. The spheres were cut into quarters when passaged every 10-15th day, avoiding mechanical or enzymatic dissociation in order to minimize cellular trauma and preserve intercellular contacts. For analysis of regional differences within the forebrain SVZ, NTS were...

  9. Effects of cognitive bias modification training on neural alcohol cue reactivity in alcohol dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiers, C.E.; Stelzel, C.; Gladwin, T.E.; Park, S.Q.; Pawelczack, S.; Gawron, C.K.; Stuke, H.; Heinz, A.; Wiers, R.W.; Rinck, M.; Lindenmeyer, J.; Walter, H.; Bermpohl, F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In alcohol-dependent patients, alcohol cues evoke increased activation in mesolimbic brain areas, such as the nucleus accumbens and the amygdala. Moreover, patients show an alcohol approach bias, a tendency to more quickly approach than avoid alcohol cues. Cognitive bias modification

  10. Effects of cognitive bias modification training on neural alcohol cue reactivity in alcohol dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiers, C.E.; Stelzel, C.; Gladwin, T.E.; Park, S.Q.; Pawelczack, S.; Gawron, C.K.; Stuke, H.; Heinz, A.; Wiers, R.W.H.J.; Rinck, M.; Lindenmeyer, J.; Walter, H.; Bermpohl, F.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In alcohol-dependent patients, alcohol cues evoke increased activation in mesolimbic brain areas, such as the nucleus accumbens and the amygdala. Moreover, patients show an alcohol approach bias, a tendency to more quickly approach than avoid alcohol cues. Cognitive bias modification

  11. Neural bases of pharmacological treatment of nicotine dependence - insights from functional brain imaging: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menossi, Henrique Soila; Goudriaan, Anna E.; de Azevedo-Marques Périco, Cintia; Nicastri, Sérgio; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; D'Elia, Gilberto; Li, Chiang-Shan R.; Castaldelli-Maia, João Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine dependence is difficult to treat, and the biological mechanisms that are involved are not entirely clear. There is an urgent need to develop better drugs and more effective treatments for clinical practice. A critical step towards accelerating progress in medication development is to

  12. Emergence of slow collective oscillations in neural networks with spike-timing dependent plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Kaare; Imparato, Alberto; Torcini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    The collective dynamics of excitatory pulse coupled neurons with spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP) is studied. The introduction of STDP induces persistent irregular oscillations between strongly and weakly synchronized states, reminiscent of brain activity during slow-wave sleep. We explain...

  13. Neural development of binaural tuning through Hebbian learning predicts frequency-dependent best delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand; Brette, Romain

    2011-08-10

    Birds use microsecond differences in the arrival times of the sounds at the two ears to infer the location of a sound source in the horizontal plane. These interaural time differences (ITDs) are encoded by binaural neurons which fire more when the ITD matches their "best delay." In the textbook model of sound localization, the best delays of binaural neurons reflect the differences in axonal delays of their monaural inputs, but recent observations have cast doubts on this classical view because best delays were found to depend on preferred frequency. Here, we show that these observations are in fact consistent with the notion that best delays are created by differences in axonal delays, provided ITD tuning is created during development through spike-timing-dependent plasticity: basilar membrane filtering results in correlations between inputs to binaural neurons, which impact the selection of synapses during development, leading to the observed distribution of best delays.

  14. Transplanted neurally modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote tissue protection and locomotor recovery in spinal cord injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanian, Arshak R; Fehlings, Michael G; Zhang, Zhiying; Maiman, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy for repair and replacement of lost neural cells is a promising treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into neural phenotypes and be isolated and expanded for autotransplantation with no risk of rejection. The authors examined whether transplanted neurally induced human MSCs (NI hMSCs), developed by a new procedure, can survive, differentiate, and promote tissue protection and functional recovery in injured spinal cord (ISC) rats. Neural induction was achieved by exposing cells simultaneously to inhibitors of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and pharmacological agents that increased cAMP levels. Three groups of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected immediately rostral and caudal to the midline lesion with phosphate-buffered saline, MSCs, or NI hMSCs, 1 week after a spinal cord impact injury at T-8. Functional outcome was measured using the Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and thermal sensitivity test on a weekly basis up to 12 weeks postinjury. Graft integration and anatomy of spinal cord was assessed by stereological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical techniques. The transplanted NI hMSCs survived, differentiated, and significantly improved locomotor recovery of ISC rats. Transplantation also reduced the volume of lesion cavity and white matter loss. This method of hMSC modification may provide an alternative source of autologous adult stem cells for CNS repair.

  15. Electrospun Collagen/Silk Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: Fiber Fabrication, Post-Treatment Optimization, and Application in Neural Differentiation of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bofan

    Biocompatible scaffolds mimicking the locally aligned fibrous structure of native extracellular matrix (ECM) are in high demand in tissue engineering. In this thesis research, unidirectionally aligned fibers were generated via a home-built electrospinning system. Collagen type I, as a major ECM component, was chosen in this study due to its support of cell proliferation and promotion of neuroectodermal commitment in stem cell differentiation. Synthetic dragline silk proteins, as biopolymers with remarkable tensile strength and superior elasticity, were also used as a model material. Good alignment, controllable fiber size and morphology, as well as a desirable deposition density of fibers were achieved via the optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters. The incorporation of silk proteins into collagen was found to significantly enhance mechanical properties and stability of electrospun fibers. Glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor post-treatment was demonstrated as a simple and effective way to tune the properties of collagen/silk fibers without changing their chemical composition. With 6-12 hours GA treatment, electrospun collagen/silk fibers were not only biocompatible, but could also effectively induce the polarization and neural commitment of stem cells, which were optimized on collagen rich fibers due to the unique combination of biochemical and biophysical cues imposed to cells. Taken together, electrospun collagen rich composite fibers are mechanically strong, stable and provide excellent cell adhesion. The unidirectionally aligned fibers can accelerate neural differentiation of stem cells, representing a promising therapy for neural tissue degenerative diseases and nerve injuries.

  16. Relative Composition of Fibrous Connective and Fatty/Glandular Tissue in Connective Tissue Grafts Depends on the Harvesting Technique but not the Donor Site of the Hard Palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertl, Kristina; Pifl, Markus; Hirtler, Lena; Rendl, Barbara; Nürnberger, Sylvia; Stavropoulos, Andreas; Ulm, Christian

    2015-12-01

    Whether the composition of palatal connective tissue grafts (CTGs) varies depending on donor site or harvesting technique in terms of relative amounts of fibrous connective tissue (CT) and fatty/glandular tissue (FGT) is currently unknown and is histologically assessed in the present study. In 10 fresh human cadavers, tissue samples were harvested in the anterior and posterior palate and in areas close to (marginal) and distant from (apical) the mucosal margin. Mucosal thickness, lamina propria thickness (defined as the extent of subepithelial portion of the biopsy containing ≤25% or ≤50% FGT), and proportions of CT and FGT were semi-automatically estimated for the entire mucosa and for CTGs virtually harvested by split-flap (SF) preparation minimum 1 mm deep or after deepithelialization (DE). Palatal mucosal thickness, ranging from 2.35 to 6.89 mm, and histologic composition showed high interindividual variability. Lamina propria thickness (P >0.21) and proportions of CT (P = 0.48) and FGT (P = 0.15) did not differ significantly among the donor sites (anterior, posterior, marginal, apical). However, thicker palatal tissue was associated with higher FGT content (P tissue composition in the hard palate, DE-harvested CTG contains much larger amounts of CT and much lower amounts of FGT than SF-harvested CTG, irrespective of the harvesting site.

  17. The ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin are required for retinoic acid-dependent neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; De Mori, Roberta; Savino, Mauro; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of the primary cilium, a complex, evolutionarily conserved, organelle playing an important role in sensing and transducing cell signals, is the unifying pathogenetic mechanism of a growing number of diseases collectively termed "ciliopathies", typically characterized by multiorgan involvement. Developmental defects of the central nervous system (CNS) characterize a subset of ciliopathies showing clinical and genetic overlap, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MS). Although several knock-out mice lacking a variety of ciliary proteins have shown the importance of primary cilia in the development of the brain and CNS-derived structures, developmental in vitro studies, extremely useful to unravel the role of primary cilia along the course of neural differentiation, are still missing. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have been recently proven to mimic brain development, giving the unique opportunity to dissect the CNS differentiation process along its sequential steps. In the present study we show that mESCs express the ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin in a developmentally-regulated manner, and that these proteins co-localize with acetylated tubulin labeled cilia located at the outer embryonic layer. Further, mESCs differentiating along the neuronal lineage activate the cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling machinery, which is impaired in Meckelin knock-out cells but results unaffected in Jouberin-deficient mESCs. However, both lose the ability to acquire a neuronal phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate a pivotal role of Meckelin and Jouberin during embryonic neural specification and indicate mESCs as a suitable tool to investigate the developmental impact of ciliary proteins dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. When the Sense of Smell Meets Emotion: Anxiety-State-Dependent Olfactory Processing and Neural Circuitry Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Lucas R.; Gitelman, Darren R.

    2013-01-01

    Phylogenetically the most ancient sense, olfaction is characterized by a unique intimacy with the emotion system. However, mechanisms underlying olfaction–emotion interaction remain unclear, especially in an ever-changing environment and dynamic internal milieu. Perturbing the internal state with anxiety induction in human subjects, we interrogated emotion-state-dependent olfactory processing in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study. Following anxiety induction, initially neutral odors become unpleasant and take longer to detect, accompanied by augmented response to these odors in the olfactory (anterior piriform and orbitofrontal) cortices and emotion-relevant pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. In parallel, the olfactory sensory relay adapts with increased anxiety, incorporating amygdala as an integral step via strengthened (afferent or efferent) connections between amygdala and all levels of the olfactory cortical hierarchy. This anxiety-state-dependent neural circuitry thus enables cumulative infusion of limbic affective information throughout the olfactory sensory progression, thereby driving affectively charged olfactory perception. These findings could constitute an olfactory etiology model of emotional disorders, as exaggerated emotion–olfaction interaction in negative mood states turns innocuous odors aversive, fueling anxiety and depression with rising ambient sensory stress. PMID:24068799

  19. Time dependent neural network models for detecting changes of state in complex processes: applications in earth sciences and astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Julio J; Bonham-Carter, Graeme

    2006-03-01

    A computational intelligence approach is used to explore the problem of detecting internal state changes in time dependent processes; described by heterogeneous, multivariate time series with imprecise data and missing values. Such processes are approximated by collections of time dependent non-linear autoregressive models represented by a special kind of neuro-fuzzy neural network. Grid and high throughput computing model mining procedures based on neuro-fuzzy networks and genetic algorithms, generate: (i) collections of models composed of sets of time lag terms from the time series, and (ii) prediction functions represented by neuro-fuzzy networks. The composition of the models and their prediction capabilities, allows the identification of changes in the internal structure of the process. These changes are associated with the alternation of steady and transient states, zones with abnormal behavior, instability, and other situations. This approach is general, and its sensitivity for detecting subtle changes of state is revealed by simulation experiments. Its potential in the study of complex processes in earth sciences and astrophysics is illustrated with applications using paleoclimate and solar data.

  20. A neural network potential-energy surface for the water dimer based on environment-dependent atomic energies and charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawietz, Tobias; Sharma, Vikas; Behler, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the unique properties of water still represents a significant challenge for theory and experiment. Computer simulations by molecular dynamics require a reliable description of the atomic interactions, and in recent decades countless water potentials have been reported in the literature. Still, most of these potentials contain significant approximations, for instance a frozen internal structure of the individual water monomers. Artificial neural networks (NNs) offer a promising way for the construction of very accurate potential-energy surfaces taking all degrees of freedom explicitly into account. These potentials are based on electronic structure calculations for representative configurations, which are then interpolated to a continuous energy surface that can be evaluated many orders of magnitude faster. We present a full-dimensional NN potential for the water dimer as a first step towards the construction of a NN potential for liquid water. This many-body potential is based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions, and long-range electrostatic interactions are incorporated employing environment-dependent atomic charges. We show that the potential and derived properties like vibrational frequencies are in excellent agreement with the underlying reference density-functional theory calculations.

  1. Neural Differentiation of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Involves Activation of the Wnt5a/JNK Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeong Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are a powerful resource for cell-based transplantation therapies, but understanding of stem cell differentiation at the molecular level is not clear yet. We hypothesized that the Wnt pathway controls stem cell maintenance and neural differentiation. We have characterized the transcriptional expression of Wnt during the neural differentiation of hADSCs. After neural induction, the expressions of Wnt2, Wnt4, and Wnt11 were decreased, but the expression of Wnt5a was increased compared with primary hADSCs in RT-PCR analysis. In addition, the expression levels of most Fzds and LRP5/6 ligand were decreased, but not Fzd3 and Fzd5. Furthermore, Dvl1 and RYK expression levels were downregulated in NI-hADSCs. There were no changes in the expression of ß-catenin and GSK3ß. Interestingly, Wnt5a expression was highly increased in NI-hADSCs by real time RT-PCR analysis and western blot. Wnt5a level was upregulated after neural differentiation and Wnt3, Dvl2, and Naked1 levels were downregulated. Finally, we found that the JNK expression was increased after neural induction and ERK level was decreased. Thus, this study shows for the first time how a single Wnt5a ligand can activate the neural differentiation pathway through the activation of Wnt5a/JNK pathway by binding Fzd3 and Fzd5 and directing Axin/GSK-3ß in hADSCs.

  2. Origin-Dependent Neural Cell Identities in Differentiated Human iPSCs In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Hargus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation capability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs toward certain cell types for disease modeling and drug screening assays might be influenced by their somatic cell of origin. Here, we have compared the neural induction of human iPSCs generated from fetal neural stem cells (fNSCs, dermal fibroblasts, or cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons could be generated at similar efficiencies from all iPSCs. Transcriptomics analysis of the whole genome and of neural genes revealed a separation of neuroectoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs from mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Furthermore, we found genes that were similarly expressed in fNSCs and neuroectoderm, but not in mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Notably, these neural signatures were retained after transplantation into the cortex of mice and paralleled with increased survival of neuroectoderm-derived cells in vivo. These results indicate distinct origin-dependent neural cell identities in differentiated human iPSCs both in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Neuroadaptive changes associated with smoking: structural and functional neural changes in nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Soelch, Chantal

    2013-02-15

    Tobacco smoking is the most frequent form of substance abuse. We provide a review of the neuroadaptive changes evidenced in human smokers with regard to the current neurobiological models of addiction. Addiction is thought to result from an interplay between positive and negative reinforcement. Positive reinforcing effects of the drugs are mediated by striatal dopamine release, while negative reinforcement involves the relief of withdrawal symptoms and neurobiological stress systems. In addition, drug-related stimuli are attributed with excessive motivational value and are thought to exert a control on the behavior. This mechanism plays a central role in drug maintenance and relapse. Further neuroadaptive changes associated with chronic use of the drug consist of reduced responses to natural rewards and in the activation of an antireward system, related to neurobiological stress systems. Reduced inhibitory cognitive control is believed to support the development and the maintenance of addiction. The findings observed in human nicotine dependence are generally in line with these models. The current state of the research indicates specific neuroadaptive changes associated with nicotine addiction that need to be further elucidated with regard to their role in the treatment of nicotine dependence.

  4. Neuroadaptive Changes Associated with Smoking: Structural and Functional Neural Changes in Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Martin-Soelch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is the most frequent form of substance abuse. We provide a review of the neuroadaptive changes evidenced in human smokers with regard to the current neurobiological models of addiction. Addiction is thought to result from an interplay between positive and negative reinforcement. Positive reinforcing effects of the drugs are mediated by striatal dopamine release, while negative reinforcement involves the relief of withdrawal symptoms and neurobiological stress systems. In addition, drug-related stimuli are attributed with excessive motivational value and are thought to exert a control on the behavior. This mechanism plays a central role in drug maintenance and relapse. Further neuroadaptive changes associated with chronic use of the drug consist of reduced responses to natural rewards and in the activation of an antireward system, related to neurobiological stress systems. Reduced inhibitory cognitive control is believed to support the development and the maintenance of addiction. The findings observed in human nicotine dependence are generally in line with these models. The current state of the research indicates specific neuroadaptive changes associated with nicotine addiction that need to be further elucidated with regard to their role in the treatment of nicotine dependence.

  5. Stochastic spike synchronization in a small-world neural network with spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2018-01-01

    We consider the Watts-Strogatz small-world network (SWN) consisting of subthreshold neurons which exhibit noise-induced spikings. This neuronal network has adaptive dynamic synaptic strengths governed by the spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). In previous works without STDP, stochastic spike synchronization (SSS) between noise-induced spikings of subthreshold neurons was found to occur in a range of intermediate noise intensities. Here, we investigate the effect of additive STDP on the SSS by varying the noise intensity. Occurrence of a "Matthew" effect in synaptic plasticity is found due to a positive feedback process. As a result, good synchronization gets better via long-term potentiation of synaptic strengths, while bad synchronization gets worse via long-term depression. Emergences of long-term potentiation and long-term depression of synaptic strengths are intensively investigated via microscopic studies based on the pair-correlations between the pre- and the post-synaptic IISRs (instantaneous individual spike rates) as well as the distributions of time delays between the pre- and the post-synaptic spike times. Furthermore, the effects of multiplicative STDP (which depends on states) on the SSS are studied and discussed in comparison with the case of additive STDP (independent of states). These effects of STDP on the SSS in the SWN are also compared with those in the regular lattice and the random graph. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Connective-Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2 Induces Astrogenesis and Fibronectin Expression of Embryonic Neural Cells In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A Mendes

    Full Text Available Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF is a modular secreted protein implicated in multiple cellular events such as chondrogenesis, skeletogenesis, angiogenesis and wound healing. CTGF contains four different structural modules. This modular organization is characteristic of members of the CCN family. The acronym was derived from the first three members discovered, cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61, CTGF and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV. CTGF is implicated as a mediator of important cell processes such as adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. Extensive data have shown that CTGF interacts particularly with the TGFβ, WNT and MAPK signaling pathways. The capacity of CTGF to interact with different growth factors lends it an important role during early and late development, especially in the anterior region of the embryo. ctgf knockout mice have several cranio-facial defects, and the skeletal system is also greatly affected due to an impairment of the vascular-system development during chondrogenesis. This study, for the first time, indicated that CTGF is a potent inductor of gliogenesis during development. Our results showed that in vitro addition of recombinant CTGF protein to an embryonic mouse neural precursor cell culture increased the number of GFAP- and GFAP/Nestin-positive cells. Surprisingly, CTGF also increased the number of Sox2-positive cells. Moreover, this induction seemed not to involve cell proliferation. In addition, exogenous CTGF activated p44/42 but not p38 or JNK MAPK signaling, and increased the expression and deposition of the fibronectin extracellular matrix protein. Finally, CTGF was also able to induce GFAP as well as Nestin expression in a human malignant glioma stem cell line, suggesting a possible role in the differentiation process of gliomas. These results implicate ctgf as a key gene for astrogenesis during development, and suggest that its mechanism may involve activation of p44/42 MAPK signaling

  7. Experience-dependent regulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator in the mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Chu, Philip; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2015-07-10

    It has been suggested that tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), a serine protease, plays a key role in regulating the extracellular matrix core proteins, thereby impacting the structural plasticity in the cerebral cortex. Much is known about its role in regulating plasticity in the visual cortex. However, its permissive role has not been demonstrated to generalize to other cerebral cortical areas. By utilizing a combination of immunofluorescent histochemistry and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that endogenous tPA is indeed present in the somatosensory cortex, and its expression is experience-dependent. Chronic sensory deprivation induced by whisker trimming from birth for one month leads to increased tPA immunoreactivity in all layers of the barrel cortex. Furthermore, tPA immunoreactivity remains high even after sensation has been restored to the mystacial pad (by allowing whiskers to grow back to full length for one month). Our results suggest that tPA levels in the cerebral cortex are regulated by sensory experience, and play a key role in regulating structural remodeling in the cerebral cortex. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Neural mechanisms of interstimulus interval-dependent responses in the primary auditory cortex of awake cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Ling

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary auditory cortex (AI neurons show qualitatively distinct response features to successive acoustic signals depending on the inter-stimulus intervals (ISI. Such ISI-dependent AI responses are believed to underlie, at least partially, categorical perception of click trains (elemental vs. fused quality and stop consonant-vowel syllables (eg.,/da/-/ta/continuum. Methods Single unit recordings were conducted on 116 AI neurons in awake cats. Rectangular clicks were presented either alone (single click paradigm or in a train fashion with variable ISI (2–480 ms (click-train paradigm. Response features of AI neurons were quantified as a function of ISI: one measure was related to the degree of stimulus locking (temporal modulation transfer function [tMTF] and another measure was based on firing rate (rate modulation transfer function [rMTF]. An additional modeling study was performed to gain insight into neurophysiological bases of the observed responses. Results In the click-train paradigm, the majority of the AI neurons ("synchronization type"; n = 72 showed stimulus-locking responses at long ISIs. The shorter cutoff ISI for stimulus-locking responses was on average ~30 ms and was level tolerant in accordance with the perceptual boundary of click trains and of consonant-vowel syllables. The shape of tMTF of those neurons was either band-pass or low-pass. The single click paradigm revealed, at maximum, four response periods in the following order: 1st excitation, 1st suppression, 2nd excitation then 2nd suppression. The 1st excitation and 1st suppression was found exclusively in the synchronization type, implying that the temporal interplay between excitation and suppression underlies stimulus-locking responses. Among these neurons, those showing the 2nd suppression had band-pass tMTF whereas those with low-pass tMTF never showed the 2nd suppression, implying that tMTF shape is mediated through the 2nd suppression. The

  9. Dynamic dependence on ATR and ATM for double-strand break repair in human embryonic stem cells and neural descendants.

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    Bret R Adams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The DNA double-strand break (DSB is the most toxic form of DNA damage. Studies aimed at characterizing DNA repair during development suggest that homologous recombination repair (HRR is more critical in pluripotent cells compared to differentiated somatic cells in which nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ is dominant. We have characterized the DNA damage response (DDR and quality of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, and in vitro-derived neural cells. Resolution of ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF was used as a surrogate for DSB repair. The resolution of gamma-H2AX foci occurred at a slower rate in hESCs compared to neural progenitors (NPs and astrocytes perhaps reflective of more complex DSB repair in hESCs. In addition, the resolution of RAD51 foci, indicative of active homologous recombination repair (HRR, showed that hESCs as well as NPs have high capacity for HRR, whereas astrocytes do not. Importantly, the ATM kinase was shown to be critical for foci formation in astrocytes, but not in hESCs, suggesting that the DDR is different in these cells. Blocking the ATM kinase in astrocytes not only prevented the formation but also completely disassembled preformed repair foci. The ability of hESCs to form IRIF was abrogated with caffeine and siRNAs targeted against ATR, implicating that hESCs rely on ATR, rather than ATM for regulating DSB repair. This relationship dynamically changed as cells differentiated. Interestingly, while the inhibition of the DNA-PKcs kinase (and presumably non-homologous endjoining [NHEJ] in astrocytes slowed IRIF resolution it did not in hESCs, suggesting that repair in hESCs does not utilize DNA-PKcs. Altogether, our results show that hESCs have efficient DSB repair that is largely ATR-dependent HRR, whereas astrocytes critically depend on ATM for NHEJ, which, in part, is DNA-PKcs-independent.

  10. A Gustatory Neural Circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans Generates Memory-Dependent Behaviors in Na(+) Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifang; Sato, Hirofumi; Satoh, Yohsuke; Tomioka, Masahiro; Kunitomo, Hirofumi; Iino, Yuichi

    2017-02-22

    Animals show various behaviors in response to environmental chemicals. These behaviors are often plastic depending on previous experiences. Caenorhabditis elegans, which has highly developed chemosensory system with a limited number of sensory neurons, is an ideal model for analyzing the role of each neuron in innate and learned behaviors. Here, we report a new type of memory-dependent behavioral plasticity in Na(+) chemotaxis generated by the left member of bilateral gustatory neuron pair ASE (ASEL neuron). When worms were cultivated in the presence of Na(+), they showed positive chemotaxis toward Na(+), but when cultivated under Na(+)-free conditions, they showed no preference regarding Na(+) concentration. Both channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) activation with blue light and up-steps of Na(+) concentration activated ASEL only after cultivation with Na(+), as judged by increase in intracellular Ca(2+) Under cultivation conditions with Na(+), photoactivation of ASEL caused activation of its downstream interneurons AIY and AIA, which stimulate forward locomotion, and inhibition of its downstream interneuron AIB, which inhibits the turning/reversal behavior, and overall drove worms toward higher Na(+) concentrations. We also found that the Gq signaling pathway and the neurotransmitter glutamate are both involved in the behavioral response generated by ASEL.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animals have acquired various types of behavioral plasticity during their long evolutionary history. Caenorhabditis elegans prefers odors associated with food, but plastically changes its behavioral response according to previous experience. Here, we report a new type of behavioral response generated by a single gustatory sensory neuron, the ASE-left (ASEL) neuron. ASEL did not respond to photostimulation or upsteps of Na(+) concentration when worms were cultivated in Na(+)-free conditions; however, when worms were cultivated with Na(+), ASEL responded and inhibited AIB to avoid turning and

  11. Egr3 dependent sympathetic target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death.

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    Lin Li

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is a target tissue derived neurotrophin required for normal sympathetic neuron survival and target tissue innervation. NGF signaling regulates gene expression in sympathetic neurons, which in turn mediates critical aspects of neuron survival, axon extension and terminal axon branching during sympathetic nervous system (SNS development. Egr3 is a transcription factor regulated by NGF signaling in sympathetic neurons that is essential for normal SNS development. Germline Egr3-deficient mice have physiologic dysautonomia characterized by apoptotic sympathetic neuron death and abnormal innervation to many target tissues. The extent to which sympathetic innervation abnormalities in the absence of Egr3 is caused by altered innervation or by neuron death during development is unknown. Using Bax-deficient mice to abrogate apoptotic sympathetic neuron death in vivo, we show that Egr3 has an essential role in target tissue innervation in the absence of neuron death. Sympathetic target tissue innervation is abnormal in many target tissues in the absence of neuron death, and like NGF, Egr3 also appears to effect target tissue innervation heterogeneously. In some tissues, such as heart, spleen, bowel, kidney, pineal gland and the eye, Egr3 is essential for normal innervation, whereas in other tissues such as lung, stomach, pancreas and liver, Egr3 appears to have little role in innervation. Moreover, in salivary glands and heart, two tissues where Egr3 has an essential role in sympathetic innervation, NGF and NT-3 are expressed normally in the absence of Egr3 indicating that abnormal target tissue innervation is not due to deregulation of these neurotrophins in target tissues. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrate a role for Egr3 in mediating sympathetic target tissue innervation that is independent of neuron survival or neurotrophin deregulation.

  12. Menstrual-cycle dependence of breast parenchyma elasticity: estimation with magnetic resonance elastography of breast tissue during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Jörn; Sinkus, Ralph; Biesterfeldt, Maike; Adam, Gerhard

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) is a promising diagnostic method that produces images with a contrast proportional to the elasticity of the tissue. This study investigated using MRE the dependence of breast tissue elasticity from the menstrual cycle of healthy volunteers. Five volunteers (age 26-36) without breast disease and contraceptive medication were examined once weekly over 2 menstrual cycles. Examinations were performed with a 1.5 T magnet (ACS-NT, Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands). Low-frequency mechanical waves (65 Hz) were transmitted into the tissue by an oscillator. By means of a motion-sensitive spin-echo sequence, mechanical waves were displayed within the phase of the MR image and phase images were used to reconstruct the local distribution of elasticity. The elasticity of fibroglandular tissue and adipose breast tissue was analyzed individually, and the median and mean values of elasticity over the menstrual cycle were determined. All volunteers presented a repeating pattern concerning the elasticity over the 2 cycles. After 5 days of the onset of menses, the median value of elasticity for fibroglandular adipose tissue declined significantly by -29% (P = 0.010). After the second week of the cycle, fibroglandular tissue showed again an increase in elasticity (P = 0.028). The highest median values of elasticity were obtained during days 11 to 23 with an increase of up to 35%. For adipose tissue, only a slight and not significant variation of elasticity during the menstrual cycle was determined. MRE is able to measure a dependence of tissue elasticity on the menstrual cycle.

  13. Fetal development of subcutaneous white adipose tissue is dependent on Zfp423

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengle Shao

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Our results reveal that Zfp423 is essential for the terminal differentiation of subcutaneous white adipocytes during fetal adipose tissue development. Moreover, our data highlight the striking adverse effects of pathological subcutaneous adipose tissue remodeling on visceral adipose function and systemic nutrient homeostasis in obesity. Importantly, these data reveal the distinct phenotypes that can occur when adiponectin driven transgenes are activated in fetal vs. adult adipose tissue.

