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Sample records for neural regions involved

  1. A longitudinal analysis of neural regions involved in reading the mind in the eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overgaauw, Sandy; van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Gunther Moor, Bregtje; Crone, Eveline A

    2015-05-01

    The ability to perceive social intentions from people's eyes is present from an early age, yet little is known about whether this skill is fully developed in childhood or that subtle changes may still occur across adolescence. This fMRI study investigated the ability to read mental states by using an adapted version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes task within adolescents (aged 12-19 years) over a 2-year test-retest interval. This longitudinal setup provides the opportunity to study both stability over time as well as age-related changes. The behavioral results showed that participants who performed well in the mental state condition at the first measurement also performed well at the second measurement. fMRI results revealed positive test-retest correlations of neural activity in the right superior temporal sulcus and right inferior frontal gyrus for the contrast mental state > control, suggesting stability within individuals over time. Besides stability of activation, dorsal medial prefrontal cortex showed a dip in mid-adolescence for the mental state > control condition and right inferior frontal gyrus decreased linearly with age for the mental state > control condition. These findings underline changes in the slope of the developmental pattern depending on age, even in the existence of relatively stable activation in the social brain network. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Visual motion imagery neurofeedback based on the hMT+/V5 complex: evidence for a feedback-specific neural circuit involving neocortical and cerebellar regions

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    Banca, Paula; Sousa, Teresa; Catarina Duarte, Isabel; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Current approaches in neurofeedback/brain-computer interface research often focus on identifying, on a subject-by-subject basis, the neural regions that are best suited for self-driven modulation. It is known that the hMT+/V5 complex, an early visual cortical region, is recruited during explicit and implicit motion imagery, in addition to real motion perception. This study tests the feasibility of training healthy volunteers to regulate the level of activation in their hMT+/V5 complex using real-time fMRI neurofeedback and visual motion imagery strategies. Approach. We functionally localized the hMT+/V5 complex to further use as a target region for neurofeedback. An uniform strategy based on motion imagery was used to guide subjects to neuromodulate hMT+/V5. Main results. We found that 15/20 participants achieved successful neurofeedback. This modulation led to the recruitment of a specific network as further assessed by psychophysiological interaction analysis. This specific circuit, including hMT+/V5, putative V6 and medial cerebellum was activated for successful neurofeedback runs. The putamen and anterior insula were recruited for both successful and non-successful runs. Significance. Our findings indicate that hMT+/V5 is a region that can be modulated by focused imagery and that a specific cortico-cerebellar circuit is recruited during visual motion imagery leading to successful neurofeedback. These findings contribute to the debate on the relative potential of extrinsic (sensory) versus intrinsic (default-mode) brain regions in the clinical application of neurofeedback paradigms. This novel circuit might be a good target for future neurofeedback approaches that aim, for example, the training of focused attention in disorders such as ADHD.

  3. A Neural Region of Abstract Working Memory

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    Cowan, Nelson; Li, Dawei; Moffitt, Amanda; Becker, Theresa M.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Saults, J. Scott; Christ, Shawn E.

    2011-01-01

    Over 350 years ago, Descartes proposed that the neural basis of consciousness must be a brain region in which sensory inputs are combined. Using fMRI, we identified at least one such area for working memory, the limited information held in mind, described by William James as the trailing edge of consciousness. Specifically, a region in the left…

  4. Interpersonal liking modulates motor-related neural regions.

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    Mona Sobhani

    Full Text Available Observing someone perform an action engages brain regions involved in motor planning, such as the inferior frontal, premotor, and inferior parietal cortices. Recent research suggests that during action observation, activity in these neural regions can be modulated by membership in an ethnic group defined by physical differences. In this study we expanded upon previous research by matching physical similarity of two different social groups and investigating whether likability of an outgroup member modulates activity in neural regions involved in action observation. Seventeen Jewish subjects were familiarized with biographies of eight individuals, half of the individuals belonged to Neo-Nazi groups (dislikable and half of which did not (likable. All subjects and actors in the stimuli were Caucasian and physically similar. The subjects then viewed videos of actors portraying the characters performing simple motor actions (e.g. grasping a water bottle and raising it to the lips, while undergoing fMRI. Using multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA, we found that a classifier trained on brain activation patterns successfully discriminated between the likable and dislikable action observation conditions within the right ventral premotor cortex. These data indicate that the spatial pattern of activity in action observation related neural regions is modulated by likability even when watching a simple action such as reaching for a cup. These findings lend further support for the notion that social factors such as interpersonal liking modulate perceptual processing in motor-related cortices.

  5. Proteus mirabilis abscess involving the entire neural axis.

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    Kamat, A S; Thango, N S; Husein, M Ben

    2016-08-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rare and potentially devastating lesions usually associated with other infective processes such as bacterial endocarditis, or pulmonary or urogenital infection. We describe a 2-year-old girl who presented with an infected dermal sinus leading to an intraspinal abscess. This abscess eventually spread and involved the entire neural axis leaving her quadriparetic. Drainage of the abscess resulted in recovery and the child regained normal function of her limbs. To our knowledge this is the first documented case of an intramedullary abscess involving the entire neural axis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New Neural Network Methods for Forecasting Regional Employment

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    Patuelli, R.; Reggiani, A; Nijkamp, P.; Blien, U.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a set of neural network (NN) models is developed to compute short-term forecasts of regional employment patterns in Germany. Neural networks are modern statistical tools based on learning algorithms that are able to process large amounts of data. Neural networks are enjoying

  7. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

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    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  8. Neural regions essential for writing verbs.

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    Hillis, Argye E; Wityk, Robert J; Barker, Peter B; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2003-01-01

    Functional imaging data collected during cognitive tasks show which brain regions are active during those tasks, but do not necessarily indicate which regions are essential for those tasks. Here, in a study of two cases of selectively impaired written naming of verbs after focal brain ischemia, we combined imaging and behavioral testing to unambiguously identify brain regions that are crucial for a specific cognitive process. We used magnetic resonance perfusion imaging to show that the selective impairment in each case was due to hypoperfusion (low blood flow) in left posterior inferior frontal gyrus (PIFG) and precentral gyrus (PrG); the impairment was immediately reversed when blood flow was restored to these regions, indicating that parts of the left frontal lobe are crucial for representing and processing verbs.

  9. Understanding the neural mechanisms involved in sensory control of voice production.

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    Parkinson, Amy L; Flagmeier, Sabina G; Manes, Jordan L; Larson, Charles R; Rogers, Bill; Robin, Donald A

    2012-05-15

    Auditory feedback is important for the control of voice fundamental frequency (F0). In the present study we used neuroimaging to identify regions of the brain responsible for sensory control of the voice. We used a pitch-shift paradigm where subjects respond to an alteration, or shift, of voice pitch auditory feedback with a reflexive change in F0. To determine the neural substrates involved in these audio-vocal responses, subjects underwent fMRI scanning while vocalizing with or without pitch-shifted feedback. The comparison of shifted and unshifted vocalization revealed activation bilaterally in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) in response to the pitch shifted feedback. We hypothesize that the STG activity is related to error detection by auditory error cells located in the superior temporal cortex and efference copy mechanisms whereby this region is responsible for the coding of a mismatch between actual and predicted voice F0. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Regional Computation of TEC Using a Neural Network Model

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    Leandro, R. F.; Santos, M. C.

