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Sample records for neural substrates leading

  1. Exposure to an Obesogenic Diet During Adolescence Leads to Abnormal Maturation of Neural and Behavioral Substrates Underpinning Fear and Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Torres, Julio David; Haddad, Elizabeth; Lee, Jeong Bin; Kalyan-Masih, Priya; George, Wanda I Maldonado; Pérez, Leonardo López; Vázquez, Darla M Piñero; Torres, Yaría Arroyo; Santana, José M Santiago; Obenaus, Andre; Figueroa, Johnny D

    2018-02-08

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and obesity are highly prevalent in adolescents. Emerging findings from our laboratory and others are consistent with the novel hypothesis that obese individuals may be predisposed to developing PTSD. Given that aberrant fear responses are pivotal in the pathogenesis of PTSD, the objective of this study was to determine the impact of an obesogenic Western-like high-fat diet (WD) on neural substrates associated with fear. Adolescent Lewis rats (n = 72) were fed with either the experimental WD (41.4% kcal from fat) or the control diet. The fear-potentiated startle paradigm was used to determine sustained and phasic fear responses. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics and T2 relaxation times were used to determine the structural integrity of the fear circuitry including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). The rats that consumed the WD exhibited attenuated fear learning and fear extinction. These behavioral impairments were associated with oversaturation of the fear circuitry and astrogliosis. The BLA T2 relaxation times were significantly decreased in the WD rats relative to the controls. We found elevated fractional anisotropy in the mPFC of the rats that consumed the WD. We show that consumption of a WD may lead to long-lasting damage to components of the fear circuitry. Our findings demonstrate that consumption of an obesogenic diet during adolescence has a profound impact in the maturation of the fear neurocircuitry. The implications of this research are significant as they identify potential biomarkers of risk for psychopathology in the growing obese population. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Shared neural substrates of apraxia and aphasia.

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    Goldenberg, Georg; Randerath, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    Apraxia is regularly associated with aphasia, but there is controversy whether their co-occurrence is the expression of a common basic deficit or results from anatomical proximity of their neural substrates. However, neither aphasia nor apraxia is an indivisible entity. Both diagnoses embrace diverse manifestations that may occur more or less independently from each other. Thus, the question whether apraxia is always accompanied by aphasia may lead to conflicting answers depending on which of their manifestations are considered. We used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) for exploring communalities between lesion sites associated with aphasia and with apraxia. Linguistic impairment was assessed by the Aachen Aphasia Test (AAT) subtests naming, comprehension, repetition, written language, and Token Test. Apraxia was examined for imitation of meaningless hand and finger postures and for pantomime of tool use. There were two areas of overlap between aphasia and apraxia. Lesions in the anterior temporal lobe interfered with pantomime of tool use and with all linguistic tests. In the left inferior parietal lobe there was a large area where lesions were associated with defective imitation of hand postures and with poor scores on written language and the Token Test. Within this large area there were also two spots in supramarginal and angular gyrus where lesions were also associated with defective pantomime. We speculate that the coincidence of language impairment and defective pantomime after anterior temporal lesions is due to impaired access to semantic memory. The combination of defective imitation of hand postures with poor scores on Token Test and written language is not easily compatible with a crucial role of parietal regions for the conversion of concepts of intended actions into motor commands. It accords better with a role of left inferior parietal lobe regions for the categorical perception of spatial relationships. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  3. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

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    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness.

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    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-11-20

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness.

  5. The structural neural substrate of subjective happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Wataru; Kochiyama, Takanori; Uono, Shota; Kubota, Yasutaka; Sawada, Reiko; Yoshimura, Sayaka; Toichi, Motomi

    2015-01-01

    Happiness is a subjective experience that is an ultimate goal for humans. Psychological studies have shown that subjective happiness can be measured reliably and consists of emotional and cognitive components. However, the neural substrates of subjective happiness remain unclear. To investigate this issue, we used structural magnetic resonance imaging and questionnaires that assessed subjective happiness, the intensity of positive and negative emotional experiences, and purpose in life. We found a positive relationship between the subjective happiness score and gray matter volume in the right precuneus. Moreover, the same region showed an association with the combined positive and negative emotional intensity and purpose in life scores. Our findings suggest that the precuneus mediates subjective happiness by integrating the emotional and cognitive components of happiness. PMID:26586449

  6. Neural plasticity: the biological substrate for neurorehabilitation.

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    Warraich, Zuha; Kleim, Jeffrey A

    2010-12-01

    Decades of basic science have clearly demonstrated the capacity of the central nervous system (CNS) to structurally and functionally adapt in response to experience. The field of neurorehabilitation has begun to use this body of work to develop neurobiologically informed therapies that harness the key behavioral and neural signals that drive neural plasticity. The present review describes how neural plasticity supports both learning in the intact CNS and functional improvement in the damaged or diseased CNS. A pragmatic, interdisciplinary definition of neural plasticity is presented that may be used by both clinical and basic scientists studying neurorehabilitation. Furthermore, a description of how neural plasticity may act to drive different neural strategies underlying functional improvement after CNS injury or disease is provided. The understanding of the relationship between these different neural strategies, mechanisms of neural plasticity, and changes in behavior may facilitate the development of novel, more effective rehabilitation interventions. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Neural substrates of decision-making.

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    Broche-Pérez, Y; Herrera Jiménez, L F; Omar-Martínez, E

    2016-06-01

    Decision-making is the process of selecting a course of action from among 2 or more alternatives by considering the potential outcomes of selecting each option and estimating its consequences in the short, medium and long term. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has traditionally been considered the key neural structure in decision-making process. However, new studies support the hypothesis that describes a complex neural network including both cortical and subcortical structures. The aim of this review is to summarise evidence on the anatomical structures underlying the decision-making process, considering new findings that support the existence of a complex neural network that gives rise to this complex neuropsychological process. Current evidence shows that the cortical structures involved in decision-making include the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This process is assisted by subcortical structures including the amygdala, thalamus, and cerebellum. Findings to date show that both cortical and subcortical brain regions contribute to the decision-making process. The neural basis of decision-making is a complex neural network of cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections which includes subareas of the PFC, limbic structures, and the cerebellum. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The Neural Substrates of Infant Speech Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homae, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Hama; Taga, Gentaro

    2014-01-01

    Infants often pay special attention to speech sounds, and they appear to detect key features of these sounds. To investigate the neural foundation of speech perception in infants, we measured cortical activation using near-infrared spectroscopy. We presented the following three types of auditory stimuli while 3-month-old infants watched a silent…

  9. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell–Substrate Interactions

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    Stukel, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell–substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell–material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell–substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo. PMID:26669274

  10. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2016-06-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell-substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell-material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell-substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo.

  11. Neural substrate expansion for the restoration of brain function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Chiao Isaac Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Restoring neurological and cognitive function in individuals who have suffered brain damage is one of the principal objectives of modern translational neuroscience. Electrical stimulation approaches, such as deep-brain stimulation, have achieved the most clinical success, but they ultimately may be limited by the computational capacity of the residual cerebral circuitry. An alternative strategy is brain substrate expansion, in which the computational capacity of the brain is augmented through the addition of new processing units and the reconstitution of network connectivity. This latter approach has been explored to some degree using both biological and electronic means but thus far has not demonstrated the ability to reestablish the function of large-scale neuronal networks. In this review, we contend that fulfilling the potential of brain substrate expansion will require a significant shift from current methods that emphasize direct manipulations of the brain (e.g., injections of cellular suspensions and the implantation of multi-electrode arrays to the generation of more sophisticated neural tissues and neural-electric hybrids in vitro that are subsequently transplanted into the brain. Drawing from neural tissue engineering, stem cell biology, and neural interface technologies, this strategy makes greater use of the manifold techniques available in the laboratory to create biocompatible constructs that recapitulate brain architecture and thus are more easily recognized and utilized by brain networks.

  12. Control of neural stem cell survival by electroactive polymer substrates.

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    Vanessa Lundin

    Full Text Available Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy, a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS, tosylate (TsO, perchlorate (ClO(4 and chloride (Cl, showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO(4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS, NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs.

  13. Neural substrates of context- and person-dependent altruistic punishment.

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    Wang, Lili; Lu, Xiaping; Gu, Ruolei; Zhu, Ruida; Xu, Rui; Broster, Lucas S; Feng, Chunliang

    2017-11-01

    Human altruistic behaviors are heterogeneous across both contexts and people, whereas the neural signatures underlying the heterogeneity remain to be elucidated. To address this issue, we examined the neural signatures underlying the context- and person-dependent altruistic punishment, conjoining event-related fMRI with both task-based and resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Acting as an impartial third party, participants decided how to punish norm violators either alone or in the presence of putative others. We found that the presence of others decreased altruistic punishment due to diffusion of responsibility. Those behavioral effects paralleled altered neural responses in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and putamen. Further, we identified modulation of responsibility diffusion on task-based functional connectivity of dACC with the brain regions implicated in reward processing (i.e., posterior cingulate cortex and amygdala/orbital frontal cortex). Finally, the RSFC results revealed that (i) increased intrinsic connectivity strengths of the putamen with temporoparietal junction and dorsolateral PFC were associated with attenuated responsibility diffusion in altruistic punishment and (ii) increased putamen-dorsomedial PFC connectivity strengths were associated with reduced responsibility diffusion in self-reported responsibility. Taken together, our findings elucidate the context- and person-dependent altruistic behaviors as well as associated neural substrates and thus provide a potential neurocognitive mechanism of heterogeneous human altruistic behaviors. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5535-5550, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Series-connected substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Accordingly, voltage-management circuit is required to protect constituent ultracapacitors from exceeding their rated voltage. In this study, the design and characterization of the substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with co-located terminals is discussed. Voltage-management circuit for the ultracapacitor is ...

  15. Series-connected substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Accordingly, voltage-management circuit is required to protect constituent ultracapacitors from exceeding their rated voltage. In this study, the design and charac- terization of the substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitor with co-located terminals is discussed. Voltage-management circuit for the ultracapacitor is ...

  16. The neural substrates of infant sleep in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A E Karlsson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is a poorly understood behavior that predominates during infancy but is studied almost exclusively in adults. One perceived impediment to investigations of sleep early in ontogeny is the absence of state-dependent neocortical activity. Nonetheless, in infant rats, sleep is reliably characterized by the presence of tonic (i.e., muscle atonia and phasic (i.e., myoclonic twitching components; the neural circuitry underlying these components, however, is unknown. Recently, we described a medullary inhibitory area (MIA in week-old rats that is necessary but not sufficient for the normal expression of atonia. Here we report that the infant MIA receives projections from areas containing neurons that exhibit state-dependent activity. Specifically, neurons within these areas, including the subcoeruleus (SubLC, pontis oralis (PO, and dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DLPT, exhibit discharge profiles that suggest causal roles in the modulation of muscle tone and the production of myoclonic twitches. Indeed, lesions in the SubLC and PO decreased the expression of muscle atonia without affecting twitching (resulting in "REM sleep without atonia", whereas lesions of the DLPT increased the expression of atonia while decreasing the amount of twitching. Thus, the neural substrates of infant sleep are strikingly similar to those of adults, a surprising finding in light of theories that discount the contribution of supraspinal neural elements to sleep before the onset of state-dependent neocortical activity.

  17. Neural substrates of approach-avoidance conflict decision-making.

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    Aupperle, Robin L; Melrose, Andrew J; Francisco, Alex; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2015-02-01

    Animal approach-avoidance conflict paradigms have been used extensively to operationalize anxiety, quantify the effects of anxiolytic agents, and probe the neural basis of fear and anxiety. Results from human neuroimaging studies support that a frontal-striatal-amygdala neural circuitry is important for approach-avoidance learning. However, the neural basis of decision-making is much less clear in this context. Thus, we combined a recently developed human approach-avoidance paradigm with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify neural substrates underlying approach-avoidance conflict decision-making. Fifteen healthy adults completed the approach-avoidance conflict (AAC) paradigm during fMRI. Analyses of variance were used to compare conflict to nonconflict (avoid-threat and approach-reward) conditions and to compare level of reward points offered during the decision phase. Trial-by-trial amplitude modulation analyses were used to delineate brain areas underlying decision-making in the context of approach/avoidance behavior. Conflict trials as compared to the nonconflict trials elicited greater activation within bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and caudate, as well as right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Right caudate and lateral PFC activation was modulated by level of reward offered. Individuals who showed greater caudate activation exhibited less approach behavior. On a trial-by-trial basis, greater right lateral PFC activation related to less approach behavior. Taken together, results suggest that the degree of activation within prefrontal-striatal-insula circuitry determines the degree of approach versus avoidance decision-making. Moreover, the degree of caudate and lateral PFC activation related to individual differences in approach-avoidance decision-making. Therefore, the approach-avoidance conflict paradigm is ideally suited to probe anxiety-related processing differences during approach-avoidance decision

  18. Structural neural substrates of reading the mind in the eyes

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    Wataru eSato

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read the minds of others in their eyes plays an important role in human adaptation to social environments. Behavioral studies have resulted in the development of a test to measure this ability (Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test, revised version; Eyes Test, and have demonstrated that this ability is consistent over time. Although functional neuroimaging studies revealed brain activation while performing the Eyes Test, the structural neural substrates supporting consistent performance on the Eyes Test remain unclear. In this study we assessed the Eyes Test and analyzed structural magnetic resonance images using voxel-based morphometry in healthy participants. Test performance was positively associated with the gray matter volumes of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule (temporoparietal junction, and precuneus in the left hemisphere. These results suggest that the fronto-temporoparietal network structures support the consistent ability to read the mind in the eyes.

  19. Neural substrates and social consequences of interpersonal gratitude: Intention matters.

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    Yu, Hongbo; Cai, Qiang; Shen, Bo; Gao, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2017-06-01

    Voluntary help during a time of need fosters interpersonal gratitude, which has positive social and personal consequences such as improved social relationships, increased reciprocity, and decreased distress. In a behavioral and a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment, participants played a multiround interactive game where they received pain stimulation. An anonymous partner interacted with the participants and either intentionally or unintentionally (i.e., determined by a computer program) bore part of the participants' pain. In each round, participants either evaluated their perceived pain intensity (behavioral experiment) or transferred an amount of money to the partner (fMRI experiment). Intentional (relative to unintentional) help led to lower experience of pain, higher reciprocity (money allocation), and increased interpersonal closeness toward the partner. fMRI revealed that for the most grateful condition (i.e., intentional help), value-related structures such as the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) showed the highest activation in response to the partner's decision, whereas the primary sensory area and the anterior insula exhibited the lowest activation at the pain delivery stage. Moreover, the vmPFC activation was predictive of the individual differences in reciprocal behavior, and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) activation was predictive of self-reported gratitude. Furthermore, using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA), we showed that the neural activation pattern in the septum/hypothalamus, an area associated with affiliative affect and social bonding, and value-related structures specifically and sensitively dissociated intentional help from unintentional help conditions. These findings contribute to our understanding of the psychological and neural substrates of the experience of interpersonal gratitude and the social consequences of this emotion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Neural substrates of irony comprehension: A functional MRI study.

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    Shibata, Midori; Toyomura, Akira; Itoh, Hiroaki; Abe, Jun-ichi

    2010-01-13

    In daily communication, we sometimes use ironic expressions to convey the opposite meaning. To understand these contradictory statements, we have to infer contextual implications and the speaker's mental state. However, little is known about how our brains carry out these complex processes. In this study, we investigated the neural substrates involved in irony comprehension using echoic utterance (Sperber and Wilson, 1986, 1995). Participants read a short scenario that consisted of five sentences. The first four sentences explained the situation of the protagonists. The fifth connoted either an ironic, literal, or unconnected meaning. The participants had to press a button to indicate whether or not the final sentence expressed irony. In the ironic sentence condition, the bilateral superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, caudate, thalamus, the left insula, and amygdala were activated. In the literal sentence condition, the right superior frontal gyrus, the bilateral middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, medial prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, caudate, the left insula, the right thalamus, and the left amygdala were activated. However, in the ironic sentence condition minus the literal sentence condition, we observed higher activation in the right medial prefrontal cortex (BA 10), the right precentral (BA 6), and the left superior temporal sulcus (BA 21). Our results suggest that irony comprehension is strongly related to mentalizing processes and that activation in these regions might be affected by higher-order cognitive operations.

  1. Shared Neural Substrates of Emotionally Enhanced Perceptual and Mnemonic Vividness

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    Rebecca M. Todd

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that emotionally salient events are remembered more vividly than mundane ones. Our recent research has demonstrated that such memory vividness is due in part to the subjective experience of emotional events as more perceptually vivid, an effect we call emotion-enhanced vividness, or EEV. The present study built on previously reported research in which fMRI data were collected while participants rated relative levels of visual noise overlaid on emotionally salient and neutral images. Ratings of greater EEV were associated with greater activation in the amygdala, visual cortex, and posterior insula. In the present study, we measured BOLD activation that predicted recognition memory vividness for these same images one week later. Results showed that, after controlling for differences between scenes in low-level objective features, hippocampus activation uniquely predicted subsequent memory vividness. In contrast, amygdala and visual cortex regions that were sensitive to EEV were also modulated by subsequent ratings of memory vividness. These findings suggest shared neural substrates for the influence of emotional salience on perceptual and mnemonic vividness, with amygdala and visual cortex activation at encoding contributing to the experience of both perception and subsequent memory.

  2. Neural Substrates of Semantic Prospection – Evidence from the Dementias

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    Muireann eIrish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to envisage personally relevant events at a future time point represents an incredibly sophisticated cognitive endeavor and one that appears to be intimately linked to episodic memory integrity. Far less is known regarding the neurocognitive mechanisms underpinning the capacity to envisage non-personal future occurrences, known as semantic future thinking. Moreover the degree of overlap between the neural substrates supporting episodic and semantic forms of prospection remains unclear. To this end, we sought to investigate the capacity for episodic and semantic future thinking in Alzheimer’s disease (n = 15 and disease-matched behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 15, neurodegenerative disorders characterized by significant medial temporal lobe and frontal pathology. Participants completed an assessment of past and future thinking across personal (episodic and non-personal (semantic domains, as part of a larger neuropsychological battery investigating episodic and semantic processing, and their performance was contrasted with 20 age- and education-matched healthy older Controls. Participants underwent whole-brain T1 weighted structural imaging and voxel-based morphometry analysis was conducted to determine the relationship between grey matter integrity and episodic and semantic future thinking. Relative to Controls, both patient groups displayed marked future thinking impairments, extending across episodic and semantic domains. Analyses of covariance revealed that while episodic future thinking deficits could be explained solely in terms of episodic memory proficiency, semantic prospection deficits reflected the interplay between episodic and semantic processing. Distinct neural correlates emerged for each form of future simulation with differential involvement of prefrontal, lateral temporal and medial temporal regions. Notably, the hippocampus was implicated irrespective of future thinking domain, with the suggestion of

  3. Identifying the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation during task performance.

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    Lee, Woogul; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2017-10-01

    Intrinsic motivation is the inherent tendency to seek out novelty and challenge, to explore and investigate, and to stretch and extend one's capacities. When people imagine performing intrinsically motivating tasks, they show heightened anterior insular cortex (AIC) activity. To fully explain the neural system of intrinsic motivation, however, requires assessing neural activity while people actually perform intrinsically motivating tasks (i.e., while answering curiosity-inducing questions or solving competence-enabling anagrams). Using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that the neural system of intrinsic motivation involves not only AIC activity, but also striatum activity and, further, AIC-striatum functional interactions. These findings suggest that subjective feelings of intrinsic satisfaction (associated with AIC activations), reward processing (associated with striatum activations), and their interactions underlie the actual experience of intrinsic motivation. These neural findings are consistent with the conceptualization of intrinsic motivation as the pursuit and satisfaction of subjective feelings (interest and enjoyment) as intrinsic rewards.

  4. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

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    Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine. PMID:24592382

  5. Fractionating the Neural Substrates of Incidental Recognition Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ciara M.; Vidaki, Kleio; Soto, David

    2015-01-01

    Familiar stimuli are typically accompanied by decreases in neural response relative to the presentation of novel items, but these studies often include explicit instructions to discriminate old and new items; this creates difficulties in partialling out the contribution of top-down intentional orientation to the items based on recognition goals.…

  6. Disgust proneness and associated neural substrates in obesity.

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    Watkins, Tristan J; Di Iorio, Christina R; Olatunji, Bunmi O; Benningfield, Margaret M; Blackford, Jennifer U; Dietrich, Mary S; Bhatia, Monisha; Theiss, Justin D; Salomon, Ronald M; Niswender, Kevin; Cowan, Ronald L

    2016-03-01

    Defects in experiencing disgust may contribute to obesity by allowing for the overconsumption of food. However, the relationship of disgust proneness and its associated neural locus has yet to be explored in the context of obesity. Thirty-three participants (17 obese, 16 lean) completed the Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale-Revised and a functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm where images from 4 categories (food, contaminates, contaminated food or fixation) were randomly presented. Independent two-sample t-tests revealed significantly lower levels of Disgust Sensitivity for the obese group (mean score = 14.7) compared with the lean group (mean score = 17.6, P = 0.026). The obese group had less activation in the right insula than the lean group when viewing contaminated food images. Multiple regression with interaction analysis revealed one left insula region where the association of Disgust Sensitivity scores with activation differed by group when viewing contaminated food images. These interaction effects were driven by the negative correlation of Disgust Sensitivity scores with beta values extracted from the left insula in the obese group (r = -0.59) compared with a positive correlation in the lean group (r = 0.65). Given these body mass index-dependent differences in Disgust Sensitivity and neural responsiveness to disgusting food images, it is likely that altered Disgust Sensitivity may contribute to obesity. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Common neural substrates for inhibition of spoken and manual responses.

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    Xue, Gui; Aron, Adam R; Poldrack, Russell A

    2008-08-01

    The inhibition of speech acts is a critical aspect of human executive control over thought and action, but its neural underpinnings are poorly understood. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and the stop-signal paradigm, we examined the neural correlates of speech control in comparison to manual motor control. Initiation of a verbal response activated left inferior frontal cortex (IFC: Broca's area). Successful inhibition of speech (naming of letters or pseudowords) engaged a region of right IFC (including pars opercularis and anterior insular cortex) as well as presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA); these regions were also activated by successful inhibition of a hand response (i.e., a button press). Moreover, the speed with which subjects inhibited their responses, stop-signal reaction time, was significantly correlated between speech and manual inhibition tasks. These findings suggest a functional dissociation of left and right IFC in initiating versus inhibiting vocal responses, and that manual responses and speech acts share a common inhibitory mechanism localized in the right IFC and pre-SMA.

  8. Optimization of the selection process of the co-substrates for chicken manure fermentation using neural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewicki Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense development of research equipment leads directly to increasing cognitive abilities. However, along with the raising amount of data generated, the development of the techniques allowing the analysis is also essential. Currently, one of the most dynamically developing branch of computer science and mathematics are the Artificial Neural Networks (ANN. Their main advantage is very high ability to solve the regression and approximation issues. This paper presents the possibility of application of artificial intelligence methods to optimize the selection of co-substrates intended for methane fermentation of chicken manure. 4-layer MLP network has proven to be the optimal structure modeling the obtained empirical data.

  9. Games in the Brain: Neural Substrates of Gambling Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murch, W Spencer; Clark, Luke

    2016-10-01

    As a popular form of recreational risk taking, gambling games offer a paradigm for decision neuroscience research. As an individual behavior, gambling becomes dysfunctional in a subset of the population, with debilitating consequences. Gambling disorder has been recently reconceptualized as a "behavioral addiction" in the DSM-5, based on emerging parallels with substance use disorders. Why do some individuals undergo this transition from recreational to disordered gambling? The biomedical model of problem gambling is a "brain disorder" account that posits an underlying neurobiological abnormality. This article first delineates the neural circuitry that underpins gambling-related decision making, comprising ventral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, dopaminergic midbrain, and insula, and presents evidence for pathophysiology in this circuitry in gambling disorder. These biological dispositions become translated into clinical disorder through the effects of gambling games. This influence is better articulated in a public health approach that describes the interplay between the player and the (gambling) product. Certain forms of gambling, including electronic gambling machines, appear to be overrepresented in problem gamblers. These games harness psychological features, including variable ratio schedules, near-misses, "losses disguised as wins," and the illusion of control, which modulate the core decision-making circuitry that is perturbed in gambling disorder. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Outcome dependency alters the neural substrates of impression formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Daniel L.; Fiske, Susan T.

    2015-01-01

    How do people maintain consistent impressions of other people when other people are often inconsistent? The present research addresses this question by combining recent neuroscientific insights with ecologically meaningful behavioral methods. Participants formed impressions of real people whom they met in a personally involving situation. fMRI and supporting behavioral data revealed that outcome dependency (i.e., depending on another person for a desired outcome) alters previously identified neural dynamics of impression formation. Consistent with past research, a functional localizer identified a region of dorsomedial PFC previously linked to social impression formation. In the main task, this ROI revealed the predicted patterns of activity across outcome dependency conditions: greater BOLD response when information confirmed (vs. violated) social expectations if participants were outcome-independent and the reverse pattern if participants were outcome-dependent. We suggest that, although social perceivers often discount expectancy-disconfirming information as noise, being dependent on another person for a desired outcome focuses impression-formation processing on the most diagnostic information, rather than on the most tractable information. PMID:23850465

  11. Neural substrates of cue reactivity and craving in gambling disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limbrick-Oldfield, E H; Mick, I; Cocks, R E; McGonigle, J; Sharman, S P; Goldstone, A P; Stokes, P R A; Waldman, A; Erritzoe, D; Bowden-Jones, H; Nutt, D; Lingford-Hughes, A; Clark, L

    2017-01-03

    Cue reactivity is an established procedure in addictions research for examining the subjective experience and neural basis of craving. This experiment sought to quantify cue-related brain responses in gambling disorder using personally tailored cues in conjunction with subjective craving, as well as a comparison with appetitive non-gambling stimuli. Participants with gambling disorder (n=19) attending treatment and 19 controls viewed personally tailored blocks of gambling-related cues, as well as neutral cues and highly appetitive (food) images during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan performed ~2-3 h after a usual meal. fMRI analysis examined cue-related brain activity, cue-related changes in connectivity and associations with block-by-block craving ratings. Craving ratings in the participants with gambling disorder increased following gambling cues compared with non-gambling cues. fMRI analysis revealed group differences in left insula and anterior cingulate cortex, with the gambling disorder group showing greater reactivity to the gambling cues, but no differences to the food cues. In participants with gambling disorder, craving to gamble correlated positively with gambling cue-related activity in the bilateral insula and ventral striatum, and negatively with functional connectivity between the ventral striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex. Gambling cues, but not food cues, elicit increased brain responses in reward-related circuitry in individuals with gambling disorder (compared with controls), providing support for the incentive sensitization theory of addiction. Activity in the insula co-varied with craving intensity, and may be a target for interventions.

  12. Functional neural substrates of posterior cortical atrophy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shames, H; Raz, N; Levin, Netta

    2015-07-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is a neurodegenerative syndrome in which the most pronounced pathologic involvement is in the occipito-parietal visual regions. Herein, we aimed to better define the cortical reflection of this unique syndrome using a thorough battery of behavioral and functional MRI (fMRI) tests. Eight PCA patients underwent extensive testing to map their visual deficits. Assessments included visual functions associated with lower and higher components of the cortical hierarchy, as well as dorsal- and ventral-related cortical functions. fMRI was performed on five patients to examine the neuronal substrate of their visual functions. The PCA patient cohort exhibited stereopsis, saccadic eye movements and higher dorsal stream-related functional impairments, including simultant perception, image orientation, figure-from-ground segregation, closure and spatial orientation. In accordance with the behavioral findings, fMRI revealed intact activation in the ventral visual regions of face and object perception while more dorsal aspects of perception, including motion and gestalt perception, revealed impaired patterns of activity. In most of the patients, there was a lack of activity in the word form area, which is known to be linked to reading disorders. Finally, there was evidence of reduced cortical representation of the peripheral visual field, corresponding to the behaviorally assessed peripheral visual deficit. The findings are discussed in the context of networks extending from parietal regions, which mediate navigationally related processing, visually guided actions, eye movement control and working memory, suggesting that damage to these networks might explain the wide range of deficits in PCA patients.

  13. Exploring the Neural Substrates of Phonological Recovery for Symposium: Neural Correlates of Recovery and Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelagie M Beeson

    2015-10-01

    All participants improved written language abilities in response to treatment, but one subgroup was limited in their ability to regain phonological skills. Both anterior and posterior components of the perisylvian phonological network were damaged in that group. These findings are consistent with fMRI activation when healthy adults write nonwords, and provide insight regarding neural support necessary for phonological rehabilitation.

  14. The influence of the diffusion module to determination of two substrate concentrations by articial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linas Litvinas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The essential part of amperometric biosensor is an enzyme. It should be selective, i.e., react only with certain substrate. The selectivity of enzyme reduces the set of possible to use enzymes. This paper demonstrates that non selective enzymes (reacting with two substrates can be used to determine concentrations of two substrates. For this purpose the steady-state current of two double biosensors was measured. The currents were used as input for an artificial neural network to determine concentrations of the substrates. The proposed approach was approved as the relative error of determined concentrations was relatively small. Paper analyses the influence of biosensor parameters to error values. The recommendations to error values minimisation were obtained.DOI: 10.15181/csat.v3i2.1109 

  15. Consecutive Acupuncture Stimulations Lead to Significantly Decreased Neural Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yeo, S.; Choe, I.H.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Bosch, M.P.C.; Lim, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in combination with block design paradigms with consecutive acupuncture stimulations, has often been used to investigate the neural responses to acupuncture. In this study, we investigated whether previous acupuncture stimulations can affect

  16. From perception to pleasure: Music and its neural substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J.; Salimpoor, Valorie N.

    2013-01-01

    Music has existed in human societies since prehistory, perhaps because it allows expression and regulation of emotion and evokes pleasure. In this review, we present findings from cognitive neuroscience that bear on the question of how we get from perception of sound patterns to pleasurable responses. First, we identify some of the auditory cortical circuits that are responsible for encoding and storing tonal patterns and discuss evidence that cortical loops between auditory and frontal cortices are important for maintaining musical information in working memory and for the recognition of structural regularities in musical patterns, which then lead to expectancies. Second, we review evidence concerning the mesolimbic striatal system and its involvement in reward, motivation, and pleasure in other domains. Recent data indicate that this dopaminergic system mediates pleasure associated with music; specifically, reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the nucleus accumbens, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. We propose that pleasure in music arises from interactions between cortical loops that enable predictions and expectancies to emerge from sound patterns and subcortical systems responsible for reward and valuation. PMID:23754373

  17. From perception to pleasure: music and its neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Salimpoor, Valorie N

    2013-06-18

    Music has existed in human societies since prehistory, perhaps because it allows expression and regulation of emotion and evokes pleasure. In this review, we present findings from cognitive neuroscience that bear on the question of how we get from perception of sound patterns to pleasurable responses. First, we identify some of the auditory cortical circuits that are responsible for encoding and storing tonal patterns and discuss evidence that cortical loops between auditory and frontal cortices are important for maintaining musical information in working memory and for the recognition of structural regularities in musical patterns, which then lead to expectancies. Second, we review evidence concerning the mesolimbic striatal system and its involvement in reward, motivation, and pleasure in other domains. Recent data indicate that this dopaminergic system mediates pleasure associated with music; specifically, reward value for music can be coded by activity levels in the nucleus accumbens, whose functional connectivity with auditory and frontal areas increases as a function of increasing musical reward. We propose that pleasure in music arises from interactions between cortical loops that enable predictions and expectancies to emerge from sound patterns and subcortical systems responsible for reward and valuation.

  18. Social cognition and neural substrates of face perception: implications for neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Steven M; Evans, David W; Myers, Scott M; Moreno-De Luca, Andres; Moore, Gregory J

    2014-04-15

    Social cognition is an important aspect of social behavior in humans. Social cognitive deficits are associated with neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study we examine the neural substrates of social cognition and face processing in a group of healthy young adults to examine the neural substrates of social cognition. Fifty-seven undergraduates completed a battery of social cognition tasks and were assessed with electroencephalography (EEG) during a face-perception task. A subset (N=22) were administered a face-perception task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Variance in the N170 EEG was predicted by social attribution performance and by a quantitative measure of empathy. Neurally, face processing was more bilateral in females than in males. Variance in fMRI voxel count in the face-sensitive fusiform gyrus was predicted by quantitative measures of social behavior, including the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Empathizing Quotient. When measured as a quantitative trait, social behaviors in typical and pathological populations share common neural pathways. The results highlight the importance of viewing neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders as spectrum phenomena that may be informed by studies of the normal distribution of relevant traits in the general population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reorganization of the injured brain: Implications for studies of the neural substrate of cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesper eMogensen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the search for a neural substrate of cognitive processes, a frequently utilized method is the scrutiny of posttraumatic symptoms exhibited by individuals suffering focal injury to the brain. For instance, the presence or absence of conscious awareness within a particular domain may, combined with knowledge of which regions of the brain have been injured, provide important data in the search for neural correlates of consciousness. Like all studies addressing the consequences of brain injury, however, such research has to face the fact that in most cases, posttraumatic impairments are accompanied by a functional recovery during which symptoms are reduced or eliminated. The apparent contradiction between localization and recovery, respectively, of functions constitutes a problem to almost all aspects of cognitive neuroscience. Several lines of investigation indicate that although the brain remains highly plastic throughout life, the posttraumatic plasticity does not recreate a copy of the neural mechanisms lost to injury. Instead, the uninjured parts of the brain are functionally reorganized in a manner which – in spite of not recreating the basic information processing lost to injury – is able to allow a more or less complete return of the surface phenomena (including manifestations of consciousness originally impaired by the trauma. A novel model (the REF-model of these processes is presented – and some of its implications discussed relative to studies of the neural substrates of cognition and consciousness.

  20. Neural Circuits via Which Single Prolonged Stress Exposure Leads to Fear Extinction Retention Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Stanfield, Briana R.; Staib, Jennifer M.; David, Nina P.; Keller, Samantha M.; DePietro, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Single prolonged stress (SPS) has been used to examine mechanisms via which stress exposure leads to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. SPS induces fear extinction retention deficits, but neural circuits critical for mediating these deficits are unknown. To address this gap, we examined the effect of SPS on neural activity in brain regions…

  1. A Neural Substrate for Rapid Timbre Recognition? Neural and Behavioral Discrimination of Very Brief Acoustic Vowels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occelli, F; Suied, C; Pressnitzer, D; Edeline, J-M; Gourévitch, B

    2016-06-01

    The timbre of a sound plays an important role in our ability to discriminate between behaviorally relevant auditory categories, such as different vowels in speech. Here, we investigated, in the primary auditory cortex (A1) of anesthetized guinea pigs, the neural representation of vowels with impoverished timbre cues. Five different vowels were presented with durations ranging from 2 to 128 ms. A psychophysical experiment involving human listeners showed that identification performance was near ceiling for the longer durations and degraded close to chance level for the shortest durations. This was likely due to spectral splatter, which reduced the contrast between the spectral profiles of the vowels at short durations. Effects of vowel duration on cortical responses were well predicted by the linear frequency responses of A1 neurons. Using mutual information, we found that auditory cortical neurons in the guinea pig could be used to reliably identify several vowels for all durations. Information carried by each cortical site was low on average, but the population code was accurate even for durations where human behavioral performance was poor. These results suggest that a place population code is available at the level of A1 to encode spectral profile cues for even very short sounds. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, M.; Stensballe, A.; Rasmussen, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...... kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation sites. The neural network was trained with a positive set of 258 experimentally verified PKA phosphorylation sites. The predictions by NetPhosK were! validated using four novel PKA substrates: Necdin, RFX5, En-2, and Wee 1. The four proteins were phosphorylated by PKA...... in vitro and 13 PKA phosphorylation sites were identified by mass spectrometry. NetPhosK was 100% sensitive and 41% specific in predicting PKA sites in the four proteins. These results demonstrate the potential of using integrated computational and experimental methods for detailed investigations...

  3. Studies on 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2.4 Assembly of 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultracapacitors. 12 V substrate-integrated lead-carbon hybrid ultraca- pacitors with co-located terminals were assembled with. 0. 500. 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000. 0.8. 0.9. 1.0. 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. 1.4. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 0.0. 0.2. 0.4. 0.6. 0.8. 1.0. 1.2. C apa city. / m.

  4. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Saito

    Full Text Available Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET. We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song, sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics, and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody. The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  5. Neural substrates underlying motor skill learning in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Motor skill learning is critical in post-stroke motor recovery, but little is known about its underlying neural substrates. Recently, using a new visuomotor skill learning paradigm involving a speed/accuracy trade-off in healthy individuals we identified three subpopulations based on their behavioral trajectories: fitters (in whom improvement in speed or accuracy coincided with deterioration in the other parameter), shifters (in whom speed and/or accuracy improved without degradation of the other parameter), and non-learners. We aimed to identify the neural substrates underlying the first stages of motor skill learning in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients and to determine whether specific neural substrates were recruited in shifters versus fitters. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 23 patients learned the visuomotor skill with their paretic upper limb. In the whole-group analysis, correlation between activation and motor skill learning was restricted to the dorsal prefrontal cortex of the damaged hemisphere (DLPFCdamh: r = -0.82) and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMddamh: r = 0.70); the correlations was much lesser (-0.16 0.25) in the other regions of interest. In a subgroup analysis, significant activation was restricted to bilateral posterior parietal cortices of the fitters and did not correlate with motor skill learning. Conversely, in shifters significant activation occurred in the primary sensorimotor cortexdamh and supplementary motor areadamh and in bilateral PMd where activation changes correlated significantly with motor skill learning (r = 0.91). Finally, resting-state activity acquired before learning showed a higher functional connectivity in the salience network of shifters compared with fitters (qFDR skill learning with the paretic upper limb in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients, with a key role of bilateral PMd.

  6. The neural substrate of the vestibulocollic reflex. What needs to be learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, V J; Schor, R H

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the role of short-latency pathways in the vestibulocollic reflex (VCR). First the current knowledge about the disynaptic and trisynaptic pathways linking semicircular canal and otolith afferents with cat neck motoneurons is summarized. We then discuss whether these pathways are sufficient or necessary to produce the responses observed in neck muscles by natural vestibular stimulation and conclude that they are neither. Finally, alternate pathways are considered, most likely involving reticulospinal fibers, which are an important part of the neural substrate of the VCR.

  7. Neural substrates of sarcasm: a functional magnetic-resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hitoshi; Seki, Ayumi; Kageyama, Hiroko; Saito, Daisuke N; Koeda, Tatsuya; Ohno, Kousaku; Sadato, Norihiro

    2006-12-08

    The understanding of sarcasm reflects a complex process, which involves recognizing the beliefs of the speaker. There is a clear association between deficits in mentalizing, which is the ability to understand other people's behavior in terms of their mental state, and the understanding of sarcasm in individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. This suggests that mentalizing is important in pragmatic non-literal language comprehension. To highlight the neural substrates of sarcasm, 20 normal adult volunteers underwent functional magnetic-resonance imaging. We used scenario-reading tasks, in which sentences describing a certain situation were presented, followed by the protagonist's comments regarding that situation. Depending on the situation, the semantic content of the comments was classified as sarcastic, non-sarcastic, or contextually unconnected. As the combination of the first and second sentences represented discourse-level information that was not encoded in the individual sentences, sarcasm detection was represented as the differential activation induced by the second sentences. Sarcasm detection activated the left temporal pole, the superior temporal sulcus, the medial prefrontal cortex, and the inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area [BA] 47). The left BA 47 was activated more prominently by sarcasm detection than by the first sentence. These findings indicate that the detection of sarcasm recruits the medial prefrontal cortex, which is part of the mentalizing system, as well as the neural substrates involved in reading sentences. The left BA 47 might therefore be where mentalizing and language processes interact during sarcasm detection.

  8. Artificial language training reveals the neural substrates underlying addressed and assembled phonologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Mei

    Full Text Available Although behavioral and neuropsychological studies have suggested two distinct routes of phonological access, their neural substrates have not been clearly elucidated. Here, we designed an artificial language (based on Korean Hangul that can be read either through addressed (i.e., whole word mapping or assembled (i.e., grapheme-to-phoneme mapping phonology. Two matched groups of native English-speaking participants were trained in one of the two conditions, one hour per day for eight days. Behavioral results showed that both groups correctly named more than 90% of the trained words after training. At the neural level, we found a clear dissociation of the neural pathways for addressed and assembled phonologies: There was greater involvement of the anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, right orbital frontal cortex, angular gyrus and middle temporal gyrus for addressed phonology, but stronger activation in the left precentral gyrus/inferior frontal gyrus and supramarginal gyrus for assembled phonology. Furthermore, we found evidence supporting the strategy-shift hypothesis, which postulates that, with practice, reading strategy shifts from assembled to addressed phonology. Specifically, compared to untrained words, trained words in the assembled phonology group showed stronger activation in the addressed phonology network and less activation in the assembled phonology network. Our results provide clear brain-imaging evidence for the dual-route models of reading.

  9. A novel neural substrate for the transformation of olfactory inputs into motor output.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Derjean

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely recognized that animals respond to odors by generating or modulating specific motor behaviors. These reactions are important for daily activities, reproduction, and survival. In the sea lamprey, mating occurs after ovulated females are attracted to spawning sites by male sex pheromones. The ubiquity and reliability of olfactory-motor behavioral responses in vertebrates suggest tight coupling between the olfactory system and brain areas controlling movements. However, the circuitry and the underlying cellular neural mechanisms remain largely unknown. Using lamprey brain preparations, and electrophysiology, calcium imaging, and tract tracing experiments, we describe the neural substrate responsible for transforming an olfactory input into a locomotor output. We found that olfactory stimulation with naturally occurring odors and pheromones induced large excitatory responses in reticulospinal cells, the command neurons for locomotion. We have also identified the anatomy and physiology of this circuit. The olfactory input was relayed in the medial part of the olfactory bulb, in the posterior tuberculum, in the mesencephalic locomotor region, to finally reach reticulospinal cells in the hindbrain. Activation of this olfactory-motor pathway generated rhythmic ventral root discharges and swimming movements. Our study bridges the gap between behavior and cellular neural mechanisms in vertebrates, identifying a specific subsystem within the CNS, dedicated to producing motor responses to olfactory inputs.

  10. A potential neural substrate for processing functional classes of complex acoustic signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle George

    Full Text Available Categorization is essential to all cognitive processes, but identifying the neural substrates underlying categorization processes is a real challenge. Among animals that have been shown to be able of categorization, songbirds are particularly interesting because they provide researchers with clear examples of categories of acoustic signals allowing different levels of recognition, and they possess a system of specialized brain structures found only in birds that learn to sing: the song system. Moreover, an avian brain nucleus that is analogous to the mammalian secondary auditory cortex (the caudo-medial nidopallium, or NCM has recently emerged as a plausible site for sensory representation of birdsong, and appears as a well positioned brain region for categorization of songs. Hence, we tested responses in this non-primary, associative area to clear and distinct classes of songs with different functions and social values, and for a possible correspondence between these responses and the functional aspects of songs, in a highly social songbird species: the European starling. Our results clearly show differential neuronal responses to the ethologically defined classes of songs, both in the number of neurons responding, and in the response magnitude of these neurons. Most importantly, these differential responses corresponded to the functional classes of songs, with increasing activation from non-specific to species-specific and from species-specific to individual-specific sounds. These data therefore suggest a potential neural substrate for sorting natural communication signals into categories, and for individual vocal recognition of same-species members. Given the many parallels that exist between birdsong and speech, these results may contribute to a better understanding of the neural bases of speech.

  11. Sleep modulates the neural substrates of both spatial and contextual memory consolidation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Rauchs

    Full Text Available It is known that sleep reshapes the neural representations that subtend the memories acquired while navigating in a virtual environment. However, navigation is not process-pure, as manifold learning components contribute to performance, notably the spatial and contextual memory constituents. In this context, it remains unclear whether post-training sleep globally promotes consolidation of all of the memory components embedded in virtual navigation, or rather favors the development of specific representations. Here, we investigated the effect of post-training sleep on the neural substrates of the consolidation of spatial and contextual memories acquired while navigating in a complex 3D, naturalistic virtual town. Using fMRI, we mapped regional cerebral activity during various tasks designed to tap either the spatial or the contextual memory component, or both, 72 h after encoding with or without sleep deprivation during the first post-training night. Behavioral performance was not dependent upon post-training sleep deprivation, neither in a natural setting that engages both spatial and contextual memory processes nor when looking more specifically at each of these memory representations. At the neuronal level however, analyses that focused on contextual memory revealed distinct correlations between performance and neuronal activity in frontal areas associated with recollection processes after post-training sleep, and in the parahippocampal gyrus associated with familiarity processes in sleep-deprived participants. Likewise, efficient spatial memory was associated with posterior cortical activity after sleep whereas it correlated with parahippocampal/medial temporal activity after sleep deprivation. Finally, variations in place-finding efficiency in a natural setting encompassing spatial and contextual elements were associated with caudate activity after post-training sleep, suggesting the automation of navigation. These data indicate that post

  12. Neural evidence that vivid imagining can lead to false remembering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsalves, Brian; Reber, Paul J; Gitelman, Darren R; Parrish, Todd B; Mesulam, M-Marsel; Paller, Ken A

    2004-10-01

    The imperfect nature of memory is highlighted by the regularity with which people fail to remember, or worse, remember something that never happened. We investigated the formation of a particular type of erroneous memory by monitoring brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging during the presentation of words and photos. Participants generated a visual image of a common object in response to each word. Subsequently, they sometimes claimed to have seen photos of specific objects they had imagined but not actually seen. In precuneus and inferior parietal regions of the cerebral cortex, activations in response to words were greater when participants subsequently claimed to have seen the corresponding object than when a false memory for that object was not subsequently produced. These findings indicate that brain activity reflecting the engagement of visual imagery can lead to falsely remembering something that was only imagined.

  13. The Racer's Brain - How Domain Expertise is Reflected in the Neural Substrates of Driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappi, Otto

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in human brain plasticity is how sensory, motor, and cognitive functions adapt in the process of skill acquisition extended over a period of many years. Recently, there has emerged a growing interest in cognitive neuroscience on studying the functional and structural differences in the brains of elite athletes. Elite performance in sports, music, or the arts, allows us to observe sensorimotor and cognitive performance at the limits of human capability. In this mini-review, we look at driving expertise. The emerging brain imaging literature on the neural substrates of real and simulated driving is reviewed (for the first time), and used as the context for interpreting recent findings on the differences between racing drivers and non-athlete controls. Also the cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience of expertise are discussed.

  14. The macaque lateral grasping network: A neural substrate for generating purposeful hand actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Elena; Gerbella, Marzio; Rozzi, Stefano; Luppino, Giuseppe

    2017-04-01

    In primates, neural mechanisms for controlling skilled hand actions primarily rely on sensorimotor transformations. These transformations are mediated by circuits linking specific inferior parietal with ventral premotor areas in which sensory coding of objects' features automatically triggers appropriate hand motor programs. Recently, connectional studies in macaques showed that these parietal and premotor areas are nodes of a large-scale cortical network, designated as "lateral grasping network," including specific temporal and prefrontal sectors involved in object recognition and executive functions, respectively. These data extend grasping models so far proposed in providing a possible substrate for interfacing perceptual, cognitive, and hand-related sensorimotor processes for controlling hand actions based on object identity, goals, and memory-based or contextual information and for the contribution of motor signals to cognitive motor functions. Human studies provided evidence for a possible counterpart of the macaque lateral grasping network, suggesting that in primate evolution the neural mechanisms for controlling hand actions described in the macaque have been retained and exploited for the emergence of human-specific motor and cognitive motor capacities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neural substrates of spontaneous musical performance: an FMRI study of jazz improvisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles J Limb

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrates that underlie spontaneous musical performance, we examined improvisation in professional jazz pianists using functional MRI. By employing two paradigms that differed widely in musical complexity, we found that improvisation (compared to production of over-learned musical sequences was consistently characterized by a dissociated pattern of activity in the prefrontal cortex: extensive deactivation of dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbital regions with focal activation of the medial prefrontal (frontal polar cortex. Such a pattern may reflect a combination of psychological processes required for spontaneous improvisation, in which internally motivated, stimulus-independent behaviors unfold in the absence of central processes that typically mediate self-monitoring and conscious volitional control of ongoing performance. Changes in prefrontal activity during improvisation were accompanied by widespread activation of neocortical sensorimotor areas (that mediate the organization and execution of musical performance as well as deactivation of limbic structures (that regulate motivation and emotional tone. This distributed neural pattern may provide a cognitive context that enables the emergence of spontaneous creative activity.

  16. Neural substrates of spontaneous musical performance: an FMRI study of jazz improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J; Braun, Allen R

    2008-02-27

    To investigate the neural substrates that underlie spontaneous musical performance, we examined improvisation in professional jazz pianists using functional MRI. By employing two paradigms that differed widely in musical complexity, we found that improvisation (compared to production of over-learned musical sequences) was consistently characterized by a dissociated pattern of activity in the prefrontal cortex: extensive deactivation of dorsolateral prefrontal and lateral orbital regions with focal activation of the medial prefrontal (frontal polar) cortex. Such a pattern may reflect a combination of psychological processes required for spontaneous improvisation, in which internally motivated, stimulus-independent behaviors unfold in the absence of central processes that typically mediate self-monitoring and conscious volitional control of ongoing performance. Changes in prefrontal activity during improvisation were accompanied by widespread activation of neocortical sensorimotor areas (that mediate the organization and execution of musical performance) as well as deactivation of limbic structures (that regulate motivation and emotional tone). This distributed neural pattern may provide a cognitive context that enables the emergence of spontaneous creative activity.

  17. Functional alterations in neural substrates of geometric reasoning in adults with high-functioning autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamada

    Full Text Available Individuals with autism spectrum condition (ASC are known to excel in some perceptual cognitive tasks, but such developed functions have been often regarded as "islets of abilities" that do not significantly contribute to broader intellectual capacities. However, recent behavioral studies have reported that individuals with ASC have advantages for performing Raven's (Standard Progressive Matrices (RPM/RSPM, a standard neuropsychological test for general fluid intelligence, raising the possibility that ASC's cognitive strength can be utilized for more general purposes like novel problem solving. Here, the brain activity of 25 adults with high-functioning ASC and 26 matched normal controls (NC was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to examine neural substrates of geometric reasoning during the engagement of a modified version of the RSPM test. Among the frontal and parietal brain regions involved in fluid intelligence, ASC showed larger activation in the left lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC during an analytic condition with moderate difficulty than NC. Activation in the left LOTC and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC increased with task difficulty in NC, whereas such modulation of activity was absent in ASC. Furthermore, functional connectivity analysis revealed a significant reduction of activation coupling between the left inferior parietal cortex and the right anterior prefrontal cortex during both figural and analytic conditions in ASC. These results indicate altered pattern of functional specialization and integration in the neural system for geometric reasoning in ASC, which may explain its atypical cognitive pattern, including performance on the Raven's Matrices test.