  14. NF-Y dependent epigenetic modifications discriminate between proliferating and postmitotic tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymone Gurtner

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene transcription requires posttranslational modifications of histones that, in concert with chromatin remodeling factors, shape the structure of chromatin. It is currently under intense investigation how this structure is modulated, in particular in the context of proliferation and differentiation. Compelling evidence suggests that the transcription factor NF-Y acts as a master regulator of cell cycle progression, activating the transcription of many cell cycle regulatory genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood. Here we show that NF-Y exerts its effect on transcription through the modulation of the histone "code". NF-Y colocalizes with nascent RNA, while RNA polymerase II is I phosphorylated on serine 2 of the YSPTSPS repeats within its carboxyterminal domain and histones are carrying modifications that represent activation signals of gene expression (H3K9ac and PAN-H4ac. Comparing postmitotic muscle tissue from normal mice and proliferating muscles from mdx mice, we demonstrate by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP that NF-Y DNA binding activity correlates with the accumulation of acetylated histones H3 and H4 on promoters of key cell cycle regulatory genes, and with their active transcription. Accordingly, p300 is recruited onto the chromatin of NF-Y target genes in a NF-Y-dependent manner, as demonstrated by Re-ChIP. Conversely, the loss of NF-Y binding correlates with a decrease of acetylated histones, the recruitment of HDAC1, and a repressed heterochromatic state with enrichment of histones carrying modifications known to mediate silencing of gene expression (H3K9me3, H3K27me2 and H4K20me3. As a consequence, NF-Y target genes are downregulated in this context. In conclusion, our data indicate a role of NF-Y in modulating the structure and transcriptional competence of chromatin in vivo and support a model in which NF-Y-dependent histone "code" changes contribute to the

  15. Tissue Transglutaminase Modulates Vascular Stiffness and Function Through Crosslinking-Dependent and Crosslinking-Independent Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steppan, Jochen; Bergman, Yehudit; Viegas, Kayla; Armstrong, Dinani; Tan, Siqi; Wang, Huilei; Melucci, Sean; Hori, Daijiro; Park, Sung Yong; Barreto, Sebastian F; Isak, Abraham; Jandu, Sandeep; Flavahan, Nicholas; Butlin, Mark; An, Steven S; Avolio, Alberto; Berkowitz, Dan E; Halushka, Marc K; Santhanam, Lakshmi

    2017-02-03

    The structural elements of the vascular wall, namely, extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cells (SMCs), contribute to the overall stiffness of the vessel. In this study, we examined the crosslinking-dependent and crosslinking-independent roles of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in vascular function and stiffness. SMCs were isolated from the aortae of TG2-/- and wild-type (WT) mice. Cell adhesion was examined by using electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing and PicoGreen assay. Cell motility was examined using a Boyden chamber assay. Cell proliferation was examined by electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing and EdU incorporation assays. Cell micromechanics were studied using magnetic torsion cytometry and spontaneous nanobead tracer motions. Aortic mechanics were examined by tensile testing. Vasoreactivity was studied by wire myography. SMCs from TG2-/- mice had delayed adhesion, reduced motility, and accelerated de-adhesion and proliferation rates compared with those from WT. TG2-/- SMCs were stiffer and displayed fewer cytoskeletal remodeling events than WT. Collagen assembly was delayed in TG2-/- SMCs and recovered with adenoviral transduction of TG2. Aortic rings from TG2-/- mice were less stiff than those from WT; stiffness was partly recovered by incubation with guinea pig liver TG2 independent of crosslinking function. TG2-/- rings showed augmented response to phenylephrine-mediated vasoconstriction when compared with WT. In human coronary arteries, vascular media and plaque, high abundance of fibronectin expression, and colocalization with TG2 were observed. TG2 modulates vascular function/tone by altering SMC contractility independent of its crosslinking function and contributes to vascular stiffness by regulating SMC proliferation and matrix remodeling. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  16. Shh-dependent differentiation of intestinal tissue from embryonic pancreas by activin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eyll, Jonathan M; Pierreux, Christophe E; Lemaigre, Frédéric P; Rousseau, Guy G

    2004-04-15

    The pancreas develops from the endoderm to give rise to ducts, acini and islets of Langerhans. This process involves extracellular signals of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGFbeta) family. The aim of this work was to study the effects of activin A, a member of this family, whose potential role in pancreas differentiation is controversial. To this end, we used pancreatic explants from E12.5 mouse embryos. In culture these explants exhibited spontaneous growth, epithelial morphogenesis and endocrine and exocrine differentiation. Exposure to activin A did not affect exocrine or endocrine differentiation. Surprisingly, activin A induced in the explants the appearance of a large contractile structure surrounded by a cylindrical epithelium, a thick basal lamina and a smooth muscle layer. This structure, the formation of which was prevented by follistatin, was typical of an intestinal wall. Consistent with this interpretation, activin A rapidly induced in the explants the mRNAs for fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), which are markers of the intestine, but not of the pancreas. We also found that induction of the FABPs was preceded by induction of Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a known inducer of intestinal differentiation in the endoderm. Activin B induced neither Shh nor intestinal differentiation. The activin A-mediated intestinal differentiation was blocked by cyclopamine, an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, and it was mimicked by Shh. We conclude that activin A does not appear to affect the exocrine or endocrine components of the pancreas, but that it can promote differentiation of pancreatic tissue into intestine via a Shh-dependent mechanism. These findings illustrate the plasticity of differentiation programs in response to extracellular signals in the pancreas and they shed new light on the regulation of pancreas and intestinal development.

  17. Size dependent gold nanoparticle interaction at nano-micro interface using both monolayer and multilayer (tissue-like) cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohan, Darren; Yang, Celina; Lu, Xiaofeng; Chithrani, Devika B.

    2016-03-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as a model NP system to improve the interface between nanotechnology and medicine since their size and surface properties can be tailored easily. GNPs are being used as radiation dose enhancers and as drug carriers in cancer research. Hence, it is important to know the optimum NP size for uptake not only at monolayer level but also at tissue level. Once GNPs leave tumor vasculature, they enter the tumor tissue. Success of any therapeutic technique using NPs depends on how well NPs penetrate the tumor tissue and reach individual tumor cells. In this work, multicellular layers (MCLs) were grown to model the post-vascular tumor environment. GNPs of 20 nm and 50 nm diameters were used to elucidate the effects of size on the GNP penetration and distribution dynamics. Larger NPs (50 nm) were better at monolayer level, but smaller NPs (20 nm) were at tissue level. The MCLs exhibited a much more extensive extracellular matrix (ECM) than monolayer cell cultures. This increased ECM created a barrier for NP transport and ECM was also dependent on the tumor cell lines. Smaller NPs penetrated better compared to larger NPs. Transport of NPs was better in MDA-MB231 vs MCF-7. This MCL model tissue structures are better tools to optimize NP transport through tissue before using them in animal models. Based on our study, we believe that smaller NPs are better for improved outcome in future cancer therapeutics.

  18. Neural stem cell differentiation by electrical stimulation using a cross-linked PEDOT substrate: Expanding the use of biocompatible conjugated conductive polymers for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Filipa; Ferreira, Quirina; Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Morgado, Jorge; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-06-01

    The use of conjugated polymers allows versatile interactions between cells and flexible processable materials, while providing a platform for electrical stimulation, which is particularly relevant when targeting differentiation of neural stem cells and further application for therapy or drug screening. Materials were tested for cytotoxicity following the ISO10993-5. PSS was cross-linked. ReNcellVM neural stem cells (NSC) were seeded in laminin coated surfaces, cultured for 4 days in the presence of EGF (20 ng/mL), FGF-2 (20 ng/mL) and B27 (20 μg/mL) and differentiated over eight additional days in the absence of those factors under 100Hz pulsed DC electrical stimulation, 1V with 10 ms pulses. NSC and neuron elongation aspect ratio as well as neurite length were assessed using ImageJ. Cells were immune-stained for Tuj1 and GFAP. F8T2, MEH-PPV, P3HT and cross-linked PSS (x PSS) were assessed as non-cytotoxic. L929 fibroblast population was 1.3 higher for x PSS than for glass control, while F8T2 presents moderate proliferation. The population of neurons (Tuj1) was 1.6 times higher with longer neurites (73 vs 108 μm) for cells cultured under electrical stimulus, with cultured NSC. Such stimulus led also to longer neurons. x PSS was, for the first time, used to elongate human NSC through the application of pulsed current, impacting on their differentiation towards neurons and contributing to longer neurites. The range of conductive conjugated polymers known as non-cytotoxic was expanded. x PSS was introduced as a stable material, easily processed from solution, to interface with biological systems, in particular NSC, without the need of in-situ polymerization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide may enhance fatty acid re-esterification in subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in lean humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Meena; Simonsen, Lene; Madsbad, Sten

    2010-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) has been implicated in lipid metabolism in animals. In humans, however, there is no clear evidence of GIP effecting lipid metabolism. The present experiments were performed in order to elucidate the effects of GIP on regional adipose tissue metab...

  20. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  1. Aging and environmental exposures alter tissue-specific DNA methylation dependent upon CpG island context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock C Christensen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic control of gene transcription is critical for normal human development and cellular differentiation. While alterations of epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation have been linked to cancers and many other human diseases, interindividual epigenetic variations in normal tissues due to aging, environmental factors, or innate susceptibility are poorly characterized. The plasticity, tissue-specific nature, and variability of gene expression are related to epigenomic states that vary across individuals. Thus, population-based investigations are needed to further our understanding of the fundamental dynamics of normal individual epigenomes. We analyzed 217 non-pathologic human tissues from 10 anatomic sites at 1,413 autosomal CpG loci associated with 773 genes to investigate tissue-specific differences in DNA methylation and to discern how aging and exposures contribute to normal variation in methylation. Methylation profile classes derived from unsupervised modeling were significantly associated with age (P<0.0001 and were significant predictors of tissue origin (P<0.0001. In solid tissues (n = 119 we found striking, highly significant CpG island-dependent correlations between age and methylation; loci in CpG islands gained methylation with age, loci not in CpG islands lost methylation with age (P<0.001, and this pattern was consistent across tissues and in an analysis of blood-derived DNA. Our data clearly demonstrate age- and exposure-related differences in tissue-specific methylation and significant age-associated methylation patterns which are CpG island context-dependent. This work provides novel insight into the role of aging and the environment in susceptibility to diseases such as cancer and critically informs the field of epigenomics by providing evidence of epigenetic dysregulation by age-related methylation alterations. Collectively we reveal key issues to consider both in the construction of reference and disease

  2. Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and oral soft tissue pathologies. I. Prevalence and characteristics of non-candidal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenheimer, J; Moore, P A; Rossie, K; Myers, D; Mongelluzzo, M B; Block, H M; Weyant, R; Orchard, T

    2000-05-01

    A large epidemiologic study on oral health has found that several oral soft tissue lesions were more prevalent in subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus than in control subjects without diabetes. Our objective in part I of this article is to characterize those lesions not associated with Candida. This cross-sectional study determined the prevalence and characteristics of oral soft tissue diseases identified during a comprehensive oral evaluation of 405 adult subjects with diabetes and 268 control subjects without diabetes. Twenty specific oral soft tissue lesions were identified. Nearly twice as many subjects with diabetes as subjects without diabetes were found to have one or more oral soft tissue lesions (44.7% vs 25.0%; P diabetes also had significantly higher prevalence rates for 7 lesions, 3 of which were non-candidal: fissured tongue, irritation fibroma, and traumatic ulcers. (Four lesions generally associated with Candida infection-median rhomboid glossitis, denture stomatitis, generalized atrophy of the tongue papillae, and angular cheilitis-will be described in part II of this article.) There were no differences found between the subjects with diabetes and the control subjects for lichen planus, gingival hyperplasia, or salivary gland disease. Oral soft tissue lesions were seen more frequently in subjects with insulin-dependent diabetes than in the control subjects. Characterization of 3 non-candidal lesions suggests that they are associated with trauma, delayed healing, or both.

  3. Fabrication of Nerve Growth Factor Encapsulated Aligned Poly(ε-Caprolactone Nanofibers and Their Assessment as a Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury is a serious clinical problem to be solved. There has been no breakthrough so far and neural tissue engineering offers a promising approach to promote the regeneration of peripheral neural injuries. In this study, emulsion electrospinning technique was introduced as a flexible and promising technique for the fabrication of random (R and aligned (A Poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL-Nerve Growth Factor (NGF&Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA nanofibrous scaffolds [(R/A-PCL-NGF&BSA], where NGF and BSA were encapsulated in the core while PCL form the shell. Random and aligned pure PCL, PCL-BSA, and PCL-NGF nanofibers were also produced for comparison. The scaffolds were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM and water contact angle test. Release study showed that, with the addition of stabilizer BSA, a sustained release of NGF from emulsion electrospun PCL nanofibers was observed over 28 days. [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] assay revealed that (R/A-PCL-NGF and (R/A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffolds favored cell growth and showed no cytotoxicity to PC12 cells. Laser scanning confocal microscope images exhibited that the A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffold increased the length of neurites and directed neurites extension along the fiber axis, indicating that the A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffold has a potential for guiding nerve tissue growth and promoting nerve regeneration.

  4. Histological characterization and quantification of cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Reekmans, Kristien; de Vocht, Nathalie; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical animal studies involving intracerebral (stem) cell grafting are gaining popularity in many laboratories due to the reported beneficial effects of cell grafting on various diseases or traumata of the central nervous system (CNS). In this chapter, we describe a histological workflow to characterize and quantify cellular events following neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cell grafting in healthy and demyelinated CNS tissue. First, we provide standardized protocols to isolate and culture eGFP(+) neural and fibroblast(-like) stem cells from embryonic mouse tissue. Second, we describe flow cytometric procedures to determine cell viability, eGFP transgene expression, and the expression of different stem cell lineage markers. Third, we explain how to induce reproducible demyelination in the CNS of mice by means of cuprizone administration, a validated mouse model for human multiple sclerosis. Fourth, the technical procedures for cell grafting in the CNS are explained in detail. Finally, an optimized and validated workflow for the quantitative histological analysis of cell graft survival and endogenous astroglial and microglial responses is provided.

  5. Novel high-viscosity polyacrylamidated chitosan for neural tissue engineering: fabrication of anisotropic neurodurable scaffold via molecular disposition of persulfate-mediated polymer slicing and complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Pillay, Viness

    2012-10-29

    Macroporous polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan scaffolds for neural tissue engineering were fabricated with varied synthetic and viscosity profiles. A novel approach and mechanism was utilized for polyacrylamide grafting onto chitosan using potassium persulfate (KPS) mediated degradation of both polymers under a thermally controlled environment. Commercially available high molecular mass polyacrylamide was used instead of the acrylamide monomer for graft copolymerization. This grafting strategy yielded an enhanced grafting efficiency (GE = 92%), grafting ratio (GR = 263%), intrinsic viscosity (IV = 5.231 dL/g) and viscometric average molecular mass (MW = 1.63 × 106 Da) compared with known acrylamide that has a GE = 83%, GR = 178%, IV = 3.901 dL/g and MW = 1.22 × 106 Da. Image processing analysis of SEM images of the newly grafted neurodurable scaffold was undertaken based on the polymer-pore threshold. Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR spectral analyses in conjugation with DSC were used for the characterization and comparison of the newly grafted copolymers. Static Lattice Atomistic Simulations were employed to investigate and elucidate the copolymeric assembly and reaction mechanism by exploring the spatial disposition of chitosan and polyacrylamide with respect to the reactional profile of potassium persulfate. Interestingly, potassium persulfate, a peroxide, was found to play a dual role initially degrading the polymers-"polymer slicing"-thereby initiating the formation of free radicals and subsequently leading to synthesis of the high molecular mass polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan (PAAm-g-CHT)-"polymer complexation". Furthermore, the applicability of the uniquely grafted scaffold for neural tissue engineering was evaluated via PC12 neuronal cell seeding. The novel PAAm-g-CHT exhibited superior neurocompatibility in terms of cell infiltration owing to the anisotropic porous architecture, high molecular mass mediated robustness, superior hydrophilicity as well as

  6. Novel High-Viscosity Polyacrylamidated Chitosan for Neural Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of Anisotropic Neurodurable Scaffold via Molecular Disposition of Persulfate-Mediated Polymer Slicing and Complexation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viness Pillay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Macroporous polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan scaffolds for neural tissue engineering were fabricated with varied synthetic and viscosity profiles. A novel approach and mechanism was utilized for polyacrylamide grafting onto chitosan using potassium persulfate (KPS mediated degradation of both polymers under a thermally controlled environment. Commercially available high molecular mass polyacrylamide was used instead of the acrylamide monomer for graft copolymerization. This grafting strategy yielded an enhanced grafting efficiency (GE = 92%, grafting ratio (GR = 263%, intrinsic viscosity (IV = 5.231 dL/g and viscometric average molecular mass (MW = 1.63 × 106 Da compared with known acrylamide that has a GE = 83%, GR = 178%, IV = 3.901 dL/g and MW = 1.22 × 106 Da. Image processing analysis of SEM images of the newly grafted neurodurable scaffold was undertaken based on the polymer-pore threshold. Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR spectral analyses in conjugation with DSC were used for the characterization and comparison of the newly grafted copolymers. Static Lattice Atomistic Simulations were employed to investigate and elucidate the copolymeric assembly and reaction mechanism by exploring the spatial disposition of chitosan and polyacrylamide with respect to the reactional profile of potassium persulfate. Interestingly, potassium persulfate, a peroxide, was found to play a dual role initially degrading the polymers—“polymer slicing”—thereby initiating the formation of free radicals and subsequently leading to synthesis of the high molecular mass polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan (PAAm-g-CHT—“polymer complexation”. Furthermore, the applicability of the uniquely grafted scaffold for neural tissue engineering was evaluated via PC12 neuronal cell seeding. The novel PAAm-g-CHT exhibited superior neurocompatibility in terms of cell infiltration owing to the anisotropic porous architecture, high molecular mass mediated robustness

  7. Temperature-dependent dielectric properties of liver tissue measured during thermal ablation: toward an improved numerical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Christopher L

    2008-01-01

    The development of microwave tumor ablation devices depends largely on numerical simulations of antenna characteristics and transient electromagnetic heating. However, without an adequate tissue model simulation predictions can vary widely from experimental results. In this study, tissue dielectric properties are measured to capture changes induced by temperature, cellular makeup and water content during thermal ablation. Measurements made using this technique agree closely with previous measurements for temperatures up to 50 degrees C, but both relative permittivity and conductivity decrease by as much as 50 percent when temperatures approach 100 degrees C.

  8. Menstrual cycle-dependent neural plasticity in the adult human brain is hormone, task, and region specific.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.S.E.; Weis, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Reuber, M.; Beyenburg, S.; Klaver, P.; Fell, J.; Greiff, A. de; Ruhlmann, J.; Reul, J.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    In rodents, cyclically fluctuating levels of gonadal steroid hormones modulate neural plasticity by altering synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis. Alterations of mood and cognition observed during the menstrual cycle suggest that steroid-related plasticity also occurs in humans. Cycle

  9. The relationship between the neural computations for speech and music perception is context-dependent: an activation likelihood estimate study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna eLaCroix

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the neurobiology of speech and music has been investigated for more than a century. There remains no widespread agreement regarding how (or to what extent music perception utilizes the neural circuitry that is engaged in speech processing, particularly at the cortical level. Prominent models such as Patel’s Shared Syntactic Integration Resource Hypothesis (SSIRH and Koelsch’s neurocognitive model of music perception suggest a high degree of overlap, particularly in the frontal lobe, but also perhaps more distinct representations in the temporal lobe with hemispheric asymmetries. The present meta-analysis study used activation likelihood estimate analyses to identify the brain regions consistently activated for music as compared to speech across the functional neuroimaging (fMRI and PET literature. Eighty music and 91 speech neuroimaging studies of healthy adult control subjects were analyzed. Peak activations reported in the music and speech studies were divided into four paradigm categories: passive listening, discrimination tasks, error/anomaly detection tasks and memory-related tasks. We then compared activation likelihood estimates within each category for music versus speech, and each music condition with passive listening. We found that listening to music and to speech preferentially activate distinct temporo-parietal bilateral cortical networks. We also found music and speech to have shared resources in the left pars opercularis but speech-specific resources in the left pars triangularis. The extent to which music recruited speech-activated frontal resources was modulated by task. While there are certainly limitations to meta-analysis techniques particularly regarding sensitivity, this work suggests that the extent of shared resources between speech and music may be task-dependent and highlights the need to consider how task effects may be affecting conclusions regarding the neurobiology of speech and music.

  10. The relationship between the neural computations for speech and music perception is context-dependent: an activation likelihood estimate study

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCroix, Arianna N.; Diaz, Alvaro F.; Rogalsky, Corianne

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between the neurobiology of speech and music has been investigated for more than a century. There remains no widespread agreement regarding how (or to what extent) music perception utilizes the neural circuitry that is engaged in speech processing, particularly at the cortical level. Prominent models such as Patel's Shared Syntactic Integration Resource Hypothesis (SSIRH) and Koelsch's neurocognitive model of music perception suggest a high degree of overlap, particularly in the frontal lobe, but also perhaps more distinct representations in the temporal lobe with hemispheric asymmetries. The present meta-analysis study used activation likelihood estimate analyses to identify the brain regions consistently activated for music as compared to speech across the functional neuroimaging (fMRI and PET) literature. Eighty music and 91 speech neuroimaging studies of healthy adult control subjects were analyzed. Peak activations reported in the music and speech studies were divided into four paradigm categories: passive listening, discrimination tasks, error/anomaly detection tasks and memory-related tasks. We then compared activation likelihood estimates within each category for music vs. speech, and each music condition with passive listening. We found that listening to music and to speech preferentially activate distinct temporo-parietal bilateral cortical networks. We also found music and speech to have shared resources in the left pars opercularis but speech-specific resources in the left pars triangularis. The extent to which music recruited speech-activated frontal resources was modulated by task. While there are certainly limitations to meta-analysis techniques particularly regarding sensitivity, this work suggests that the extent of shared resources between speech and music may be task-dependent and highlights the need to consider how task effects may be affecting conclusions regarding the neurobiology of speech and music. PMID:26321976

  11. Monte Carlo study of voxel S factor dependence on tissue density and atomic composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amato, Ernesto, E-mail: eamato@unime.it [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences, via Consolare Valeria, 1, I-98125 Messina (Italy); Italiano, Antonio [INFN – Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Gruppo Collegato di Messina (Italy); Baldari, Sergio [University of Messina, Department of Biomedical Sciences and of Morphologic and Functional Imaging, Section of Radiological Sciences, via Consolare Valeria, 1, I-98125 Messina (Italy)

    2013-11-21

    Voxel dosimetry is a common approach to the internal dosimetry of non-uniform activity distributions in nuclear medicine therapies with radiopharmaceuticals and in the estimation of the radiation hazard due to internal contamination of radionuclides. Aim of the present work is to extend our analytical approach for the calculation of voxel S factors to materials different from the soft tissue. We used a Monte Carlo simulation in GEANT4 of a voxelized region of each material in which the source of monoenergetic electrons or photons was uniformly distributed within the central voxel, and the energy deposition was scored over the surrounding 11×11×11 voxels. Voxel S factors were obtained for the following standard ICRP materials: Adipose tissue, Bone cortical, Brain, Lung, Muscle skeletal and Tissue soft with 1 g cm{sup −3} density. Moreover, we considered the standard ICRU materials: Bone compact and Muscle striated. Voxel S factors were represented as a function of the “normalized radius”, defined as the ratio between the source–target voxel distance and the voxel side. We found that voxel S factors and related analytical fit functions are mainly affected by the tissue density, while the material composition gives only a slight contribution to the difference between data series, which is negligible for practical purposes. Our results can help in broadening the dosimetric three-dimensional approach based on voxel S factors to other tissues where diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides can be taken up and radiation can propagate.

  12. Gene Delivery Particle Engineering Strategies for Shape-dependent Targeting of Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Successful gene delivery requires overcoming both systemic and intracellular obstacles before the nucleic acid cargo can successfully reach its tissue and subcellular target location. Materials & Methods: Non-viral mechanisms to enable targeting while avoiding off-target delivery have arisen via biological, chemical, and physical engineering strategies. Herein we will discuss the physical parameters in particle design that promote tissue- and cell-targeted delivery of genetic cargo. We will discuss systemic concerns, such as circulation, tissue localization, and clearance, as well as cell-scale obstacles, such as cellular uptake and nucleic acid packaging. In particular, we will focus on engineering particle shape and size in order to enhance delivery and promote precise targeting. We will also address methods to program or change particle shape in situ using environmentally triggered cues. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide has impaired effect on abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue metabolism in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, M; Simonsen, L; Arngrim, N

    2013-01-01

    to an oral glucose challenge: (i) NGT and (ii) IGT. Abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue lipid metabolism was studied by conducting measurements of arteriovenous concentrations of metabolites and regional adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF) during GIP (1.5 pmol kg(-1) min(-1)) in combination with a HI......OBJECTIVE: Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) appears to have a role in lipid metabolism. Recently, we showed that GIP in combination with hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia increases triglyceride uptake in abdominal, subcutaneous adipose tissue in lean humans. It has been suggested...... be enhanced or blunted during a GIP, hyperinsulinemic and hyperglycemic (HI-HG) clamp in obese subjects with either normal glucose tolerance (NGT) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). DESIGN: Sixteen obese (BMI>30 kg m(-2)) subjects were divided into two groups, based on their plasma glucose response...

  14. Differentiating pediatric epileptic brain tissue from normal brain tissue by using time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo: comprehensive data analysis method in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sanghoon; Fernald, Bradley; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Sandberg, David; Johnson, Mahlon; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to differentiate pediatric epileptic brain tissue from normal brain tissue. The optical spectroscopic technique monitored the dynamic optical properties of the cerebral cortex that are associated with its physiological, morphological, and compositional characteristics. Due to the transient irregular epileptic discharge activity within the epileptic brain tissue it was hypothesized that the lesion would express abnormal dynamic optical behavior that would alter normal dynamic behavior. Thirteen pediatric epilepsy patients and seven pediatric brain tumor patients (normal controls) were recruited for this clinical study. Dynamic optical properties were obtained from the cortical surface intraoperatively using a timedependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system. This system consisted of a fiber-optic probe, a tungsten-halogen light source, and a spectrophotometer. It acquired diffuse reflectance spectra with a spectral range of 204 nm to 932 nm at a rate of 33 spectra per second for approximately 12 seconds. Biopsy samples were taken from electrophysiologically abnormal cortex and evaluated by a neuropathologist, which served as a gold standard for lesion classification. For data analysis, spectral intensity changes of diffuse reflectance in the time domain at two different wavelengths from each investigated site were compared. Negative correlation segment, defined by the periods where the intensity changes at the two wavelengths were opposite in their slope polarity, were extracted. The total duration of negative correlation, referred to as the "negative correlation time index", was calculated by integrating the negative correlation segments. The negative correlation time indices from all investigated sites were sub-grouped according to the corresponding histological classifications. The difference between the mean indices of two subgroups was evaluated by standard

  15. Ascorbic acid alters cell fate commitment of human neural progenitors in a WNT/β-catenin/ROS signaling dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rharass, Tareck; Lantow, Margareta; Gbankoto, Adam; Weiss, Dieter G; Panáková, Daniela; Lucas, Stéphanie

    2017-10-16

    Improving the neuronal yield from in vitro cultivated neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is an essential challenge in transplantation therapy in neurological disorders. In this regard, Ascorbic acid (AA) is widely used to expand neurogenesis from NPCs in cultures although the mechanisms of its action remain unclear. Neurogenesis from NPCs is regulated by the redox-sensitive WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway. We therefore aimed to investigate how AA interacts with this pathway and potentiates neurogenesis. Effects of 200 μM AA were compared with the pro-neurogenic reagent and WNT/β-catenin signaling agonist lithium chloride (LiCl), and molecules with antioxidant activities i.e. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and ruthenium red (RuR), in differentiating neural progenitor ReNcell VM cells. Cells were supplemented with reagents for two periods of treatment: a full period encompassing the whole differentiation process versus an early short period that is restricted to the cell fate commitment stage. Intracellular redox balance and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism were examined by flow cytometry using redox and ROS sensors. Confocal microscopy was performed to assess cell viability, neuronal yield, and levels of two proteins: Nucleoredoxin (NXN) and the WNT/β-catenin signaling component Dishevelled 2 (DVL2). TUBB3 and MYC gene responses were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. DVL2-NXN complex dissociation was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In contrast to NAC which predictably exhibited an antioxidant effect, AA treatment enhanced ROS metabolism with no cytotoxic induction. Both drugs altered ROS levels only at the early stage of the differentiation as no changes were held beyond the neuronal fate commitment stage. FRET studies showed that AA treatment accelerated the redox-dependent release of the initial pool of DVL2 from its sequestration by NXN, while RuR treatment hampered the dissociation of the two proteins. Accordingly, AA

  16. Protein disulfide-isomerase - a trigger of tissue factor-dependent thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiouptsi, Klytaimnistra; Reinhardt, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The plasmatic coagulation system is tightly controlled by natural anticoagulant mechanisms, preventing thrombosis to ensure the supply of tissues with oxygen and nutrients without provoking susceptibility to bleeding diatheses. The membrane receptor tissue factor (TF) is the principal initiator of coagulation, forming a high affinity complex with coagulation factor VIIa, thus catalyzing quantitative formation of the coagulation factor Xa. While it has been well-established that the TF-VIIa complex is efficiently blocked by factor Xa associated with tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI), it was uncovered during the last decade that TF contains an intramolecular allosteric disulfide, which is prone to reduction and is crucial for TF's procoagulant and prothrombotic function. The compromised integrity of the allosteric TF disulfide pair Cys186/Cys209 was demonstrated to be responsible for the cryptic nature of TF procoagulant activity on monocytes and other cell types as well as in mouse thrombosis models. Cell surface associated protein disulfide-isomerases (PDI) were identified as activators of cryptic tissue factor. Here, we review this current concept of TF de-encryption by PDI oxidoreductases that have become interesting targets for the development of new antithrombotic treatment strategies.

  17. Silencer-delimited transgenesis: NRSE/RE1 sequences promote neural-specific transgene expression in a NRSF/REST-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xiayang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have investigated a simple strategy for enhancing transgene expression specificity by leveraging genetic silencer elements. The approach serves to restrict transgene expression to a tissue of interest - the nervous system in the example provided here - thereby promoting specific/exclusive targeting of discrete cellular subtypes. Recent innovations are bringing us closer to understanding how the brain is organized, how neural circuits function, and how neurons can be regenerated. Fluorescent proteins enable mapping of the 'connectome', optogenetic tools allow excitable cells to be short-circuited or hyperactivated, and targeted ablation of neuronal subtypes facilitates investigations of circuit function and neuronal regeneration. Optimally, such toolsets need to be expressed solely within the cell types of interest as off-site expression makes establishing causal relationships difficult. To address this, we have exploited a gene 'silencing' system that promotes neuronal specificity by repressing expression in non-neural tissues. This methodology solves non-specific background issues that plague large-scale enhancer trap efforts and may provide a means of leveraging promoters/enhancers that otherwise express too broadly to be of value for in vivo manipulations. Results We show that a conserved neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE can function to restrict transgene expression to the nervous system. The neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST transcriptional repressor binds NRSE/repressor element 1 (RE1 sites and silences gene expression in non-neuronal cells. Inserting NRSE sites into transgenes strongly biased expression to neural tissues. NRSE sequences were effective in restricting expression of bipartite Gal4-based 'driver' transgenes within the context of an enhancer trap and when associated with a defined promoter and enhancer. However, NRSE sequences did

  18. Organotypic three-dimensional culture model of mesenchymal and epithelial cells to examine tissue fusion events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires coordination of multiple cell types, the extracellular matrix, and complex signaling pathways. Fusion events during processes including heart development, neural tube closure, and palatal fusion are dependent on signaling ...

  19. YAP/TAZ-Dependent Reprogramming of Colonic Epithelium Links ECM Remodeling to Tissue Regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yui, Shiro; Azzolin, Luca; Maimets, Martti

    2018-01-01

    sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model, and we demonstrate that the epithelium is transiently reprogrammed into a primitive state. This is characterized by de novo expression of fetal markers as well as suppression of markers for adult stem and differentiated cells. The fate change is orchestrated......Tissue regeneration requires dynamic cellular adaptation to the wound environment. It is currently unclear how this is orchestrated at the cellular level and how cell fate is affected by severe tissue damage. Here we dissect cell fate transitions during colonic regeneration in a mouse dextran...... by remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM), increased FAK/Src signaling, and ultimately YAP/TAZ activation. In a defined cell culture system recapitulating the extracellular matrix remodeling observed in vivo, we show that a collagen 3D matrix supplemented with Wnt ligands is sufficient to sustain endogenous...