    2004-05-01

    One of the main sources of errors of GPS measurements is the ionosphere refraction. As a dispersive medium, the ionosphere allow its influence to be computed by using dual frequency receivers. In the case of single frequency receivers it is necessary to use models that tell us how big the ionospheric refraction is. The GPS broadcast message carries parameters of this model, namely Klobuchar model. Dual frequency receivers allow to estimate the influence of ionosphere in the GPS signal by the computation of TEC (Total Electron Content) values, that have a direct relationship with the magnitude of the delay caused by the ionosphere. One alternative is to create a regional model based on a network of dual frequency receivers. In this case, the regional behaviour of ionosphere is modelled in a way that it is possible to estimate the TEC values into or near this region. This regional model can be based on polynomials, for example. In this work we will present a Neural Network-based model to the regional computation of TEC. The advantage of using a Neural Network is that it is not necessary to have a great knowledge on the behaviour of the modelled surface due to the adaptation capability of neural networks training process, that is an iterative adjust of the synaptic weights in function of residuals, using the training parameters. Therefore, the previous knowledge of the modelled phenomena is important to define what kind of and how many parameters are needed to train the neural network so that reasonable results are obtained from the estimations. We have used data from the GPS tracking network in Brazil, and we have tested the accuracy of the new model to all locations where there is a station, accessing the efficiency of the model everywhere. TEC values were computed for each station of the network. After that the training parameters data set for the test station was formed, with the TEC values of all others (all stations, except the test one). The Neural Network was

  11. FACTORS OF DIRECT FOREIGN INVESTMENTS INVOLVEMENT INTO RUSSIAN REGIONS

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    D.V. Nesterova

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The factors of direct foreign investments involvement into Russian regions are analyzed, and the classification of groups of factors forming regional comparable advantages in the process of direct foreign investments involvement is worked out in the article: economical indicators, the level of physical infrastructure development, the level of regional institutional development, regional economic policy, regional openness for the external economic relations, geographical peculiarities of the region. Ranging of factors of direct foreign investments involvement is conducted on the base of econometrical research, the recommendations for working out of economic policy on the foreign capital income to the Russian economy stimulation are given in the article.

  12. Regional frequency analysis using Growing Neural Gas network

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    Abdi, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Yousef; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2017-07-01

    The delineation of hydrologically homogeneous regions is an important issue in regional hydrological frequency analysis. In the present study, an application of the Growing Neural Gas (GNG) network for hydrological data clustering is presented. The GNG is an incremental and unsupervised neural network, which is able to adapt its structure during the training procedure without using a prior knowledge of the size and shape of the network. In the GNG algorithm, the Minimum Description Length (MDL) measure as the cluster validity index is utilized for determining the optimal number of clusters (sub-regions). The capability of the proposed algorithm is illustrated by regionalizing drought severities for 40 synoptic weather stations in Iran. To fulfill this aim, first a clustering method is applied to form the sub-regions and then a heterogeneity measure is used to test the degree of heterogeneity of the delineated sub-regions. According to the MDL measure and considering two different indices namely CS and Davies-Bouldin (DB) in the GNG network, the entire study area is subdivided in two sub-regions located in the eastern and western sides of Iran. In order to evaluate the performance of the GNG algorithm, a number of other commonly used clustering methods, like K-means, fuzzy C-means, self-organizing map and Ward method are utilized in this study. The results of the heterogeneity measure based on the L-moments approach reveal that only the GNG algorithm successfully yields homogeneous sub-regions in comparison to the other methods.

  13. Neural circuits involved in the renewal of extinguished fear.

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    Chen, Weihai; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaqing; Li, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The last 10 years have witnessed a substantial progress in understanding the neural mechanisms for the renewal of the extinguished fear memory. Based on the theory of fear extinction, exposure therapy has been developed as a typical cognitive behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder. Although the fear memory can be extinguished by repeated presentation of conditioned stimulus without unconditioned stimulus, the fear memory is not erased and tends to relapse outside of extinction context, which is referred to as renewal. Therefore, the renewal is regarded as a great obstruction interfering with the effect of exposure therapy. In recent years, there has been a great deal of studies in understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of fear renewal. These offer a foundation upon which novel therapeutic interventions for the renewal may be built. This review focuses on behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological studies that interpret roles of the hippocampus, prelimbic cortex and amygdala as well as the connections between them for the renewal of the extinguished fear. Additionally, this review suggests the possible pathways for the renewal: (1) the prelimbic cortex may integrate contextual information from hippocampal inputs and project to the basolateral amygdala to mediate the renewal of extinguished fear memory; the ventral hippocampus may innervate the activities of the basolateral amygdala or the central amygdala directly for the renewal. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(7):470-478, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  14. Involvement of Neptune in induction of the hatching gland and neural crest in the Xenopus embryo.

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    Kurauchi, Takayuki; Izutsu, Yumi; Maéno, Mitsugu

    2010-01-01

    Neptune, a Krüppel-like transcription factor, is expressed in various regions of the developing Xenopus embryo and it has multiple functions in the process of development in various organs. In situ hybridization analysis showed that Neptune is expressed in the boundary region between neural and non-neural tissues at the neurula stage, but little is known about the function of Neptune in this region. Here, we examined the expression and function of Neptune in the neural plate border (NPB) in the Xenopus embryo. Depletion of Neptune protein in developing embryos by using antisense MO caused loss of the hatching gland and otic vesicle as well as malformation of neural crest-derived cranial cartilages and melanocytes. Neptune MO also suppressed the expression of hatching gland and neural crest markers such as he, snail2, sox9 and msx1 at the neurula stage. Subsequent experiments showed that Neptune is necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hatching gland cells and that it is located downstream of pax3 in the signal regulating the differentiation of these cells. Thus, Neptune is a new member of hatching gland specifier and plays a physiological role in determination and specification of multiple lineages derived from the NPB region.

  15. Neural Systems Involved When Attending to a Speaker.

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    Kamourieh, Salwa; Braga, Rodrigo M; Leech, Robert; Newbould, Rexford D; Malhotra, Paresh; Wise, Richard J S

    2015-11-01

    Remembering what a speaker said depends on attention. During conversational speech, the emphasis is on working memory, but listening to a lecture encourages episodic memory encoding. With simultaneous interference from background speech, the need for auditory vigilance increases. We recreated these context-dependent demands on auditory attention in 2 ways. The first was to require participants to attend to one speaker in either the absence or presence of a distracting background speaker. The second was to alter the task demand, requiring either an immediate or delayed recall of the content of the attended speech. Across 2 fMRI studies, common activated regions associated with segregating attended from unattended speech were the right anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum (aI/FOp), the left planum temporale, and the precuneus. In contrast, activity in a ventral right frontoparietal system was dependent on both the task demand and the presence of a competing speaker. Additional multivariate analyses identified other domain-general frontoparietal systems, where activity increased during attentive listening but was modulated little by the need for speech stream segregation in the presence of 2 speakers. These results make predictions about impairments in attentive listening in different communicative contexts following focal or diffuse brain pathology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. Response of neural reward regions to food cues in autism spectrum disorders

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    Cascio Carissa J

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One hypothesis for the social deficits that characterize autism spectrum disorders (ASD is diminished neural reward response to social interaction and attachment. Prior research using established monetary reward paradigms as a test of non-social reward to compare with social reward may involve confounds in the ability of individuals with ASD to utilize symbolic representation of money and the abstraction required to interpret monetary gains. Thus, a useful addition to our understanding of neural reward circuitry in ASD includes a characterization of the neural response to primary rewards. Method We asked 17 children with ASD and 18 children without ASD to abstain from eating for at least four hours before an MRI scan in which they viewed images of high-calorie foods. We assessed the neural reward network for increases in the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal in response to the food images Results We found very similar patterns of increased BOLD signal to these images in the two groups; both groups showed increased BOLD signal in the bilateral amygdala, as well as in the nucleus accumbens, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula. Direct group comparisons revealed that the ASD group showed a stronger response to food cues in bilateral insula along the anterior-posterior gradient and in the anterior cingulate cortex than the control group, whereas there were no neural reward regions that showed higher activation for controls than for ASD. Conclusion These results suggest that neural response to primary rewards is not diminished but in fact shows an aberrant enhancement in children with ASD.