  18. The neural substrate of naming events: effects of processing demands but not of grammatical class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Simona; Tettamanti, Marco; Cappa, Stefano F; Della Rosa, Pasquale; Saccuman, Cristina; Scifo, Paola; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2008-01-01

    Grammatical class is a fundamental property of language, and all natural languages distinguish between nouns and verbs. Brain activation studies have provided conflicting evidence concerning the neural substrates of noun and verb processing. A major limitation of many previous imaging studies is that they did not disentangle the impact of grammatical class from the differences in semantic correlates. In order to tease apart the role of semantic and grammatical factors, we performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study presenting Italian speakers with pictures of events and asked them to name them as 1) Infinitive Verb (e.g., mangiare [to eat]); 2) Inflected Verb (e.g., mangia [she/he eats]); and 3) Action Noun (e.g., mangiata [the eating]). We did not find any verb-specific activation. However, reliable left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) activations were found when contrasting the Action Noun with the Infinitive Verb condition. A second-level analysis indicated then that activation in left IFG was greatest for Action Nouns, intermediate for Inflected Verbs, and least for Infinitive Verbs. We conclude that, when all other factors are controlled, nouns and verbs are processed by a common neural system. In the present case, differences in left IFG activation emerge as a consequence of increasing linguistic and/or general processing demands.

  19. Shared neural substrates for song discrimination in parental and parasitic songbirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louder, Matthew I M; Voss, Henning U; Manna, Thomas J; Carryl, Sophia S; London, Sarah E; Balakrishnan, Christopher N; Hauber, Mark E

    2016-05-27

    In many social animals, early exposure to conspecific stimuli is critical for the development of accurate species recognition. Obligate brood parasitic songbirds, however, forego parental care and young are raised by heterospecific hosts in the absence of conspecific stimuli. Having evolved from non-parasitic, parental ancestors, how brood parasites recognize their own species remains unclear. In parental songbirds (e.g. zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata), the primary and secondary auditory forebrain areas are known to be critical in the differential processing of conspecific vs. heterospecific songs. Here we demonstrate that the same auditory brain regions underlie song discrimination in adult brood parasitic pin-tailed whydahs (Vidua macroura), a close relative of the zebra finch lineage. Similar to zebra finches, whydahs showed stronger behavioral responses during conspecific vs. heterospecific song and tone pips as well as increased neural responses within the auditory forebrain, as measured by both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and immediate early gene (IEG) expression. Given parallel behavioral and neuroanatomical patterns of song discrimination, our results suggest that the evolutionary transition to brood parasitism from parental songbirds likely involved an "evolutionary tinkering" of existing proximate mechanisms, rather than the wholesale reworking of the neural substrates of species recognition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying the Neural Substrates of Procrastination: a Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Xiangpeng; Feng, Tingyong

    2016-09-12

    Procrastination is a prevalent problematic behavior that brings serious consequences to individuals who suffer from it. Although this phenomenon has received increasing attention from researchers, the underpinning neural substrates of it is poorly studied. To examine the neural bases subserving procrastination, the present study employed resting-state fMRI. The main results were as follows: (1) the behavioral procrastination was positively correlated with the regional activity of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and the parahippocampal cortex (PHC), while negatively correlated with that of the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC). (2) The aPFC-seed connectivity with the anterior medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex was positively associated with procrastination. (3) The connectivity between vmPFC and several other regions, such as the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, the bilateral inferior prefrontal cortex showed a negative association with procrastination. These results suggested that procrastination could be attributed to, on the one hand, hyper-activity of the default mode network (DMN) that overrides the prefrontal control signal; while on the other hand, the failure of top-down control exerted by the aPFC on the DMN. Therefore, the present study unravels the biomarkers of procrastination and provides treatment targets for procrastination prevention.

  1. Metaplasticity as a Neural Substrate for Adaptive Learning and Choice under Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farashahi, Shiva; Donahue, Christopher H; Khorsand, Peyman; Seo, Hyojung; Lee, Daeyeol; Soltani, Alireza

    2017-04-19

    Value-based decision making often involves integration of reward outcomes over time, but this becomes considerably more challenging if reward assignments on alternative options are probabilistic and non-stationary. Despite the existence of various models for optimally integrating reward under uncertainty, the underlying neural mechanisms are still unknown. Here we propose that reward-dependent metaplasticity (RDMP) can provide a plausible mechanism for both integration of reward under uncertainty and estimation of uncertainty itself. We show that a model based on RDMP can robustly perform the probabilistic reversal learning task via dynamic adjustment of learning based on reward feedback, while changes in its activity signal unexpected uncertainty. The model predicts time-dependent and choice-specific learning rates that strongly depend on reward history. Key predictions from this model were confirmed with behavioral data from non-human primates. Overall, our results suggest that metaplasticity can provide a neural substrate for adaptive learning and choice under uncertainty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinct Neural Substrates for Maintaining Locations and Spatial Relations in Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara J Blacker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Previous work has demonstrated a distinction between maintenance of two types of spatial information in working memory (WM: spatial locations and spatial relations. While a body of work has investigated the neural mechanisms of sensory-based information like spatial locations, little is known about how spatial relations are maintained in WM. In two experiments, we used fMRI to investigate the involvement of early visual cortex in the maintenance of spatial relations in WM. In both experiments, we found less quadrant-specific BOLD activity in visual cortex when a single spatial relation, compared to a single spatial location, was held in WM. Also across both experiments, we found a consistent set of brain regions that were differentially activated during maintenance of locations versus relations. Maintaining a location, compared to a relation, was associated with greater activity in typical spatial WM regions like posterior parietal cortex and prefrontal regions. Whereas maintaining a relation, compared to a location, was associated with greater activity in the parahippocampal gyrus and precuneus/retrosplenial cortex. Further, in Experiment 2 we manipulated WM load and included trials where participants had to maintain three spatial locations or relations. Under this high load condition, the regions sensitive to locations versus relations were somewhat different than under low load. We also identified regions that were sensitive to load specifically for location or relation maintenance, as well as overlapping regions sensitive to load more generally. These results suggest that the neural substrates underlying WM maintenance of spatial locations and relations are distinct from one another and that the neural representations of these distinct types of spatial information change with load.

  3. Neural substrates of treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Straube, Benjamin; Konrad, Carsten; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittmann, André; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Uhlmann, Christina; Arolt, Volker; Jansen, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo

    2013-11-01

    Although exposure-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment option for panic disorder with agoraphobia, the neural substrates of treatment response remain unknown. Evidence suggests that panic disorder with agoraphobia is characterized by dysfunctional safety signal processing. Using fear conditioning as a neurofunctional probe, the authors investigated neural baseline characteristics and neuroplastic changes after CBT that were associated with treatment outcome in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia. Neural correlates of fear conditioning and extinction were measured using functional MRI before and after a manualized CBT program focusing on behavioral exposure in 49 medication-free patients with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Treatment response was defined as a reduction exceeding 50% in Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores. At baseline, nonresponders exhibited enhanced activation in the right pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, the hippocampus, and the amygdala in response to a safety signal. While this activation pattern partly resolved in nonresponders after CBT, successful treatment was characterized by increased right hippocampal activation when processing stimulus contingencies. Treatment response was associated with an inhibitory functional coupling between the anterior cingulate cortex and the amygdala that did not change over time. This study identified brain activation patterns associated with treatment response in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia. Altered safety signal processing and anterior cingulate cortex-amygdala coupling may indicate individual differences among these patients that determine the effectiveness of exposure-based CBT and associated neuroplastic changes. Findings point to brain networks by which successful CBT in this patient population is mediated.

  4. Tuning of large piezoelectric response in nanosheet-buffered lead zirconate titanate films on glass substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Anuj; Bayraktar, Muharrem; Nijland, Maarten; Ten Elshof, Johan E; Bijkerk, Fred; Rijnders, Guus

    2017-03-21

    Renewed interest has been witnessed in utilizing the piezoelectric response of PbZr 0.52 Ti 0.48 O 3 (PZT) films on glass substrates for applications such as adaptive optics. Accordingly, new methodologies are being explored to grow well-oriented PZT thin films to harvest a large piezoelectric response. However, thin film piezoelectric response is significantly reduced compared to intrinsic response due to substrate induced clamping, even when films are well-oriented. Here, a novel method is presented to grow preferentially (100)-oriented PZT films on glass substrates by utilizing crystalline nanosheets as seed layers. Furthermore, increasing the repetition frequency up to 20 Hz during pulsed laser deposition helps to tune the film microstructure to hierarchically ordered columns that leads to reduced clamping and enhanced piezoelectric response evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and analytical calculations. A large piezoelectric coefficient of 250 pm/V is observed in optimally tuned structure which is more than two times the highest reported piezoelectric response on glass. To confirm that the clamping compromises the piezoelectric response, denser films are deposited using a lower repetition frequency and a BiFeO 3 buffer layer resulting in significantly reduced piezoelectric responses. This paper demonstrates a novel method for PZT integration on glass substrates without compromising the large piezoelectric response.

  5. Neural substrates for the motivational regulation of motor recovery after spinal-cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukio Nishimura

    Full Text Available It is believed that depression impedes and motivation enhances functional recovery after neuronal damage such as spinal-cord injury and stroke. However, the neuronal substrate underlying such psychological effects on functional recovery remains unclear. A longitudinal study of brain activation in the non-human primate model of partial spinal-cord injury using positron emission tomography (PET revealed a contribution of the primary motor cortex (M1 to the recovery of finger dexterity through the rehabilitative training. Here, we show that activity of the ventral striatum, including the nucleus accumbens (NAc, which plays a critical role in processing of motivation, increased and its functional connectivity with M1 emerged and was progressively strengthened during the recovery. In addition, functional connectivities among M1, the ventral striatum and other structures belonging to neural circuits for processing motivation, such as the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus were also strengthened during the recovery. These results give clues to the neuronal substrate for motivational regulation of motor learning required for functional recovery after spinal-cord injury.

  6. Neural substrate for brain stimulation reward in the rat: cathodal and anodal strength-duration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, G

    1977-08-01

    The trade-off between current strength and duration of a stimulating pulse was studied for the rewarding and priming effects of brain stimulation reward (BSR). With cathodal pulses, strenght-duration functions for BSR had chronaxies of .8-3 msec. No differences were observed between the results for rewarding and priming effects. With anodal pulses. strength-duration curves were parallel to the cathodal curves at pulse durations of .1-5 msec, but at pulse durations greater than 5 msec the anodal curves showed a greater drop in required current intensity than did the cathodal curves. The parallel portion of the anodal curves was interpreted as due to anode-make excitation, and the drop at longer pulse durations was interpreted as due to anode-break excitation. Cathodal strength-duration functions for the motor effect elicited through the BSR electrodes had chronaxies of .15-.48 msec. Measurements of the latency of the muscle twitch confirmed that anode-make and anode-break excitation occurred, the latter becoming evident at pulse durations as brief as .3-.4 msec. The results provide quantitative characterization of cathodal and anodal strength-duration properties of the neural substrate for BSR and are discussed in terms of their value in guiding electrophysiological investigation of that substrate.

  7. The neural substrates of procrastination: A voxel-based morphometry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Liu, Peiwei; Guo, Yiqun; Feng, Tingyong

    2018-03-01

    Procrastination is a pervasive phenomenon across different cultures and brings about lots of serious consequences, including performance, subjective well-being, and even public policy. However, little is known about the neural substrates of procrastination. In order to shed light upon this question, we investigated the neuroanatomical substrates of procrastination across two independent samples using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) method. The whole-brain analysis showed procrastination was positively correlated with the graymatter (GM) volume of clusters in the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and the orbital frontal cortex (OFC), while negatively correlated with the GM volume of clusters in the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) in sample one (151 participants). We further conducted a verification procedure on another sample (108 participants) using region-of-interest analysis to examine the reliability of these results. Results showed procrastination can be predicted by the GM volume of the OFC and the MFG. The present findings suggest that the MFG and OFC, which are the key regions of self-control and emotion regulation, may play an important role in procrastination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Substrate and Co-Culture on Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Erin Boote [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the study of stem and progenitor cells has moved to the forefront of research. Since the isolation of human hematopoietic stem cells in 1988 and the subsequent discovery of a self renewing population of multipotent cells in many tissues, many researchers have envisioned a better understanding of development and potential clinical usage in intractable diseases. Both these goals, however, depend on a solid understanding of the intracellular and extracellular forces that cause stem cells to differentiate to a specific cell fate. Many diseases of large scale cell loss have been suggested as candidates for stem cell based treatments. It is proposed that replacing the function of the damaged or defective cells by specific differentiation of stem or progenitor cells could treat the disease. Before cells can be directed to specific lineages, the mechanisms of differentiation must be better understood. Differentiation in vivo is an intensively complex system that is difficult to study. The goal of this research is to develop further understanding of the effects of soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues on the differentiation of neural progenitor cells with the use of a simplified in vitro culture system. Specific research objectives are to study the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in response to astrocyte conditioned medium and protein substrate composition and concentration. In an effort to reveal the mechanism of the conditioned medium interaction, a test for the presence of a feedback loop between progenitor cells and astrocytes is presented along with an examination of conditioned medium storage temperature, which can reveal enzymatic dependencies. An examination of protein substrate composition and concentration will help to reveal the role of any ECM interactions on differentiation. This thesis is organized into a literature review covering recent advances in use of external modulators of differentiation such as surface coatings, co

  9. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  10. Ferroelectric response from lead zirconate titanate thin films prepared directly on low-resistivity copper substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losego, Mark D.; Jimison, Leslie H.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2005-04-01

    We demonstrate films of the well-known ferroelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) prepared directly on copper foils by chemical solution deposition (CSD). The films exhibit saturating polarization hysteresis, remanent polarization values of 26μC/cm2, and permittivities of 800; these properties are comparable to those achieved using semiconductor-grade substrates. The preparation methodology is founded upon an understanding of solution chemistry as opposed to conventional gas-phase / condensed-phase equilibrium approaches. By adopting this technique, base-metal compatibility can be achieved using much lower temperatures, and a broader set of devices can be prepared offering intimate contact with high conductivity, easily patternable, or ferromagnetic metals.

  11. The development of the neural substrates of cognitive control in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Marjorie; Yoon, Jong H; Ragland, J Daniel; Niendam, Tara A; Lesh, Tyler A; Fairbrother, Wonja; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) involve impairments in cognitive control. In typical development (TYP), neural systems underlying cognitive control undergo substantial maturation during adolescence. Development is delayed in adolescents with ASD. Little is known about the neural substrates of this delay. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a cognitive control task involving overcoming a prepotent response tendency to examine the development of cognitive control in young (ages 12-15; n = 13 with ASD and n = 13 with TYP) and older (ages 16-18; n = 14 with ASD and n = 14 with TYP) adolescents with whole-brain voxelwise univariate and task-related functional connectivity analyses. Older ASD and TYP showed reduced activation in sensory and premotor areas relative to younger ones. The older ASD group showed reduced left parietal activation relative to TYP. Functional connectivity analyses showed a significant age by group interaction with the older ASD group exhibiting increased functional connectivity strength between the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, bilaterally. This functional connectivity strength was related to task performance in ASD, whereas that between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 9 and 40) was related to task performance in TYP. Adolescents with ASD rely more on reactive cognitive control, involving last-minute conflict detection and control implementation by the anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, versus proactive cognitive control requiring processing by dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. Findings await replication in larger longitudinal studies that examine their functional consequences and amenability to intervention. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  12. Neural substrates of intention--consequence integration and its impact on reactive punishment in interpersonal transgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbo; Li, Jia; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2015-03-25

    When evaluating interpersonal transgressions, people take into account both the consequential damage and the intention of the agent. The intention and consequence, however, do not always match, as is the case with accidents and failed attempts. We combined an interactive game and functional MRI to investigate the neural substrates underlying the processing of intention and consequence, and its bearing on reactive punishment. The participant interacted with anonymous partners, who decided to deliver pain stimulation either to himself/herself or to the participant to earn a monetary reward. In some cases, the decision was reversed by the computer. After pain delivery, the partner's intention was revealed. Unbeknownst to the partner, the participant was then allowed to punish the partner by reducing his/her monetary reward. Behaviorally, the punishment was lower in the accidental condition (unintended harm relative to intended harm) but higher in the failed-attempt condition (unintended no-harm relative to intended no-harm). Neurally, the left amygdala/hippocampus was activated in the conditions with blameworthy intention (i.e., intentional harm and failed attempt). The accidental (relative to intentional) harm activated the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and the anterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), while the failed attempt (relative to genuine no-harm) activated the anterior insula (AI) and the posterior IFG. Effective connectivity analysis revealed that in the unintentional conditions (i.e., accidental and failed attempt) the IFG received input from the TPJ and AI, and sent regulatory signals to the amygdala. These findings demonstrate that the processing of intention may gate the emotional responses to transgression and regulate subsequent reactive punishment. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354917-09$15.00/0.

  13. Fabrication, characterization and electrocatalytic application of a lead dioxide electrode with porous titanium substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenli; Kong, Haishen [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Lin, Haibo [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Key Laboratory of Physics and Technology for Advanced Batteries of Ministry of Education, Jilin University, Changchun, 130012 (China); Lu, Haiyan, E-mail: luhy@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Huang, Weimin; Yin, Jian; Lin, Zheqi; Bao, Jinpeng [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2015-11-25

    In this study, PbO{sub 2} electrode was prepared on porous Ti/SnO{sub 2}–Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5} substrate (denoted as 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode), and its electrochemical properties were investigated in detail. The electrodeposition mechanism of 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Scanning electron microscope (SEM) result showed that the 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode possessed porous structure when it was electrodeposited for time less than 30 min. The 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode prepared for 10 min had more active sites than the lead dioxide electrode electrodeposited on planar titanium substrate (denoted as 2D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode) and its electrochemical porosity is about 54%. The embedded structure between porous Ti/SnO{sub 2}–Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5} substrate and PbO{sub 2} coating increased the stability of 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode. The service life of 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode was about 350 h which was much longer than 2D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode. What's more, 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode had better electrocatalytic activity towards phenol degradation than 2D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode. - Highlights: • 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode was prepared on a porous titanium substrate. • The electrochemical active surface area was investigated. • The activity of 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode towards phenol oxidation was investigated. • 3D-Ti/PbO{sub 2} electrode shows superior electrocatalytic activity.

  14. Overlapping neural substrates between intentional and incidental down-regulation of negative emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payer, Doris E; Baicy, Kate; Lieberman, Matthew D; London, Edythe D

    2012-04-01

    Emotion regulation can be achieved in various ways, but few studies have evaluated the extent to which the neurocognitive substrates of these distinct operations overlap. In the study reported here, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure activity in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex of 10 participants who completed two independent tasks of emotion regulation-reappraisal, measuring intentional emotion regulation, and affect labeling, measuring incidental emotion regulation-with the objective of identifying potential overlap in the neural substrates underlying each task. Analyses focused on a priori regions of interest in the amygdala and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). For both tasks, fMRI showed decreased amygdala activation during emotion regulation compared with emotion conditions. During reappraisal, this decrease in amygdala activation was accompanied by a proportional decrease in emotional intensity ratings; during affect labeling, the decrease in amygdala activation correlated with self-reported aggression. Importantly, across participants, the magnitude of decrease in amygdala activation during reappraisal correlated with the magnitude of decrease during affect labeling, even though the tasks were administered on separate days, and values indexing amygdala activation during each task were extracted independently of one another. In addition, IFG-amygdala connectivity, assessed via psychophysiological interaction analysis, overlapped between tasks in two regions within the right IFG. The results suggest that the two tasks recruit overlapping regions of prefrontal cortex, resulting in similar reductions in amygdala activation, regardless of the strategy employed. Intentional and incidental forms of emotion regulation, despite their phenomenological differences, may therefore converge on a common neurocognitive pathway. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Experience Shapes the Development of Neural Substrates of Face Processing in Human Ventral Temporal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-02-01

    In adult humans, the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) represents faces in a reproducible topology. However, it is unknown what role visual experience plays in the development of this topology. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults, we found a sequential development, in which the topology of face-selective activations across the VTC was matured by age 7, but the spatial extent and degree of face selectivity continued to develop past age 7 into adulthood. Importantly, own- and other-age faces were differentially represented, both in the distributed multivoxel patterns across the VTC, and also in the magnitude of responses of face-selective regions. These results provide strong evidence that experience shapes cortical representations of faces during development from childhood to adulthood. Our findings have important implications for the role of experience and age in shaping the neural substrates of face processing in the human VTC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Common neural substrates support speech and non-speech vocal tract gestures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Soo-Eun; Kenney, Mary Kay; Loucks, Torrey M J; Poletto, Christopher J; Ludlow, Christy L

    2009-08-01

    The issue of whether speech is supported by the same neural substrates as non-speech vocal tract gestures has been contentious. In this fMRI study we tested whether producing non-speech vocal tract gestures in humans shares the same functional neuroanatomy as non-sense speech syllables. Production of non-speech vocal tract gestures, devoid of phonological content but similar to speech in that they had familiar acoustic and somatosensory targets, was compared to the production of speech syllables without meaning. Brain activation related to overt production was captured with BOLD fMRI using a sparse sampling design for both conditions. Speech and non-speech were compared using voxel-wise whole brain analyses, and ROI analyses focused on frontal and temporoparietal structures previously reported to support speech production. Results showed substantial activation overlap between speech and non-speech function in regions. Although non-speech gesture production showed greater extent and amplitude of activation in the regions examined, both speech and non-speech showed comparable left laterality in activation for both target perception and production. These findings posit a more general role of the previously proposed "auditory dorsal stream" in the left hemisphere--to support the production of vocal tract gestures that are not limited to speech processing.

  17. Neural substrate of quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: a magnetisation transfer imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faget-Agius, Catherine; Catherine, Faget-Agius; Boyer, Laurent; Wirsich, Jonathan; Jonathan, Wirsich; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Jean-Philippe, Ranjeva; Richieri, Raphaelle; Raphaelle, Richieri; Soulier, Elisabeth; Elisabeth, Soulier; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Sylviane, Confort-Gouny; Auquier, Pascal; Pascal, Auquier; Guye, Maxime; Maxime, Guye; Lançon, Christophe; Christophe, Lançon

    2015-12-03

    The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrate underlying quality of life (QoL) and to demonstrate the microstructural abnormalities associated with impaired QoL in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, using magnetisation transfer imaging. A total of 81 right-handed men with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and 25 age- and sex-similar healthy controls were included and underwent a 3T MRI with magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) to detect microstructural abnormalities. Compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia had grey matter (GM) decreased MTR values in the temporal lobe (BA21, BA37 and BA38), the bilateral insula, the occipital lobe (BA17, BA18 and BA19) and the cerebellum. Patients with impaired QoL had lower GM MTR values relative to patients with preserved QoL in the bilateral temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the secondary visual cortex (BA18), the vermis and the cerebellum. Significant correlations between MTR values and QoL scores (p < 0.005) were observed in the GM of patients in the right temporal pole (BA38), the bilateral insula, the vermis and the right cerebellum. Our study shows that QoL impairment in patients with schizophrenia is related to the microstructural changes in an extensive network, suggesting that QoL is a bio-psychosocial marker.

  18. The comprehensive connectome of a neural substrate for ‘ON’ motion detection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Shin-ya; Nern, Aljoscha; Chklovskii, Dmitri B; Scheffer, Louis K; Rubin, Gerald M; Meinertzhagen, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    Analysing computations in neural circuits often uses simplified models because the actual neuronal implementation is not known. For example, a problem in vision, how the eye detects image motion, has long been analysed using Hassenstein-Reichardt (HR) detector or Barlow-Levick (BL) models. These both simulate motion detection well, but the exact neuronal circuits undertaking these tasks remain elusive. We reconstructed a comprehensive connectome of the circuits of Drosophila‘s motion-sensing T4 cells using a novel EM technique. We uncover complex T4 inputs and reveal that putative excitatory inputs cluster at T4’s dendrite shafts, while inhibitory inputs localize to the bases. Consistent with our previous study, we reveal that Mi1 and Tm3 cells provide most synaptic contacts onto T4. We are, however, unable to reproduce the spatial offset between these cells reported previously. Our comprehensive connectome reveals complex circuits that include candidate anatomical substrates for both HR and BL types of motion detectors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24394.001 PMID:28432786

  19. Distinct and Shared Endophenotypes of Neural Substrates in Bipolar and Major Depressive Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsubara

    Full Text Available Little is known about disorder-specific biomarkers of bipolar disorder (BD and major depressive disorder (MDD. Our aim was to determine a neural substrate that could be used to distinguish BD from MDD. Our study included a BD group (10 patients with BD, 10 first-degree relatives (FDRs of individuals with BD, MDD group (17 patients with MDD, 17 FDRs of individuals with MDD, and 27 healthy individuals. Structural and functional brain abnormalities were evaluated by voxel-based morphometry and a trail making test (TMT, respectively. The BD group showed a significant main effect of diagnosis in the gray matter (GM volume of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC; p = 0.01 and left insula (p < 0.01. FDRs of individuals with BD showed significantly smaller left ACC GM volume than healthy subjects (p < 0.01, and patients with BD showed significantly smaller ACC (p < 0.01 and left insular GM volume (p < 0.01 than healthy subjects. The MDD group showed a tendency toward a main effect of diagnosis in the right and left insular GM volume. The BD group showed a significantly inverse correlation between the left insular GM volume and TMT-A scores (p < 0.05. Our results suggest that the ACC volume could be a distinct endophenotype of BD, while the insular volume could be a shared BD and MDD endophenotype. Moreover, the insula could be associated with cognitive decline and poor outcome in BD.

  20. Different functional neural substrates for good and poor language outcome in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Michael V; Pierce, Karen; Eyler, Lisa T; Carter Barnes, Cindy; Ahrens-Barbeau, Clelia; Solso, Stephanie; Campbell, Kathleen; Courchesne, Eric

    2015-04-22

    Autism (ASD) is vastly heterogeneous, particularly in early language development. While ASD language trajectories in the first years of life are highly unstable, by early childhood these trajectories stabilize and are predictive of longer-term outcome. Early neural substrates that predict/precede such outcomes are largely unknown, but could have considerable translational and clinical impact. Pre-diagnosis fMRI response to speech in ASD toddlers with relatively good language outcome was highly similar to non-ASD comparison groups and robustly recruited language-sensitive superior temporal cortices. In contrast, language-sensitive superior temporal cortices were hypoactive in ASD toddlers with poor language outcome. Brain-behavioral relationships were atypically reversed in ASD, and a multimodal combination of pre-diagnostic clinical behavioral measures and speech-related fMRI response showed the most promise as an ASD prognosis classifier. Thus, before ASD diagnoses and outcome become clinically clear, distinct functional neuroimaging phenotypes are already present that can shed insight on an ASD toddler's later outcome. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tactile, gustatory, and visual biofeedback stimuli modulate neural substrates of deglutition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Ianessa A; Joel, Suresh

    2012-01-16

    It has been well established that swallowing kinematics are modified with different forms of exogenous and endogenous input, however the underlying neural substrates associated with these effects are largely unknown. Our objective was to determine whether the swallowing BOLD response is modulated with heightened sensory modalities (taste, cutaneous electrical stimulation, and visual biofeedback) compared to water ingestion (control) in healthy adults across the age span. Habituation and sensitization were also examined for each sensory condition. Our principal findings are that each sensory swallowing condition activated components of the swallowing cortical network, plus regions associated with the particular sensory modality (i.e. primarily frontal motor planning and integration areas with visual condition). Overall, the insula was most commonly active among the sensory modalities. We also discuss gradual increases and decreases in BOLD signal with repeated exposures for each condition. We conclude that both stimulus- and intention-based inputs have unique cortical swallowing networks relative to their modality. This scientific contribution advances our understanding of the mechanisms of normal swallowing cortical control and has the potential to impact clinical uses of these modalities in treatments for neurogenic dysphagia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Protein kinase C substrate phosphorylation in relation to neural growth and synaptic plasticity: a common molecular mechanism underlying multiple neural functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    In these studies, we addressed the issues of: (1) whether neural protein kinase C (PKC) substrates might be altered in phosphorylation following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP); (2) whether PKC substrate phosphorylation might be specifically related to a model of neural plasticity other than LTP; and (3) whether the PKC substrates implicated in adult synaptic plasticity might be present in axonal growth cones given reports that high concentrations of PKC are found in these structures. Using quantitative analysis of multiple two-dimensional gels, we found that the two major substrates of exogenous purified PKC in adult hippocampal homogenate are both directly correlated to persistence of LTP. In rhesus monkey cerebral cortex, the proteins corresponding to protein F1 and 80k displayed topographical gradients in /sup 32/P-incorporation along the occipitotemporal visual processing pathway. The phosphorylation of both proteins was 11- and 14-fold higher, respectively, in temporal regions of this pathway implicated in the storage of visual representations, than in occipital regions, which do not appear to directly participate in visual memory functions.

  3. Interactions of Penicillium griseofulvum with inorganic and organic substrates: vanadium, lead and hexachlorocyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceci, Andrea; Pierro, Lucia; Riccardi, Carmela; Maggi, Oriana; Pinzari, Flavia; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael; Petrangeli Papini, Marco; Persiani, Anna Maria

    2015-04-01

    Soil is an essential and non-renewable resource for human beings and ecosystems. In recent years, anthropogenic activities mainly related to hydrocarbon fuel combustion, mining and industrial activities have increased the levels of vanadium in the environment, raising concern over its spread. Vanadium may be essential for some bacteria and fungi, but can have toxic effects at high concentrations. The pesticide lindane or γ-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) and another two isomers of hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), α-HCH, and β-HCH, were included as persistent organic pollutants in the Stockholm Convention in 2008, and their worldwide spread and toxic effects on organisms are severe environmental problems. Fungi play important roles in soil and can survive in high concentrations of toxic elements and pesticides by possessing mechanisms for the degradation, utilization and transformation of organic and inorganic substrates. The transformation of potentially toxic elements (PTEs), and degradation of chlorinated pesticides and other persistent organic pollutants may provide environmentally-friendly and economical approaches for environmental management and restoration. In this work, we have investigated the tolerance of a soil fungal species, Penicillum griseofulvum, to different hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) isomers, α-HCH, β-HCH, δ-HCH and γ-HCH or lindane, and two PTEs, vanadium and lead in relation to growth responses and biotransformation. P. griseofulvum was isolated from soils with high levels of PTEs (including vanadium and lead), and HCH residues. P. griseofulvum was able to tolerate vanadium concentrations up to 5 mM, combinations of 2.5 mM vanadium and lead compounds, and was able to grow in the presence of a 4 mg L-1 mixture of α-HCH, β-HCH, δ-HCH and γ-HCH, and degrade these substrates. Tolerance mechanisms may explain the occurrence of fungi in polluted habitats: their roles in the biotransformation of metals and persistent organic pollutants may

  4. The impact of cultural differences in self-representation on the neural substrates of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Belinda J; Jobson, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A significant body of literature documents the neural mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, there is very little empirical work considering the influence of culture on these underlying mechanisms. Accumulating cultural neuroscience research clearly indicates that cultural differences in self-representation modulate many of the same neural processes proposed to be aberrant in PTSD. The objective of this review paper is to consider how culture may impact on the neural mechanisms underlying PTSD. We first outline five key affective and cognitive functions and their underlying neural correlates that have been identified as being disrupted in PTSD: (1) fear dysregulation; (2) attentional biases to threat; (3) emotion and autobiographical memory; (4) self-referential processing; and (5) attachment and interpersonal processing. Second, we consider prominent cultural theories and review the empirical research that has demonstrated the influence of cultural variations in self-representation on the neural substrates of these same five affective and cognitive functions. Finally, we propose a conceptual model that suggests that these five processes have major relevance to considering how culture may influence the neural processes underpinning PTSD.

  5. The impact of cultural differences in self-representation on the neural substrates of posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda J. Liddell

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A significant body of literature documents the neural mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, there is very little empirical work considering the influence of culture on these underlying mechanisms. Accumulating cultural neuroscience research clearly indicates that cultural differences in self-representation modulate many of the same neural processes proposed to be aberrant in PTSD. The objective of this review paper is to consider how culture may impact on the neural mechanisms underlying PTSD. We first outline five key affective and cognitive functions and their underlying neural correlates that have been identified as being disrupted in PTSD: (1 fear dysregulation; (2 attentional biases to threat; (3 emotion and autobiographical memory; (4 self-referential processing; and (5 attachment and interpersonal processing. Second, we consider prominent cultural theories and review the empirical research that has demonstrated the influence of cultural variations in self-representation on the neural substrates of these same five affective and cognitive functions. Finally, we propose a conceptual model that suggests that these five processes have major relevance to considering how culture may influence the neural processes underpinning PTSD. Highlights of the article:

  6. Age-related differences in the neural substrates of cross-modal olfactory recognition memory: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf-Ducastel, Barbara; Murphy, Claire

    2009-08-18

    Impaired ability to remember what has gone before is one of the most distressing aspects of the aging process. Odor recognition memory is particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging, yet the underlying neural substrate is unknown. This study investigated the neural substrate of cross-modal olfactory recognition memory in young and older adults using fMRI. Participants were presented with 16 familiar odors immediately before entering the scanner, and were then tested for retrieval with words, either names of odors previously presented (targets) or names of new odors (foils), while being scanned at 3 T. Activation was reduced in the old subjects, both in regions involved in episodic memory retrieval and in regions involved in olfactory processing. Greater activation in the cerebellum of older adults was observed, suggesting increased response to attentional demands or compensatory mechanisms. Unlike in a number of studies in other sensory modalities, no increase in activation in frontal areas in older adults was observed during retrieval.

  7. Neural substrates underlying stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Stéphanie; Dricot, Laurence; Laloux, Patrice; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Desfontaines, Philippe; Evrard, Frédéric; Peeters, André; Jamart, Jacques; Vandermeeren, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Motor skill learning is one of the key components of motor function recovery after stroke, especially recovery driven by neurorehabilitation. Transcranial direct current stimulation can enhance neurorehabilitation and motor skill learning in stroke patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the retention of stimulation-enhanced motor skill learning involving a paretic upper limb have not been resolved. These neural substrates were explored by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Nineteen chronic hemiparetic stroke patients participated in a double-blind, cross-over randomized, sham-controlled experiment with two series. Each series consisted of two sessions: (i) an intervention session during which dual transcranial direct current stimulation or sham was applied during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb; and (ii) an imaging session 1 week later, during which the patients performed the learned motor skill. The motor skill learning task, called the 'circuit game', involves a speed/accuracy trade-off and consists of moving a pointer controlled by a computer mouse along a complex circuit as quickly and accurately as possible. Relative to the sham series, dual transcranial direct current stimulation applied bilaterally over the primary motor cortex during motor skill learning with the paretic upper limb resulted in (i) enhanced online motor skill learning; (ii) enhanced 1-week retention; and (iii) superior transfer of performance improvement to an untrained task. The 1-week retention's enhancement driven by the intervention was associated with a trend towards normalization of the brain activation pattern during performance of the learned motor skill relative to the sham series. A similar trend towards normalization relative to sham was observed during performance of a simple, untrained task without a speed/accuracy constraint, despite a lack of behavioural difference between the dual transcranial direct current stimulation and sham

  8. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Gillihan, Seth J.; Detre, John A.; Martha J Farah; Rao, Hengyi

    2011-01-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of...

  9. Do political and economic choices rely on common neural substrates? A systematic review of the emerging neuropolitics literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekoul eKrastev

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The methods of cognitive neuroscience are beginning to be applied to the study of political behavior. The neural substrates of value-based decision-making have been extensively examined in economic contexts; this might provide a powerful starting point for understanding political decision-making. Here, we asked to what extent the neuropolitics literature to date has used conceptual frameworks and experimental designs that make contact with the reward-related approaches that have dominated decision neuroscience. We then asked whether the studies of political behavior that can be considered in this light implicate the brain regions that have been associated with subjective value related to economic rewards. We performed a systematic literature review to identify papers addressing the neural substrates of political behavior and extracted the fMRI studies reporting behavioral measures of subjective value as defined in decision neuroscience studies of reward. A minority of neuropolitics studies met these criteria and relatively few brain activation foci from these studies overlapped with regions where activity has been related to subjective value. These findings show modest influence of reward-focused decision neuroscience on neuropolitics research to date. Whether the neural substrates of subjective value identified in economic choice paradigms generalize to political choice thus remains an open question. We argue that systematically addressing the commonalities and differences in these two classes of value-based choice will be important in developing a more comprehensive model of the brain basis of human decision-making.

  10. Slowing gait and risk for cognitive impairment: The hippocampus as a shared neural substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Andrea L; Verghese, Joe; Metti, Andrea L; Boudreau, Robert M; Aizenstein, Howard J; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Harris, Tamara; Yaffe, Kristine; Satterfield, Suzanne; Studenski, Stephanie; Rosano, Caterina

    2017-07-25

    To identify the shared neuroimaging signature of gait slowing and cognitive impairment. We assessed a cohort of older adults (n = 175, mean age 73 years, 57% female, 65% white) with repeated measures of gait speed over 14 years, MRI for gray matter volume (GMV) at year 10 or 11, and adjudicated cognitive status at year 14. Gait slowing was calculated by bayesian slopes corrected for intercepts, with higher values indicating faster decline. GMV was normalized to intracranial volume, with lower values indicating greater atrophy for 10 regions of interest (hippocampus, anterior and posterior cingulate, primary and supplementary motor cortices, posterior parietal lobe, middle frontal lobe, caudate, putamen, pallidum). Nonparametric correlations adjusted for demographics, comorbidities, muscle strength, and knee pain assessed associations of time to walk with GMV. Logistic regression models calculated odds ratios (ORs) of gait slowing with dementia or mild cognitive impairment with and without adjustment for GMV. Gait slowing was associated with cognitive impairment at year 14 (OR per 0.1 s/y slowing 1.47; 95% confidence interval 1.04-2.07). The right hippocampus was the only region that was related to both gait slowing (ρ = -0.16, p = 0.03) and cognitive impairment (OR 0.17, p = 0.009). Adjustment for right hippocampal volume attenuated the association of gait slowing with cognitive impairment by 23%. The association between gait slowing and cognitive impairment is supported by a shared neural substrate that includes a smaller right hippocampus. This finding underscores the value of long-term gait slowing as an early indicator of dementia risk. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Neural substrates of cognitive control under the belief of getting neurofeedback training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel eNinaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning to modulate one’s own brain activity is the fundament of neurofeedback (NF applications. Besides the neural networks directly involved in the generation and modulation of the neurophysiological parameter being specifically trained, more general determinants of NF efficacy such as self-referential processes and cognitive control have been frequently disregarded. Nonetheless, deeper insight into these cognitive mechanisms and their neuronal underpinnings sheds light on various open NF related questions concerning individual differences, brain-computer interface (BCI illiteracy as well as a more general model of NF learning. In this context, we investigated the neuronal substrate of these more general regulatory mechanisms that are engaged when participants believe that they are receiving NF. Twenty healthy participants (40-63 years, 10 female performed a sham NF paradigm during fMRI scanning. All participants were novices to NF-experiments and were instructed to voluntarily modulate their own brain activity based on a visual display of moving color bars. However, the bar depicted a recording and not the actual brain activity of participants. Reports collected at the end of the experiment indicate that participants were unaware of the sham feedback. In comparison to a passive watching condition, bilateral insula, anterior cingulate cortex and supplementary motor and dorsomedial and lateral prefrontal area were activated when participants actively tried to control the bar. In contrast, when merely watching moving bars, increased activation in the left angular gyrus was observed. These results show that the intention to control a moving bar is sufficient to engage a broad frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular network involved in cognitive control. The results of the present study indicate that tasks such as those generally employed in NF training recruit the neuronal correlates of cognitive control even when only sham NF is presented.

  12. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kikuro eFukushima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioural evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioural responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go or not pursue (no-go according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST, supplementary eye fields (SEF, caudal frontal eye fields (FEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI-VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN, and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease, the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  13. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kikuro; Fukushima, Junko; Warabi, Tateo; Barnes, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioral evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioral responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go) or not pursue (no-go) according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST), supplementary eye fields (SEF), caudal frontal eye fields (FEF), cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI-VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN), and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  14. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kikuro; Fukushima, Junko; Warabi, Tateo; Barnes, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioral evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioral responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go) or not pursue (no-go) according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST), supplementary eye fields (SEF), caudal frontal eye fields (FEF), cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI–VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN), and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  15. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Singh, A. K.

    2016-07-01

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagnetic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal mass ejection (CME) and related interplanetary (IP) events. IP inputs were considered within a 5-day time window after the commencement of storm. The artificial neural network (ANN) model training, testing and validation datasets were constructed based on 110 halo CMEs (both full and partial halo and their properties) observed during the ascending phase of the 24th solar cycle between 2009 and 2014. The geomagnetic storm occurrence rate from halo CMEs is estimated at a probability of 79%, by this model.

  16. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  17. Mapping Common Aphasia Assessments to Underlying Cognitive Processes and Their Neural Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Elizabeth H; Skipper-Kallal, Laura M; Xing, Shihui; Fama, Mackenzie E; Turkeltaub, Peter E

    2017-05-01

    Understanding the relationships between clinical tests, the processes they measure, and the brain networks underlying them, is critical in order for clinicians to move beyond aphasia syndrome classification toward specification of individual language process impairments. To understand the cognitive, language, and neuroanatomical factors underlying scores of commonly used aphasia tests. Twenty-five behavioral tests were administered to a group of 38 chronic left hemisphere stroke survivors and a high-resolution magnetic resonance image was obtained. Test scores were entered into a principal components analysis to extract the latent variables (factors) measured by the tests. Multivariate lesion-symptom mapping was used to localize lesions associated with the factor scores. The principal components analysis yielded 4 dissociable factors, which we labeled Word Finding/Fluency, Comprehension, Phonology/Working Memory Capacity, and Executive Function. While many tests loaded onto the factors in predictable ways, some relied heavily on factors not commonly associated with the tests. Lesion symptom mapping demonstrated discrete brain structures associated with each factor, including frontal, temporal, and parietal areas extending beyond the classical language network. Specific functions mapped onto brain anatomy largely in correspondence with modern neural models of language processing. An extensive clinical aphasia assessment identifies 4 independent language functions, relying on discrete parts of the left middle cerebral artery territory. A better understanding of the processes underlying cognitive tests and the link between lesion and behavior may lead to improved aphasia diagnosis, and may yield treatments better targeted to an individual's specific pattern of deficits and preserved abilities.

  18. Neural substrates of individual differences in human fear learning: evidence from concurrent fMRI, fear-potentiated startle, and US-expectancy data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Well, S.; Visser, R.M.; Scholte, H.S.; Kindt, M.

    2012-01-01

    To provide insight into individual differences in fear learning, we examined the emotional and cognitive expressions of discriminative fear conditioning in direct relation to its neural substrates. Contrary to previous behavioral-neural (fMRI) research on fear learning—in which the emotional

  19. Development of Energy-Efficient Cryogenic Leads with High Temperature Superconducting Films on Ceramic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, A. V.; Fedoseev, S. A.; Shcherbakova, O. V.; Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Zhou, S.; Dou, S. X.; Webber, R. J.; Mukhanov, O. A.; Yamashita, T.; Taylor, R.

    High temperature superconductor (HTS) material can be used for the implementation of high-speed low-heat conduction data links to transport digital data from 4 K superconductor integrated circuits to higher-temperature parts of computing systems. In this work, we present a conceptual design of energy efficient interface and results in fabricating such HTS leads. Initial calculations have shown that the microstrip line cable geometry for typical materials employed in production of HTS thin films can be a two-layered film for which the two layers of about 10 cm long are separated by an insulation layer with as low permittivity as possible. With this architecture in mind, the pulsed laser deposition process has been designed in a 45 cm diameter vacuum chamber to incorporate an oscillating sample holder with homogeneous substrate heating up to 900°C, while the laser plume is fixed. This design has allowed us to produce 200 nm to 500 nm thick, 7 cm to 10 cm long YBa2Cu3O7 thin films with the homogeneous critical temperature (Tc) of about 90 K. The critical current density (Jc) of the short samples obtained from the long sample is of (2 ± 1) × 1010 A/m2. Lines of 3-100 μm wide have been successfully patterned along the length of the samples in order to directly measure the Tc and Jc values over the entire length of the samples, as well as to attempt the structuring of multichannel data lead prototype.

  20. Flexible lead sulfide colloidal quantum dot photodetector using pencil graphite electrodes on paper substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jungang [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Luo, Miao; Hu, Long [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Zhou, Yongli [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Jiang, Shenglin, E-mail: jsl@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Song, Haisheng; Ye, Rui; Chen, Jie; Gao, Liang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Tang, Jiang, E-mail: jtang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics (WNLO), Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1037 Luoyu Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Flexible PbS colloidal quantum dot photoconductive photodetector is presented. • High device detectivity of 1 × 10{sup 10} Jones is obtained. • 4B pencil drawn electrodes was employed as the Ohmic contact. • Au nanocrystals were incorporated to improve device performance. - Abstract: Photoconductive photodetector fabricated from lead sulfide (PbS) colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) has demonstrated extremely high sensitivity and detectivity, in addition to their low-cost solution process. In this report we presented an extremely low-cost and flexible PbS photodetector using stone paper as the substrates and pencil drawn graphite as the electrodes. Single crystalline PbS CQDs and Au nanocrystals (NCs) with diameter of 3.2 nm and 7.5 nm were synthesized from the hot injection method. Layer-by-layer spin-coating was applied to construct the absorbing layer. By applying cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) for the treatment and incorporating Au NCs into PbS CQD film, we have successfully built a fast and flexible device with detectivity up to 1.1 × 10{sup 10} Jones and 3 dB bandwidth of 61.2 Hz. Our flexible CQD photodetector might find its application in next generation flexible optoelectronic device.

  1. Culture-sensitive neural substrates of human cognition: a transcultural neuroimaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shihui; Northoff, Georg

    2008-08-01

    Our brains and minds are shaped by our experiences, which mainly occur in the context of the culture in which we develop and live. Although psychologists have provided abundant evidence for diversity of human cognition and behaviour across cultures, the question of whether the neural correlates of human cognition are also culture-dependent is often not considered by neuroscientists. However, recent transcultural neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that one's cultural background can influence the neural activity that underlies both high- and low-level cognitive functions. The findings provide a novel approach by which to distinguish culture-sensitive from culture-invariant neural mechanisms of human cognition.

  2. Low Substrate Loading Limits Methanogenesis and Leads to High Coulombic Efficiency in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom H. J. A. Sleutels

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A crucial aspect for the application of bioelectrochemical systems (BESs as a wastewater treatment technology is the efficient oxidation of complex substrates by the bioanode, which is reflected in high Coulombic efficiency (CE. To achieve high CE, it is essential to give a competitive advantage to electrogens over methanogens. Factors that affect CE in bioanodes are, amongst others, the type of wastewater, anode potential, substrate concentration and pH. In this paper, we focus on acetate as a substrate and analyze the competition between methanogens and electrogens from a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We reviewed experimental data from earlier studies and propose that low substrate loading in combination with a sufficiently high anode overpotential plays a key-role in achieving high CE. Low substrate loading is a proven strategy against methanogenic activity in large-scale reactors for sulfate reduction. The combination of low substrate loading with sufficiently high overpotential is essential because it results in favorable growth kinetics of electrogens compared to methanogens. To achieve high current density in combination with low substrate concentrations, it is essential to have a high specific anode surface area. New reactor designs with these features are essential for BESs to be successful in wastewater treatment in the future.

  3. Stress-protective neural circuits: not all roads lead through the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to an uncontrollable stressor elicits a constellation of physiological and behavioral sequel in laboratory rats that often reflect aspects of anxiety and other emotional disruptions. We review evidence suggesting that plasticity within the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is critical to the expression of uncontrollable stressor-induced anxiety. Specifically, after uncontrollable stressor exposure subsequent anxiogenic stimuli evoke greater 5-HT release in DRN terminal regions including the amygdala and striatum; and pharmacological blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT(2C) receptors in these regions prevents expression of stressor-induced anxiety. Importantly, the controllability of stress, the presence of safety signals, and a history of exercise mitigate the expression of stressor-induced anxiety. These stress-protective factors appear to involve distinct neural substrates; with stressor controllability requiring the medial prefrontal cortex, safety signals the insular cortex and exercise affecting the 5-HT system directly. Knowledge of the distinct yet converging mechanisms underlying these stress-protective factors could provide insight into novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  4. Tai Chi and meditation-plus-exercise benefit neural substrates of executive function: a cross-sectional, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkes, Teresa D; Manselle, Wayne; Woollacott, Marjorie H

    2014-12-01

    We report the first controlled study of Tai Chi effects on the P300 event-related potential, a neuroelectric index of human executive function. Tai Chi is a form of exercise and moving meditation. Exercise and meditation have been associated with enhanced executive function. This cross-sectional, controlled study utilized the P300 event-related potential (ERP) to compare executive network neural function between self-selected long-term Tai Chi, meditation, aerobic fitness, and sedentary groups. We hypothesized that because Tai Chi requires moderate aerobic and mental exertion, this group would show similar or better executive neural function compared to meditation and aerobic exercise groups. We predicted all health training groups would outperform sedentary controls. Fifty-four volunteers (Tai Chi, n=10; meditation, n=16; aerobic exercise, n=16; sedentary, n=12) were tested with the Rockport 1-mile walk (estimated VO2 Max), a well-validated measure of aerobic capacity, and an ecologically valid visuo-spatial, randomized, alternating runs Task Switch test during dense-array electroencephalographic (EEG) recording. Only Tai Chi and meditation plus exercise groups demonstrated larger P3b ERP switch trial amplitudes compared to sedentary controls. Our results suggest long-term Tai Chi practice, and meditation plus exercise may benefit the neural substrates of executive function.

  5. Absolute Pitch and Synesthesia: Two Sides of the Same Coin? Shared and Distinct Neural Substrates of Music Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche; Zamm, Anna; Schlaug, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    People with Absolute Pitch can categorize musical pitches without a reference, whereas people with tone-color synesthesia can see colors when hearing music. Both of these special populations perceive music in an above-normal manner. In this study we asked whether AP possessors and tone-color synesthetes might recruit specialized neural mechanisms during music listening. Furthermore, we tested the degree to which neural substrates recruited for music listening may be shared between these special populations. AP possessors, tone-color synesthetes, and matched controls rated the perceived arousal levels of musical excerpts in a sparse-sampled fMRI study. Both APs and synesthetes showed enhanced superior temporal gyrus (STG, secondary auditory cortex) activation relative to controls during music listening, with left-lateralized enhancement in the APs and right-lateralized enhancement in the synesthetes. When listening to highly arousing excerpts, AP possessors showed additional activation in the left STG whereas synesthetes showed enhanced activity in the bilateral lingual gyrus and inferior temporal gyrus (late visual areas). Results support both shared and distinct neural enhancements in AP and synesthesia: common enhancements in early cortical mechanisms of perceptual analysis, followed by relative specialization in later association and categorization processes that support the unique behaviors of these special populations during music listening. PMID:23508195

  6. Distinct neural substrates of visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning as assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhencai; De Beuckelaer, Alain; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jia

    2017-11-24

    Recent studies revealed spontaneous neural activity to be associated with fluid intelligence (gF) which is commonly assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices, and embeds two types of reasoning: visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning. With resting-state fMRI data, using global brain connectivity (GBC) analysis which averages functional connectivity of a voxel in relation to all other voxels in the brain, distinct neural correlates of these two reasoning types were found. For visuospatial reasoning, negative correlations were observed in both the primary visual cortex (PVC) and the precuneus, and positive correlations were observed in the temporal lobe. For verbal-analytic reasoning, negative correlations were observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and temporoparietal junction, and positive correlations were observed in the angular gyrus. Furthermore, an interaction between GBC value and type of reasoning was found in the PVC, rIFG and the temporal lobe. These findings suggest that visuospatial reasoning benefits more from elaborate perception to stimulus features, whereas verbal-analytic reasoning benefits more from feature integration and hypothesis testing. In sum, the present study offers, for different types of reasoning in gF, first empirical evidence of separate neural substrates in the resting brain.