  20. The Extent of Tissue Damage in the Epidural Space by Ho / YAG Laser During Epiduroscopic Laser Neural Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Daehyun; Lee, Dong Joo

    2016-01-01

    Lasers have recently become very useful for epiduroscopy. As the use of lasers increases, the potential for unwanted complications with direct application of laser energy to nerve tissue has also increased. Even using the lowest laser power to test for nerve stimulation, there are still risks of laser ablation. However, there are no studies investigating tissue damage from laser procedures in the epidural space. This is a study on the risks of Ho/YAG laser usage during epiduroscopy. Observatory cadaver study. Department of anatomy and clinical research institute at the University Hospital. We used 5 cadavers for this study. After removing the dura and nerve root from the spinal column, laser energy from a Ho/YAG laser was applied directly to the dura and nerve root as well as in the virtual epidural space, which mimicked the conditions of epiduroscopy with the dura folded. Tissue destruction at all laser ablation sites was observed with the naked eye as well as with a microscope. Specimens were collected from each site of laser exposure, fixed in 10% neutral formalin, and dyed with H/E staining. Tissue destruction was observed in all laser ablation sites, regardless of the length of exposure and the power of the laser beam. A cadaver is not exactly the same as a living human because dura characteristics change and tissue damage can be influenced by dura thickness according to the spinal level. Even with low power and short duration, a laser can destroy tissue if the laser beam makes direct contact with the tissue.

  1. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Sharp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing and the posterior abdomen (P-abd. We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism.

  2. A cGMP-applicable expansion method for aggregates of human neural stem and progenitor cells derived from pluripotent stem cells or fetal brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Brandon C; Gowing, Geneviève; Svendsen, Clive N

    2014-06-15

    A cell expansion technique to amass large numbers of cells from a single specimen for research experiments and clinical trials would greatly benefit the stem cell community. Many current expansion methods are laborious and costly, and those involving complete dissociation may cause several stem and progenitor cell types to undergo differentiation or early senescence. To overcome these problems, we have developed an automated mechanical passaging method referred to as "chopping" that is simple and inexpensive. This technique avoids chemical or enzymatic dissociation into single cells and instead allows for the large-scale expansion of suspended, spheroid cultures that maintain constant cell/cell contact. The chopping method has primarily been used for fetal brain-derived neural progenitor cells or neurospheres, and has recently been published for use with neural stem cells derived from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. The procedure involves seeding neurospheres onto a tissue culture Petri dish and subsequently passing a sharp, sterile blade through the cells effectively automating the tedious process of manually mechanically dissociating each sphere. Suspending cells in culture provides a favorable surface area-to-volume ratio; as over 500,000 cells can be grown within a single neurosphere of less than 0.5 mm in diameter. In one T175 flask, over 50 million cells can grow in suspension cultures compared to only 15 million in adherent cultures. Importantly, the chopping procedure has been used under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), permitting mass quantity production of clinical-grade cell products.

  3. Fetal development of subcutaneous white adipose tissue is dependent on Zfp423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Mengle; Hepler, Chelsea; Vishvanath, Lavanya; MacPherson, Karen A; Busbuso, Napoleon C; Gupta, Rana K

    2017-01-01

    Zfp423 is a multi zinc-finger transcription factor expressed in preadipocytes and mature adipocytes in vivo. Our recent work has revealed a critical role for Zfp423 in maintaining the fate of white adipocytes in adult mice through suppression of the beige cell thermogenic gene program; loss of Zfp423 in mature adipocytes of adult mice results in a white-to-beige phenotypic switch. However, the exact requirements of Zfp423 in the fetal stages of early adipose development in vivo have not been clarified. Here, we utilize two models that confer adipose-specific Zfp423 inactivation during fetal adipose development (Adiponectin-Cre; Zfp423loxP/loxP and Adiponectin-rtTA; TRE-Cre; Zfp423loxP/loxP). We assess the impact of fetal adipose Zfp423 deletion on the initial formation of adipose tissue and evaluate the metabolic consequences of challenging these animals with high-fat diet feeding. Deletion of Zfp423 during fetal adipose development results in a different phenotype than is observed when deleting Zfp423 in adipocytes of adult mice. Inactivation of Zfp423 during fetal adipose development results in arrested differentiation, specifically of inguinal white adipocytes, rather than a white-to-beige phenotypic switch that occurs when Zfp423 is inactivated in adult mice. This is likely explained by the observation that adiponectin driven Cre expression is active at an earlier stage of the adipocyte life cycle during fetal subcutaneous adipose development than in adult mice. Upon high-fat diet feeding, obese adipose Zfp423-deficient animals undergo a pathological adipose tissue expansion, associated with ectopic lipid deposition and systemic insulin resistance. Our results reveal that Zfp423 is essential for the terminal differentiation of subcutaneous white adipocytes during fetal adipose tissue development. Moreover, our data highlight the striking adverse effects of pathological subcutaneous adipose tissue remodeling on visceral adipose function and systemic nutrient

  4. Age-dependent differences in brain tissue microstructure assessed with neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Andrew P; Dean, Douglas C; Adluru, Nagesh; Suryawanshi, Gaurav S; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Oh, Jennifer M; Hermann, Bruce P; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Zhang, Hui; Johnson, Sterling C; Alexander, Andrew L; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2016-07-01

    Human aging is accompanied by progressive changes in executive function and memory, but the biological mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not fully understood. Using neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, we sought to examine the relationship between age, cellular microstructure, and neuropsychological scores in 116 late middle-aged, cognitively asymptomatic participants. Results revealed widespread increases in the volume fraction of isotropic diffusion and localized decreases in neurite density in frontal white matter regions with increasing age. In addition, several of these microstructural alterations were associated with poorer performance on tests of memory and executive function. These results suggest that neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging is capable of measuring age-related brain changes and the neural correlates of poorer performance on tests of cognitive functioning, largely in accordance with published histological findings and brain-imaging studies of people of this age range. Ultimately, this study sheds light on the processes underlying normal brain development in adulthood, knowledge that is critical for differentiating healthy aging from changes associated with dementia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  6. The orphan G-protein-coupled receptor-encoding gene V28 is closely related to genes for chemokine receptors and is expressed in lymphoid and neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raport, C J; Schweickart, V L; Eddy, R L; Shows, T B; Gray, P W

    1995-10-03

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategy with degenerate primers was used to identify novel G-protein-coupled receptor-encoding genes from human genomic DNA. One of the isolated clones, termed V28, showed high sequence similarity to the genes encoding human chemokine receptors for monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1 alpha)/RANTES, and to the rat orphan receptor-encoding gene RBS11. When RNA was analyzed by Northern blot, V28 was found to be most highly expressed in neural and lymphoid tissues. Myeloid cell lines, particularly THP.1 cells, showed especially high expression of V28. We have mapped V28 to human chromosome 3p21-3pter, near the MIP-1 alpha/RANTES receptor-encoding gene.

  7. The immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization versus therapeutic ultrasound for patients with neck and arm pain with evidence of neural mechanosensitivity: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael; Puentedura, Emilio 'Louie' J; Cleland, Josh; Ciccone, Charles D

    2016-07-01

    Randomized clinical trial. To investigate the immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization (STM) versus therapeutic ultrasound (US) in patients with neck and arm pain who demonstrate neural mechanical sensitivity. While experts have suggested that individuals with neck and arm pain associated with neural tissue mechanical sensitivity may benefit from STM, there has been little research to investigate this hypothesis. Twenty-three patients with neck and arm pain and a positive upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT) were randomly assigned to receive STM or therapeutic US during a single session. Outcome measures were collected immediately before and after treatment, and at 2-4 day follow-up. Primary outcomes were the Global Rating of Change (GROC), range of motion (ROM) during the ULNT, and pain rating during the ULNT. Secondary measures included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), and active range of shoulder abduction motion combined with the wrist neutral or wrist extension. A greater proportion of patients in the STM group reported a significant improvement on the GROC immediately after treatment (P = 0·003, STM = 75%, US = 9%), and at 2-4 day follow-up (P = 0·027, STM = 58%, US = 9%). Patients who received STM demonstrated greater improvements in ROM during ULNT (P = 0·026), PSFS (P = 0·007), and shoulder active ROM combined with wrist extension (P = 0·028). Improvements in Numeric Pain Rating Scale and pain during the ULNT were observed only in the STM group. There was no difference between groups for the NDI or shoulder abduction ROM with wrist neutral. Patients with neck and arm pain demonstrated greater improvements in ULNT ROM, GROC, and PSFS, and pain following STM than after receiving therapeutic US. Therapy, level 1b.

  8. The immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization versus therapeutic ultrasound for patients with neck and arm pain with evidence of neural mechanosensitivity: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Michael; Puentedura, Emilio ‘Louie’ J.; Cleland, Josh; Ciccone, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Study design Randomized clinical trial. Objectives To investigate the immediate effects of soft tissue mobilization (STM) versus therapeutic ultrasound (US) in patients with neck and arm pain who demonstrate neural mechanical sensitivity. Background While experts have suggested that individuals with neck and arm pain associated with neural tissue mechanical sensitivity may benefit from STM, there has been little research to investigate this hypothesis. Methods Twenty-three patients with neck and arm pain and a positive upper limb neurodynamic test (ULNT) were randomly assigned to receive STM or therapeutic US during a single session. Outcome measures were collected immediately before and after treatment, and at 2–4 day follow-up. Primary outcomes were the Global Rating of Change (GROC), range of motion (ROM) during the ULNT, and pain rating during the ULNT. Secondary measures included the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), and active range of shoulder abduction motion combined with the wrist neutral or wrist extension. Results A greater proportion of patients in the STM group reported a significant improvement on the GROC immediately after treatment (P = 0·003, STM = 75%, US = 9%), and at 2–4 day follow-up (P = 0·027, STM = 58%, US = 9%). Patients who received STM demonstrated greater improvements in ROM during ULNT (P = 0·026), PSFS (P = 0·007), and shoulder active ROM combined with wrist extension (P = 0·028). Improvements in Numeric Pain Rating Scale and pain during the ULNT were observed only in the STM group. There was no difference between groups for the NDI or shoulder abduction ROM with wrist neutral. Conclusion Patients with neck and arm pain demonstrated greater improvements in ULNT ROM, GROC, and PSFS, and pain following STM than after receiving therapeutic US. Level of evidence Therapy, level 1b. PMID:27559283

  9. Adipocyte-Specific IKKβ Signaling Suppresses Adipose Tissue Inflammation through an IL-13-Dependent Paracrine Feedback Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyokjoon Kwon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue inflammation is one pathway shown to mediate insulin resistance in obese humans and rodents. Obesity induces dynamic cellular changes in adipose tissue to increase proinflammatory cytokines and diminish anti-inflammatory cytokines. However, we have found that anti-inflammatory interleukin-13 (IL-13 is unexpectedly induced in adipose tissue of obese humans and high-fat diet (HFD-fed mice, and the source of IL-13 is primarily the adipocyte. Moreover, HFD-induced proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and IL-1β mediate IL-13 production in adipocytes in an IKKβ-dependent manner. In contrast, adipocyte-specific IKKβ-deficient mice show diminished IL-13 expression and enhanced inflammation after HFD feeding, resulting in a worsening of the insulin-resistant state. Together these data demonstrate that although IKKβ activates the expression of proinflammatory mediators, in adipocytes, IKKβ signaling also induces the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-13, which plays a unique protective role by limiting adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

  10. Rate-dependent activation failure in isolated cardiac cells and tissue due to Na+ channel block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindler, Anthony J.; Paterson, David; Noble, Denis

    2015-01-01

    While it is well established that class-I antiarrhythmics block cardiac sodium channels, the mechanism of action of therapeutic levels of these drugs is not well understood. Using a combination of mathematical modeling and in vitro experiments, we studied the failure of activation of action potentials in single ventricular cells and in tissue caused by Na+ channel block. Our computations of block and unblock of sodium channels by a theoretical class-Ib antiarrhythmic agent predict differences in the concentrations required to cause activation failure in single cells as opposed to multicellular preparations. We tested and confirmed these in silico predictions with in vitro experiments on isolated guinea-pig ventricular cells and papillary muscles stimulated at various rates (2–6.67 Hz) and exposed to various concentrations (5 × 10−6 to 500 × 10−6 mol/l) of lidocaine. The most salient result was that whereas large doses (5 × 10−4 mol/l or higher) of lidocaine were required to inhibit action potentials temporarily in single cells, much lower doses (5 × 10−6 mol/l), i.e., therapeutic levels, were sufficient to have the same effect in papillary muscles: a hundredfold difference. Our experimental results and mathematical analysis indicate that the syncytial nature of cardiac tissue explains the effects of clinically relevant doses of Na+ channel blockers. PMID:26342072

  11. Orientation dependence of microcirculation-induced diffusion signal in anisotropic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Osama M; Gomez, Arnold David; Merchant, Samer; Heidinger, Michael; Poelzing, Steven; Hsu, Edward W

    2016-10-01

    To seek a better understanding of the effect of organized capillary flow on the MR diffusion-weighted signal. A theoretical framework was proposed to describe the diffusion-weighted MR signal, which was then validated both numerically using a realistic model of capillary network and experimentally in an animal model of isolated perfused heart preparation with myocardial blood flow verified by means of direct arterial spin labeling measurements. Microcirculation in organized tissues gave rise to an MR signal that could be described as a combination of the bi-exponential behavior of conventional intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) theory and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) -like anisotropy of the vascular signal, with the flow-related pseudo diffusivity represented as the linear algebraic product between the encoding directional unit vector and an appropriate tensor entity. Very good agreement between theoretical predictions and both numerical and experimental observations were found. These findings suggest that the DTI formalism of anisotropic spin motion can be incorporated into the classical IVIM theory to describe the MR signal arising from diffusion and microcirculation in organized tissues. Magn Reson Med 76:1252-1262, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Medium dependant production of corymbiferone a novel product from Penicillium hordei cultured on plant tissue agar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overy, David Patrick; Zidorn, C.; Petersen, B.O.

    2005-01-01

    Medium dependant production and the structure elucidation of corymbiferone (1) from the fungus Penicillitan hordei grown on oatmeal and macerated tulip, yellow onion and red onion agars are reported. Compound 1 possesses an unusual oxygenated aromatic structure with a lactone bridge preventing full...

  13. Age, Dose, and Time-Dependency of Plasma and Tissue Distribution of Deltamethrine in Immature Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major objective of this project was to characterize the systemic disposition of the pyrethroid, deltamethrin (DLT), in immature rats, with emphasis on the age-dependence of target organ (brain) dosimetry. Postnatal day (PND) 10, 21, and 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0...

  14. Apparatus dependence of normal brain tissue dose in stereotactic radiosurgery for multiple brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijun; Petti, Paula; Wang, Brian; Descovich, Martina; Chuang, Cynthia; Barani, Igor J; Kunwar, Sandeep; Shrieve, Dennis C; Sahgal, Arjun; Larson, David A

    2011-06-01

    Technical improvements in commercially available radiosurgery platforms have made it practical to treat a large number of intracranial targets. The goal of this study was to investigate whether the dose to normal brain when planning radiosurgery to multiple targets is apparatus dependent. The authors selected a single case involving a patient with 12 metastatic lesions widely distributed throughout the brain as visualized on contrast-enhanced CT. Target volumes and critical normal structures were delineated with Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion software. The imaging studies including the delineated contours were digitally exported into the CyberKnife and Novalis multileaf collimator-based planning systems for treatment planning using identical target dose goals and dose-volume constraints. Subsets of target combinations (3, 6, 9, or 12 targets) were planned separately to investigate the relationship of number of targets and radiosurgery platform to the dose to normal brain. Despite similar target dose coverage and dose to normal structures, the dose to normal brain was strongly apparatus dependent. A nonlinear increase in dose to normal brain volumes with increasing number of targets was also noted. The dose delivered to normal brain is strongly dependent on the radiosurgery platform. How general this conclusion is and whether apparatus-dependent differences are related to differences in hardware design or differences in dose-planning algorithms deserve further investigation.

  15. Disease-associated prion protein in neural and lymphoid tissues of mink (Mustela vison) inoculated with transmissible mink encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D A; Harrington, R D; Zhuang, D; Yan, H; Truscott, T C; Dassanayake, R P; O'Rourke, K I

    2012-11-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are diagnosed by immunodetection of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)). The distribution of PrP(d) within the body varies with the time-course of infection and between species, during interspecies transmission, as well as with prion strain. Mink are susceptible to a form of TSE known as transmissible mink encephalopathy (TME), presumed to arise due to consumption of feed contaminated with a single prion strain of ruminant origin. After extended passage of TME isolates in hamsters, two strains emerge, HY and DY, each of which is associated with unique structural isoforms of PrP(TME) and of which only the HY strain is associated with accumulation of PrP(TME) in lymphoid tissues. Information on the structural nature and lymphoid accumulation of PrP(TME) in mink is limited. In this study, 13 mink were challenged by intracerebral inoculation using late passage TME inoculum, after which brain and lymphoid tissues were collected at preclinical and clinical time points. The distribution and molecular nature of PrP(TME) was investigated by techniques including blotting of paraffin wax-embedded tissue and epitope mapping by western blotting. PrP(TME) was detected readily in the brain and retropharyngeal lymph node during preclinical infection, with delayed progression of accumulation within other lymphoid tissues. For comparison, three mink were inoculated by the oral route and examined during clinical disease. Accumulation of PrP(TME) in these mink was greater and more widespread, including follicles of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Western blot analyses revealed that PrP(TME) accumulating in the brain of mink is structurally most similar to that accumulating in the brain of hamsters infected with the DY strain. Collectively, the results of extended passage in mink are consistent with the presence of only a single strain of TME, the DY strain, capable of inducing accumulation of PrP(TME) in the lymphoid

  16. Microscopic neural image registration based on the structure of mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huiwen; Han, Hua; Rao, Qiang; Xiao, Chi; Chen, Xi

    2017-02-01

    Microscopic image registration is a key component of the neural structure reconstruction with serial sections of neural tissue. The goal of microscopic neural image registration is to recover the 3D continuity and geometrical properties of specimen. During image registration, various distortions need to be corrected, including image rotation, translation, tissue deformation et.al, which come from the procedure of sample cutting, staining and imaging. Furthermore, there is only certain similarity between adjacent sections, and the degree of similarity depends on local structure of the tissue and the thickness of the sections. These factors make the microscopic neural image registration a challenging problem. To tackle the difficulty of corresponding landmarks extraction, we introduce a novel image registration method for Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images of serial neural tissue sections based on the structure of mitochondria. The ellipsoidal shape of mitochondria ensures that the same mitochondria has similar shape between adjacent sections, and its characteristic of broad distribution in the neural tissue guarantees that landmarks based on the mitochondria distributed widely in the image. The proposed image registration method contains three parts: landmarks extraction between adjacent sections, corresponding landmarks matching and image deformation based on the correspondences. We demonstrate the performance of our method with SEM images of drosophila brain.

  17. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  18. Automated cancer stem cell recognition in H and E stained tissue using convolutional neural networks and color deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, Wolfgang; Krappe, Sebastian; Cetin, A. Enis; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul; Üner, Aysegül; Benz, Michaela; Wittenberg, Thomas; Stamminger, Marc; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2017-03-01

    The analysis and interpretation of histopathological samples and images is an important discipline in the diagnosis of various diseases, especially cancer. An important factor in prognosis and treatment with the aim of a precision medicine is the determination of so-called cancer stem cells (CSC) which are known for their resistance to chemotherapeutic treatment and involvement in tumor recurrence. Using immunohistochemistry with CSC markers like CD13, CD133 and others is one way to identify CSC. In our work we aim at identifying CSC presence on ubiquitous Hematoxilyn and Eosin (HE) staining as an inexpensive tool for routine histopathology based on their distinct morphological features. We present initial results of a new method based on color deconvolution (CD) and convolutional neural networks (CNN). This method performs favorably (accuracy 0.936) in comparison with a state-of-the-art method based on 1DSIFT and eigen-analysis feature sets evaluated on the same image database. We also show that accuracy of the CNN is improved by the CD pre-processing.

  19. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P; Smith, David R

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4 to 8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and Type I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of eight fish could detect an increase of approximately 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α=0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of approximately 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2, this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of approximately 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated for by increased precision of composites

  20. Threshold-dependent sample sizes for selenium assessment with stream fish tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Natural resource managers are developing assessments of selenium (Se) contamination in freshwater ecosystems based on fish tissue concentrations. We evaluated the effects of sample size (i.e., number of fish per site) on the probability of correctly detecting mean whole-body Se values above a range of potential management thresholds. We modeled Se concentrations as gamma distributions with shape and scale parameters fitting an empirical mean-to-variance relationship in data from southwestern West Virginia, USA (63 collections, 382 individuals). We used parametric bootstrapping techniques to calculate statistical power as the probability of detecting true mean concentrations up to 3 mg Se/kg above management thresholds ranging from 4 to 8 mg Se/kg. Sample sizes required to achieve 80% power varied as a function of management thresholds and Type I error tolerance (α). Higher thresholds required more samples than lower thresholds because populations were more heterogeneous at higher mean Se levels. For instance, to assess a management threshold of 4 mg Se/kg, a sample of eight fish could detect an increase of approximately 1 mg Se/kg with 80% power (given α = 0.05), but this sample size would be unable to detect such an increase from a management threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with more than a coin-flip probability. Increasing α decreased sample size requirements to detect above-threshold mean Se concentrations with 80% power. For instance, at an α-level of 0.05, an 8-fish sample could detect an increase of approximately 2 units above a threshold of 8 mg Se/kg with 80% power, but when α was relaxed to 0.2, this sample size was more sensitive to increasing mean Se concentrations, allowing detection of an increase of approximately 1.2 units with equivalent power. Combining individuals into 2- and 4-fish composite samples for laboratory analysis did not decrease power because the reduced number of laboratory samples was compensated for by increased

  1. Exponential Antisynchronization Control of Stochastic Memristive Neural Networks with Mixed Time-Varying Delays Based on Novel Delay-Dependent or Delay-Independent Adaptive Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The global exponential antisynchronization in mean square of memristive neural networks with stochastic perturbation and mixed time-varying delays is studied in this paper. Then, two kinds of novel delay-dependent and delay-independent adaptive controllers are designed. With the ability of adapting to environment changes, the proposed controllers can modify their behaviors to achieve the best performance. In particular, on the basis of the differential inclusions theory, inequality theory, and stochastic analysis techniques, several sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the exponential antisynchronization between the drive system and response system. Furthermore, two numerical simulation examples are provided to the validity of the derived criteria.

  2. Mechanical properties of native and tissue-engineered cartilage depend on carrier permeability: a bioreactor study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, Elisa; Leicht, Uta; Winkler, Thomas; Mielke, Gabriela; Beck, Katharina; Peters, Fabian; Schilling, Arndt F; Morlock, Michael M

    2013-07-01

    The implantation of osteochondral constructs-tissue-engineered (TE) cartilage on a bone substitute carrier-is a promising method to treat defects in articular cartilage. Currently, however, the TE cartilage's mechanical properties are clearly inferior to those of native cartilage. Their improvement has been the subject of various studies, mainly focusing on growth factors and physical loading during cultivation. With the approach of osteochondral constructs another aspect arises: the permeability of the carrier materials. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether and how the permeability of the subchondral bone influences the properties of native cartilage and whether the bone substitute carrier's permeability influences the TE cartilage of osteochondral constructs accordingly. Consequently, the influence of the subchondral bone's permeability on native cartilage was determined: Native porcine cartilage-bone cylinders were cultivated for 2 weeks in a bioreactor under mechanical loading with and without restricted permeability of the bone. For the TE cartilage these two permeability conditions were investigated using permeable and impermeable tricalciumphosphate carriers under equivalent cultivation conditions. All specimens were evaluated mechanically, biochemically, and histologically. The restriction of the bone's permeability significantly decreased the Young's modulus of native cartilage in vitro. No biochemical differences were found. This finding was confirmed for TE cartilage: While the biochemical parameters were not affected, a permeable carrier improved the cell morphology and mechanical properties in comparison to an impermeable one. In conclusion, the carrier permeability was identified as a determining factor for the mechanical properties of TE cartilage of osteochondral constructs.

  3. Time-dependent matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases expression change in fusarium solani keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Gao, Xin-Rui; Cui, Hong-Ping; Lang, Li-Li; Xie, Xiu-Wen; Chen, Qun

    2016-01-01

    To investigate matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) expression during the progress of fusarium solani (F.solani) keratitis in a rat model. A rat model of F.solani keratitis was produced using corneal scarification and a hand-made contact lens. MMPs and TIMPs expressiond were explored in this rat model of F.solani keratitis using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DIF. GM6001 (400 µmol/mL) was used to treat infected corneas. The keratitis duration, amount and area of corneal neovascularization (CNV) were evaluated. MMP-3 expression was 66.3 times higher in infected corneas compared to normal corneas. MMP-8, -9, and -13 expressions were significantly upregulated in the mid-period of the infection, with infected-to-normal ratios of 4.03, 39.86, and 5.94, respectively. MMP-2 and -7 expressions increased in the late period, with the infected-to-normal ratios of 5.94 and 16.22, respectively. TIMP-1 expression was upregulated in the early period, and it was 43.17 times higher in infected compared to normal corneas, but TIMP-2, -3, and -4 expressions were mildly downregulated or unchanged. The results of DIF were consistent with the result of real-time PCR. GM6001, a MMPs inhibitor, decreased the duration of F.solani infection and the amount and area of CNV. MMPs and TIMPs contributed into the progress of F.solani keratitis.

  4. Neuronal regeneration in the newt: a model to study the partly reconstruction of the neural tissue in real and simulated weightles sness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, H.; Grigoryan, E.; Mitashov, V.

    The micro -"g" effect on nervous tissue regeneration in newts has been investigated by our group for many years. It has been performed in real and in simulated microgravity with a clinostat. During limb regeneration the motor - and sensory nerves regrow perfectly within the newly formed limb. Like in `1g' conditions they are responsible for the initiation of blastema formation and continuity of g owth andr differentiation. Except for a general acceleration of growth and differentiation processes no differences became visible. Tail regeneration, which is perfectly regulated in newts during their whole life, includes the restoration of the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. They follow or initiate an accelerated growth. Up to the present the cellular derivation of the sensory neurones within the regenerate has not yet been clarified. But growth acceleration comprises the whole nervous system. That means a totally new formation of the sensory connection from the periphery to the whole spinal cord. Regeneration must be initiated by the outgrowth of nerve fibres into the wound area. This may be performed by the remaining cut sensory fibres of the last stump segment and should be followed by the differentiation of undifferentiated cells of neural crest origin nearby the amputation area. Such cells are present in the form of meningeal cells which are the origin of mantle and Schwann cells too. Corresponding to the well proved growth acceleration of lens, retina, connective tissue, muscle and skin, the real and simulated microgravity affects the nervous system in the same manner. Tissues and organs of adult organisms have no chance to remain unaffected by the microgravity effect. We try to find the trigger which initiates the accelerated proliferation of the stem cells of sensory neurons, mantle and sheath cells under micro-"g" conditions.

  5. Severe diabetes, age-dependent loss of adipose tissue, and mild growth deficiency in mice lacking Akt2/PKBβ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Robert S.; Orena, Stephen J.; Rafidi, Kristina; Torchia, Anthony J.; Stock, Jeffrey L.; Hildebrandt, Audrey L.; Coskran, Timothy; Black, Shawn C.; Brees, Dominique J.; Wicks, Joan R.; McNeish, John D.; Coleman, Kevin G.

    2003-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB plays key roles in the regulation of cell growth, survival, and metabolism. It remains unclear, however, whether the functions of individual Akt/PKB isoforms are distinct. To investigate the function of Akt2/PKBβ, mice lacking this isoform were generated. Both male and female Akt2/PKBβ-null mice exhibit mild growth deficiency and an age-dependent loss of adipose tissue or lipoatrophy, with all observed adipose depots dramatically reduced by 22 weeks of age. Akt2/PKBβ-deficient mice are insulin resistant with elevated plasma triglycerides. In addition, Akt2/PKBβ-deficient mice exhibit fed and fasting hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and impaired muscle glucose uptake. In males, insulin resistance progresses to a severe form of diabetes accompanied by pancreatic β cell failure. In contrast, female Akt2/PKBβ-deficient mice remain mildly hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic until at least one year of age. Thus, Akt2/PKBβ-deficient mice exhibit growth deficiency similar to that reported previously for mice lacking Akt1/PKBα, indicating that both Akt2/PKBβ and Akt1/PKBα participate in the regulation of growth. The marked hyperglycemia and loss of pancreatic β cells and adipose tissue in Akt2/PKBβ-deficient mice suggest that Akt2/PKBβ plays critical roles in glucose metabolism and the development or maintenance of proper adipose tissue and islet mass for which other Akt/PKB isoforms are unable to fully compensate. PMID:12843127

  6. DEPENDENCE OF THE SPECKLE-PATTERNS SIZE AND THEIR CONTRAST ON THE BIOPHYSICAL AND STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS OF BIOLOGICAL TISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. D. Abramovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Speckle fields are widely used in optical diagnostics of biotissues and evaluation of the functional state of bioobjects. The speckle field is formed by laser radiation scattered from the object under study. It bears information about the average dimensions of the scatterers, the degree of surface roughness makes it possible to judge the structural and biophysical characteristics of individual tissue cells (particles, on the one hand, and the integral optical characteristics of the entire biological tissue. The aim of the study was – the determination of connections between the biophysical and structural characteristics of the biotissue and the light fields inside the biotissues.The model developed of the medium gives a direct relationship between the optical and biophysical parameters of the biotissue. Calculations were carried out using known solutions of the radiation transfer equation, taking into account the multilayer structure of the tissue, multiple scattering in the medium, and multiple reflection of irradiation between the layers.With the increase wavelength, the size of speckles formed by the non-scattered component (direct light of laser radiation increases by a factor of 2 from 400 to 800 μm in the stratum corneum and 5 times from 0.6 to 3 μm for the epidermis and from 0.27 to 1.4 μm to the dermis. Typical values of sizes of speckles formed by the diffraction component of laser radiation for the stratum corneum and epidermis range from 0.02 to 0.15 μm. For the dermis typical spot sizes are up to 0.03 μm. The speckle-spot size of the diffusion component in the dermis can vary from ±10 % at 400 nm and up to ±23 % for 800 nm when the volume concentration of blood capillaries changes. Characteristic dependencies are obtained and biophysical factors associated with the volume concentration of blood and the degree of it’s oxygenation that affect the contrast of the speckle structure in the dermis are discussed.The of speckles

  7. Type I Interferon Counters or Promotes Coxiella burnetii Replication Dependent on Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedges, Jodi F; Robison, Amanda; Kimmel, Emily; Christensen, Kelly; Lucas, Erin; Ramstead, Andrew; Jutila, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular pathogen and the cause of Q fever. Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is critical for host protection from infection, but a role for type I IFN in C. burnetii infection has not been determined. Type I IFN supports host protection from a related pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, and we hypothesized that it would be similarly protective in C. burnetii infection. In contrast to our prediction, IFN-α receptor-deficient (IFNAR(-/-)) mice were protected from C. burnetii-induced infection. Therefore, the role of type I IFN in C. burnetii infection was distinct from that in L. pneumophila Mice treated with a double-stranded-RNA mimetic were protected from C. burnetii-induced weight loss through an IFNAR-independent pathway. We next treated mice with recombinant IFN-α (rIFN-α). When rIFN-α was injected by the intraperitoneal route during infection, disease-induced weight loss was exacerbated. Mice that received rIFN-α by this route had dampened interleukin 1β (IL-1β) expression in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. However, when rIFN-α was delivered to the lung, bacterial replication was decreased in all tissues. Thus, the presence of type I IFN in the lung protected from infection, but when delivered to the periphery, type I IFN enhanced disease, potentially by dampening inflammatory cytokines. To better characterize the capacity for type I IFN induction by C. burnetii, we assessed expression of IFN-β transcripts by human macrophages following stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from C. burnetii Understanding innate responses in C. burnetii infection will support the discovery of novel therapies that may be alternative or complementary to the current antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Histone Acetylation Modifications Affect Tissue-Dependent Expression of Poplar Homologs of C4 Photosynthetic Enzyme Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play important roles in regulating the expression of C4 photosynthetic genes. Given that all enzymes required for the C4 photosynthesis pathway are present in C3 plants, it has been hypothesized that this expression regulatory mechanism has been conserved. However, the relationship between histone modification and the expression of homologs of C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes has not been well determined in C3 plants. In the present study, we cloned nine hybrid poplar (Populus simonii × Populus nigra homologs of maize (Zea mays C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes, carbonic anhydrase (CA, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, and investigated the correlation between the expression levels of these genes and the levels of promoter histone acetylation modifications in four vegetative tissues. We found that poplar homologs of C4 homologous genes had tissue-dependent expression patterns that were mostly well-correlated with the level of histone acetylation modification (H3K9ac and H4K5ac determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A further confirmed the role of histone acetylation in the regulation of the nine target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that both H3K9ac and H4K5ac positively regulate the tissue-dependent expression pattern of the PsnCAs, PsnPPDKs, PsnPCKs, and PsnPEPCs genes and that this regulatory mechanism seems to be conserved among the C3 and C4 species. Our findings provide new insight that will aid efforts to modify the expression pattern of these homologs of C4 genes to engineer C4 plants from C3 plants.