  17. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation

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    H.M. Endedijk

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other’s actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children’s interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction.

  18. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation.

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    Endedijk, H M; Meyer, M; Bekkering, H; Cillessen, A H N; Hunnius, S

    2017-04-01

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is therefore considered important for social interaction. Still, to date, it is unknown whether interindividual differences in neural mirroring play a role in interpersonal coordination during different instances of social interaction. A relation between neural mirroring and interpersonal coordination has particularly relevant implications for early childhood, since successful early interaction with peers is predictive of a more favorable social development. We examined the relation between neural mirroring and children's interpersonal coordination during peer interaction using EEG and longitudinal behavioral data. Results showed that 4-year-old children with higher levels of motor system involvement during action observation (as indicated by lower beta-power) were more successful in early peer cooperation. This is the first evidence for a relation between motor system involvement during action observation and interpersonal coordination during other instances of social interaction. The findings suggest that interindividual differences in neural mirroring are related to interpersonal coordination and thus successful social interaction. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Maintenance of neural stem cell regional identity in culture.

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    Delgado, Ryan N; Lu, Changqing; Lim, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are distributed throughout the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) in the adult mouse brain. NSCs located in spatially distinct regions of the V-SVZ generate different types of olfactory bulb (OB) neurons, and the regional expression of specific transcription factors correlates with these differences in NSC developmental potential. In a recent article, we show that Nkx2.1-expressing embryonic precursors give rise to NKX2.1+ NSCs located in the ventral V-SVZ of adult mice. Here we characterize a V-SVZ monolayer culture system that retains regional gene expression and neurogenic potential of NSCs from the dorsal and ventral V-SVZ. In particular, we find that Nkx2.1-lineage V-SVZ NSCs maintain Nkx2.1 expression through serial passage and can generate new neurons in vitro. Thus, V-SVZ NSCs retain key aspects of their in vivo regional identity in culture, providing new experimental opportunities for understanding how such developmental patterns are established and maintained during development.

  20. Neural mirroring and social interaction : Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, H. M.; Meyer, M.; Bekkering, H.; Cillessen, A. H. N.; Hunnius, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is

  1. Neural mirroring and social interaction: Motor system involvement during action observation relates to early peer cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endedijk, H.M.; Meyer, M.; Bekkering, H.; Cillessen, A.H.N.; Hunnius, S.

    2017-01-01

    Whether we hand over objects to someone, play a team sport, or make music together, social interaction often involves interpersonal action coordination, both during instances of cooperation and entrainment. Neural mirroring is thought to play a crucial role in processing other's actions and is

  2. The Involvement of Rural Entrepreneurship In The Regional Development

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    Marin Burcea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present paper are to emphasize the importance of the rural entrepreneurship involvement in the regional development and to analyse the results of a research regarding the cooperation between the stakeholders of the local and regional development. A set of two hypotheses has been tested by using the data of a sociological survey focused on entrepreneurship and on the potential entrepreneurs from the rural area, belonging to five development regions. The results of our research highlight that the relationships between the rural area business environment and the other actors involved in the regional development (local public authorities, professional associations, institutions centred on regional development are influenced by the framework of organisation and cooperation with the local business environment.

  3. Neural correlates of envy: Regional homogeneity of resting-state brain activity predicts dispositional envy.

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    Xiang, Yanhui; Kong, Feng; Wen, Xue; Wu, Qihan; Mo, Lei

    2016-11-15

    Envy differs from common negative emotions across cultures. Although previous studies have explored the neural basis of episodic envy via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), little is known about the neural processes associated with dispositional envy. In the present study, we used regional homogeneity (ReHo) as an index in resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) to identify brain regions involved in individual differences in dispositional envy, as measured by the Dispositional Envy Scale (DES). Results showed that ReHo in the inferior/middle frontal gyrus (IFG/MFG) and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) positively predicted dispositional envy. Moreover, of all the personality traits measured by the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R), only neuroticism was significantly associated with dispositional envy. Furthermore, neuroticism mediated the underlying association between the ReHo of the IFG/MFG and dispositional envy. Hence, to the best of our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence that spontaneous brain activity in multiple regions related to self-evaluation, social perception, and social emotion contributes to dispositional envy. In addition, our findings reveal that neuroticism may play an important role in the cognitive processing of dispositional envy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Brain regions involved in the recognition of happiness and sadness in music.

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    Khalfa, Stéphanie; Schon, Daniele; Anton, Jean-Luc; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine

    2005-12-19

    Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to test for the lateralization of the brain regions specifically involved in the recognition of negatively and positively valenced musical emotions. The manipulation of two major musical features (mode and tempo), resulting in the variation of emotional perception along the happiness-sadness axis, was shown to principally involve subcortical and neocortical brain structures, which are known to intervene in emotion processing in other modalities. In particular, the minor mode (sad excerpts) involved the left orbito and mid-dorsolateral frontal cortex, which does not confirm the valence lateralization model. We also show that the recognition of emotions elicited by variations of the two perceptual determinants rely on both common (BA 9) and distinct neural mechanisms.

  5. Neural Signatures of the Reading-Writing Connection: Greater Involvement of Writing in Chinese Reading than English Reading.

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    Cao, Fan; Perfetti, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Research on cross-linguistic comparisons of the neural correlates of reading has consistently found that the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG) is more involved in Chinese than in English. However, there is a lack of consensus on the interpretation of the language difference. Because this region has been found to be involved in writing, we hypothesize that reading Chinese characters involves this writing region to a greater degree because Chinese speakers learn to read by repeatedly writing the characters. To test this hypothesis, we recruited English L1 learners of Chinese, who performed a reading task and a writing task in each language. The English L1 sample had learned some Chinese characters through character-writing and others through phonological learning, allowing a test of writing-on-reading effect. We found that the left MFG was more activated in Chinese than English regardless of task, and more activated in writing than in reading regardless of language. Furthermore, we found that this region was more activated for reading Chinese characters learned by character-writing than those learned by phonological learning. A major conclusion is that writing regions are also activated in reading, and that this reading-writing connection is modulated by the learning experience. We replicated the main findings in a group of native Chinese speakers, which excluded the possibility that the language differences observed in the English L1 participants were due to different language proficiency level.