  7. Defective ALK5 signaling in the neural crest leads to increased postmigratory neural crest cell apoptosis and severe outflow tract defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucov Henry M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cardiovascular diseases are the most common form of birth defects in humans. A substantial portion of these defects has been associated with inappropriate induction, migration, differentiation and patterning of pluripotent cardiac neural crest stem cells. While TGF-β-superfamily signaling has been strongly implicated in neural crest cell development, the detailed molecular signaling mechanisms in vivo are still poorly understood. Results We deleted the TGF-β type I receptor Alk5 specifically in the mouse neural crest cell lineage. Failure in signaling via ALK5 leads to severe cardiovascular and pharyngeal defects, including inappropriate remodeling of pharyngeal arch arteries, abnormal aortic sac development, failure in pharyngeal organ migration and persistent truncus arteriosus. While ALK5 is not required for neural crest cell migration, our results demonstrate that it plays an important role in the survival of post-migratory cardiac neural crest cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ALK5-mediated signaling in neural crest cells plays an essential cell-autonomous role in the pharyngeal and cardiac outflow tract development.

  8. Identification of phosphorylation sites in protein kinase A substrates using artificial neural networks and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerrild, Majbrit; Stensballe, Allan; Rasmussen, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell regulation and identification of phosphorylation sites is important for understanding their functional significance. Here, we present an artificial neural network algorithm: NetPhosK (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPhosK/) that predicts protein...

  9. Substrate effects on photoluminescence and low temperature phase transition of methylammonium lead iodide hybrid perovskite thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaee, S. A.; Harriman, T. A.; Han, G. S.; Lee, J.-K.; Lucca, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the effects of substrates on the low temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectra and phase transition in methylammonium lead iodide hybrid perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) thin films. Structural characterization at room temperature with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy indicated that while the chemical structure of films deposited on glass and quartz was similar, the glass substrate induced strain in the perovskite films and suppressed the grain growth. The luminescence response and phase transition of the perovskite thin films were studied by PL spectroscopy. The induced strain was found to affect both the room temperature and low temperature PL spectra of the hybrid perovskite films. In addition, it was found that the effects of the glass substrate inhibited a tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition such that it occurred at lower temperatures.

  10. Ferroelectric properties of lead-free polycrystalline CaBi2Nb2O9 thin films on glass substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yoonho; Jang, Joonkyung; Son, Jong Yeog

    2016-03-01

    CaBi2Nb2O9 (CBNO) thin film, a lead-free ferroelectric material, was prepared on a Pt/Ta/glass substrate via pulsed laser deposition. The Ta film was deposited on the glass substrate for a buffer layer. A (115) preferred orientation of the polycrystalline CBNO thin film was verified via X-ray diffraction measurements. The CBNO thin film on a glass substrate exhibited good ferroelectric properties with a remnant polarization of 4.8 μC/cm2 (2Pr ˜9.6 μC/cm2), although it had lower polarization than the epitaxially c-oriented CBNO thin film reported previously. A mosaic-like ferroelectric domain structure was observed via piezoresponse force microscopy. Significantly, the polycrystalline CBNO thin film showed much faster switching behavior within about 100 ns than that of the epitaxially c-oriented CBNO thin film.

  11. Tuning of large piezoelectric response in nanosheet-buffered lead zirconate titanate films on glass substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chopra, A.; Bayraktar, Muharrem; Nijland, Maarten; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bijkerk, Frederik; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Renewed interest has been witnessed in utilizing the piezoelectric response of PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 (PZT) films on glass substrates for applications such as adaptive optics. Accordingly, new methodologies are being explored to grow well-oriented PZT thin films to harvest a large piezoelectric response.

  12. Artificial Neural Network Models for Long Lead Streamflow Forecasts using Climate Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, J.; Devineni, N.

    2007-12-01

    Information on season ahead stream flow forecasts is very beneficial for the operation and management of water supply systems. Daily streamflow conditions at any particular reservoir primarily depend on atmospheric and land surface conditions including the soil moisture and snow pack. On the other hand recent studies suggest that developing long lead streamflow forecasts (3 months ahead) typically depends on exogenous climatic conditions particularly Sea Surface Temperature conditions (SST) in the tropical oceans. Examples of some oceanic variables are El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). Identification of such conditions that influence the moisture transport into a given basin poses many challenges given the nonlinear dependency between the predictors (SST) and predictand (stream flows). In this study, we apply both linear and nonlinear dependency measures to identify the predictors that influence the winter flows into the Neuse basin. The predictor identification approach here adopted uses simple correlation coefficients to spearman rank correlation measures for detecting nonlinear dependency. All these dependency measures are employed with a lag 3 time series of the high flow season (January - February - March) using 75 years (1928-2002) of stream flows recorded in to the Falls Lake, Neuse River Basin. Developing streamflow forecasts contingent on these exogenous predictors will play an important role towards improved water supply planning and management. Recently, the soft computing techniques, such as artificial neural networks (ANNs) have provided an alternative method to solve complex problems efficiently. ANNs are data driven models which trains on the examples given to it. The ANNs functions as universal approximators and are non linear in nature. This paper presents a study aiming towards using climatic predictors for 3 month lead time streamflow forecast. ANN models representing the physical process of the system are

  13. Neural substrates of sexual desire in individuals with problematic hypersexual behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Woo eSeok

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the characteristics of individuals with hypersexual disorder have been accumulating due to increasing concerns about problematic hypersexual behavior (PHB. Currently, relatively little is known about the underlying behavioral and neural mechanisms of sexual desire. Our study aimed to investigate the neural correlates of sexual desire with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Twenty-three individuals with PHB and 22 age-matched healthy controls were scanned while they passively viewed sexual and nonsexual stimuli. The subjects’ levels of sexual desire were assessed in response to each sexual stimulus. Relative to controls, individuals with PHB experienced more frequent and enhanced sexual desire during exposure to sexual stimuli. Greater activation was observed in the caudate nucleus, inferior parietal lobe, dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the PHB group than in the control group. In addition, the hemodynamic patterns in the activated areas differed between the groups. Consistent with the findings of brain imaging studies of substance and behavior addiction, individuals with the behavioral characteristics of PHB and enhanced desire exhibited altered activation in the prefrontal cortex and subcortical regions. In conclusion, our results will help to characterize the behaviors and associated neural mechanisms of individuals with PHB.

  14. Neural substrates of defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Hilbert, Kevin; Stolyar, Veronika; Maslowski, Nina I; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Depending on threat proximity, different defensive behaviours are mediated by a descending neural network involving forebrain (distal threat) vs midbrain areas (proximal threat). Compared to healthy subjects, it can be assumed that phobics are characterized by shortened defensive distances on a behavioural and neural level. This study aimed at characterizing defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia [snake (SP) and dental phobics (DP)]. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), n = 39 subjects (13 healthy controls, HC; 13 SP; 13 DP) underwent an event-related fMRI task employing an anticipation (5-10 s) and immediate perception phase (phobic pictures and matched neutral stimuli; 1250 ms) to modulate defensive distance. Although no differential brain activity in any comparisons was observed in DP, areas associated with defensive behaviours (e.g. amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain) were activated in SP. Decreasing defensive distance in SP was characterized by a shift to midbrain activity. Present findings substantiate differences between phobia types in their physiological and neural organization that can be expanded to early stages of defensive behaviours. Findings may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamic organization of defensive reactivity in different types of phobic fear. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Female Songbirds: The unsung drivers of courtship behavior and its neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkes, Ammon; White, David; Wild, J Martin; Schmidt, Marc

    2017-12-10

    Songbirds hold a prominent role in the fields of neurobiology, evolution, and social behavior. Many of these fields have assumed that females lacked the ability to produce song and have therefore treated song as a male-specific behavior. Consequently, much of our understanding regarding the evolution and neural control of song behavior has been driven by these assumptions. Here we review literature from diverse fields to provide a broader perspective of the role of females in vocal communication and courtship. Recent evidence indicates that song evolved in both males and females and instances of female song are still common. The specialized neural circuit known as the "song system," which is necessary for singing in males, is also present in females, including those that do not sing, implying broader functions that include evaluating male song and controlling courtship behavior. In addition to having flexible, individualized preferences, females actively shape their social network through their interactions with males, females, and juveniles. We suggest that by developing more accurate hypotheses concerning the role of females we may better understand the evolution and neural mechanisms of song production and courtship behavior. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Is avoiding an aversive outcome rewarding? Neural substrates of avoidance learning in the human brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hackjin Kim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Avoidance learning poses a challenge for reinforcement-based theories of instrumental conditioning, because once an aversive outcome is successfully avoided an individual may no longer experience extrinsic reinforcement for their behavior. One possible account for this is to propose that avoiding an aversive outcome is in itself a reward, and thus avoidance behavior is positively reinforced on each trial when the aversive outcome is successfully avoided. In the present study we aimed to test this possibility by determining whether avoidance of an aversive outcome recruits the same neural circuitry as that elicited by a reward itself. We scanned 16 human participants with functional MRI while they performed an instrumental choice task, in which on each trial they chose from one of two actions in order to either win money or else avoid losing money. Neural activity in a region previously implicated in encoding stimulus reward value, the medial orbitofrontal cortex, was found to increase, not only following receipt of reward, but also following successful avoidance of an aversive outcome. This neural signal may itself act as an intrinsic reward, thereby serving to reinforce actions during instrumental avoidance.

  17. Neural substrates of child irritability in typically developing and psychiatric populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan B. Perlman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irritability is an aspect of the negative affectivity domain of temperament, but in severe and dysregulated forms is a symptom of a range of psychopathologies. Better understanding of the neural underpinnings of irritability, outside the context of specific disorders, can help to understand normative variation but also characterize its clinical salience in psychopathology diagnosis. This study assessed brain activation during reward and frustration, domains of behavioral deficits in childhood irritability. Children (age 6–9 presenting in mental health clinics for extreme and impairing irritability (n = 26 were compared to healthy children (n = 28. Using developmentally sensitive methods, neural activation was measured via a negative mood induction paradigm during fMRI scanning. The clinical group displayed more activation of the anterior cingulate and middle frontal gyrus during reward, but less activation during frustration, than healthy comparison children. The opposite pattern was found in the posterior cingulate. Further, in clinical subjects, parent report of irritability was dimensionally related to decreased activation of the anterior cingulate and striatum during frustration. The results of this study indicate neural dysfunction within brain regions related to reward processing, error monitoring, and emotion regulation underlying clinically impairing irritability. Results are discussed in the context of a growing field of neuroimaging research investigating irritable children.

  18. Effect of dopants on ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties of lead zirconate titanate thin films on Si substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Duc Minh; Trinh, Thong Q.; Dekkers, Jan M.; Houwman, Evert Pieter; Vu, Hung Ngoc; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3 (undoped PZT) and doped PZT thin films with thickness of about 500 nm were grown on Pt/Ti/SiO2/Si substrates by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). In this study, 1.0 mol% Nb-doping (at Zr/Ti site) as donor, 1.0 mol% Fe-doping (at Zr/Ti) as acceptor and 10 mol%

  19. The Racer’s Brain – How Domain Expertise is Reflected in the Neural Substrates of Driving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto eLappi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in human brain plasticity is how sensory, motor, and cognitive functions adapt in the process of skill acquisition extended over a period of many years. Recently, there has emerged a growing interest in cognitive neuroscience on studying the functional and structural differences in the brains of elite athletes. Elite performance in sports, music or the arts, allows us to observe sensorimotor and cognitive performance at the limits of human capability. In this mini-review we look at driving expertise. The emerging brain imaging literature on the neural substrates of real and simulated driving is reviewed (for the first time, and used as the context for interpreting recent findings on the differences between racing drivers and non-athlete controls. Also the cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience of expertise are discussed.

  20. The neural substrates of cognitive flexibility are related to individual differences in preschool irritability: A fNIRS investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwei; Grabell, Adam S; Wakschlag, Lauren S; Huppert, Theodore J; Perlman, Susan B

    2017-06-01

    Preschool (age 3-5) is a phase of rapid development in both cognition and emotion, making this a period in which the neurodevelopment of each domain is particularly sensitive to that of the other. During this period, children rapidly learn how to flexibly shift their attention between competing demands and, at the same time, acquire critical emotion regulation skills to respond to negative affective challenges. The integration of cognitive flexibility and individual differences in irritability may be an important developmental process of early childhood maturation. However, at present it is unclear if they share common neural substrates in early childhood. Our main goal was to examine the neural correlates of cognitive flexibility in preschool children and test for associations with irritability. Forty-six preschool aged children completed a novel, child-appropriate, Stroop task while dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) activation was recorded using functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS). Parents rated their child's irritability. Results indicated that left DLPFC activation was associated with cognitive flexibility and positively correlated with irritability. Right DLPFC activation was also positively correlated with irritability. Results suggest the entwined nature of cognitive and emotional neurodevelopment during a developmental period of rapid and mutual acceleration. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The neural substrates of cognitive flexibility are related to individual differences in preschool irritability: A fNIRS investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Preschool (age 3–5 is a phase of rapid development in both cognition and emotion, making this a period in which the neurodevelopment of each domain is particularly sensitive to that of the other. During this period, children rapidly learn how to flexibly shift their attention between competing demands and, at the same time, acquire critical emotion regulation skills to respond to negative affective challenges. The integration of cognitive flexibility and individual differences in irritability may be an important developmental process of early childhood maturation. However, at present it is unclear if they share common neural substrates in early childhood. Our main goal was to examine the neural correlates of cognitive flexibility in preschool children and test for associations with irritability. Forty-six preschool aged children completed a novel, child-appropriate, Stroop task while dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC activation was recorded using functional Near Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS. Parents rated their child’s irritability. Results indicated that left DLPFC activation was associated with cognitive flexibility and positively correlated with irritability. Right DLPFC activation was also positively correlated with irritability. Results suggest the entwined nature of cognitive and emotional neurodevelopment during a developmental period of rapid and mutual acceleration.

  2. Neural Substrate of Group Mental Health: Insights from Multi-Brain Reference Frame in Functional Neuroimaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Ray

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary mental health practice primarily centers around the neurobiological and psychological processes at the individual level. However, a more careful consideration of interpersonal and other group-level attributes (e.g., interpersonal relationship, mutual trust/hostility, interdependence, and cooperation and a better grasp of their pathology can add a crucial dimension to our understanding of mental health problems. A few recent studies have delved into the interpersonal behavioral processes in the context of different psychiatric abnormalities. Neuroimaging can supplement these approaches by providing insight into the neurobiology of interpersonal functioning. Keeping this view in mind, we discuss a recently developed approach in functional neuroimaging that calls for a shift from a focus on neural information contained within brain space to a multi-brain framework exploring degree of similarity/dissimilarity of neural signals between multiple interacting brains. We hypothesize novel applications of quantitative neuroimaging markers like inter-subject correlation that might be able to evaluate the role of interpersonal attributes affecting an individual or a group. Empirical evidences of the usage of these markers in understanding the neurobiology of social interactions are provided to argue for their application in future mental health research.

  3. An investigation of the neural substrates of mind wandering induced by viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Mo, Lei; Vartanian, Oshin; Cant, Jonathan S.; Cupchik, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether the calming effect induced by viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings would make disengagement from that mental state more difficult, as measured by performance on a cognitive control task. In Experiment 1 we examined the subjective experience of viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings vs. realistic oil landscape paintings in a behavioral study. Our results confirmed that, as predicted, traditional Chinese landscape paintings induce greater levels of relaxation and mind wandering and lower levels of object-oriented absorption and recognition, compared to realistic oil landscape paintings. In Experiment 2 we used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging to explore the behavioral and neural effects of viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings on a task requiring cognitive control (i.e., the flanker task)—administered immediately following exposure to paintings. Contrary to our prediction, the behavioral data demonstrated that compared to realistic oil landscape paintings, exposure to traditional Chinese landscape paintings had no effect on performance on the flanker task. However, the neural data demonstrated an interaction effect such that there was greater activation in the inferior parietal cortex and the superior frontal gyrus on incongruent compared with congruent flanker trials when participants switched from viewing traditional Chinese landscape paintings to the flanker task than when they switched from realistic oil landscape paintings. These results suggest that switching from traditional Chinese landscape paintings placed greater demands on the brain’s attention and working memory networks during the flanker task than did switching from realistic oil landscape paintings. PMID:25610386

  4. Neural substrates of reliability-weighted visual-tactile multisensory integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Beauchamp

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available As sensory systems deteriorate in aging or disease, the brain must relearn the appropriate weights to assign each modality during multisensory integration. Using blood-oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI of human subjects, we tested a model for the neural mechanisms of sensory weighting, termed “weighted connections”. This model holds that the connection weights between early and late areas vary depending on the reliability of the modality, independent of the level of early sensory cortex activity. When subjects detected viewed and felt touches to the hand, a network of brain areas was active, including visual areas in lateral occipital cortex, somatosensory areas in inferior parietal lobe, and multisensory areas in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS. In agreement with the weighted connection model, the connection weight measured with structural equation modeling between somatosensory cortex and IPS increased for somatosensory-reliable stimuli, and the connection weight between visual cortex and IPS increased for visual-reliable stimuli. This double dissociation of connection strengths was similar to the pattern of behavioral responses during incongruent multisensory stimulation, suggesting that weighted connections may be a neural mechanism for behavioral reliability weighting.for behavioral reliability weighting.

  5. The motivation and pleasure dimension of negative symptoms: neural substrates and behavioral outputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Ann M; Barch, Deanna M

    2014-05-01

    A range of emotional and motivation impairments have long been clinically documented in people with schizophrenia, and there has been a resurgence of interest in understanding the psychological and neural mechanisms of the so-called "negative symptoms" in schizophrenia, given their lack of treatment responsiveness and their role in constraining function and life satisfaction in this illness. Negative symptoms comprise two domains, with the first covering diminished motivation and pleasure across a range of life domains and the second covering diminished verbal and non-verbal expression and communicative output. In this review, we focus on four aspects of the motivation/pleasure domain, providing a brief review of the behavioral and neural underpinnings of this domain. First, we cover liking or in-the-moment pleasure: immediate responses to pleasurable stimuli. Second, we cover anticipatory pleasure or wanting, which involves prediction of a forthcoming enjoyable outcome (reward) and feeling pleasure in anticipation of that outcome. Third, we address motivation, which comprises effort computation, which involves figuring out how much effort is needed to achieve a desired outcome, planning, and behavioral response. Finally, we cover the maintenance emotional states and behavioral responses. Throughout, we consider the behavioral manifestations and brain representations of these four aspects of motivation/pleasure deficits in schizophrenia. We conclude with directions for future research as well as implications for treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Money talks: neural substrate of modulation of fairness by monetary incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yun; Rao, Li-Lin; Yang, Liu-Qing; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    A unique feature of the human species is compliance with social norms, e.g., fairness, even though this normative decision means curbing self-interest. However, sometimes people prefer to pursue wealth at the expense of moral goodness. Specifically, deviations from a fairness-related normative choice have been observed in the presence of a high monetary incentive. The neural mechanism underlying this deviation from the fairness-related normative choice has yet to be determined. In order to address this issue, using functional magnetic resonance imaging we employed an ultimatum game (UG) paradigm in which fairness and a proposed monetary amount were orthogonally varied. We found evidence for a significant modulation by the proposed amount on fairness in the right lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the bilateral insular cortices. Additionally, the insular subregions showed dissociable modulation patterns. Inter-individual differences in the modulation effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) accounted for inter-individual differences in the behavioral modulation effect as measured by the rejection rate, supporting the concept that the PFC plays a critical role in making fairness-related normative decisions in a social interaction condition. Our findings provide neural evidence for the modulation of fairness by monetary incentives as well as accounting for inter-individual differences.

  7. Neural substrates of risky decision making in individuals with Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seok, Ji-Woo; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Sohn, Sunju; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2015-10-01

    With the wide and rapid expansion of computers and smartphones, Internet use has become an essential part of life and an important tool that serves various purposes. Despite the advantages of Internet use, psychological and behavioral problems, including Internet addiction, have been reported. In response to growing concern, researchers have focused on the characteristics of Internet addicts. However, relatively little is known about the behavioral and neural mechanisms that underlie Internet addiction, especially with respect to risky decision making, which is an important domain frequently reported in other types of addictions. To examine the neural characteristics of decision making in Internet addicts, Internet addicts and healthy controls were scanned while they performed a financial decision-making task. Relative to healthy controls, Internet addicts showed (1) more frequent risky decision making; (2) greater activation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the left caudate nucleus, which are brain regions involved in conflict monitoring and reward, respectively; and (3) less activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, an area associated with cognitive control/regulation. These findings suggest that risky decision making may be an important behavioral characteristic of Internet addiction and that altered brain function in regions associated with conflict monitoring, reward and cognitive control/regulation might be critical biological risk factors for Internet addiction. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  8. Neural substrates in color processing: a comparison between painting majors and non-majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Zhiying; Peng, Danling; Chen, Kewei; Jin, Zhen; Yao, Li

    2011-01-07

    Although several studies provide evidence of differences in the neural mechanisms of art professionals and non-professionals, little is known about the neural mechanism differences between painting professionals/majors and non-professionals/non-majors during color processing. For the first time, we compared functional activation patterns, functional connectivity during both color naming and passive color viewing, and gray-matter density in 12 painting majors and 12 controls through both functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Inter-group comparisons revealed that the painting majors showed more activation in the color selective areas and increased correlation between left V4 and the left ventral lateral prefrontal cortex during color naming. In contrast, the controls exhibited stronger activity in the Broca's area during color naming. Moreover, increased gray matter density in the left V4 complex was found when the painting majors were compared to the controls. This study demonstrates that the left V4 complex shows both functional and structural differences between painting majors and non-majors. In addition, the results suggest the reorganization of the brain circuit underlying lexical retrieval during color naming in the anterior regions of the painting major group. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of enzyme activity with neural network models based on electronic and geometrical features of substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaleniec, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are introduced as robust and versatile tools in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. Their application to the modeling of enzyme reactivity is discussed, along with methodological issues. Methods of input variable selection, optimization of network internal structure, data set division and model validation are discussed. The application of ANNs in the modeling of enzyme activity over the last 20 years is briefly recounted. The discussed methodology is exemplified by the case of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase (EBDH). Intelligent Problem Solver and genetic algorithms are applied for input vector selection, whereas k-means clustering is used to partition the data into training and test cases. The obtained models exhibit high correlation between the predicted and experimental values (R(2) > 0.9). Sensitivity analyses and study of the response curves are used as tools for the physicochemical interpretation of the models in terms of the EBDH reaction mechanism. Neural networks are shown to be a versatile tool for the construction of robust QSAR models that can be applied to a range of aspects important in drug design and the prediction of biological activity.

  10. Neural substrates of figurative language during natural speech perception: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Arne; Kauschke, Christina; Schrauf, Judith; Whitney, Carin; Straube, Benjamin; Kircher, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    Many figurative expressions are fully conventionalized in everyday speech. Regarding the neural basis of figurative language processing, research has predominantly focused on metaphoric expressions in minimal semantic context. It remains unclear in how far metaphoric expressions during continuous text comprehension activate similar neural networks as isolated metaphors. We therefore investigated the processing of similes (figurative language, e.g., "He smokes like a chimney!") occurring in a short story. Sixteen healthy, male, native German speakers listened to similes that came about naturally in a short story, while blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) responses were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). For the event-related analysis, similes were contrasted with non-figurative control sentences (CS). The stimuli differed with respect to figurativeness, while they were matched for frequency of words, number of syllables, plausibility, and comprehensibility. Similes contrasted with CS resulted in enhanced BOLD responses in the left inferior (IFG) and adjacent middle frontal gyrus. Concrete CS as compared to similes activated the bilateral middle temporal gyri as well as the right precuneus and the left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG). Activation of the left IFG for similes in a short story is consistent with results on single sentence metaphor processing. The findings strengthen the importance of the left inferior frontal region in the processing of abstract figurative speech during continuous, ecologically-valid speech comprehension; the processing of concrete semantic contents goes along with a down-regulation of bilateral temporal regions.

  11. Neural substrates of figurative language during natural speech perception: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne eNagels

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many figurative expressions are fully conventionalized in everyday speech. Regarding the neural basis of figurative language processing, research has predominantly focused on metaphoric expressions in minimal semantic context. It remains unclear in how far metaphoric expressions during continuous text comprehension activate similar neural networks as isolated metaphors. We therefore investigated the processing of similes (figurative language, e.g. He smokes like a chimney! occurring in a short story.Sixteen healthy, male, native German speakers listened to similes that came about naturally in a short story, while blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD responses were measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. For the event-related analysis, similes were contrasted with non-figurative control sentences. The stimuli differed with respect to figurativeness, while they were matched for frequency of words, number of syllables, plausibility and comprehensibility.Similes contrasted with control sentences resulted in enhanced BOLD responses in the left inferior (IFG and adjacent middle frontal gyrus. Concrete control sentences as compared to similes activated the bilateral middle temporal gyri as well as the right precuneus and the left middle frontal gyrus.Activation of the left IFG for similes in a short story is consistent with results on single sentence metaphor processing. The findings strengthen the importance of the left inferior frontal region in the processing of abstract figurative speech during continuous, ecologically-valid speech comprehension; the processing of concrete semantic contents goes along with a down-regulation of bilateral temporal regions.

  12. Money talks: Neural substrate of modulation of fairness by monetary incentives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan eZhou

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A unique feature of the human species is compliance with social norms, e.g., fairness, even though this normative decision means curbing self-interest. However, sometimes people prefer to pursue wealth at the expense of moral goodness. Specifically, deviations from a fairness-related normative choice have been observed in the presence of a high monetary incentive. The neural mechanism underlying this deviation from the fairness-related normative choice has yet to be determined. In order to address this issue, using functional magnetic resonance imaging we employed an ultimatum game paradigm in which fairness and a proposed monetary amount were orthogonally varied. We found evidence for a significant modulation by the proposed amount on fairness in the right lateral prefrontal cortex and the bilateral insular cortices. Additionally, the insular subregions showed dissociable modulation patterns. Inter-individual differences in the modulation effects in the left inferior frontal gyrus accounted for inter-individual differences in the behavioral modulation effect as measured by the rejection rate, supporting the concept that the prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in making fairness-related normative decisions in a social interaction condition. Our findings provide neural evidence for the modulation of fairness by monetary incentives as well as accounting for inter-individual differences.

  13. Neural substrates and behavioral profiles of romantic jealousy and its temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Yu, Hongbo; Chen, Jie; Liang, Jie; Lu, Lin; Zhou, Xiaolin; Shi, Jie

    2016-06-07

    Jealousy is not only a way of experiencing love but also a stabilizer of romantic relationships, although morbid romantic jealousy is maladaptive. Being engaged in a formal romantic relationship can tune one's romantic jealousy towards a specific target. Little is known about how the human brain processes romantic jealousy by now. Here, by combining scenario-based imagination and functional MRI, we investigated the behavioral and neural correlates of romantic jealousy and their development across stages (before vs. after being in a formal relationship). Romantic jealousy scenarios elicited activations primarily in the basal ganglia (BG) across stages, and were significantly higher after the relationship was established in both the behavioral rating and BG activation. The intensity of romantic jealousy was related to the intensity of romantic happiness, which mainly correlated with ventral medial prefrontal cortex activation. The increase in jealousy across stages was associated with the tendency for interpersonal aggression. These results bridge the gap between the theoretical conceptualization of romantic jealousy and its neural correlates and shed light on the dynamic changes in jealousy.

  14. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal

  15. Language aptitude for pronunciation in advanced second language (L2) learners: behavioural predictors and neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaochen; Ackermann, Hermann; Martin, Jason A; Erb, Michael; Winkler, Susanne; Reiterer, Susanne M

    2013-12-01

    Individual differences in second language (L2) aptitude have been assumed to depend upon a variety of cognitive and personality factors. Especially, the cognitive factor phonological working memory has been conceptualised as language learning device. However, strong associations between phonological working memory and L2 aptitude have been previously found in early-stage learners only, not in advanced learners. The current study aimed at investigating the behavioural and neurobiological predictors of advanced L2 learning. Our behavioural results showed that phonetic coding ability and empathy, but not phonological working memory, predict L2 pronunciation aptitude in advanced learners. Second, functional neuroimaging revealed this behavioural trait to be correlated with hemodynamic responses of the cerebral network of speech motor control and auditory-perceptual areas. We suggest that the acquisition of L2 pronunciation aptitude is a dynamic process, requiring a variety of neural resources at different processing stages over time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural Substrates of Processing Anger in Language: Contributions of Prosody and Semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelluccio, Brian C; Myers, Emily B; Schuh, Jillian M; Eigsti, Inge-Marie

    2016-12-01

    Emotions are conveyed primarily through two channels in language: semantics and prosody. While many studies confirm the role of a left hemisphere network in processing semantic emotion, there has been debate over the role of the right hemisphere in processing prosodic emotion. Some evidence suggests a preferential role for the right hemisphere, and other evidence supports a bilateral model. The relative contributions of semantics and prosody to the overall processing of affect in language are largely unexplored. The present work used functional magnetic resonance imaging to elucidate the neural bases of processing anger conveyed by prosody or semantic content. Results showed a robust, distributed, bilateral network for processing angry prosody and a more modest left hemisphere network for processing angry semantics when compared to emotionally neutral stimuli. Findings suggest the nervous system may be more responsive to prosodic cues in speech than to the semantic content of speech.

  17. Relationship between receptive vocabulary and the neural substrates for story processing in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, M Claire; Vannest, Jennifer; Maloney, Thomas C; Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Byars, Anna W; Holland, Scott K

    2015-03-01

    A left-lateralized fronto-temporo-parietal language network has been well-characterized in adults; however, the neural basis of this fundamental network has hardly been explored in the preschool years, despite this being a time for rapid language development and vocabulary growth. We examined the functional imaging correlates associated with vocabulary ability and narrative comprehension in 30 preschool children ages 3 to 5. Bilateral auditory cortex and superior temporal activation as well as left angular and supramarginal gyrus activation were observed during a passive listening-to-stories task. Boys showed greater activation than girls in the right anterior cingulate and right superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Finally, children with higher vocabulary scores showed increased grey matter left-lateralization and greater activation in bilateral thalamus, hippocampus, and left angular gyrus. This study is novel in its approach to relate left-hemisphere language regions and vocabulary scores in preschool-aged children using fMRI.

  18. Modeling the behavioral substrates of associate learning and memory - Adaptive neural models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chuen-Chien

    1991-01-01

    Three adaptive single-neuron models based on neural analogies of behavior modification episodes are proposed, which attempt to bridge the gap between psychology and neurophysiology. The proposed models capture the predictive nature of Pavlovian conditioning, which is essential to the theory of adaptive/learning systems. The models learn to anticipate the occurrence of a conditioned response before the presence of a reinforcing stimulus when training is complete. Furthermore, each model can find the most nonredundant and earliest predictor of reinforcement. The behavior of the models accounts for several aspects of basic animal learning phenomena in Pavlovian conditioning beyond previous related models. Computer simulations show how well the models fit empirical data from various animal learning paradigms.

  19. Commonalities and differences in the neural substrates of threat predictability in panic disorder and specific phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luisa Klahn

    2017-01-01

    Group independent neural activity in the right dlPFC increased with decreasing threat predictability. PD patients showed a sustained hyperactivation of the vmPFC under threat and safety conditions. The magnitude of hyperactivation was inversely correlated with PDs subjective arousal and anxiety sensitivity. Both PD and SP patients revealed decreased parietal processing of affective stimuli. Findings indicate overgeneralization between threat and safety conditions and increased need for emotion regulation via the vmPFC in PD, but not SP patients. Both anxiety disorders showed decreased activation in parietal networks possibly indicating attentional avoidance of affective stimuli. Present results complement findings from fear conditioning studies and underline overgeneralization of fear, particularly in PD.

  20. Neural substrates of interactive musical improvisation: an FMRI study of 'trading fours' in jazz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel F Donnay

    Full Text Available Interactive generative musical performance provides a suitable model for communication because, like natural linguistic discourse, it involves an exchange of ideas that is unpredictable, collaborative, and emergent. Here we show that interactive improvisation between two musicians is characterized by activation of perisylvian language areas linked to processing of syntactic elements in music, including inferior frontal gyrus and posterior superior temporal gyrus, and deactivation of angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus, brain structures directly implicated in semantic processing of language. These findings support the hypothesis that musical discourse engages language areas of the brain specialized for processing of syntax but in a manner that is not contingent upon semantic processing. Therefore, we argue that neural regions for syntactic processing are not domain-specific for language but instead may be domain-general for communication.

  1. Imaging a cognitive model of apraxia: the neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigneux, Philippe; Van der Linden, Martial; Garraux, Gaetan; Laureys, Steven; Degueldre, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Del Fiore, Guy; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, Andre; Salmon, Eric

    2004-03-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using H2 15O PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis of the visual analysis of gestures. First, we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture imitation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;33:63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to-be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A Cross-modal Investigation of the Neural Substrates for Ongoing Cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biyu J He

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available What neural mechanisms underlie the seamless flow of our waking consciousness? A necessary albeit insufficient condition for such neural mechanisms is that they should be consistently modulated across time were a segment of the conscious stream to be repeated twice. In this study, we experimentally manipulated the content of a story followed by subjects during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI independently from the modality of sensory input (as visual text or auditory speech as well as attentional focus. We then extracted brain activity patterns consistently modulated across subjects by the evolving content of the story regardless of whether it was presented visually or auditorily. Specifically, in one experiment we presented the same story to different subjects via either auditory or visual modality. In a second experiment, we presented two different stories simultaneously, one auditorily, one visually, and manipulated the subjects’ attentional focus. This experimental design allowed us to dissociate brain activities underlying modality-specific sensory processing from modality-independent story processing. We uncovered a network of brain regions consistently modulated by the evolving content of a story regardless of the sensory modality used for stimulus input, including the superior temporal sulcus/gyrus (STS/STG, the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC, the medial frontal cortex (MFC, the temporal pole (TP and the temporoparietal junction (TPJ. Many of these regions have previously been implicated in semantic processing. Interestingly, different stories elicited similar brain activity patterns, but with subtle differences potentially attributable to varying degrees of emotional valence and self-relevance.

  3. Neural substrates of motor and non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: a resting FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangsun Yoo

    Full Text Available Recently, non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD have been considered crucial factors in determining a patient's quality of life and have been proposed as the predominant features of the premotor phase. Researchers have investigated the relationship between non-motor symptoms and the motor laterality; however, this relationship remains disputed. This study investigated the neural connectivity correlates of non-motor and motor symptoms of PD with respect to motor laterality.Eight-seven patients with PD were recruited and classified into left-more-affected PD (n = 44 and right-more affected PD (n = 37 based on their MDS-UPDRS (Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor examination scores. The patients underwent MRI scanning, which included resting fMRI. Brain regions were labeled as ipsilateral and contralateral to the more-affected body side. Correlation analysis between the functional connectivity across brain regions and the scores of various symptoms was performed to identify the neural connectivity correlates of each symptom.The resting functional connectivity centered on the ipsilateral inferior orbito-frontal area was negatively correlated with the severity of non-motor symptoms, and the connectivity of the contralateral inferior parietal area was positively correlated with the severity of motor symptoms (p 0.3.These results suggest that the inferior orbito-frontal area may play a crucial role in non-motor dysfunctions, and that the connectivity information may be utilized as a neuroimaging biomarker for the early diagnosis of PD.

  4. Neural substrates of impulsive decision making modulated by modafinil in alcohol-dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaal, L; Goudriaan, A E; Joos, L; Dom, G; Pattij, T; van den Brink, W; Veltman, D J

    2014-10-01

    Impulsive decision making is a hallmark of frequently occurring addiction disorders including alcohol dependence (AD). Therefore, ameliorating impulsive decision making is a promising target for the treatment of AD. Previous studies have shown that modafinil enhances cognitive control functions in various psychiatric disorders. However, the effects of modafinil on delay discounting and its underlying neural correlates have not been investigated as yet. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of modafinil on neural correlates of impulsive decision making in abstinent AD patients and healthy control (HC) subjects. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects cross-over study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was conducted in 14 AD patients and 16 HC subjects. All subjects participated in two fMRI sessions in which they either received a single dose of placebo or 200 mg of modafinil 2 h before the session. During fMRI, subjects completed a delay-discounting task to measure impulsive decision making. Modafinil improved impulsive decision making in AD pateints, which was accompanied by enhanced recruitment of frontoparietal regions and reduced activation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Moreover, modafinil-induced enhancement of functional connectivity between the superior frontal gyrus and ventral striatum was specifically associated with improvement in impulsive decision making. These findings indicate that modafinil can improve impulsive decision making in AD patients through an enhanced coupling of prefrontal control regions and brain regions coding the subjective value of rewards. Therefore, the current study supports the implementation of modafinil in future clinical trials for AD.

  5. Effect of trace elements on the interface reactions between two lead-free solders and copper or nickel substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Sn-Pb solder alloys are being replaced, because of environmental and health concerns about lead toxicity. Among some alternative alloy systems, the Sn-Zn and Sn-Cu base alloy systems have been studied and reveal promising properties. The reliability of a solder joint is affected by the solder/substrate interaction and the nature of the layers formed at the interface. The solder/substrate reactions, for Sn-Zn and Sn-Cu base solder alloys, were evaluated in what concerns the morphology and chemical composition of the interface layers. The effect of the addition of P, at low levels, on the chemical composition of the layers present at the interface was studied. The phases formed at the interface between the Cu or Ni substrate and a molten lead-free solder at 250ºC, were studied for different stage times and alloy compositions. The melting temperatures, of the studied alloys, were determined by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. Identification of equilibrium phases formed at the interface layer, and the evaluation of their chemical composition were performed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDS. Different interface characteristics were obtained, namely for the alloys containing Zn. The obtained IML layer thickness was compared, for both types of alloy systems.

  6. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Sapp, Shawn; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-08-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this article, we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10-20 S/cm and loses 40 wt % after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) toward either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared with control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (±3%) without an observable directional preference, compared with the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pencil lead scratches on steel surfaces as a substrate for LIBS analysis of dissolved salts in liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jijon, D; Costa, C, E-mail: judijival@hotmail.com [Departamento de Fisica, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-256, Apartado 17-12-866, Quito (Ecuador)

    2011-01-01

    A new substrate for the quantitative analysis of salts dissolved in liquids with Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is introduced for the first time. A steel surface scratched with HB pencil lead is introduced as a very efficient and sensitive substrate for quantitative analysis of dissolved salts in liquids. In this work we demonstrate the analytical quality of this system with the analysis of the crystalline deposits formed by the dried aqueous solutions of salts. We focused on analytical parameters such as sensitivity and linearity for the salt cations in each case. Four salts were studied (Sr(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, LiSO{sub 4}, RbCl and BaCl), at nine different concentrations each. To improve linearity and lower the overall error in the calibration curves, we introduce a novel outlier removal method that takes into account the homogeneity of the dry deposits on the analytical surface.

  8. Determining the Neural Substrate for Encoding a Memory of Human Pain and the Influence of Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ming-Tsung; Kong, Yazhuo; Eippert, Falk; Tracey, Irene

    2017-12-06

    To convert a painful stimulus into a briefly maintainable construct when the painful stimulus is no longer accessible is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Because of the aversive nature of pain, this encoding process might be influenced by emotional aspects and could thus vary across individuals, but we have yet to understand both the basic underlying neural mechanisms as well as potential interindividual differences. Using fMRI in combination with a delayed-discrimination task in healthy volunteers of both sexes, we discovered that brain regions involved in this working memory encoding process were dissociable according to whether the to-be-remembered stimulus was painful or not, with the medial thalamus and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex encoding painful and the primary somatosensory cortex encoding nonpainful stimuli. Encoding of painful stimuli furthermore significantly enhanced functional connectivity between the thalamus and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). With regards to emotional aspects influencing encoding processes, we observed that more anxious participants showed significant performance advantages when encoding painful stimuli. Importantly, only during the encoding of pain, the interindividual differences in anxiety were associated with the strength of coupling between medial thalamus and mPFC, which was furthermore related to activity in the amygdala. These results indicate not only that there is a distinct signature for the encoding of a painful experience in humans, but also that this encoding process involves a strong affective component. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT To convert the sensation of pain into a briefly maintainable construct is essential to guide human behavior and avoid dangerous situations. Although this working memory encoding process is implicitly contained in the majority of studies, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. Using fMRI in a delayed-discrimination task, we found that the

  9. Using motor imagery to study the neural substrates of dynamic balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murielle Ursulla Ferraye

    Full Text Available This study examines the cerebral structures involved in dynamic balance using a motor imagery (MI protocol. We recorded cerebral activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects imagined swaying on a balance board along the sagittal plane to point a laser at target pairs of different sizes (small, large. We used a matched visual imagery (VI control task and recorded imagery durations during scanning. MI and VI durations were differentially influenced by the sway accuracy requirement, indicating that MI of balance is sensitive to the increased motor control necessary to point at a smaller target. Compared to VI, MI of dynamic balance recruited additional cortical and subcortical portions of the motor system, including frontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and mesencephalic locomotor region, the latter showing increased effective connectivity with the supplementary motor area. The regions involved in MI of dynamic balance were spatially distinct but contiguous to those involved in MI of gait (Bakker et al., 2008; Snijders et al., 2011; Crémers et al., 2012, in a pattern consistent with existing somatotopic maps of the trunk (for balance and legs (for gait. These findings validate a novel, quantitative approach for studying the neural control of balance in humans. This approach extends previous reports on MI of static stance (Jahn et al., 2004, 2008, and opens the way for studying gait and balance impairments in patients with neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. The neural substrate for binaural masking level differences in the auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Heather J; Shackleton, Trevor M; Krumbholz, Katrin; Palmer, Alan R

    2015-01-07

    The binaural masking level difference (BMLD) is a phenomenon whereby a signal that is identical at each ear (S0), masked by a noise that is identical at each ear (N0), can be made 12-15 dB more detectable by inverting the waveform of either the tone or noise at one ear (Sπ, Nπ). Single-cell responses to BMLD stimuli were measured in the primary auditory cortex of urethane-anesthetized guinea pigs. Firing rate was measured as a function of signal level of a 500 Hz pure tone masked by low-passed white noise. Responses were similar to those reported in the inferior colliculus. At low signal levels, the response was dominated by the masker. At higher signal levels, firing rate either increased or decreased. Detection thresholds for each neuron were determined using signal detection theory. Few neurons yielded measurable detection thresholds for all stimulus conditions, with a wide range in thresholds. However, across the entire population, the lowest thresholds were consistent with human psychophysical BMLDs. As in the inferior colliculus, the shape of the firing-rate versus signal-level functions depended on the neurons' selectivity for interaural time difference. Our results suggest that, in cortex, BMLD signals are detected from increases or decreases in the firing rate, consistent with predictions of cross-correlation models of binaural processing and that the psychophysical detection threshold is based on the lowest neural thresholds across the population. Copyright © 2015 Gilbert et al.

  11. The impact of iconic gestures on foreign language word learning and its neural substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Manuela; Müller, Karsten; Friederici, Angela D

    2011-06-01

    Vocabulary acquisition represents a major challenge in foreign language learning. Research has demonstrated that gestures accompanying speech have an impact on memory for verbal information in the speakers' mother tongue and, as recently shown, also in foreign language learning. However, the neural basis of this effect remains unclear. In a within-subjects design, we compared learning of novel words coupled with iconic and meaningless gestures. Iconic gestures helped learners to significantly better retain the verbal material over time. After the training, participants' brain activity was registered by means of fMRI while performing a word recognition task. Brain activations to words learned with iconic and with meaningless gestures were contrasted. We found activity in the premotor cortices for words encoded with iconic gestures. In contrast, words encoded with meaningless gestures elicited a network associated with cognitive control. These findings suggest that memory performance for newly learned words is not driven by the motor component as such, but by the motor image that matches an underlying representation of the word's semantics. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Neural substrates of embodied natural beauty and social endowed beauty: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; He, Xianyou; Lai, Siyan; Wan, Juan; Lai, Shuxian; Zhao, Xueru; Li, Darong

    2017-08-02

    What are the neural mechanisms underlying beauty based on objective parameters and beauty based on subjective social construction? This study scanned participants with fMRI while they performed aesthetic judgments on concrete pictographs and abstract oracle bone scripts. Behavioral results showed both pictographs and oracle bone scripts were judged to be more beautiful when they referred to beautiful objects and positive social meanings, respectively. Imaging results revealed regions associated with perceptual, cognitive, emotional and reward processing were commonly activated both in beautiful judgments of pictographs and oracle bone scripts. Moreover, stronger activations of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and motor-related areas were found in beautiful judgments of pictographs, whereas beautiful judgments of oracle bone scripts were associated with putamen activity, implying stronger aesthetic experience and embodied approaching for beauty were elicited by the pictographs. In contrast, only visual processing areas were activated in the judgments of ugly pictographs and negative oracle bone scripts. Results provide evidence that the sense of beauty is triggered by two processes: one based on the objective parameters of stimuli (embodied natural beauty) and the other based on the subjective social construction (social endowed beauty).

  13. Neural substrates for writing impairments in Japanese patients with mild Alzheimer's disease: a SPECT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Atsuko; Nomura, Hiroshi; Mochizuki, Ruriko; Ohnuma, Ayumu; Kimpara, Teiko; Ootomo, Kazumasa; Hosokai, Yoshiyuki; Ishioka, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Kyoko; Mori, Etsuro

    2011-06-01

    Language is fairly well preserved in most patients with mild Alzheimer's disease, but writing ability seems to be impaired even in the early stages of the disease. To investigate the neural bases of writing impairments in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we examined the correlation between writing ability and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 52 Japanese patients with mild AD compared to 22 controls, using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We found that, compared with control subjects, Kana writing to dictation and copying Kanji words were preserved in AD patients, but writing to dictating Kanji words was impaired. We classified the errors in the Kanji dictation task into four types to investigate the correlation between rCBF and the error type, as follows: non-response errors, phonologically plausible errors, non-phonologically plausible errors, and peripheral errors. Non-response errors, which indicated difficulty with retrieving Kanji graphic images, were the most frequent. When controlled for confounding factors, the number of non-response errors negatively correlated with rCBF in the left inferior parietal lobule, the posterior middle and inferior temporal gyri, and the posterior middle frontal gyrus. Thus, the impaired recall of Kanji in early Alzheimer's disease is related to dysfunctional cortical activity, which appears to be predominant in the left frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Social inference deficits in temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy: risk factors and neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Melanie; St-Laurent, Marie; Barnett, Alexander; McAndrews, Mary Pat

    2015-05-01

    In temporal lobe epilepsy and lobectomy, deficits in emotion identification have been found consistently, but there is limited evidence for complex social inference skills such as theory of mind. Furthermore, risk factors and the specific neural underpinnings of these deficits in this population are unclear. We investigated these issues using a comprehensive range of social inference tasks (emotion identification and comprehension of sincere, deceitful and sarcastic social exchanges) in individuals with temporal lobe epilepsy or lobectomy (n = 87). We observed deficits across patient groups which were partly related to the presence of mesial temporal lobe sclerosis, early age of seizure onset and left lobectomy. A voxel-based morphometry analysis conducted in the pre-operative group confirmed the importance of the temporal lobe by showing a relationship between left hippocampal atrophy and overall social inference abilities, and between left anterior neocortex atrophy and sarcasm comprehension. These findings are in keeping with theoretical proposals that the hippocampus is critical for binding diverse elements in cognitive domains beyond canonical episodic memory operations, and that the anterior temporal cortex is a convergence zone of higher-order perceptual and emotional processes, and of stored representations. As impairments were frequent, we require further investigation of this behavioural domain and its impact on the lives of people with epilepsy. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Neural substrates of contingency learning and executive control: dissociating physical, valuative, and behavioral changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Dhaniel A Mullette-Gillman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Contingency learning is fundamental to cognition. Knowledge about environmental contingencies allows behavioral flexibility, as executive control processes accommodate the demands of novel or changing environments. Studies of experiential learning have focused on the relationship between actions and the values of associated outcomes. However, outcome values have often been confounded with the physical changes in the outcomes themselves. Here, we dissociated contingency learning into valuative and non-valuative forms, using a novel version of the two-alternative choice task, while measuring the neural effects of contingency changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Changes in value-relevant contingencies evoked activation in the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC, posterior parietal cortex (PPC, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC consistent with prior results (e.g., reversal-learning paradigms. Changes in physical contingencies unrelated to value or to action produced similar activations within the LPFC, indicating that LPFC may engage in generalized contingency learning that is not specific to valuation. In contrast, contingency changes that required behavioral shifts evoked activation localized to the DMPFC, supplementary motor, and precentral cortices, suggesting that these regions play more specific roles within the executive control of behavior.

  16. Using motor imagery to study the neural substrates of dynamic balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraye, Murielle Ursulla; Debû, Bettina; Heil, Lieke; Carpenter, Mark; Bloem, Bastiaan Roelof; Toni, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the cerebral structures involved in dynamic balance using a motor imagery (MI) protocol. We recorded cerebral activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging while subjects imagined swaying on a balance board along the sagittal plane to point a laser at target pairs of different sizes (small, large). We used a matched visual imagery (VI) control task and recorded imagery durations during scanning. MI and VI durations were differentially influenced by the sway accuracy requirement, indicating that MI of balance is sensitive to the increased motor control necessary to point at a smaller target. Compared to VI, MI of dynamic balance recruited additional cortical and subcortical portions of the motor system, including frontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum and mesencephalic locomotor region, the latter showing increased effective connectivity with the supplementary motor area. The regions involved in MI of dynamic balance were spatially distinct but contiguous to those involved in MI of gait (Bakker et al., 2008; Snijders et al., 2011; Crémers et al., 2012), in a pattern consistent with existing somatotopic maps of the trunk (for balance) and legs (for gait). These findings validate a novel, quantitative approach for studying the neural control of balance in humans. This approach extends previous reports on MI of static stance (Jahn et al., 2004, 2008), and opens the way for studying gait and balance impairments in patients with neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. The neural substrates of complex argument structure representations: Processing 'alternating transitivity' verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer-Asscher, Aya; Schuchard, Julia; den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Thompson, Cynthia K

    This study examines the neural correlates of processing verbal entries with multiple argument structures using fMRI. We compared brain activation in response to 'alternating transitivity' verbs, corresponding to two different verbal alternates - one transitive and one intransitive - and simple verbs, with only one, intransitive, thematic grid. Fourteen young healthy participants performed a lexical decision task with the two verb types. Results showed significantly greater activation in the angular and supramarginal gyri (BAs 39 and 40) extending to the posterior superior and middle temporal gyri bilaterally, for alternating compared to simple verbs. Additional activation was detected in bilateral middle and superior frontal gyri (BAs 8 and 9). The opposite contrast, simple compared to alternating verbs, showed no significant differential activation in any regions of the brain. These findings are consistent with previous studies implicating a posterior network including the superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri for processing verbs with multiple thematic roles, as well as with those suggesting involvement of the middle and superior frontal gyri in lexical ambiguity processing. However, because 'alternating transitivity' verbs differ from simple intransitives with regard to both the number of thematic grids (two vs. one) and the number of thematic roles (two vs. one), our findings do not distinguish between activations associated with these two differences.