  9. The matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor marimastat promotes neural progenitor cell differentiation into neurons by gelatinase-independent TIMP-2-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinno, Maddalena; Biagioni, Stefano; Ajmone-Cat, Maria Antonietta; Pafumi, Irene; Caramanica, Pasquale; Medda, Virginia; Tonti, Gaetana; Minghetti, Luisa; Mannello, Ferdinando; Cacci, Emanuele

    2013-02-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs), produced in the brain by cells of non-neural and neural origin, including neural progenitors (NPs), are emerging as regulators of nervous system development and adult brain functions. In the present study, we explored whether MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-2, abundantly produced in the brain, modulate NP developmental properties. We found that treatment of NPs, isolated from the murine fetal cerebral cortex or adult subventricular zone, with the clinically tested broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor Marimastat profoundly affected the NP differentiation fate. Marimastat treatment allowed for an enrichment of our cultures in neuronal cells, inducing NPs to generate higher percentage of neurons and a lower percentage of astrocytes, possibly affecting NP commitment. Consistently with its proneurogenic effect, Marimastat early downregulated the expression of Notch target genes, such as Hes1 and Hes5. MMP-2 and MMP-9 profiling on proliferating and differentiating NPs revealed that MMP-9 was not expressed under these conditions, whereas MMP-2 increased in the medium as pro-MMP-2 (72 kDa) during differentiation; its active form (62 kDa) was not detectable by gel zymography. MMP-2 silencing or administration of recombinant active MMP-2 demonstrated that MMP-2 does not affect NP neuronal differentiation, nor it is involved in the Marimastat proneurogenic effect. We also found that TIMP-2 is expressed in NPs and increases during late differentiation, mainly as a consequence of astrocyte generation. Endogenous TIMP-2 did not modulate NP neurogenic potential; however, the proneurogenic action of Marimastat was mediated by TIMP-2, as demonstrated by silencing experiments. In conclusion, our data exclude a major involvement of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the regulation of basal NP differentiation, but highlight the ability of TIMP-2 to act as key effector of the proneurogenic response to an inducing stimulus such as Marimastat.

  10. Context-dependent neural activation: internally and externally guided rhythmic lower limb movement in individuals with and without neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Eve Hackney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients’ quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, tai chi have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control and postural stability in people with PD (Amano, Nocera, Vallabhajosula, Juncos, Gregor, Waddell et al., 2013; Earhart, 2009; M. E. Hackney & Earhart, 2008; Kadivar, Corcos, Foto, & Hondzinski, 2011; Morris, Iansek, & Kirkwood, 2009; Ridgel, Vitek, & Alberts, 2009. However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG and externally guided (EG movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG versus EG designs. Because of the potential task specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural

  11. The positional identity of iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells along the anterior-posterior axis is controlled in a dosage-dependent manner by bFGF and EGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shuling; Ochalek, Anna; Szczesna, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Neural rosettes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been claimed to be a highly robust in vitro cellular model for biomedical application. They are able to propagate in vitro in the presence of mitogens, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth...... factor (EGF). However, these two mitogens are also involved in anterior-posterior patterning in a gradient dependent manner along the neural tube axis. Here, we compared the regional identity of neural rosette cells and specific neural subtypes of their progeny propagated with low and high concentrations...... of bFGF and EGF. We observed that low concentrations of bFGF and EGF in the culturing system were able to induce forebrain identity of the neural rosettes and promote subsequent cortical neuronal differentiation. On the contrary, high concentrations of these mitogens stimulate a mid-hindbrain fate...

  12. Changes in pitch height elicit both language-universal and language-dependent changes in neural representation of pitch in the brainstem and auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ananthanarayan; Suresh, Chandan H; Gandour, Jackson T

    2017-03-27

    Language experience shapes encoding of pitch-relevant information at both brainstem and cortical levels of processing. Pitch height is a salient dimension that orders pitch from low to high. Herein we investigate the effects of language experience (Chinese, English) in the brainstem and cortex on (i) neural responses to variations in pitch height, (ii) presence of asymmetry in cortical pitch representation, and (iii) patterns of relative changes in magnitude of pitch height between these two levels of brain structure. Stimuli were three nonspeech homologs of Mandarin Tone 2 varying in pitch height only. The frequency-following response (FFR) and the cortical pitch-specific response (CPR) were recorded concurrently. At the Fz-linked T7/T8 site, peak latency of Na, Pb, and Nb decreased with increasing pitch height for both groups. Peak-to-peak amplitude of Na-Pb and Pb-Nb increased with increasing pitch height across groups. A language-dependent effect was restricted to Na-Pb; the Chinese had larger amplitude than the English group. At temporal sites (T7/T8), the Chinese group had larger amplitude, as compared to English, across stimuli, but also limited to the Na-Pb component and right temporal site. In the brainstem, F0 magnitude decreased with increasing pitch height; Chinese had larger magnitude across stimuli. A comparison of CPR and FFR responses revealed distinct patterns of relative changes in magnitude common to both groups. CPR amplitude increased and FFR amplitude decreased with increasing pitch height. Experience-dependent effects on CPR components vary as a function of neural sensitivity to pitch height within a particular temporal window (Na-Pb). Differences between the auditory brainstem and cortex imply distinct neural mechanisms for pitch extraction at both levels of brain structure. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Role of hepatic and extrahepatic tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firth, R.G.; Bell, P.M.; Marsh, H.M.; Hansen, I.; Rizza, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    Patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) have both preprandial and postprandial hyperglycemia. To determine the mechanism responsible for the postprandial hyperglycemia, insulin secretion, insulin action, and the pattern of carbohydrate metabolism after glucose ingestion were assessed in patients with NIDDM and in matched nondiabetic subjects using the dual isotope and forearm catheterization techniques. Prior to meal ingestion, hepatic glucose release was increased (P less than 0.001) in the diabetic patients measured using (2-/sup 3/H) or (3-/sup 3/H) glucose. After meal ingestion, patients with NIDDM had excessive rates of systemic glucose entry (1,316 +/- 56 vs. 1,018 +/- 65 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01), primarily owing to a failure to suppress adequately endogenous glucose release (680 +/- 50 vs. 470 +/- 32 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.01) from its high preprandial level. Despite impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production during a hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp (P less than 0.001) and decreased postprandial C-peptide response (P less than 0.05) in NIDDM, percent suppression of hepatic glucose release after oral glucose was comparable in the diabetic and nondiabetic subjects (45 +/- 3 vs. 39 +/- 2%). Although new glucose formation from meal-derived three-carbon precursors (53 +/- 3 vs. 40 +/- 7 mg/kg X 7 h, P less than 0.05) was greater in the diabetic patients, it accounted for only a minor part of this excessive postprandial hepatic glucose release. Postprandial hyperglycemia was exacerbated by the lack of an appropriate increase in glucose uptake whether measured isotopically or by forearm glucose uptake. Thus excessive hepatic glucose release and impaired glucose uptake are involved in the pathogenesis of postprandial hyperglycemia in patients with NIDDM.

  14. Breast-cancer extracellular vesicles induce platelet activation and aggregation by tissue factor-independent and -dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fausto G; Sandim, Vanessa; Almeida, Vitor H; Rondon, Araci M R; Succar, Barbara B; Hottz, Eugenio D; Leal, Ana Carolina; Verçoza, Brunno Renato F; Rodrigues, Juliany Cola F; Bozza, Patrícia T; Zingali, Russolina B; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2017-11-01

    Cancer-associated thrombosis is one of the major causes of worse prognosis among tumor-bearing patients. Extracellular vesicles derived from cancer cells, which can be divided mainly into microvesicles and exosomes, can participate in several tumor progression phenomena. Tumor-derived microvesicles positive for tissue factor (TF) have been associated with thrombotic risk in certain cancer types. Cancer cell-derived exosomes, however, have not. In this study we evaluated the capacity of extracellular vesicles (EVs, containing both microvesicles and exosomes) derived from breast-cancer cell lines in promoting platelet activation, aggregation and plasma coagulation, in experiments that access both TF-dependent and -independent activities. EVs were isolated from the conditioned media of two human mammary carcinoma cell lines: MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive) and MCF-7 (less invasive). TF-independent EV/platelet interaction, platelet P-selectin exposure and aggregation were evaluated. Western blotting, plasma clotting and platelet aggregation in the presence of plasma were performed for the measurement of TF-dependent activity in EVs. Interaction between MDA-MB-231 EVs and washed platelets led to increased platelet P-selectin exposure and platelet aggregation compared to MCF-7 EVs. MDA-MB-231 EVs had higher TF protein levels and TF-dependent procoagulant activity than MCF-7 EVs. Consequently, TF-dependent platelet aggregation was also induced by MDA-MB-231 EVs, but not by MCF-7 EVs. Our results suggest that MDA-MB-231 EVs induce TF-independent platelet activation and aggregation, as well as TF-dependent plasma clotting and platelet aggregation by means of thrombin generation. In this context, aggressive breast cancer-derived EVs may contribute to cancer-associated thrombosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Boys vs. girls: Gender differences in the neural development of trust and reciprocity depend on social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmers-Jansen, Imke L J; Krabbendam, Lydia; Veltman, Dick J; Fett, Anne-Kathrin J

    2017-06-01

    Trust and cooperation increase from adolescence to adulthood, but studies on gender differences in this development are rare. We investigated gender and age-related differences in trust and reciprocity and associated neural mechanisms in 43 individuals (16-27 years, 22 male). Participants played two multi-round trust games with a cooperative and an unfair partner. Males showed more basic trust towards unknown others than females. Both genders increased trust during cooperative interactions, with no differences in average trust. Age was unrelated to trust during cooperation. During unfair interactions males decreased their trust more with age than females. ROI analysis showed age-related increases in activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during cooperative investments, and increased age-related caudate activation during both cooperative and unfair repayments. Gender differences in brain activation were only observed during cooperative repayments, with males activating the TPJ more than females, and females activating the caudate more. The findings suggest relatively mature processes of trust and reciprocity in the investigated age range. Gender differences only occur in unfair contexts, becoming more pronounced with age. Largely similar neural activation in males and females and few age effects suggest that similar, mature cognitive strategies are employed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Brown remodeling of white adipose tissue by SirT1-dependent deacetylation of Pparγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Li; Wang, Liheng; Kon, Ning; Zhao, Wenhui; Lee, Sangkyu; Zhang, Yiying; Rosenbaum, Michael; Zhao, Yingming; Gu, Wei; Farmer, Stephen R; Accili, Domenico

    2012-08-03

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) can disperse stored energy as heat. Promoting BAT-like features in white adipose (WAT) is an attractive, if elusive, therapeutic approach to staunch the current obesity epidemic. Here we report that gain of function of the NAD-dependent deacetylase SirT1 or loss of function of its endogenous inhibitor Deleted in breast cancer-1 (Dbc1) promote "browning" of WAT by deacetylating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar)-γ on Lys268 and Lys293. SirT1-dependent deacetylation of Lys268 and Lys293 is required to recruit the BAT program coactivator Prdm16 to Pparγ, leading to selective induction of BAT genes and repression of visceral WAT genes associated with insulin resistance. An acetylation-defective Pparγ mutant induces a brown phenotype in white adipocytes, whereas an acetylated mimetic fails to induce "brown" genes but retains the ability to activate "white" genes. We propose that SirT1-dependent Pparγ deacetylation is a form of selective Pparγ modulation of potential therapeutic import. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-dimensional immersive virtual reality for studying cellular compartments in 3D models from EM preparations of neural tissues

    KAUST Repository

    Cali, Corrado

    2015-07-14

    Advances for application of electron microscopy to serial imaging are opening doors to new ways of analyzing cellular structure. New and improved algorithms and workflows for manual and semiautomated segmentation allow to observe the spatial arrangement of the smallest cellular features with unprecedented detail in full three-dimensions (3D). From larger samples, higher complexity models can be generated; however, they pose new challenges to data management and analysis. Here, we review some currently available solutions and present our approach in detail. We use the fully immersive virtual reality (VR) environment CAVE (cave automatic virtual environment), a room where we are able to project a cellular reconstruction and visualize in 3D, to step into a world created with Blender, a free, fully customizable 3D modeling software with NeuroMorph plug-ins for visualization and analysis of electron microscopy (EM) preparations of brain tissue. Our workflow allows for full and fast reconstructions of volumes of brain neuropil using ilastik, a software tool for semiautomated segmentation of EM stacks. With this visualization environment, we can walk into the model containing neuronal and astrocytic processes to study the spatial distribution of glycogen granules, a major energy source that is selectively stored in astrocytes. The use of CAVE was key to observe a nonrandom distribution of glycogen, and led us to develop tools to quantitatively analyze glycogen clustering and proximity to other subcellular features. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunohistochemical study of PrPSc distribution in neural and extraneural tissues of two cats with feline spongiform encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wunderlin Sabina S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two domestic shorthair cats presenting with progressive hind-limb ataxia and increased aggressiveness were necropsied and a post mortem diagnosis of Feline Spongiform Encephalopathy (FSE was made. A wide spectrum of tissue samples was collected and evaluated histologically and immunohistologically for the presence of PrPSc. Results Histopathological examination revealed a diffuse vacuolation of the grey matter neuropil with the following areas being most severely affected: corpus geniculatum medialis, thalamus, gyrus dentatus of the hippocampus, corpus striatum, and deep layers of the cerebral and cerebellar cortex as well as in the brain stem. In addition, a diffuse glial reaction involving astrocytes and microglia and intraneuronal vacuolation in a few neurons in the brain stem was present. Heavy PrPSc immunostaining was detected in brain, retina, optic nerve, pars nervosa of the pituitary gland, trigeminal ganglia and small amounts in the myenteric plexus of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum and slightly in the medulla of the adrenal gland. Conclusion The PrPSc distribution within the brain was consistent with that described in other FSE-affected cats. The pattern of abnormal PrP in the retina corresponded to that found in a captive cheetah with FSE, in sheep with scrapie and was similar to nvCJD in humans.

  19. Comparative Study of Various Delivery Methods for the Supply of Alpha-Ketoglutarate to the Neural Cells for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanushree Vishnoi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of growth factors or bioactive molecules plays an important role in tissue engineering, as the duration to which these are supplied can modulate the cell fate. Thus, the delivery method plays an important role, and the same is presented in this work wherein the exogenous supply of alpha-ketoglutarate (α-KG gave better results for fast proliferating cells as compared to delivery by microspheres or microspheres incorporated scaffolds which can be used while culturing slow growing cells. All these studies were performed in two dimensional (2D and three dimensional (3D setups in which chitosan-gelatin-polypyrrole has been used as 3-D scaffolds. Chitosan and gelatin microspheres alone as well as incorporated in the cryogels were characterized. MTT assay done using neuro-2a cell line showed approximately 42% and 70% increment in cellular proliferation when gelatin and chitosan microspheres were added in a 3-D setup, respectively, as compared to the control. Biochemical analysis of ammonia showed 6-fold reductions in ammonia level in a 3-D setup compared to the control. We also studied the synthesis of a neurotransmitter-like glutamate and found that its concentration increased up to 0.25 mg/ml when the microspheres were added exogenously in a 3-D system.

  20. Three-dimensional immersive virtual reality for studying cellular compartments in 3D models from EM preparations of neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calì, Corrado; Baghabra, Jumana; Boges, Daniya J; Holst, Glendon R; Kreshuk, Anna; Hamprecht, Fred A; Srinivasan, Madhusudhanan; Lehväslaiho, Heikki; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in the application of electron microscopy (EM) to serial imaging are opening doors to new ways of analyzing cellular structure. New and improved algorithms and workflows for manual and semiautomated segmentation allow us to observe the spatial arrangement of the smallest cellular features with unprecedented detail in full three-dimensions. From larger samples, higher complexity models can be generated; however, they pose new challenges to data management and analysis. Here we review some currently available solutions and present our approach in detail. We use the fully immersive virtual reality (VR) environment CAVE (cave automatic virtual environment), a room in which we are able to project a cellular reconstruction and visualize in 3D, to step into a world created with Blender, a free, fully customizable 3D modeling software with NeuroMorph plug-ins for visualization and analysis of EM preparations of brain tissue. Our workflow allows for full and fast reconstructions of volumes of brain neuropil using ilastik, a software tool for semiautomated segmentation of EM stacks. With this visualization environment, we can walk into the model containing neuronal and astrocytic processes to study the spatial distribution of glycogen granules, a major energy source that is selectively stored in astrocytes. The use of CAVE was key to the observation of a nonrandom distribution of glycogen, and led us to develop tools to quantitatively analyze glycogen clustering and proximity to other subcellular features. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  2. Experimental Toxoplasmosis in Rats Induced Orally with Eleven Strains of Toxoplasma gondii of Seven Genotypes: Tissue Tropism, Tissue Cyst Size, Neural Lesions, Tissue Cyst Rupture without Reactivation, and Ocular Lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender P Dubey

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is one of the most widely distributed and successful parasites. Toxoplasma gondii alters rodent behavior such that infected rodents reverse their fear of cat odor, and indeed are attracted rather than repelled by feline urine. The location of the parasite encysted in the brain may influence this behavior. However, most studies are based on the highly susceptible rodent, the mouse.Latent toxoplasmosis was induced in rats (10 rats per T. gondii strains of the same age, strain, and sex, after oral inoculation with oocysts (natural route and natural stage of infection of 11 T. gondii strains of seven genotypes. Rats were euthanized at two months post inoculation (p.i. to investigate whether the parasite genotype affects the distribution, location, tissue cyst size, or lesions. Tissue cysts were enumerated in different regions of the brains, both in histological sections as well in saline homogenates. Tissue cysts were found in all regions of the brain. The tissue cyst density in different brain regions varied extensively between rats with many regions highly infected in some animals. Overall, the colliculus was most highly infected although there was a large amount of variability. The cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum had higher tissue cyst densities and two strains exhibited tropism for the colliculus and olfactory bulb. Histologically, lesions were confined to the brain and eyes. Tissue cyst rupture was frequent with no clear evidence for reactivation of tachyzoites. Ocular lesions were found in 23 (25% of 92 rat eyes at two months p.i. The predominant lesion was focal inflammation in the retina. Tissue cysts were seen in the sclera of one and in the optic nerve of two rats. The choroid was not affected. Only tissue cysts, not active tachyzoite infections, were detected. Tissue cysts were seen in histological sections of tongue of 20 rats but not in myocardium and leg muscle.This study reevaluated

  3. Signal-dependent splicing of tissue factor pre-mRNA modulates the thrombogenecity of human platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwertz, Hansjörg; Tolley, Neal D.; Foulks, Jason M.; Denis, Melvin M.; Risenmay, Ben W.; Buerke, Michael; Tilley, Rachel E.; Rondina, Matthew T.; Harris, Estelle M.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Mackman, Nigel; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Weyrich, Andrew S.

    2006-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is an essential cofactor for the activation of blood coagulation in vivo. We now report that quiescent human platelets express TF pre-mRNA and, in response to activation, splice this intronic-rich message into mature mRNA. Splicing of TF pre-mRNA is associated with increased TF protein expression, procoagulant activity, and accelerated formation of clots. Pre-mRNA splicing is controlled by Cdc2-like kinase (Clk)1, and interruption of Clk1 signaling prevents TF from accumulating in activated platelets. Elevated intravascular TF has been reported in a variety of prothrombotic diseases, but there is debate as to whether anucleate platelets—the key cellular effector of thrombosis—express TF. Our studies demonstrate that human platelets use Clk1-dependent splicing pathways to generate TF protein in response to cellular activation. We propose that platelet-derived TF contributes to the propagation and stabilization of a thrombus. PMID:17060476

  4. Effect of Butler's neural tissue mobilization and Mulligan's bent leg raise on pain and straight leg raise in patients of low back ache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambekar, Neha; Sabnis, Shaila; Phadke, Apoorva; Bedekar, Nilima

    2016-04-01

    Low back ache (LBA) is a common musculoskeletal disorder sometimes associated with a positive limited Straight leg raise (SLR) test. Mulligan's bent leg raise (BLR) and Butler's neural tissue mobilization (NTM) are commonly used techniques for the treatment of low back ache where SLR is limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of both the techniques on pain and limited SLR in patients with LBA. Thirty one patients with LBA with radiculopathy were randomly allocated into 2 groups; BLR [n = 16] NTM [n = 15]. The outcome measures i.e. visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain and universal goniometer for measuring SLR range of motion (SROM) were assessed at the baseline, post intervention and after 24 h (follow up). Within group analysis using paired t-test revealed a significant difference between pre-treatment and post-treatment VAS and SROM score(p  0.05). The study showed that both techniques produce immediate improvement in pain and SLR range but this effect was not maintained during the follow up period. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The interaction of force and repetition on musculoskeletal and neural tissue responses and sensorimotor behavior in a rat model of work-related musculoskeletal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We examined the relationship of musculoskeletal risk factors underlying force and repetition on tissue responses in an operant rat model of repetitive reaching and pulling, and if force x repetition interactions were present, indicative of a fatigue failure process. We examined exposure-dependent changes in biochemical, morphological and sensorimotor responses occurring with repeated performance of a handle-pulling task for 12 weeks at one of four repetition and force levels: 1) low repetition with low force, 2) high repetition with low force, 3) low repetition with high force, and 4) high repetition with high force (HRHF). Methods Rats underwent initial training for 4–6 weeks, and then performed one of the tasks for 12 weeks, 2 hours/day, 3 days/week. Reflexive grip strength and sensitivity to touch were assayed as functional outcomes. Flexor digitorum muscles and tendons, forelimb bones, and serum were assayed using ELISA for indicators of inflammation, tissue stress and repair, and bone turnover. Histomorphometry was used to assay macrophage infiltration of tissues, spinal cord substance P changes, and tissue adaptative or degradative changes. MicroCT was used to assay bones for changes in bone quality. Results Several force x repetition interactions were observed for: muscle IL-1alpha and bone IL-1beta; serum TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, and IL-1beta; muscle HSP72, a tissue stress and repair protein; histomorphological evidence of tendon and cartilage degradation; serum biomarkers of bone degradation (CTXI) and bone formation (osteocalcin); and morphological evidence of bone adaptation versus resorption. In most cases, performance of the HRHF task induced the greatest tissue degenerative changes, while performance of moderate level tasks induced bone adaptation and a suggestion of muscle adaptation. Both high force tasks induced median nerve macrophage infiltration, spinal cord sensitization (increased substance P), grip strength declines and forepaw

  6. Proton-dependent coniferin transport, a common major transport event in differentiating xylem tissue of woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuyama, Taku; Kawai, Ryo; Shitan, Nobukazu; Matoh, Toru; Sugiyama, Junji; Yoshinaga, Arata; Takabe, Keiji; Fujita, Minoru; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2013-06-01

    Lignin biosynthesis is an essential physiological activity of vascular plants if they are to survive under various environmental stresses on land. The biosynthesis of lignin proceeds in the cell wall by polymerization of precursors; the initial step of lignin polymerization is the transportation of lignin monomers from the cytosol to the cell wall, which is critical for lignin formation. There has been much debate on the transported form of the lignin precursor, either as free monolignols or their glucosides. In this study, we performed biochemical analyses to characterize the membrane transport mechanism of lignin precursors using angiosperms, hybrid poplar (Populus sieboldii × Populus grandidentata) and poplar (Populus sieboldii), as well gymnosperms, Japanese cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) and pine (Pinus densiflora). Membrane vesicles prepared from differentiating xylem tissues showed clear ATP-dependent transport activity of coniferin, whereas less than 4% of the coniferin transport activity was seen for coniferyl alcohol. Bafilomycin A1 and proton gradient erasers markedly inhibited coniferin transport in hybrid poplar membrane vesicles; in contrast, vanadate had no effect. Cis-inhibition experiments suggested that this transport activity was specific for coniferin. Membrane fractionation of hybrid poplar microsomes demonstrated that transport activity was localized to the tonoplast- and endomembrane-rich fraction. Differentiating xylem of Japanese cypress exhibited almost identical transport properties, suggesting the involvement of a common endomembrane-associated proton/coniferin antiport mechanism in the lignifying tissues of woody plants, both angiosperms and gymnosperms.

  7. Investigation of the mechanical behavior of kangaroo humeral head cartilage tissue by a porohyperelastic model based on the strain-rate-dependent permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibbotuwawa, Namal; Oloyede, Adekunle; Senadeera, Wijitha; Li, Tong; Gu, YuanTong

    2015-11-01

    Solid-interstitial fluid interaction, which depends on tissue permeability, is significant to the strain-rate-dependent mechanical behavior of humeral head (shoulder) cartilage. Due to anatomical and biomechanical similarities to that of the human shoulder, kangaroos present a suitable animal model. Therefore, indentation experiments were conducted on kangaroo shoulder cartilage tissues from low (10(-4)/s) to moderately high (10(-2)/s) strain-rates. A porohyperelastic model was developed based on the experimental characterization; and a permeability function that takes into account the effect of strain-rate on permeability (strain-rate-dependent permeability) was introduced into the model to investigate the effect of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue response. The prediction of the model with the strain-rate-dependent permeability was compared with those of the models using constant permeability and strain-dependent permeability. Compared to the model with constant permeability, the models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability were able to better capture the experimental variation at all strain-rates (p < 0.05). Significant differences were not identified between models with strain-dependent and strain-rate-dependent permeability at strain-rate of 5 × 10(-3)/s (p = 0.179). However, at strain-rate of 10(-2)/s, the model with strain-rate-dependent permeability was significantly better at capturing the experimental results (p < 0.005). The findings thus revealed the significance of rate-dependent fluid flow on tissue behavior at large strain-rates, which provides insights into the mechanical deformation mechanisms of cartilage tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Distance-dependent penumbra and MLC-width: new insights in determinants of healthy tissue sparing in stereotactic irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bratengeier Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For stereotactic irradiation, both, penumbra and MLC leaf width make an impact on the sparing of healthy tissue around the target. Mostly, MLC design is regarded as the one influenceable parameter. However, also penumbra can be varied by choosing different distances between the source of radiation and the patient. The authors investigate the distance- dependent penumbra effects of idealized collimators as well as for real 5 mm MLCs. Test objects are small spherical targets of varying diameters to be irradiated under differing prescription conditions. A method to calculate exact stereotactic radial dose distributions from beam profiles or 2D dose distributions of single beams is developed for circular and MLC shaped targets. Also, a planning study is performed using a Pinnacle3™ planning system. Also, in a theoretical analysis perfect top hat profile beams and beams with varying penumbra are compared for better understanding of penumbra effects with respect to radial dose distributions. It is shown, that the penumbra changes for small targets are more relevant than the beam shaping by 5 mm MLCs. Quasi-isotropic irradiated MLC shaped (quadratic beams at virtual SAD 700 mm produce steeper radial dose decrease than ideal circular beam shapes with a penumbra typical for SAD 1000 mm. A reduced source-to-patient distance allows better sparing of healthy tissue because of two reasons: The smaller effective leaf width but even more due to steeper penumbra. First, the authors suggest for future recommendations on stereotactic irradiations to specify not only MLC widths but also penumbra characteristics. Second, a so-called “virtual isocentre” could be useful to take advantage of the penumbra effect: Dependent on gantry angle and isocentric couch angle, the couch should be steered automatically in a way that the central axes of all beams always intersect in the same point at the same distance from the source.

  9. A Laboratory Study on Stress Dependency of Joint Transmissivity and its Modeling with Neural Networks, Fuzzy Method and Regression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Moori Roozali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Correct estimation of water inflow into underground excavations can decrease safety risks and associated costs. Researchers have proposed different methods to asses this value. It has been proved that water transmissivity of a rock joint is a function of factors, such as normal stress, joint roughness and its size and water pressure therefore, a laboratory setup was proposed to quantitatively measure the flow as a function of mentioned parameters. Among these, normal stress has proved to be the most influential parameter. With increasing joint roughness and rock sample size, water flow has decreased while increasing water pressure has a direct increasing effect on the flow. To simulate the complex interaction of these parameters, neural networks and Fuzzy method together with regression analysis have been utilized. Correlation factors between laboratory results and obtained numerical ones show good agreement which proves usefulness of these methods for assessment of water inflow.

  10. Auto-Associative Recurrent Neural Networks and Long Term Dependencies in Novelty Detection for Audio Surveillance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, A.; Montefoschi, F.; Rizzo, A.; Diligenti, M.; Festucci, C.

    2017-10-01

    Machine Learning applied to Automatic Audio Surveillance has been attracting increasing attention in recent years. In spite of several investigations based on a large number of different approaches, little attention had been paid to the environmental temporal evolution of the input signal. In this work, we propose an exploration in this direction comparing the temporal correlations extracted at the feature level with the one learned by a representational structure. To this aim we analysed the prediction performances of a Recurrent Neural Network architecture varying the length of the processed input sequence and the size of the time window used in the feature extraction. Results corroborated the hypothesis that sequential models work better when dealing with data characterized by temporal order. However, so far the optimization of the temporal dimension remains an open issue.