  6. Neural Signatures of the Reading-Writing Connection: Greater Involvement of Writing in Chinese Reading than English Reading.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cao

    Full Text Available Research on cross-linguistic comparisons of the neural correlates of reading has consistently found that the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG is more involved in Chinese than in English. However, there is a lack of consensus on the interpretation of the language difference. Because this region has been found to be involved in writing, we hypothesize that reading Chinese characters involves this writing region to a greater degree because Chinese speakers learn to read by repeatedly writing the characters. To test this hypothesis, we recruited English L1 learners of Chinese, who performed a reading task and a writing task in each language. The English L1 sample had learned some Chinese characters through character-writing and others through phonological learning, allowing a test of writing-on-reading effect. We found that the left MFG was more activated in Chinese than English regardless of task, and more activated in writing than in reading regardless of language. Furthermore, we found that this region was more activated for reading Chinese characters learned by character-writing than those learned by phonological learning. A major conclusion is that writing regions are also activated in reading, and that this reading-writing connection is modulated by the learning experience. We replicated the main findings in a group of native Chinese speakers, which excluded the possibility that the language differences observed in the English L1 participants were due to different language proficiency level.

  7. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation

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    Kikuro eFukushima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioural evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioural responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go or not pursue (no-go according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST, supplementary eye fields (SEF, caudal frontal eye fields (FEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI-VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN, and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease, the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  8. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation.

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    Fukushima, Kikuro; Fukushima, Junko; Warabi, Tateo; Barnes, Graham R

    2013-01-01

    Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioral evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioral responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go) or not pursue (no-go) according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST), supplementary eye fields (SEF), caudal frontal eye fields (FEF), cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI-VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN), and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  9. Cognitive processes involved in smooth pursuit eye movements: behavioral evidence, neural substrate and clinical correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Kikuro; Fukushima, Junko; Warabi, Tateo; Barnes, Graham R.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth-pursuit eye movements allow primates to track moving objects. Efficient pursuit requires appropriate target selection and predictive compensation for inherent processing delays. Prediction depends on expectation of future object motion, storage of motion information and use of extra-retinal mechanisms in addition to visual feedback. We present behavioral evidence of how cognitive processes are involved in predictive pursuit in normal humans and then describe neuronal responses in monkeys and behavioral responses in patients using a new technique to test these cognitive controls. The new technique examines the neural substrate of working memory and movement preparation for predictive pursuit by using a memory-based task in macaque monkeys trained to pursue (go) or not pursue (no-go) according to a go/no-go cue, in a direction based on memory of a previously presented visual motion display. Single-unit task-related neuronal activity was examined in medial superior temporal cortex (MST), supplementary eye fields (SEF), caudal frontal eye fields (FEF), cerebellar dorsal vermis lobules VI–VII, caudal fastigial nuclei (cFN), and floccular region. Neuronal activity reflecting working memory of visual motion direction and go/no-go selection was found predominantly in SEF, cerebellar dorsal vermis and cFN, whereas movement preparation related signals were found predominantly in caudal FEF and the same cerebellar areas. Chemical inactivation produced effects consistent with differences in signals represented in each area. When applied to patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), the task revealed deficits in movement preparation but not working memory. In contrast, patients with frontal cortical or cerebellar dysfunction had high error rates, suggesting impaired working memory. We show how neuronal activity may be explained by models of retinal and extra-retinal interaction in target selection and predictive control and thus aid understanding of underlying

  10. Co-speech gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Hasson, Uri; Skipper, Jeremy I; Small, Steven L

    2009-11-01

    Everyday communication is accompanied by visual information from several sources, including co-speech gestures, which provide semantic information listeners use to help disambiguate the speaker's message. Using fMRI, we examined how gestures influence neural activity in brain regions associated with processing semantic information. The BOLD response was recorded while participants listened to stories under three audiovisual conditions and one auditory-only (speech alone) condition. In the first audiovisual condition, the storyteller produced gestures that naturally accompany speech. In the second, the storyteller made semantically unrelated hand movements. In the third, the storyteller kept her hands still. In addition to inferior parietal and posterior superior and middle temporal regions, bilateral posterior superior temporal sulcus and left anterior inferior frontal gyrus responded more strongly to speech when it was further accompanied by gesture, regardless of the semantic relation to speech. However, the right inferior frontal gyrus was sensitive to the semantic import of the hand movements, demonstrating more activity when hand movements were semantically unrelated to the accompanying speech. These findings show that perceiving hand movements during speech modulates the distributed pattern of neural activation involved in both biological motion perception and discourse comprehension, suggesting listeners attempt to find meaning, not only in the words speakers produce, but also in the hand movements that accompany speech.

  11. Ear Detection under Uncontrolled Conditions with Multiple Scale Faster Region-Based Convolutional Neural Networks

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    Yi Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ear detection is an important step in ear recognition approaches. Most existing ear detection techniques are based on manually designing features or shallow learning algorithms. However, researchers found that the pose variation, occlusion, and imaging conditions provide a great challenge to the traditional ear detection methods under uncontrolled conditions. This paper proposes an efficient technique involving Multiple Scale Faster Region-based Convolutional Neural Networks (Faster R-CNN to detect ears from 2D profile images in natural images automatically. Firstly, three regions of different scales are detected to infer the information about the ear location context within the image. Then an ear region filtering approach is proposed to extract the correct ear region and eliminate the false positives automatically. In an experiment with a test set of 200 web images (with variable photographic conditions, 98% of ears were accurately detected. Experiments were likewise conducted on the Collection J2 of University of Notre Dame Biometrics Database (UND-J2 and University of Beira Interior Ear dataset (UBEAR, which contain large occlusion, scale, and pose variations. Detection rates of 100% and 98.22%, respectively, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  12. Extracting Neural Oscillation Signatures of Laser-Induced Nociception in Pain-Related Regions in Rats

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    Xuezhu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that multiple brain regions are involved in pain perception and pain-related neural processes by forming a functionally connected pain network. It is still unclear how these pain-related brain areas actively work together to generate the experience of pain. To get a better insight into the pain network, we implanted electrodes in four pain-related areas of rats including the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, primary somatosensory cortex (S1 and periaqueductal gray (PAG. We analyzed the pattern of local field potential (LFP oscillations under noxious laser stimulations and innoxious laser stimulations. A high-dimensional feature matrix was built based on the LFP characters for both experimental conditions. Generalized linear models (GLMs were trained to classify recorded LFPs under noxious vs. innoxious condition. We found a general power decrease in α and β bands and power increase in γ band in the recorded areas under noxious condition. After noxious laser stimulation, there was a consistent change in LFP power and correlation in all four brain areas among all 13 rats. With GLM classifiers, noxious laser trials were distinguished from innoxious laser trials with high accuracy (86% using high-dimensional LFP features. This work provides a basis for further research to examine which aspects (e.g., sensory, motor or affective processes of noxious stimulation should drive distinct neural activity across the pain network.

  13. Neural Mechanisms Involved in Hypersensitive Hearing: Helping Children with ASD Who Are Overly Sensitive to Sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucker, Jay R; Doman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities. This review article discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. The authors focus on brain research to support the idea of the nonclassical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. The authors also discuss brain mechanisms felt to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity. The authors conclude with a discussion of some treatments for hypersensitive hearing. These treatments include desensitization training and the use of listening therapies such as The Listening Program.

  14. Neural Mechanisms Involved in Hypersensitive Hearing: Helping Children with ASD Who Are Overly Sensitive to Sounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R. Lucker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities. This review article discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. The authors focus on brain research to support the idea of the nonclassical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. The authors also discuss brain mechanisms felt to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity. The authors conclude with a discussion of some treatments for hypersensitive hearing. These treatments include desensitization training and the use of listening therapies such as The Listening Program.