  18. The neural substrates of complex argument structure representations: Processing ‘alternating transitivity’ verbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer-Asscher, Aya; Schuchard, Julia; den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Thompson, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the neural correlates of processing verbal entries with multiple argument structures using fMRI. We compared brain activation in response to ‘alternating transitivity’ verbs, corresponding to two different verbal alternates – one transitive and one intransitive - and simple verbs, with only one, intransitive, thematic grid. Fourteen young healthy participants performed a lexical decision task with the two verb types. Results showed significantly greater activation in the angular and supramarginal gyri (BAs 39 and 40) extending to the posterior superior and middle temporal gyri bilaterally, for alternating compared to simple verbs. Additional activation was detected in bilateral middle and superior frontal gyri (BAs 8 and 9). The opposite contrast, simple compared to alternating verbs, showed no significant differential activation in any regions of the brain. These findings are consistent with previous studies implicating a posterior network including the superior temporal, supramarginal and angular gyri for processing verbs with multiple thematic roles, as well as with those suggesting involvement of the middle and superior frontal gyri in lexical ambiguity processing. However, because ‘alternating transitivity’ verbs differ from simple intransitives with regard to both the number of thematic grids (two vs. one) and the number of thematic roles (two vs. one), our findings do not distinguish between activations associated with these two differences. PMID:26139954

  19. Effects of metallic nanoparticle doped flux on the interfacial intermetallic compounds between lead-free solder ball and copper substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujan, G.K., E-mail: sgkumer@gmail.com; Haseeb, A.S.M.A., E-mail: haseeb@um.edu.my; Afifi, A.B.M., E-mail: amalina@um.edu.my

    2014-11-15

    Lead free solders currently in use are prone to develop thick interfacial intermetallic compound layers with rough morphology which are detrimental to the long term solder joint reliability. A novel method has been developed to control the morphology and growth of intermetallic compound layers between lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder ball and copper substrate by doping a water soluble flux with metallic nanoparticles. Four types of metallic nanoparticles (nickel, cobalt, molybdenum and titanium) were used to investigate their effects on the wetting behavior and interfacial microstructural evaluations after reflow. Nanoparticles were dispersed manually with a water soluble flux and the resulting nanoparticle doped flux was placed on copper substrate. Lead-free Sn–3.0Ag–0.5Cu solder balls of diameter 0.45 mm were placed on top of the flux and were reflowed at a peak temperature of 240 °C for 45 s. Angle of contact, wetting area and interfacial microstructure were studied by optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was observed that the angle of contact increased and wetting area decreased with the addition of cobalt, molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles to flux. On the other hand, wettability improved with the addition of nickel nanoparticles. Cross-sectional micrographs revealed that both nickel and cobalt nanoparticle doping transformed the morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} from a typical scallop type to a planer one and reduced the intermetallic compound thickness under optimum condition. These effects were suggested to be related to in-situ interfacial alloying at the interface during reflow. The minimum amount of nanoparticles required to produce the planer morphology was found to be 0.1 wt.% for both nickel and cobalt. Molybdenum and titanium nanoparticles neither appear to undergo alloying during reflow nor have any influence at the solder/substrate interfacial reaction. Thus, doping

  20. Early influence of the rs4675690 on the neural substrates of sadness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortier, Emilie; Noreau, Anne; Lepore, Franco; Boivin, Michel; Pérusse, Daniel; Rouleau, Guy A; Beauregard, Mario

    2011-12-01

    CREB1 has previously been implicated in mood disorders, suicide, and antidepressant response. There is some evidence that the T allele in rs4675690, a single-nucleotide polymorphism near the CREB1 gene, is involved in the modulation of neural responses to negative stimuli. It is not known whether differential brain activity during negative mood state appears early in life in T allele carriers. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain activity, during a transient state of sadness, in children homozygous for the T allele or the C allele. This primary emotion was selected given that it is the prevailing mood in major depressive disorder (MDD). Blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal changes were measured while subjects viewed blocks of neutral film excerpts and blocks of sad film excerpts. There was significantly greater BOLD activation in the TT group, compared to the CC group, in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area [BA 24]), right putamen, right caudate nucleus and left anterior temporal pole (BA 21), when the brain activity associated with the viewing of the emotionally neutral film excerpts was subtracted from that associated with the viewing of the sad film excerpts. A replication study using larger samples may be required for more definitive conclusions. The different pattern of regional brain activation found here during transient sadness - in children carrying the T allele, compared to those carrying the C allele - might increase later in life susceptibility to emotional dysregulation and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Perfusion imaging in Pusher syndrome to investigate the neural substrates involved in controlling upright body position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Francesco Ticini

    Full Text Available Brain damage may induce a dysfunction of upright body position termed "pusher syndrome". Patients with such disorder suffer from an alteration of their sense of body verticality. They experience their body as oriented upright when actually tilted nearly 20 degrees to the ipsilesional side. Pusher syndrome typically is associated with posterior thalamic stroke; less frequently with extra-thalamic lesions. This argued for a fundamental role of these structures in our control of upright body posture. Here we investigated whether such patients may show additional functional or metabolic abnormalities outside the areas of brain lesion. We investigated 19 stroke patients with thalamic or with extra-thalamic lesions showing versus not showing misperception of body orientation. We measured fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI. This allowed us to determine the structural damage as well as to identify the malperfused but structural intact tissue. Pusher patients with thalamic lesions did not show dysfunctional brain areas in addition to the ones found to be structurally damaged. In the pusher patients with extra-thalamic lesions, the thalamus was neither structurally damaged nor malperfused. Rather, these patients showed small regions of abnormal perfusion in the structurally intact inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, and parietal white matter. The results indicate that these extra-thalamic brain areas contribute to the network controlling upright body posture. The data also suggest that damage of the neural tissue in the posterior thalamus itself rather than additional malperfusion in distant cortical areas is associated with pusher syndrome. Hence, it seems as if the normal functioning of both extra-thalamic as well as posterior thalamic structures is integral to perceiving gravity and controlling upright body orientation in humans.

  2. Neural Substrates of Visual Spatial Coding and Visual Feedback Control for Hand Movements in Allocentric and Target-Directed Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Lore; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological evidence suggests that different brain areas may be involved in movements that are directed at visual targets (e.g., pointing or reaching), and movements that are based on allocentric visual information (e.g., drawing or copying). Here we used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of these two types of movements in healthy volunteers. Subjects (n = 14) performed right hand movements in either a target-directed task (moving a cursor to a target dot) or an allocentric task (moving a cursor to reproduce the distance and direction between two distal target dots) with or without visual feedback about their hand movement. Movements were monitored with an MR compatible touch panel. A whole brain analysis revealed that movements in allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in the fundus of the left intra-parietal sulcus (IPS), in posterior IPS, in bilateral dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), and in the lateral occipital complex (LOC). Visual feedback in both target-directed and allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in area MT+, superior parietal–occipital cortex (SPOC), and posterior IPS (all bilateral). In addition, we found that visual feedback affected brain activity differently in target-directed as compared to allocentric conditions, particularly in the pre-supplementary motor area, PMd, IPS, and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results, in combination with previous findings, suggest that the LOC is essential for allocentric visual coding and that SPOC is involved in visual feedback control. The differences in brain activity between target-directed and allocentric visual feedback conditions may be related to behavioral differences in visual feedback control. Our results advance the understanding of the visual coordinate frame used by the LOC. In addition, because of the nature of the allocentric task, our results have relevance for the understanding of neural substrates of magnitude estimation and vector coding of

  3. Uptake of Cadmium, Lead and Arsenic by Tenebrio molitor and Hermetia illucens from Contaminated Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Fels-Klerx, H J; Camenzuli, L; van der Lee, M K; Oonincx, D G A B

    2016-01-01

    Insects have potential as a novel source of protein in feed and food production in Europe, provided they can be used safely. To date, limited information is available on the safety of insects, and toxic elements are one of the potential hazards of concern. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the potential accumulation of cadmium, lead and arsenic in larvae of two insect species, Tenebrio molitor (yellow mealworm) and Hermetia illucens (black soldier fly), which seem to hold potential as a source of food or feed. An experiment was designed with 14 treatments, each in triplicate, per insect species. Twelve treatments used feed that was spiked with cadmium, lead or arsenic at 0.5, 1 and 2 times the respective maximum allowable levels (ML) in complete feed, as established by the European Commission (EC). Two of the 14 treatments consisted of controls, using non-spiked feed. All insects per container (replicate) were harvested when the first larva in that container had completed its larval stage. Development time, survival rates and fresh weights were similar over all treatments, except for development time and total live weight of the half of the maximum limit treatment for cadmium of the black soldier fly. Bioaccumulation (bioaccumulation factor > 1) was seen in all treatments (including two controls) for lead and cadmium in black soldier fly larvae, and for the three arsenic treatments in the yellow mealworm larvae. In the three cadmium treatments, concentrations of cadmium in black soldier fly larvae are higher than the current EC maximum limit for feed materials. The same was seen for the 1.0 and 2.0 ML treatments of arsenic in the yellow mealworm larvae. From this study, it can be concluded that if insects are used as feed materials, the maximum limits of these elements in complete feed should be revised per insect species.

  4. Neural substrates underlying reconcentration for the preparation of an appropriate cognitive state to prevent future mistakes: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eMiura

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to reconcentrate on the present situation by recognizing one’s own recent errors is a cognitive mechanism that is crucial for safe and appropriate behavior in a particular situation. However, an individual may not be able to adequately perform a subsequent task even if he/she recognize his/her own error; thus, it is hypothesized that the neural mechanisms underlying the reconcentration process are different from the neural substrates supporting error recognition. The present study performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI analysis to explore the neural substrates associated with reconcentration related to achieving an appropriate cognitive state, and to dissociate these brain regions from the neural substrates involved in recognizing one’s own mistake. This study included 44 healthy volunteers who completed an experimental procedure that was based on the Eriksen flanker task and included feedback regarding the results of the current trial. The hemodynamic response induced by each instance of feedback was modeled using a combination of the successes and failures of the current and subsequent trials in order to identify the neural substrates underlying the ability to reconcentrate for the next situation and to dissociate them from those involved in recognizing current errors. The fMRI findings revealed significant and specific activation in the dorsal aspect of the medial prefrontal cortex (MFC when participants successfully reconcentrated on the task after recognizing their own error based on feedback. Additionally, this specific activation was clearly dissociated from the activation foci that occurred during error recognition. These findings indicate that the dorsal aspect of the MFC may be a distinct functional region that specifically supports the reconcentration process and that is associated with the prevention of successive errors when a human subject recognizes his/her own mistake. Furthermore, it is likely

  5. Neural substrates underlying reconcentration for the preparation of an appropriate cognitive state to prevent future mistakes: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Naoki; Nozawa, Takayuki; Takahashi, Makoto; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Sasaki, Yukako; Sakaki, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    The ability to reconcentrate on the present situation by recognizing one’s own recent errors is a cognitive mechanism that is crucial for safe and appropriate behavior in a particular situation. However, an individual may not be able to adequately perform a subsequent task even if he/she recognize his/her own error; thus, it is hypothesized that the neural mechanisms underlying the reconcentration process are different from the neural substrates supporting error recognition. The present study performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis to explore the neural substrates associated with reconcentration related to achieving an appropriate cognitive state, and to dissociate these brain regions from the neural substrates involved in recognizing one’s own mistake. This study included 44 healthy volunteers who completed an experimental procedure that was based on the Eriksen flanker task and included feedback regarding the results of the current trial. The hemodynamic response induced by each instance of feedback was modeled using a combination of the successes and failures of the current and subsequent trials in order to identify the neural substrates underlying the ability to reconcentrate for the next situation and to dissociate them from those involved in recognizing current errors. The fMRI findings revealed significant and specific activation in the dorsal aspect of the medial prefrontal cortex (MFC) when participants successfully reconcentrated on the task after recognizing their own error based on feedback. Additionally, this specific activation was clearly dissociated from the activation foci that occurred during error recognition. These findings indicate that the dorsal aspect of the MFC may be a distinct functional region that specifically supports the reconcentration process and that is associated with the prevention of successive errors when a human subject recognizes his/her own mistake. Furthermore, it is likely that this

  6. Neural Substrates Associated with Weather-Induced Mood Variability: An Exploratory Study Using ASL Perfusion fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Detre, John A; Farah, Martha J; Rao, Hengyi

    2011-04-01

    Daily variations in weather are known to be associated with variations in mood. However, little is known about the specific brain regions that instantiate weather-related mood changes. We used a data-driven approach and ASL perfusion fMRI to assess the neural substrates associated with weather-induced mood variability. The data-driven approach was conducted with mood ratings under various weather conditions (N = 464). Forward stepwise regression was conducted to develop a statistical model of mood as a function of weather conditions. The model results were used to calculate the mood-relevant weather index which served as the covariate in the regression analysis of the resting CBF (N = 42) measured by ASL perfusion fMRI under various weather conditions. The resting CBF activities in the left insula-prefrontal cortex and left superior parietal lobe were negatively correlated (corrected pweather index, indicating that better mood-relevant weather conditions were associated with lower CBF in these regions within the brain's emotional network. The present study represents a first step toward the investigation of the effect of natural environment on baseline human brain function, and suggests the feasibility of ASL perfusion fMRI for such study.

  7. Neural substrates of the interaction of emotional stimulus processing and motor inhibitory control: an emotional linguistic go/no-go fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Martin; Brendel, Gary; Tuescher, Oliver; Pan, Hong; Epstein, Jane; Beutel, Manfred; Yang, Yihong; Thomas, Katherine; Levy, Kenneth; Silverman, Michael; Clarkin, Jonathon; Posner, Michael; Kernberg, Otto; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David

    2007-07-01

    Neural substrates of behavioral inhibitory control have been probed in a variety of animal model, physiologic, behavioral, and imaging studies, many emphasizing the role of prefrontal circuits. Likewise, the neurocircuitry of emotion has been investigated from a variety of perspectives. Recently, neural mechanisms mediating the interaction of emotion and behavioral regulation have become the focus of intense study. To further define neurocircuitry specifically underlying the interaction between emotional processing and response inhibition, we developed an emotional linguistic go/no-go fMRI paradigm with a factorial block design which joins explicit inhibitory task demand (i.e., go or no-go) with task-unrelated incidental emotional stimulus valence manipulation, to probe the modulation of the former by the latter. In this study of normal subjects focusing on negative emotional processing, we hypothesized activity changes in specific frontal neocortical and limbic regions reflecting modulation of response inhibition by negative stimulus processing. We observed common fronto-limbic activations (including orbitofrontal cortical and amygdalar components) associated with the interaction of emotional stimulus processing and response suppression. Further, we found a distributed cortico-limbic network to be a candidate neural substrate for the interaction of negative valence-specific processing and inhibitory task demand. These findings have implications for elucidating neural mechanisms of emotional modulation of behavioral control, with relevance to a variety of neuropsychiatric disease states marked by behavioral dysregulation within the context of negative emotional processing.

  8. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is serious about making sure companies that break the law are held accountable In the past year, EPA ... the health effects of lead in drinking water The law mandates no-lead products for drinking water after ...

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging reveals different neural substrates for the effects of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Gozzi

    Full Text Available Orexins are neuro-modulatory peptides involved in the control of diverse physiological functions through interaction with two receptors, orexin-1 (OX1R and orexin-2 (OX2R. Recent evidence in pre-clinical models points toward a putative dichotomic role of the two receptors, with OX2R predominantly involved in the regulation of the sleep/wake cycle and arousal, and the OX1R being more specifically involved in reward processing and motivated behaviour. However, the specific neural substrates underlying these distinct processes in the rat brain remain to be elucidated. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in the rat to map the modulatory effect of selective OXR blockade on the functional response produced by D-amphetamine, a psychostimulant and arousing drug that stimulates orexigenic activity. OXR blockade was produced by GSK1059865 and JNJ1037049, two novel OX1R and OX2R antagonists with unprecedented selectivity at the counter receptor type. Both drugs inhibited the functional response to D-amphetamine albeit with distinct neuroanatomical patterns: GSK1059865 focally modulated functional responses in striatal terminals, whereas JNJ1037049 induced a widespread pattern of attenuation characterised by a prominent cortical involvement. At the same doses tested in the fMRI study, JNJ1037049 exhibited robust hypnotic properties, while GSK1059865 failed to display significant sleep-promoting effects, but significantly reduced drug-seeking behaviour in cocaine-induced conditioned place preference. Collectively, these findings highlight an essential contribution of the OX2R in modulating cortical activity and arousal, an effect that is consistent with the robust hypnotic effect exhibited by JNJ1037049. The subcortical and striatal pattern observed with GSK1059865 represent a possible neurofunctional correlate for the modulatory role of OX1R in controlling reward-processing and goal-oriented behaviours in the rat.

  10. Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Test Safety Alert: Learn about CDC Recommendations Second Informational Call (CDC-RFA-17-1701PPHF17), April 5, 2017, ... CLPPP CAP Healthy Homes Assessment Tools Lead Health Literacy Initiative Refugee Tool Kit Resources Healthy Homes and ...

  11. The structural neural substrates of persistent negative symptoms in first-episode of non-affective psychosis: a voxel-based morphometry study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey eBenoit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: An important subset of patients with schizophrenia present clinically significant persistent negative symptoms (PNS. Identifying the neural substrates of PNS could help improve our understanding and treatment of these symptoms. Methods: This study included 64 non-affective first-episode of psychosis (FEP patients and 60 healthy controls; 16 patients displayed PNS (i.e., at least 1 primary negative symptom at moderate or worse severity sustained for at least 6 consecutive months. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM, we explored for grey matter differences between PNS and non-PNS patients; patient groups were also compared to controls. All comparisons were performed at p<0.05, corrected for multiple comparisons.Results: PNS patients had smaller grey matter in the right frontal medial-orbital gyrus (extending into the inferior frontal gyrus and right parahippocampal gyrus (extending into the fusiform gyrus compared to non-PNS patients. Compared to controls, PNS patients had smaller grey matter in the right parahippocampal gyrus (extending into the fusiform gyrus and superior temporal gyrus; non-PNS patients showed no significant differences to controls. Conclusions: Neural substrates of persistent negative symptoms are evident in FEP patients. A better understanding of the neural etiology of PNS may encourage the search for new medications and/or alternative treatments to better help those affected.

  12. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  13. Monitoring substrate and products in a bioprocess with FTIR spectroscopy coupled to artificial neural networks enhanced with a genetic-algorithm-based method for wavelength selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Vanina G; Perín, Juan C; Mantovani, Víctor E; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2006-01-15

    An experiment was developed as a simple alternative to existing analytical methods for the simultaneous quantitation of glucose (substrate) and glucuronic acid (main product) in the bioprocesses Kombucha by using FTIR spectroscopy coupled to multivariate calibration (partial least-squares, PLS-1 and artificial neural networks, ANNs). Wavelength selection through a novel ranked regions genetic algorithm (RRGA) was used to enhance the predictive ability of the chemometric models. Acceptable results were obtained by using the ANNs models considering the complexity of the sample and the speediness and simplicity of the method. The accuracy on the glucuronic acid determination was calculated by analysing spiked real fermentation samples (recoveries ca. 115%).

  14. Selectively stimulating neural populations in the subthalamic region using a novel deep brain stimulation lead design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Kees Joab; Verhagen, R.; Bour, L.J.; Heida, Tjitske

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) is widely used in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease(PD) and has proven to be an effective treatment of the various motor symptoms. The therapy involves implanting a lead consisting of multiple electrodes in the STN through which

  15. Ginsenoside Rd maintains adult neural stem cell proliferation during lead-impaired neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Feng, Guodong; Tang, Chi; Wang, Li; Cheng, Haoran; Zhang, Yunxia; Ma, Jing; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2013-07-01

    Lead exposure attracts a great deal of public attention due to its harmful effects on human health. Even low-level lead (Pb) exposure reduces the capacity for neurogenesis. It is well known that microglia-mediated neurotoxicity can impair neurogenesis. Despite this, few in vivo studies have been conducted to understand the relationship between acute Pb exposure and microglial activation. We investigated whether the acute Pb exposure altered the expression of a marker of activated microglial cells (Iba-1), and markers of neurogenesis (BrdU and doublecortin) in aging rats. As compared to controls, Pb exposure significantly enhanced the expression of Iba-1 immunoreactivity; increased the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α and decreased the numbers of BrdU(+) and doublecortin(+) cells. Our prior work demonstrated that ginsenoside Rd (Rd), one of the major active ingredients in Panax ginseng, was neuroprotective in a variety of paradigms involving anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Thus, we further examined whether Rd could attenuate Pb-induced phenotypes. Compared with the Pb exposure group, Rd pretreatment indeed attenuated the effects of Pb exposure. These results suggest that Rd may be neuroprotective in old rats following acute Pb exposure, which involves limitation of microglial activation and maintenance of NSC proliferation.

  16. The neural substrates of response inhibition to negative information across explicit and implicit tasks in GAD patients: Electrophysiological evidence from an ERP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiong eYu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been established that the inability to inhibit a response to negative stimuli is the genesis of anxiety. However, the neural substrates of response inhibition to sad faces across explicit and implicit tasks in general anxiety disorder (GAD patients remain unclear.Methods: Electrophysiological data were recorded when subjects performed two modified emotional go/no-go tasks in which neutral and sad faces were presented: one task was explicit (emotion categorization, and the other task was implicit (gender categorization.Results: In the explicit task, electrophysiological evidence showed decreased amplitudes of no-go/go difference waves at the N2 interval in the GAD group compared to the control group. However, in the implicit task, the amplitudes of no-go/go difference waves at the N2 interval showed a reversed trend. Source localization analysis on no-go/N2 components revealed a decreased current source density (CSD in the right dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex in GAD individuals relative to controls. In the implicit task, the left superior temporal gyrus and the left inferior parietal lobe showed enhanced activation in GAD individuals and may compensate for the dysfunction of the right dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex.Conclusions: These findings indicated that the processing of response inhibition to socially sad faces in GAD individuals was interrupted in the explicit task. However, this processing was preserved in the implicit task. The neural substrates of response inhibition to sad faces were dissociated between implicit and explicit tasks.

  17. Distinct neural substrates of visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning as assessed by Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Zhencai; De Beuckelaer, A.; Wang, Xu; Liu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies revealed spontaneous neural activity to be associated with fluid intelligence (gF) which is commonly assessed by Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices, and embeds two types of reasoning: visuospatial and verbal-analytic reasoning. With resting-state fMRI data, using global brain

  18. The Neural Substrates of Recognition Memory for Verbal Information: Spanning the Divide between Short- and Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchsbaum, Bradley R.; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Berman, Karen Faith

    2011-01-01

    One of the classic categorical divisions in the history of memory research is that between short-term and long-term memory. Indeed, because memory for the immediate past (a few seconds) and memory for the relatively more remote past (several seconds and beyond) are assumed to rely on distinct neural systems, more often than not, memory research…

  19. Dividing the Self: Distinct Neural Substrates of Task-Based and Automatic Self-Prioritization after Brain Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Jie; Chechlacz, Magdalena; Humphreys, Glyn W.

    2012-01-01

    Facial self-awareness is a basic human ability dependent on a distributed bilateral neural network and revealed through prioritized processing of our own over other faces. Using non-prosopagnosic patients we show, for the first time, that facial self-awareness can be fractionated into different component processes. Patients performed two face…

  20. Using a Large-scale Neural Model of Cortical Object Processing to Investigate the Neural Substrate for Managing Multiple Items in Short-term Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Ulloa, Antonio; Horwitz, Barry

    2017-11-01

    Many cognitive and computational models have been proposed to help understand working memory. In this article, we present a simulation study of cortical processing of visual objects during several working memory tasks using an extended version of a previously constructed large-scale neural model [Tagamets, M. A., & Horwitz, B. Integrating electrophysiological and anatomical experimental data to create a large-scale model that simulates a delayed match-to-sample human brain imaging study. Cerebral Cortex, 8, 310-320, 1998]. The original model consisted of arrays of Wilson-Cowan type of neuronal populations representing primary and secondary visual cortices, inferotemporal (IT) cortex, and pFC. We added a module representing entorhinal cortex, which functions as a gating module. We successfully implemented multiple working memory tasks using the same model and produced neuronal patterns in visual cortex, IT cortex, and pFC that match experimental findings. These working memory tasks can include distractor stimuli or can require that multiple items be retained in mind during a delay period (Sternberg's task). Besides electrophysiology data and behavioral data, we also generated fMRI BOLD time series from our simulation. Our results support the involvement of IT cortex in working memory maintenance and suggest the cortical architecture underlying the neural mechanisms mediating particular working memory tasks. Furthermore, we noticed that, during simulations of memorizing a list of objects, the first and last items in the sequence were recalled best, which may implicate the neural mechanism behind this important psychological effect (i.e., the primacy and recency effect).

  1. Localization of Origins of Premature Ventricular Contraction by Means of Convolutional Neural Network from 12-lead ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Yu, Long; Jin, Qi; Wu, Liqun; He, Bin

    2017-09-25

    This paper proposes a novel method to localize origins of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) from 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) using convolutional neural network (CNN) and a realistic computer heart model. The proposed method consists of two CNNs (Segment CNN and Epi-Endo CNN) to classify among ventricular sources from 25 segments and from epicardium (Epi) or endocardium (Endo). The inputs are the full time courses and the first half of QRS complexes of 12-lead ECG, respectively. After registering the ventricle computer model with an individual patient's heart, the training datasets were generated by multiplying ventricular current dipoles derived from single pacing at various locations with patient-specific lead field. The origins of PVC are localized by calculating the weighted center of gravity of classification returned by the CNNs. A number of computer simulations were conducted to evaluate the proposed method under a variety of noise levels and heart registration errors. Furthermore, the proposed method was evaluated on 90 PVC beats from 9 human patients with PVCs and compared against ablation outcome in the same patients. The computer simulation evaluation returned relatively high accuracies for Segment CNN (∼78%) and Epi-Endo CNN (∼90%). Clinical testing in 9 PVC patients resulted an averaged localization error of 11 mm. Our simulation and clinical evaluation results demonstrate the capability and merits of the proposed CNN-based method for localization of PVC. This work suggests a new approach for cardiac source localization of origin of arrhythmias using only the 12-lead ECG by means of CNN, and may have important applications for future real-time monitoring and localizing origins of cardiac arrhythmias guiding ablation treatment.

  2. Cascade of neural events leading from error commission to subsequent awareness revealed using EEG source imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Dhar

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to shed light on the respective contributions of three important action monitoring brain regions (i.e. cingulate cortex, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex during the conscious detection of response errors. To this end, fourteen healthy adults performed a speeded Go/Nogo task comprising Nogo trials of varying levels of difficulty, designed to elicit aware and unaware errors. Error awareness was indicated by participants with a second key press after the target key press. Meanwhile, electromyogram (EMG from the response hand was recorded in addition to high-density scalp electroencephalogram (EEG. In the EMG-locked grand averages, aware errors clearly elicited an error-related negativity (ERN reflecting error detection, and a later error positivity (Pe reflecting conscious error awareness. However, no Pe was recorded after unaware errors or hits. These results are in line with previous studies suggesting that error awareness is associated with generation of the Pe. Source localisation results confirmed that the posterior cingulate motor area was the main generator of the ERN. However, inverse solution results also point to the involvement of the left posterior insula during the time interval of the Pe, and hence error awareness. Moreover, consecutive to this insular activity, the right orbitofrontal cortex (OFC was activated in response to aware and unaware errors but not in response to hits, consistent with the implication of this area in the evaluation of the value of an error. These results reveal a precise sequence of activations in these three non-overlapping brain regions following error commission, enabling a progressive differentiation between aware and unaware errors as a function of time elapsed, thanks to the involvement first of interoceptive or proprioceptive processes (left insula, later leading to the detection of a breach in the prepotent response mode (right OFC.

  3. Emotional Intent Modulates The Neural Substrates Of Creativity: An fMRI Study of Emotionally Targeted Improvisation in Jazz Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Malinda J; Barrett, Frederick S; Lopez-Gonzalez, Monica; Jiradejvong, Patpong; Limb, Charles J

    2016-01-04

    Emotion is a primary motivator for creative behaviors, yet the interaction between the neural systems involved in creativity and those involved in emotion has not been studied. In the current study, we addressed this gap by using fMRI to examine piano improvisation in response to emotional cues. We showed twelve professional jazz pianists photographs of an actress representing a positive, negative or ambiguous emotion. Using a non-ferromagnetic thirty-five key keyboard, the pianists improvised music that they felt represented the emotion expressed in the photographs. Here we show that activity in prefrontal and other brain networks involved in creativity is highly modulated by emotional context. Furthermore, emotional intent directly modulated functional connectivity of limbic and paralimbic areas such as the amygdala and insula. These findings suggest that emotion and creativity are tightly linked, and that the neural mechanisms underlying creativity may depend on emotional state.

  4. Neural stem cell differentiation by electrical stimulation using a cross-linked PEDOT substrate: Expanding the use of biocompatible conjugated conductive polymers for neural tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Filipa; Ferreira, Quirina; Rodrigues, Carlos A V; Morgado, Jorge; Ferreira, Frederico Castelo

    2015-06-01

    The use of conjugated polymers allows versatile interactions between cells and flexible processable materials, while providing a platform for electrical stimulation, which is particularly relevant when targeting differentiation of neural stem cells and further application for therapy or drug screening. Materials were tested for cytotoxicity following the ISO10993-5. PSS was cross-linked. ReNcellVM neural stem cells (NSC) were seeded in laminin coated surfaces, cultured for 4 days in the presence of EGF (20 ng/mL), FGF-2 (20 ng/mL) and B27 (20 μg/mL) and differentiated over eight additional days in the absence of those factors under 100Hz pulsed DC electrical stimulation, 1V with 10 ms pulses. NSC and neuron elongation aspect ratio as well as neurite length were assessed using ImageJ. Cells were immune-stained for Tuj1 and GFAP. F8T2, MEH-PPV, P3HT and cross-linked PSS (x PSS) were assessed as non-cytotoxic. L929 fibroblast population was 1.3 higher for x PSS than for glass control, while F8T2 presents moderate proliferation. The population of neurons (Tuj1) was 1.6 times higher with longer neurites (73 vs 108 μm) for cells cultured under electrical stimulus, with cultured NSC. Such stimulus led also to longer neurons. x PSS was, for the first time, used to elongate human NSC through the application of pulsed current, impacting on their differentiation towards neurons and contributing to longer neurites. The range of conductive conjugated polymers known as non-cytotoxic was expanded. x PSS was introduced as a stable material, easily processed from solution, to interface with biological systems, in particular NSC, without the need of in-situ polymerization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Depletion of Neural Crest-Derived Cells Leads to Reduction in Plasma Noradrenaline and Alters B Lymphopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunokuma, Naoki; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Tsuneto, Motokazu; Isono, Kana; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells and their lymphoid progenitors are supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironmental niches composed of various stromal cells and Schwann cells and sympathetic nerve fibers. Although neural crest (NC) cells contribute to the development of all the three, their function in BM is not well understood. In this study, NC-derived cells were ablated with diphtheria toxin in double-transgenic mice expressing NC-specific Cre and Cre-driven diphtheria toxin receptor with yellow fluorescent protein reporter. We found that yellow fluorescent protein-expressing, NC-derived nonhematopoietic cells in BM expressed hematopoietic factors Cxcl12 and stem cell factor The ablation of NC-derived cells led to a significant decrease in B cell progenitors but not in hematopoietic stem cells or myeloid lineage cells in BM. Interestingly, plasma noradrenaline was markedly decreased in these mice. The i.p. administration of 6-hydroxydopamine, a known neurotoxin for noradrenergic neurons, led to a similar phenotype, whereas the administration of a noradrenaline precursor in NC-ablated mice partially rescued this phenotype. Additionally, the continuous administration of adrenergic receptor β antagonists partially decreased the number of B cell progenitors while preserving B lymphopoiesis in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that NC-derived cell depletion leads to abnormal B lymphopoiesis partially through decreased plasma noradrenaline, suggesting this as a novel mechanism regulated by molecules released by the sympathetic neurons. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) agonist FGF1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide FGL activate FGFR substrate 2alpha differently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yongshuo; Li, Shizhong; Berezin, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Activation of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors (FGFRs) both by FGFs and by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is crucial in the development and function of the nervous system. We found that FGFR substrate 2alpha (FRS2alpha), Src homologous and collagen A (ShcA), and phospholipase......-Cgamma (PLCgamma) were all required for neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) induced by FGF1 and FGL (an NCAM-derived peptide agonist of FGFR1). Like FGF1, FGL induced tyrosine phosphorylation of FGFR1, FRS2alpha, ShcA, and PLCgamma in a time- and dose-dependent manner. However, the activation...... of FRS2alpha by FGL was significantly lower than the activation by FGF1, indicating a differential signaling profile induced by NCAM compared with the cognate growth factor....

  7. Goal-independent mechanisms for free response generation: creative and pseudo-random performance share neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Manzano, Örjan; Ullén, Fredrik

    2012-01-02

    To what extent free response generation in different tasks uses common and task-specific neurocognitive processes has remained unclear. Here, we investigated overlap and differences in neural activity during musical improvisation and pseudo-random response generation. Brain activity was measured using fMRI in a group of professional classical pianists, who performed musical improvisation of melodies, pseudo-random key-presses and a baseline condition (sight-reading), on either two, six or twelve keys on a piano keyboard. The results revealed an extensive overlap in neural activity between the two generative conditions. Active regions included the dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal cortices, inferior frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex and pre-SMA. No regions showed higher activity in improvisation than in pseudo-random generation. These findings suggest that the activated regions fulfill generic functions that are utilized in different types of free generation tasks, independent of overall goal. In contrast, pseudo-random generation was accompanied by higher activity than improvisation in several regions. This presumably reflects the participants' musical expertise as well as the pseudo-random generation task's high load on attention, working memory, and executive control. The results highlight the significance of using naturalistic tasks to study human behavior and cognition. No brain activity was related to the size of the response set. We discuss that this may reflect that the musicians were able to use specific strategies for improvisation, by which there was no simple relationship between response set size and neural activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Language, Tone and Prosody of Emotions: Neural Substrates and Dynamics of Spoken-Word Emotion Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenthal, Einat; Silbersweig, David A; Stern, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Rapid assessment of emotions is important for detecting and prioritizing salient input. Emotions are conveyed in spoken words via verbal and non-verbal channels that are mutually informative and unveil in parallel over time, but the neural dynamics and interactions of these processes are not well understood. In this paper, we review the literature on emotion perception in faces, written words, and voices, as a basis for understanding the functional organization of emotion perception in spoken words. The characteristics of visual and auditory routes to the amygdala-a subcortical center for emotion perception-are compared across these stimulus classes in terms of neural dynamics, hemispheric lateralization, and functionality. Converging results from neuroimaging, electrophysiological, and lesion studies suggest the existence of an afferent route to the amygdala and primary visual cortex for fast and subliminal processing of coarse emotional face cues. We suggest that a fast route to the amygdala may also function for brief non-verbal vocalizations (e.g., laugh, cry), in which emotional category is conveyed effectively by voice tone and intensity. However, emotional prosody which evolves on longer time scales and is conveyed by fine-grained spectral cues appears to be processed via a slower, indirect cortical route. For verbal emotional content, the bulk of current evidence, indicating predominant left lateralization of the amygdala response and timing of emotional effects attributable to speeded lexical access, is more consistent with an indirect cortical route to the amygdala. Top-down linguistic modulation may play an important role for prioritized perception of emotions in words. Understanding the neural dynamics and interactions of emotion and language perception is important for selecting potent stimuli and devising effective training and/or treatment approaches for the alleviation of emotional dysfunction across a range of neuropsychiatric states.

  9. Dissociation of neural substrates of response inhibition to negative information between implicit and explicit facial Go/Nogo tasks: evidence from an electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fengqiong; Ye, Rong; Sun, Shiyue; Carretié, Luis; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Yi; Zhu, Chunyan; Luo, Yuejia; Wang, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Although ample evidence suggests that emotion and response inhibition are interrelated at the behavioral and neural levels, neural substrates of response inhibition to negative facial information remain unclear. Thus we used event-related potential (ERP) methods to explore the effects of explicit and implicit facial expression processing in response inhibition. We used implicit (gender categorization) and explicit emotional Go/Nogo tasks (emotion categorization) in which neutral and sad faces were presented. Electrophysiological markers at the scalp and the voxel level were analyzed during the two tasks. We detected a task, emotion and trial type interaction effect in the Nogo-P3 stage. Larger Nogo-P3 amplitudes during sad conditions versus neutral conditions were detected with explicit tasks. However, the amplitude differences between the two conditions were not significant for implicit tasks. Source analyses on P3 component revealed that right inferior frontal junction (rIFJ) was involved during this stage. The current source density (CSD) of rIFJ was higher with sad conditions compared to neutral conditions for explicit tasks, rather than for implicit tasks. The findings indicated that response inhibition was modulated by sad facial information at the action inhibition stage when facial expressions were processed explicitly rather than implicitly. The rIFJ may be a key brain region in emotion regulation.

  10. Dissociation of neural substrates of response inhibition to negative information between implicit and explicit facial Go/Nogo tasks: evidence from an electrophysiological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengqiong Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although ample evidence suggests that emotion and response inhibition are interrelated at the behavioral and neural levels, neural substrates of response inhibition to negative facial information remain unclear. Thus we used event-related potential (ERP methods to explore the effects of explicit and implicit facial expression processing in response inhibition. METHODS: We used implicit (gender categorization and explicit emotional Go/Nogo tasks (emotion categorization in which neutral and sad faces were presented. Electrophysiological markers at the scalp and the voxel level were analyzed during the two tasks. RESULTS: We detected a task, emotion and trial type interaction effect in the Nogo-P3 stage. Larger Nogo-P3 amplitudes during sad conditions versus neutral conditions were detected with explicit tasks. However, the amplitude differences between the two conditions were not significant for implicit tasks. Source analyses on P3 component revealed that right inferior frontal junction (rIFJ was involved during this stage. The current source density (CSD of rIFJ was higher with sad conditions compared to neutral conditions for explicit tasks, rather than for implicit tasks. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicated that response inhibition was modulated by sad facial information at the action inhibition stage when facial expressions were processed explicitly rather than implicitly. The rIFJ may be a key brain region in emotion regulation.

  11. Neural substrates of excessive daytime sleepiness in early drug naïve Parkinson's disease: A resting state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming-Ching; Ng, Samuel Y E; Heng, Hannah S E; Chao, Yin Xia; Chan, Ling Ling; Tan, Eng King; Tan, Louis C S

    2016-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a common non-motor symptom in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its neuropathology remains elusive due to the limited studies and the inclusion of medicated patients. This current study examined the neural substrates of EDS in drug naïve PD patients. A total of 76 PD patients in the early disease stages were recruited; 16 of them had EDS, while the remaining 60 did not. Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) was used to determine group differences (patients with EDS vs. patients without EDS) in spontaneous neural activity indicated by regional homogeneity (ReHo). Additionally, functional connectivity (FC) of the regions showing group differences in ReHo with the entire brain was performed. ReHo analysis controlling for gray matter volume, age, gender, general cognition, depression, postural instability gait difficulty, and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder showed decreased ReHo in the left cerebellum and inferior frontal gyrus, but increased ReHo in the left paracentral lobule in PD-EDS patients, compared with patients without EDS. FC analysis controlling for the same variables as in the analysis of ReHo revealed that the three regions showing ReHo differences had decreased FC with regions in the frontal, temporal, insular and limbic lobes and cerebellum in PDs with EDS. While decreases in ReHo and FC were found, increases in ReHo were also noted, implying both neural downregulation and compensatory mechanisms in early PD patients with EDS. Longitudinal studies are warranted to clarify the long-term impact of EDS in PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Human neural stem cell-derived cultures in three-dimensional substrates form spontaneously functional neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Imogen; Silveirinha, Vasco; Stein, Jason L; de la Torre-Ubieta, Luis; Farrimond, Jonathan A; Williamson, Elizabeth M; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2017-04-01

    Differentiated human neural stem cells were cultured in an inert three-dimensional (3D) scaffold and, unlike two-dimensional (2D) but otherwise comparable monolayer cultures, formed spontaneously active, functional neuronal networks that responded reproducibly and predictably to conventional pharmacological treatments to reveal functional, glutamatergic synapses. Immunocytochemical and electron microscopy analysis revealed a neuronal and glial population, where markers of neuronal maturity were observed in the former. Oligonucleotide microarray analysis revealed substantial differences in gene expression conferred by culturing in a 3D vs a 2D environment. Notable and numerous differences were seen in genes coding for neuronal function, the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. In addition to producing functional networks, differentiated human neural stem cells grown in inert scaffolds offer several significant advantages over conventional 2D monolayers. These advantages include cost savings and improved physiological relevance, which make them better suited for use in the pharmacological and toxicological assays required for development of stem cell-based treatments and the reduction of animal use in medical research. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Neural substrate for higher-order learning in an insect: Mushroom bodies are necessary for configural discriminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, Jean-Marc; Papouin, Thomas; Carcaud, Julie; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Grünewald, Bernd; Giurfa, Martin

    2015-10-27

    Learning theories distinguish elemental from configural learning based on their different complexity. Although the former relies on simple and unambiguous links between the learned events, the latter deals with ambiguous discriminations in which conjunctive representations of events are learned as being different from their elements. In mammals, configural learning is mediated by brain areas that are either dispensable or partially involved in elemental learning. We studied whether the insect brain follows the same principles and addressed this question in the honey bee, the only insect in which configural learning has been demonstrated. We used a combination of conditioning protocols, disruption of neural activity, and optophysiological recording of olfactory circuits in the bee brain to determine whether mushroom bodies (MBs), brain structures that are essential for memory storage and retrieval, are equally necessary for configural and elemental olfactory learning. We show that bees with anesthetized MBs distinguish odors and learn elemental olfactory discriminations but not configural ones, such as positive and negative patterning. Inhibition of GABAergic signaling in the MB calyces, but not in the lobes, impairs patterning discrimination, thus suggesting a requirement of GABAergic feedback neurons from the lobes to the calyces for nonelemental learning. These results uncover a previously unidentified role for MBs besides memory storage and retrieval: namely, their implication in the acquisition of ambiguous discrimination problems. Thus, in insects as in mammals, specific brain regions are recruited when the ambiguity of learning tasks increases, a fact that reveals similarities in the neural processes underlying the elucidation of ambiguous tasks across species.

  14. Human Brain Basis of Musical Rhythm Perception: Common and Distinct Neural Substrates for Meter, Tempo, and Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Thaut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus. Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas. These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure.

  15. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-06-17

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure.

  16. Time disparity sensitive behavior and its neural substrates of a pulse-type gymnotiform electric fish, Brachyhypopomus gauderio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Atsuko; Pyon, Grace; Kawasaki, Masashi

    2013-07-01

    Roles of the time coding electrosensory system in the novelty responses of a pulse-type gymnotiform electric fish, Brachyhypopomus, were examined behaviorally, physiologically, and anatomically. Brachyhypopomus responded with the novelty responses to small changes (100 μs) in time difference between electrosensory stimulus pulses applied to different parts of the body, as long as these pulses were given within a time period of ~500 μs. Physiological recording revealed neurons in the hindbrain and midbrain that fire action potentials time-locked to stimulus pulses with short latency (500-900 μs). These time-locked neurons, along with other types of neurons, were labeled with intracellular and extracellular marker injection techniques. Light and electron microscopy of the labeled materials revealed neural connectivity within the time coding system. Two types of time-locked neurons, the pear-shaped cells and the large cells converge onto the small cells in a hypertrophied structure, the mesencephalic magnocellular nucleus. The small cells receive a calyx synapse from a large cell at their somata and an input from a pear-shaped cell at the tip of their dendrites via synaptic islands. The small cells project to the torus semicircularis. We hypothesized that the time-locked neural signals conveyed by the pear-shaped cells and the large cells are decoded by the small cells for detection of time shifts occurring across body areas.

  17. Neural substrates involved in anger induced by audio-visual film clips among patients with alcohol dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Sook; Lee, Bae Hwan; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2016-07-08

    Very little is known about the neural circuitry underlying anger processing among alcoholics. The purpose of this study was to examine the altered brain activity of alcoholic individuals during transient anger emotion. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 18 male patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence in an inpatient alcohol treatment facility and 16 social drinkers with similar demographics were scanned during the viewing of anger-provoking film clips. While there was no significant difference in the level of experienced anger between alcohol-dependent patients and non-alcoholic controls, significantly greater activation was observed in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the right precentral gyrus among alcoholic patients compared to the normal controls. In summary, specific brain regions were identified that are associated with anger among patients with alcohol dependency.

  18. The influence of emotional priming on the neural substrates of memory: a prospective fMRI study using portrait art stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeken, Chris; De Raedt, Rudi; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; De Mey, Johan; Bossuyt, Axel; Luypaert, Robert

    2012-07-16

    Events coupled with an emotional context seem to be better retained than non-emotional events. The aim of our study was to investigate whether an emotional context could influence the neural substrates of memory associations with novel portrait art stimuli. In the current prospective fMRI study, we have investigated for one specific visual art form (modern artistic portraits with a high degree of abstraction) whether memory is influenced by priming with emotional facial pictures. In total forty healthy female volunteers in the same age range were recruited for the study. Twenty of these women participated in a prospective brain imaging memory paradigm and were asked to memorize a series of similar looking, but different portraits. After randomization, for twelve participants (Group 1), a third of the portraits was emotionally primed with approach-related pictures (smiling baby faces), a third with withdrawal-related pictures (baby faces with severe dermatological conditions), and another third with neutral images. Group 2 consisted of eight participants and they were not primed. Then, during an fMRI session 2h later, these portraits were viewed in random order intermixed with a set of new (previously unseen) ones, and the participants had to decide for each portrait whether or not they had already been seen. In a separate experiment, a different sample of twenty healthy females (Group 3) rated their mood after being exposed to the same art stimuli, without priming. The portraits did not evoke significant mood changes by themselves, supporting their initial neutral emotional character (Group 3). The correct decision on whether the portraits were Familiar of Unfamiliar led to similar neuronal activations in brain areas implicated in visual and attention processing for both groups (Groups 1 and 2). In contrast, whereas primed participants showed significant higher neuronal activities in the left midline superior frontal cortex (Brodmann area (BA) 6), unprimed

  19. Application of a series of artificial neural networks to on-site quantitative analysis of lead into real soil samples by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Haddad, J. [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, CNRS UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); Bruyère, D. [BRGM, Service Métrologie, Monitoring et Analyse, 3 av. C. Guillemin, B.P 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex (France); Ismaël, A.; Gallou, G. [IVEA Solution, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, Bât 503, 91400 Orsay (France); Laperche, V.; Michel, K. [BRGM, Service Métrologie, Monitoring et Analyse, 3 av. C. Guillemin, B.P 36009, 45060 Orléans Cedex (France); Canioni, L. [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, CNRS UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France); Bousquet, B., E-mail: bruno.bousquet@u-bordeaux.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, LOMA, CNRS UMR 5798, F-33400 Talence (France)

    2014-07-01

    Artificial neural networks were applied to process data from on-site LIBS analysis of soil samples. A first artificial neural network allowed retrieving the relative amounts of silicate, calcareous and ores matrices into soils. As a consequence, each soil sample was correctly located inside the ternary diagram characterized by these three matrices, as verified by ICP-AES. Then a series of artificial neural networks were applied to quantify lead into soil samples. More precisely, two models were designed for classification purpose according to both the type of matrix and the range of lead concentrations. Then, three quantitative models were locally applied to three data subsets. This complete approach allowed reaching a relative error of prediction close to 20%, considered as satisfying in the case of on-site analysis. - Highlights: • Application of a series of artificial neural networks (ANN) to quantitative LIBS • Matrix-based classification of the soil samples by ANN • Concentration-based classification of the soil samples by ANN • Series of quantitative ANN models dedicated to the analysis of data subsets • Relative error of prediction lower than 20% for LIBS analysis of soil samples.

  20. Neural Substrates of Social Emotion Regulation: A fMRI Study on Imitation and Expressive Suppression to Dynamic Facial Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal eVrticka

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation is crucial for successfully engaging in social interactions. Yet, little is known about the neural mechanisms controlling behavioral responses to emotional expressions perceived in the face of other people, which constitute a key element of interpersonal communication. Here, we investigated brain systems involved in social emotion perception and regulation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in 20 healthy participants who saw dynamic facial expressions of either happiness or sadness, and were asked to either imitate the expression or to suppress any expression on their own face (in addition to a gender judgment control task. fMRI results revealed higher activity in regions associated with emotion (e.g., the insula, motor function (e.g., motor cortex, and theory of mind during imitation. Activity in dorsal cingulate cortex was also increased during imitation, possibly reflecting greater action monitoring or conflict with own feeling states. In addition, premotor regions were more strongly activated during both imitation and suppression, suggesting a recruitment of motor control for both the production and inhibition of emotion expressions. Expressive suppression produced increases in dorsolateral and lateral prefrontal cortex typically related to cognitive control. These results suggest that voluntary imitation and expressive suppression modulate brain responses to emotional signals perceived from faces, by up- and down-regulating activity in distributed subcortical and cortical networks that are particularly involved in emotion, action monitoring, and cognitive control.

  1. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Petrini

    Full Text Available In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music, visual (musician's movements only, and auditory emotional (music only displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  2. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Karin; Crabbe, Frances; Sheridan, Carol; Pollick, Frank E

    2011-04-29

    In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music), visual (musician's movements only), and auditory emotional (music only) displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound) than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound) as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  3. Effects of craving behavioral intervention on neural substrates of cue-induced craving in Internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tao; Yao, Yuan-Wei; Potenza, Marc N; Xia, Cui-Cui; Lan, Jing; Liu, Lu; Wang, Ling-Jiao; Liu, Ben; Ma, Shan-Shan; Fang, Xiao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is characterized by high levels of craving for online gaming and related cues. Since addiction-related cues can evoke increased activation in brain areas involved in motivational and reward processing and may engender gaming behaviors or trigger relapse, ameliorating cue-induced craving may be a promising target for interventions for IGD. This study compared neural activation between 40 IGD and 19 healthy control (HC) subjects during an Internet-gaming cue-reactivity task and found that IGD subjects showed stronger activation in multiple brain areas, including the dorsal striatum, brainstem, substantia nigra, and anterior cingulate cortex, but lower activation in the posterior insula. Furthermore, twenty-three IGD subjects (CBI + group) participated in a craving behavioral intervention (CBI) group therapy, whereas the remaining 17 IGD subjects (CBI - group) did not receive any intervention, and all IGD subjects were scanned during similar time intervals. The CBI + group showed decreased IGD severity and cue-induced craving, enhanced activation in the anterior insula and decreased insular connectivity with the lingual gyrus and precuneus after receiving CBI. These findings suggest that CBI is effective in reducing craving and severity in IGD, and it may exert its effects by altering insula activation and its connectivity with regions involved in visual processing and attention bias.

  4. Effects of craving behavioral intervention on neural substrates of cue-induced craving in Internet gaming disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Tao Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Internet gaming disorder (IGD is characterized by high levels of craving for online gaming and related cues. Since addiction-related cues can evoke increased activation in brain areas involved in motivational and reward processing and may engender gaming behaviors or trigger relapse, ameliorating cue-induced craving may be a promising target for interventions for IGD. This study compared neural activation between 40 IGD and 19 healthy control (HC subjects during an Internet-gaming cue-reactivity task and found that IGD subjects showed stronger activation in multiple brain areas, including the dorsal striatum, brainstem, substantia nigra, and anterior cingulate cortex, but lower activation in the posterior insula. Furthermore, twenty-three IGD subjects (CBI+ group participated in a craving behavioral intervention (CBI group therapy, whereas the remaining 17 IGD subjects (CBI− group did not receive any intervention, and all IGD subjects were scanned during similar time intervals. The CBI+ group showed decreased IGD severity and cue-induced craving, enhanced activation in the anterior insula and decreased insular connectivity with the lingual gyrus and precuneus after receiving CBI. These findings suggest that CBI is effective in reducing craving and severity in IGD, and it may exert its effects by altering insula activation and its connectivity with regions involved in visual processing and attention bias.