  11. Activity-dependent plasticity in the isolated embryonic avian brainstem following manipulations of rhythmic spontaneous neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincen-Brown, Michael A; Revill, Ann L; Pilarski, Jason Q

    2016-07-15

    When rhythmic spontaneous neural activity (rSNA) first appears in the embryonic chick brainstem and cranial nerve motor axons it is principally driven by nicotinic neurotransmission (NT). At this early age, the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonist nicotine is known to critically disrupt rSNA at low concentrations (0.1-0.5μM), which are levels that mimic the blood plasma levels of a fetus following maternal cigarette smoking. Thus, we quantified the effect of persistent exposure to exogenous nicotine on rSNA using an in vitro developmental model. We found that rSNA was eliminated by continuous bath application of exogenous nicotine, but rSNA recovered activity within 6-12h despite the persistent activation and desensitization of nAChRs. During the recovery period rSNA was critically driven by chloride-mediated membrane depolarization instead of nicotinic NT. To test whether this observed compensation was unique to the antagonism of nicotinic NT or whether the loss of spiking behavior also played a role, we eliminated rSNA by lowering overall excitatory drive with a low [K(+)]o superfusate. In this context, rSNA again recovered, although the recovery time was much quicker, and exhibited a lower frequency, higher duration, and an increase in the number of bursts per episode when compared to control embryos. Importantly, we show that the main compensatory response to lower overall excitatory drive, similar to nicotinergic block, is a result of potentiated chloride mediated membrane depolarization. These results support increasing evidence that early neural circuits sense spiking behavior to maintain primordial bioelectric rhythms. Understanding the nature of developmental plasticity in the nervous system, especially versions that preserve rhythmic behaviors following clinically meaningful environmental stimuli, both normal and pathological, will require similar studies to determine the consequences of feedback compensation at more mature chronological ages

  12. Fatty Acid Composition of Lamb Liver, Muscle, And Adipose Tissues in Response to Rumen-Protected Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Supplementation Is Tissue Dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Stefano; Bergamaschi, Matteo; Pellattiero, Erika; Simonetto, Alberto; Tagliapietra, Franco

    2017-12-06

    The tissue-specific response to rumen-protected conjugated linoleic acid supply (rpCLA) of liver, two muscles, and three adipose tissues of heavy lambs was studied. Twenty-four lambs, 8 months old, divided into 4 groups of 6, were fed at libitum on a ration supplemented without or with a mixture of rpCLA. Silica and hydrogenated soybean oil was the rpCLA coating matrix. The lambs were slaughtered at 11 months of age. Tissues were collected and analyzed for their FA profiles. The dietary rpCLA supplement had no influence on carcass fatness nor on the fat content of the liver and tissues and had little influence on the FA profiles of these tissues. In the adipose tissues, rpCLA increased the proportions of saturated FAs, 18:0 and 18:2t10c12, and decreased the proportions of monounsaturated FAs in the adipose tissues. In muscles, the effects were the opposite. The results suggest that Δ9 desaturase activity is inhibited by the rpCLA mixture in adipose tissues to a greater extent than in the other tissues.

  13. Prostaglandin F2 alpha administered in vivo induces Ca2+-dependent protein phosphorylation in rat luteal tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present study was performed in order to further elucidate the mechanism of action of PGF2 alpha in luteolysis in the rat ovary. Seven days after priming with superovulatory doses of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin to induce luteal tissue formation, the rats were injected with a luteolytic dose of the prostaglandin F2 alpha analogue cloprostenol. The ovaries were then homogenized, a 30,000 x g supernatant and pellet were prepared, whereafter aliquots of the preparations were incubated in the presence of (gamma-/sup 32/P)ATP with or without Ca2+. The phosphorylated proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and localized by autoradiography. The presence of Ca2+ caused an increased phosphorylation of a 45 kDa protein band in the particulate, but not in the cytosol, fraction. Furthermore, PGF2 alpha rapidly increased the /sup 32/P incorporation into the same protein band of 45 kDa. Thus, the PGF2 alpha-stimulated /sup 32/P incorporation was Ca2+-dependent and seen only in the particulate fraction. These results suggest that PGF2 alpha in its role as a luteolytic agent stimulates a Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation of a specific protein in luteal membranes of the rat ovary.

  14. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by histone deacetylases is associated with T-box gene regulation in mammalian abdominal tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Traci; Gross, Michael K; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2010-04-09

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2 and the T-box transcription factors are essential for organogenesis. Pitx2 and T-box genes are induced by growth factors and function as transcriptional activators or repressors. Gene expression analyses on abdominal tissue were used to identify seven of the T-box genes of the genome as Pitx2 target genes in the abdomen at embryonic day.10.5. Pitx2 activated Tbx4, Tbx15, and Mga and repressed Tbx1, Tbx2, Tbx5, and Tbx6 expression. As expected, activated genes showed reduced expression patterns, and repressed T-box genes showed increased expression patterns in the abdomen of Pitx2 mutants. Pitx2 occupied chromatin sites near all of these T-box genes. Co-occupancy by coactivators, corepressors, and histone acetylation at these sites was frequently Pitx2-dependent. Genes repressed by Pitx2 generally showed increased histone acetylation and decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC)/corepressor occupancy in Pitx2 mutants. The lower N-CoR, HDAC1, and HDAC3 occupancy observed at multiple sites along Tbx1 chromatin in mutants is consistent with the model that increased histone acetylation and gene expression of Tbx1 may result from a loss of recruitment of corepressors by Pitx2. Genes activated by Pitx2 showed less consistent patterns in chromatin analyses. Reduced H4 acetylation and increased HDAC1/nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) occupancy at some Tbx4 sites were accompanied by increased H3 acetylation and reduced HDAC3 occupancy at the same or other more distal chromatin sites in mutants. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by corepressors resulted in alteration of the acetylation levels of several T-box genes, whereas Pitx2-dependent occupancy by coactivators was more site-localized. These studies will provide the basic scientific underpinning to understand abdominal wall syndromes.

  15. Oxygen-dependent acetylation and dimerization of the corepressor CtBP2 in neural stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaca, Esra; Lewicki, Jakub; Hermanson, Ola, E-mail: Ola.Hermanson@ki.se

    2015-03-01

    The transcriptional corepressor CtBP2 is essential for proper development of the nervous system. The factor exerts its repression by interacting in complexes with chromatin-modifying factors such as histone deacetylases (HDAC) 1/2 and the histone demethylase LSD1/KDM1. Notably, the histone acetyl transferase p300 acetylates CtBP2 and this is an important regulatory event of the activity and subcellular localization of the protein. We recently demonstrated an essential role for CtBPs as sensors of microenvironmental oxygen levels influencing the differentiation potential of neural stem cells (NSCs), but it is not known whether oxygen levels influence the acetylation levels of CtBP factors. Here we show by using proximity ligation assay (PLA) that CtBP2 acetylation levels increased significantly in undifferentiated, proliferating NSCs under hypoxic conditions. CtBP2 interacted with the class III HDAC Sirt1 but this interaction was unaltered in hypoxic conditions, and treatment with the Sirt1 inhibitor Ex527 did not result in any significant change in total CtBP2 acetylation levels. Instead, we revealed a significant decrease in PLA signal representing CtBP2 dimerization in NSCs under hypoxic conditions, negatively correlating with the acetylation levels. Our results suggest that microenvironmental oxygen levels influence the dimerization and acetylation levels, and thereby the activity, of CtBP2 in proliferating NSCs.

  16. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N

    2000-01-01

    The signal transduction pathways associated with neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-induced neuritogenesis are only partially characterized. We here demonstrate that NCAM-induced neurite outgrowth depends on activation of p59(fyn), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma......), protein kinase C (PKC), and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathway. This was done using a coculture system consisting of PC12-E2 cells grown on fibroblasts, with or without NCAM expression, allowing NCAM-NCAM interactions resulting in neurite outgrowth. PC12-E2 cells were transiently...... propose a model of NCAM signaling involving two pathways: NCAM-Ras-MAP kinase and NCAM-FGF receptor-PLCgamma-PKC, and we propose that PKC serves as the link between the two pathways activating Raf and thereby creating the sustained activity of the MAP kinases necessary for neuronal differentiation....

  17. Uptake and bio-reactivity of polystyrene nanoparticles is affected by surface modifications, ageing and LPS adsorption: in vitro studies on neural tissue cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Kumarasamy; Kenesei, Kata; Li, Yang; Demeter, Kornél; Környei, Zsuzsanna; Madarász, Emilia

    2015-02-01

    Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the role of the chemical composition of particle surfaces in the in vitro interaction with different neural cell types. PS NPs within a size-range of 45-70 nm influenced the metabolic activity of cells depending on the cell-type, but caused toxicity only at extremely high particle concentrations. Neurons did not internalize particles, while microglial cells ingested a large amount of carboxylated but almost no PEGylated NPs. PEGylation reduced the protein adsorption, toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs. After storage (shelf-life >6 months), the toxicity and cellular uptake of NPs increased. The altered biological activity of ``aged'' NPs was due to particle aggregation and due to the adsorption of bioactive compounds on NP surfaces. Aggregation by increasing the size and sedimentation velocity of NPs results in increased cell-targeted NP doses. The ready endotoxin adsorption which cannot be prevented by PEG coating, can render the particles toxic. The age-dependent changes in otherwise harmless NPs could be the important sources for variability in the effects of NPs, and could explain the contradictory data obtained with ``identical'' NPs.Because of their capacity of crossing an intact blood-brain barrier and reaching the brain through an injured barrier or via the nasal epithelium, nanoparticles have been considered as vehicles to deliver drugs and as contrast materials for brain imaging. The potential neurotoxicity of nanoparticles, however, is not fully explored. Using particles with a biologically inert polystyrene core material, we investigated the

  18. A two-step convolutional neural network based computer-aided detection scheme for automatically segmenting adipose tissue volume depicting on CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Qiu, Yuchen; Thai, Theresa; Moore, Kathleen; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2017-06-01

    Accurately assessment of adipose tissue volume inside a human body plays an important role in predicting disease or cancer risk, diagnosis and prognosis. In order to overcome limitation of using only one subjectively selected CT image slice to estimate size of fat areas, this study aims to develop and test a computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme based on deep learning technique to automatically segment subcutaneous fat areas (SFA) and visceral fat areas (VFA) depicting on volumetric CT images. A retrospectively collected CT image dataset was divided into two independent training and testing groups. The proposed CAD framework consisted of two steps with two convolution neural networks (CNNs) namely, Selection-CNN and Segmentation-CNN. The first CNN was trained using 2,240 CT slices to select abdominal CT slices depicting SFA and VFA. The second CNN was trained with 84,000pixel patches and applied to the selected CT slices to identify fat-related pixels and assign them into SFA and VFA classes. Comparing to the manual CT slice selection and fat pixel segmentation results, the accuracy of CT slice selection using the Selection-CNN yielded 95.8%, while the accuracy of fat pixel segmentation using the Segmentation-CNN was 96.8%. This study demonstrated the feasibility of applying a new deep learning based CAD scheme to automatically recognize abdominal section of human body from CT scans and segment SFA and VFA from volumetric CT data with high accuracy or agreement with the manual segmentation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Differentiation-Dependent Energy Production and Metabolite Utilization: A Comparative Study on Neural Stem Cells, Neurons, and Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jády, Attila Gy; Nagy, Ádám M; Kőhidi, Tímea; Ferenczi, Szilamér; Tretter, László; Madarász, Emília

    2016-07-01

    While it is evident that the metabolic machinery of stem cells should be fairly different from that of differentiated neurons, the basic energy production pathways in neural stem cells (NSCs) or in neurons are far from clear. Using the model of in vitro neuron production by NE-4C NSCs, this study focused on the metabolic changes taking place during the in vitro neuronal differentiation. O2 consumption, H(+) production, and metabolic responses to single metabolites were measured in cultures of NSCs and in their neuronal derivatives, as well as in primary neuronal and astroglial cultures. In metabolite-free solutions, NSCs consumed little O2 and displayed a higher level of mitochondrial proton leak than neurons. In stem cells, glycolysis was the main source of energy for the survival of a 2.5-h period of metabolite deprivation. In contrast, stem cell-derived or primary neurons sustained a high-level oxidative phosphorylation during metabolite deprivation, indicating the consumption of own cellular material for energy production. The stem cells increased O2 consumption and mitochondrial ATP production in response to single metabolites (with the exception of glucose), showing rapid adaptation of the metabolic machinery to the available resources. In contrast, single metabolites did not increase the O2 consumption of neurons or astrocytes. In "starving" neurons, neither lactate nor pyruvate was utilized for mitochondrial ATP production. Gene expression studies also suggested that aerobic glycolysis and rapid metabolic adaptation characterize the NE-4C NSCs, while autophagy and alternative glucose utilization play important roles in the metabolism of stem cell-derived neurons.

  20. Effects of cognitive bias modification training on neural signatures of alcohol approach tendencies in male alcohol-dependent patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiers, C.E.; Ludwig, V.U.; Gladwin, T.E.; Park, S.Q.; Heinz, A.; Wiers, R.W.; Rinck, M.; Lindenmeyer, J.; Walter, H.; Bermpohl, F.

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol-dependent patients have been shown to faster approach than avoid alcohol stimuli on the Approach Avoidance Task (AAT). This so-called alcohol approach bias has been associated with increased brain activation in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Cognitive bias modification

  1. Tissue-Specific, Development-Dependent Phenolic Compounds Accumulation Profile and Gene Expression Pattern in Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs. PMID:23646127

  2. Tissue-specific, development-dependent phenolic compounds accumulation profile and gene expression pattern in tea plant [Camellia sinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaolan; Liu, Yajun; Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs.

  3. Identification of a cytochrome P4502E1/Bid/C1q-dependent axis mediating inflammation in adipose tissue after chronic ethanol feeding to mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Becky M; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Tang, Hui; Hillian, Antoinette D; Feldstein, Ariel E; Stahl, Gregory L; Takahashi, Kazue; Nagy, Laura E

    2011-10-14

    Chronic, heavy alcohol exposure results in inflammation in adipose tissue, insulin resistance, and liver injury. Here we have identified a CYP2E1/Bid/C1q-dependent pathway that is activated in response to chronic ethanol and is required for the development of inflammation in adipose tissue. Ethanol feeding for 25 days to wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice increased expression of multiple markers of adipose tissue inflammation relative to pair-fed controls independent of increased body weight or adipocyte size. Ethanol feeding increased the expression of CYP2E1 in adipocytes, but not stromal vascular cells, in adipose tissue and Cyp2e1(-/-) mice were protected from adipose tissue inflammation in response to ethanol. Ethanol feeding also increased the number of TUNEL-positive nuclei in adipose tissue of wild-type mice but not in Cyp2e1(-/-) or Bid (-/-) mice. Apoptosis contributed to adipose inflammation, as the expression of multiple inflammatory markers was decreased in mice lacking the Bid-dependent apoptotic pathway. The complement protein C1q binds to apoptotic cells, facilitating their clearance and activating complement. Making use of C1q-deficient mice, we found that activation of complement via C1q provided the critical link between CYP2E1/Bid-dependent apoptosis and onset of adipose tissue inflammation in response to chronic ethanol. In summary, chronic ethanol increases CYP2E1 activity in adipose, leading to Bid-mediated apoptosis and activation of complement via C1q, finally resulting in adipose tissue inflammation. Taken together, these data identify a novel mechanism for the development of adipose tissue inflammation that likely contributes to the pathophysiological effects of ethanol.

  4. Neural crest cell survival is dependent on Rho kinase and is required for development of the mid face in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Phillips

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC give rise to much of the tissue that forms the vertebrate head and face, including cartilage and bone, cranial ganglia and teeth. In this study we show that conditional expression of a dominant-negative (DN form of Rho kinase (Rock in mouse NCC results in severe hypoplasia of the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, ultimately resulting in reduction of the maxilla and nasal bones and severe craniofacial clefting affecting the nose, palate and lip. These defects resemble frontonasal dysplasia in humans. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to abnormalities in cell-matrix attachment, is seen in the RockDN;Wnt1-cre mutant embryos. This leads to elevated cell death, resulting in NCC deficiency and hypoplastic NCC-derived craniofacial structures. Rock is thus essential for survival of NCC that form the craniofacial region. We propose that reduced NCC numbers in the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, resulting from exacerbated cell death, may be the common mechanism underlying frontonasal dysplasia.

  5. Combined Use of Tissue Morphology, Neural Network Analysis of Chromatin Texture and Clinical Variables to Predict Prostate Cancer Agressiveness from Biopsy Water

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Partin, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To combine clinical, serum, pathologic and computer derived information into an artificial neural network to develop/validate a model to predict prostate cancer tumor aggressiveness in both a...

  6. Combined Use of Tissue Morphology, Neural Network Analysis of Chromatin Texture & Clinical Variables to Predict Prostate Cancer Agressiveness from Biopsy Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Partin, Alan

    1999-01-01

    the purpose of this report is to combine clinical, serum, pathological and computer derived information into an artificial neural network to develop/validate a model to predict prostate cancer tumor...

  7. Dynamic culture induces a cell type-dependent response impacting on the thickness of engineered connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Guillaume Marceau; Gauvin, Robert; Proulx, Maryse; Vallée, Maud; Fradette, Julie

    2013-04-01

    Mesenchymal cells are central to connective tissue homeostasis and are widely used for tissue-engineering applications. Dermal fibroblasts and adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) allow successful tissue reconstruction by the self-assembly approach of tissue engineering. This method leads to the production of multilayered tissues, devoid of exogenous biomaterials, that can be used as stromal compartments for skin or vesical reconstruction. These tissues are formed by combining cell sheets, generated through cell stimulation with ascorbic acid, which favours the cell-derived production/organization of matrix components. Since media motion can impact on cell behaviour, we investigated the effect of dynamic culture on mesenchymal cells during tissue reconstruction, using the self-assembly method. Tissues produced using ASCs in the presence of a wave-like movement were nearly twice thicker than under standard conditions, while no difference was observed for tissues produced from dermal fibroblasts. The increased matrix deposition was not correlated with an increased proliferation of ASCs, or by higher transcript levels of fibronectin or collagens I and III. A 30% increase of type V collagen mRNA was observed. Interestingly, tissues engineered from dermal fibroblasts featured a four-fold higher level of MMP-1 transcripts under dynamic conditions. Mechanical properties were similar for tissues reconstructed using dynamic or static conditions. Finally, cell sheets produced using ASCs under dynamic conditions could readily be manipulated, resulting in a 2 week reduction of the production time (from 5 to 3 weeks). Our results describe a distinctive property of ASCs' response to media motion, indicating that their culture under dynamic conditions leads to optimized tissue engineering. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Obesity Activates a Program of Lysosomal-Dependent Lipid Metabolism in Adipose Tissue Macrophages Independently of Classic Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Grijalva, Ambar; Skowronski, Alicja; van Eijk, Marco; Serlie, Mireille J.; Ferrante Jr., Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity activates a complex systemic immune response that includes the recruitment of macrophages and other immune cells to key metabolic tissues. Current models postulate that obesity and excess lipids classically activate macrophages, polarizing them toward an M1 (inflammatory) state. Little is known about noninflammatory functions of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). Here, we show that the expansion of adipose tissue (AT) across models of obesity induces a program of lysosome biogenesis i...

  9. SNW1 is a critical regulator of spatial BMP activity, neural plate border formation, and neural crest specification in vertebrate embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Y Wu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP gradients provide positional information to direct cell fate specification, such as patterning of the vertebrate ectoderm into neural, neural crest, and epidermal tissues, with precise borders segregating these domains. However, little is known about how BMP activity is regulated spatially and temporally during vertebrate development to contribute to embryonic patterning, and more specifically to neural crest formation. Through a large-scale in vivo functional screen in Xenopus for neural crest fate, we identified an essential regulator of BMP activity, SNW1. SNW1 is a nuclear protein known to regulate gene expression. Using antisense morpholinos to deplete SNW1 protein in both Xenopus and zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that dorsally expressed SNW1 is required for neural crest specification, and this is independent of mesoderm formation and gastrulation morphogenetic movements. By exploiting a combination of immunostaining for phosphorylated Smad1 in Xenopus embryos and a BMP-dependent reporter transgenic zebrafish line, we show that SNW1 regulates a specific domain of BMP activity in the dorsal ectoderm at the neural plate border at post-gastrula stages. We use double in situ hybridizations and immunofluorescence to show how this domain of BMP activity is spatially positioned relative to the neural crest domain and that of SNW1 expression. Further in vivo and in vitro assays using cell culture and tissue explants allow us to conclude that SNW1 acts upstream of the BMP receptors. Finally, we show that the requirement of SNW1 for neural crest specification is through its ability to regulate BMP activity, as we demonstrate that targeted overexpression of BMP to the neural plate border is sufficient to restore neural crest formation in Xenopus SNW1 morphants. We conclude that through its ability to regulate a specific domain of BMP activity in the vertebrate embryo, SNW1 is a critical regulator of neural plate

  10. Células mesenquimales de médula ósea: Diferenciación y potencial reemplazo neuronal Mesenchymal stem cells: Differentiation and alternative source of neural tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina C. Bianchi de Di Risio

    2004-12-01

    cells to repair damaged tissues. Particularly neuronal differentiation from progenitors obtained from mesenchymae non hemopoietic cells offers a new possibility in the field of neural transplantation and tissue engineering to repair functional entities in the nervous system.

  11. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancourt, Raymond C; Veress, Livia A; Guo, Xiaoling; Jones, Tara N; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B; White, Carl W

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation.

  12. Monocyte tissue factor–dependent activation of coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys is inhibited by simvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A. Phillip; Passam, Freda H.; Antoniak, Silvio; Marshall, Stephanie M.; McDaniel, Allison L.; Rudel, Lawrence; Williams, Julie C.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Dutton, Julie-Ann; Wang, Jianguo; Tobias, Peter S.; Curtiss, Linda K.; Daugherty, Alan; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Luyendyk, James P.; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce; Johns, Douglas G.; Temel, Ryan E.; Mackman, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. It also is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which increases morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia produces a procoagulant state remain undefined. Atherosclerosis is associated with accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins within atherosclerotic lesions. Small quantities of oxidized lipoproteins are also present in the circulation of patients with coronary artery disease. We therefore hypothesized that hypercholesterolemia leads to elevated levels of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in plasma and that this induces expression of the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) in monocytes. In support of this hypothesis, we report here that oxLDL induced TF expression in human monocytic cells and monocytes. In addition, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia had elevated levels of plasma microparticle (MP) TF activity. Furthermore, a high-fat diet induced a time-dependent increase in plasma MP TF activity and activation of coagulation in both LDL receptor–deficient mice and African green monkeys. Genetic deficiency of TF in bone marrow cells reduced coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice, consistent with a major role for monocyte-derived TF in the activation of coagulation. Similarly, a deficiency of either TLR4 or TLR6 reduced levels of MP TF activity. Simvastatin treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys reduced oxLDL, monocyte TF expression, MP TF activity, activation of coagulation, and inflammation, without affecting total cholesterol levels. Our results suggest that the prothrombotic state associated with hypercholesterolemia is caused by oxLDL-mediated induction of TF expression in monocytes via engagement of a TLR4/TLR6 complex. PMID:22214850

  13. Dose- and time-dependent effects of actomyosin inhibition on live mouse outflow resistance and aqueous drainage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, MinHee K; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tan, James C

    2016-02-17

    Actomyosin contractility modulates outflow resistance of the aqueous drainage tissues and intraocular pressure, a key pathogenic factor of glaucoma. We established methodology to reliably analyze the effect of latrunculin-B (Lat-B)-induced actin depolymerization on outflow physiology in live mice. A voltage-controlled microperfusion system for delivering drugs and simultaneously analyzing outflow resistance was tested in live C57BL/6 mice. Flow rate and perfusion pressure were reproducible within a coefficient of variation of 2%. Outflow facility for phosphate-buffered saline (0.0027 ± 0.00036 μL/min/mmHg; mean ± SD) and 0.02% ethanol perfusions (Lat-B vehicle; 0.0023 ± 0.0005 μL/min/mmHg) were similar and stable over 2 hours (p > 0.1 for change), indicating absence of a 'washout' artifact seen in larger mammals. Outflow resistance changed in graded fashion, decreasing dose- and time-dependently over 2 hours for Lat-B doses of 2.5 μM (p = 0.29), 5 μM (p = 0.039) and 10 μM (p = 0.001). Resulting outflow resistance was about 10 times lower with 10 μM Lat-B than vehicle control. The filamentous actin network was decreased and structurally altered in the ciliary muscle (46 ± 5.6%) and trabecular meshwork (37 ± 8.3%) of treated eyes relative to vehicle controls (p < 0.005; 5 μM Lat-B). Mouse actomyosin contractile mechanisms are important to modulating aqueous outflow resistance, mirroring mechanisms in primates. We describe approaches to reliably probe these mechanisms in vivo.

  14. T1 and T2 temperature dependence of female human breast adipose tissue at 1.5 T : groundwork for monitoring thermal therapies in the breast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baron, Paul; Deckers, RHR; Knuttel, Floor M.; Bartels, LW

    2015-01-01

    The T-1 and T-2 temperature dependence of female breast adipose tissue was investigated at 1.5 T in order to evaluate the applicability of relaxation-based MR thermometry in fat for the monitoring of thermal therapies in the breast. Relaxation times T-1, T-2 and T-2TSE (the apparent T-2 measured

  15. Müller glial cell‐dependent regeneration of the neural retina: An overview across vertebrate model systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Annaïg; Roger, Jérôme E.; Yang, Xian‐Jie

    2016-01-01

    Retinal dystrophies are a major cause of blindness for which there are currently no curative treatments. Transplantation of stem cell‐derived neuronal progenitors to replace lost cells has been widely investigated as a therapeutic option. Another promising strategy would be to trigger self‐repair mechanisms in patients, through the recruitment of endogenous cells with stemness properties. Accumulating evidence in the past 15 year0s has revealed that several retinal cell types possess neurogenic potential, thus opening new avenues for regenerative medicine. Among them, Müller glial cells have been shown to be able to undergo a reprogramming process to re‐acquire a stem/progenitor state, allowing them to proliferate and generate new neurons for repair following retinal damages. Although Müller cell–dependent spontaneous regeneration is remarkable in some species such as the fish, it is extremely limited and ineffective in mammals. Understanding the cellular events and molecular mechanisms underlying Müller cell activities in species endowed with regenerative capacities could provide knowledge to unlock the restricted potential of their mammalian counterparts. In this context, the present review provides an overview of Müller cell responses to injury across vertebrate model systems and summarizes recent advances in this rapidly evolving field. Developmental Dynamics 245:727–738, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661417

  16. Effects of Coralliophila violacea on tissue loss in the scleractinian corals Porites spp. depend on host response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo, L.; Work, Thierry M.; Miller, R.L.; Lozada-Misa, P.L.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated interactions between the corallivorous gastropod Coralliophila violacea and its preferred hosts Porites spp. Our objectives were to experimentally determine whether tissue loss could progress in Porites during or after Coralliophila predation on corals with and without tissue loss and to histologically document snail predation. In 64% of feeding scars, tissue regenerated within 3 wk, leaving no trace of predation. However, in roughly 28% of scars, lesions progressed to subacute tissue loss resembling white syndrome. In feeding experiments, scars from snails previously fed diseased tissue developed progressive tissue loss twice as frequently as scars from snails previously fed healthy tissue. Scars from previously healthy-fed snails were 3 times as likely to heal as those from previously diseased-fed snails. Histology revealed marked differences in host responses to snails; P. cylindrica manifested a robust inflammatory response with fewer secondary colonizing organisms such as algae, sponges, and helminths, whereas P. rus showed no evident inflammation and more secondary colonization. We conclude that lesion progression associated with Coralliophila may be associated with secondary colonization of coral tissues damaged by predator-induced trauma and necrosis. Importantly, variation at the cellular level should be considered when explaining interspecific differences in host responses in corals impacted by phenomena such as predation.

  17. Breast tissue composition and its dependence on demographic risk factors for breast cancer: non-invasive assessment by time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, Paola; Quarto, Giovanna; Pifferi, Antonio; Abbate, Francesca; Balestreri, Nicola; Menna, Simona; Cassano, Enrico; Cubeddu, Rinaldo

    2015-01-01

    Breast tissue composition is recognized as a strong and independent risk factor for breast cancer. It is a heritable feature, but is also significantly affected by several other elements (e.g., age, menopause). Nowadays it is quantified by mammographic density, thus requiring the use of ionizing radiation. Optical techniques are absolutely non-invasive and have already proved effective in the investigation of biological tissues, as they are sensitive to tissue composition and structure. Time domain diffuse optical spectroscopy was performed at 7 wavelengths (635-1060 nm) on 200 subjects to derive their breast tissue composition (in terms of water, lipid and collagen content), blood parameters (total hemoglobin content and oxygen saturation level), and information on the microscopic structure (scattering amplitude and power). The dependence of all optically-derived parameters on age, menopausal status, body mass index, and use of oral contraceptives, and the correlation with mammographic density were investigated. Younger age, premenopausal status, lower body mass index values, and use of oral contraceptives all correspond to significantly higher water, collagen and total hemoglobin content, and lower lipid content (always p breast tissue composition and physiologic blood parameters, and provide information on tissue structure. The measurement is suitable for in vivo studies and monitoring of changes in breast tissue (e.g., with age, lifestyle, chemotherapy, etc.) and to gain insight into related processes, like the origin of cancer risk associated with breast density.