  15. Cortical regions involved in the observation of bimanual actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitger, Marcus H; Macé, Marc J-M; Jastorff, Jan; Swinnen, Stephan P; Orban, Guy A

    2012-11-01

    Although we are beginning to understand how observed actions performed by conspecifics with a single hand are processed and how bimanual actions are controlled by the motor system, we know very little about the processing of observed bimanual actions. We used fMRI to compare the observation of bimanual manipulative actions with their unimanual components, relative to visual control conditions equalized for visual motion. Bimanual action observation did not activate any region specialized for processing visual signals related to this more elaborated action. On the contrary, observation of bimanual and unimanual actions activated similar occipito-temporal, parietal and premotor networks. However, whole-brain as well as region of interest (ROI) analyses revealed that this network functions differently under bimanual and unimanual conditions. Indeed, in bimanual conditions, activity in the network was overall more bilateral, especially in parietal cortex. In addition, ROI analyses indicated bilateral parietal activation patterns across hand conditions distinctly different from those at other levels of the action-observation network. These activation patterns suggest that while occipito-temporal and premotor levels are involved with processing the kinematics of the observed actions, the parietal cortex is more involved in the processing of static, postural aspects of the observed action. This study adds bimanual cooperation to the growing list of distinctions between parietal and premotor cortex regarding factors affecting visual processing of observed actions.

  16. Junctional neurulation: a unique developmental program shaping a discrete region of the spinal cord highly susceptible to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dady, Alwyn; Havis, Emmanuelle; Escriou, Virginie; Catala, Martin; Duband, Jean-Loup

    2014-09-24

    In higher vertebrates, the primordium of the nervous system, the neural tube, is shaped along the rostrocaudal axis through two consecutive, radically different processes referred to as primary and secondary neurulation. Failures in neurulation lead to severe anomalies of the nervous system, called neural tube defects (NTDs), which are among the most common congenital malformations in humans. Mechanisms causing NTDs in humans remain ill-defined. Of particular interest, the thoracolumbar region, which encompasses many NTD cases in the spine, corresponds to the junction between primary and secondary neurulations. Elucidating which developmental processes operate during neurulation in this region is therefore pivotal to unraveling the etiology of NTDs. Here, using the chick embryo as a model, we show that, at the junction, the neural tube is elaborated by a unique developmental program involving concerted movements of elevation and folding combined with local cell ingression and accretion. This process ensures the topological continuity between the primary and secondary neural tubes while supplying all neural progenitors of both the junctional and secondary neural tubes. Because it is distinct from the other neurulation events, we term this phenomenon junctional neurulation. Moreover, the planar-cell-polarity member, Prickle-1, is recruited specifically during junctional neurulation and its misexpression within a limited time period suffices to cause anomalies that phenocopy lower spine NTDs in human. Our study thus provides a molecular and cellular basis for understanding the causality of NTD prevalence in humans and ascribes to Prickle-1 a critical role in lower spinal cord formation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3413208-14$15.00/0.

  17. Toxocara canis myelitis involving the lumbosacral region: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Yu; Yoshimura, Michiyoshi; Saigo, Ryuji; Arata, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Yuji; Matsuura, Eiji; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Toxocara canis is a parasite known to cause visceral larva migrans. The infection rarely affects the central nervous system but there have been several reports of myelitis caused by visceral larva migrans due to Toxocara canis. In previous reported cases, the lesions were located in the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a lesion involving the lumbosacral region. A 60-year-old man developed weakness and dysesthesia in the lower limbs. The symptoms resolved spontaneously, but recurred after five months. One month later, the patient developed pollakiuria and constipation. He was a dog owner and frequently ate raw chicken meat and beef liver. Sagittal T2-weighted image (T2WI) showed swelling and hyperintensity in the spinal cord from T10 to the lumbosacral region and focal nodular enhancement on the posterior segment of the lumbar spinal cord. Blood cell counts showed slight eosinophilia and elevated serum immunoglobulin E level. Cerebrospinal fluid examination showed slight pleocytosis with eosinophilia. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed high levels of anti-Toxocara antibodies in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid. In addition, confirmatory test by Western blot was positive. The patient was initially treated with intravenous methylprednisolone with slight improvement in muscle weakness. Albendazole was added with a second course of intravenous methylprednisolone. The muscle weakness in the lower limbs improved considerably, and swelling and hyperintensity on T2WI almost disappeared. Our results suggest that Toxocara canis myelitis cannot be discounted even if the myelitis involves the lumbosacral region.

  18. Regionally-specified second trimester fetal neural stem cells reveals differential neurogenic programming.

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    Yiping Fan

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSC have the potential for treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases such as Parkinson Disease and multiple sclerosis. Currently, NSC have been isolated only from hippocampus and subventricular zone (SVZ of the adult brain. It is not known whether NSC can be found in all parts of the developing mid-trimester central nervous system (CNS when the brain undergoes massive transformation and growth. Multipotent NSC from the mid-trimester cerebra, thalamus, SVZ, hippocampus, thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord can be derived and propagated as clonal neurospheres with increasing frequencies with increasing gestations. These NSC can undergo multi-lineage differentiation both in vitro and in vivo, and engraft in a developmental murine model. Regionally-derived NSC are phenotypically distinct, with hippocampal NSC having a significantly higher neurogenic potential (53.6% over other sources (range of 0%-27.5%, p<0.004. Whole genome expression analysis showed differential gene expression between these regionally-derived NSC, which involved the Notch, epidermal growth factor as well as interleukin pathways. We have shown the presence of phenotypically-distinct regionally-derived NSC from the mid-trimester CNS, which may reflect the ontological differences occurring within the CNS. Aside from informing on the role of such cells during fetal growth, they may be useful for different cellular therapy applications.

  19. Viewing pictures of a romantic partner reduces experimental pain: involvement of neural reward systems.

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    Jarred Younger

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The early stages of a new romantic relationship are characterized by intense feelings of euphoria, well-being, and preoccupation with the romantic partner. Neuroimaging research has linked those feelings to activation of reward systems in the human brain. The results of those studies may be relevant to pain management in humans, as basic animal research has shown that pharmacologic activation of reward systems can substantially reduce pain. Indeed, viewing pictures of a romantic partner was recently demonstrated to reduce experimental thermal pain. We hypothesized that pain relief evoked by viewing pictures of a romantic partner would be associated with neural activations in reward-processing centers. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study, we examined fifteen individuals in the first nine months of a new, romantic relationship. Participants completed three tasks under periods of moderate and high thermal pain: 1 viewing pictures of their romantic partner, 2 viewing pictures of an equally attractive and familiar acquaintance, and 3 a word-association distraction task previously demonstrated to reduce pain. The partner and distraction tasks both significantly reduced self-reported pain, although only the partner task was associated with activation of reward systems. Greater analgesia while viewing pictures of a romantic partner was associated with increased activity in several reward-processing regions, including the caudate head, nucleus accumbens, lateral orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex--regions not associated with distraction-induced analgesia. The results suggest that the activation of neural reward systems via non-pharmacologic means can reduce the experience of pain.

  20. What does gamma coherence tell us about inter-regional neural communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzsáki, György; Schomburg, Erik W

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations have been measured and interpreted in multitudinous ways, with a variety of hypothesized functions in physiology, information processing and cognition. Much attention has been paid in recent years to gamma-band (30-100 Hz) oscillations and synchrony, with an increasing interest in 'high gamma' (>100 Hz) signals as mesoscopic measures of inter-regional communication. The biophysical origins of the measured variables are often difficult to precisely identify, however, making their interpretation fraught with pitfalls. Here we discuss how measurements of inter-regional gamma coherence can be prone to misinterpretation and suggest strategies for deciphering the roles that synchronized oscillations across brain networks may play in neural function.