  5. The neural substrates of natural reading: A comparison of normal and nonword text using eyetracking and fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonil eChoi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most previous studies investigating the neural correlates of reading have presented text using serial visual presentation (SVP, which may not fully reflect the underlying processes of natural reading. In the present study, eye movements and BOLD data were collected while subjects either read normal paragraphs naturally or moved their eyes through paragraphs of pseudo-text (pronounceable pseudowords or consonant letter strings in two pseudo-reading conditions. Eye movement data established that subjects were reading and scanning the stimuli normally. A conjunction fMRI analysis across natural- and pseudo-reading showed that a common eye-movement network including frontal eye fields, supplementary eye fields, and intraparietal sulci was activated, consistent with previous studies using simpler eye movement tasks. In addition, natural reading versus pseudo-reading showed different patterns of brain activation: normal reading produced activation in a well-established language network that included superior temporal gyrus/sulcus, middle temporal gyrus, angular gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus, whereas pseudo-reading produced activation in an attentional network that included anterior/posterior cingulate and parietal cortex. These results are consistent with results found in previous single-saccade eye movement tasks and SVP reading studies, suggesting that component processes of eye-movement control and language processing observed in past fMRI research generalize to natural reading. The results also suggest that combining eyetracking and fMRI is a suitable method for investigating the component processes of natural reading in fMRI research.

  6. The neural substrates of natural reading: a comparison of normal and nonword text using eyetracking and fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonil; Desai, Rutvik H; Henderson, John M

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies investigating the neural correlates of reading have presented text using serial visual presentation (SVP), which may not fully reflect the underlying processes of natural reading. In the present study, eye movements and BOLD data were collected while subjects either read normal paragraphs naturally or moved their eyes through "paragraphs" of pseudo-text (pronounceable pseudowords or consonant letter strings) in two pseudo-reading conditions. Eye movement data established that subjects were reading and scanning the stimuli normally. A conjunction fMRI analysis across natural- and pseudo-reading showed that a common eye-movement network including frontal eye fields (FEF), supplementary eye fields (SEF), and intraparietal sulci was activated, consistent with previous studies using simpler eye movement tasks. In addition, natural reading versus pseudo-reading showed different patterns of brain activation: normal reading produced activation in a well-established language network that included superior temporal gyrus/sulcus, middle temporal gyrus (MTG), angular gyrus (AG), inferior frontal gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus, whereas pseudo-reading produced activation in an attentional network that included anterior/posterior cingulate and parietal cortex. These results are consistent with results found in previous single-saccade eye movement tasks and SVP reading studies, suggesting that component processes of eye-movement control and language processing observed in past fMRI research generalize to natural reading. The results also suggest that combining eyetracking and fMRI is a suitable method for investigating the component processes of natural reading in fMRI research.

  7. Ferroelectric properties of lead-free polycrystalline CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} thin films on glass substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yoonho, E-mail: yahn@khu.ac.kr; Son, Jong Yeog, E-mail: jyson@khu.ac.kr [Department of Applied Physics and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Joonkyung [Department of Nanoenergy Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    CaBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9} (CBNO) thin film, a lead-free ferroelectric material, was prepared on a Pt/Ta/glass substrate via pulsed laser deposition. The Ta film was deposited on the glass substrate for a buffer layer. A (115) preferred orientation of the polycrystalline CBNO thin film was verified via X-ray diffraction measurements. The CBNO thin film on a glass substrate exhibited good ferroelectric properties with a remnant polarization of 4.8 μC/cm{sup 2} (2P{sub r} ∼9.6 μC/cm{sup 2}), although it had lower polarization than the epitaxially c-oriented CBNO thin film reported previously. A mosaic-like ferroelectric domain structure was observed via piezoresponse force microscopy. Significantly, the polycrystalline CBNO thin film showed much faster switching behavior within about 100 ns than that of the epitaxially c-oriented CBNO thin film.

  8. Lead decreases cell survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of primary cultured adult neural precursor cells through activation of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Anna; Wang, Hao; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process whereby adult neural precursor cells (aNPCs) in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) generate adult-born, functional neurons in the hippocampus. This process is modulated by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and the adult-born neurons have been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. However, studies on how neurotoxic agents affect this process and the underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether lead, a heavy metal, directly impairs critical processes in adult neurogenesis and to characterize the underlying signaling pathways using primary cultured SGZ-aNPCs isolated from adult mice. We report here that lead significantly increases apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in SGZ-aNPCs. In addition, lead significantly impairs spontaneous neuronal differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, we found that activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways are important for lead cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that lead can directly act on adult neural stem cells and impair critical processes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to its neurotoxicity and adverse effects on cognition in adults. PMID:25967738

  9. Computational analysis of the domain architecture and substrate-gating mechanism of prolyl oligopeptidases from Shewanella woodyi and identification probable lead molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Priya; Skariyachan, Sinosh; Mutt, Eshita; Kaushik, Swati

    2015-02-06

    Prolyl oligopeptidases (POP) are serine proteases found in prokaryotes and eukaryotes which hydrolyze the peptide bond containing proline. The current study focuses on the analysis of POP sequences, their distribution and domain architecture in Shewanella woodyi, a Gram negative, luminous bacterium which causes celiac sprue and similar infections in marine organisms. The POP undergoes huge inter-domain movement, which allows possible route for the entry of any substrate. Hence, it offers an opportunity to understand the mechanism of substrate gating by studying the domain architecture and possibility to identify a probable drug target. In the present study, the POP sequence was retrieved from GenBank data base and the best homologous templates were identified by PSI-BLAST search. The three dimensional structures of the closed and open forms of POP from Shewanella woodyi, which are not available in native form, was generated by homology modeling. The ideal lead molecules were screened by computer aided virtual screening and the binding potential of the best leads towards the target was studied by molecular docking. The domain architecture of the POP revealed that, it has a propeller domain consist of β-sheets, surrounded by α-helices and α/β hydrolase domain with catalytic triad containing Ser-564, Asp-646 and His-681. The hypothetical models of open and closed POP showed backbone RMSD value of 0.56 Å and 0.65 Å respectively. Ramachandran plot of the open and closed POP conformations accounts for 99.4% and 98.7% residues in the favoured region respectively. Our study revealed that, propeller domain comes as an insert between N-terminal and C-terminal α/β hydrolase domain. Molecular docking, drug likeliness properties and ADME prediction suggested that KUC-103481N and Pramiracetum can be used as probable lead molecules towards the POP from Shewanella woodyi.

  10. Low-cost and high-resolution x-ray lithography utilizing a lift-off sputtered lead film mask on a Mylar substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisitsoraat, A.; Mongpraneet, S.; Phatthanakun, R.; Chomnawang, N.; Phokharatkul, D.; Patthanasettakul, V.; Tuantranont, A.

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a low-cost and high-resolution x-ray micromask is developed by sputtered lead film on a Mylar sheet substrate with the lift-off process and the x-ray mask is experimented for patterning SU-8 negative photoresist on a glass substrate. Sputtering is selected for Pb thick film deposition due to its high sputtering yield. The Pb mask is used for x-ray lithography of SU-8 photoresist with 5 µm closely spaced square array patterns, designed for electrowetting electrodes on a microfluidic chip. For 140 µm thick SU-8 photoresist, a Pb film thickness of around 10 µm was used to block x-rays with 95% x-ray image contrast at a critical dose of 4200 mJ cm-3. A high aspect ratio of 26.5 of SU8 microstructure with 5 µm lateral resolution has been demonstrated by the developed low-cost Pb-based x-ray mask. In addition, a steep sidewall angle of nearly 90° for SU-8 structure is confirmed. The results demonstrate that the Pb-based x-ray mask offers high-resolution x-ray lithography at a very low cost. Therefore, it is highly promising for commercial applications.

  11. Reduced tract integrity of the model for social communication is a neural substrate of social communication deficits in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Chun; Chen, Yu-Jen; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen

    2017-05-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with social communication deficits as one of the core symptoms. Recently, a five-level model for the social communication has been proposed in which white matter tracts corresponding to each level of the model are identified. Given that the model for social communication subserves social language functions, we hypothesized that the tract integrity of the model for social communication may be reduced in ASD, and the reduction may be related to social communication deficits. Sixty-two right-handed boys with ASD and 55 typically developing (TD) boys received clinical evaluations, intelligence tests, the Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ), and MRI scans. Generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) was measured by diffusion spectrum imaging to indicate the microstructural integrity of the tracts for each level of the social communication model. Group difference in the tract integrity and its relationship with the SCQ subscales of social communication and social interaction were investigated. We found that the GFA values of the superior longitudinal fasciculus III (SLF III, level 1) and the frontal aslant tracts (FAT, level 2) were decreased in ASD compared to TD. Moreover, the GFA values of the SLF III and the FAT were associated with the social interaction subscale in ASD. The tract integrity of the model for social communication is reduced in ASD, and the reduction is associated with impaired social interaction. Our results support that reduced tract integrity of the model for social communication might be a neural substrate of social communication deficits in ASD. © 2016 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  12. Arrhythmia Identification with Two-Lead Electrocardiograms Using Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines for a Portable ECG Monitor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shing-Hong Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic configuration that can detect the position of R-waves, classify the normal sinus rhythm (NSR and other four arrhythmic types from the continuous ECG signals obtained from the MIT-BIH arrhythmia database is proposed. In this configuration, a support vector machine (SVM was used to detect and mark the ECG heartbeats with raw signals and differential signals of a lead ECG. An algorithm based on the extracted markers segments waveforms of Lead II and V1 of the ECG as the pattern classification features. A self-constructing neural fuzzy inference network (SoNFIN was used to classify NSR and four arrhythmia types, including premature ventricular contraction (PVC, premature atrium contraction (PAC, left bundle branch block (LBBB, and right bundle branch block (RBBB. In a real scenario, the classification results show the accuracy achieved is 96.4%. This performance is suitable for a portable ECG monitor system for home care purposes.

  13. A Balanced Accuracy Fitness Function Leads to Robust Analysis using Grammatical Evolution Neural Networks in the Case of Class Imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardison, Nicholas E; Fanelli, Theresa J; Dudek, Scott M; Reif, David M; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2008-01-01

    Grammatical Evolution Neural Networks (GENN) is a computational method designed to detect gene-gene interactions in genetic epidemiology, but has so far only been evaluated in situations with balanced numbers of cases and controls. Real data, however, rarely has such perfectly balanced classes. In the current study, we test the power of GENN to detect interactions in data with a range of class imbalance using two fitness functions (classification error and balanced error), as well as data re-sampling. We show that when using classification error, class imbalance greatly decreases the power of GENN. Re-sampling methods demonstrated improved power, but using balanced accuracy resulted in the highest power. Based on the results of this study, balanced error has replaced classification error in the GENN algorithm.

  14. Augmented BMPRIA-mediated BMP signaling in cranial neural crest lineage leads to cleft palate formation and delayed tooth differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available The importance of BMP receptor Ia (BMPRIa mediated signaling in the development of craniofacial organs, including the tooth and palate, has been well illuminated in several mouse models of loss of function, and by its mutations associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and facial defects in humans. In this study, we took a gain-of-function approach to further address the role of BMPR-IA-mediated signaling in the mesenchymal compartment during tooth and palate development. We generated transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa in cranial neural crest (CNC cells that contributes to the dental and palatal mesenchyme. Mice bearing enhanced BMPRIa-mediated signaling in CNC cells exhibit complete cleft palate and delayed odontogenic differentiation. We showed that the cleft palate defect in the transgenic animals is attributed to an altered cell proliferation rate in the anterior palatal mesenchyme and to the delayed palatal elevation in the posterior portion associated with ectopic cartilage formation. Despite enhanced activity of BMP signaling in the dental mesenchyme, tooth development and patterning in transgenic mice appeared normal except delayed odontogenic differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that a finely tuned level of BMPRIa-mediated signaling is essential for normal palate and tooth development.

  15. Dielectric and ferroelectric properties of strain-relieved epitaxial lead-free KNN-LT-LS ferroelectric thin films on SrTiO3 substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazari, M.; Akdoǧan, E. K.; Safari, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report the growth of single-phase (K0.44,Na0.52,Li0.04)(Nb0.84,Ta0.10,Sb0.06)O3 thin films on SrRuO3 coated ⟨001⟩ oriented SrTiO3 substrates by using pulsed laser deposition. Films grown at 600°C under low laser fluence exhibit a ⟨001⟩ textured columnar grained nanostructure, which coalesce with increasing deposition temperature, leading to a uniform fully epitaxial highly stoichiometric film at 750°C. However, films deposited at lower temperatures exhibit compositional fluctuations as verified by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. The epitaxial films of 400-600nm thickness have a room temperature relative permittivity of ˜750 and a loss tangent of ˜6% at 1kHz. The room temperature remnant polarization of the films is 4μC /cm2, while the saturation polarization is 7.1μC/cm2 at 24kV/cm and the coercive field is ˜7.3kV/cm. The results indicate that approximately 50% of the bulk permittivity and 20% of bulk spontaneous polarization can be retained in submicron epitaxial KNN-LT-LS thin film, respectively. The conductivity of the films remains to be a challenge as evidenced by the high loss tangent, leakage currents, and broad hysteresis loops.

  16. Overreliance on auditory feedback may lead to sound/syllable repetitions: simulations of stuttering and fluency-inducing conditions with a neural model of speech production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civier, Oren; Tasko, Stephen M.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the hypothesis that stuttering may result in part from impaired readout of feedforward control of speech, which forces persons who stutter (PWS) to produce speech with a motor strategy that is weighted too much toward auditory feedback control. Over-reliance on feedback control leads to production errors which, if they grow large enough, can cause the motor system to “reset” and repeat the current syllable. This hypothesis is investigated using computer simulations of a “neurally impaired” version of the DIVA model, a neural network model of speech acquisition and production. The model’s outputs are compared to published acoustic data from PWS’ fluent speech, and to combined acoustic and articulatory movement data collected from the dysfluent speech of one PWS. The simulations mimic the errors observed in the PWS subject’s speech, as well as the repairs of these errors. Additional simulations were able to account for enhancements of fluency gained by slowed/prolonged speech and masking noise. Together these results support the hypothesis that many dysfluencies in stuttering are due to a bias away from feedforward control and toward feedback control. PMID:20831971

  17. Effect of the bismuth content on the interface reactions between copper substrate and Sn-Zn-Al-Bi lead-free solder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares, D.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of environmental and health concerns, some alternative solder alloys, named lead-free ones, are being developed. Among them, the Sn-Zn-Al system has been studied and reveals promising properties. In this work the presence of bismuth, in the range of 0-8 wt%, was evaluated in what concerns to the chemical interactions between solder/substrate and the equilibrium phases present at the interface. The phases formed at the interface between the copper substrate and a molten lead-free solder were studied with different time of stage and alloy compositions. The effect of bismuth content on transformation temperatures of a Sn-9Zn-1Al base alloy was studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC. For each alloy the solidification range was determined, which is an important characteristic regarding the application of these materials in the electronic industry. Identification of equilibrium phases and their chemical composition evaluation was performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS. The interface thickness and chemical composition profiles were also evaluated.

    Debido a las preocupaciones ambientales y sanitarias, se están desarrollando aleaciones alternativas para soldadura sin plomo. Entre ellas se ha estudiado el sistema Sn-Zn-Al, que revela propiedades prometedoras. En este trabajo se evalúa la presencia de bismuto, en el rango de 0 a 8 % en peso, en relación con las interacciones químicas entre soldadura y substrato y con las fases de equilibrio presentes en la superficie de contacto. Se han estudiado las fases formadas en la superficie de contacto entre el substrato de cobre y una soldadura fundida sin plomo en función del tiempo de mantenimiento y de la composición de la aleación. Se ha evaluado el efecto del contenido en bismuto sobre las temperaturas de transformación de una aleación de base Sn-9Zn-1Al mediante Calorimetría de Barrido Diferencial (DSC. Se ha determinado el rango de solidificación para cada

  18. Effects of indium on the intermetallic layer between low-Ag SAC0307-xIn lead-free solders and Cu substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanlayasiri, Kannachai, E-mail: kkkannac@kmitl.ac.th; Sukpimai, Kamtorn

    2016-05-25

    This research has investigated the effects of indium on the intermetallic layer formation attributable to the reaction between low-Ag SAC0307-xIn lead-free solder and a Cu substrate, where x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0 wt%. This study has also examined the post-soldering and post–thermal aging interfacial layers. Morphology parameters were utilized to represent the shape of total intermetallic layer at the interface. The findings indicated that indium had no effect on the pre- and post-aging intermetallic layer overall thicknesses but lowered the Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} thickness ratio; and that the concentrations of indium exhibited no influence over the post-soldering and post–thermal aging morphology parameter values. In the experiments, the morphology parameter value decreased with increase in the aging time. In addition, the suppression effect of indium on the growth of Cu{sub 3}Sn layer was evident in the post–thermal aging stage with the growth inversely correlated to the indium content. Discussion on the suppression mechanism of indium on the Cu{sub 3}Sn formation is also provided herein. - Highlights: • Indium has no effect on both thickness and morphology of intermetallic layer. • The morphology parameter decreases with the increase of aging time. • Cu{sub 3}Sn/Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} thickness ratio is decreased with the increase of indium content. • Suppression mechanism of indium on the Cu{sub 3}Sn formation is proposed.

  19. Culture in the mind's mirror: how anthropology and neuroscience can inform a model of the neural substrate for cultural imitative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losin, Elizabeth A Reynolds; Dapretto, Mirella; Iacoboni, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Cultural neuroscience, the study of how cultural experience shapes the brain, is an emerging subdiscipline in the neurosciences. Yet, a foundational question to the study of culture and the brain remains neglected by neuroscientific inquiry: "How does cultural information get into the brain in the first place?" Fortunately, the tools needed to explore the neural architecture of cultural learning - anthropological theories and cognitive neuroscience methodologies - already exist; they are merely separated by disciplinary boundaries. Here we review anthropological theories of cultural learning derived from fieldwork and modeling; since cultural learning theory suggests that sophisticated imitation abilities are at the core of human cultural learning, we focus our review on cultural imitative learning. Accordingly we proceed to discuss the neural underpinnings of imitation and other mechanisms important for cultural learning: learning biases, mental state attribution, and reinforcement learning. Using cultural neuroscience theory and cognitive neuroscience research as our guides, we then propose a preliminary model of the neural architecture of cultural learning. Finally, we discuss future studies needed to test this model and fully explore and explain the neural underpinnings of cultural imitative learning.

  20. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth exhibit stromal-derived inducing activity and lead to generation of neural crest cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Tanhaei, Somayyeh; Rabiei, Farzaneh; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Masoudi, Najmeh Sadat; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs). These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs) and NCCs. In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA) and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  1. Application of Chitosan-Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Lead Extraction From Water Samples by Combining Ant Colony Optimization with Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, M.; Pourkarami, A.; Arefnejad, E.; Bohlooli, M.; Khatibi, A.; Ghaffari-Moghaddam, M.; Zareian-Jahromi, S.

    2017-09-01

    Chitosan-zinc oxide nanoparticles (CZPs) were developed for solid-phase extraction. Combined artificial neural network-ant colony optimization (ANN-ACO) was used for the simultaneous preconcentration and determination of lead (Pb2+) ions in water samples prior to graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). The solution pH, mass of adsorbent CZPs, amount of 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN), which was used as a complexing agent, eluent volume, eluent concentration, and flow rates of sample and eluent were used as input parameters of the ANN model, and the percentage of extracted Pb2+ ions was used as the output variable of the model. A multilayer perception network with a back-propagation learning algorithm was used to fit the experimental data. The optimum conditions were obtained based on the ACO. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection for Pb2+ ions was found to be 0.078 μg/L. This procedure was also successfully used to determine the amounts of Pb2+ ions in various natural water samples.

  2. Functional overlap of top-down emotion regulation and generation: an fMRI study identifying common neural substrates between cognitive reappraisal and cognitively generated emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Benjamin; Misra, Supriya; Prasad, Aditya; McRae, Kateri

    2014-09-01

    One factor that influences the success of emotion regulation is the manner in which the regulated emotion was generated. Recent research has suggested that reappraisal, a top-down emotion regulation strategy, is more effective in decreasing self-reported negative affect when emotions were generated from the top-down, versus the bottom-up. On the basis of a process overlap framework, we hypothesized that the neural regions active during reappraisal would overlap more with emotions that were generated from the top-down, rather than from the bottom-up. In addition, we hypothesized that increased neural overlap between reappraisal and the history effects of top-down emotion generation would be associated with increased reappraisal success. The results of several analyses suggested that reappraisal and emotions that were generated from the top-down share a core network of prefrontal, temporal, and cingulate regions. This overlap is specific; no such overlap was observed between reappraisal and emotions that were generated in a bottom-up fashion. This network consists of regions previously implicated in linguistic processing, cognitive control, and self-relevant appraisals, which are processes thought to be crucial to both reappraisal and top-down emotion generation. Furthermore, individuals with high reappraisal success demonstrated greater neural overlap between reappraisal and the history of top-down emotion generation than did those with low reappraisal success. The overlap of these key regions, reflecting overlapping processes, provides an initial insight into the mechanism by which generation history may facilitate emotion regulation.

  3. Neural substrates of normal and impaired preattentive sensory discrimination in large cohorts of nonpsychiatric subjects and schizophrenia patients as indexed by MMN and P3a change detection responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Rissling, Anthony J; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto; Kirihara, Kenji; Pela, Marlena; Sprock, Joyce; Braff, David L; Light, Gregory A

    2013-02-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) patients have information processing deficits, spanning from low level sensory processing to higher-order cognitive functions. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are event-related potential (ERP) components that are automatically elicited in response to unattended changes in ongoing, repetitive stimuli that provide a window into abnormal information processing in SZ. MMN and P3a are among the most robust and consistently identified deficits in SZ, yet the neural substrates of these responses and their associated deficits in SZ are not fully understood. This study examined the neural sources of MMN and P3a components in a large cohort of SZ and nonpsychiatric control subjects (NCS) using Exact Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analyses (eLORETA) in order to identify the neural sources of MMN and P3a as well as the brain regions associated with deficits commonly observed among SZ patients. 410 SZ and 247 NCS underwent EEG testing using a duration-deviant auditory oddball paradigm (1-kHz tones, 500ms SOA; standard p=0.90, 50-ms duration; deviant tones P=0.10, 100-ms duration) while passively watching a silent video. Voxel-by-voxel within- (MMN vs. P3a) and between-group (SZ vs. NCS) comparisons were performed using eLORETA. SZ had robust deficits in MMN and P3a responses measured at scalp electrodes consistent with other studies. These components mapped onto neural sources broadly distributed across temporal, frontal, and parietal regions. MMN deficits in SZ were associated with reduced activations in discrete medial frontal brain regions, including the anterior-posterior cingulate and medial frontal gyri. These early sensory discriminatory MMN impairments were followed by P3a deficits associated with widespread reductions in the activation of attentional networks (frontal, temporal, parietal regions), reflecting impaired orienting or shifts of attention to the infrequent stimuli. MMN and P3a are dissociable responses associated with broadly

  4. Neural substrates of normal and impaired preattentive sensory discrimination in large cohorts of nonpsychiatric subjects and schizophrenia patients as indexed by MMN and P3a change detection responses☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Rissling, Anthony J.; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto; Kirihara, Kenji; Pela, Marlena; Sprock, Joyce; Braff, David L.; Light, Gregory A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia (SZ) patients have information processing deficits, spanning from low level sensory processing to higher-order cognitive functions. Mismatch negativity (MMN) and P3a are event-related potential (ERP) components that are automatically elicited in response to unattended changes in ongoing, repetitive stimuli that provide a window into abnormal information processing in SZ. MMN and P3a are among the most robust and consistently identified deficits in SZ, yet the neural substrates of these responses and their associated deficits in SZ are not fully understood. This study examined the neural sources of MMN and P3a components in a large cohort of SZ and nonpsychiatric control subjects (NCS) using Exact Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography Analyses (eLORETA) in order to identify the neural sources of MMN and P3a as well as the brain regions associated with deficits commonly observed among SZ patients. Methods 410 SZ and 247 NCS underwent EEG testing using a duration-deviant auditory oddball paradigm (1-kHz tones, 500 ms SOA; standard p=0.90, 50-ms duration; deviant tones P=0.10, 100-ms duration) while passively watching a silent video. Voxel-by-voxel within- (MMN vs. P3a) and between-group (SZ vs. NCS) comparisons were performed using eLORETA. Results SZ had robust deficits in MMN and P3a responses measured at scalp electrodes consistent with other studies. These components mapped onto neural sources broadly distributed across temporal, frontal, and parietal regions. MMN deficits in SZ were associated with reduced activations in discrete medial frontal brain regions, including the anterior–posterior cingulate and medial frontal gyri. These early sensory discriminatory MMN impairments were followed by P3a deficits associated with widespread reductions in the activation of attentional networks (frontal, temporal, parietal regions), reflecting impaired orienting or shifts of attention to the infrequent stimuli. Conclusions MMN and P3a are

  5. X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stress in sol-gel grown lead zirconate titanate thick films on nickel-based super alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshyarmanesh, Hamidreza; Nehzat, Naser; Salehi, Mehdi [Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghodsi, Mojtaba [Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat (Oman)

    2015-02-15

    Residual compressive stress of Pb(Zr{sub 0.52}Ti{sub 0.48})O{sub 3} thick films was investigated using residual strains derived from X-ray diffraction patterns. Sin{sup 2}ψ method was applied for the 5, 10 and 15 μm sol-gel derived thick films annealed at 700 .deg. C for 1 hr as high frequency structural health monitoring square-shape transducers of 10 x10 mm, deposited onto the curved nickel-based super alloy substrates. A triaxial model was proposed based on piezoelectric constitutive equations, and Bragg's law at a large diffraction angle (∼89°) was utilized considering the electromechanical coupling factor as well as elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric constants. Thickness variations led to a significant change in residual stress magnitudes delineated from more-accurate triaxial model compared to small angle plane-stress results not considering the piezoelectric coupling effects.

  6. LAMP-2 deficiency leads to hippocampal dysfunction but normal clearance of neuronal substrates of chaperone-mediated autophagy in a mouse model for Danon disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaug, Michelle; Stroobants, Stijn; Schweizer, Michaela; Peters, Judith; Zunke, Friederike; Allerding, Mirka; D'Hooge, Rudi; Saftig, Paul; Blanz, Judith

    2015-01-31

    The Lysosomal Associated Membrane Protein type-2 (LAMP-2) is an abundant lysosomal membrane protein with an important role in immunity, macroautophagy (MA) and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Mutations within the Lamp2 gene cause Danon disease, an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder characterized by (cardio)myopathy and intellectual dysfunction. The pathological hallmark of this disease is an accumulation of glycogen and autophagic vacuoles in cardiac and skeletal muscle that, along with the myopathy, is also present in LAMP-2-deficient mice. Intellectual dysfunction observed in the human disease suggests a pivotal role of LAMP-2 within brain. LAMP-2A, one specific LAMP-2 isoform, was proposed to be important for the lysosomal degradation of selective proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's and Parkinson's disease. To elucidate the neuronal function of LAMP-2 we analyzed knockout mice for neuropathological changes, MA and steady-state levels of CMA substrates. The absence of LAMP-2 in murine brain led to inflammation and abnormal behavior, including motor deficits and impaired learning. The latter abnormality points to hippocampal dysfunction caused by altered lysosomal activity, distinct accumulation of p62-positive aggregates, autophagic vacuoles and lipid storage within hippocampal neurons and their presynaptic terminals. The absence of LAMP-2 did not apparently affect MA or steady-state levels of selected CMA substrates in brain or neuroblastoma cells under physiological and prolonged starvation conditions. Our data contribute to the understanding of intellectual dysfunction observed in Danon disease patients and highlight the role of LAMP-2 within the central nervous system, particularly the hippocampus.

  7. Determination of the load state of lead-acid batteries using neural networks; Determinacion del estado de carga de baterias plomo-acido utilizando redes neuronales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristin V, Miguel A; Ortega S, Cesar A [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The charge of lead-acid batteries (LAB), as in any other type of batteries, consists of replacing the energy consumed during the discharge. Nevertheless, as no physical or chemical process is good enough to totality recharge a battery, it is necessary to supply to it more than the 100% of the energy demanded during its discharge. A critical factor to make a suitable load control of the batteries is to determine its own state of load. That is to say, to have an efficient load control, it is necessary to count on means that allow to accurately determining the residual capacity of the battery to deliver load. This one is the one of the aspects of greater interest in the research centers around world. For this reason, in this work it was pretended to develop a calculation algorithm of the state of load of batteries based on a fuzzy-neural network that could calculate the state of load without using the battery current as an input. This is because one of the main problems for the designers of battery load controllers is the correct supervision of the current that circulates around the system in all the rank of operation of the same one because the sensors do not have a linear behavior. [Spanish] La recarga de baterias plomo-acido (BPA), como cualquier otro tipo de baterias, consiste en reponer la energia consumida durante la descarga. Sin embargo, como ningun proceso fisico o quimico es lo bastante eficiente para recargar a totalidad una bateria, es necesario suministrarle mas del 100% de la energia demandada durante su descarga. Un factor critico para realizar un adecuado control de carga de las baterias, es determinar su propio estado de carga. Es decir, para tener un control de carga eficiente, es necesario contar con un medio que permita determinar con precision la capacidad remanente de la bateria para entregar carga. Este es uno de los aspectos de mayor interes en los centros de investigacion alrededor el mundo. Por tal razon, en este trabajo se propuso

  8. Thermal and mechanical properties of lead-free SnZn–xNa casting alloys, and interfacial chemistry on Cu substrates during the soldering process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gancarz, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.gancarz@imim.pl [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Bobrowski, Piotr; Pstruś, Janusz [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Pawlak, Sylwia [Wroclaw Research Centre EIT+, Wroclaw (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    The microstructural features, thermal properties and mechanical properties of eutectic Sn–Zn alloys with varying Na content (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 3.0 and 5.0 at. %) were examined in this study. In the scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis data, precipitates of NaSn were observed. The addition of Na to eutectic Sn–Zn alloy improved the mechanical properties and increased electrical resistivity, and reduced the coefficient of thermal expansion; however, the melting point did not change. Wettability tests carried out using Na-doped Sn–15Zn alloys on Cu substrates showed the formation of Cu–Zn phases at the interfaces. Wettability studies were performed using flux ALU33 after 60, 180, 480, 900, 1800 and 3600 s of contact, at temperatures of 230, 250, 280 and 320 °C. The experiments were designed to demonstrate the effect of Na addition on the formation and growth kinetics of Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} and CuZn{sub 4} phases, which were identified using XRDs and EDS. The addition of Na to SnZn causes a reduction in the thickness of the intermetallic compounds layer created at the interface between the liquid solder and the Cu substrate, and an increase in the activation energy of the Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} phase compared to eutectic SnZn. - Highlights: • Precipitates of NaSn was observed and confirmed using TEM and XRD. • Addition Na to eutectic SnZn cussed increased the mechanical properties. • IMCs of Na–Zn and Na–Sn increased electrical resistivity and reduced the CTE. • IMCs layers CuZn{sub 4} and Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} was found at the interface. • Na content changing the character of growth CuZn{sub 4} layer in SnZnNa alloys.

  9. Met117 oxidation leads to enhanced flexibility of cardiovascular biomarker- lipoprotein- associated phospholipase A2 and reduced substrate binding affinity with platelet-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Arun Bahadur; Bhattacharjee, Atanu

    2018-02-07

    Human Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an important biomarker for cardiovascular diseases and a therapeutically important drug target against Atherosclerosis. It has the ability to hydrolyze various oxidized low density lipoproteins (LDL) and generates potent pro-inflammatory signaling molecules. Both physiological and non-physiological oxidants have been reported to inhibit Lp-PLA2 activity. The mechanism of the enzyme inhibition due to oxidation of surface exposed Met117 at the structural level is not clearly understood. In the present work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and Essential dynamics (ED) has been used in tandem with molecular docking approach to understand the structural alteration in Lp-PLA2 upon Met117 oxidation. Further, the binding of substrate, Platelet-activating factor (PAF) with the wild type and oxidized form have also been investigated. Our results showed that Met117 oxidation caused enhanced flexibility and decreased compactness in oxidized state. PAF binding interaction with oxidized protein was mediated only through hydrophobic interactions. MD simulation studies revealed that the oxidized protein failed to firmly bind PAF. Our present findings will help understand the mechanism of Lp-PLA2 inhibition under oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Motor-related brain activity during action observation: a neural substrate for electrocorticographic brain-computer interfaces after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Collinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available After spinal cord injury (SCI, motor commands from the brain are unable to reach peripheral nerves and muscles below the level of the lesion. Action observation, in which a person observes someone else performing an action, has been used to augment traditional rehabilitation paradigms. Similarly, action observation can be used to derive the relationship between brain activity and movement kinematics for a motor-based brain-computer interface (BCI even when the user cannot generate overt movements. BCIs use brain signals to control external devices to replace functions that have been lost due to SCI or other motor impairment. Previous studies have reported congruent motor cortical activity during observed and overt movements using magnetoencephalography (MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Recent single-unit studies using intracortical microelectrodes also demonstrated that a large number of motor cortical neurons had similar firing rate patterns between overt and observed movements. Given the increasing interest in electrocorticography (ECoG-based BCIs, our goal was to identify whether action observation-related cortical activity could be recorded using ECoG during grasping tasks. Specifically, we aimed to identify congruent neural activity during observed and executed movements in both the sensorimotor rhythm (10-40 Hz and the high-gamma band (65-115 Hz which contains significant movement-related information. We observed significant motor-related high-gamma band activity during action observation in both able-bodied individuals and one participant with a complete C4 SCI. Furthermore, in able-bodied participants, both the low and high frequency bands demonstrated congruent activity between action execution and observation. Our results suggest that action observation could be an effective and critical procedure for deriving the mapping from ECoG signals to intended movement for an ECoG-based BCI system for individuals with

  11. Diversity in the architecture of ATLs, a family of plant ubiquitin-ligases, leads to recognition and targeting of substrates in different cellular environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Hernández, Victor; Aguilar-Henonin, Laura; Guzmán, Plinio

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin-ligases or E3s are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) that coordinate the transfer of ubiquitin to the target protein. A major class of ubiquitin-ligases consists of RING-finger domain proteins that include the substrate recognition sequences in the same polypeptide; these are known as single-subunit RING finger E3s. We are studying a particular family of RING finger E3s, named ATL, that contain a transmembrane domain and the RING-H2 finger domain; none of the member of the family contains any other previously described domain. Although the study of a few members in A. thaliana and O. sativa has been reported, the role of this family in the life cycle of a plant is still vague. To provide tools to advance on the functional analysis of this family we have undertaken a phylogenetic analysis of ATLs in twenty-four plant genomes. ATLs were found in all the 24 plant species analyzed, in numbers ranging from 20-28 in two basal species to 162 in soybean. Analysis of ATLs arrayed in tandem indicates that sets of genes are expanding in a species-specific manner. To get insights into the domain architecture of ATLs we generated 75 pHMM LOGOs from 1815 ATLs, and unraveled potential protein-protein interaction regions by means of yeast two-hybrid assays. Several ATLs were found to interact with DSK2a/ubiquilin through a region at the amino-terminal end, suggesting that this is a widespread interaction that may assist in the mode of action of ATLs; the region was traced to a distinct sequence LOGO. Our analysis provides significant observations on the evolution and expansion of the ATL family in addition to information on the domain structure of this class of ubiquitin-ligases that may be involved in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  12. Diversity in the architecture of ATLs, a family of plant ubiquitin-ligases, leads to recognition and targeting of substrates in different cellular environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Aguilar-Hernández

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin-ligases or E3s are components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS that coordinate the transfer of ubiquitin to the target protein. A major class of ubiquitin-ligases consists of RING-finger domain proteins that include the substrate recognition sequences in the same polypeptide; these are known as single-subunit RING finger E3s. We are studying a particular family of RING finger E3s, named ATL, that contain a transmembrane domain and the RING-H2 finger domain; none of the member of the family contains any other previously described domain. Although the study of a few members in A. thaliana and O. sativa has been reported, the role of this family in the life cycle of a plant is still vague. To provide tools to advance on the functional analysis of this family we have undertaken a phylogenetic analysis of ATLs in twenty-four plant genomes. ATLs were found in all the 24 plant species analyzed, in numbers ranging from 20-28 in two basal species to 162 in soybean. Analysis of ATLs arrayed in tandem indicates that sets of genes are expanding in a species-specific manner. To get insights into the domain architecture of ATLs we generated 75 pHMM LOGOs from 1815 ATLs, and unraveled potential protein-protein interaction regions by means of yeast two-hybrid assays. Several ATLs were found to interact with DSK2a/ubiquilin through a region at the amino-terminal end, suggesting that this is a widespread interaction that may assist in the mode of action of ATLs; the region was traced to a distinct sequence LOGO. Our analysis provides significant observations on the evolution and expansion of the ATL family in addition to information on the domain structure of this class of ubiquitin-ligases that may be involved in plant adaptation to environmental stress.

  13. A Study on the Physical Properties and Interfacial Reactions with Cu Substrate of Rapidly Solidified Sn-3.5Ag Lead-Free Solder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hai-Tao; Wang, Jie; Qu, Lin; Zhao, Ning; Kunwar, A.

    2013-08-01

    A rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag eutectic alloy produced by the melt-spinning technique was used as a sample in this research to investigate the microstructure, thermal properties, solder wettability, and inhibitory effect of Ag3Sn on Cu6Sn5 intermetallic compound (IMC). In addition, an as-cast Sn-3.5Ag solder was prepared as a reference. Rapidly solidified and as-cast Sn-3.5Ag alloys of the same size were soldered at 250°C for 1 s to observe their instant melting characteristics and for 3 s with different cooling methods to study the inhibitory effect of Ag3Sn on Cu6Sn5 IMC. Experimental techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and energy-dispersive spectrometry were used to observe and analyze the results of the study. It was found that rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder has more uniform microstructure, better wettability, and higher melting rate as compared with the as-cast material; Ag3Sn nanoparticles that formed in the rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder inhibited the growth of Cu6Sn5 IMC during aging significantly much strongly than in the as-cast material because their number in the rapidly solidified Sn-3.5Ag solder was greater than in the as-cast material with the same soldering process before aging. Among the various alternative lead-free solders, this study focused on comparison between rapidly solidified and as-cast solder alloys, with the former being observed to have better properties.

  14. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  15. Cultured neural networks: Optimisation of patterned network adhesiveness and characterisation of their neural activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Ruardij, T.G.; Marani, Enrico; Roelofsen, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    One type of future, improved neural interface is the "cultured probe"?. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA) on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and

  16. Neural Manifolds for the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A; Perich, Matthew G; Miller, Lee E; Solla, Sara A

    2017-06-07

    The analysis of neural dynamics in several brain cortices has consistently uncovered low-dimensional manifolds that capture a significant fraction of neural variability. These neural manifolds are spanned by specific patterns of correlated neural activity, the "neural modes." We discuss a model for neural control of movement in which the time-dependent activation of these neural modes is the generator of motor behavior. This manifold-based view of motor cortex may lead to a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  18. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Patti eAdank; Nuttall, Helen E.; Briony eBanks; Dan eKennedy-Higgins

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006). Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented...

  19. Neural Adaptation Leads to Cognitive Ethanol Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Brooks G.; Khurana, Sukant; Kuperman, Anna; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2012-01-01

    Physiological alcohol dependence is a key adaptation to chronic ethanol consumption that underlies withdrawal symptoms, is thought to directly contribute to alcohol addiction behaviors, and is associated with cognitive problems such as deficits in learning and memory [1–3]. Based on the idea that an ethanol-adapted (dependent) animal will perform better in a learning assay than an animal experiencing ethanol withdrawal will, we have used a learning paradigm to detect physiological ethanol dep...

  20. Development and Evolution of Neural Networks in an Artificial Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Astor, J C; Astor, Jens C.; Adami, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    We present a model of decentralized growth for Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) inspired by the development and the physiology of real nervous systems. In this model, each individual artificial neuron is an autonomous unit whose behavior is determined only by the genetic information it harbors and local concentrations of substrates modeled by a simple artificial chemistry. Gene expression is manifested as axon and dendrite growth, cell division and differentiation, substrate production and cell stimulation. We demonstrate the model's power with a hand-written genome that leads to the growth of a simple network which performs classical conditioning. To evolve more complex structures, we implemented a platform-independent, asynchronous, distributed Genetic Algorithm (GA) that allows users to participate in evolutionary experiments via the World Wide Web.

  1. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  2. Neural fields theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter; Potthast, Roland; Wright, James

    2014-01-01

    With this book, the editors present the first comprehensive collection in neural field studies, authored by leading scientists in the field - among them are two of the founding-fathers of neural field theory. Up to now, research results in the field have been disseminated across a number of distinct journals from mathematics, computational neuroscience, biophysics, cognitive science and others. Starting with a tutorial for novices in neural field studies, the book comprises chapters on emergent patterns, their phase transitions and evolution, on stochastic approaches, cortical development, cognition, robotics and computation, large-scale numerical simulations, the coupling of neural fields to the electroencephalogram and phase transitions in anesthesia. The intended readership are students and scientists in applied mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical biology, and computational neuroscience. Neural field theory and its applications have a long-standing tradition in the mathematical and computational ...

  3. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Lead Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Related Content View Sources Also Known As Blood Lead Test Blood Lead Level BLL Formal Name Lead, ...

  4. A new perspective on behavioral inconsistency and neural noise in aging: Compensatory speeding of neural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lee Hong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to present a new perspective on the aging brain. Here, we make connections between two key phenomena of brain aging: 1 increased neural noise or random background activity; and 2 slowing of brain activity. Our perspective proposes the possibility that the slowing of neural processing due to decreasing nerve conduction velocities leads to a compensatory speeding of neuron firing rates. These increased firing rates lead to a broader distribution of power in the frequency spectrum of neural oscillations, which we propose, can just as easily be interpreted as neural noise. Compensatory speeding of neural activity, as we present, is constrained by the: A availability of metabolic energy sources; and B competition for frequency bandwidth needed for neural communication. We propose that these constraints lead to the eventual inability to compensate for age-related declines in neural function that are manifested clinically as deficits in cognition, affect, and motor behavior.

  5. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  6. Droplet dynamics on patterned substrates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... comprising hydrophobic and hydrophilic stripes can depend sensitively on the dynamical pathway by which the state is reached. We also consider a substrate covered with micron-scale posts and investigate how this can lead to superhydrophobic behaviour. Finally we model how a Namibian desert beetle collects water ...

  7. Solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry for the determination of trace lead using p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone-multi-wall carbon nanotubes-Tween-80 micellae compound and diagnosis about human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tianlong, Yang; Zhenbo, Liu; Jiaming, Liu; Haizhu, Liu; Yahong, Huang; Jianqin, Liu; Xuebing, Chen; Yibing, Zhao

    2009-02-01

    The structures of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were modified by H 2SO 4-HNO 3 and H 2SO 4-H 2O 2, respectively. The corresponding products were water-soluble MWNTs-A and MWNTs-B. According to the experiment, it was found that MWNTs-B could emit stable solid substrate-room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) on the surface of paper with Ag + as perturber. Under the conditions of 70 °C and 15 min, MWNTs-B can react with Tween-80 and p-nitro-phenyl-fluorone (R) to form R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound, which could emit RTP of R and MWNTs-B on the surface of paper, respectively. Pb 2+ could cause the RTP of R and MWNTs-B enhanced sharply, respectively. Δ Ip is directly proportional to the content of Pb 2+. A new solid substrate-room temperature phosphorimetry (SS-RTP) for the determination of trace Pb 2+ has been established based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule. The detection limit of this method were 0.035 ag Pb 2+ spot -1 (8.8 × 10 -17 g Pb 2+ ml -1, MWNTs-B) and 0.028 ag Pb 2+ spot -1 (7.1 × 10 -17 g Pb 2+ ml -1, R). This method is of high sensitivity, good selectivity, high precision and accuracy. It could be applied to determine trace Pb 2+ in serum samples at wavelength of 453.7/623.0 nm (R) or 475.9/645.0 nm (MWNTs-B) with satisfactory results, showing that SS-RTP has flexibility and utility value. Simultaneously, this method can be used to diagnose human diseases. The reaction mechanism for the determination of trace Pb 2+ by SS-RTP based on R-MWNTs-B-Tween-80 micellae compound containing double luminescent molecule was also discussed.

  8. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  9. NEURAL-NETWORK PROCESSING OF CERVICAL SMEARS CAN LEAD TO A DECREASE IN DIAGNOSTIC VARIABILITY AND AN INCREASE IN SCREENING EFFICACY - A STUDY OF 63 FALSE-NEGATIVE SMEARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOON, ME; KOK, LP; NYGAARDNIELSEN, M; HOLM, K; HOLUND, B

    1994-01-01

    A realistic approach for decreasing the number of erroneous diagnoses plaguing cervical cytology screening is to try to reduce the amount of nondiagnostic visual information. The neural network of PAPNET selects 128 cytological views from the routinely prepared smear which in digitized form can be

  10. Neural recording and modulation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ritchie; Canales, Andres; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-01-01

    In the mammalian nervous system, billions of neurons connected by quadrillions of synapses exchange electrical, chemical and mechanical signals. Disruptions to this network manifest as neurological or psychiatric conditions. Despite decades of neuroscience research, our ability to treat or even to understand these conditions is limited by the capability of tools to probe the signalling complexity of the nervous system. Although orders of magnitude smaller and computationally faster than neurons, conventional substrate-bound electronics do not recapitulate the chemical and mechanical properties of neural tissue. This mismatch results in a foreign-body response and the encapsulation of devices by glial scars, suggesting that the design of an interface between the nervous system and a synthetic sensor requires additional materials innovation. Advances in genetic tools for manipulating neural activity have fuelled the demand for devices that are capable of simultaneously recording and controlling individual neurons at unprecedented scales. Recently, flexible organic electronics and bio- and nanomaterials have been developed for multifunctional and minimally invasive probes for long-term interaction with the nervous system. In this Review, we discuss the design lessons from the quarter-century-old field of neural engineering, highlight recent materials-driven progress in neural probes and look at emergent directions inspired by the principles of neural transduction.

  11. Self-organization of neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, J.W.; Winston, J.V.; Rafelski, J.

    1984-05-14

    The plastic development of a neural-network model operating autonomously in discrete time is described by the temporal modification of interneuronal coupling strengths according to momentary neural activity. A simple algorithm (brainwashing) is found which, applied to nets with initially quasirandom connectivity, leads to model networks with properties conducive to the simulation of memory and learning phenomena. 18 references, 2 figures.

  12. Lead poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or dust from lead-based paint. Toys and furniture painted before 1976. Painted toys and decorations made ... by decades of car exhaust or years of house paint scrapings. Lead is more common in soil ...

  13. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a hard, durable surface. In 1977, federal regulations banned lead from paint for general use. But homes ... OTHERS: Lead has recently been found in some plastic mini-blinds and vertical blinds which were made ...

  14. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  15. Relational Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vinther; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    This first chapter presents the exploratory and curious approach to leading as relational processes – an approach that pervades the entire book. We explore leading from a perspective that emphasises the unpredictable challenges and triviality of everyday life, which we consider an interesting......, relevant and realistic way to examine leading. The chapter brings up a number of concepts and contexts as formulated by researchers within the field, and in this way seeks to construct a first understanding of relational leading....

  16. A Neural Basis for the Acquired Capability for Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishna Deshpande

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of fatal suicidal behavior in men is an urgent issue as highlighted in the public eye via news sources and media outlets. In this study, we have attempted to address this issue and understand the neural substrates underlying the gender differences in the rate of fatal suicidal behavior. The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS has proposed an explanation for the seemingly paradoxical relationship between gender and suicidal behavior, i.e. greater non-fatal suicide attempts by women but higher number of deaths by suicide in men. This theory states that possessing suicidal desire (due to conditions such as depression alone is not sufficient for a lethal suicide attempt. It is imperative for an individual to have acquired the capability for suicide (ACS along with suicidal desire in order to die by suicide. Therefore, higher levels of ACS in men may explain why men are more likely to die by suicide than women, despite being less likely to experience suicidal ideation or depression. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis to investigate a potential ACS network that involves neural substrates underlying emotional stoicism, sensation seeking, pain tolerance, and fearlessness of death along with a potential depression network that involves neural substrates that underlie clinical depression. Brain regions commonly found in ACS and depression networks for males and females were further used as seeds to obtain regions functionally and structurally connected to them. We found that the male-specific networks were more widespread and diverse than the female-specific ones. Also, while the former involved motor regions such as the premotor cortex and cerebellum, the latter was dominated by limbic regions. This may support the fact that suicidal desire generally leads to fatal/decisive action in males while in females, it manifests as depression, ideation and generally non-fatal actions. The proposed

  17. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  18. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  19. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti eAdank

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006. Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012 for an in-depth overview of behavioural aspects of accent processing.

  20. Neural bases of accented speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adank, Patti; Nuttall, Helen E; Banks, Briony; Kennedy-Higgins, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Floccia et al., 2006; Adank et al., 2009). Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012) for an in-depth overview of behavioral aspects of accent processing.

  1. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blue-gray metal that is mined from the earth’s crust. • Lead has been used for many industrial ... including the kidneys, heart, and reproductive system, • Pregnant women should know that the developing fetus is very ...

  2. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has also been associated with juvenile delinquency and criminal behavior. In adults, lead can increase blood pressure ... and-forth manner, but rather from left to right (or vise-versa), or from the top of ...

  3. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison you. Most lead is present as an inorganic compound and does not move well through the ... D. R., Editors (© 2006). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry: AACC Press, Washington, DC. Pp 474. Wu, A. (© ...

  4. Distinctive and common neural underpinnings of major depression, social anxiety, and their comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, J Paul; Chen, Michael C; Waugh, Christian E; Joormann, Jutta; Gotlib, Ian H

    2015-04-01

    Assessing neural commonalities and differences among depression, anxiety and their comorbidity is critical in developing a more integrative clinical neuroscience and in evaluating currently debated categorical vs dimensional approaches to psychiatric classification. Therefore, in this study, we sought to identify patterns of anomalous neural responding to criticism and praise that are specific to and common among major depressive disorder (MDD), social anxiety disorder (SAD) and comorbid MDD-SAD. Adult females who met formal diagnostic criteria for MDD, SAD or MDD-SAD and psychiatrically healthy participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging as they listened to statements directing praise or criticism at them or at another person. MDD groups showed reduced responding to praise across a distributed cortical network, an effect potentially mediated by thalamic nuclei undergirding arousal-mediated attention. SAD groups showed heightened anterior insula and decreased default-mode network response to criticism. The MDD-SAD group uniquely showed reduced responding to praise in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. Finally, all groups with psychopathology showed heightened response to criticism in a region of the superior frontal gyrus implicated in attentional gating. The present results suggest novel neural models of anhedonia in MDD, vigilance-withdrawal behaviors in SAD, and poorer outcome in MDD-SAD. Importantly, in identifying unique and common neural substrates of MDD and SAD, these results support a formulation in which common neural components represent general risk factors for psychopathology that, due to factors that are present at illness onset, lead to distinct forms of psychopathology with unique neural signatures. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  6. Neuroanatomical Substrates of Social Cognition Dysfunction in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelphrey, Kevin; Adolphs, Ralph; Morris, James P.