  18. Central neural pathways for thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Central neural circuits orchestrate a homeostatic repertoire to maintain body temperature during environmental temperature challenges and to alter body temperature during the inflammatory response. This review summarizes the functional organization of the neural pathways through which cutaneous thermal receptors alter thermoregulatory effectors: the cutaneous circulation for heat loss, the brown adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and heart for thermogenesis and species-dependent mechanisms (sweating, panting and saliva spreading) for evaporative heat loss. These effectors are regulated by parallel but distinct, effector-specific neural pathways that share a common peripheral thermal sensory input. The thermal afferent circuits include cutaneous thermal receptors, spinal dorsal horn neurons and lateral parabrachial nucleus neurons projecting to the preoptic area to influence warm-sensitive, inhibitory output neurons which control thermogenesis-promoting neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus that project to premotor neurons in the rostral ventromedial medulla, including the raphe pallidus, that descend to provide the excitation necessary to drive thermogenic thermal effectors. A distinct population of warm-sensitive preoptic neurons controls heat loss through an inhibitory input to raphe pallidus neurons controlling cutaneous vasoconstriction. PMID:21196160

  19. Searching for learning-dependent changes in the antennal lobe: simultaneous recording of neural activity and aversive olfactory learning in honeybees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Roussel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity in the honeybee brain has been studied using the appetitive olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension reflex, in which a bee learns the association between an odor and a sucrose reward. In this framework, coupling behavioral measurements of proboscis extension and invasive recordings of neural activity has been difficult because proboscis movements usually introduce brain movements that affect physiological preparations. Here we took advantage of a new conditioning protocol, the aversive olfactory conditioning of the sting extension reflex, which does not generate this problem. We achieved the first simultaneous recordings of conditioned sting extension responses and calcium imaging of antennal lobe activity, thus revealing on-line processing of olfactory information during conditioning trials. Based on behavioral output we distinguished learners and non-learners and analyzed possible learning-dependent changes in antennal lobe activity. We did not find differences between glomerular responses to the CS+ and the CS- in learners. Unexpectedly, we found that during conditioning trials non-learners exhibited a progressive decrease in physiological responses to odors, irrespective of their valence. This effect could neither be attributed to a fitness problem nor to abnormal dye bleaching. We discuss the absence of learning-induced changes in the antennal lobe of learners and the decrease in calcium responses found in non-learners. Further studies will have to extend the search for functional plasticity related to aversive learning to other brain areas and to look on a broader range of temporal scales

  20. Proliferation and recapitulation of developmental patterning associated with regulative regeneration of the spinal cord neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasi, Gabor; Søviknes, Anne Mette; Sigurjonsson, Olafur; Glover, Joel C

    2012-05-01

    Developmental patterning during regulative regeneration of the chicken embryo spinal neural tube was characterized by assessing proliferation and the expression of transcription factors specific to neural progenitor and postmitotic neuron populations. One to several segments of the thoracolumbar neural tube were selectively excised unilaterally to initiate regeneration. The capacity for regeneration depended on the stage when ablation was performed and the extent of tissue removed. 20% of surviving embryos exhibited complete regulative regeneration, wherein the missing hemi-neural tube was reconstituted to normal size and morphology. Fate-mapping of proliferative adjacent tissue indicated contributions from the opposite side of the neural tube and potentially from the ipsilateral neural tube rostral and caudal to the lesion. Application of the thymidine analog EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) demonstrated a moderate increase in cell proliferation in lesioned relative to control embryos, and quantitative PCR demonstrated a parallel moderate increase in transcription of proliferation-related genes. Mathematical calculation showed that such modest increases are sufficient to account for the amount of regenerated tissue. Within the regenerated neural tube the expression pattern of progenitor-specific transcription factors was recapitulated in the separate advancing ventral and dorsal fronts of regeneration, with no evidence of abnormal mixing of progenitor subpopulations, indicating that graded patterning mechanisms do not require continuity of neural tube tissue along the dorsoventral axis and do not involve a sorting out of committed progenitors. Upon completion of the regeneration process, the pattern of neuron-specific transcription factor expression was essentially normal. Modest deficits in the numbers of transcription factor-defined neuron types were evident in the regenerated tissue, increasing particularly in dorsal neuron types with later lesions. These

  1. Stressor and glucocorticoid-dependent induction of the immediate early gene kruppel-like factor 9: implications for neural development and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Ronald M; Hu, Fang; Bagamasbad, Pia; Denver, Robert J

    2009-04-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a thyroid hormone-induced, immediate early gene implicated in neural development in vertebrates. We analyzed stressor and glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent regulation of KLF9 expression in the brain of the frog Xenopus laevis, and investigated a possible role for KLF9 in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to shaking/confinement stressor increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and KLF9 immunoreactivity in several brain regions, which included the medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anterior preoptic area (homologous to the mammalian paraventricular nucleus), and optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus). The stressor-induced KLF9 mRNA expression in the brain was blocked by pretreatment with the GC receptor antagonist RU486, or mimicked by injection of CORT. Treatment with CORT also caused a rapid and dose-dependent increase in KLF9 mRNA in X. laevis XTC-2 cells that was resistant to inhibition of protein synthesis. The action of CORT on KLF9 expression in XTC-2 cells was blocked by RU486, but not by the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone. To test for functional consequences of up-regulation of KLF9, we introduced a KLF9 expression plasmid into living tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer. Forced expression of KLF9 in tadpole brain caused an increase in Golgi-stained cells, reflective of neuronal differentiation/maturation. Our results support that KLF9 is a direct, GC receptor target gene that is induced by stress, and functions as an intermediary in the actions of GCs on brain gene expression and neuronal structure.

  2. Stressor and Glucocorticoid-Dependent Induction of the Immediate Early Gene Krüppel-Like Factor 9: Implications for Neural Development and Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonett, Ronald M.; Hu, Fang; Bagamasbad, Pia; Denver, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) is a thyroid hormone-induced, immediate early gene implicated in neural development in vertebrates. We analyzed stressor and glucocorticoid (GC)-dependent regulation of KLF9 expression in the brain of the frog Xenopus laevis, and investigated a possible role for KLF9 in neuronal differentiation. Exposure to shaking/confinement stressor increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration, and KLF9 immunoreactivity in several brain regions, which included the medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, anterior preoptic area (homologous to the mammalian paraventricular nucleus), and optic tectum (homologous to the mammalian superior colliculus). The stressor-induced KLF9 mRNA expression in the brain was blocked by pretreatment with the GC receptor antagonist RU486, or mimicked by injection of CORT. Treatment with CORT also caused a rapid and dose-dependent increase in KLF9 mRNA in X. laevis XTC-2 cells that was resistant to inhibition of protein synthesis. The action of CORT on KLF9 expression in XTC-2 cells was blocked by RU486, but not by the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone. To test for functional consequences of up-regulation of KLF9, we introduced a KLF9 expression plasmid into living tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer. Forced expression of KLF9 in tadpole brain caused an increase in Golgi-stained cells, reflective of neuronal differentiation/maturation. Our results support that KLF9 is a direct, GC receptor target gene that is induced by stress, and functions as an intermediary in the actions of GCs on brain gene expression and neuronal structure. PMID:19036875

  3. A comparative study on collagen type I and hyaluronic acid dependent cell behavior for osteochondral tissue bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju Young; Choi, Jong-Cheol; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Seob; Park, Hyoungjun; Kim, Sung Won; Doh, Junsang; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2014-09-01

    Bioprinting is a promising technique for engineering composite tissues, such as osteochondral tissues. In this study, as a first step toward bioprinting-based osteochondral tissue regeneration, we systematically examined the behavior of chondrocytes and osteoblasts to hyaluronic acid (HA) and type I collagen (Col-1) hydrogels. First, we demonstrated that cells on hydrogels that were comprised of major native tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) components (i.e. chondrocytes on HA hydrogels and osteoblasts on Col-1 hydrogels) exhibited better proliferation and cell function than cells on non-native ECM hydrogels (i.e., chondrocytes on Col-1 hydrogels and osteoblasts on HA hydrogels). In addition, cells located near their native ECM hydrogels migrated towards them. Finally, we bioprinted three-dimensional (3D) osteochondral tissue-mimetic structures composed of two compartments, osteoblast-encapsulated Col-1 hydrogels and chondrocyte-encapsulated HA hydrogels, and found viability and functions of each cell type were well maintained within the 3D structures up to 14 days in vitro. These results suggest that with proper choice of hydrogel materials, bioprinting-based approaches can be successfully applied for osteochondral tissue regeneration.

  4. Novel endodontic sealers induce cell cytotoxicity and apoptosis in a dose-dependent behavior and favorable response in mice subcutaneous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, L A B; Azevedo, L U; Consolaro, A; Barnett, F; Xu, Y; Battaglino, R A; Cañadas, P S; de Oliveira, Katharina Morant Holanda; Silva, R A B

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo biocompatibility of two novel endodontic sealers: RealSeal XT1 and Sealapex Xpress on the subcutaneous connective tissue of mice. The cytotoxicity was assessed by cell viability using the MTT assay (one-way ANOVA), trypan blue test (Mann-Whitney) and cell apoptosis by flow cytometer. For the subcutaneous study, polyethylene tubes filled with the sealers were implanted in 70 BALB/c mice: 6 experimental groups (n = 10/group) and 2 control groups with empty tubes (n = 5/group). At the end of experimental periods (7, 21, and 63 days), the tissue was removed and histotechnically processed. Angioblastic proliferation and edema (Fisher's exact test) were evaluated, besides thickness measurement (μm) of the reactionary granulomatous tissue and neutrophil counts (Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's post test; Mann-Whitney) (α = 0.05). MTT assay, trypan blue, and analysis of apoptotic cells showed a dose-dependent direct effect: the more diluted the sealer, the less cytotoxic. Regarding the angioblastic proliferation and edema, difference between the sealers at 7 and 63 days occurred (p endodontic sealers initially promoted perimaterial tissue reaction as a foreign body granuloma and thus stimulated favorable tissue responses. Both sealers showed a dose-dependent effect and promoted satisfactory subcutaneous tissue response; the sealer Sealapex Xpress was less cytotoxic and more biocompatible than RealSeal XT. The step of root canal filling during endodontic treatment is highly important for the preservation of the periapical tissue integrity. Subcutaneous reaction to endodontic sealers enables scientific basis for clinical use.

  5. Impaired autoregulation of blood flow in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous tissue in long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faris, I; Vagn Nielsen, H; Henriksen, O

    1983-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow was studied in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous tissue in seven Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients (median age: 36 years) with nephropathy and retinopathy and in eight normal subjects of the same age. Blood flow was measured by the local 133Xe washout...... technique. Reduction in arterial perfusion pressure was produced by elevating the limb 20 and 40 cm above heart level. Blood flow remained within 10% of control values when the limb was elevated in normal subjects. In five of the seven diabetic subjects blood flow fell significantly in both tissues when...

  6. Tissue phenotype depends on reciprocal interactions between the extracellular matrix and the structural organization of the nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelie' vre, S.A.; Weaver, V.M.; Nickerson, J.A.; Larabell, C.A.; Bhaumik, A.; Petersen, O.W.; Bissell, M.J.

    1998-08-14

    What determines the nuclear organization within a cell and whether this organization itself can impose cellular function within a tissue remains unknown. To explore the relationship between nuclear organization and tissue architecture and function, we used a model of human mammary epithelial cell acinar morphogenesis. When cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane (rBM), HMT-3522 cells form polarized and growth-arrested tissue-like acini with a central lumen and deposit an endogenous BM. We show that rBM-induced morphogenesis is accompanied by relocalization of the nuclear matrix proteins NuMA, splicing factor SRm160, and cell cycle regulator Rb. These proteins had distinct distribution patterns specific for proliferation, growth arrest, and acini formation, whereas the distribution of the nuclear lamina protein, lamin B, remained unchanged. NuMA relocalized to foci, which coalesced into larger assemblies as morphogenesis progressed. Perturbation of histone acetylation in the acini by trichostatin A treatment altered chromatin structure, disrupted NuMA foci, and induced cell proliferation. Moreover, treatment of transiently permeabilized acini with a NuMA antibody led to the disruption of NuMA foci, alteration of histone acetylation, activation of metalloproteases, and breakdown of the endogenous BM. These results experimentally demonstrate a dynamic interaction between the extracellular matrix, nuclear organization, and tissue phenotype. They further show that rather than passively ref lecting changes in gene expression, nuclear organization itself can modulate the cellular and tissue phenotype.

  7. UCP1 induction during recruitment of brown adipocytes in white adipose tissue is dependent on cyclooxygenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone M; Lillefosse, Haldis Haukaas

    2010-01-01

    expression in inguinal white adipocytes, but not in classic interscapular brown adipocytes. Cold-induced expression of UCP1 in inguinal white adipocytes was repressed in COX2 knockout (KO) mice and by administration of the COX inhibitor indomethacin in wild-type mice. Indomethacin repressed beta...... attenuated diet-induced UCP1 expression and increased energy efficiency and adipose tissue mass in obesity-resistant mice kept at thermoneutrality. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide evidence that induction of UCP1 expression in white adipose tissue, but not in classic interscapular brown adipose......-adrenergic induction of UCP1 expression in primary inguinal adipocytes. The use of PGE(2) receptor antagonists implicated EP(4) as a main PGE(2) receptor, and injection of the stable PGE(2) analog (EP(3/4) agonist) 16,16 dm PGE(2) induced UCP1 expression in inguinal white adipose tissue. Inhibition of COX activity...

  8. Obesity Activates a Program of Lysosomal-Dependent Lipid Metabolism in Adipose Tissue Macrophages Independently of Classic Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Grijalva, Ambar; Skowronski, Alicja; van Eijk, Marco; Serlie, Mireille J.; Ferrante, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Obesity activates a complex systemic immune response that includes the recruitment of macrophages and other immune cells to key metabolic tissues. Current models postulate that obesity and excess lipids classically activate macrophages, polarizing them toward an M1 (inflammatory) state. Little is known about noninflammatory functions of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). Here, we show that the expansion of adipose tissue (AT) across models of obesity induces a program of lysosome biogenesis in ATMs and is associated with lipid catabolism but not a classic inflammatory phenotype. This program is induced by factors produced by AT and is tightly coupled to lipid accumulation by ATMs. Inhibition of ATM lysosome function impairs lipid metabolism and increases lipid content in ATMs and reduces whole AT lipolysis. These data argue that ATMs contribute quantitatively to the development of obesity-induced inflammation but also serve an important role in lipid trafficking independent of their inflammatory phenotype. PMID:24315368

  9. Obesity activates a program of lysosomal-dependent lipid metabolism in adipose tissue macrophages independently of classic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyuan; Grijalva, Ambar; Skowronski, Alicja; van Eijk, Marco; Serlie, Mireille J; Ferrante, Anthony W

    2013-12-03

    Obesity activates a complex systemic immune response that includes the recruitment of macrophages and other immune cells to key metabolic tissues. Current models postulate that obesity and excess lipids classically activate macrophages, polarizing them toward an M1 (inflammatory) state. Little is known about noninflammatory functions of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). Here, we show that the expansion of adipose tissue (AT) across models of obesity induces a program of lysosome biogenesis in ATMs and is associated with lipid catabolism but not a classic inflammatory phenotype. This program is induced by factors produced by AT and is tightly coupled to lipid accumulation by ATMs. Inhibition of ATM lysosome function impairs lipid metabolism and increases lipid content in ATMs and reduces whole AT lipolysis. These data argue that ATMs contribute quantitatively to the development of obesity-induced inflammation but also serve an important role in lipid trafficking independent of their inflammatory phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brown adipose tissue in obesity: Fractalkine-receptor dependent immune cell recruitment affects metabolic-related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyák, Ágnes; Winkler, Zsuzsanna; Kuti, Dániel; Ferenczi, Szilamér; Kovács, Krisztina J

    2016-11-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays essential role in metabolic- and thermoregulation and displays morphological and functional plasticity in response to environmental and metabolic challenges. BAT is a heterogeneous tissue containing adipocytes and various immune-related cells, however, their interaction in regulation of BAT function is not fully elucidated. Fractalkine is a chemokine synthesized by adipocytes, which recruits fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1)-expressing leukocytes into the adipose tissue. Using transgenic mice, in which the fractalkine receptor, Cx3cr1 gene was replaced by Gfp, we evaluated whether deficiency in fractalkine signaling affects BAT remodeling and function in high-fat-diet - induced obesity. Homo- and heterozygote male CX3CR1-GFP mice were fed with normal or fat enriched (FatED) diet for 10weeks. Interscapular BAT was collected for molecular biological analysis. Heterozygous animals in which fractalkine signaling remains intact, gain more weight during FatED than CX3CR1 deficient gfp/gfp homozygotes. FatED in controls resulted in macrophage recruitment to the BAT with increased expression of proinflammatory mediators (Il1a, b, Tnfa and Ccl2). Local BAT inflammation was accompanied by increased expression of lipogenic enzymes and resulted in BAT "whitening". By contrast, fractalkine receptor deficiency prevented accumulation of tissue macrophages, selectively attenuated the expression of Tnfa, Il1a and Ccl2, increased BAT expression of lipolytic enzymes (Atgl, Hsl and Mgtl) and upregulated genes involved thermo-metabolism (Ucp1, Pparg Pgc1a) in response to FatED. These results highlight the importance of fractalkine-CX3CR1 interaction in recruitment of macrophages into the BAT of obese mice which might contribute to local tissue inflammation, adipose tissue remodeling and regulation of metabolic-related genes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Crank-Nicholson Scheme for the Estimation of Thermal Disturbance on the Peripheral Tissues of Human Body Subjected to Oscillatory Boundary Condition and Time Dependent Heat Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M. A.; Hussain, Fida

    2015-07-01

    To predict the behaviour of thermal physiology of a finite biological tissue in severe cold climatic conditions, a mathematical model has been established based on Pennes' bio-heat transfer equation with oscillatory boundary condition and time dependent heat source term. Crank-Nicholson scheme has been employed to obtain the solution of the boundary value problem to understand the change in stable temperature profiles at the peripheral tissues of human body subjected to forced convection due to cold. Thermal stress at these regions with respect to different input parameters has been computed under extreme environmental conditions using MATLAB Software. The results have shown a relative significance and provide a reasonable outcome in terms of variable metabolic heat generation and oscillatory heat source. The oscillations of the temperature profiles from the mean temperatures were computed in relation with tissue medium and other physiological parameters.

  12. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  13. OTX2 exhibits cell-context-dependent effects on cellular and molecular properties of human embryonic neural precursors and medulloblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Kaur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Medulloblastoma (MB is the most common malignant primary pediatric brain tumor and is currently divided into four subtypes based on different genomic alterations, gene expression profiles and response to treatment: WNT, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH, Group 3 and Group 4. This extensive heterogeneity has made it difficult to assess the functional relevance of genes to malignant progression. For example, expression of the transcription factor Orthodenticle homeobox2 (OTX2 is frequently dysregulated in multiple MB variants; however, its role may be subtype specific. We recently demonstrated that neural precursors derived from transformed human embryonic stem cells (trans-hENs, but not their normal counterparts (hENs, resemble Groups 3 and 4 MB in vitro and in vivo. Here, we tested the utility of this model system as a means of dissecting the role of OTX2 in MB using gain- and loss-of-function studies in hENs and trans-hENs, respectively. Parallel experiments with MB cells revealed that OTX2 exerts inhibitory effects on hEN and SHH MB cells by regulating growth, self-renewal and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. This was accompanied by decreased expression of pluripotent genes, such as SOX2, and was supported by overexpression of SOX2 in OTX2+ SHH MB and hENs that resulted in significant rescue of self-renewal and cell migration. By contrast, OTX2 is oncogenic and promotes self-renewal of trans-hENs and Groups 3 and 4 MB independent of pluripotent gene expression. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OTX2 in self-renewal and migration of hENs and MB cells and reveal a cell-context-dependent link between OTX2 and pluripotent genes. Our study underscores the value of human embryonic stem cell derivatives as alternatives to cell lines and heterogeneous patient samples for investigating the contribution of key developmental regulators to MB progression.

  14. Cotransplantation of Adipose Tissue-Derived Insulin-Secreting Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Hematopoietic Stem Cells: A Novel Therapy for Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    A V Vanikar; Dave, S. D.; Thakkar, U. G.; H L Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is believed to be an autoimmune disorder with disturbed glucose/insulin metabolism, requiring life-long insulin replacement therapy (IRT), 30% of patients develop end-organ failure. We present our experience of cotransplantation of adipose tissue derived insulin-secreting mesenchymal stem cells (IS-AD-MSC) and cultured bone marrow (CBM) as IRT for these patients. Methods. This was a prospective open-labeled clinical trial to test efficacy and s...

  15. PVP formulated Fullerene (C60) increases Rho-kinase dependent Vascular Tissue Contractility in Pregnant Sprague Dawley Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidanapathirana, Achini K.; Thompson, Leslie C.; Mann, Erin. E.; Odom, Jillian T.; Holland, Nathan A.; Sumner, Susan J.; Han, Li; Lewin, Anita H.; Fennell, Timothy R.; Brown, Jared M.; Wingard, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy is a unique physiological state, in which C60 fullerene is reported to be distributed in both maternal and fetal tissues. Tissue distribution of C60 differs between pregnant and non-pregnant states, presumably due to functional changes in vasculature during pregnancy. We hypothesized that, polyvinylpyrorrolidone (PVP) formulated C60 (C60/PVP) increases vascular tissue contractility during pregnancy by increasing Rho-kinase activity. C60/PVP was administered intravenously to pregnant and non-pregnant female Sprague Dawley rats. Vascular responses were assessed using wire myography 24 hours post-exposure. Increased stress generation was observed in uterine artery, thoracic aorta and umbilical vein. Rho-Rho-kinase mediated force maintenance was increased in arterial segments from C60/PVP exposed pregnant rats when compared to PVP exposed rats. Our findings suggest that intravenous exposure to C60/PVP during pregnancy increases vascular tissue contractility of the uterine artery through elements of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling during late stages of pregnancy. PMID:25088243

  16. Fixation-dependent vimentin immunoreactivity of mono- and polyclonal antibodies in brain tissue of cattle, rabbits, rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, K; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    1994-12-01

    The immunohistochemical staining of vimentin in paraffin-embedded sections from adult cattle, rabbit, rat and mouse brain fixed in different fixatives (formaldehyde, methacarn, ethanol) was examined using two monoclonal antibodies and a polyclonal antiserum. In non-trypsinized formaldehyde-fixed tissue sections both monoclonal antibodies and the polyclonal antibodies failed to stain vimentin. Following trypsinization of formaldehyde-fixed sections of the four species the meninges, endothelial cells of blood vessels, ependymal cells and the stroma of the choroid plexus were labelled by the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies used. Astrocytes and Bergmann glial fibers in pretrypsinized formaldehyde-fixed sections from cattle, rabbit and rat brain, however, showed only weak staining. Fixation of cattle and rat brain in methacarn markedly improved the vimentin immunoreactivity of astrocytes and Bergmann glial fibers. The best fixative for the preservation of immunoreactive determinants of vimentin in astrocytes and Bergmann glial fibers in cattle, rabbit and rat brain was ethanol. In brain tissue from mice both monoclonal antibodies labelled only mesoderm-derived tissue components, but did not recognize vimentin in astrocytes and Bergmann glial fibers. Pre-heating formaldehyde-fixed sections from cattle, rabbit and rat brain in a microwave oven prior to the immunohistochemical reaction resulted in an enormous enhancement of vimentin staining of mesoderm-derived tissues, of astrocytes and bergmann cell fibers.

  17. hmmr mediates anterior neural tube closure and morphogenesis in the frog Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Angela; Hagenlocher, Cathrin; Ott, Tim; Schambony, Alexandra; Feistel, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Development of the central nervous system requires orchestration of morphogenetic processes which drive elevation and apposition of the neural folds and their fusion into a neural tube. The newly formed tube gives rise to the brain in anterior regions and continues to develop into the spinal cord posteriorly. Conspicuous differences between the anterior and posterior neural tube become visible already during neural tube closure (NTC). Planar cell polarity (PCP)-mediated convergent extension (CE) movements are restricted to the posterior neural plate, i.e. hindbrain and spinal cord, where they propagate neural fold apposition. The lack of CE in the anterior neural plate correlates with a much slower mode of neural fold apposition anteriorly. The morphogenetic processes driving anterior NTC have not been addressed in detail. Here, we report a novel role for the breast cancer susceptibility gene and microtubule (MT) binding protein Hmmr (Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, RHAMM) in anterior neurulation and forebrain development in Xenopus laevis. Loss of hmmr function resulted in a lack of telencephalic hemisphere separation, arising from defective roof plate formation, which in turn was caused by impaired neural tissue narrowing. hmmr regulated polarization of neural cells, a function which was dependent on the MT binding domains. hmmr cooperated with the core PCP component vangl2 in regulating cell polarity and neural morphogenesis. Disrupted cell polarization and elongation in hmmr and vangl2 morphants prevented radial intercalation (RI), a cell behavior essential for neural morphogenesis. Our results pinpoint a novel role of hmmr in anterior neural development and support the notion that RI is a major driving force for anterior neurulation and forebrain morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Tissue-Specific and Light-Mediated Expression of the C4 Photosynthetic NAD-Dependent Malic Enzyme of Amaranth Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J. J.; Berry, J. O.

    1996-01-01

    In the C4 dicotyledonous grain plant amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus), a mitochondrial NAD-dependent malic enzyme (NAD-ME; EC 1.1.1.39) serves a specialized and essential role in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In this study we have examined specialized photosynthetic gene expression patterns for the NAD-ME [alpha] subunit. We show here that the [alpha] subunit gene is preferentially expressed in leaves and cotyledons (the most photosynthetically active tissues), and this expression is specific to the bundle-sheath cells of these tissues from the earliest stages of development. Synthesis of the [alpha] subunit polypeptide and accumulation of its corresponding mRNA are strongly light-dependent, but this regulation is also influenced by seedling development. In addition, light-dependent accumulation of the [alpha] subunit mRNA is regulated at transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional levels. Our findings demonstrate that the NAD-ME of amaranth has acquired numerous complex tissue-specific and light-mediated regulation patterns that define its specialized function as a key enzyme in the C4 photosynthetic pathway. PMID:12226404

  19. Neural Manifolds for the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A; Perich, Matthew G; Miller, Lee E; Solla, Sara A

    2017-06-07

    The analysis of neural dynamics in several brain cortices has consistently uncovered low-dimensional manifolds that capture a significant fraction of neural variability. These neural manifolds are spanned by specific patterns of correlated neural activity, the "neural modes." We discuss a model for neural control of movement in which the time-dependent activation of these neural modes is the generator of motor behavior. This manifold-based view of motor cortex may lead to a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rod-Shaped Neural Units for Aligned 3D Neural Network Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Negishi, Midori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Ito, Akane; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes neural tissue units with aligned nerve fibers (called rod-shaped neural units) that connect neural networks with aligned neurons. To make the proposed units, 3D fiber-shaped neural tissues covered with a calcium alginate hydrogel layer are prepared with a microfluidic system and are cut in an accurate and reproducible manner. These units have aligned nerve fibers inside the hydrogel layer and connectable points on both ends. By connecting the units with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) guide, 3D neural tissues can be constructed and maintained for more than two weeks of culture. In addition, neural networks can be formed between the different neural units via synaptic connections. Experimental results indicate that the proposed rod-shaped neural units are effective tools for the construction of spatially complex connections with aligned nerve fibers in vitro. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Exercise-dependent IGF-I, IGFBPs, and type I collagen changes in human peritendinous connective tissue determined by microdialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jens L; Heinemeier, Katja M; Gemmer, Carsten

    2007-01-01

    and exercise groups after 48 h (P human peritendinous tissue in response to prolonged mechanical loading with part of the increase due to trauma from the sampling......Microdialysis studies indicate that mechanical loading of human tendon during exercise elevates type I collagen production in tendon. However, the possibility that the insertion of microdialysis fibers per se may increase the local collagen production due to trauma has not been explored. Insulin......-terminal propeptide (PICP) and COOH-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen] were measured by microdialysis in peritendinous tissue of the human Achilles tendon in an exercise group (performing a 36-km run, n = 6) and a control group (no intervention, n = 6). An increase in local PICP concentration was seen in both...

  2. Content of sodium ions in the tissues of Crimean flora halophytes depending on the varying degree of salinity

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Kabuzenko; A. V. Omelchenko; L. N. Mikhalskaya; SCHWARTAU V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative content and distribution in organs and tissue compartments of Na + ions in halophytes Suaeda prostrata Pall., Salicornia perennans Willd., Artemisia santonica L. growing in the areas with chloride-sulfate type of salinization of soil in the vicinity of the Sasyk salt lake (Northwest Crimea) has been determined. It was found that for S. perennans and S. prostrata euhalophytes the strategy of translocation of Na + ions to the organs of the aerial part with increasing NaCl conce...

  3. Targeted Delivery of Neutralizing Anti-C5 Antibody to Renal Endothelium Prevents Complement-Dependent Tissue Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Durigutto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Complement activation is largely implicated in the pathogenesis of several clinical conditions and its therapeutic neutralization has proven effective in preventing tissue and organ damage. A problem that still needs to be solved in the therapeutic control of complement-mediated diseases is how to avoid side effects associated with chronic neutralization of the complement system, in particular, the increased risk of infections. We addressed this issue developing a strategy based on the preferential delivery of a C5 complement inhibitor to the organ involved in the pathologic process. To this end, we generated Ergidina, a neutralizing recombinant anti-C5 human antibody coupled with a cyclic-RGD peptide, with a distinctive homing property for ischemic endothelial cells and effective in controlling tissue damage in a rat model of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI. As a result of its preferential localization on renal endothelium, the molecule induced complete inhibition of complement activation at tissue level, and local protection from complement-mediated tissue damage without affecting circulating C5. The ex vivo binding of Ergidina to surgically removed kidney exposed to cold ischemia supports its therapeutic use to prevent posttransplant IRI leading to delay of graft function. Moreover, the finding that the ex vivo binding of Ergidina was not restricted to the kidney, but was also seen on ischemic heart, suggests that this RGD-targeted anti-C5 antibody may represent a useful tool to treat organs prior to transplantation. Based on this evidence, we propose preliminary data showing that Ergidina is a novel targeted drug to prevent complement activation on the endothelium of ischemic kidney.