  1. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making.

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    Julie Giustiniani

    Full Text Available The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects. No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing.

  2. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustiniani, Julie; Gabriel, Damien; Nicolier, Magali; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects) and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects). No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing.

  3. Successful dieters have increased neural activity in cortical areas involved in the control of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelParigi, A; Chen, K; Salbe, A D; Hill, J O; Wing, R R; Reiman, E M; Tataranni, P A

    2007-03-01

    To investigate whether dietary restraint, a landmark of successful dieting, is associated with specific patterns of brain responses to the sensory experience of food and meal consumption. Cross-sectional study of the brain's response to the sensory experience of food and meal consumption in nine successful dieters (age: 38+/-7 years, body fat (%): 28+/-3) and 20 non-dieters (age: 31+/-9 years, body fat (%): 33+/-9), all women. Changes in brain activity in response to the sensory experience of food and meal consumption were assessed by using positron emission tomography and (15)O water as a radiotracer. Body fatness was assessed by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Subjective ratings of hunger and fullness were measured by visual analogue scale. Dietary restraint, disinhibition and hunger were assessed by the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire. Successful dieters had a significantly higher level of dietary restraint compared to non-dieters. In response to meal consumption, successful dieters had a greater activation in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (DPFC), dorsal striatum and anterior cerebellar lobe as compared to non-dieters. In response to the same stimulation, the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was significantly more activated in non-dieters as compared to successful dieters. Dietary restraint was positively correlated with the response in the DPFC and negatively with the response in the OFC. The responses in the DPFC and OFC were negatively intercorrelated. Cortical areas involved in controlling inappropriate behavioral responses, such as the DPFC, are particularly activated in successful dieters in response to meal consumption. The association between the degree of dietary restraint and the coordinated neural changes in the DPFC and OFC raises the possibility that cognitive control of food intake is achieved by modulating neural circuits controlling food reward.

  4. A Deep Convolutional Neural Network for segmenting and classifying epithelial and stromal regions in histopathological images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Luo, Xiaofei; Wang, Guanhao; Gilmore, Hannah; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-05-26

    Epithelial (EP) and stromal (ST) are two types of tissues in histological images. Automated segmentation or classification of EP and ST tissues is important when developing computerized system for analyzing the tumor microenvironment. In this paper, a Deep Convolutional Neural Networks (DCNN) based feature learning is presented to automatically segment or classify EP and ST regions from digitized tumor tissue microarrays (TMAs). Current approaches are based on handcraft feature representation, such as color, texture, and Local Binary Patterns (LBP) in classifying two regions. Compared to handcrafted feature based approaches, which involve task dependent representation, DCNN is an end-to-end feature extractor that may be directly learned from the raw pixel intensity value of EP and ST tissues in a data driven fashion. These high-level features contribute to the construction of a supervised classifier for discriminating the two types of tissues. In this work we compare DCNN based models with three handcraft feature extraction based approaches on two different datasets which consist of 157 Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) stained images of breast cancer and 1376 immunohistological (IHC) stained images of colorectal cancer, respectively. The DCNN based feature learning approach was shown to have a F1 classification score of 85%, 89%, and 100%, accuracy (ACC) of 84%, 88%, and 100%, and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 86%, 77%, and 100% on two H&E stained (NKI and VGH) and IHC stained data, respectively. Our DNN based approach was shown to outperform three handcraft feature extraction based approaches in terms of the classification of EP and ST regions.

  5. Thalamic Multisensory integration: Creating a neural network map of involved brain areas in music perception, processing and execution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaschke, A.C.; Scherder, E.J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Music activates a wide array of neural areas involved in different functions besides the perception, processing and execution of music itself. Understanding musical processes in the brain has had multiple implications in the neuro- and health sciences. Engaging the brain with a multisensory stimulus

  6. The role of the anterior neural ridge and Fgf-8 in early forebrain patterning and regionalization in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagleson, Gerald W; Dempewolf, Ryan D

    2002-05-01

    The tissue, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate early regional specification of the vertebrate forebrain are largely unknown. We studied the expression patterns of Xbf-1, an anterior (and telencephalon) neural-specific winged helix transcription factor and Fgf-8, an early-secreted factor. This study looked at Xbf-1 and Fgf-8 expression in combination with embryonic grafting experiments and also used beads containing the recombinant Fgf-8 protein to determine these factors' effects upon forebrain patterning events. We provide evidence that additional Fgf-8 displaces Xbf-1 expression posteriorly, suggesting a concentration dependence of Fgf-8 for the early distinct regionalization of the telencephalic primordia. Also, additional stage 15 mid-anterior neural ridge (mANR) transplants inhibited telencephalon development, whereas lateral ANR transplants facilitated increased areas of telencephalon development. In both cases, these transplantations promoted ectopic expression of Xbf-1. These studies suggested that the distinct regionalization of the forebrain primordia involves the inhibitory actions of the mANR towards a telencephalon development and maintaining bilateral telencephali. These telencephalic primordia are initially localized by optimal Fgf-8 expression. The anterior mANR will eventually become the anterior and rostral diencephalic tissue. This in vivo study demonstrated Fgf-8 and the mANR are important in forebrain regionalization.

  7. Let7a involves in neural stem cell differentiation relating with TLX level

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    Song, Juhyun [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyoung Joo; Oh, Yumi [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Sciences, and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Eun, E-mail: jelee@yuhs.ac [Department of Anatomy, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); BK21 Plus Project for Medical Sciences, and Brain Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the potential for differentiation into neurons known as a groundbreaking therapeutic solution for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. To resolve the therapeutic efficiency of NSCs, recent researchers have focused on the study on microRNA's role in CNS. Some micro RNAs have been reported significant functions in NSC self-renewal and differentiation through the post-transcriptional regulation of neurogenesis genes. MicroRNA-Let7a (Let7a) has known as the regulator of diverse cellular mechanisms including cell differentiation and proliferation. In present study, we investigated whether Let7a regulates NSC differentiation by targeting the nuclear receptor TLX, which is an essential regulator of NSC self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. We performed the following experiments: western blot analysis, TaqMan assay, RT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry to confirm the alteration of NSCs. Our data showed that let7a play important roles in controlling NSC fate determination. Thus, manipulating Let-7A and TLX could be a novel strategy to enhance the efficiency of NSC's neuronal differentiation for CNS disorders. - Highlights: • Let7a influences on NSC differentiation and proliferation. • Let7a involves in mainly NSC differentiation rather than proliferation. • Let7a positively regulates the TLX expression.