    2004-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize recent progress toward understanding the neural structures and circuitry underlying dysfunctional social cognition in autism. We review selected studies from the growing literature that has used the functional neuroimaging techniques of cognitive neuroscience to map out the neuroanatomical substrates of social…

  7. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  8. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also disting...

  10. Task-modulated coactivation of vergence neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaswal, Rajbir; Gohel, Suril; Biswal, Bharat B; Alvarez, Tara L

    2014-10-01

    While functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has identified which regions of interests (ROIs) are functionally active during a vergence movement (inward or outward eye rotation), task-modulated coactivation between ROIs is less understood. This study tested the following hypotheses: (1) significant task-modulated coactivation would be observed between the frontal eye fields (FEFs), the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), and the cerebellar vermis (CV); (2) significantly more functional activity and task-modulated coactivation would be observed in binocularly normal controls (BNCs) compared with convergence insufficiency (CI) subjects; and (3) after vergence training, the functional activity and task-modulated coactivation would increase in CIs compared with their baseline measurements. A block design of sustained fixation versus vergence eye movements stimulated activity in the FEFs, PPC, and CV. fMRI data from four CI subjects before and after vergence training were compared with seven BNCs. Functional activity was assessed using the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) percent signal change. Task-modulated coactivation was assessed using an ROI-based task-modulated coactivation analysis that revealed significant correlation between the FEF, PPC, and CV ROIs. Prior to vergence training, the CIs had a reduced BOLD percent signal change compared with BNCs for the CV (p<0.05), FEFs, and PPC (p<0.01). The BOLD percent signal change increased within the CV, FEF, and PPC ROIs (p<0.001) as did the task-modulated coactivation between the FEFs and CV as well as the PPC and CV (p<0.05) when comparing the CI pre- and post-training datasets. Results from the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey were correlated to the percent BOLD signal change from the FEFs and CV (p<0.05).

  11. Comprehensibility and neural substrate of communicative gestures in severe aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogrefe, Katharina; Ziegler, Wolfram; Weidinger, Nicole; Goldenberg, Georg

    2017-08-01

    Communicative gestures can compensate incomprehensibility of oral speech in severe aphasia, but the brain damage that causes aphasia may also have an impact on the production of gestures. We compared the comprehensibility of gestural communication of persons with severe aphasia and non-aphasic persons and used voxel based lesion symptom mapping (VLSM) to determine lesion sites that are responsible for poor gestural expression in aphasia. On group level, persons with aphasia conveyed more information via gestures than controls indicating a compensatory use of gestures in persons with severe aphasia. However, individual analysis showed a broad range of gestural comprehensibility. VLSM suggested that poor gestural expression was associated with lesions in anterior temporal and inferior frontal regions. We hypothesize that likely functional correlates of these localizations are selection of and flexible changes between communication channels as well as between different types of gestures and between features of actions and objects that are expressed by gestures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural substrate of dynamic Bayesian inference in the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funamizu, Akihiro; Kuhn, Bernd; Doya, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic Bayesian inference allows a system to infer the environmental state under conditions of limited sensory observation. Using a goal-reaching task, we found that posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and adjacent posteromedial cortex (PM) implemented the two fundamental features of dynamic Bayesian inference: prediction of hidden states using an internal state transition model and updating the prediction with new sensory evidence. We optically imaged the activity of neurons in mouse PPC and PM layers 2, 3 and 5 in an acoustic virtual-reality system. As mice approached a reward site, anticipatory licking increased even when sound cues were intermittently presented; this was disturbed by PPC silencing. Probabilistic population decoding revealed that neurons in PPC and PM represented goal distances during sound omission (prediction), particularly in PPC layers 3 and 5, and prediction improved with the observation of cue sounds (updating). Our results illustrate how cerebral cortex realizes mental simulation using an action-dependent dynamic model.

  13. Phonological dyslexia and dysgraphia: cognitive mechanisms and neural substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M; Henry, Maya L; Leyden, Anne; Kim, Esther; Rising, Kindle; Andersen, Sarah; Cho, Hyesuk

    2009-05-01

    To examine the validity of different theoretical assumptions about the neuropsychological mechanisms and lesion correlates of phonological dyslexia and dysgraphia, we studied written and spoken language performance in a large cohort of patients with focal damage to perisylvian cortical regions implicated in phonological processing. Despite considerable variation in accuracy for both words and non-words, the majority of participants demonstrated the increased lexicality effects in reading and spelling that are considered the hallmark features of phonological dyslexia and dysgraphia. Increased lexicality effects were also documented in spoken language tasks such as oral repetition, and patients performed poorly on a battery of phonological tests that did not involve an orthographic component. Furthermore, a composite measure of general phonological ability was strongly predictive of both reading and spelling accuracy, and we obtained evidence that the continuum of severity that characterized the written language disorder of our patients was attributable to an underlying continuum of phonological impairment. Although patients demonstrated qualitatively similar deficits across measures of written and spoken language processing, there were quantitative differences in levels of performance reflecting task difficulty effects. Spelling was more severely affected than reading by the reduction in phonological capacity and this differential vulnerability accounted for occasional disparities between patterns of impairment on the two written language tasks. Our findings suggest that phonological dyslexia and dysgraphia in patients with perisylvian lesions are manifestations of a central or modality-independent phonological deficit rather than the result of damage to cognitive components dedicated to reading or spelling. Our results also provide empirical support for shared-components models of written language processing, according to which the same central cognitive systems support both reading and spelling. Lesion-deficit correlations indicated that phonological dyslexia and dysgraphia may be produced by damage to a variety of perisylvian cortical regions, consistent with distributed network models of phonological processing.

  14. Behavioural Differences and Neural Substrates of Altruistic and Spiteful Punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Toshio; Li, Yang; Fermin, Alan S R; Kanai, Ryota; Takagishi, Haruto; Matsumoto, Yoshie; Kiyonari, Toko; Sakagami, Masamichi

    2017-11-07

    Altruistic punishment following social norm violations promotes human cooperation. However, experimental evidence indicates that some forms of punishment are spiteful rather than altruistic. Using two types of punishment games and seven non-strategic games, we identified strong behavioural differences between altruistic and spiteful punishers. Altruistic punishers who rejected unfair offers in the ultimatum game and punished norm violators in the third-party punishment game behaved pro-socially in various non-strategic games. Spiteful punishers who rejected unfair offers in the ultimatum game but did not punish norm violators in the third-party punishment game behaved selfishly in non-strategic games. In addition, the left caudate nucleus was larger in spiteful punishers than in altruistic punishers. These findings are in contrast to the previous assumption that altruistic punishers derive pleasure from enforcement of fairness norms, and suggest that spiteful punishers derive pleasure from seeing the target experience negative consequences.

  15. Neural scaling laws for an uncertain world

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    The Weber-Fechner law describes the form of psychological space in many behavioral experiments involving perception of one-dimensional physical quantities. If the physical quantity is expressed using multiple neural receptors, then placing receptive fields evenly along a logarithmic scale naturally leads to the psychological Weber-Fechner law. In the visual system, the spacing and width of extrafoveal receptive fields are consistent with logarithmic scaling. Other sets of neural "receptors" appear to show the same qualitative properties, suggesting that this form of neural scaling reflects a solution to a very general problem. This paper argues that these neural scaling laws enable the brain to represent information about the world efficiently without making any assumptions about the statistics of the world. This analysis suggests that the organization of neural scales to represent one-dimensional quantities, including more abstract quantities such as numerosity, time, and allocentric space, should have a uni...

  16. Reliability and risk analysis using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses preliminary research at Sandia National Laboratories into the application of artificial neural networks for reliability and risk analysis. The goal of this effort is to develop a reliability based methodology that captures the complex relationship between uncertainty in material properties and manufacturing processes and the resulting uncertainty in life prediction estimates. The inputs to the neural network model are probability density functions describing system characteristics and the output is a statistical description of system performance. The most recent application of this methodology involves the comparison of various low-residue, lead-free soldering processes with the desire to minimize the associated waste streams with no reduction in product reliability. Model inputs include statistical descriptions of various material properties such as the coefficients of thermal expansion of solder and substrate. Consideration is also given to stochastic variation in the operational environment to which the electronic components might be exposed. Model output includes a probabilistic characterization of the fatigue life of the surface mounted component.

  17. Neural basis of first and second language processing of sentence-level linguistic prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandour, Jackson; Tong, Yunxia; Talavage, Thomas; Wong, Donald; Dzemidzic, Mario; Xu, Yisheng; Li, Xiaojian; Lowe, Mark

    2007-02-01

    A fundamental question in multilingualism is whether the neural substrates are shared or segregated for the two or more languages spoken by polyglots. This study employs functional MRI to investigate the neural substrates underlying the perception of two sentence-level prosodic phenomena that occur in both Mandarin Chinese (L1) and English (L2): sentence focus (sentence-initial vs. -final position of contrastive stress) and sentence type (declarative vs. interrogative modality). Late-onset, medium proficiency Chinese-English bilinguals were asked to selectively attend to either sentence focus or sentence type in paired three-word sentences in both L1 and L2 and make speeded-response discrimination judgments. L1 and L2 elicited highly overlapping activations in frontal, temporal, and parietal lobes. Furthermore, region of interest analyses revealed that for both languages the sentence focus task elicited a leftward asymmetry in the supramarginal gyrus; both tasks elicited a rightward asymmetry in the mid-portion of the middle frontal gyrus. A direct comparison between L1 and L2 did not show any difference in brain activation in the sentence type task. In the sentence focus task, however, greater activation for L2 than L1 occurred in the bilateral anterior insula and superior frontal sulcus. The sentence focus task also elicited a leftward asymmetry in the posterior middle temporal gyrus for L1 only. Differential activation patterns are attributed primarily to disparities between L1 and L2 in the phonetic manifestation of sentence focus. Such phonetic divergences lead to increased computational demands for processing L2. These findings support the view that L1 and L2 are mediated by a unitary neural system despite late age of acquisition, although additional neural resources may be required in task-specific circumstances for unequal bilinguals.

  18. Who Leads China's Leading Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Futao

    2017-01-01

    This study attempts to identify the major characteristics of two different groups of institutional leaders in China's leading universities. The study begins with a review of relevant literature and theory. Then, there is a brief introduction to the selection of party secretaries, deputy secretaries, presidents and vice presidents in leading…

  19. Snap-Through Instability of Graphene on Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Teng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We determine the graphene morphology regulated by substrates with herringbone and checkerboard surface corrugations. As the graphene–substrate interfacial bonding energy and the substrate surface roughness vary, the graphene morphology snaps between two distinct states: (1 closely conforming to the substrate and (2 remaining nearly flat on the substrate. Since the graphene morphology is strongly tied to the electronic properties of graphene, such a snap-through instability of graphene morphology can lead to desirable graphene electronic properties that could potentially enable graphene-based functional electronic components (e.g. nano-switches.

  20. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0505 TITLE: Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Ittmann MD PhD...CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0505 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...ABSTRACT Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer -related death for men in the United States. Recent

  1. Neural correlates of paediatric dysgraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F; Maathuis, Carel G B; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2013-11-01

    Writing is an important skill that is related both to school performance and to psychosocial outcomes such as the child's self-esteem. Deficits in handwriting performance are frequently encountered in children with developmental coordination disorder. This review focuses on what is known about the neural correlates of atypical handwriting in children. Knowledge of the neural correlates is derived from studies using clinical case designs (e.g. lesion studies), studies using neuroimaging, and assessment of minor neurological dysfunction. The two functional imaging studies suggest a contribution of cortical areas and the cerebellum. The largest study indicated that cortical areas in all regions of the brain are involved (frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital). The two lesion studies confirmed cerebellar involvement. The findings of the study on minor neurological dysfunction in children with writing problems correspond to the imaging results. The limited data on the neural substrate of paediatric dysgraphia suggest that at least a subset of the children with dysgraphia have dysfunctions in extensive supraspinal networks. In others, dysfunction may be restricted to either the cerebellum or specific cortical sites. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  2. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya eWatanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group setting, individuals’ perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems’ level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation.

  3. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    showed differentiation potential similar to those grown on polylysine-treated well plates, as previously reported. Viable (still expressing GFP) NPCs were found on and in proximity to the neural implant after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Preliminary examinations indicated that the probe's NPC coating might reduce the glial response at these 2 different time points. The authors' findings suggest that NPCs can differentiate and strongly adhere to laminin-immobilized surfaces, providing a stable matrix for these cells to be implanted in brain tissue on the neural probe's surface. In addition, NPCs were found to improve the astrocytic reaction around the implant site. Further in vivo work revealing the mechanisms of this effect could lead to improvement of biocompatibility and chronic recording performance of neural probes.

  4. Nanomechanics of hard films on compliant substrates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Earl David, Jr. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Emerson, John Allen (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Bahr, David F. (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Moody, Neville Reid; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Hales, Lucas (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN); Adams, David Price (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yeager,John (Washington State University, Pullman, WA); Nyugen, Thao D. (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD); Corona, Edmundo (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kennedy, Marian S. (Clemson University, Clemson, SC); Cordill, Megan J. (Erich Schmid Institute, Leoben, Austria)

    2009-09-01

    Development of flexible thin film systems for biomedical, homeland security and environmental sensing applications has increased dramatically in recent years [1,2,3,4]. These systems typically combine traditional semiconductor technology with new flexible substrates, allowing for both the high electron mobility of semiconductors and the flexibility of polymers. The devices have the ability to be easily integrated into components and show promise for advanced design concepts, ranging from innovative microelectronics to MEMS and NEMS devices. These devices often contain layers of thin polymer, ceramic and metallic films where differing properties can lead to large residual stresses [5]. As long as the films remain substrate-bonded, they may deform far beyond their freestanding counterpart. Once debonded, substrate constraint disappears leading to film failure where compressive stresses can lead to wrinkling, delamination, and buckling [6,7,8] while tensile stresses can lead to film fracture and decohesion [9,10,11]. In all cases, performance depends on film adhesion. Experimentally it is difficult to measure adhesion. It is often studied using tape [12], pull off [13,14,15], and peel tests [16,17]. More recent techniques for measuring adhesion include scratch testing [18,19,20,21], four point bending [22,23,24], indentation [25,26,27], spontaneous blisters [28,29] and stressed overlayers [7,26,30,31,32,33]. Nevertheless, sample design and test techniques must be tailored for each system. There is a large body of elastic thin film fracture and elastic contact mechanics solutions for elastic films on rigid substrates in the published literature [5,7,34,35,36]. More recent work has extended these solutions to films on compliant substrates and show that increasing compliance markedly changes fracture energies compared with rigid elastic solution results [37,38]. However, the introduction of inelastic substrate response significantly complicates the problem [10,39,40]. As

  5. Introduction to neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    James, Frederick E

    1994-02-02

    1. Introduction and overview of Artificial Neural Networks. 2,3. The Feed-forward Network as an inverse Problem, and results on the computational complexity of network training. 4.Physics applications of neural networks.

  6. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  7. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental contributions to neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Jonathan J; Petersen, Juliette R; Niswander, Lee

    2014-01-01

    The formation of the embryonic brain and spinal cord begins as the neural plate bends to form the neural folds, which meet and adhere to close the neural tube. The neural ectoderm and surrounding tissues also coordinate proliferation, differentiation, and patterning. This highly orchestrated process is susceptible to disruption, leading to neural tube defects (NTDs), a common birth defect. Here, we highlight genetic and epigenetic contributions to neural tube closure. We describe an online database we created as a resource for researchers, geneticists, and clinicians. Neural tube closure is sensitive to environmental influences, and we discuss disruptive causes, preventative measures, and possible mechanisms. New technologies will move beyond candidate genes in small cohort studies toward unbiased discoveries in sporadic NTD cases. This will uncover the genetic complexity of NTDs and critical gene-gene interactions. Animal models can reveal the causative nature of genetic variants, the genetic interrelationships, and the mechanisms underlying environmental influences.

  8. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Emotional moments across time: a possible neural basis for time perception in the anterior insula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A.D. (Bud) Craig

    2009-01-01

    ... in the range of seconds to subseconds. The model posits that the neural substrate for awareness across time is located in the anterior insular cortex, which fits with recent functional imaging evidence relevant to awareness and time perception...

  10. Visuospatial planning in unmedicated major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder : distinct and common neural correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rive, M. M.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Veltman, D. J.; Schene, A. H.; Ruhe, H. G.

    Background Cognitive impairments are an important feature of both remitted and depressed major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). In particular, deficits in executive functioning may hamper everyday functioning. Identifying the neural substrates of impaired executive functioning

  11. The major symptom dimensions of obsessive-compulsive disorder are mediated by partially distinct neural systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, van den O.; Remijnse, P.L.; Mataix-Cols, D.; Vrenken, H.; Groenewegen, H.J.; Uylings, H.B.M.; Balkom, van A.J.L.M.; Veltman, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Obsessivecompulsive disorder (OCD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by multiple, temporally stable symptom dimensions. Preliminary functional neuroimaging studies suggest that these symptom dimensions may have distinct neural substrates. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry was

  12. The major symptom dimensions of obsessive-compulsive disorder are mediated by partially distinct neural systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, Odile A.; Remijnse, Peter L.; Mataix-Cols, David; Vrenken, Hugo; Groenewegen, Henk J.; Uylings, Harry B. M.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Veltman, Dick J.

    2009-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by multiple, temporally stable symptom dimensions. Preliminary functional neuroimaging studies suggest that these symptom dimensions may have distinct neural substrates. Whole-brain voxel-based morphometry was

  13. Nemesia Root Hair Response to Paper Pulp Substrate for Micropropagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Labrousse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Agar substrates for in vitro culture are well adapted to plant micropropagation, but not to plant rooting and acclimatization. Conversely, paper-pulp-based substrates appear as potentially well adapted for in vitro culture and functional root production. To reinforce this hypothesis, this study compares in vitro development of nemesia on several substrates. Strong differences between nemesia roots growing in agar or in paper-pulp substrates were evidenced through scanning electron microscopy. Roots developed in agar have shorter hairs, larger rhizodermal cells, and less organized root caps than those growing on paper pulp. In conclusion, it should be noted that in this study, in vitro microporous substrates such as paper pulp lead to the production of similar root hairs to those found in greenhouse peat substrates. Consequently, if agar could be used for micropropagation, rooting, and plant acclimatization, enhancement could be achieved if rooting stage was performed on micro-porous substrates such as paper pulp.

  14. Neurite outgrowth and branching of PC12 cells on very soft substrates sharply decreases below a threshold of substrate rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Jennie B.; Brown, Xin Q.; Jacot, Jeffrey G.; Di Milla, Paul A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2007-06-01

    Rationally designed matrices for nerve tissue engineering and encapsulated cell therapies critically rely on a comprehensive understanding of neural response to biochemical as well as biophysical cues. Whereas biochemical cues are established mediators of neuronal behavior (e.g., outgrowth), physical cues such as substrate stiffness have only recently been recognized to influence cell behavior. In this work, we examine the response of PC12 neurites to substrate stiffness. We quantified and controlled fibronectin density on the substrates and measured multiple neurite behaviors (e.g., growth, branching, neurites per cell, per cent cells expressing neurites) in a large sample population. We found that PC12 neurons display a threshold response to substrate stiffness. On the softest substrates tested (shear modulus ~10 Pa), neurites were relatively few, short in length and unbranched. On stiffer substrates (shear modulus ~102-104 Pa), neurites were longer and more branched and a greater percentage of cells expressed neurites; significant differences in these measures were not found on substrates with a shear modulus >102 Pa. Based on these data and comparisons with published neurobiology and neuroengineering reports of neurite mechanotransduction, we hypothesize that results from studies of neuronal response to compliant substrates are cell-type dependent and sensitive to ligand density, sample size and the range of stiffness investigated.

  15. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...

  17. Optimal neural computations require analog processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-31

    This paper discusses some of the limitations of hardware implementations of neural networks. The authors start by presenting neural structures and their biological inspirations, while mentioning the simplifications leading to artificial neural networks. Further, the focus will be on hardware imposed constraints. They will present recent results for three different alternatives of parallel implementations of neural networks: digital circuits, threshold gate circuits, and analog circuits. The area and the delay will be related to the neurons` fan-in and to the precision of their synaptic weights. The main conclusion is that hardware-efficient solutions require analog computations, and suggests the following two alternatives: (i) cope with the limitations imposed by silicon, by speeding up the computation of the elementary silicon neurons; (2) investigate solutions which would allow the use of the third dimension (e.g. using optical interconnections).

  18. Application of Neural Networks to House Pricing and Bond Rating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daniëls, H.A.M.; Kamp, B.; Verkooijen, W.J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Feed forward neural networks receive a growing attention as a data modelling tool in economic classification problems. It is well-known that controlling the design of a neural network can be cumbersome. Inaccuracies may lead to a manifold of problems in the application such as higher errors due to

  19. STABILIZATION OF LEAD-BASED PAINT WASTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluated the ability of a cementitious stabilizing agent to reduce leachable lead from lead-based paint waste removed from substrate via blasting, and to evaluate the mechanism by which the reduction occurs. Testing demonstrated that the representative cementitious ag...

  20. Six Networks on a Universal Neuromorphic Computing Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeil, Thomas; Grübl, Andreas; Jeltsch, Sebastian; Müller, Eric; Müller, Paul; Petrovici, Mihai A.; Schmuker, Michael; Brüderle, Daniel; Schemmel, Johannes; Meier, Karlheinz

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality. PMID:23423583

  1. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  2. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In contemporary consciousness studies the phenomenon of neural plasticity has received little attention despite the fact that neural plasticity is of still increased interest in neuroscience. We will, however, argue that neural plasticity could be of great importance to consciousness studies....... If consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather...... a dynamic entity, which physical structure changes according to its use and environment. This change may take the form of growth of new neurons, the creation of new networks and structures, and change within network structures, that is, changes in synaptic strengths. Plasticity raises questions about...

  3. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  4. Neural Specialization for Speech in the First Months of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sarah; Vouloumanos, Athena; Bennett, Randi H.; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    How does the brain's response to speech change over the first months of life? Although behavioral findings indicate that neonates' listening biases are sharpened over the first months of life, with a species-specific preference for speech emerging by 3 months, the neural substrates underlying this developmental change are unknown. We…

  5. Vitreous carbon mask substrate for X-ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigeldinger, Georg [Livermore, CA; Skala, Dawn M [Fremont, CA; Griffiths, Stewart K [Livermore, CA; Talin, Albert Alec [Livermore, CA; Losey, Matthew W [Livermore, CA; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter [Dublin, CA

    2009-10-27

    The present invention is directed to the use of vitreous carbon as a substrate material for providing masks for X-ray lithography. The new substrate also enables a small thickness of the mask absorber used to pattern the resist, and this enables improved mask accuracy. An alternative embodiment comprised the use of vitreous carbon as a LIGA substrate wherein the VC wafer blank is etched in a reactive ion plasma after which an X-ray resist is bonded. This surface treatment provides a surface enabling good adhesion of the X-ray photoresist and subsequent nucleation and adhesion of the electrodeposited metal for LIGA mold-making while the VC substrate practically eliminates secondary radiation effects that lead to delamination of the X-ray resist form the substrate, the loss of isolated resist features, and the formation of a resist layer adjacent to the substrate that is insoluble in the developer.

  6. Fuzzy and neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  7. Neural tube morphogenesis in synthetic 3D microenvironments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ranga, Aian; Girgin, Mehmet; Meinhardt, Anea; Eberle, Dominic; Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Tanaka, Elly M; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2016-01-01

    .... We demonstrate how key ECM parameters are involved in specifying cytoskeleton-mediated symmetry-breaking events that ultimately lead to neural tube-like patterning along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis...

  8. Cultured Neural Networks: Optimization of Patterned Network Adhesiveness and Characterization of their Neural Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. L. C. Rutten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One type of future, improved neural interface is the “cultured probe”. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and surrounded by a local circularly confined network (“island” of cultured neurons. The main purpose of the local networks is that they act as biofriendly intermediates for collateral sprouts from the in vivo system, thus allowing for an effective and selective neuron–electrode interface. As a secondary purpose, one may envisage future information processing applications of these intermediary networks. In this paper, first, progress is shown on how substrates can be chemically modified to confine developing networks, cultured from dissociated rat cortex cells, to “islands” surrounding an electrode site. Additional coating of neurophobic, polyimide-coated substrate by triblock-copolymer coating enhances neurophilic-neurophobic adhesion contrast. Secondly, results are given on neuronal activity in patterned, unconnected and connected, circular “island” networks. For connected islands, the larger the island diameter (50, 100 or 150 μm, the more spontaneous activity is seen. Also, activity may show a very high degree of synchronization between two islands. For unconnected islands, activity may start at 22 days in vitro (DIV, which is two weeks later than in unpatterned networks.

  9. The neural basis of economic decision-making in the ultimatum game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanfey, A.G.; Rilling, J.K.; Aronson, J.A.; Nystrom, L.E.; Cohen, J.D.

    2003-01-01

    The nascent field of neuroeconomics seeks to ground economic decision-making in the biological substrate of the brain. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging of Ultimatum Game players to investigate neural substrates of cognitive and emotional processes involved in economic decision-making.

  10. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  11. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  12. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  13. Somatosensory Substrates of Flight Control in Bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara L. Marshall

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Flight maneuvers require rapid sensory integration to generate adaptive motor output. Bats achieve remarkable agility with modified forelimbs that serve as airfoils while retaining capacity for object manipulation. Wing sensory inputs provide behaviorally relevant information to guide flight; however, components of wing sensory-motor circuits have not been analyzed. Here, we elucidate the organization of wing innervation in an insectivore, the big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus. We demonstrate that wing sensory innervation differs from other vertebrate forelimbs, revealing a peripheral basis for the atypical topographic organization reported for bat somatosensory nuclei. Furthermore, the wing is innervated by an unusual complement of sensory neurons poised to report airflow and touch. Finally, we report that cortical neurons encode tactile and airflow inputs with sparse activity patterns. Together, our findings identify neural substrates of somatosensation in the bat wing and imply that evolutionary pressures giving rise to mammalian flight led to unusual sensorimotor projections.

  14. Healthy aging is associated with increased neural processing of positive valence but attenuated processing of emotional arousal: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, Elizabeth G; Toomey, John M; Balsters, Joshua H; Bokde, Arun L W

    2013-03-01

    Arousal and valence play key roles in emotional perception, with normal aging leading to changes in the neural substrates supporting valence processing. The objective of this study was to investigate normal age-related changes in the neural substrates of emotional arousal processing. Twenty-three young and 23 older, healthy women underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging as they viewed images which were neutral or positive in valence and which varied in arousal level from low to high. Using a parametric modulation approach, we examined how the blood oxygen-level dependent signal varied with single trial subjective ratings of valence and arousal, and whether this differed with age. In accordance with previous studies we found that the older group showed greater activation in response to positive valence, in the left amygdala, left middle temporal gyrus and right lingual gyrus. In contrast however, they showed reduced reactivity to emotional arousal, in occipital and temporal visual cortices bilaterally, the left inferior parietal cortex, and the supplementary motor area bilaterally. This study represents the first of its kind to clearly dissociate how aging affects the neural correlates of emotional arousal and valence. The changes in arousal processing may in part be mediated by the functional reorganization evident in the aging brain, such as reduced activation of the posterior cortices as described by the posterior-anterior shift in ageing (PASA) effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Aging affects neural precision of speech encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samira; Parbery-Clark, Alexandra; White-Schwoch, Travis; Kraus, Nina

    2012-10-10

    Older adults frequently report they can hear what is said but cannot understand the meaning, especially in noise. This difficulty may arise from the inability to process rapidly changing elements of speech. Aging is accompanied by a general slowing of neural processing and decreased neural inhibition, both of which likely interfere with temporal processing in auditory and other sensory domains. Age-related reductions in inhibitory neurotransmitter levels and delayed neural recovery can contribute to decreases in the temporal precision of the auditory system. Decreased precision may lead to neural timing delays, reductions in neural response magnitude, and a disadvantage in processing the rapid acoustic changes in speech. The auditory brainstem response (ABR), a scalp-recorded electrical potential, is known for its ability to capture precise neural synchrony within subcortical auditory nuclei; therefore, we hypothesized that a loss of temporal precision results in subcortical timing delays and decreases in response consistency and magnitude. To assess this hypothesis, we recorded ABRs to the speech syllable /da/ in normal hearing younger (18-30 years old) and older (60-67 years old) adult humans. Older adults had delayed ABRs, especially in response to the rapidly changing formant transition, and greater response variability. We also found that older adults had decreased phase locking and smaller response magnitudes than younger adults. Together, our results support the theory that older adults have a loss of temporal precision in the subcortical encoding of sound, which may account, at least in part, for their difficulties with speech perception.

  16. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  17. Neural crest development in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R; Berres, Mark E

    2014-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Some affected individuals possess distinctive craniofacial deficits, but many more lack overt facial changes. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying these deficits would inform their diagnostic utility. Our understanding of these mechanisms is challenged because ethanol lacks a single receptor when redirecting cellular activity. This review summarizes our current understanding of how ethanol alters neural crest development. Ample evidence shows that ethanol causes the "classic" fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) face (short palpebral fissures, elongated upper lip, deficient philtrum) because it suppresses prechordal plate outgrowth, thereby reducing neuroectoderm and neural crest induction and causing holoprosencephaly. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) at premigratory stages elicits a different facial appearance, indicating FASD may represent a spectrum of facial outcomes. PAE at this premigratory period initiates a calcium transient that activates CaMKII and destabilizes transcriptionally active β-catenin, thereby initiating apoptosis within neural crest populations. Contributing to neural crest vulnerability are their low antioxidant responses. Ethanol-treated neural crest produce reactive oxygen species and free radical scavengers attenuate their production and prevent apoptosis. Ethanol also significantly impairs neural crest migration, causing cytoskeletal rearrangements that destabilize focal adhesion formation; their directional migratory capacity is also lost. Genetic factors further modify vulnerability to ethanol-induced craniofacial dysmorphology and include genes important for neural crest development, including shh signaling, PDFGA, vangl2, and ribosomal biogenesis. Because facial and brain development are mechanistically and functionally linked, research into ethanol's effects on neural crest also informs our understanding of ethanol's CNS pathologies. © 2014

  18. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  19. Mechanically flexible optically transparent porous mono-crystalline silicon substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, we present a simple process to fabricate a thin (≥5μm), mechanically flexible, optically transparent, porous mono-crystalline silicon substrate. Relying only on reactive ion etching steps, we are able to controllably peel off a thin layer of the original substrate. This scheme is cost favorable as it uses a low-cost silicon <100> wafer and furthermore it has the potential for recycling the remaining part of the wafer that otherwise would be lost and wasted during conventional back-grinding process. Due to its porosity, it shows see-through transparency and potential for flexible membrane applications, neural probing and such. Our process can offer flexible, transparent silicon from post high-thermal budget processed device wafer to retain the high performance electronics on flexible substrates. © 2012 IEEE.

  20. [Glutamate signaling and neural plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the precise formation of neural circuits during development. At birth, neurons have redundant synaptic connections not only to their proper targets but also to other neighboring cells. Then, functional neural circuits are formed during early postnatal development by the selective strengthening of necessary synapses and weakening of surplus connections. Synaptic connections are also modified so that projection fields of active afferents expand at the expense of lesser ones. We have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying these activity-dependent prunings and the plasticity of synaptic circuitry using gene-engineered mice defective in the glutamatergic signaling system. NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critically involved in the establishment of the somatosensory pathway ascending from the brainstem trigeminal nucleus to the somatosensory cortex. Without NMDA receptors, whisker-related patterning fails to develop, whereas lesion-induced plasticity occurs normally during the critical period. In contrast, mice lacking the glutamate transporters GLAST or GLT1 are selectively impaired in the lesion-induced critical plasticity of cortical barrels, although whisker-related patterning itself develops normally. In the developing cerebellum, multiple climbing fibers initially innervating given Purkinje cells are eliminated one by one until mono-innervation is achieved. In this pruning process, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels expressed on Purkinje cells are critically involved by the selective strengthening of single main climbing fibers against other lesser afferents. Therefore, the activation of glutamate receptors that leads to an activity-dependent increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays a key role in the pruning of immature synaptic circuits into functional circuits. On the other hand, glutamate transporters appear to control activity-dependent plasticity among afferent fields, presumably through adjusting

  1. Solid substrate fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengerdy, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    Solid Substrate Fermentation (SSF) describes the microbiological tranformation of biological materials in their natural state, in contrast with liquid or submerged fermentations which are carried out in dilute solutions or slurries. The most important industrial microorganisms used in SSF are filamentous fungi and the critical factors in their growth are the control of the moisture level and the temperature. Traditionally, most SSFs are conducted in shallow trays (so that heat build up is avoided) and stacked in a moist chamber, however, the modern SSF should be able to mix large amounts of substrate for a uniform fermentation, maximum automization scale-up of the process, continuous operation and fermentation control and a promising new design is the Helical screw fermenter. At the present time SSF is used in the production of foods (e.g. mushrooms and oriental foods) in municipal, agricultural and industrial solid waste disposal and in the production of enzymes and speciality chemicals but it does not seem likely that it will replace prevalent liquid fermentation technologies. 29 references.

  2. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  3. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  4. Neural simulations on multi-core architectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Eichner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscience is witnessing increasing knowledge about the anatomy and electrophysiological properties of neurons and their connectivity, leading to an ever increasing computational complexity of neural simulations. At the same time, a rather radical change in personal computer technology emerges with the establishment of multi-cores: high-density, explicitly parallel processor architectures for both high performance as well as standard desktop computers. This work introduces strategies for the parallelization of biophysically realistic neural simulations based on the compartmental modeling technique and results of such an implementation, with a strong focus on multi-core architectures and automation, i. e. user-transparent load balancing.

  5. Design of Robust Neural Network Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Hintz-Madsen, Mads

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses a new framework for designing robust neural network classifiers. The network is optimized using the maximum a posteriori technique, i.e., the cost function is the sum of the log-likelihood and a regularization term (prior). In order to perform robust classification, we present...... a modified likelihood function which incorporates the potential risk of outliers in the data. This leads to the introduction of a new parameter, the outlier probability. Designing the neural classifier involves optimization of network weights as well as outlier probability and regularization parameters. We...

  6. Assessing Landslide Hazard Using Artificial Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, Farzad; Choobbasti, Asskar Janalizadeh; Barari, Amin

    2011-01-01

    failure" which is main concentration of the current research and "liquefaction failure". Shear failures along shear planes occur when the shear stress along the sliding surfaces exceed the effective shear strength. These slides have been referred to as landslide. An expert system based on artificial...... neural network has been developed for use in the stability evaluation of slopes under various geological conditions and engineering requirements. The Artificial neural network model of this research uses slope characteristics as input and leads to the output in form of the probability of failure...

  7. Using c-Jun to identify fear extinction learning-specific patterns of neural activity that are affected by single prolonged stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Stanfield, Briana R; Staib, Jennifer M; David, Nina P; DePietro, Thomas; Chamness, Marisa; Schneider, Elizabeth K; Keller, Samantha M; Lawless, Caroline

    2017-12-29

    Neural circuits via which stress leads to disruptions in fear extinction is often explored in animal stress models. Using the single prolonged stress (SPS) model of post traumatic stress disorder and the immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos as a measure of neural activity, we previously identified patterns of neural activity through which SPS disrupts extinction retention. However, none of these stress effects were specific to fear or extinction learning and memory. C-Jun is another IEG that is sometimes regulated in a different manner to c-Fos and could be used to identify emotional learning/memory specific patterns of neural activity that are sensitive to SPS. Animals were either fear conditioned (CS-fear) or presented with CSs only (CS-only) then subjected to extinction training and testing. C-Jun was then assayed within neural substrates critical for extinction memory. Inhibited c-Jun levels in the hippocampus (Hipp) and enhanced functional connectivity between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) during extinction training was disrupted by SPS in the CS-fear group only. As a result, these effects were specific to emotional learning/memory. SPS also disrupted inhibited Hipp c-Jun levels, enhanced BLA c-Jun levels, and altered functional connectivity among the vmPFC, BLA, and Hipp during extinction testing in SPS rats in the CS-fear and CS-only groups. As a result, these effects were not specific to emotional learning/memory. Our findings suggest that SPS disrupts neural activity specific to extinction memory, but may also disrupt the retention of fear extinction by mechanisms that do not involve emotional learning/memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Autonomic neural functions in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, T

    2005-08-01

    Autonomic neural functions are important to regulate vital functions in the living body. There are different methods to evaluate indirectly and directly autonomic, sympathetic and parasympathetic, neural functions of human body. Among various methods, microneurography is a technique to evaluate directly sympathetic neural functions in humans. Using this technique sympathetic neural traffic leading to skeletal muscles (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA) can be recorded from human peripheral nerves in situ. MSNA plays essentially important roles to maintain blood pressure homeostasis against gravity. Orthostatic intolerance is an important problem as an autonomic dysfunction encountered after exposure of human beings to microgravity. There exist at least two different types of sympathetic neural responses, low and high responders to orthostatic stress in orthostatic hypotension seen in neurological disorders. To answer the question if post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance is induced by low or high MSNA responses to orthostatic stress, MSNA was microneurographically recorded for the first time before, during and after spaceflight in 1998 under Neurolab international research project. The same activity has been recorded during and/or after ground-based short- and long-term simulations of microgravity. MSNA was rather enhanced on the 12(th) and 13(th) day of spaceflight and just after landing day. Postflight MSNA response to head-up tilt was well preserved in astronauts who were orthostatically well tolerant. MSNA was suppressed during short-term simulation of microgravity less than 2 hours but was enhanced after long-term simulation of microgravity more than 3 days. Orthostatic intolerance after exposure to long-term simulation of microgravity was associated with reduced MSNA response to orthostatic stress with impaired baroreflex functions. These findings obtained from MSNA recordings in subjects exposed to space as well as short- and long-term simulations of

  9. Neural correlates of gesture processing across human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Elizabeth M; James, Thomas W; James, Karin H

    2013-01-01

    Co-speech gesture facilitates learning to a greater degree in children than in adults, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying the processing of co-speech gesture differ as a function of development. We suggest that this may be partially due to children's lack of experience producing gesture, leading to differences in the recruitment of sensorimotor networks when comparing adults to children. Here, we investigated the neural substrates of gesture processing in a cross-sectional sample of 5-, 7.5-, and 10-year-old children and adults and focused on relative recruitment of a sensorimotor system that included the precentral gyrus (PCG) and the posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG). Children and adults were presented with videos in which communication occurred through different combinations of speech and gesture during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. Results demonstrated that the PCG and pMTG were recruited to different extents in the two populations. We interpret these novel findings as supporting the idea that gesture perception (pMTG) is affected by a history of gesture production (PCG), revealing the importance of considering gesture processing as a sensorimotor process.

  10. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  11. Biological substrates of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Max E; Grueter, Carrie A; Grueter, Brad A

    2014-03-01

    This review is an introduction to addiction, the reward circuitry, and laboratory addiction models. Addiction is a chronic disease hallmarked by a state of compulsive drug seeking that persists despite negative consequences. Most of the advances in addiction research have centered on the canonical and contemporary drugs of abuse; however, addictions to other activities and stimuli also exist. Substances of abuse have the potential to induce long-lasting changes in the brain at the behavioral, circuit, and synaptic levels. Addiction-related behavioral changes involve initiation, escalation, and obsession to drug seeking and much of the current research is focused on mapping these manifestations to specific neural pathways. Drug abuse is well known to recruit components of the mesolimbic dopamine system, including the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. In addition, altered function of a wide variety of brain regions is tightly associated with specific manifestations of drug abuse. These regions peripheral to the mesolimbic pathway likely play a role in specific observed comorbidities and endophenotypes that can facilitate, or be caused by, substance abuse. Alterations in synaptic structure, function, and connectivity, as well as epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are thought to underlie the pathologies of addiction. In preclinical models, these persistent changes are studied at the levels of molecular pharmacology and biochemistry, ex vivo and in vivo electrophysiology, radiography, and behavior. Coordinating research efforts across these disciplines and examining cell type- and circuit-specific phenomena are crucial components for translating preclinical findings to viable medical interventions that effectively treat addiction and related disorders. WIREs Cogn Sci 2014, 5:151-171. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1273 Conflict of interest: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the

  12. Substrate-induced dielectric polarization in thin films of lead-free (Sr{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}){sub 2}Mn{sub 2-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 6-δ} perovskites grown by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Álvarez-Serrano, I., E-mail: ias@ucm.es [Dpto. Química Inorgánica I, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ruiz de Larramendi, I. [Dpto. Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); López, M.L.; Veiga, M.L. [Dpto. Química Inorgánica I, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • Highly oriented SrBiMn{sub 2-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 6} thin films are successfully fabricated by PLD. • Thicknesses between 80 and 900 nm depending on x, substrate-type and chamber pressure. • Compositional A-segregation controlled by the STO substrate orientation. • Dielectric response analyzed under impedance and modulus formalisms. • Relaxor phenomena obtained related to NPRs formation and compositional scenario. - Abstract: Thin films of SrBiMn{sub 2-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 6-δ} have been fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition on SrTiO{sub 3} [100] and [111] substrates. Their texture, width, homogeneity and morphology are evaluated by means of XRD, SEM, XPS, whereas complex impedance spectroscopy is employed to analyze their electrical response. The thickness values range between 80 and 900 nm depending on the experimental conditions. The epitaxial growing could be interpreted in terms of two contributions of microstructural origin: a matrix part and some polycrystalline surface formations (hemi-spheres). Texture studies suggest a fiber-type orientated morphology coherently with the Scanning Electron Microscopy images. XPS analyses indicate a segregation regarding A-sublattice cations, which features depend on the substrate orientation. This segregation could be connected to the development of nanopolar regions. Impedance data show the electrical polarization in the samples to be enhanced compared to bulk response of corresponding powdered samples. A relaxor behavior which fits a Vogel-Fulcher law is obtained for x = 0.50 whereas an almost frequency-independent relaxor ferroelectric behavior is registered for the thinnest film of x = 0.25 composition grown on SrTiO{sub 3} [111] substrate. The influence of compositional and structural aspects in the obtained dielectric response is analyzed.

  13. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  14. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  15. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  16. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  17. Substrate-enhanced superconductivity in Li-decorated graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the role of the substrate for the strength of the electron-phonon coupling in Li-decorated graphene. We find that the interaction with a h-BN substrate leads to a significant enhancement from to , which corresponds to a 25% increase of the transition temperature from to . The superconducting gaps amount to 1.56 meV (suspended) and 1.98 meV (supported). These findings open up a new route to enhanced superconducting transition temperatures in graphene-based materials by substrate engineering. © 2013 EPLA.

  18. ECG monitoring leads and special leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Johnson

    ECG monitoring is common place in the hospital and even pre-hospital setting. The need for different types of lead systems in different settings has been emphasised. Simple three electrode bipolar recording is ubiquitous for monitoring. This can be used to record modified bipolar chest leads as well. Using five leads gives the option of getting a chest lead in addition to bipolar limb leads, enhancing detection of ischemia during procedures. Lead stability is important when the movement of the subject is maximum as in exercise testing. Mason-Likar modification with limb leads shifted to the torso is popular for exercise testing, though the diagnostic value of the ECG is altered. Lund system with leads on proximal part of limbs have both stability and fair diagnostic value. EASI lead system permits derivation of 12 leads from just five electrodes. Lewis lead and the newly devised modified limb lead system are useful in enhancing detection of atrial activity. Fontaine lead has been designed to improve visualization of Epsilon wave in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia. Copyright © 2016 Indian Heart Rhythm Society. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spray forming lead strip. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, K.

    1996-04-10

    A cooperative research project was conducted between the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and Johnson Controls, Inc. (JCI) to adapt the INEL spray forming process to produce near-net-shape lead alloy strip. The emphasis of the work was to spray form lead strip samples at INEL, using a variety of spray conditions, for characterization at JCI. An existing glove box apparatus was modified at INEL to spray form lead. The main spray forming components were housed inside the glove box. They included a spray nozzle, tundish (crucible), substrate assembly, gas heater and furnaces to heat the nozzle and tundish. To spray form metal strip, liquid metal was pressure-fed at a controlled rate through a series of circular orifices that span the width of the nozzle. There the metal contacted high velocity, high temperature inert gas (nitrogen) which atomized the molten material into fine droplets, entrained the droplets in a directed flow, and deposited them onto glass plates that were swept through the spray plume to form strip samples. In-flight convection cooling of the droplets followed by conduction and convection cooling at the substrate resulted in rapid solidification of the deposit. During operation, the inside of the glove box was purged with an inert gas to limit the effects of in-flight oxidation of the particles and spray-formed strips, as well as to protect personnel from exposure to airborne lead particulate. Remote controls were used to start/stop the spray and control the speed and position of the substrate. In addition, substrate samples were loaded into the substrate translator manually using the gloved side ports of the box. In this way, the glove box remained closed during a series of spray trials, and was opened only when loading the crucible with a lead charge or when removing lead strip samples for shipment to JCI.

  20. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  1. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  2. Neural network applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mary L.; Desai, Utpal; Roppel, T.A.; White, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    A design procedure is suggested for neural networks which accommodates the inclusion of such knowledge-based systems techniques as fuzzy logic and pairwise comparisons. The use of these procedures in the design of applications combines qualitative and quantitative factors with empirical data to yield a model with justifiable design and parameter selection procedures. The procedure is especially relevant to areas of back-propagation neural network design which are highly responsive to the use of precisely recorded expert knowledge.

  3. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  4. NEMEFO: NEural MEteorological FOrecast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasero, E.; Moniaci, W.; Meindl, T.; Montuori, A. [Polytechnic of Turin (Italy). Dept. of Electronics

    2004-07-01

    Artificial Neural Systems are a well-known technique used to classify and recognize objects. Introducing the time dimension they can be used to forecast numerical series. NEMEFO is a ''nowcasting'' tool, which uses both statistical and neural systems to forecast meteorological data in a restricted area close to a meteorological weather station in a short time range (3 hours). Ice, fog, rain are typical events which can be anticipated by NEMEFO. (orig.)

  5. Short-term synaptic plasticity and heterogeneity in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, J. F.; Kappen, H. J.; Longtin, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent results on neural dynamics and information processing which arise when considering several biophysical factors of interest, in particular, short-term synaptic plasticity and neural heterogeneity. The inclusion of short-term synaptic plasticity leads to enhanced long-term memory capacities, a higher robustness of memory to noise, and irregularity in the duration of the so-called up cortical states. On the other hand, considering some level of neural heterogeneity in neuron models allows neural systems to optimize information transmission in rate coding and temporal coding, two strategies commonly used by neurons to codify information in many brain areas. In all these studies, analytical approximations can be made to explain the underlying dynamics of these neural systems.

  6. Learn about Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protection Agency Search Search Lead Contact Us Share Learn about Lead General Lead Information Read more about ... water, soil, consumer products, food, and occupational settings. Learn more about sources of lead exposure: At home ...

  7. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  8. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... is used to screen people at risk for lead poisoning. This may include industrial workers and children ... also used to measure how well treatment for lead poisoning is working. Lead is common in the ...

  9. Lexical organization and competition in first and second languages: computational and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping

    2009-06-01

    How does a child rapidly acquire and develop a structured mental organization for the vast number of words in the first years of life? How does a bilingual individual deal with the even more complicated task of learning and organizing two lexicons? It is only until recently have we started to examine the lexicon as a dynamical system with regard to its acquisition, representation, and organization. In this article, I outline a proposal based on our research that takes the dynamical approach to the lexicon, and I discuss how this proposal can be applied to account for lexical organization, structural representation, and competition within and between languages. In particular, I provide computational evidence based on the DevLex model, a self-organizing neural network model, and neuroimaging evidence based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, to illustrate how children and adults learn and represent the lexicon in their first and second languages. In the computational research, our goal has been to identify, through linguistically and developmentally realistic models, detailed cognitive mechanisms underlying the dynamic self-organizing processes in monolingual and bilingual lexical development; in the neuroimaging research, our goal has been to identify the neural substrates that subserve lexical organization and competition in the monolingual and the bilingual brain. In both cases, our findings lead to a better understanding of the interactive dynamics involved in the acquisition and representation of one or multiple languages. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  10. Multi-substrate terpene synthases: their occurrence and physiological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pazouki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15, and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5, mono- (C10 and diterpenes (C20. Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles.

  11. Multi-Substrate Terpene Synthases: Their Occurrence and Physiological Significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazouki, Leila; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Terpene synthases are responsible for synthesis of a large number of terpenes in plants using substrates provided by two distinct metabolic pathways, the mevalonate-dependent pathway that is located in cytosol and has been suggested to be responsible for synthesis of sesquiterpenes (C15), and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway located in plastids and suggested to be responsible for the synthesis of hemi- (C5), mono- (C10), and diterpenes (C20). Recent advances in characterization of genes and enzymes responsible for substrate and end product biosynthesis as well as efforts in metabolic engineering have demonstrated existence of a number of multi-substrate terpene synthases. This review summarizes the progress in the characterization of such multi-substrate terpene synthases and suggests that the presence of multi-substrate use might have been significantly underestimated. Multi-substrate use could lead to important changes in terpene product profiles upon substrate profile changes under perturbation of metabolism in stressed plants as well as under certain developmental stages. We therefore argue that multi-substrate use can be significant under physiological conditions and can result in complicate modifications in terpene profiles.

  12. Simulating the neural correlates of stuttering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Ouden, Dirk-Bart; Montgomery, Allen; Adams, Charley

    2014-08-01

    For functional neuroimaging studies of stuttering, two challenges are (1) the elicitation of naturally stuttered versus fluent speech and (2) the separation of activation associated with abnormal motor execution from activation that reflects the cognitive substrates of stuttering. This paper reports on a proof-of-concept study, in which a single-subject approach was applied to address these two issues. A stuttering speaker used his insight into his own stuttering behavior to create a list of stutter-prone words versus a list of "fluent" words. He was then matched to a non-stuttering speaker, who imitated the specific articulatory and orofacial motor pattern of the stuttering speaker. Both study participants performed a functional MRI experiment of single word reading, each being presented with the same lexical items. Results suggest that the generally observed right-hemisphere lateralization appears to reflect a true neural correlate of stuttering. Some of the classically reported activation associated with stuttering appears to be driven more by nonspecific motor patterns than by cognitive substrates of stuttering, while anterior cingulate activation may reflect awareness of (upcoming) dysfluencies. This study shows that it is feasible to match stuttering speakers' utterances more closely to simulated stutters for the investigation of neural correlates of real stuttering. Significant main effects and contrast effects were obtained for the differences between fluent and stuttered speech, and right-hemisphere lateralization associated with real stuttered speech was shown in a single subject.

  13. Analog neural network-based helicopter gearbox health monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, P T; Dzwonczyk, M; Manolakos, E S

    1995-12-01

    The development of a reliable helicopter gearbox health monitoring system (HMS) has been the subject of considerable research over the past 15 years. The deployment of such a system could lead to a significant saving in lives and vehicles as well as dramatically reduce the cost of helicopter maintenance. Recent research results indicate that a neural network-based system could provide a viable solution to the problem. This paper presents two neural network-based realizations of an HMS system. A hybrid (digital/analog) neural system is proposed as an extremely accurate off-line monitoring tool used to reduce helicopter gearbox maintenance costs. In addition, an all analog neural network is proposed as a real-time helicopter gearbox fault monitor that can exploit the ability of an analog neural network to directly compute the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) as a sum of weighted samples. Hardware performance results are obtained using the Integrated Neural Computing Architecture (INCA/1) analog neural network platform that was designed and developed at The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory. The results indicate that it is possible to achieve a 100% fault detection rate with 0% false alarm rate by performing a DFT directly on the first layer of INCA/1 followed by a small-size two-layer feed-forward neural network and a simple post-processing majority voting stage.