  4. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  5. Association Between Fungal Contamination and Eye Bank-Prepared Endothelial Keratoplasty Tissue: Temperature-Dependent Risk Factors and Antifungal Supplementation of Optisol-Gentamicin and Streptomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kimberly M; Shanks, Robert M Q; Hurlbert, Susan; Kowalski, Regis P; Tu, Elmer Y

    2017-09-28

    Fungal contamination and infection from donor tissues processed for endothelial keratoplasty is a growing concern, prompting analysis of donor tissues after processing. To determine whether eyebank-processed endothelial keratoplasty tissue is at higher risk of contamination than unprocessed tissue and to model eyebank processing with regard to room temperature exposure on Candida growth in optisol-gentamicin and streptomycin (GS) with and without antifungal supplementation. An examination of the 2013 Eversight Eyebank Study follow-up database for risk factors associated with post-keratoplasty infection identified an increased risk of positive fungal rim culture results in tissue processed for endothelial keratoplasty vs unprocessed tissue. Processing steps at room temperature were hypothesized as a potential risk factor for promotion of fungal growth between these 2 processes. Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Candida parapsilosis endophthalmitis isolates were each inoculated into optisol-GS and subjected to 2 different room temperature incubation regimens reflective of current corneal tissue handling protocols. Eversight Eyebank Study outcomes and measures were follow-up inquiries from 6592 corneal transplants. Efficacy study outcomes and measures were fungal colony-forming units from inoculated vials of optisol-GS taken at 2 different processing temperatures. Donor rim culture results were 3 times more likely to be positive for fungi in endothelial keratoplasty-processed eyes (1.14%) than for other uses (0.37%) (difference, 0.77%; 95% CI, 0.17-.1.37) (P = .009). In vitro, increased room temperature incubation of optisol-GS increased growth of Candida species over time. The addition of caspofungin and voriconazole decreased growth of Candida in a species-dependent manner. Detectable Candida growth in donor rim cultures, associated with a higher rate of post keratoplasty infection, is seen in endothelial keratoplasty tissue vs other uses at the time of

  6. Material-induced tissue factor expression but not CD11b upregulation depends on the presence of platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbet, M B; Sefton, M V

    2003-12-01

    Biomaterials activate leukocytes as well as platelets when exposed to blood. One feature of leukocyte activation at least at times beyond a few hours is tissue factor expression, contributing to a procoagulant state. We show here that platelet activation and specifically platelet-monocyte aggregate formation appears to be a precondition for tissue factor expression. Material-induced Tissue Factor (TF) expression by isolated leukocytes (6 x 10(6) cells/mL) resuspended in increasing concentrations of platelets in plasma was elevated when the platelet concentration was 50 x 10(6) platelets/mL or more; at lower platelet concentrations (1-25 x 10(6). cells/mL) the TF expression remained at background levels. On the other hand, significant CD11b upregulation was observed on leukocytes, in bulk and adherent to beads, at all platelet concentrations. This platelet effect on material-induced TF expression appeared to be mediated by the formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates. Anti-P-selectin, which blocked the association between platelets and leukocytes, reduced monocyte adhesion and material-induced TF expression for bulk monocytes. Anti-GPIIb/IIIa, a GPIIb/IIIa platelet antagonist, also reduced monocyte adhesion and material-induced TF expression in the bulk, most likely due to its inhibiting effect on the formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates, secondary to platelet activation. However, the antibody-associated reductions for bulk leukocytes (mainly neutrophils) were small and incomplete. Similar levels of TF expression, in the bulk, were observed with both polystyrene (PS), a strong platelet activator, and polyethylene glycol-modified PEG (PS-PEG), a mild platelet activator. The role of platelets in material-induced TF expression appears to be mediated in part via the formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates, although other mechanisms are likely also involved. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res 67A: 792-800, 2003

  7. Characterization of endophytic fungi from Acer ginnala Maxim. in an artificial plantation: media effect and tissue-dependent variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghui Qi

    Full Text Available The community of endophytic fungi associated with Acer ginnala, a common tree in northeastern China, was investigated. Four media, PDA, Czapek's, WA and Sabouraud's, were used to inoculate explants from seeds, annual twigs and perennial twigs (xylem and bark. Media strongly affected the isolated species number, but not colonization frequency (CF or isolation frequency (IF. To investigate media effect further, a Principal Component Analysis (PCA was done. As a result, two components accounted for 86.502% of the total variance were extracted. These two components were named as PDA-determined factor (accounted for 45.139% of the total variance and Czapek's-determined factor (accounted for 41.363% of the total variance, respectively. This result suggested that only two media, PDA and Czapek's, could be used instead of all four media in this study without affecting the isolation results significantly. In total, ten taxa were isolated in this study. Alternaria sp., Phomopsis sp., Neurospora sp. and Phoma sp. were dominant endophytes while Pleosporales Incertae Sedis sp., Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp. and Epicoccum sp. were rare taxa. Different tissues/organs had different endophyte assemblages. All tissue/organ pairs had low Bray-Curtis indices (<0.3 except for bark and annual twigs (0.63. Compared to perennial twigs, annual twigs had a lower taxon number, lower isolate number, lower endophyte dominance and diversity indices. Seeds had distinct assemblage, lower similarity and similar low diversity indices to annual twigs. These results suggested that tissue type determines the endophyte assemblage while age determines the diversity.

  8. Success of spiral wave unpinning from the heterogeneity in a cardiac tissue depends on its boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachalov, V. N.; Tsvelaya, V. A.; Kudryashova, N. N.; Agladze, K. I.

    2017-11-01

    The mechanism of the low voltage defibrillation is based on the drift of the spiral wave induced by high frequency wave-train. In the process, it is first necessary to unpin the wave from the stabilizing obstacle. We study the conditions of unpinning of rotating wave anchored to the defect by posing the main accent on the boundary conditions of it. The computer simulations performed using Korhonen model showed that the fluxes through the border of the defect in the cardiac tissue can significantly modify the excitation pattern, and the working frequency gap for the unpinning of reentry waves could be substantially reduced, making overdrive pacing procedure less effective or practically inapplicable.

  9. Epithelial Control of Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Formation through p38α-Dependent Restraint of NF-κB Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Franco, Celia; Guma, Monica; Choo, Min-Kyung; Sano, Yasuyo; Enzler, Thomas; Karin, Michael; Mizoguchi, Atsushi; Park, Jin Mo

    2016-03-01

    The protein kinase p38α mediates cellular responses to environmental and endogenous cues that direct tissue homeostasis and immune responses. Studies of mice lacking p38α in several different cell types have demonstrated that p38α signaling is essential to maintaining the proliferation-differentiation balance in developing and steady-state tissues. The mechanisms underlying these roles involve cell-autonomous control of signaling and gene expression by p38α. In this study, we show that p38α regulates gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) formation in a noncell-autonomous manner. From an investigation of mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific deletion of the p38α gene, we find that p38α serves to limit NF-κB signaling and thereby attenuate GALT-promoting chemokine expression in the intestinal epithelium. Loss of this regulation results in GALT hyperplasia and, in some animals, mucosa-associated B cell lymphoma. These anomalies occur independently of luminal microbial stimuli and are most likely driven by direct epithelial-lymphoid interactions. Our study illustrates a novel p38α-dependent mechanism preventing excessive generation of epithelial-derived signals that drive lymphoid tissue overgrowth and malignancy. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Neural Correlates of Stimulus Reportability

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Oliver J.; Friston, Karl F.; Zeki, Semir

    2009-01-01

    Most experiments on the “neural correlates of consciousness” employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged...

  11. Cell-laden 3D bioprinting hydrogel matrix depending on different compositions for soft tissue engineering: Characterization and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisun; Lee, Sang Jin; Chung, Solchan; Lee, Jun Hee; Kim, Wan Doo; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Su A

    2017-02-01

    Cell-printing techniques that can construct three-dimensional (3D) structures with biocompatible materials and cells are of great interest for various biomedical applications, such as tissue engineering and drug-screening studies. For successful cell-printing with cells, bioinks are critical for both the processability of printing and the viability of printed cells. However, the influence of composition on 3D bio-printing with cells has not been well explored. In this study, we investigated different compositions of alginate bioinks by varying the concentrations of high molecular weight alginate (High Alg) and low molecular weight alginate (Low Alg). Bioinks of 3wt% alginate containing High Alg alone or a 1:2 (Low Alg:High Alg) composite allowed for the construction of 3D scaffolds with good processability and shapes. Cell-printing with fibroblasts and in vitro culture studies revealed good viability and growth of the printed cells after up to 7days of culture. Bioinks prepared with High and Low Alg at a 2:1 ratio exhibited better cell growth compared with those of other compositions. This study progresses the design and applications of alginate-based bioinks for cell-printing platforms in soft tissue engineering. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. High-fat diet feeding induces sex-dependent changes in inflammatory and insulin sensitivity profiles of rat adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrany, Maria E; Proenza, Ana M; Gianotti, Magdalena; Lladó, Isabel

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine, in rats of both sexes, the effect of HF diet feeding on the expression of adipokines involved in inflammatory status and insulin sensitivity and on the levels of proteins involved in lipid handling of retroperitoneal adipose tissue. Eight-week-old Wistar rats of both sexes were fed a control diet (2.9% w/w fat) or an HF diet (30% w/w fat) for 14 weeks. Adiponectin, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and inflammatory marker mRNA levels were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Levels of insulin receptor, glucose transporter 4, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, fatty acid synthase, hormone-sensitive lipase and lipoprotein lipase were determined by Western blot. HF diet feeding did not induce hyperphagia or body weight gain but did promote an increase in adiposity although only in male rats. HF diet impaired glucose tolerance and the expression of inflammatory and insulin sensitivity markers in adipose tissue of male rats, but not in female rats. Male rats seem to be more prone to disorders associated with an unbalanced composition of the diet, even in the absence of hyperphagia. In contrast, female rats counteract excessive fat intake by improving their ability to use lipid fuels, which limits adiposity and maintains insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Computational model of soft tissues in the human upper airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelteret, J-P V; Reddy, B D

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a three-dimensional finite element model of the tongue and surrounding soft tissues with potential application to the study of sleep apnoea and of linguistics and speech therapy. The anatomical data was obtained from the Visible Human Project, and the underlying histological data was also extracted and incorporated into the model. Hyperelastic constitutive models were used to describe the material behaviour, and material incompressibility was accounted for. An active Hill three-element muscle model was used to represent the muscular tissue of the tongue. The neural stimulus for each muscle group was determined through the use of a genetic algorithm-based neural control model. The fundamental behaviour of the tongue under gravitational and breathing-induced loading is investigated. It is demonstrated that, when a time-dependent loading is applied to the tongue, the neural model is able to control the position of the tongue and produce a physiologically realistic response for the genioglossus.

  14. RNA-sequencing of a mouse-model of spinal muscular atrophy reveals tissue-wide changes in splicing of U12-dependent introns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doktor, Thomas Koed; Hua, Yimin; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a neuromuscular disorder caused by insufficient levels of the Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein. SMN is expressed ubiquitously and functions in RNA processing pathways that include trafficking of mRNA and assembly of snRNP complexes. Importantly, SMA severity...... is correlated with decreased snRNP assembly activity. In particular, the minor spliceosomal snRNPs are affected, and some U12-dependent introns have been reported to be aberrantly spliced in patient cells and animal models. SMA is characterized by loss of motor neurons, but the underlying mechanism is largely...... unknown. It is likely that aberrant splicing of genes expressed in motor neurons is involved in SMA pathogenesis, but increasing evidence indicates that pathologies also exist in other tissues. We present here a comprehensive RNA-seq study that covers multiple tissues in an SMA mouse model. We show...

  15. Effects of temperature-dependent optical properties on the fluence rate and temperature of biological tissue during low-level laser therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soogeun; Jeong, Sungho

    2014-03-01

    The effects of temperature-dependent optical properties on the change of fluence rate and temperature distribution within biological tissues during low-level laser therapy (LLLT) were investigated by experimental and numerical methods. The fluence rate and temperature within a porcine skin were measured in vitro using an optical fiber sensor and a thermocouple, respectively, while irradiating the sample with a continuous wave laser (IPG Laser GmbH, Burbach, Germany, 1,064 nm, 3.14 W/cm(2)). The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of porcine skin were estimated using an inverse adding-doubling algorithm from the total reflectance and transmittance measured with a double-integrating sphere. It was shown that the reduced scattering coefficient of porcine skin decreased significantly as the skin temperature increased within the range of 26-40 °C. To incorporate the temperature dependency of tissue optical properties in the simulation, a mathematical model that adopted coupled equations for fluence rate and bioheat transfer was developed. It was shown that the predicted fluence rate and temperature by the proposed mathematical model agreed closely with the measured values of porcine skin. The calculation of human skin temperature using the developed model revealed that the skin temperature could be significantly underestimated if the temperature dependency of optical properties of human skin were ignored during LLLT simulation.

  16. The tissue-specific extinguisher locus TSE1 encodes a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshart, M; Weih, F; Nichols, M; Schütz, G

    1991-09-06

    The tissue-specific extinguisher locus TSE1, a dominant negative regulator of transcription in somatic cell hybrids, acts via a cAMP response element (CRE) to repress activity of a hepatocyte-specific enhancer. Guided by the antagonism between TSE1 and cAMP-mediated signal transduction, we identified the regulatory subunit RI alpha of protein kinase A (PKA) as the product of the TSE1 locus. The evidence derives from concordant expression of RI alpha mRNA and TSE1 genetic activity, high resolution mapping of the RI alpha gene and TSE1 on human chromosome 17, and the ability of a transfected RI alpha cDNA to generate a phenocopy of TSE1-mediated extinction. The mechanism of TSE1/RI alpha-mediated extinction involves repression of basal PKA activity, reduced phosphorylation of CREB at Ser-133, and a corresponding reduction of in vivo protein binding at the target CRE.

  17. Perinatal lead (Pb) exposure results in sex and tissue-dependent adult DNA methylation alterations in murine IAP transposons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrose, L; Faulk, C; Francis, J; Dolinoy, D C

    2017-10-01

    Epidemiological and animal data suggest that adult chronic disease is influenced by early-life exposure-induced changes to the epigenome. Previously, we observed that perinatal lead (Pb) exposure results in persistent murine metabolic- and activity-related effects. Using phylogenetic and DNA methylation analysis, we have also identified novel intracisternal A particle (IAP) retrotransposons exhibiting regions of variable methylation as candidate loci for environmental effects on the epigenome. Here, we now evaluate brain and kidney DNA methylation profiles of four representative IAPs in adult mice exposed to human physiologically relevant levels of Pb two weeks prior to mating through lactation. When IAPs across the genome were evaluated globally, average (sd) methylation levels were 92.84% (3.74) differing by tissue (P methylation at IAP 110 (P methylation at IAP 236 (P = 0.01) and 1.77% less at IAP 506 (P = 0.05). Individual IAP DNA methylation differed by sex for IAP 110 in the brain and kidney, IAP 236 in the kidney, and IAP 1259 in the kidney. Using Tomtom, we identified three binding motifs that matched to each of our novel IAPs impacted by Pb, one of which (HMGA2) has been linked to metabolic-related conditions in both mice and humans. Thus, these recently identified IAPs display tissue-specific environmental lability as well as sex-specific differences supporting an epigenetic link between early exposure to Pb and later-in-life health outcomes. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 58:540-550, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Content of sodium ions in the tissues of Crimean flora halophytes depending on the varying degree of salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Kabuzenko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative content and distribution in organs and tissue compartments of Na+ ions in halophytes Suaeda prostrata Pall., Salicornia perennans Willd., Artemisia santonica L. growing in the areas with chloride-sulfate type of salinization of soil in the vicinity of the Sasyk salt lake (Northwest Crimea has been determined. It was found that for S. perennans and S. prostrata euhalophytes the strategy of translocation of Na+ ions to the organs of the aerial part with increasing NaCl concentration in the medium was typical. In this case, the content of Na+ ions in the cell sap of the above-ground parts of plants significantly increases which is more pronounced in S. perennans. Increasing concentrations of NaCl in the medium contribute to 0.50–0.75% improvement in plant growth indicators and protein content increase in vegetative organs. A positive correlation between the content of Na+ and biomass accumulation in organs of euhalophytes is shown. Glycohalophyte A. santonica is characterized by localization of Na+ ions predominantly in the root tissues. The highest content of Na+ ions in the above-ground organs of euhalophytes growing in natural conditions was observed in the phase of active vegetative growth and budding, therefore, it is recommended to mow their aerial organs at these stages of ontogenesis for the purpose of soil desalinization. It is concluded that absorption of Na+, as a strategy of adaptation of halophytes to salinity, not only helps to reduce water potential in cells and plants in general, but also activates anabolism, which directly correlates with their salt tolerance.

  19. PPARgamma activation attenuates T-lymphocyte-dependent inflammation of adipose tissue and development of insulin resistance in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation of adipose tissue (AT has been recently accepted as a first step towards obesity-mediated insulin resistance. We could previously show that mice fed with high fat diet (HFD develop systemic insulin resistance (IR and glucose intolerance (GI associated with CD4-positive T-lymphocyte infiltration into visceral AT. These T-lymphocytes, when enriched in AT, participate in the development of fat tissue inflammation and subsequent recruitment of proinflammatory macrophages. The aim of this work was to elucidate the action of the insulin sensitizing PPARgamma on T-lymphocyte infiltration during development of IR, and comparison of the PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammatory effects of rosiglitazone and telmisartan in diet-induced obesity model (DIO-model in mice. Methods In order to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying early development of systemic insulin resistance and glucose intolerance male C57BL/6J mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD for 10-weeks in parallel to the pharmacological intervention with rosiglitazone, telmisartan, or vehicle. Results Both rosiglitazone and telmisartan were able to reduce T-lymphocyte infiltration into AT analyzed by quantitative analysis of the T-cell marker CD3gamma and the chemokine SDF1alpha. Subsequently, both PPARgamma agonists were able to attenuate macrophage infiltration into AT, measured by the reduction of MCP1 and F4/80 expression. In parallel to the reduction of AT-inflammation, ligand-activated PPARgamma improved diet-induced IR and GI. Conclusion Together the present study demonstrates a close connection between PPARgamma-mediated anti-inflammation in AT and systemic improvement of glucose metabolism identifying T-lymphocytes as one cellular mediator of PPARgamma´s action.

  20. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geemen, Daphne; Soares, Ana L F; Oomen, Pim J A; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Janssen-van den Broek, Marloes W J T; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Goumans, Marie-José T H; Baaijens, Frank P T; Bouten, Carlijn V C

    2016-01-01

    There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years) were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  1. Age-Dependent Changes in Geometry, Tissue Composition and Mechanical Properties of Fetal to Adult Cryopreserved Human Heart Valves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne van Geemen

    Full Text Available There is limited information about age-specific structural and functional properties of human heart valves, while this information is key to the development and evaluation of living valve replacements for pediatric and adolescent patients. Here, we present an extended data set of structure-function properties of cryopreserved human pulmonary and aortic heart valves, providing age-specific information for living valve replacements. Tissue composition, morphology, mechanical properties, and maturation of leaflets from 16 pairs of structurally unaffected aortic and pulmonary valves of human donors (fetal-53 years were analyzed. Interestingly, no major differences were observed between the aortic and pulmonary valves. Valve annulus and leaflet dimensions increase throughout life. The typical three-layered leaflet structure is present before birth, but becomes more distinct with age. After birth, cell numbers decrease rapidly, while remaining cells obtain a quiescent phenotype and reside in the ventricularis and spongiosa. With age and maturation-but more pronounced in aortic valves-the matrix shows an increasing amount of collagen and collagen cross-links and a reduction in glycosaminoglycans. These matrix changes correlate with increasing leaflet stiffness with age. Our data provide a new and comprehensive overview of the changes of structure-function properties of fetal to adult human semilunar heart valves that can be used to evaluate and optimize future therapies, such as tissue engineering of heart valves. Changing hemodynamic conditions with age can explain initial changes in matrix composition and consequent mechanical properties, but cannot explain the ongoing changes in valve dimensions and matrix composition at older age.

  2. Electromagnetic fields as first messenger in biological signaling: Application to calmodulin-dependent signaling in tissue repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Arthur; Fitzsimmons, Robert; Muehsam, David; Wu, June; Rohde, Christine; Casper, Diana

    2011-12-01

    The transduction mechanism for non-thermal electromagnetic field (EMF) bioeffects has not been fully elucidated. This study proposes that an EMF can act as a first messenger in the calmodulin-dependent signaling pathways that orchestrate the release of cytokines and growth factors in normal cellular responses to physical and/or chemical insults. Given knowledge of Ca(2+) binding kinetics to calmodulin (CaM), an EMF signal having pulse duration or carrier period shorter than bound Ca(2+) lifetime may be configured to accelerate binding, and be detectable above thermal noise. New EMF signals were configured to modulate calmodulin-dependent signaling and assessed for efficacy in cellular studies. Configured EMF signals modulated CaM-dependent enzyme kinetics, produced several-fold increases in key second messengers to include nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in chondrocyte and endothelial cultures and cyclic adenosine monophosphate in neuronal cultures. Calmodulin antagonists and downstream blockers annihilated these effects, providing strong support for the proposed mechanism. Knowledge of the kinetics of Ca(2+) binding to CaM, or for any ion binding specific to any signaling cascade, allows the use of an electrochemical model by which the ability of any EMF signal to modulate CaM-dependent signaling can be assessed a priori or a posteriori. Results are consistent with the proposed mechanism, and strongly support the Ca/CaM/NO pathway as a primary EMF transduction pathway. The predictions of the proposed model open a host of significant possibilities for configuration of non-thermal EMF signals for clinical and wellness applications that can reach far beyond fracture repair and wound healing. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A subset of replication-dependent histone mRNAs are expressed as polyadenylated RNAs in terminally differentiated tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Shawn M.; Cunningham, Clark H.; Welch, Joshua D; Groh, Beezly; Guo, Andrew Y.; Wei, Bruce; Whitfield, Michael L.; Xiong, Yue; Marzluff, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are synthesized in large amounts during S-phase to package the newly replicated DNA, and are among the most stable proteins in the cell. The replication-dependent (RD)-histone mRNAs expressed during S-phase end in a conserved stem-loop rather than a polyA tail. In addition, there are replication-independent (RI)-histone genes that encode histone variants as polyadenylated mRNAs. Most variants have specific functions in chromatin, but H3.3 also serves as a replacement histone ...

  4. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-Silva, Albená; Bernardes, Priscila T T; Rezende, Bárbara M; Lopes, Fernando; Gomes, Elisa C; Marques, Pedro E; Lima, Paulo M A; Coimbra, Cândido C; Menezes, Gustavo B; Teixeira, Mauro M; Pinho, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK) concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase) mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  5. Treadmill exercise induces neutrophil recruitment into muscle tissue in a reactive oxygen species-dependent manner. An intravital microscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albená Nunes-Silva

    Full Text Available Intense exercise is a physiological stress capable of inducing the interaction of neutrophils with muscle endothelial cells and their transmigration into tissue. Mechanisms driving this physiological inflammatory response are not known. Here, we investigate whether production of reactive oxygen species is relevant for neutrophil interaction with endothelial cells and recruitment into the quadriceps muscle in mice subjected to the treadmill fatiguing exercise protocol. Mice exercised until fatigue by running for 56.3±6.8 min on an electric treadmill. Skeletal muscle was evaluated by intravital microscopy at different time points after exercise, and then removed to assess local oxidative stress and histopathological analysis. We observed an increase in plasma lactate and creatine kinase (CK concentrations after exercise. The numbers of monocytes, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in blood increased 12 and 24 hours after the exercise. Numbers of rolling and adherent leukocytes increased 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours post-exercise, as assessed by intravital microscopy. Using LysM-eGFP mice and confocal intravital microscopy technology, we show that the number of transmigrating neutrophils increased 12 hours post-exercise. Mutant gp91phox-/- (non-functional NADPH oxidase mice and mice treated with apocynin showed diminished neutrophil recruitment. SOD treatment promoted further adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes 12 hours after the exercise. These findings confirm our hypothesis that treadmill exercise increases the recruitment of leukocytes to the postcapillary venules, and NADPH oxidase-induced ROS plays an important role in this process.

  6. Tissue- and time-dependent transcription in Ixodes ricinus salivary glands and midguts when blood feeding on the vertebrate host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a tick that transmits the pathogens of Lyme and several arboviral diseases. Pathogens invade the tick midgut, disseminate through the hemolymph, and are transmitted to the vertebrate host via the salivary glands; subverting these processes could be used to interrupt pathogen transfer. Here, we use massive de novo sequencing to characterize the transcriptional dynamics of the salivary and midgut tissues of nymphal and adult I. ricinus at various time points after attachment on the vertebrate host. Members of a number of gene families show stage- and time-specific expression. We hypothesize that gene expression switching may be under epigenetic control and, in support of this, identify 34 candidate proteins that modify histones. I. ricinus-secreted proteins are encoded by genes that have a non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rate even greater than immune-related genes. Midgut transcriptome (mialome) analysis reveals several enzymes associated with protein, carbohydrate, and lipid digestion, transporters and channels that might be associated with nutrient uptake, and immune-related transcripts including antimicrobial peptides. This publicly available dataset supports the identification of protein and gene targets for biochemical and physiological studies that exploit the transmission lifecycle of this disease vector for preventative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25765539

  7. Classification of Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectra from Normal and Malignant bladder tissues using Learning Vector Quantization Neural Network in Bladder Cancer Diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Mascarenhas, Kim Komal; Patil, Choudhary

    2008-01-01

    In the present work we discuss the potential of recently developed classification algorithm, Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ), for the analysis of Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) Spectra, recorded from normal and malignant bladder tissue samples. The algorithm is prototype based and inherently...

  8. How T-cell-dependent and -independent challenges access the brain: vascular and neural responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide and staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrats, Jordi; Sawchenko, Paul E

    2009-10-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is widely used to study immune influences on the CNS, and cerebrovascular prostaglandin (PG) synthesis is implicated in mediating LPS influences on some acute phase responses. Other bacterial products, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), impact target tissues differently in that their effects are T-lymphocyte-dependent, yet both LPS and SEB recruit a partially overlapping set of subcortical central autonomic cell groups. We sought to compare neurovascular responses to the two pathogens, and the mechanisms by which they may access the brain. Rats received iv injections of LPS (2 microg/kg), SEB (1mg/kg) or vehicle and were sacrificed 0.5-3h later. Both challenges engaged vascular cells as early 0.5h, as evidenced by induced expression of the vascular early response gene (Verge), and the immediate-early gene, NGFI-B. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was detected in both endothelial and perivascular cells (PVCs) in response to LPS, but only in PVCs of SEB-challenged animals. The non-selective COX inhibitor, indomethacin (1mg/kg, iv), blocked LPS-induced activation in a subset of central autonomic structures, but failed to alter SEB-driven responses. Liposome mediated ablation of PVCs modulated the CNS response to LPS, did not affect the SEB-induced activational profile. By contrast, disruptions of interoceptive signaling by area postrema lesions or vagotomy (complete or hepatic) markedly attenuated SEB-, but not LPS-, stimulated central activational responses. Despite partial overlap in their neuronal and vascular response profiles, LPS and SEB appear to use distinct mechanisms to access the brain.

  9. Somatostatin and its receptors contribute in a tissue-specific manner to the sex-dependent metabolic (fed/fasting) control of growth hormone axis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D; Castaño, Justo P; Kineman, Rhonda D; Luque, Raul M

    2011-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) inhibits growth hormone (GH) secretion and regulates multiple processes by signaling through its receptors sst1-5. Differential expression of SST/ssts may contribute to sex-specific GH pattern and fasting-induced GH rise. To further delineate the tissue-specific roles of SST and sst1-5 in these processes, their expression patterns were evaluated in hypothalamus, pituitary, and stomach of male and female mice under fed/fasted conditions in the presence (wild type) or absence (SST-knockout) of endogenous SST. Under fed conditions, hypothalamic/stomach SST/ssts expression did not differ between sexes, whereas male pituitary expressed more SST and sst2A/2B/3/5A/5TMD2/5TMD1 and less sst1, and male pituitary cell cultures were more responsive to SST inhibitory actions on GH release compared with females. This suggests that local pituitary SST/ssts can contribute to the sexually dimorphic pattern of GH release. Fasting (48 h) reduced stomach sst2A/B and hypothalamic SST/sst2A expression in both sexes, whereas it caused a generalized downregulation of pituitary sst subtypes in male and of sst2A only in females. Thus, fasting can reduce SST sensitivity across tissues and SST input to the pituitary, thereby jointly contributing to enhance GH release. In SST-knockout mice, lack of SST differentially altered sst subtype expression levels in both sexes, supporting an important role for SST in sex-dependent control of GH axis. Evaluation of SST, IGF-I, and glucocorticoid effects on hypothalamic and pituitary cell cultures revealed that these hormones could directly account for alterations in sst2/5 expression in the physiological states examined. Taken together, these results indicate that changes in SST output and sensitivity can contribute critically to precisely define, in a tissue-dependent manner, the sex-specific metabolic regulation of the GH axis.

  10. Onset of herbivore-induced resistance in systemic tissue primed for jasmonate-dependent defenses is activated by abscisic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene A. Vos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, the MYC2 transcription factor on the one hand and the AP2/ERF transcription factors ORA59 and ERF1 on the other hand regulate distinct branches of the jasmonic acid (JA signaling pathway in an antagonistic fashion, co-regulated by abscisic acid (ABA and ethylene, respectively. Feeding by larvae of the specialist herbivorous insect Pieris rapae (small cabbage white butterfly results in activation of the MYC-branch and concomitant suppression of the ERF-branch in insect-damaged leaves. Here we investigated differential JA signaling activation in undamaged systemic leaves of P. rapae-infested plants. We found that the MYC2 transcription factor gene was induced both in the local insect-damaged leaves and the systemic undamaged leaves of P. rapae-infested Arabidopsis plants. However, in contrast to the insect-damaged leaves, the undamaged tissue did not show activation of the MYC-branch marker gene VSP1. Comparison of the hormone signal signature revealed that the levels of JA and (+-7-iso-jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile raised to similar extents in locally damaged and systemically undamaged leaves, but the production of ABA and the JA precursor 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA was enhanced only in the local herbivore-damaged leaves, and not in the distal undamaged leaves. Challenge of undamaged leaves of pre-infested plants with either P. rapae larvae or exogenously applied ABA led to potentiated expression levels of MYC2 and VSP1, with the latter reaching extremely high expression levels. Moreover, P. rapae-induced resistance, as measured by reduction of caterpillar growth on pre-infested plants, was blocked in the ABA biosynthesis mutant aba2-1, that was also impaired in P. rapae-induced expression of VSP1. Together, these results suggest that ABA is a crucial regulator of herbivore-induced resistance by activating primed JA-regulated defense responses upon secondary herbivore attack in Arabidopsis.

  11. Neural repair in the adult brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessberger, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Acute or chronic injury to the adult brain often results in substantial loss of neural tissue and subsequent permanent functional impairment. Over the last two decades, a number of approaches have been developed to harness the regenerative potential of neural stem cells and the existing fate plasticity of neural cells in the nervous system to prevent tissue loss or to enhance structural and functional regeneration upon injury. Here, we review recent advances of stem cell-associated neural repair in the adult brain, discuss current challenges and limitations, and suggest potential directions to foster the translation of experimental stem cell therapies into the clinic. PMID:26918167

  12. A comparison of the techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry and resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of potentially toxic element accumulation in neural tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, O R; Perks, R M; Abraham, C J; Telle, H H; Oakley, A E

    1997-01-01

    A comparison is made of the techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) for the detection of the neuro-toxic element aluminium in cortical tissue. Experiments were performed using a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) in conjunction with an Ar+ source for target sputtering and a pulsed tuneable dye laser system for resonance ionization. It is shown how isobaric interference of species such as CNH and C2H3 in the case of aluminium greatly affect the quantitative accuracy and the detection limit of aluminium in biological samples when analysed using SIMS. In contrast the use of RIMS virtually eliminates this problem, so allowing easier quantification and much lower detection limits to be achieved. Detection limits of approximately 3 ppm for aluminium in brain tissue homogenates were achieved using RIMS, with a spatial resolution of less than 100 microns.