  8. Nrf2/ARE Pathway Involved in Oxidative Stress Induced by Paraquat in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

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    Tingting Dou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compelling evidences have shown that diverse environmental insults arising during early life can either directly lead to a reduction in the number of dopaminergic neurons or cause an increased susceptibility to neurons degeneration with subsequent environmental insults or with aging alone. Oxidative stress is considered the main effect of neurotoxins exposure. In this study, we investigated the oxidative stress effect of Paraquat (PQ on immortalized human embryonic neural progenitor cells by treating them with various concentrations of PQ. We show that PQ can decrease the activity of SOD and CAT but increase MDA and LDH level. Furthermore, the activities of Cyc and caspase-9 were found increased significantly at 10 μM of PQ treatment. The cytoplasmic Nrf2 protein expressions were upregulated at 10 μM but fell back at 100 μM. The nuclear Nrf2 protein expressions were upregulated as well as the downstream mRNA expressions of HO-1 and NQO1 in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the proteins expression of PKC and CKII was also increased significantly even at 1 μM. The results suggested that Nrf2/ARE pathway is involved in mild to moderate PQ-induced oxidative stress which is evident from dampened Nrf2 activity and low expression of antioxidant genes in PQ induced oxidative damage.

  9. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effect of orthography over neural regions in bilinguals: a view from neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam

    2014-09-19

    Effects of written script processing on neural regions have been explored using fMRI in a group of bilingual population that has not so far been studied, namely, Urdu-Hindi skilled bilinguals. Hindi and Urdu languages are very similar at the spoken level but differ greatly in scripts; Hindi is a highly transparent script, whereas Urdu is more opaque. The common regions (conjunction analyses) observed for Urdu-Hindi bilingual readers are left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) (BA 44/45), bilateral middle temporal (BA 22), left fusiform gyrus (BA 37) and bilateral middle occipital regions. The distinct regions for Urdu words were found in left superior frontal and left middle frontal regions whereas; no distinct region was found for Hindi words. Imaging result suggests that middle and superior frontal regions are crucial for the orthography and graphemic complexity of Urdu script. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Involvement of Atm and Trp53 in neural cell loss due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jusik; Choi, Inseo; Lee, Youngsoo

    2017-11-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is one of the critical features for proper neurodevelopment and inhibition of neurological diseases. The signals from both ATM and ATR to TP53 are well-known mechanisms to remove neural cells with DNA damage during neurogenesis. Here we examined the involvement of Atm and Atr in genomic instability due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development. Selective inactivation of Terf2 in neural progenitors induced apoptosis, resulting in a complete loss of the brain structure. This neural loss was rescued partially in both Atm and Trp53 deficiency, but not in an Atr-deficient background in the mouse. Atm inactivation resulted in incomplete brain structures, whereas p53 deficiency led to the formation of multinucleated giant neural cells and the disruption of the brain structure. These giant neural cells disappeared in Lig4 deficiency. These data demonstrate ATM and TP53 are important for the maintenance of telomere homeostasis and the surveillance of telomere dysfunction during neurogenesis.

  12. Soy sauce classification by geographic region and fermentation based on artificial neural network and genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libin; Li, Yang; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong; Wang, Chao; He, Jianjun; Cao, Yueze; Chen, Shigui; Li, Dongsheng

    2014-12-24

    This work demonstrated the possibility of using artificial neural networks to classify soy sauce from China. The aroma profiles of different soy sauce samples were differentiated using headspace solid-phase microextraction. The soy sauce samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and 22 and 15 volatile aroma compounds were selected for sensitivity analysis to classify the samples by fermentation and geographic region, respectively. The 15 selected samples can be classified by fermentation and geographic region with a prediction success rate of 100%. Furans and phenols represented the variables with the greatest contribution in classifying soy sauce samples by fermentation and geographic region, respectively.

  13. Perfusion imaging in Pusher syndrome to investigate the neural substrates involved in controlling upright body position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Francesco Ticini

    Full Text Available Brain damage may induce a dysfunction of upright body position termed "pusher syndrome". Patients with such disorder suffer from an alteration of their sense of body verticality. They experience their body as oriented upright when actually tilted nearly 20 degrees to the ipsilesional side. Pusher syndrome typically is associated with posterior thalamic stroke; less frequently with extra-thalamic lesions. This argued for a fundamental role of these structures in our control of upright body posture. Here we investigated whether such patients may show additional functional or metabolic abnormalities outside the areas of brain lesion. We investigated 19 stroke patients with thalamic or with extra-thalamic lesions showing versus not showing misperception of body orientation. We measured fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery (FLAIR imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI, and perfusion-weighted imaging (PWI. This allowed us to determine the structural damage as well as to identify the malperfused but structural intact tissue. Pusher patients with thalamic lesions did not show dysfunctional brain areas in addition to the ones found to be structurally damaged. In the pusher patients with extra-thalamic lesions, the thalamus was neither structurally damaged nor malperfused. Rather, these patients showed small regions of abnormal perfusion in the structurally intact inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, and parietal white matter. The results indicate that these extra-thalamic brain areas contribute to the network controlling upright body posture. The data also suggest that damage of the neural tissue in the posterior thalamus itself rather than additional malperfusion in distant cortical areas is associated with pusher syndrome. Hence, it seems as if the normal functioning of both extra-thalamic as well as posterior thalamic structures is integral to perceiving gravity and controlling upright body orientation in humans.

  14. Modelling innovation performance of European regions using multi-output neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Petr; Henriques, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Regional innovation performance is an important indicator for decision-making regarding the implementation of policies intended to support innovation. However, patterns in regional innovation structures are becoming increasingly diverse, complex and nonlinear. To address these issues, this study aims to develop a model based on a multi-output neural network. Both intra- and inter-regional determinants of innovation performance are empirically investigated using data from the 4th and 5th Community Innovation Surveys of NUTS 2 (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) regions. The results suggest that specific innovation strategies must be developed based on the current state of input attributes in the region. Thus, it is possible to develop appropriate strategies and targeted interventions to improve regional innovation performance. We demonstrate that support of entrepreneurship is an effective instrument of innovation policy. We also provide empirical support that both business and government R&D activity have a sigmoidal effect, implying that the most effective R&D support should be directed to regions with below-average and average R&D activity. We further show that the multi-output neural network outperforms traditional statistical and machine learning regression models. In general, therefore, it seems that the proposed model can effectively reflect both the multiple-output nature of innovation performance and the interdependency of the output attributes.

  15. Modelling innovation performance of European regions using multi-output neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hajek

    Full Text Available Regional innovation performance is an important indicator for decision-making regarding the implementation of policies intended to support innovation. However, patterns in regional innovation structures are becoming increasingly diverse, complex and nonlinear. To address these issues, this study aims to develop a model based on a multi-output neural network. Both intra- and inter-regional determinants of innovation performance are empirically investigated using data from the 4th and 5th Community Innovation Surveys of NUTS 2 (Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics regions. The results suggest that specific innovation strategies must be developed based on the current state of input attributes in the region. Thus, it is possible to develop appropriate strategies and targeted interventions to improve regional innovation performance. We demonstrate that support of entrepreneurship is an effective instrument of innovation policy. We also provide empirical support that both business and government R&D activity have a sigmoidal effect, implying that the most effective R&D support should be directed to regions with below-average and average R&D activity. We further show that the multi-output neural network outperforms traditional statistical and machine learning regression models. In general, therefore, it seems that the proposed model can effectively reflect both the multiple-output nature of innovation performance and the interdependency of the output attributes.

  16. What does gamma coherence tell us about inter-regional neural communication?

    OpenAIRE

    Buzsáki, György; Schomburg, Erik W

    2015-01-01

    Neural oscillations have been measured and interpreted in multitudinous ways, with a variety of hypothesized functions in physiology, information processing and cognition. Much attention has been paid in recent years to gamma-band (30–100 Hz) oscillations and synchrony, with an increasing interest in ‘high gamma’ (>100 Hz) signals as mesoscopic measures of inter-regional communication. The biophysical origins of the measured variables are often difficult to precisely identify, however, making...