  14. Standard Operating Procedure for the Preparation of Lead-Containing Paint Films and Lead-in-Paint Diagnostic Test Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the preparation of stand-alone, lead paint films, prepared according to the old paint recipes. Further, this SOP describes the use of these paint films for the preparation of simulated old paints on a variety of substrates. Substrates used included wood, stee...

  15. Stacked Heterogeneous Neural Networks for Time Series Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin Leon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid model for time series forecasting is proposed. It is a stacked neural network, containing one normal multilayer perceptron with bipolar sigmoid activation functions, and the other with an exponential activation function in the output layer. As shown by the case studies, the proposed stacked hybrid neural model performs well on a variety of benchmark time series. The combination of weights of the two stack components that leads to optimal performance is also studied.

  16. Japanese studies on neural circuits and behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakura, Hiroyuki; Tsukada, Yuki; Takagi, Shin; Mori, Ikue

    2013-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal organism for studying neural plasticity and animal behaviors. A total of 302 neurons of a C. elegans hermaphrodite have been classified into 118 neuronal groups. This simple neural circuit provides a solid basis for understanding the mechanisms of the brains of higher animals, including humans. Recent studies that employ modern imaging and manipulation techniques enable researchers to study the dynamic properties of nervous systems with great precision. Behavioral and molecular genetic analyses of this tiny animal have contributed greatly to the advancement of neural circuit research. Here, we will review the recent studies on the neural circuits of C. elegans that have been conducted in Japan. Several laboratories have established unique and clever methods to study the underlying neuronal substrates of behavioral regulation in C. elegans. The technological advances applied to studies of C. elegans have allowed new approaches for the studies of complex neural systems. Through reviewing the studies on the neuronal circuits of C. elegans in Japan, we will analyze and discuss the directions of neural circuit studies. PMID:24348340

  17. Neural reactivity to reward in school-age offspring of depressed mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Schwartz, Karen T G; Kryza-Lacombe, Maria; Spechler, Philip A; Blankenship, Sarah L; Dougherty, Lea R

    2017-05-01

    Identifying neural profiles predictive of future psychopathology in at-risk individuals is important to efficiently direct preventive care. Alterations in reward processing may be a risk factor for depression. The current study characterized neural substrates of reward processing in children at low- and high-risk for psychopathology due to maternal depression status. Children with (n=27) and without (n=19) maternal depression (ages 5.9-9.6 years) performed a monetary incentive delay task in which they received rewards, if they successfully hit a target, or no reward regardless of performance, during fMRI acquisition. Multiple dorsal prefrontal, temporal, and striatal regions showed significant Group (high- vs. low-risk)×Performance (hit vs. miss)×Condition (no reward vs. reward) interactions in a whole-brain analysis. All regions exhibited similar patterns, whereby the high-risk group showed blunted activation differences between trials with vs. without rewards when participants hit the target. Moreover, high-risk children showed activation differences between trials with vs. without rewards in the opposite direction, compared to the low-risk group, when they missed the target. This study had a modest sample size, though larger than existing studies. Children with maternal depression are at elevated risk for future psychopathology, yet not all experience clinically significant symptoms; longitudinal research is necessary to fully track the pathway from risk to disorder. Children of depressed mothers exhibited attenuated neural activation differences and activation patterns opposite to children without depressed mothers. Our findings may provide targets for hypothesis-driven preventive interventions and lead to earlier identification of individuals at risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biomimetic substrate control of cellular mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Mohammad Nahid; Dzenis, Yuris; Donahue, Henry J; Lim, Jung Yul

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular mechanophysical signals from both static substrate cue and dynamic mechanical loading have strong potential to regulate cell functions. Most of the studies have adopted either static or dynamic cue and shown that each cue can regulate cell adhesion, spreading, migration, proliferation, lineage commitment, and differentiation. However, there is limited information on the integrative control of cell functions by the static and dynamic mechanophysical signals. For example, a majority of dynamic loading studies have tested mechanical stimulation of cells utilizing cultures on flat surfaces without any surface modification. While these approaches have provided significant information on cell mechanotransduction, obtained outcomes may not correctly recapitulate complex cellular mechanosensing milieus in vivo. Several pioneering studies documented cellular response to mechanical stimulations upon cultures with biomimetic substrate modifications. In this min-review, we will highlight key findings on the integrative role of substrate cue (topographic, geometric, etc.) and mechanical stimulation (stretch, fluid shear) in modulating cell function and fate. The integrative approaches, though not fully established yet, will help properly understand cell mechanotransduction under biomimetic mechanophysical environments. This may further lead to advanced functional tissue engineering and regenerative medicine protocols.

  19. Substrate integrated antennas and arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Yu Jian

    2015-01-01

    Substrate Integrated Antennas and Arrays provides a single source for cutting-edge information on substrate integrated circuits (SICs), substrate integrated waveguide (SIW) feeding networks, SIW slot array antennas, SIC traveling-wave antennas, SIW feeding antennas, SIW monopulse antennas, and SIW multibeam antennas. Inspired by the author's extensive research, this comprehensive book:Describes a revolutionary SIC-based antenna technique with the potential to replace existing antenna technologiesExamines theoretical and experimental results connected to electrical and mechanical performanceExp

  20. Direct cooled power electronics substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-14

    The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

  1. Substrate noise coupling in RFICs

    CERN Document Server

    Helmy, Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Substrate Noise Coupling in RFICs addresses substrate noise coupling in RF and mixed signal ICs when used in a system on chip (SoC) containing digital ICs as well. This trend of integrating RF, mixed signal ICs with large digital ICs is found in many of today's commercial ICs such as single chip Wi-Fi or Bluetooth solutions and is expected to grow rapidly in the future. The book reports modeling and simulation techniques for substrate noise coupling effects in RFICs and introduces isolation structures and design guides to mitigate such effects with the ultimate goal of enhancing the yield of R

  2. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  3. Lead and the Romans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  4. Hyperbolic Hopfield neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, several neural networks using Clifford algebra have been studied. Clifford algebra is also called geometric algebra. Complex-valued Hopfield neural networks (CHNNs) are the most popular neural networks using Clifford algebra. The aim of this brief is to construct hyperbolic HNNs (HHNNs) as an analog of CHNNs. Hyperbolic algebra is a Clifford algebra based on Lorentzian geometry. In this brief, a hyperbolic neuron is defined in a manner analogous to a phasor neuron, which is a typical complex-valued neuron model. HHNNs share common concepts with CHNNs, such as the angle and energy. However, HHNNs and CHNNs are different in several aspects. The states of hyperbolic neurons do not form a circle, and, therefore, the start and end states are not identical. In the quantized version, unlike complex-valued neurons, hyperbolic neurons have an infinite number of states.

  5. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  6. Neural correlates of sad feelings in healthy girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, J; Joanette, Y; Mensour, B; Beaudoin, G; Leroux, J-M; Bourgouin, P; Beauregard, M

    2003-01-01

    Emotional development is indisputably one of the cornerstones of personality development during infancy. According to the differential emotions theory (DET), primary emotions are constituted of three distinct components: the neural-evaluative, the expressive, and the experiential. The DET further assumes that these three components are biologically based and functional nearly from birth. Such a view entails that the neural substrate of primary emotions must be similar in children and adults. Guided by this assumption of the DET, the present functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to identify the neural correlates of sad feelings in healthy children. Fourteen healthy girls (aged 8-10) were scanned while they watched sad film excerpts aimed at externally inducing a transient state of sadness (activation task). Emotionally neutral film excerpts were also presented to the subjects (reference task). The subtraction of the brain activity measured during the viewing of the emotionally neutral film excerpts from that noted during the viewing of the sad film excerpts revealed that sad feelings were associated with significant bilateral activations of the midbrain, the medial prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area [BA] 10), and the anterior temporal pole (BA 21). A significant locus of activation was also noted in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 47). These results are compatible with those of previous functional neuroimaging studies of sadness in adults. They suggest that the neural substrate underlying the subjective experience of sadness is comparable in children and adults. Such a similitude provides empirical support to the DET assumption that the neural substrate of primary emotions is biologically based.

  7. Neural correlates of generation and inhibition of verbal association patterns in mood disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Piguet, Camille; Desseilles, Martin; Cojan, Yann; Sterpenich, Virginie; Dayer, Alexandre; Bertschy, Gilles; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Thought disorders such as rumination or flight of ideas are frequent in patients with mood disorders, and not systematically linked to mood state. These symptoms point to anomalies in cognitive processes mediating the generation and control of thoughts; for example, associative thinking and inhibition. However, their neural substrates are not known. METHOD: To obtain an ecological measure of neural processes underlying the generation and suppression of spontaneous thoughts, we des...

  8. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  9. The neural basis of body form and body action agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Valentina; Urgesi, Cosimo; Pernigo, Simone; Lanteri, Paola; Pazzaglia, Mariella; Aglioti, Salvatore Maria

    2008-10-23

    Visual analysis of faces and nonfacial body stimuli brings about neural activity in different cortical areas. Moreover, processing body form and body action relies on distinct neural substrates. Although brain lesion studies show specific face processing deficits, neuropsychological evidence for defective recognition of nonfacial body parts is lacking. By combining psychophysics studies with lesion-mapping techniques, we found that lesions of ventromedial, occipitotemporal areas induce face and body recognition deficits while lesions involving extrastriate body area seem causatively associated with impaired recognition of body but not of face and object stimuli. We also found that body form and body action recognition deficits can be double dissociated and are causatively associated with lesions to extrastriate body area and ventral premotor cortex, respectively. Our study reports two category-specific visual deficits, called body form and body action agnosia, and highlights their neural underpinnings.

  10. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Contact Us Share As a result of EPA's ... protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Basic Information How does lead get in the ...

  11. Substrate preferences in laying hens

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, de, M.J.M.; Reenen, van, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the substrate preference of laying hens with respect to dustbathing and foraging behaviour, in order to determine which resources should be provided in laying hen housing systems for the expression of these behaviours. The consumer demand approach was used to study the strength of preference. Hens had to push a weighted door to enter choice pens with either a wire floor, sand, wood shavings or peat moss as substrate. Twelve Isa-Brown hens, reared on battery cages, successfully...

  12. Coated substrate apparatus and method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Zhenan; Diao, Ying; Mannsfeld, Stefan Christian Bernhardt; Tee, Chee-Keong; Becerril-Garcia, Hector A.; Zhou, Yan

    2018-01-09

    A coated substrate is formed with aligned objects such as small molecules, macromolecules and nanoscale particulates, such as inorganic, organic or inorganic/organic hybrid materials. In accordance with one or more embodiments, an apparatus or method involves an applicator having at least one surface patterned with protruded or indented features, and a coated substrate including a solution-based layer of objects having features and morphology attributes arranged as a function of the protruded or indented features.

  13. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  14. Deconvolution using a neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S.K.

    1990-11-15

    Viewing one dimensional deconvolution as a matrix inversion problem, we compare a neural network backpropagation matrix inverse with LMS, and pseudo-inverse. This is a largely an exercise in understanding how our neural network code works. 1 ref.

  15. Numerical simulations of sessile droplet evaporating on heated substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Chen, Paul G.; Ouazzani, Jalil; Liu, Qiusheng

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the space project EFILE, a 2D axisymmetric numerical model in the framework of ALE method is developed to investigate the coupled physical mechanism during the evaporation of a pinned drop that partially wets on a heated substrate. The model accounts for mass transport in surrounding air, Marangoni convection inside the drop and heat conduction in the substrate as well as moving interface. Numerical results predict simple scaling laws for the evaporation rate which scales linearly with drop radius but follows a power-law with substrate temperature. It is highlighted that thermal effect of the substrate has a great impact on the temperature profile at the drop surface, which leads to a multicellular thermocapillary flow pattern. In particular, the structure of the multicellular flow behavior induced within a heated drop is mainly controlled by a geometric parameter (aspect ratio). A relationship between the number of thermal cells and the aspect ratio is proposed.

  16. Adhesion of Sputtered Nickel Films on Polycarbonate Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xueqiang; Pang, Xiaolu; Gao, Kewei; Yang, Huisheng; Jin, Jie; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2014-03-01

    Nickel films were deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering on top of polycarbonate substrates. Surface energy of the substrate was measured by means of the contact angle technique. Effects of sputtering parameters on the critical load between the film and the substrate were determined by the universal mechanical testing system. Optimized fabrication parameters and their influence on the critical load between sputtered nickel films and polymer substrate were studied by means of the orthogonal experimental design. Increasing radio frequency power and time improved film critical load. The radio frequency power had a more pronounced effect on critical load than the sputter power. The plasma pretreatment with Ar gas modified the surface, leading to an increased surface energy, improving the chemical bonds between nickel and carbon atoms, and thereby enhanced the critical load. The adhesion mechanism is also discussed in this paper.

  17. Elucidating Substrate Promiscuity within the FabI Enzyme Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Gabriel S; O'Brien, Terrence E; Vinson, Logan; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Yao, Andrew; Mak, Wai Shun; Tagkopoulos, Ilias; Facciotti, Marc T; Tantillo, Dean J; Siegel, Justin B

    2017-09-15

    The rapidly growing appreciation of enzymes' catalytic and substrate promiscuity may lead to their expanded use in the fields of chemical synthesis and industrial biotechnology. Here, we explore the substrate promiscuity of enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases (commonly known as FabI) and how that promiscuity is a function of inherent reactivity and the geometric demands of the enzyme's active site. We demonstrate that these enzymes catalyze the reduction of a wide range of substrates, particularly α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. In addition, we demonstrate that a combination of quantum mechanical hydride affinity calculations and molecular docking can be used to rapidly categorize compounds that FabI can use as substrates. The results here provide new insight into the determinants of catalysis for FabI and set the stage for the development of a new assay for drug discovery, organic synthesis, and novel biocatalysts.

  18. Downward self-polarization of lead-free (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})(Mn{sub 0.005}Nb{sub 0.995})O{sub 3} ferroelectric thin films on Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seog, Hae Jin; Ahn, Chang Won; Cho, Shinuk; Kim, Ill Won [Department of Physics and Energy Harvest-Storage Research Center, University of Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwang-Eun; Yang, Chan-Ho [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejion (Korea, Republic of); Koo, Tae Yeong [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Gyungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jong Pil [Division of Analysis and Research, Korea Basic Science Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Spontaneously appearing macroscopic polarization (self-polarization) in ferroelectrics without an electrode or an external electric field would enable the freedom to design many ferroelectric heterostructures and devices. The (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5})(Mn{sub 0.005}Nb{sub 0.995})O{sub 3} (KNMN) thin film was grown on Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} single-crystal substrate and the resultant self-polarization behavior due to strain relaxation was investigated. The lattice mismatch and difference in TEC between the KNMN thin film and the Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} substrate creates a compressive strain. The compressive strain gradient may be the main cause for the observed downward self-polarization. The downward self-polarization of the KNMN thin film can be explained by the strong inhomogeneous compressive strain caused by strain relaxation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Nano-topography Enhances Communication in Neural Cells Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2017-08-23

    Neural cells are the smallest building blocks of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Information in neural networks and cell-substrate interactions have been heretofore studied separately. Understanding whether surface nano-topography can direct nerve cells assembly into computational efficient networks may provide new tools and criteria for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we used information theory approaches and functional multi calcium imaging (fMCI) techniques to examine how information flows in neural networks cultured on surfaces with controlled topography. We found that substrate roughness Sa affects networks topology. In the low nano-meter range, S-a = 0-30 nm, information increases with Sa. Moreover, we found that energy density of a network of cells correlates to the topology of that network. This reinforces the view that information, energy and surface nano-topography are tightly inter-connected and should not be neglected when studying cell-cell interaction in neural tissue repair and regeneration.

  20. Abnormal neural responses to social exclusion in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradin, Victoria B; Waiter, Gordon; Kumar, Poornima; Stickle, Catriona; Milders, Maarten; Matthews, Keith; Reid, Ian; Hall, Jeremy; Steele, J Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Social exclusion is an influential concept in politics, mental health and social psychology. Studies on healthy subjects have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in emotional and social information processing, in neural responses to social exclusion. Impairments in social interactions are common in schizophrenia and are associated with reduced quality of life. Core symptoms such as delusions usually have a social content. However little is known about the neural underpinnings of social abnormalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrates of social exclusion in schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent fMRI while participating in a popular social exclusion paradigm. This task involves passing a 'ball' between the participant and two cartoon representations of other subjects. The extent of social exclusion (ball not being passed to the participant) was parametrically varied throughout the task. Replicating previous findings, increasing social exclusion activated the mPFC in controls. In contrast, patients with schizophrenia failed to modulate mPFC responses with increasing exclusion. Furthermore, the blunted response to exclusion correlated with increased severity of positive symptoms. These data support the hypothesis that the neural response to social exclusion differs in schizophrenia, highlighting the mPFC as a potential substrate of impaired social interactions.

  1. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  2. As We May Think and Be: Brain-computer interfaces to expand the substrate of mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijail Demian Serruya

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over a half-century ago, the scientist Vannevar Bush explored the conundrum of how to tap the exponentially rising sea of human knowledge for the betterment of humanity. In his description of a hypothetical electronic library he dubbed the memex, he anticipated internet search and online encyclopedias (Bush, 1945. By blurring the boundary between brain and computer, brain-computer interfaces (BCI could lead to more efficient use of electronic resources (Schalk, 2008. We could expand the substrate of the mind itself rather than merely interfacing it to external computers. Components of brain-computer interfaces could be re-arranged to create brain-brain interfaces, or tightly interconnected links between a person’s brain and ectopic neural modules. Such modules – whether sitting in a bubbling Petri dish, rendered in reciprocally linked integrated circuits, or implanted in our belly – would mark the first step on to a path of breaking out of the limitations imposed by our phylogenetic past Novel BCI architectures could generate novel abilities to navigate and access information that might speed translational science efforts and push the boundaries of human knowledge in an unprecedented manner.

  3. Neural Network Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Salamon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We propose several means for improving the performance an training of neural networks for classification. We use crossvalidation as a tool for optimizing network parameters and architecture. We show further that the remaining generalization error can be reduced by invoking ensembles of similar...... networks....

  4. Neural systems for control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omidvar, Omid; Elliott, David L

    1997-01-01

    ... is reprinted with permission from A. Barto, "Reinforcement Learning," Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks, M.A. Arbib, ed.. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 804-809, 1995. Chapter 4, Figures 4-5 and 7-9 and Tables 2-5, are reprinted with permission, from S. Cho, "Map Formation in Proprioceptive Cortex," International Jour...

  5. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancies each year in the United States. A baby’s neural tube normally develops into the brain and spinal cord. ... fluid in the brain. This is called hydrocephalus. Babies with this condition are treated with surgery to insert a tube (called a shunt) into the brain. The shunt ...

  6. Intelligence moderates reinforcement learning: a mini-review of the neural evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong

    2015-06-01

    Our understanding of the neural basis of reinforcement learning and intelligence, two key factors contributing to human strivings, has progressed significantly recently. However, the overlap of these two lines of research, namely, how intelligence affects neural responses during reinforcement learning, remains uninvestigated. A mini-review of three existing studies suggests that higher IQ (especially fluid IQ) may enhance the neural signal of positive prediction error in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and striatum, several brain substrates of reinforcement learning or intelligence. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Structure-based substrate screening for an enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dongzhi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, more and more novel enzymes can be easily found in the whole enzyme pool with the rapid development of genetic operation. However, experimental work for substrate screening of a new enzyme is laborious, time consuming and costly. On the other hand, many computational methods have been widely used in lead screening of drug design. Seeing that the ligand-target protein system in drug design and the substrate-enzyme system in enzyme applications share the similar molecular recognition mechanism, we aim to fulfill the goal of substrate screening by in silico means in the present study. Results A computer-aided substrate screening (CASS system which was based on the enzyme structure was designed and employed successfully to help screen substrates of Candida antarctica lipase B (CALB. In this system, restricted molecular docking which was derived from the mechanism of the enzyme was applied to predict the energetically favorable poses of substrate-enzyme complexes. Thereafter, substrate conformation, distance between the oxygen atom of the alcohol part of the ester (in some compounds, this oxygen atom was replaced by nitrogen atom of the amine part of acid amine or sulfur atom of the thioester and the hydrogen atom of imidazole of His224, distance between the carbon atom of the carbonyl group of the compound and the oxygen atom of hydroxyl group of Ser105 were used sequentially as the criteria to screen the binding poses. 223 out of 233 compounds were identified correctly for the enzyme by this screening system. Such high accuracy guaranteed the feasibility and reliability of the CASS system. Conclusion The idea of computer-aided substrate screening is a creative combination of computational skills and enzymology. Although the case studied in this paper is tentative, high accuracy of the CASS system sheds light on the field of computer-aided substrate screening.

  8. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  9. Diminished neural responses predict enhanced intrinsic motivation and sensitivity to external incentive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Karen E; Ma, Wei Ji; Deci, Edward L; Ryan, Richard M; Chiu, Pearl H

    2015-06-01

    The duration and quality of human performance depend on both intrinsic motivation and external incentives. However, little is known about the neuroscientific basis of this interplay between internal and external motivators. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation, operationalized as the free-choice time spent on a task when this was not required, and tested the neural and behavioral effects of external reward on intrinsic motivation. We found that increased duration of free-choice time was predicted by generally diminished neural responses in regions associated with cognitive and affective regulation. By comparison, the possibility of additional reward improved task accuracy, and specifically increased neural and behavioral responses following errors. Those individuals with the smallest neural responses associated with intrinsic motivation exhibited the greatest error-related neural enhancement under the external contingency of possible reward. Together, these data suggest that human performance is guided by a "tonic" and "phasic" relationship between the neural substrates of intrinsic motivation (tonic) and the impact of external incentives (phasic).

  10. A review of evidence linking disrupted neural plasticity to schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voineskos, Daphne; Rogasch, Nigel C; Rajji, Tarek K; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2013-02-01

    The adaptations resulting from neural plasticity lead to changes in cognition and behaviour, which are strengthened through repeated exposure to the novel environment or stimulus. Learning and memory have been hypothesized to occur through modifications of the strength of neural circuits, particularly in the hippocampus and cortex. Cognitive deficits, specifically in executive functioning and negative symptoms, may be a corollary to deficits in neural plasticity. Moreover, the main excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters associated with neural plasticity have also been extensively investigated for their role in the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents some of the most promising approaches to directly explore the physiological manifestations of neural plasticity in the human brain. Three TMS paradigms (use-dependent plasticity, paired associative stimulation, and repetitive TMS) have been used to evaluate neurophysiological measures of neural plasticity in the healthy brain and in patients with schizophrenia, and to examine the brain's responses to such stimulation. In schizophrenia, deficits in neural plasticity have been consistently shown which parallel the molecular evidence appearing to be entwined with this debilitating disorder. Such pathophysiology may underlie the learning and memory deficits that are key symptoms of this disorder and may even be a key mechanism involved in treatment with antipsychotics.

  11. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  12. Brain oscillatory substrates of visual short-term memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauseng, Paul; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Heise, Kirstin F; Gruber, Walter R; Holz, Elisa; Karim, Ahmed A; Glennon, Mark; Gerloff, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2009-11-17

    The amount of information that can be stored in visual short-term memory is strictly limited to about four items. Therefore, memory capacity relies not only on the successful retention of relevant information but also on efficient suppression of distracting information, visual attention, and executive functions. However, completely separable neural signatures for these memory capacity-limiting factors remain to be identified. Because of its functional diversity, oscillatory brain activity may offer a utile solution. In the present study, we show that capacity-determining mechanisms, namely retention of relevant information and suppression of distracting information, are based on neural substrates independent of each other: the successful maintenance of relevant material in short-term memory is associated with cross-frequency phase synchronization between theta (rhythmical neural activity around 5 Hz) and gamma (> 50 Hz) oscillations at posterior parietal recording sites. On the other hand, electroencephalographic alpha activity (around 10 Hz) predicts memory capacity based on efficient suppression of irrelevant information in short-term memory. Moreover, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation at alpha frequency can modulate short-term memory capacity by influencing the ability to suppress distracting information. Taken together, the current study provides evidence for a double dissociation of brain oscillatory correlates of visual short-term memory capacity.

  13. Assessing Posidonia oceanica seedling substrate preference: an experimental determination of seedling anchorage success in rocky vs. sandy substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Alagna

    Full Text Available In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks. Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg, which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have

  14. Assessing Posidonia oceanica seedling substrate preference: an experimental determination of seedling anchorage success in rocky vs. sandy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Adriana; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Anna, Giovanni D; Magliola, Carlo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock) and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks). Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg), which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have influenced P

  15. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Shaping the learning curve: epigenetic dynamics in neural plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronfman, Zohar Z; Ginsburg, Simona; Jablonka, Eva

    2014-01-01

    A key characteristic of learning and neural plasticity is state-dependent acquisition dynamics reflected by the non-linear learning curve that links increase in learning with practice. Here we propose that the manner by which epigenetic states of individual cells change during learning contributes to the shape of the neural and behavioral learning curve. We base our suggestion on recent studies showing that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and RNA-mediated gene regulation are intimately involved in the establishment and maintenance of long-term neural plasticity, reflecting specific learning-histories and influencing future learning. Our model, which is the first to suggest a dynamic molecular account of the shape of the learning curve, leads to several testable predictions regarding the link between epigenetic dynamics at the promoter, gene-network, and neural-network levels. This perspective opens up new avenues for therapeutic interventions in neurological pathologies.

  17. Genetics and development of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital defects of neural tube closure (neural tube defects; NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe disorders of the fetus and newborn. Disturbance of any of the sequential events of embryonic neurulation produce NTDs, with the phenotype (e.g. anencephaly, spina bifida) varying depending on the region of neural tube that remains open. While mutation of more than 200 genes is known to cause NTDs in mice, the pattern of occurrence in humans suggests a multifactorial polygenic or oligogenic aetiology. This emphasises the importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the origin of these defects. A number of cell biological functions are essential for neural tube closure, with defects of the cytoskeleton, cell cycle and molecular regulation of cell viability prominent among the mouse NTD mutants. Many transcriptional regulators and proteins that affect chromatin structure are also required for neural tube closure, although the downstream molecular pathways regulated by these proteins is unknown. Some key signalling pathways for NTDs have been identified: over-activation of sonic hedgehog signalling and loss of function in the planar cell polarity (non-canonical Wnt) pathway are potent causes of NTD, with requirements also for retinoid and inositol signalling. Folic acid supplementation is an effective method for primary prevention of a proportion of NTDs, in both humans and mice, although the embryonic mechanism of folate action remains unclear. Folic acid-resistant cases can be prevented by inositol supplementation in mice, raising the possibility that this could lead to an additional preventive strategy for human NTDs in future. PMID:19918803

  18. Developmental plasticity in neural circuits for a learned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottjer, S W; Arnold, A P

    1997-01-01

    The neural substrate underlying learned vocal behavior in songbirds provides a textbook illustration of anatomical localization of function for a complex learned behavior in vertebrates. The song-control system has become an important model for studying neural systems related to learning, behavior, and development. The song system of zebra finches is characterized by a heightened capacity for both neural and behavioral change during development and has taught us valuable information regarding sensitive periods, rearrangement of synaptic connections, topographic specificity, cell death and neurogenesis, experience-dependent neural plasticity, and sexual differentiation. The song system differs in some interesting ways from some well-studied mammalian model systems and thus offers fresh perspectives on specific theoretical issues. In this highly selective review, we concentrate on two major questions: What are the developmental changes in the song system responsible for song learning and the restriction of learning to a sensitive period, and what factors explain the highly sexually dimorphic development of this system? We discuss the important role of sex steroid hormones and of neurotrophins in creating a male-typical neural song circuit (which can learn to produce complex vocalizations) instead of a reduced, female-typical song circuit that does not produce learned song.

  19. On the nature, modeling, and neural bases of social ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winden, Frans; Stallen, Mirre; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2008-01-01

    This chapter addresses the nature, formalization, and neural bases of (affective) social ties and discusses the relevance of ties for health economics. A social tie is defined as an affective weight attached by an individual to the well-being of another individual ('utility interdependence'). Ties can be positive or negative, and symmetric or asymmetric between individuals. Characteristic of a social tie, as conceived of here, is that it develops over time under the influence of interaction, in contrast with a trait like altruism. Moreover, a tie is not related to strategic behavior such as reputation formation but seen as generated by affective responses. A formalization is presented together with some supportive evidence from behavioral experiments. This is followed by a discussion of related psychological constructs and the presentation of suggestive existing neural findings. To help prepare the grounds for a model-based neural analysis some speculations on the neural networks involved are provided, together with suggestions for future research. Social ties are not only found to be important from an economic viewpoint, it is also shown that they can be modeled and related to neural substrates. By providing an overview of the economic research on social ties and connecting it with the broader behavioral and neuroeconomics literature, the chapter may contribute to the development of a neuroeconomics of social ties.

  20. Neural markers of errors as endophenotypes in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara S Manoach

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning from errors is fundamental to adaptive human behavior. It requires detecting errors, evaluating what went wrong, and adjusting behavior accordingly. These dynamic adjustments are at the heart of behavioral flexibility and accumulating evidence suggests that deficient error processing contributes to maladaptively rigid and repetitive behavior in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies reveal highly reliable neural markers of error processing. In this review, we evaluate the evidence that abnormalities in these neural markers can serve as sensitive endophenotypes of neuropsychiatric disorders. We describe the behavioral and neural hallmarks of error processing, their mediation by common genetic polymorphisms, and impairments in schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude that neural markers of errors meet several important criteria as endophenotypes including heritability, established neuroanatomical and neurochemical substrates, association with neuropsychiatric disorders, presence in syndromally-unaffected family members, and evidence of genetic mediation. Understanding the mechanisms of error processing deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders may provide novel neural and behavioral targets for treatment and sensitive surrogate markers of treatment response. Treating error processing deficits may improve functional outcome since error signals provide crucial information for flexible adaptation to changing environments. Given the dearth of effective interventions for cognitive deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders, this represents a promising approach.

  1. Porous substrates filled with nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Stadermann, Michael

    2014-08-19

    A composition comprising: at least one porous carbon monolith, such as a carbon aerogel, comprising internal pores, and at least one nanomaterial, such as carbon nanotubes, disposed uniformly throughout the internal pores. The nanomaterial can be disposed in the middle of the monolith. In addition, a method for making a monolithic solid with both high surface area and good bulk electrical conductivity is provided. A porous substrate having a thickness of 100 microns or more and comprising macropores throughout its thickness is prepared. At least one catalyst is deposited inside the porous substrate. Subsequently, chemical vapor deposition is used to uniformly deposit a nanomaterial in the macropores throughout the thickness of the porous substrate. Applications include electrical energy storage, such as batteries and capacitors, and hydrogen storage.

  2. Determination of inhibition in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose using hybrid neural modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Corazza

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural networks and hybrid models were used to study substrate and product inhibition observed in the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellobiose at 40ºC, 50ºC and 55ºC, pH 4.8, using cellobiose solutions with or without the addition of exogenous glucose. Firstly, the initial velocity method and nonlinear fitting with StatisticaÒ were used to determine the kinetic parameters for either the uncompetitive or the competitive substrate inhibition model at a negligible product concentration and cellobiose from 0.4 to 2.0 g/L. Secondly, for six different models of substrate and product inhibitions and data for low to high cellobiose conversions in a batch reactor, neural networks were used for fitting the product inhibition parameter to the mass balance equations derived for each model. The two models found to be best were: 1 noncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive by product and 2 uncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive by product; however, these models’ correlation coefficients were quite close. To distinguish between them, hybrid models consisting of neural networks and first principle equations were used to select the best inhibition model based on the smallest norm observed, and the model with noncompetitive inhibition by substrate and competitive inhibition by product was shown to be the best predictor of cellobiose hydrolysis reactor behavior.

  3. Plastic Substrates for Flexible Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hisashi; Oka, Wataru; Goto, Hideki; Umeda, Hideo

    2006-05-01

    New flexible fibrous glass-reinforced plastic (FRP) substrates for flat panel displays were developed. Optimizing the composition of the FRP by adjusting the difference in refractive index between a matrix resin and a glass fiber enabled the coexistence of a high transparency and a low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). An excellent smooth surface morphology was confirmed by the formulation of a coating resin. The stability of moisture impermeability depended on the surface smoothness and adhesion between a barrier layer and the coating layer. The moisture permeation rates of barrier substrates were below detection limits (<0.01 g m-2 day-1) on standard measurement equipment.

  4. Spaced Learning Enhances Subsequent Recognition Memory by Reducing Neural Repetition Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gui; Mei, Leilei; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Poldrack, Russell; Dong, Qi

    2011-01-01

    Spaced learning usually leads to better recognition memory as compared with massed learning, yet the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive. One open question is whether the spacing effect is achieved by reducing neural repetition suppression. In this fMRI study, participants were scanned while intentionally memorizing 120 novel faces, half…

  5. Fixation mechanisms of nanoparticles on substrates by electron beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Daichi; Nose, Tomohiro; Chikuta, Taiki; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    For applications such as the fabrication of plasmonic waveguides we developed a patterning technique to fabricate an array of nanoparticles on a substrate using focused electron beams (Noriki, T.; Abe, S.;.Kajikawa, K.; Shimojo, M. Beilstein J. Nanotechnol.2015,6, 1010-1015). This technique consists of three steps: Firstly, nanoparticles are placed over the entire surface of a substrate. Secondly, the nanoparticles are fixed on the substrate by focused electron beam irradiation. The electron beam decomposes the organic molecules located around the particle into amorphous carbon. The amorphous carbon immobilizes the particle on the substrate. Finally, the unfixed nanoparticles are removed. However, in this original technique, the area in which the nanoparticles were fixed was wider than the electron-probe size of a few nanometers. To understand this widening mechanisms, the effects of accelerating voltage, particle size and substrate material are investigated by means of both experiments and simulation. It is demonstrated that the fixing area is greatly affected by the electrons back-scattered by the substrate. The back-scattering leads to an increase in line width and thus reduces the resolution of this patterning technique.

  6. From UBE3A to Angelman syndrome: a substrate perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle L Sell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by motor dysfunction, intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures and common features of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. Some of these AS related phenotypes can be seen in other neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams, 2011;Tan et al., 2014. AS patients commonly carry mutations that render the maternally inherited UBE3A gene nonfunctional. Duplication of the chromosomal region containing the UBE3A gene is associated with ASDs. Although the causative role for UBE3A gene mutations in AS is well established, a long-standing challenge in AS research has been to identify neural substrates of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A prevailing hypothesis is that changes in UBE3A protein levels would alter the levels of a collection of protein substrates, giving rise to the unique phenotypic aspects of AS and possibly UBE3A associated ASDs. Interestingly, proteins altered in AS are linked to additional ASDs that are not previously associated with changes in UBE3A, indicating a possible molecular overlap underlying the broad-spectrum phenotypes of these neurogenetic disorders. This idea raises the possibility that there may exist a one-size-fits-all approach to the treatment of neurogenetic disorders with phenotypes overlapping AS. Furthermore, while a comprehensive list of UBE3A substrates and downstream affected pathways should be developed, this is only part of the story. The timing of when UBE3A protein functions, through either changes in UBE3A or possibly substrate expression patterns, appears to be critical for AS phenotype development. These data call for further investigation of UBE3A substrates and their timing of action relevant to AS phenotypes.

  7. From UBE3A to Angelman syndrome: a substrate perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Gabrielle L.; Margolis, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a debilitating neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by motor dysfunction, intellectual disability, speech impairment, seizures and common features of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Some of these AS related phenotypes can be seen in other neurodevelopmental disorders (Williams, 2011; Tan et al., 2014). AS patients commonly carry mutations that render the maternally inherited UBE3A gene non-functional. Duplication of the chromosomal region containing the UBE3A gene is associated with ASDs. Although the causative role for UBE3A gene mutations in AS is well established, a long-standing challenge in AS research has been to identify neural substrates of UBE3A, an E3 ubiquitin ligase. A prevailing hypothesis is that changes in UBE3A protein levels would alter the levels of a collection of protein substrates, giving rise to the unique phenotypic aspects of AS and possibly UBE3A associated ASDs. Interestingly, proteins altered in AS are linked to additional ASDs that are not previously associated with changes in UBE3A, indicating a possible molecular overlap underlying the broad-spectrum phenotypes of these neurogenetic disorders. This idea raises the possibility that there may exist a “one-size-fits-all” approach to the treatment of neurogenetic disorders with phenotypes overlapping AS. Furthermore, while a comprehensive list of UBE3A substrates and downstream affected pathways should be developed, this is only part of the story. The timing of when UBE3A protein functions, through either changes in UBE3A or possibly substrate expression patterns, appears to be critical for AS phenotype development. These data call for further investigation of UBE3A substrates and their timing of action relevant to AS phenotypes. PMID:26441497

  8. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    grown on PMMA resembled closely to that of cells grown on the control surface, thus confirming the biocompatibility of PMMA. Additionally, the astrocyte GFAP gene expressions of cells grown on PMMA were lower than the control, signifying a lack of astrocyte reactivity. Based on the findings from the biomaterials study, it was decided to optimize PMMA by changing the surface characteristic of the material. Through the process of hot embossing, nanopatterns were placed on the surface in order to test the hypothesis that nanopatterning can improve the cellular response to the material. Results of this study agreed with current literature showing that topography effects protein and cell behavior. It was concluded that for the use in neural electrode fabrication and design, the 3600mm/gratings pattern feature sizes were optimal. The 3600 mm/gratings pattern depicted cell alignment along the nanopattern, less protein adsorption, less cell adhesion, proliferation and viability, inhibition of GFAP and MAP2k1 compared to all other substrates tested. Results from the initial biomaterials study also indicated platinum was negatively affected the cells and may not be a suitable material for neural electrodes. This lead to pursuing studies with iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires for the glial scar assay. Iridium oxide advantages of lower impedance and higher charge injection capacity would appear to make iridium oxide more favorable for neural electrode fabrication. However, results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Astrocytes cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Results from the nanopatterning PMMA study prompted a more thorough investigation of the nanopatterning effects using an organotypic brain slice model. PDMS was utilized as the substrate due to its optimal physical properties

  9. On the neural mechanisms subserving consciousness and attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eTallon-Baudry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness, as described in the experimental literature, is a multi-faceted phenomenon, that impinges on other well-studied concepts such as attention and control. Do consciousness and attention refer to different aspects of the same core phenomenon, or do they correspond to distinct functions? One possibility to address this question is to examine the neural mechanisms underlying consciousness and attention. If consciousness and attention pertain to the same concept, they should rely on shared neural mechanisms. Conversely, if their underlying mechanisms are distinct, then consciousness and attention should be considered as distinct entities. This paper therefore reviews neurophysiological facts arguing in favor or against a tight relationship between consciousness and attention. Three neural mechanisms that have been associated with both attention and consciousness are examined (neural amplification, involvement of the fronto-parietal network, and oscillatory synchrony, to conclude that the commonalities between attention and consciousness at the neural level may have been overestimated. Last but not least, experiments in which both attention and consciousness were probed at the neural level point toward a dissociation between the two concepts. It therefore appears from this review that consciousness and attention rely on distinct neural properties, although they can interact at the behavioral level. It is proposed that a "cumulative influence model", in which attention and consciousness correspond to distinct neural mechanisms feeding a single decisional process leading to behavior, fits best with available neural and behavioral data. In this view, consciousness should not be considered as a top-level executive function but should rather be defined by its experiential properties.

  10. Neural network technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James A.

    1991-01-01

    A whole new arena of computer technologies is now beginning to form. Still in its infancy, neural network technology is a biologically inspired methodology which draws on nature's own cognitive processes. The Software Technology Branch has provided a software tool, Neural Execution and Training System (NETS), to industry, government, and academia to facilitate and expedite the use of this technology. NETS is written in the C programming language and can be executed on a variety of machines. Once a network has been debugged, NETS can produce a C source code which implements the network. This code can then be incorporated into other software systems. Described here are various software projects currently under development with NETS and the anticipated future enhancements to NETS and the technology.

  11. Analysis of neural data

    CERN Document Server

    Kass, Robert E; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    Continual improvements in data collection and processing have had a huge impact on brain research, producing data sets that are often large and complicated. By emphasizing a few fundamental principles, and a handful of ubiquitous techniques, Analysis of Neural Data provides a unified treatment of analytical methods that have become essential for contemporary researchers. Throughout the book ideas are illustrated with more than 100 examples drawn from the literature, ranging from electrophysiology, to neuroimaging, to behavior. By demonstrating the commonality among various statistical approaches the authors provide the crucial tools for gaining knowledge from diverse types of data. Aimed at experimentalists with only high-school level mathematics, as well as computationally-oriented neuroscientists who have limited familiarity with statistics, Analysis of Neural Data serves as both a self-contained introduction and a reference work.

  12. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  13. Behavioral and neural correlates of acute and scheduled hunger in C57BL/6 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian M Gallardo

    Full Text Available In rodents, daily feeding schedules induce food anticipatory activity (FAA rhythms with formal properties suggesting mediation by food-entrained circadian oscillators (FEOs. The search for the neuronal substrate of FEOs responsible for FAA is an active area of research, but studies spanning several decades have yet to identify unequivocally a brain region required for FAA. Variability of results across studies leads to questions about underlying biology versus methodology. Here we describe in C57BL/6 male mice the effects of varying the 'dose' of caloric restriction (0%, 60%, 80%, 110% on the expression of FAA as measured by a video-based analysis system, and on the induction of c-Fos in brain regions that have been implicated in FAA. We determined that more severe caloric restriction (60% leads to a faster onset of FAA with increased magnitude. Using the 60% caloric restriction, we found little evidence for unique signatures of neuronal activation in the brains of mice anticipating a daily mealtime compared to mice that were fasted acutely or fed ad-libitum-even in regions such as the dorsomedial and ventrolateral hypothalamus, nucleus accumbens, and cerebellum that have previously been implicated in FAA. These results underscore the importance of feeding schedule parameters in determining quantitative features of FAA in mice, and demonstrate dissociations between behavioral FAA and neural activity in brain areas thought to harbor FEOs or participate in their entrainment or output.

  14. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  16. Neurally-mediated sincope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, I; Cytron, J; Jhanjee, R; Nguyen, J; Benditt, D G

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a syndrome characterized by a relatively sudden, temporary and self-terminating loss of consciousness; the causes may vary, but they have in common a temporary inadequacy of cerebral nutrient flow, usually due to a fall in systemic arterial pressure. However, while syncope is a common problem, it is only one explanation for episodic transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). Consequently, diagnostic evaluation should start with a broad consideration of real or seemingly real TLOC. Among those patients in whom TLOC is deemed to be due to ''true syncope'', the focus may then reasonably turn to assessing the various possible causes; in this regard, the neurally-mediated syncope syndromes are among the most frequently encountered. There are three common variations: vasovagal syncope (often termed the ''common'' faint), carotid sinus syndrome, and the so-called ''situational faints''. Defining whether the cause is due to a neurally-mediated reflex relies heavily on careful history taking and selected testing (e.g., tilt-test, carotid massage). These steps are important. Despite the fact that neurally-mediated faints are usually relatively benign from a mortality perspective, they are nevertheless only infrequently an isolated event; neurally-mediated syncope tends to recur, and physical injury resulting from falls or accidents, diminished quality-of-life, and possible restriction from employment or avocation are real concerns. Consequently, defining the specific form and developing an effective treatment strategy are crucial. In every case the goal should be to determine the cause of syncope with sufficient confidence to provide patients and family members with a reliable assessment of prognosis, recurrence risk, and treatment options.

  17. The Neural Noisy Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lei; Blunsom, Phil; Dyer, Chris; Grefenstette, Edward; Kocisky, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We formulate sequence to sequence transduction as a noisy channel decoding problem and use recurrent neural networks to parameterise the source and channel models. Unlike direct models which can suffer from explaining-away effects during training, noisy channel models must produce outputs that explain their inputs, and their component models can be trained with not only paired training samples but also unpaired samples from the marginal output distribution. Using a latent variable to control ...

  18. Lead content of foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D G; Aldous, K M

    1974-05-01

    The lead content of a number of foodstuffs, particularly baby fruit juices and milk, is reported. Samples were analyzed in quadruplicate by using an automated Delves cup atomic absorption procedure. A large proportion of the products examined contained significant amounts of lead. Of 256 metal can examined, the contents of 62% contained a lead level of 100 mug/l. or more, 37% contained 200 mug/l. or more and 12% contained 400 mug/l. lead or more. Of products in glass and aluminum containers, only 1% had lead levels in excess of 200 mug/l. Lead levels of contents also correlate with the seam length/volume ratio of the leaded seam can. A survey of bulk milk showed a mean lead level of 40 mug/l. for 270 samples; for canned evaporated milk the mean level was 202 mug/l. These data indicate a potential health hazard.

  19. Lead and tap water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  20. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  1. Flexible SERS-based substrates: challenges and opportunities toward an Army relevant universal sensing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mikella E.; Singamaneni, Srikanth; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2015-05-01

    Generally the fabrication, assembly and evaluation of plasmonic nanostructures for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates has focused on static rigid substrates such as glass and silicon. However, these static substrates severely limit the application of plasmonic nanostructures as (i) they provide no means to alter the state of assembly of the nanostructures once they are formed or anchored on the surface i.e., not reconfigurable; and (ii) preclude applications which demand non-planar, flexible or conformal surfaces. The above considerations has led to the development of a novel class of SERS substrates based on flexible substrates such paper, polymer membranes and electrospun fibers. These flexible SERS media based on unconventional substrates such as paper offer distinct advantages compared to the conventional SERS substrates in that (i) flexible nature of the substrate enables conformal contact with the surfaces under investigation leading to efficient sample collection; (ii) porous nature of the SERS substrate (interstices between the fibers) provides efficient access to the analytes; (iii) high surface area of the 3D paper substrate results in large dynamic range of the chemical sensors; (iv) intricate network of fibers decorated with metal nanoparticles can provide potentially high density of electromagnetic hotspots; (v) intense light scattering caused by the fibrous structure of the substrate (e.g., paper) enables efficient light-metal interaction; and (vi) facile fabrication leads to efficient, robust, reliable, reusable and cost-effective SERS substrates. In this presentation, we will focus on the Army need for a more flexible (substrate surface and application) SERS substrate for universal sensing. This presentation will leverage from material presented at a flexible SERS (May 2014) workshop hosted by Dr. Srikanth Singamaneni at Washington University.

  2. NA49: lead-lead collision

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  3. Optimization of the enzyme system for hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates; Optimering av enzymsystemet foer hydrolys av foerbehandlade lignocellulosa substrat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tjerneld, Folke [Lund univ., (Sweden). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2000-06-01

    This project aims to clarify the reasons for the slow and incomplete enzymatic hydrolysis of certain lignocellulose substrates, particularly softwood e.g. spruce. Based on this knowledge we will optimize the enzyme system so that the yield of fermentable sugars is increased as well as the rate of hydrolysis. We will also study methods for recycling of the enzymes in the process by adsorption on fresh substrate. Progress in these areas will lead to improved process economy in an ethanol process. We collaborate with Chemical Engineering on hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulose substrates and with Analytical Chemistry and Applied Microbiology on analysis of potential inhibitors. Within this main research direction the work at Biochemistry during this project period (since 970701) has been focused on the following areas: (1) Studies of the role of substrate properties in the enzymatic hydrolysis to clarify the reasons for the decrease in the rate of hydrolysis; (2) enzyme adsorption on lignin; (3) studies of recently identified low molecular weight endo glucanases which may be used for more effective penetration of small pores in pretreated substrates (this part is financed by the Nordic Energy Research Program). Central results during the period: In order to study the role of substrate properties for hydrolysis we have initiated investigations on steam pretreated substrates with several techniques. Measurements of pore sizes have been done with probe molecules of known molecular weights. Results show that probe molecules with diameters larger than 50 Aangstroem can more easily penetrate pretreated willow compared with spruce, which can be a part of the explanation for the better hydrolysability of hardwood substrates compared with softwood. We have started studies with electron microscopy of pretreated substrates at different degrees of enzymatic hydrolysis. With scanning electron microscopy (SEM) we can see significant differences in substrate structure in

  4. Network-Based Substrate of Cognitive Reserve in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Laura; Mancini, Matteo; Cercignani, Mara; Di Domenico, Carlotta; Spanò, Barbara; Giulietti, Giovanni; Koch, Giacomo; Marra, Camillo; Bozzali, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive reserve (CR) is known to modulate the clinical features of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This concept may be critical for the development of non-pharmacological interventions able to slow down patients' cognitive decline in the absence of disease-modifying treatments. We aimed at identifying the neurobiological substrates of CR (i.e., neural reserve) over the transition between normal aging and AD, by assessing the underlying brain networks and their topological properties. A cohort of 154 participants (n = 68 with AD, n = 61 with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 25 healthy subjects) underwent resting-state functional MRI and neuropsychological testing. Within each group, participants were classified as having high or low CR, and functional connectivity measures were compared, within group, between high and low CR individuals. Network-based statistics and topological network properties derived from graph theory were explored. Connectivity differences between high and low CR were evident only for aMCI patients, with participants with high CR showing a significant increase of connectivity in a network involving mainly fronto-parietal nodes. Conversely, they showed significantly decreased connectivity in a network involving fronto-temporo-cerebellar nodes. Consistently, changes to topological measures were observed in either direction, and were associated with measures of global cognitive function. These findings support the hypothesis that CR impacts on neurodegenerative process in the early phase of AD only. In addition, they fit with the existence of a "neural reserve", characterized by specific neural networks and their efficiency. It remains to be demonstrated whether interventions later in life can modulate this "neural reserve".

  5. Modeling graphene-substrate interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amlaki, T.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis I focussed on the interactions between graphene-like materials (grapheme and germanene) and various substrates. The attractive properties of graphene like a high carrier mobility, its single-atomic thickness and its theoretical magic have made graphene a very popular and promising

  6. Neurobiological Substrates of Tourette's Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.; Smith, Megan E.; Larabi, Daouia; Hampson, Michelle

    Objective: This article reviews the available scientific literature concerning the neurobiological substrates of Tourette's disorder (TD). Methods: The electronic databases of PubMed, ScienceDirect, and PsycINFO were searched for relevant studies using relevant search terms. Results:

  7. Neuronal substrate of eating disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Timofeeva, Elena; Calvez, Juliane

    2014-01-01

    Eating disorders are devastating and life-threatening psychiatric diseases. Although clinical and experimental investigations have significantly progressed in discovering the neuronal causes of eating disorders, the exact neuronal and molecular mechanisms of the development and maintenance of these pathologies are not fully understood. The complexity of the neuronal substrate of eating disorders hampers progress in revealing the precise mechanisms. The present re...

  8. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  9. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  10. Lead poisoning: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  11. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  12. Microstructure of pulsed-laser deposited PZT on polished and annealed MGO substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King, S.L.; Coccia, L.G.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Boyd, I.W.