  13. Concise Review: Reprogramming, Behind the Scenes: Noncanonical Neural Stem Cell Signaling Pathways Reveal New, Unseen Regulators of Tissue Plasticity With Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poser, Steven W; Chenoweth, Josh G; Colantuoni, Carlo; Masjkur, Jimmy; Chrousos, George; Bornstein, Stefan R; McKay, Ronald D; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Interest is great in the new molecular concepts that explain, at the level of signal transduction, the process of reprogramming. Usually, transcription factors with developmental importance are used, but these approaches give limited information on the signaling networks involved, which could reveal new therapeutic opportunities. Recent findings involving reprogramming by genetic means and soluble factors with well-studied downstream signaling mechanisms, including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and hairy and enhancer of split 3 (Hes3), shed new light into the molecular mechanisms that might be involved. We examine the appropriateness of common culture systems and their ability to reveal unusual (noncanonical) signal transduction pathways that actually operate in vivo. We then discuss such novel pathways and their importance in various plastic cell types, culminating in their emerging roles in reprogramming mechanisms. We also discuss a number of reprogramming paradigms (mouse induced pluripotent stem cells, direct conversion to neural stem cells, and in vivo conversion of acinar cells to β-like cells). Specifically for acinar-to-β-cell reprogramming paradigms, we discuss the common view of the underlying mechanism (involving the Janus kinase-STAT pathway that leads to STAT3-tyrosine phosphorylation) and present alternative interpretations that implicate STAT3-serine phosphorylation alone or serine and tyrosine phosphorylation occurring in sequential order. The implications for drug design and therapy are important given that different phosphorylation sites on STAT3 intercept different signaling pathways. We introduce a new molecular perspective in the field of reprogramming with broad implications in basic, biotechnological, and translational research. Reprogramming is a powerful approach to change cell identity, with implications in both basic and applied biology. Most efforts involve the forced expression of key transcription

  14. Tissue segmentation-assisted analysis of fMRI for human motor response: an approach combining artificial neural network and fuzzy C means

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, MJ; Lin, CC; Chuang, KH; Chen, JH; Huang, KM

    2001-01-01

    The authors have developed an automated algorithm for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. They investigated the quantitative analysis of tissue-specific human motor response through an approach combining gradient echo functional MRI and automated segmentation analysis. Fifteen healthy volunteers, placed in a 1.5 T clinical MR imager, performed a self-paced finger opposition throughout the activation periods. T1-weighted images (WI), T2WI, and proton density WI ...

  15. Tissue segmentation-assisted analysis of fMRI for human motor response: an approach combining artificial neural network and fuzzy C means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, M J; Lin, C C; Chuang, K H; Chen, J H; Huang, K M

    2001-03-01

    The authors have developed an automated algorithm for segmentation of magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the human brain. They investigated the quantitative analysis of tissue-specific human motor response through an approach combining gradient echo functional MRI and automated segmentation analysis. Fifteen healthy volunteers, placed in a 1.5 T clinical MR imager, performed a self-paced finger opposition throughout the activation periods. T1-weighted images (WI), T2WI, and proton density WI were acquired for segmentation analysis. Single-slice axial T2* fast low-angle shot (FLASH) images were obtained during the functional study. Pixelwise cross-correlation analysis was performed to obtain an activation map. A cascaded algorithm, combining Kohonen feature maps and fuzzy C means, was applied for segmentation. After processing, masks for gray matter, white matter, small vessels, and large vessels were generated. Tissue-specific analysis showed a signal change rate of 4.53% in gray matter, 2.98% in white matter, 5.79% in small vessels, and 7.24% in large vessels. Different temporal patterns as well as different levels of activation were identified in the functional response from various types of tissue. High correlation exists between cortical gray matter and subcortical white matter (r = 0.957), while the vessel behaves somewhat different temporally. The cortical gray matter fits best to the assumed input function (r = 0.957) followed by subcortical white matter (r = 0.829) and vessels (r = 0.726). The automated algorithm of tissue-specific analysis thus can assist functional MRI studies with different modalities of response in different brain regions.

  16. Role of Rab11 in planar cell polarity and apical constriction during vertebrate neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipova, Olga; Kim, Kyeongmi; Lake, Blue B; Itoh, Keiji; Ioannou, Andriani; Sokol, Sergei Y

    2014-05-13

    Epithelial folding is a critical process underlying many morphogenetic events including vertebrate neural tube closure, however, its spatial regulation is largely unknown. Here we show that during neural tube formation Rab11-positive recycling endosomes acquire bilaterally symmetric distribution in the Xenopus neural plate, being enriched at medial apical cell junctions. This mediolateral polarization was under the control of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling, was necessary for neural plate folding and was accompanied by the polarization of the exocyst component Sec15. Our further experiments demonstrate that similar PCP-dependent polarization of Rab11 is essential for ectopic apical constriction driven by the actin-binding protein Shroom and during embryonic wound repair. We propose that anisotropic membrane trafficking has key roles in diverse morphogenetic behaviours of individual cells and propagates in a tissue by a common mechanism that involves PCP.

  17. The action of anti-inflammatory agents in healthy temporomandibular joint synovial tissues is sex-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroba, S R; Groppo, M F; Faibish, D; Groppo, F C

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dexamethasone, parecoxib, and glucosamine on cartilage thickness and cytokine levels in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Forty-eight rats (24 female, 24 male) were assigned to four treatments administered once daily for 7 days: control (saline intramuscularly), parecoxib (0.3mg/kg intramuscularly), dexamethasone (0.1mg/kg intramuscularly), and glucosamine (80mg/kg orally). The thickness of TMJ cartilage and levels of four cytokines were measured. Median cartilage thickness was higher in males than in females in the control (253.2 vs. 240.4μm, P=0.0036), parecoxib (227.3 vs. 192.1μm, P0.05). Only dexamethasone induced lower IL-6 levels in males than in females (median 4.6 vs. 2.1ng/ml, P=0.0044). Median TNF-α levels did not differ between males and females in the control (0.07 vs. 0.05ng/ml) or parecoxib (0.07 vs. 0.05ng/ml) groups (both P>0.05), but dexamethasone (0.09 vs. 0.05ng/ml, P=0.0002) and glucosamine (0.09 vs. 0.07ng/ml, P=0.0259) induced higher TNF-α levels in females. Thus, the effects of the three treatments on the levels of cytokines and thickness of condylar cartilage were sex-dependent. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Conservative treatment of bone tissue metabolic disorders among patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II with genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Martsyniak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. The purpose of the article is to determine the effect of conservative therapy on genetically caused disorders of bone tissue metabolism in patients with vitamin D-dependent rickets type II and genetic abnormality of type I collagen formation (VDDR(COL1. Materials and methods. At the premises of consulting and outpatient department of SI “Institute of Traumatology and Orthopaedics of the NAMS of Ukraine”, 13 patients having VDDR type II and genetic damage of type I collagen formation were examined and treated. The medical treatment was conducted in four stages. The first stage included full examination of patients (calcium and phosphorus levels in the blood serum and their urinary excretion, as well as determination of calcidiol and calcitriol serum levels, indicators of parathyroid hormone and osteocalcin, and a marker of bone formation P1NP and osteoresorption b-CTx. At this stage, children were obligated to undergo a genetic test to detect changes (polymorphism in alleles of receptors to vitamin D and type I collagen. Besides genetic tests, examinations at the other stages were conducted in full. Results. The study has shown the following. The genetically caused abnormality of reception to vitamin D results into substantial accumulation of vitamin D active metabolite in the blood serum. When combined with gene­tic abnormality of type I collagen formation, it significantly affected bone formation and destruction processes that causes development of osteomalacia (parathormone — vitamin D — osteocalcin system. The comprehensive study of vitamin D metabolism and biochemical vitals of bone tissue in patients having VDDR (COL1 brought us to understanding of some issues related to pathogenesis and nature of osteomalacia and, in future, osteoporotic changes on different levels, ensured us to express these changes by corresponding indices in the biochemical research and, finally, to develop appropriate schemes for the treatment of

  19. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  20. Tumor cell–associated tissue factor and circulating hemostatic factors cooperate to increase metastatic potential through natural killer cell–dependent and–independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Joseph S.; Talmage, Kathryn E.; Massari, Jessica V.; La Jeunesse, Christine M.; Flick, Matthew J.; Kombrinck, Keith W.; Hu, Zhiwei; Barney, Kelley A.

    2007-01-01

    Tumor cell–associated tissue factor (TF) is a powerful determinant of metastatic potential. TF may increase metastasis by supporting thrombin-mediated proteolysis, through intracellular signaling events mediated by the TF cytoplasmic domain, through TF/fVIIa/fXa–mediated activation of protease-activated receptors, or through a combination of these processes. To better define the relationship between tumor cell-associated TF and circulating hemostatic factors in malignancy, we generated a set of C57Bl/6-derived tumor lines genetically lacking TF, expressing wild-type murine TF, or expressing a mutant TF lacking the cytoplasmic domain. Comparison of the metastatic potential of these cells in immunocompetent mice with genetic deficits in prothrombin, platelet function, or fibrinogen revealed that TF supports metastasis through mechanisms independent of the cytoplasmic domain, but dependent on each of these distal hemostatic factors. TF was neither required for primary tumor growth nor necessary for initial localization of embolized tumor cells within the lungs. Rather, tumor cell fate studies indicated TF supports metastasis by increasing the survival of micrometastases. One mechanism linking TF to metastasis is through a fibrin(ogen)-dependent and platelet-dependent restriction in natural killer cell–mediated clearance of micrometastases. However, TF also supported the early success of micrometastases through an additional mechanism independent of natural killer cells, but coupled to circulating prothrombin. PMID:17371949

  1. Tumor cell-associated tissue factor and circulating hemostatic factors cooperate to increase metastatic potential through natural killer cell-dependent and-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Joseph S; Talmage, Kathryn E; Massari, Jessica V; La Jeunesse, Christine M; Flick, Matthew J; Kombrinck, Keith W; Hu, Zhiwei; Barney, Kelley A; Degen, Jay L

    2007-07-01

    Tumor cell-associated tissue factor (TF) is a powerful determinant of metastatic potential. TF may increase metastasis by supporting thrombin-mediated proteolysis, through intracellular signaling events mediated by the TF cytoplasmic domain, through TF/fVIIa/fXa-mediated activation of protease-activated receptors, or through a combination of these processes. To better define the relationship between tumor cell-associated TF and circulating hemostatic factors in malignancy, we generated a set of C57Bl/6-derived tumor lines genetically lacking TF, expressing wild-type murine TF, or expressing a mutant TF lacking the cytoplasmic domain. Comparison of the metastatic potential of these cells in immunocompetent mice with genetic deficits in prothrombin, platelet function, or fibrinogen revealed that TF supports metastasis through mechanisms independent of the cytoplasmic domain, but dependent on each of these distal hemostatic factors. TF was neither required for primary tumor growth nor necessary for initial localization of embolized tumor cells within the lungs. Rather, tumor cell fate studies indicated TF supports metastasis by increasing the survival of micrometastases. One mechanism linking TF to metastasis is through a fibrin(ogen)-dependent and platelet-dependent restriction in natural killer cell-mediated clearance of micrometastases. However, TF also supported the early success of micrometastases through an additional mechanism independent of natural killer cells, but coupled to circulating prothrombin.

  2. Review of the mathematical functions used to model the temperature dependence of electrical and thermal conductivities of biological tissue in radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Macarena; Berjano, Enrique

    2013-09-01

    Although theoretical modelling is widely used to study different aspects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA), its utility is directly related to its realism. An important factor in this realism is the use of mathematical functions to model the temperature dependence of thermal (k) and electrical (σ) conductivities of tissue. Our aim was to review the piecewise mathematical functions most commonly used for modelling the temperature dependence of k and σ in RFA computational modelling. We built a hepatic RFA theoretical model of a cooled electrode and compared lesion dimensions and impedance evolution with combinations of mathematical functions proposed in previous studies. We employed the thermal damage contour D63 to compute the lesion dimension contour, which corresponds to Ω = 1, Ω being local thermal damage assessed by the Arrhenius damage model. The results were very similar in all cases in terms of impedance evolution and lesion size after 6 min of ablation. Although the relative differences between cases in terms of time to first roll-off (abrupt increase in impedance) were as much as 12%, the maximum relative differences in terms of the short lesion (transverse) diameter were below 3.5%. The findings suggest that the different methods of modelling temperature dependence of k and σ reported in the literature do not significantly affect the computed lesion diameter.

  3. Dose-Dependent Hemodynamic, Biochemical, and Tissue Oxygen Effects of OC99 following Severe Oxygen Debt Produced by Hemorrhagic Shock in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Muir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We determined the dose-dependent effects of OC99, a novel, stabilized hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrier, on hemodynamics, systemic and pulmonary artery pressures, surrogates of tissue oxygen debt (arterial lactate 7.2±0.1 mM/L and arterial base excess −17.9 ± 0.5 mM/L, and tissue oxygen tension (tPO2 in a dog model of controlled severe oxygen-debt from hemorrhagic shock. The dose/rate for OC99 was established from a pilot study conducted in six bled dogs. Subsequently twenty-four dogs were randomly assigned to one of four groups (n=6 per group and administered: 0.0, 0.065, 0.325, or 0.65 g/kg of OC99 combined with 10 mL/kg lactated Ringers solution administered in conjunction with 20 mL/kg Hextend IV over 60 minutes. The administration of 0.325 g/kg and 0.65 g/kg OC99 produced plasma hemoglobin concentrations of 0.63±0.01 and 1.11±0.02 g/dL, respectively, improved systemic hemodynamics, enhanced tPO2, and restored lactate and base excess values compared to 0.0 and 0.065 g/kg OC99. The administration of 0.65 g/kg OC99 significantly elevated pulmonary artery pressure. Plasma hemoglobin concentrations of OC99 ranging from 0.3 to 1.1 g/dL, in conjunction with colloid based fluid resuscitation, normalized clinical surrogates of tissue oxygen debt, improved tPO2, and avoided clinically relevant increases in pulmonary artery pressure.

  4. The electric field distribution in the brain during TTFields therapy and its dependence on tissue dielectric properties and anatomy: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Cornelia; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J.; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2015-09-01

    Tumor treating fields (TTFields) are a non-invasive, anti-mitotic and approved treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients. In vitro studies have shown that inhibition of cell division in glioma is achieved when the applied alternating electric field has a frequency in the range of 200 kHz and an amplitude of 1-3 V cm-1. Our aim is to calculate the electric field distribution in the brain during TTFields therapy and to investigate the dependence of these predictions on the heterogeneous, anisotropic dielectric properties used in the computational model. A realistic head model was developed by segmenting MR images and by incorporating anisotropic conductivity values for the brain tissues. The finite element method (FEM) was used to solve for the electric potential within a volume mesh that consisted of the head tissues, a virtual lesion with an active tumour shell surrounding a necrotic core, and the transducer arrays. The induced electric field distribution is highly non-uniform. Average field strength values are slightly higher in the tumour when incorporating anisotropy, by about 10% or less. A sensitivity analysis with respect to the conductivity and permittivity of head tissues shows a variation in field strength of less than 42% in brain parenchyma and in the tumour, for values within the ranges reported in the literature. Comparing results to a previously developed head model suggests significant inter-subject variability. This modelling study predicts that during treatment with TTFields the electric field in the tumour exceeds 1 V cm-1, independent of modelling assumptions. In the future, computational models may be useful to optimize delivery of TTFields.

  5. Temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of biological tissues within the temperature and frequency ranges typically used for magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Fanrui; Xin, Sherman Xuegang; Chen, Wufan

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to obtain the temperature- and frequency-dependent dielectric properties of tissues subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) scanning for MR imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS). These variables are necessary to calculate radio frequency electromagnetic fields distribution and specific radio frequency energy absorption rate (SAR) in the healthy tissues surrounding the target tumours, and their variation may affect the efficacy of advanced RF pulses. The dielectric properties of porcine uterus, liver, kidney, urinary bladder, skeletal muscle, and fat were determined using an open-ended coaxial probe method. The temperature range was set from 36 °C to 60 °C; and the frequencies were set at 42.58 (1 T), 64 (1.5 T), 128 (3 T), 170 (4 T), 298 (7 T), 400 (9 T), and 468 MHz (11 T). Within the temperature and frequency ranges, the dielectric constants were listed as follows: uterus 49.6-121.64, liver 44.81-127.68, kidney 37.3-169.26, bladder 42.43-125.95, muscle 58.62-171.7, and fat 9.2327-20.2295. The following conductivities were obtained at the same temperature and frequency ranges: uterus 0.5506-1.4419, liver 0.5174-0.9709, kidney 0.8061-1.3625, bladder 0.6766-1.1817, muscle 0.8983-1.3083, and fat 0.1552-0.2316. The obtained data are consistent with the temperature and frequency ranges typically used in MRgFUS and thus can be used as reference to calculate radio frequency electromagnetic fields and SAR distribution inside the healthy tissues subjected to MR scanning for MRgFUS.

  6. Alternative promoters and repetitive DNA elements define the species-dependent tissue-specific expression of the FMO1 genes of human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Elizabeth A; Chandan, Pritpal; Stevanovic-Walker, Milena; Edwards, Mina; Phillips, Ian R

    2007-09-15

    In humans, expression of the FMO1 (flavin-containing mono-oxygenase 1) gene is silenced postnatally in liver, but not kidney. In adult mouse, however, the gene is active in both tissues. We investigated the basis of this species-dependent tissue-specific transcription of FMO1. Our results indicate the use of three alternative promoters. Transcription of the gene in fetal human and adult mouse liver is exclusively from the P0 promoter, whereas in extra-hepatic tissues of both species, P1 and P2 are active. Reporter gene assays showed that the proximal P0 promoters of human (hFMO1) and mouse (mFmo1) genes are equally effective. However, sequences upstream (-2955 to -506) of the proximal P0 of mFmo1 increased reporter gene activity 3-fold, whereas hFMO1 upstream sequences (-3027 to -541) decreased reporter gene activity by 75%. Replacement of the upstream sequence of human P0 with the upstream sequence of mouse P0 increased activity of the human proximal P0 8-fold. Species-specific repetitive elements are present immediately upstream of the proximal P0 promoters. The human gene contains five LINE (long-interspersed nuclear element)-1-like elements, whereas the mouse gene contains a poly A region, an 80-bp direct repeat, an LTR (long terminal repeat), a SINE (short-interspersed nuclear element) and a poly T tract. The rat and rabbit FMO1 genes, which are expressed in adult liver, lack some (rat) or all (rabbit) of the elements upstream of mouse P0. Thus silencing of FMO1 in adult human liver is due apparently to the presence upstream of the proximal P0 of L1 (LINE-1) elements rather than the absence of retrotransposons similar to those found in the mouse gene.

  7. Impaired autoregulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue of long-term type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Nørgaard, T; Parving, H H

    1985-01-01

    Autoregulation of blood flow in subcutaneous tissue was studied at the level of the lateral malleolus in eight long-term Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with clinical microangiopathy, eight short-term Type 1 diabetic patients without clinical microangiopathy and seven healthy control...... subjects. Blood flow was measured by the local 133Xenon washout technique. Mean arterial blood pressure was reduced by a maximum of 23 mmHg by elevating the limb above heart level and elevating to a maximum of 70 mmHg by head-up tilt; in the latter position venous pressure was kept constant and low...... by activation of the leg muscle vein pump (heel raising). Mean arterial blood pressure was thus varied between 60 and 160 mmHg. In normal and short-term diabetic subjects blood flow remained within 10% of control values during the changes in arterial blood pressure. In six of the eight Type 1 diabetic patients...

  8. MEKK1 is required for MPK4 activation and regulates tissue-specific and temperature-dependent cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichimura, Kazuya; Casais, Catarina; Peck, Scott C; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Shirasu, Ken

    2006-12-01

    Innate immunity signaling pathways in both animals and plants are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. An Arabidopsis MAPK cascade (MEKK1, MKK4/MKK5, and MPK3/MPK6) has been proposed to function downstream of the flagellin receptor FLS2 based on biochemical assays using transient overexpression of candidate components. To genetically test this model, we characterized two mekk1 mutants. We show here that MEKK1 is not required for flagellin-triggered activation of MPK3 and MPK6. Instead, MEKK1 is essential for activation of MPK4, a MAPK that negatively regulates systemic acquired resistance. We also showed that MEKK1 negatively regulates temperature-sensitive and tissue-specific cell death and H(2)O(2) accumulation that are partly dependent on both RAR1, a key component in resistance protein function, and SID2, an isochorismate synthase required for salicylic acid production upon pathogen infection.

  9. Tissue transglutaminase treatment leads to concentration-dependent changes in dendritic cell phenotype - implications for the role of transglutaminase in coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalleywater William J

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are part of the innate immune system with a key role in initiating and modulating T cell mediated immune responses. Coeliac disease is caused by inappropriate activation of such a response leading to small intestinal inflammation when gluten is ingested. Tissue transglutaminase, an extracellular matrix (ECM protein, has an established role in coeliac disease; however, little work to date has examined its impact on DCs. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of small intestinal ECM proteins, fibronectin (FN and tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG-2, on human DCs by including these proteins in DC cultures. The study used flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy to determine the effect of FN and TG-2 on phenotype, endocytic ability and and morphology of DCs. Furthermore, DCs treated with FN and TG-2 were cultured with T cells and subsequent T cell proliferation and cytokine profile was determined. The data indicate that transglutaminase affected DCs in a concentration-dependent manner. High concentrations were associated with a more mature phenotype and increased ability to stimulate T cells, while lower concentrations led to maintenance of an immature phenotype. These data provide support for an additional role for transglutaminase in coeliac disease and demonstrate the potential of in vitro modelling of coeliac disease pathogenesis.

  10. Energy absorption and exposure buildup factors for some polymers and tissue substitute materials: photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel

    2011-03-01

    The gamma ray energy absorption and exposure buildup factors have been calculated by using the five parameter geometric progression (GP) fitting formula for some polymers and tissue substitute materials in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to a penetration depth of 40 mean free paths. From the results, it is worth noting that significant variations occur in gamma ray buildup factors for the given polymers and tissue substitute materials depending on photon energy, penetration depth and chemical composition of the materials. Also, it was observed that there are significant variations between energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors which may be due to the variations in chemical composition of the materials used. Finally, it is expected that the presented buildup factor data may be helpful in (a) estimating the effective dose to be given to patients in radiation therapy and diagnostics, hence allowing corrections to be made to the intensity of radiation, as it is somewhat problematic to evaluate the real absorbed dose in critical organs due to the probability of photon buildup somewhere inside the medium; (b) estimating the health hazards arising from the exposure of the human body to radiation, thus it will be helpful in controlling the exposure of the human body to radiation.

  11. The Effects of Xiangqing Anodyne Spray on Treating Acute Soft-Tissue Injury Mainly Depend on Suppressing Activations of AKT and p38 Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shudong Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In the present study we try to elucidate the mechanism of Xiangqing anodyne spray (XQAS effects on acute soft-tissue injury (STI. Methods. Acute STI model was established by hammer blow in the rat hind leg muscle. Within 8 hours, instantly after modeling and per 2-hour interval repeated topical applications with or without XQAS, CP or IH ethanol extracts spray (CPS and IHS were performed, respectively; muscle swelling rate and inflammation-related biochemical parameters, muscle histological observation, and mRNA and protein expression were then examined. Results. XQAS dose-dependently suppressed STI-caused muscle swelling, proinflammatory mediator productions, and oxidative stress as well as severe pathological changes in the injured muscle tissue. Moreover, CPS mainly by blocking p38 activation while IHS majorly by blocking AKT activation led to cytoplastic IκBα degradation with NF-κB p65 translocated into the nucleus. There are synergistic effects between CP and IH components in the XQAS on preventing from acute STI with suppressing IκBα degradation, NF-κB p65 translocation, and subsequent inflammation and oxidative stress-related abnormality. Conclusion. Marked effects of XQAS on treating acute STI are ascribed to strong anti-inflammatory and antioxidative actions with a reasonable combination of CP active components, blocking p38-NF-κB pathway activated, and IH active components, blocking AKT-NF-κB pathway activated.

  12. Subtle tissue and sex-dependent proteome variation in mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) populations of the Galician coast (NW Spain) raised in a common environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atasaral-Şahin, Şebnem; Romero, Mónica R; Cueto, Rosa; González-Lavín, Nerea; Marcos, Manuel; Diz, Angel P

    2015-12-01

    The mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is one of the most important marine resources for aquaculture in Europe, and Galicia (NW Spain) is the EU's leading region for production. Variation in environmental and ecological factors exists in Northern and Southern estuaries of this region, and natural selection could have modulated genetic variation among populations with adaptation to local conditions as the driving force. Results from a previous genetic study using neutral markers suggested subtle genetic differentiation between mussel populations from both estuarine areas. In this new study, mussel samples from Northern and Southern estuaries were brought into a common environment to test for proteome differences due to genetic and permanent non-genetic effects in populations from both estuarine areas, using both foot and mantle border tissues. Because the sex of the mussels was determined through histological tests, sex-specific effects were also examined. Evidence of subtle differences in the foot proteome, dependent on mussel sex, were detected between populations from both estuaries. These differences were more marked for female samples. No evidence of proteome differences was found for the factors estuaries and sex in mantle border tissue. Candidate proteins with a potential role in local adaptation were identified and point to molecular functions that might be involved in responses to different stressors. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Carotenoid accumulation in postharvest "Cara Cara" navel orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) fruits stored at different temperatures was transcriptionally regulated in a tissue-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Nengguo; Wang, Changfeng; Xu, Juan; Cheng, Yunjiang

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this work was to investigate the effect of storage temperature (4 and 20 °C) on carotenoid accumulation and on the expression levels of seven carotenoid biosynthetic genes (Psy, Pds, Zds, Lcyb, Lcye, Hyb and Zep) in postharvest 'Cara Cara' navel orange (C. sinensis Osbeck) fruits. Storage at 20 °C rapidly increased the carotenoid content in the peel, whereas the content remained unchanged in the pulp before 35 days of storage. By contrast, storage at 4 °C maintained the carotenoid content in the peel before 35 days of storage, after which it slightly increased as time progressed. However, the content in the pulp gradually increased over the entire storage period. In the peel, the gene expressions of Psy and Lcyb were up-regulated at 20 °C but remained unchanged at 4 °C. In addition, the gene expressions of Zds, Hyb, and Zep were repressed at both temperatures before the early storage, followed by a rapid increase only at 20 °C. Then the expressions remained constant level at both temperatures, with the expression level at 20 °C higher than that at 4 °C. Low temperature (4 °C) apparently induced the expression of all the test carotenoid biosynthetic genes in the pulp, in contrast to the nearly stable level at 20 °C. Our present study suggests that the carotenoid biosynthesis in postharvest 'Cara Cara' fruits is transcriptionally regulated, and storage temperature affects the carotenoid accumulation and gene expression in a tissue-dependent manner. Temperature could affect the carotenoid biosynthesis in postharvest 'Cara Cara' fruits in a tissue-dependent manner. The carotenoid biosynthesis in postharvest 'Cara Cara' fruits was transcriptionally regulated by correlated genes.

  14. Microtubule-associated protein 1b is required for shaping the neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Olmo, Valerie N; Sanchez, Stephanie P; McFarland, Rebecca J; Vital, Eudorah; Werner, Jonathan M; Hong, Elim; Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Molodstov, Aleksey; Brewster, Rachel M

    2016-01-18

    Shaping of the neural tube, the precursor of the brain and spinal cord, involves narrowing and elongation of the neural tissue, concomitantly with other morphogenetic changes that contribue to this process. In zebrafish, medial displacement of neural cells (neural convergence or NC), which drives the infolding and narrowing of the neural ectoderm, is mediated by polarized migration and cell elongation towards the dorsal midline. Failure to undergo proper NC results in severe neural tube defects, yet the molecular underpinnings of this process remain poorly understood. We investigated here the role of the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton in mediating NC in zebrafish embryos using the MT destabilizing and hyperstabilizing drugs nocodazole and paclitaxel respectively. We found that MTs undergo major changes in organization and stability during neurulation and are required for the timely completion of NC by promoting cell elongation and polarity. We next examined the role of Microtubule-associated protein 1B (Map1b), previously shown to promote MT dynamicity in axons. map1b is expressed earlier than previously reported, in the developing neural tube and underlying mesoderm. Loss of Map1b function using morpholinos (MOs) or δMap1b (encoding a truncated Map1b protein product) resulted in delayed NC and duplication of the neural tube, a defect associated with impaired NC. We observed a loss of stable MTs in these embryos that is likely to contribute to the NC defect. Lastly, we found that Map1b mediates cell elongation in a cell autonomous manner and polarized protrusive activity, two cell behaviors that underlie NC and are MT-dependent. Together, these data highlight the importance of MTs in the early morphogenetic movements that shape the neural tube and reveal a novel role for the MT regulator Map1b in mediating cell elongation and polarized cell movement in neural progenitor cells.

  15. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  16. Depot-specific and GH-dependent regulation of IGF binding protein-4, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A, and stanniocalcin-2 in murine adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortebjerg, Rikke; Berryman, Darlene E; Comisford, Ross; List, Edward O; Oxvig, Claus; Bjerre, Mette; Frystyk, Jan; Kopchick, John J

    2018-02-02

    Pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) stimulates insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I action through proteolytic cleavage of IGF binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4). Recently, stanniocalcin-2 (STC2) was discovered as an inhibitor of PAPP-A. Most members of the IGF system are expressed in adipose tissue (AT), but there is a relative paucity of information on the distribution of IGFBP-4, PAPP-A, and STC2 in different AT depots. Since IGF-I expression in AT is highly GH-dependent, we used bovine GH transgenic (bGH) and GH receptor knockout (GHR-/-) mice to investigate AT depot-specific expression patterns of IGFBP-4, PAPP-A, and STC2, and whether the regulation is GH-dependent. Seven-month-old male bGH, GHR-/- and wild type (WT) control mice were used. Body composition was determined, and subcutaneous, epididymal, retroperitoneal, mesenteric and brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots were collected. RNA expression of Igfbp4, Pappa, and Stc2 was assessed by reverse transcription quantitative PCR and IGFBP-4 protein by Western blotting. Igfbp4, Pappa, and Stc2 RNA levels were differentially expressed in an AT depot-dependent manner in WT mice. Igfbp4 RNA levels were significantly higher in all white AT depots than in BAT. Pappa was most highly expressed in the mesenteric depot: levels were 7.5-fold higher in mesenteric than in subcutaneous AT (p PAPP-A-IGFBP-4-axis in AT. However, proteins levels of intact IGFBP-4 were significantly increased in bGH mice and decreased in GHR-/- mice, whereas the PAPP-A-generated IGFBP-4 fragment level was unaltered. Expression of Igfbp4, Pappa, and Stc2 differ between AT depots and is generally higher in white AT than in BAT. The transcription appears to occur in a GH-independent manner, whereas IGFBP-4 protein levels are highly influenced by altered GH activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Three-Dimensional Normal Human Neural Progenitor Tissue-Like Assemblies: A Model for Persistent Varicell-Zoster Virus Infection and Platform to Study Viral Infectivity and Oxidative Stress and Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, T. J.; McCarthy, M.; Osterrieder, N.; Cohrs, R. J.; Kaufer, B. B.

    2014-01-01

    The environment of space results in a multitude of challenges to the human physiology that present barriers to extended habitation and exploration. Over 40 years of investigation to define countermeasures to address space flight adaptation has left gaps in our knowledge regarding mitigation strategies partly due to the lack of investigative tools, monitoring strategies, and real time diagnostics to understand the central causative agent(s) responsible for physiologic adaptation and m