    1996-01-01

    Thin films of Lead-Zirconate-Titanate (PZT) have been grown by pulsed-laser-deposition (PLD) onto polished MgO substrates both with and without pre-annealing. The surface morphology of polished MgO substrates, which are widely used for deposition, is examined by AFM. Commercially available,

  13. Integrated information theory: from consciousness to its physical substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Boly, Melanie; Massimini, Marcello; Koch, Christof

    2016-07-01

    In this Opinion article, we discuss how integrated information theory accounts for several aspects of the relationship between consciousness and the brain. Integrated information theory starts from the essential properties of phenomenal experience, from which it derives the requirements for the physical substrate of consciousness. It argues that the physical substrate of consciousness must be a maximum of intrinsic cause-effect power and provides a means to determine, in principle, the quality and quantity of experience. The theory leads to some counterintuitive predictions and can be used to develop new tools for assessing consciousness in non-communicative patients.

  14. Review of cellular mechanotransduction on micropost substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yuxu; Wang, Zhanjiang

    2016-03-01

    As physical entities, living cells can sense and respond to various stimulations within and outside the body through cellular mechanotransduction. Any deviation in cellular mechanotransduction will not only undermine the orchestrated regulation of mechanical responses, but also lead to the breakdown of their physiological function. Therefore, a quantitative study of cellular mechanotransduction needs to be conducted both in experiments and in computational simulations to investigate the underlying mechanisms of cellular mechanotransduction. In this review, we present an overview of the current knowledge and significant progress in cellular mechanotransduction via micropost substrates. In the aspect of experimental studies, we summarize significant experimental progress and place an emphasis on the coupled relationship among cellular spreading, focal adhesion and contractility as well as the influence of substrate properties on force-involved cellular behaviors. In the other aspect of computational investigations, we outline a coupled framework including the biochemically motivated stress fiber model and thermodynamically motivated adhesion model and present their predicted biomechanical responses and then compare predicted simulation results with experimental observations to further explore the mechanisms of cellular mechanotransduction. At last, we discuss the future perspectives both in experimental technologies and in computational models, as well as facing challenges in the area of cellular mechanotransduction.

  15. An artificial neural network controller for intelligent transportation systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitela, J.E.; Hanebutte, U.R.; Reifman, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Reactor Analysis Div.

    1996-04-01

    An Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) has been designed using a feedforward artificial neural network, as an example for utilizing artificial neural networks for nonlinear control problems arising in intelligent transportation systems applications. The AICC is based on a simple nonlinear model of the vehicle dynamics. A Neural Network Controller (NNC) code developed at Argonne National Laboratory to control discrete dynamical systems was used for this purpose. In order to test the NNC, an AICC-simulator containing graphical displays was developed for a system of two vehicles driving in a single lane. Two simulation cases are shown, one involving a lead vehicle with constant velocity and the other a lead vehicle with varying acceleration. More realistic vehicle dynamic models will be considered in future work.

  16. Lead poisoning and brain cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, G.W. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Exposure to excessive amounts of inorganic lead during the toddler years may produce lasting adverse effects upon brain function. Maximal ingestion of lead occurs at an age when major changes are occurring in the density of brain synaptic connections. The developmental reorganization of synapses is, in part, mediated by protein kinases, and these enzymes are particularly sensitive to stimulation by lead. By inappropriately activating specific protein kinases, lead poisoning may disrupt the development of neural networks without producing overt pathological alterations. The blood-brain barrier is another potential vulnerable site for the neurotoxic action of lead. protein kinases appear to regulate the development of brain capillaries and the expression of the blood-brain barrier properties. Stimulation of protein kinase by lead may disrupt barrier development and alter the precise regulation of the neuronal environment that is required for normal brain function. Together, these findings suggest that the sensitivity of protein kinases to lead may in part underlie the brain dysfunction observed in children poisoned by this toxicant.

  17. Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting The EXIN Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cirrincione, Giansalvo

    2008-01-01

    Written by three leaders in the field of neural based algorithms, Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting proposes several neural networks, all endowed with a complete theory which not only explains their behavior, but also compares them with the existing neural and traditional algorithms. The algorithms are studied from different points of view, including: as a differential geometry problem, as a dynamic problem, as a stochastic problem, and as a numerical problem. All algorithms have also been analyzed on real time problems (large dimensional data matrices) and have shown accurate solutions. Wh

  18. Lead encephalopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries. We report the varied clinical presentation, diagnostic and management issues in two adult patients with lead encephalopathy. Both patients worked in a battery manufacturing unit. Both patients presented with seizures and one patient also complained of abdominal colic and vomiting. Both were anemic and a lead line was present. Blood lead level in both the patients was greater than 25 µg/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalamus, lentiform nucleus in both patients and also the external capsules, sub-cortical white matter in one patient. All these changes, seen as hyperintensities in T2-weighted images suggested demyelination. They were advised avoidance of further exposure to lead and were treated with anti-epileptics; one patient also received D-penicillamine. They improved well on follow-up. Lead encephalopathy is an uncommon but important manifestation of lead toxicity in adults.

  19. Lead in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattee, Oliver H.; Pain, Deborah J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Anthropogenic uses of lead have probably altered its availability and environmental distribution more than any other toxic element. Consequently, lead concentrations in many living organisms may be approaching thresholds of toxicity for the adverse effects of lead. Such thresholds are difficult to define, as they vary with the chemical and physical form of lead, exposure regime, other elements present and also vary both within and between species. The technological capability to accurately quantify low lead concentrations has increased over the last decade, and physiological and behavioral effects have been measured in wildlife with tissue lead concentrations below those previously considered safe for humans.s.236 Consequently. lead criteria for the protection of wildlife and human health are frequently under review, and 'thresholds' of lead toxicity are being reconsidered. Proposed lead criteria for the protection of natural resources have been reviewed by Eisler. Uptake of lead by plants is limited by its generally low availability in soils and sediments, and toxicity may be limited by storage mechanisms and its apparently limited translocation within most plants. Lead does not generally accumulate within the foliar parts of plants, which limits its transfer to higher trophic levels. Although lead may concentrate in plant and animal tissues, no evidence of biomagnification exists. Acid deposition onto surface waters and soils with low buffering capacity may influence the availability of lead for uptake by plants and animals, and this may merit investigation at susceptible sites. The biological significance of chronic low-level lead exposure to wildlife is sometimes difficult to quantify. Animals living in urban environments or near point sources of lead emission are inevitably subject to greater exposure to lead and enhanced risk of lead poisoning. Increasingly strict controls on lead emissions in many countries have reduced exposure to lead from some sources

  20. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eBenn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent fMRI while playing a game that involved monitoring progress towards either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress towards a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring.

  1. Marginalization in Random Nonlinear Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudeva Raju, Rajkumar; Pitkow, Xaq

    2015-03-01

    Computations involved in tasks like causal reasoning in the brain require a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. Marginalization corresponds to averaging over irrelevant variables to obtain the probability of the variables of interest. This is a fundamental operation that arises whenever input stimuli depend on several variables, but only some are task-relevant. Animals often exhibit behavior consistent with marginalizing over some variables, but the neural substrate of this computation is unknown. It has been previously shown (Beck et al. 2011) that marginalization can be performed optimally by a deterministic nonlinear network that implements a quadratic interaction of neural activity with divisive normalization. We show that a simpler network can perform essentially the same computation. These Random Nonlinear Networks (RNN) are feedforward networks with one hidden layer, sigmoidal activation functions, and normally-distributed weights connecting the input and hidden layers. We train the output weights connecting the hidden units to an output population, such that the output model accurately represents a desired marginal probability distribution without significant information loss compared to optimal marginalization. Simulations for the case of linear coordinate transformations show that the RNN model has good marginalization performance, except for highly uncertain inputs that have low amplitude population responses. Behavioral experiments, based on these results, could then be used to identify if this model does indeed explain how the brain performs marginalization.

  2. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    One of the most striking achievements of evolution is the ability to build cellular systems that are both robust and dynamic. Taken by themselves, both properties are obvious requirements: robustness reflects the fact that cells are there to survive, and dynamics is required to adapt to changing environments. However, it is by no means trivial to understand how these two requirements can be implemented simultaneously in a physical system. The long and difficult quest to build adaptive materials is testimony to the inherent difficulty of this goal. Here materials science can learn a lot from nature, because cellular systems show that robustness and dynamics can be achieved in a synergetic fashion. For example, the capabilities of tissues to repair and regenerate are still unsurpassed in the world of synthetic materials. One of the most important aspects of the way biological cells adapt to their environment is their adhesive interaction with the substrate. Numerous aspects of the physiology of metazoan cells, including survival, proliferation, differentiation and migration, require the formation of adhesions to the cell substrate, typically an extracellular matrix protein. Adhesions guide these diverse processes both by mediating force transmission from the cell to the substrate and by controlling biochemical signaling pathways. While the study of cell-substrate adhesions is a mature field in cell biology, a quantitative biophysical understanding of how the interactions of the individual molecular components give rise to the rich dynamics and mechanical behaviors observed for cell-substrate adhesions has started to emerge only over the last decade or so. The recent growth of research activities on cell-substrate interactions was strongly driven by the introduction of new physical techniques for surface engineering into traditional cell biological work with cell culture. For example, microcontact printing of adhesive patterns was used to show that cell fate depends

  3. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomag- netic storms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-based model to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronal.

  4. A study on precursors leading to geomagnetic storms using artificial ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Space weather prediction involves advance forecasting of the magnitude and onset time of major geomagneticstorms on Earth. In this paper, we discuss the development of an artificial neural network-basedmodel to study the precursor leading to intense and moderate geomagnetic storms, following halo coronalmass ...

  5. Lithium - an update on the mechanisms of action. Part two: neural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... has a complicated multitude of diverse effects in the human nervous system. This new data is helping us understand the neurobiology of bipolar disorder. The focus of this review will be to distil this new knowledge.This, the second of a two part review will focus principally on neural effects and neuroanatomical substrates.

  6. Distinct neural pathways mediate alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-dependent activation of the forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    important for cognitive function. However, the neural substrates involved in these effects remain elusive. Here we identify cortically projecting cholinergic neurons in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) in the basal forebrain (BF) as important targets for alpha(7) nAChR activation...

  7. Neural Reactivity to Emotional Faces May Mediate the Relationship between Childhood Empathy and Adolescent Prosocial Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flournoy, John C.; Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Moore, William E.; Tackman, Allison M.; Masten, Carrie L.; Mazziotta, John C.; Iacoboni, Marco; Dapretto, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    Reactivity to others' emotions not only can result in empathic concern (EC), an important motivator of prosocial behavior, but can also result in personal distress (PD), which may hinder prosocial behavior. Examining neural substrates of emotional reactivity may elucidate how EC and PD differentially influence prosocial behavior. Participants…

  8. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  9. Psychoanatomical substrates of Bálint's syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, M; Vecera, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: From a series of glimpses, we perceive a seamless and richly detailed visual world. Cerebral damage, however, can destroy this illusion. In the case of Bálint's syndrome, the visual world is perceived erratically, as a series of single objects. The goal of this review is to explore a range of psychological and anatomical explanations for this striking visual disorder and to propose new directions for interpreting the findings in Bálint's syndrome and related cerebral disorders of visual processing. Methods: Bálint's syndrome is reviewed in the light of current concepts and methodologies of vision research. Results: The syndrome affects visual perception (causing simultanagnosia/visual disorientation) and visual control of eye and hand movement (causing ocular apraxia and optic ataxia). Although it has been generally construed as a biparietal syndrome causing an inability to see more than one object at a time, other lesions and mechanisms are also possible. Key syndrome components are dissociable and comprise a range of disturbances that overlap the hemineglect syndrome. Inouye's observations in similar cases, beginning in 1900, antedated Bálint's initial report. Because Bálint's syndrome is not common and is difficult to assess with standard clinical tools, the literature is dominated by case reports and confounded by case selection bias, non-uniform application of operational definitions, inadequate study of basic vision, poor lesion localisation, and failure to distinguish between deficits in the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Conclusions: Studies of Bálint's syndrome have provided unique evidence on neural substrates for attention, perception, and visuomotor control. Future studies should address possible underlying psychoanatomical mechanisms at "bottom up" and "top down" levels, and should specifically consider visual working memory and attention (including object based attention) as well as systems for identification of object

  10. Photosensitive-polyimide based method for fabricating various neural electrode architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuhiro X.; Furukawa, Shigeto; Samejima, Kazuyuki; Hironaka, Naoyuki; Kashino, Makio

    2012-01-01

    An extensive photosensitive-polyimide (PSPI)-based method for designing and fabricating various neural electrode architectures was developed. The method aims to broaden the design flexibility and expand the fabrication capability for neural electrodes to improve the quality of recorded signals and integrate other functions. After characterizing PSPI's properties for micromachining processes, we successfully designed and fabricated various neural electrodes even on a non-flat substrate using only one PSPI as an insulation material and without the time-consuming dry etching processes. The fabricated neural electrodes were an electrocorticogram (ECoG) electrode, a mesh intracortical electrode with a unique lattice-like mesh structure to fixate neural tissue, and a guide cannula electrode with recording microelectrodes placed on the curved surface of a guide cannula as a microdialysis probe. In vivo neural recordings using anesthetized rats demonstrated that these electrodes can be used to record neural activities repeatedly without any breakage and mechanical failures, which potentially promises stable recordings for long periods of time. These successes make us believe that this PSPI-based fabrication is a powerful method, permitting flexible design, and easy optimization of electrode architectures for a variety of electrophysiological experimental research with improved neural recording performance. PMID:22719725

  11. Neural Correlates of Stimulus Reportability

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Oliver J.; Friston, Karl F.; Zeki, Semir

    2009-01-01

    Most experiments on the “neural correlates of consciousness” employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged...

  12. Symbolic processing in neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Hava T Siegelmann; Costa,J.Félix

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show that programming languages can be translated into recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theoretical exciting, but has also some practical implications in the recent efforts to merge symbolic and sub symbolic computation. To be of some use, it should be carried in a context of bounded resources. Herein, we show how to use resource bounds to speed up computations over neural nets, thro...

  13. Organic Lead Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Patočka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead is one of the oldest known and most widely studied occupational and environmental poison. Despite intensive study, there is still debate about the toxic effects of lead, both from low-level exposure in the general population owing to environmental pollution and historic use of lead in paint and plumbing and from exposure in the occupational setting. Significant position have organic lead compounds used more than 60 years as antiknock additives in gasoline. Chemical and toxicological characteristics of main tetraalkyl leads used as gasoline additives are discussed in this article. The majority of industries historically associated with high lead exposure have made dramatic advances in their control of occupational exposure. However, cases of unacceptably high exposure and even of frank lead poisoning are still seen, predominantly in the demolition and tank cleaning industries. Nevertheless, in most industries blood lead levels have declined below levels at which signs or symptoms are seen and the current focus of attention is on the subclinical effects of exposure. The significance of some of these effects for the overt health of the workers is often the subject of debate. Inevitably there is pressure to reduce lead exposure in the general population and in working environments, because current studies show that no level of lead exposure appears to be a ‘safe’ and even the current ‘low’ levels of exposure, especially in children, are associated with neurodevelopmental deficits.

  14. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  15. Neural Correlates of Face Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Although face detection likely played an essential adaptive role in our evolutionary past and in contemporary social interactions, there have been few rigorous studies investigating its neural correlates...

  16. Review article: Autonomous neural inflammatory reflex and control of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inflammation is common pathology associated with infections and other diseases process that lead to non specific sickness behaviours. Identification of autonomous neural inflammatory reflex that is regulated through autonomic nervous system and their receptors give a way forward on how this can be use as therapeutic ...

  17. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  18. Neural responses to exclusion predict susceptibility to social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Cascio, Christopher N; O'Donnell, Matthew Brook; Carp, Joshua; Tinney, Francis J; Bingham, C Raymond; Shope, Jean T; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Pradhan, Anuj K; Simons-Morton, Bruce G

    2014-05-01

    Social influence is prominent across the lifespan, but sensitivity to influence is especially high during adolescence and is often associated with increased risk taking. Such risk taking can have dire consequences. For example, in American adolescents, traffic-related crashes are leading causes of nonfatal injury and death. Neural measures may be especially useful in understanding the basic mechanisms of adolescents' vulnerability to peer influence. We examined neural responses to social exclusion as potential predictors of risk taking in the presence of peers in recently licensed adolescent drivers. Risk taking was assessed in a driving simulator session occurring approximately 1 week after the neuroimaging session. Increased activity in neural systems associated with the distress of social exclusion and mentalizing during an exclusion episode predicted increased risk taking in the presence of a peer (controlling for solo risk behavior) during a driving simulator session outside the neuroimaging laboratory 1 week later. These neural measures predicted risky driving behavior above and beyond self-reports of susceptibility to peer pressure and distress during exclusion. These results address the neural bases of social influence and risk taking; contribute to our understanding of social and emotional function in the adolescent brain; and link neural activity in specific, hypothesized, regions to risk-relevant outcomes beyond the neuroimaging laboratory. Results of this investigation are discussed in terms of the mechanisms underlying risk taking in adolescents and the public health implications for adolescent driving. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. [Folic acid: Primary prevention of neural tube defects. Literature Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas Centeno, M J; Miguélez Lago, C

    2016-03-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are the most common congenital malformations of the nervous system, they have a multifactorial etiology, are caused by exposure to chemical, physical or biological toxic agents, factors deficiency, diabetes, obesity, hyperthermia, genetic alterations and unknown causes. Some of these factors are associated with malnutrition by interfering with the folic acid metabolic pathway, the vitamin responsible for neural tube closure. Its deficit produce anomalies that can cause abortions, stillbirths or newborn serious injuries that cause disability, impaired quality of life and require expensive treatments to try to alleviate in some way the alterations produced in the embryo. Folic acid deficiency is considered the ultimate cause of the production of neural tube defects, it is clear the reduction in the incidence of Espina Bifida after administration of folic acid before conception, this leads us to want to further study the action of folic acid and its application in the primary prevention of neural tube defects. More than 40 countries have made the fortification of flour with folate, achieving encouraging data of decrease in the prevalence of neural tube defects. This paper attempts to make a literature review, which clarify the current situation and future of the prevention of neural tube defects.

  20. Neural Network Control of Asymmetrical Multilevel Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice WIRA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a neural implementation of a harmonic eliminationstrategy (HES to control a Uniform Step Asymmetrical Multilevel Inverter(USAMI. The mapping between the modulation rate and the requiredswitching angles is learned and approximated with a Multi-Layer Perceptron(MLP neural network. After learning, appropriate switching angles can bedetermined with the neural network leading to a low-computational-costneural controller which is well suited for real-time applications. Thistechnique can be applied to multilevel inverters with any number of levels. Asan example, a nine-level inverter and an eleven-level inverter are consideredand the optimum switching angles are calculated on-line. Comparisons to thewell-known sinusoidal pulse-width modulation (SPWM have been carriedout in order to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. Simulationresults demonstrate the technical advantages of the proposed neuralimplementation over the conventional method (SPWM in eliminatingharmonics while controlling a nine-level and eleven-level USAMI. Thisneural approach is applied for the supply of an asynchronous machine andresults show that it ensures a highest quality torque by efficiently cancelingthe harmonics generated by the inverters.

  1. Robust information propagation through noisy neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, Joel; Pouget, Alexandre; Latham, Peter E; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Sensory neurons give highly variable responses to stimulation, which can limit the amount of stimulus information available to downstream circuits. Much work has investigated the factors that affect the amount of information encoded in these population responses, leading to insights about the role of covariability among neurons, tuning curve shape, etc. However, the informativeness of neural responses is not the only relevant feature of population codes; of potentially equal importance is how robustly that information propagates to downstream structures. For instance, to quantify the retina's performance, one must consider not only the informativeness of the optic nerve responses, but also the amount of information that survives the spike-generating nonlinearity and noise corruption in the next stage of processing, the lateral geniculate nucleus. Our study identifies the set of covariance structures for the upstream cells that optimize the ability of information to propagate through noisy, nonlinear circuits. Within this optimal family are covariances with "differential correlations", which are known to reduce the information encoded in neural population activities. Thus, covariance structures that maximize information in neural population codes, and those that maximize the ability of this information to propagate, can be very different. Moreover, redundancy is neither necessary nor sufficient to make population codes robust against corruption by noise: redundant codes can be very fragile, and synergistic codes can-in some cases-optimize robustness against noise.

  2. Robust information propagation through noisy neural circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Zylberberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neurons give highly variable responses to stimulation, which can limit the amount of stimulus information available to downstream circuits. Much work has investigated the factors that affect the amount of information encoded in these population responses, leading to insights about the role of covariability among neurons, tuning curve shape, etc. However, the informativeness of neural responses is not the only relevant feature of population codes; of potentially equal importance is how robustly that information propagates to downstream structures. For instance, to quantify the retina's performance, one must consider not only the informativeness of the optic nerve responses, but also the amount of information that survives the spike-generating nonlinearity and noise corruption in the next stage of processing, the lateral geniculate nucleus. Our study identifies the set of covariance structures for the upstream cells that optimize the ability of information to propagate through noisy, nonlinear circuits. Within this optimal family are covariances with "differential correlations", which are known to reduce the information encoded in neural population activities. Thus, covariance structures that maximize information in neural population codes, and those that maximize the ability of this information to propagate, can be very different. Moreover, redundancy is neither necessary nor sufficient to make population codes robust against corruption by noise: redundant codes can be very fragile, and synergistic codes can-in some cases-optimize robustness against noise.

  3. A dynamical systems view of motor preparation: Implications for neural prosthetic system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Krishna V.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Sahani, Maneesh; Churchland, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Neural prosthetic systems aim to help disabled patients suffering from a range of neurological injuries and disease by using neural activity from the brain to directly control assistive devices. This approach in effect bypasses the dysfunctional neural circuitry, such as an injured spinal cord. To do so, neural prostheses depend critically on a scientific understanding of the neural activity that drives them. We review here several recent studies aimed at understanding the neural processes in premotor cortex that precede arm movements and lead to the initiation of movement. These studies were motivated by hypotheses and predictions conceived of within a dynamical systems perspective. This perspective concentrates on describing the neural state using as few degrees of freedom as possible and on inferring the rules that govern the motion of that neural state. Although quite general, this perspective has led to a number of specific predictions that have been addressed experimentally. It is hoped that the resulting picture of the dynamical role of preparatory and movement-related neural activity will be particularly helpful to the development of neural prostheses, which can themselves be viewed as dynamical systems under the control of the larger dynamical system to which they are attached. PMID:21763517

  4. Lead-Free Piezoelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Nahm, Sahn

    2012-01-01

    Ecological restrictions in many parts of the world are demanding the elimination of Pb from all consumer items. At this moment in the piezoelectric ceramics industry, there is no issue of more importance than the transition to lead-free materials. The goal of Lead-Free Piezoelectrics is to provide a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals and developments in the field of lead-free materials and products to leading researchers in the world. The text presents chapters on demonstrated applications of the lead-free materials, which will allow readers to conceptualize the present possibilities and will be useful for both students and professionals conducting research on ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, smart materials, lead-free materials, and a variety of applications including sensors, actuators, ultrasonic transducers and energy harvesters.

  5. Methods of repairing a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedell, James A. (Inventor); Easler, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A precursor of a ceramic adhesive suitable for use in a vacuum, thermal, and microgravity environment. The precursor of the ceramic adhesive includes a silicon-based, preceramic polymer and at least one ceramic powder selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, boron carbide, boron oxide, boron nitride, hafnium boride, hafnium carbide, hafnium oxide, lithium aluminate, molybdenum silicide, niobium carbide, niobium nitride, silicon boride, silicon carbide, silicon oxide, silicon nitride, tin oxide, tantalum boride, tantalum carbide, tantalum oxide, tantalum nitride, titanium boride, titanium carbide, titanium oxide, titanium nitride, yttrium oxide, zirconium boride, zirconium carbide, zirconium oxide, and zirconium silicate. Methods of forming the ceramic adhesive and of repairing a substrate in a vacuum and microgravity environment are also disclosed, as is a substrate repaired with the ceramic adhesive.

  6. Network visualization by semantic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneiderman, Ben; Aris, Aleks

    2006-01-01

    Networks have remained a challenge for information visualization designers because of the complex issues of node and link layout coupled with the rich set of tasks that users present. This paper offers a strategy based on two principles: (1) layouts are based on user-defined semantic substrates, which are non-overlapping regions in which node placement is based on node attributes, (2) users interactively adjust sliders to control link visibility to limit clutter and thus ensure comprehensibility of source and destination. Scalability is further facilitated by user control of which nodes are visible. We illustrate our semantic substrates approach as implemented in NVSS 1.0 with legal precedent data for up to 1122 court cases in three regions with 7645 legal citations.

  7. A Physiological Neural Network for Saccadic Eye Movement Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    posterior eye field (striate, prestriate, and inferior parietal cortices). Both the neural circuit and the ocu- lomotor plant will be described in... motoneuron . There are two types of burst neurons in the PPRF called the long-lead burst neuron (LLBN) and a medium-lead burst neuron (MLBN); during...neurons (EBN) and the inhibitory burst neurons (IBN). The EBN and IBN label describes the synaptic ac- tivity upon the motoneurons ; the EBN excite

  8. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    In all attempts to emulate the considerable powers of the brain, one is struck by both its immense size, parallelism, and complexity. While the fields of neural networks, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic engineering have all attempted oversimplifications on the considerable complexity, all three can benefit from the inherent scalability and parallelism of optics. This thesis looks at specific aspects of three modes in which optics, and particularly volume holography, can play a part in neural computation. First, holography serves as the basis of highly-parallel correlators, which are the foundation of optical neural networks. The huge input capability of optical neural networks make them most useful for image processing and image recognition and tracking. These tasks benefit from the shift invariance of optical correlators. In this thesis, I analyze the capacity of correlators, and then present several techniques for controlling the amount of shift invariance. Of particular interest is the Fresnel correlator, in which the hologram is displaced from the Fourier plane. In this case, the amount of shift invariance is limited not just by the thickness of the hologram, but by the distance of the hologram from the Fourier plane. Second, volume holography can provide the huge storage capacity and high speed, parallel read-out necessary to support large artificial intelligence systems. However, previous methods for storing data in volume holograms have relied on awkward beam-steering or on as-yet non- existent cheap, wide-bandwidth, tunable laser sources. This thesis presents a new technique, shift multiplexing, which is capable of very high densities, but which has the advantage of a very simple implementation. In shift multiplexing, the reference wave consists of a focused spot a few millimeters in front of the hologram. Multiplexing is achieved by simply translating the hologram a few tens of microns or less. This thesis describes the theory for how shift

  9. Lead and the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B.R.; Moore, M.R.; Hunter, J.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The increasing use of lead will continue to give rise to problems of toxicity. Protective measures have resulted in florid lead poisoning becoming rare. Attention has recently turned to the possibility of prolonged exposure to low doses of lead causing morbidity in the absence of the classical clinical features of poisoning. Lead is absorbed mostly through the lungs and gastrointestinal tract. Some is also absorbed through the skin but with inorganic compounds the amount is small. Shortly after the most widely used compound, tetraethyl lead, was first manufactured, cases of toxicity began to occur. Manufacture was forbidden until plant design produced greater safety. Significant absorption can occur through the skin. The hazard to those handling leaded gasoline in a normal manner is probably small, mainly because 95 percent of a dose applied to the open skin surface evaporates. Hair has been used as a biopsy material to assess lead exposure. The biological effects of lead poisoning are discussed, including the synergistic effects of lead and agents provoking porphyria.

  10. 2D neural hardware versus 3D biological ones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiu, V.

    1998-12-31

    This paper will present important limitations of hardware neural nets as opposed to biological neural nets (i.e. the real ones). The author starts by discussing neural structures and their biological inspirations, while mentioning the simplifications leading to artificial neural nets. Going further, the focus will be on hardware constraints. The author will present recent results for three different alternatives of implementing neural networks: digital, threshold gate, and analog, while the area and the delay will be related to neurons' fan-in and weights' precision. Based on all of these, it will be shown why hardware implementations cannot cope with their biological inspiration with respect to their power of computation: the mapping onto silicon lacking the third dimension of biological nets. This translates into reduced fan-in, and leads to reduced precision. The main conclusion is that one is faced with the following alternatives: (1) try to cope with the limitations imposed by silicon, by speeding up the computation of the elementary silicon neurons; (2) investigate solutions which would allow one to use the third dimension, e.g. using optical interconnections.

  11. Directional neurite growth using carbon nanotube patterned substrates as a biomimetic cue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min Jee; Nam, Yoonkey [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Namgung, Seon; Hong, Seunghun, E-mail: seunghun@snu.ac.kr, E-mail: ynam@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-11

    Researchers have made extensive efforts to mimic or reverse-engineer in vivo neural circuits using micropatterning technology. Various surface chemical cues or topographical structures have been proposed to design neuronal networks in vitro. In this paper, we propose a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based network engineering method which naturally mimics the structure of extracellular matrix (ECM). On CNT patterned substrates, poly-L-lysine (PLL) was coated, and E18 rat hippocampal neurons were cultured. In the early developmental stage, soma adhesion and neurite extension occurred in disregard of the surface CNT patterns. However, later the majority of neurites selectively grew along CNT patterns and extended further than other neurites that originally did not follow the patterns. Long-term cultured neuronal networks had a strong resemblance to the in vivo neural circuit structures. The selective guidance is possibly attributed to higher PLL adsorption on CNT patterns and the nanomesh structure of the CNT patterns. The results showed that CNT patterned substrates can be used as novel neuronal patterning substrates for in vitro neural engineering.

  12. Affective neural response to restricted interests in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Carissa J; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Heacock, Jessica; Schauder, Kimberly B; Loring, Whitney A; Rogers, Baxter P; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Newsom, Cassandra R; Cockhren, Jurnell; Cao, Aize; Bolton, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Restricted interests are a class of repetitive behavior in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) whose intensity and narrow focus often contribute to significant interference with daily functioning. While numerous neuroimaging studies have investigated executive circuits as putative neural substrates of repetitive behavior, recent work implicates affective neural circuits in restricted interests. We sought to explore the role of affective neural circuits and determine how restricted interests are distinguished from hobbies or interests in typical development. We compared a group of children with ASD to a typically developing (TD) group of children with strong interests or hobbies, employing parent report, an operant behavioral task, and functional imaging with personalized stimuli based on individual interests. While performance on the operant task was similar between the two groups, parent report of intensity and interference of interests was significantly higher in the ASD group. Both the ASD and TD groups showed increased BOLD response in widespread affective neural regions to the pictures of their own interest. When viewing pictures of other children's interests, the TD group showed a similar pattern, whereas BOLD response in the ASD group was much more limited. Increased BOLD response in the insula and anterior cingulate cortex distinguished the ASD from the TD group, and parent report of the intensity and interference with daily life of the child's restricted interest predicted insula response. While affective neural network response and operant behavior are comparable in typical and restricted interests, the narrowness of focus that clinically distinguishes restricted interests in ASD is reflected in more interference in daily life and aberrantly enhanced insula and anterior cingulate response to individuals' own interests in the ASD group. These results further support the involvement of affective neural networks in repetitive behaviors in ASD. © 2013 The

  13. Natural language acquisition in large scale neural semantic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealey, Douglas

    This thesis puts forward the view that a purely signal- based approach to natural language processing is both plausible and desirable. By questioning the veracity of symbolic representations of meaning, it argues for a unified, non-symbolic model of knowledge representation that is both biologically plausible and, potentially, highly efficient. Processes to generate a grounded, neural form of this model-dubbed the semantic filter-are discussed. The combined effects of local neural organisation, coincident with perceptual maturation, are used to hypothesise its nature. This theoretical model is then validated in light of a number of fundamental neurological constraints and milestones. The mechanisms of semantic and episodic development that the model predicts are then used to explain linguistic properties, such as propositions and verbs, syntax and scripting. To mimic the growth of locally densely connected structures upon an unbounded neural substrate, a system is developed that can grow arbitrarily large, data- dependant structures composed of individual self- organising neural networks. The maturational nature of the data used results in a structure in which the perception of concepts is refined by the networks, but demarcated by subsequent structure. As a consequence, the overall structure shows significant memory and computational benefits, as predicted by the cognitive and neural models. Furthermore, the localised nature of the neural architecture also avoids the increasing error sensitivity and redundancy of traditional systems as the training domain grows. The semantic and episodic filters have been demonstrated to perform as well, or better, than more specialist networks, whilst using significantly larger vocabularies, more complex sentence forms and more natural corpora.

  14. TRIBOLOGY OF BIO-INSPIRED NANOWRINKLED FILMS ON ULTRASOFT SUBSTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen M. Lackner

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis. The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue: Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high

  15. Determinants and Prediction of Esterase Substrate Promiscuity Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Coscolín, Cristina; Santiago, Gerard; Chow, Jennifer; Stogios, Peter J; Bargiela, Rafael; Gertler, Christoph; Navarro-Fernández, José; Bollinger, Alexander; Thies, Stephan; Méndez-García, Celia; Popovic, Ana; Brown, Greg; Chernikova, Tatyana N; García-Moyano, Antonio; Bjerga, Gro E K; Pérez-García, Pablo; Hai, Tran; Del Pozo, Mercedes V; Stokke, Runar; Steen, Ida H; Cui, Hong; Xu, Xiaohui; Nocek, Boguslaw P; Alcaide, María; Distaso, Marco; Mesa, Victoria; Peláez, Ana I; Sánchez, Jesús; Buchholz, Patrick C F; Pleiss, Jürgen; Fernández-Guerra, Antonio; Glöckner, Frank O; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Savchenko, Alexei; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Yakunin, Alexander F; Streit, Wolfgang R; Golyshin, Peter N; Guallar, Víctor; Ferrer, Manuel; The Inmare Consortium

    2018-01-19

    Esterases receive special attention because of their wide distribution in biological systems and environments and their importance for physiology and chemical synthesis. The prediction of esterases' substrate promiscuity level from sequence data and the molecular reasons why certain such enzymes are more promiscuous than others remain to be elucidated. This limits the surveillance of the sequence space for esterases potentially leading to new versatile biocatalysts and new insights into their role in cellular function. Here, we performed an extensive analysis of the substrate spectra of 145 phylogenetically and environmentally diverse microbial esterases, when tested with 96 diverse esters. We determined the primary factors shaping their substrate range by analyzing substrate range patterns in combination with structural analysis and protein-ligand simulations. We found a structural parameter that helps rank (classify) the promiscuity level of esterases from sequence data at 94% accuracy. This parameter, the active site effective volume, exemplifies the topology of the catalytic environment by measuring the active site cavity volume corrected by the relative solvent accessible surface area (SASA) of the catalytic triad. Sequences encoding esterases with active site effective volumes (cavity volume/SASA) above a threshold show greater substrate spectra, which can be further extended in combination with phylogenetic data. This measure provides also a valuable tool for interrogating substrates capable of being converted. This measure, found to be transferred to phosphatases of the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase superfamily and possibly other enzymatic systems, represents a powerful tool for low-cost bioprospecting for esterases with broad substrate ranges, in large scale sequence data sets.

  16. Tribology of bio-inspired nanowrinkled films on ultrasoft substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackner, Juergen M; Waldhauser, Wolfgang; Major, Lukasz; Teichert, Christian; Hartmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Biomimetic design of new materials uses nature as antetype, learning from billions of years of evolution. This work emphasizes the mechanical and tribological properties of skin, combining both hardness and wear resistance of its surface (the stratum corneum) with high elasticity of the bulk (epidermis, dermis, hypodermis). The key for combination of such opposite properties is wrinkling, being consequence of intrinsic stresses in the bulk (soft tissue): Tribological contact to counterparts below the stress threshold for tissue trauma occurs on the thick hard stratum corneum layer pads, while tensile loads smooth out wrinkles in between these pads. Similar mechanism offers high tribological resistance to hard films on soft, flexible polymers, which is shown for diamond-like carbon (DLC) and titanium nitride thin films on ultrasoft polyurethane and harder polycarbonate substrates. The choice of these two compared substrate materials will show that ultra-soft substrate materials are decisive for the distinct tribological material. Hierarchical wrinkled structures of films on these substrates are due to high intrinsic compressive stress, which evolves during high energetic film growth. Incremental relaxation of these stresses occurs by compound deformation of film and elastic substrate surface, appearing in hierarchical nano-wrinkles. Nano-wrinkled topographies enable high elastic deformability of thin hard films, while overstressing results in zigzag film fracture along larger hierarchical wrinkle structures. Tribologically, these fracture mechanisms are highly important for ploughing and sliding of sharp and flat counterparts on hard-coated ultra-soft substrates like polyurethane. Concentration of polyurethane deformation under the applied normal loads occurs below these zigzag cracks. Unloading closes these cracks again. Even cyclic testing do not lead to film delamination and retain low friction behavior, if the adhesion to the substrate is high and the initial

  17. EFFECT OF LEAD ACETATE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICROSOFT

    The project was conducted to evaluate the effect of lead administered as lead acetate at different dosage levels via drinking water in broiler chicks. Thirty-five healthy chicks were divided into seven groups (five chicks each) and one group was kept as un-medicated control. Groups A, B, C, D, E and F were medicated with ...

  18. Leading Acquisition Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    Army and Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition, for a reduction of the Excalibur and Accelerated Precision Mortar initiative rounds.25...Can’t Dance? Leading a Great Enterprise Through Dramatic Change, (New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2003), 235. 13 John P. Kotter , Leading Change

  19. Developmental immunotoxicology of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietert, Rodney R; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hussain, Irshad; Piepenbrink, Michael

    2004-07-15

    The heavy metal, lead, is a known developmental immunotoxicant that has been shown to produce immune alterations in humans as well as other species. Unlike many compounds that exert adverse immune effects, lead exposure at low to moderate levels does not produce widespread loss of immune cells. In contrast, changes resulting from lead exposure are subtle at the immune cell population level but, nevertheless, can be functionally dramatic. A hallmark of lead-induced immunotoxicity is a pronounced shift in the balance in T helper cell function toward T helper 2 responses at the expense of T helper 1 functions. This bias alters the nature and range of immune responses that can be produced thereby influencing host susceptibility to various diseases. Immunotoxic responses to lead appear to differ across life stages not only quantitatively with regard to dose response, but also qualitatively in terms of the spectrum of immune alterations. Experimental studies in several lab animal species suggest the latter stages of gestation are a period of considerable sensitivity for lead-induced immunotoxicity. This review describes the basic characteristics of lead-induced immunotoxicity emphasizing experimental animal results. It also provides a framework for the consideration of toxicant exposure effects across life stages. The existence of and probable basis for developmental windows of immune hyper-susceptibility are presented. Finally, the potential for lead to serve as a perinatal risk factor for childhood asthma as well as other diseases is considered.

  20. Lead - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead soldered cans goes into effect. If imported wine containers have a lead foil wrapper, wipe the rim and neck of the bottle with a towel moistened with lemon juice, vinegar, or wine before using. DO NOT store wine, spirits, or ...

  1. Analysis of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heiden, Uwe

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is a unified and general treatment of activity in neural networks from a mathematical pOint of view. Possible applications of the theory presented are indica­ ted throughout the text. However, they are not explored in de­ tail for two reasons : first, the universal character of n- ral activity in nearly all animals requires some type of a general approach~ secondly, the mathematical perspicuity would suffer if too many experimental details and empirical peculiarities were interspersed among the mathematical investigation. A guide to many applications is supplied by the references concerning a variety of specific issues. Of course the theory does not aim at covering all individual problems. Moreover there are other approaches to neural network theory (see e.g. Poggio-Torre, 1978) based on the different lev­ els at which the nervous system may be viewed. The theory is a deterministic one reflecting the average be­ havior of neurons or neuron pools. In this respect the essay is writt...

  2. A Decline in Response Variability Improves Neural Signal Detection during Auditory Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Trapp, Gardiner; Buran, Bradley N; Sen, Kamal; Semple, Malcolm N; Sanes, Dan H

    2016-10-26

    The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity, but a sensory neuron's response is rarely identical to successive presentations of the same stimulus. Large trial-to-trial variability would limit the central nervous system's ability to reliably detect a stimulus, presumably affecting perceptual performance. However, if response variability were to decrease while firing rate remained constant, then neural sensitivity could improve. Here, we asked whether engagement in an auditory detection task can modulate response variability, thereby increasing neural sensitivity. We recorded telemetrically from the core auditory cortex of gerbils, both while they engaged in an amplitude-modulation detection task and while they sat quietly listening to the identical stimuli. Using a signal detection theory framework, we found that neural sensitivity was improved during task performance, and this improvement was closely associated with a decrease in response variability. Moreover, units with the greatest change in response variability had absolute neural thresholds most closely aligned with simultaneously measured perceptual thresholds. Our findings suggest that the limitations imposed by response variability diminish during task performance, thereby improving the sensitivity of neural encoding and potentially leading to better perceptual sensitivity. The detection of a sensory stimulus arises from a significant change in neural activity. However, trial-to-trial variability of the neural response may limit perceptual performance. If the neural response to a stimulus is quite variable, then the response on a given trial could be confused with the pattern of neural activity generated when the stimulus is absent. Therefore, a neural mechanism that served to reduce response variability would allow for better stimulus detection. By recording from the cortex of freely moving animals engaged in an auditory detection task, we found that variability

  3. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-05-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  4. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    differences between biological neural networks (BNNs) of the brain and ANN s. A thorough understanding of ... neurons. Artificial neural models are loosely based on biology since a complete understanding of the .... A learning scheme for updating a neuron's connections (weights) was proposed by Donald Hebb in 1949.

  5. Neural Networks for Optimal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process.......Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process....

  6. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  7. The neural basis of bounded rational behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coricelli, Giorgio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Bounded rational behaviour is commonly observed in experimental games and in real life situations. Neuroeconomics can help to understand the mental processing underlying bounded rationality and out-of-equilibrium behaviour. Here we report results from recent studies on the neural basis of limited steps of reasoning in a competitive setting —the beauty contest game. We use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to study the neural correlates of human mental processes in strategic games. We apply a cognitive hierarchy model to classify subject’s choices in the experimental game according to the degree of strategic reasoning so that we can identify the neural substrates of different levels of strategizing. We found a correlation between levels of strategic reasoning and activity in a neural network related to mentalizing, i.e. the ability to think about other’s thoughts and mental states. Moreover, brain data showed how complex cognitive processes subserve the higher level of reasoning about others. We describe how a cognitive hierarchy model fits both behavioural and brain data.

    La racionalidad limitada es un fenómeno observado de manera frecuente tanto en juegos experimentales como en situaciones cotidianas. La Neuroeconomía puede mejorar la comprensión de los procesos mentales que caracterizan la racionalidad limitada; en paralelo nos puede ayudar a comprender comportamientos que violan el equilibrio. Nuestro trabajo presenta resultados recientes sobre la bases neuronales del razonamiento estratégico (y sus límite en juegos competitivos —como el juego del “beauty contest”. Estudiamos las bases neuronales del comportamiento estratégico en juegos con interacción entre sujetos usando resonancia magnética funcional (fMRI. Las decisiones de los participantes se clasifican acorde al grado de razonamiento estratégico: el llamado modelo de Jerarquías Cognitivas. Los resultados muestran una correlación entre niveles de

  8. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyer, R.A. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  9. Isolating neural correlates of the pacemaker for food anticipation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian David Blum

    Full Text Available Mice fed a single daily meal at intervals within the circadian range exhibit food anticipatory activity. Previous investigations strongly suggest that this behaviour is regulated by a circadian pacemaker entrained to the timing of fasting/refeeding. The neural correlate(s of this pacemaker, the food entrainable oscillator (FEO, whether found in a neural network or a single locus, remain unknown. This study used a canonical property of circadian pacemakers, the ability to continue oscillating after removal of the entraining stimulus, to isolate activation within the neural correlates of food entrainable oscillator from all other mechanisms driving food anticipatory activity. It was hypothesized that continued anticipatory activation of central nuclei, after restricted feeding and a return to ad libitum feeding, would elucidate a neural representation of the signaling circuits responsible for the timekeeping component of the food entrainable oscillator. Animals were entrained to a temporally constrained meal then placed back on ad libitum feeding for several days until food anticipatory activity was abolished. Activation of nuclei throughout the brain was quantified using stereological analysis of c-FOS expressing cells and compared against both ad libitum fed and food entrained controls. Several hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei remained activated at the previous time of food anticipation, implicating them in the timekeeping mechanism necessary to track previous meal presentation. This study also provides a proof of concept for an experimental paradigm useful to further investigate the anatomical and molecular substrates of the FEO.

  10. Role of neural modulation in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Male

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial-fibrillation (AF is the most common clinically encountered arrhythmia affecting over 1 per cent of population in the United States and its prevalence seems to be moving only in forward direction. A recent systemic review estimates global prevalence of AF to be 596.2 and 373.1 per 100,000 population in males and females respectively. Multiple mechanisms have been put forward in the pathogenesis of AF, however; multiple wavelet hypothesis is the most accepted theory so far. Similar to the conduction system of the heart, a neural network exists which surrounds the heart and plays an important role in formation of the substrate of AF and when a trigger is originated, usually from pulmonary vein sleeves, AF occurs. This neural network includes ganglionated plexi (GP located adjacent to pulmonary vein ostia which are under control of higher centers in normal people. When these GP become hyperactive owing to loss of inhibition from higher centers e.g. in elderly, AF can occur. We can control these hyperactive GP either by stimulating higher centers and their connections, e.g. vagus nerve stimulation or simply by ablating these GP. This review provides detailed information about the different proposed mechanisms underlying AF, the exact role of autonomic neural tone in the pathogenesis of AF and the possible role of neural modulation in the treatment of AF.

  11. Neural plasticity is affected by stress and heritable variation in stress coping style

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, I.B.; Sørensen, C.; Sandvik, G.K.

    2012-01-01

    Here we use a comparative model to investigate how behavioral and physiological traits correlate with neural plasticity. Selection for divergent post-stress cortisol levels in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) has yielded low- (LR) and high responsive (HR) lines. Recent reports show low...... behavioral flexibility in LR compared to HR fish and we hypothesize that this divergence is caused by differences in neural plasticity. Genes involved in neural plasticity and neurogenesis were investigated by quantitative PCR in brains of LR and HR fish at baseline conditions and in response to two...... also being affected by STC – and LTS stress in a biphasic manner. A higher degree of neural plasticity in HR fish may provide the substrate for enhanced behavioral flexibility...

  12. The Neural Correlates of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tiffany A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral analyses are a natural choice for understanding the wide-ranging behavioral consequences of racial stereotyping and prejudice. However, neuroimaging and electrophysiological research has recently considered the neural mechanisms that underlie racial categorization and the activation and application of racial stereotypes and prejudice, revealing exciting new insights. Work reviewed here points to the importance of neural structures previously associated with face processing, semantic knowledge activation, evaluation, and self-regulatory behavioral control, allowing for the specification of a neural model of race processing. We show how research on the neural correlates of race can serve to link otherwise disparate lines of evidence on the neural underpinnings of a broad array of social-cognitive phenomena, and consider implications for effecting change in race relations. PMID:19896410

  13. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... examined, and it appears that considering 'normal' neural network models with, say, 500 samples, the problem of over-fitting is neglible, and therefore it is not taken into consideration afterwards. Numerous model types, often met in control applications, are implemented as neural network models...... Kalmann filter) representing state space description. The potentials of neural networks for control of non-linear processes are also examined, focusing on three different groups of control concepts, all considered as generalizations of known linear control concepts to handle also non-linear processes...

  14. Carbon Nanotube Patterning on a Metal Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A CNT electron source, a method of manufacturing a CNT electron source, and a solar cell utilizing a CNT patterned sculptured substrate are disclosed. Embodiments utilize a metal substrate which enables CNTs to be grown directly from the substrate. An inhibitor may be applied to the metal substrate to inhibit growth of CNTs from the metal substrate. The inhibitor may be precisely applied to the metal substrate in any pattern, thereby enabling the positioning of the CNT groupings to be more precisely controlled. The surface roughness of the metal substrate may be varied to control the density of the CNTs within each CNT grouping. Further, an absorber layer and an acceptor layer may be applied to the CNT electron source to form a solar cell, where a voltage potential may be generated between the acceptor layer and the metal substrate in response to sunlight exposure.

  15. Deposition of metal onto a sulfur loaded substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daeho; Sun, Dezheng; Lu, Wenhao; Chu, Eric; Wyrick, Jon; Cheng, Zhihai; Bartels, Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    A Cu(111) surface can be loaded with sulfur to form a variety of surface patterns. In this work, we study the deposition of copper and molybdenum on a Cu(111) surface and the resultant film morphology as a function of the sulfur pre-loading of the substrate. For copper deposition, we find the formation of adstructures of different geometry depending on the sulfur decoration of the substrate. A 0.143 ML S coverage leads to rectangular structure consisting of 6 lobes while a 0.118 ML S coverage leads to 7 × 7 structure. Notably, annealing allows the sulfur to float up decorating the newly deposited layer. Deposition of molybdenum shows a similar pattern, with ordered MoS2 forming as a result of annealing.

  16. Design, fabrication and characterisation of advanced substrate crosstalk suppression structures in silicon on insulator substrates with buried ground planes (GPSOI)

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanou, S

    2002-01-01

    Substrate crosstalk or coupling has been acknowledged to be a limiting factor in mixed signal RF integration. Although high levels of integration and high frequencies of operation are desirable for mixed mode RF and microwave circuits, they make substrate crosstalk more pronounced and may lead to circuit performance degradation. High signal isolation is dictated by requirements for low power dissipation, reduced number of components and lower integration costs for feasible system-on-chip (SoC) solutions. Substrate crosstalk suppression in ground plane silicon-on-insulator (GPSOI) substrates is investigated in this thesis. Test structures are designed and fabricated on SOI substrates with a buried WSi sub 2 plane that is connected to ground; hence it is called a ground plane. A Faraday cage structure that exhibits very high degrees of signal isolation is presented and compared to other SOI isolation schemes. The Faraday cage structure is shown to achieve 20 dB increased isolation in the frequency range of 0.5-...

  17. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Low-dose CT denoising with convolutional neural network

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hu; Zhang, Weihua; Liao, Peixi; Li, Ke; Zhou, Jiliu; Wang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the potential radiation risk, low-dose CT has attracted much attention. However, simply lowering the radiation dose will lead to significant deterioration of the image quality. In this paper, we propose a noise reduction method for low-dose CT via deep neural network without accessing original projection data. A deep convolutional neural network is trained to transform low-dose CT images towards normal-dose CT images, patch by patch. Visual and quantitative evaluation demonstrates a competing performance of the proposed method.

  19. Distinct impacts of substrate elasticity and ligand affinity on traction force evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Christina; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-01-07

    Cell adhesion is regulated by the mechanical characteristics of the cell environment. The influences of different parameters of the adhesive substrates are convoluted in the cell response leading to questions on the underlying mechanisms, like biochemical signaling on the level of adhesion molecules, or viscoelastic properties of substrates and cell. By a time-resolved analysis of traction force generation during early cell adhesion, we wanted to elucidate the contributions of substrate mechanics to the adhesion process, in particular the impact of substrate elasticity and the molecular friction of adhesion ligands on the substrate surface. Both parameters were independently adjusted by (i) an elastic polyacrylamide hydrogel of variable crosslinking degree and (ii) a thin polymer coating of the hydrogel surface controlling the affinity (and the correlated substrate-ligand friction) of the adhesion ligand fibronectin. Our analysis showed two sequential regimes of considerable force generation, whose occurrence was found to be independent of substrate properties. The first regime is characterized by spreading of the cell and a succeeding force increase. After spreading cells enter the second regime with saturated forces. Substrate elasticity and viscosity, namely hydrogel elasticity and ligand affinity, were both found to affect the kinetics and absolute levels of traction force quantities. A faster increase and a higher saturation level of traction forces were observed for a higher substrate stiffness and a higher ligand affinity. The results complement recent modeling approaches on the evolution of forces in cell spreading and contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of cell adhesion on viscoelastic substrates.

  20. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.