  17. Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Qi Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, which is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood and anhedonia, greatly impacts patients, their families, and society. The associated and recurring sleep disturbances further reduce patient’s quality of life. However, therapeutic sleep deprivation has been regarded as a rapid and robust antidepressant treatment for several decades, which suggests a complicated role of sleep in development of depression. Changes in neural plasticity are observed during physiological sleep, therapeutic sleep deprivation, and depression. This correlation might help us to understand better the mechanism underlying development of depression and the role of sleep. In this review, we first introduce the structure of sleep and the facilitated neural plasticity caused by physiological sleep. Then, we introduce sleep disturbances and changes in plasticity in patients with depression. Finally, the effects and mechanisms of antidepressants and therapeutic sleep deprivation on neural plasticity are discussed.

  18. Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Qi; Li, Rui; Wang, Yi-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2017-01-01

    Depression, which is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood and anhedonia, greatly impacts patients, their families, and society. The associated and recurring sleep disturbances further reduce patient's quality of life. However, therapeutic sleep deprivation has been regarded as a rapid and robust antidepressant treatment for several decades, which suggests a complicated role of sleep in development of depression. Changes in neural plasticity are observed during physiological sleep, therapeutic sleep deprivation, and depression. This correlation might help us to understand better the mechanism underlying development of depression and the role of sleep. In this review, we first introduce the structure of sleep and the facilitated neural plasticity caused by physiological sleep. Then, we introduce sleep disturbances and changes in plasticity in patients with depression. Finally, the effects and mechanisms of antidepressants and therapeutic sleep deprivation on neural plasticity are discussed.

  19. Involvement of crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a in neural cell fate decision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeyuki Yamada

    Full Text Available Oct4 plays a critical role both in maintaining pluripotency and the cell fate decision of embryonic stem (ES cells. Nonetheless, in the determination of the neuroectoderm (NE from ES cells, the detailed regulation mechanism of the Oct4 gene expression is poorly understood. Here, we report that crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a, a Pbx-related homeobox protein, is required for neural differentiation of mouse P19 embryonic carcinoma (EC cells induced by retinoic acid (RA. During neural differentiation, Oct4 expression was transiently enhanced during 6-12 h of RA addition and subsequently disappeared within 48 h. Coinciding with up-regulation of Oct4 expression, the induction of Meis1a expression was initiated and reached a plateau at 48 h, suggesting that transiently induced Oct4 activates Meis1a expression and the up-regulated Meis1a then suppresses Oct4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP and luciferase reporter analysis showed that Oct4 enhanced Meis1a expression via direct binding to the Meis1 promoter accompanying histone H3 acetylation and appearance of 5-hydoxymethylcytosine (5hmC, while Meis1a suppressed Oct4 expression via direct association with the Oct4 promoter together with histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1. Furthermore, ectopic Meis1a expression promoted neural differentiation via formation of large neurospheres that expressed Nestin, GLAST, BLBP and Sox1 as neural stem cell (NSC/neural progenitor markers, whereas its down-regulation generated small neurospheres and repressed neural differentiation. Thus, these results imply that crosstalk between Oct4 and Meis1a on mutual gene expressions is essential for the determination of NE from EC cells.

  20. Construction of hazard maps of Hantavirus contagion using Remote Sensing, logistic regression and Artificial Neural Networks: case Araucan\\'ia Region, Chile

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez, G; Salinas, R

    2016-01-01

    In this research, methods and computational results based on statistical analysis and mathematical modelling, data collection in situ in order to make a hazard map of Hanta Virus infection in the region of Araucania, Chile are presented. The development of this work involves several elements such as Landsat satellite images, biological information regarding seropositivity of Hanta Virus and information concerning positive cases of infection detected in the region. All this information has been processed to find a function that models the danger of contagion in the region, through logistic regression analysis and Artificial Neural Networks

  1. STAT3 signal that mediates the neural plasticity is involved in willed-movement training in focal ischemic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qing-Ping; Shen, Qin; Wu, Li-Xiang; Feng, Xiang-Ling; Liu, Hui; Wu, Bei; Huang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Gai-Qing; Li, Zhong-Hao; Liu, Zun-Jing

    2016-07-01

    Willed-movement training has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to increase motor performance and neural plasticity in ischemic rats. However, little is known regarding the molecular signals that are involved in neural plasticity following willed-movement training. To investigate the potential signals related to neural plasticity following willed-movement training, littermate rats were randomly assigned into three groups: middle cerebral artery occlusion, environmental modification, and willed-movement training. The infarct volume was measured 18 d after occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunofluorescence staining were used to detect the changes in the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mRNA and protein, respectively. A chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to investigate whether STAT3 bound to plasticity-related genes, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), synaptophysin, and protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1). In this study, we demonstrated that STAT3 mRNA and protein were markedly increased following 15-d willed-movement training in the ischemic hemispheres of the treated rats. STAT3 bound to BDNF, PICK1, and synaptophysin promoters in the neocortical cells of rats. These data suggest that the increased STAT3 levels after willed-movement training might play critical roles in the neural plasticity by directly regulating plasticity-related genes.

  2. Social discounting involves modulation of neural value signals by temporoparietal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strombach, Tina; Weber, Bernd; Hangebrauk, Zsofia; Kenning, Peter; Karipidis, Iliana I.; Tobler, Philippe N.; Kalenscher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Most people are generous, but not toward everyone alike: generosity usually declines with social distance between individuals, a phenomenon called social discounting. Despite the pervasiveness of social discounting, social distance between actors has been surprisingly neglected in economic theory and neuroscientific research. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the neural basis of this process to understand the neural underpinnings of social decision making. Participants chose between selfish and generous alternatives, yielding either a large reward for the participant alone, or smaller rewards for the participant and another individual at a particular social distance. We found that generous choices engaged the temporoparietal junction (TPJ). In particular, the TPJ activity was scaled to the social-distance–dependent conflict between selfish and generous motives during prosocial choice, consistent with ideas that the TPJ promotes generosity by facilitating overcoming egoism bias. Based on functional coupling data, we propose and provide evidence for a biologically plausible neural model according to which the TPJ supports social discounting by modulating basic neural value signals in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex to incorporate social-distance–dependent other-regarding preferences into an otherwise exclusively own-reward value representation. PMID:25605887

  3. Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells into Oligodendrocytes : Involvement of the Polycomb Group Protein Ezh2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Rossler, Reinhard; Brouwer, Nieske; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) renewal and maintenance of their multipotency are still not completely understood. Self-renewal of stem cells in general implies repression of genes that encode for cell lineage differentiation. Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (Ezh2) is

  4. Jarid1b targets genes regulating development and is involved in neural differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Albert, Mareike; Malatesta, Martina

    2011-01-01

    -renewal and differentiation is just starting to emerge. Here, we show that the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) is dispensable for ESC self-renewal, but essential for ESC differentiation along the neural lineage. By genome-wide location analysis, we demonstrate that Jarid1b localizes predominantly...

  5. Regional cerebral glucose metabolic changes in oculopalatal myoclonus: implication for neural pathways, underlying the disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Moon, So Young; Kim, Ji Soo; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Palatal myoclonus (PM) is characterized by rhythmic involuntary jerky movements of the soft palate of the throat. When associated with eye movements, it is called oculopalatal myoclonus (OPM). Ordinary PM is characterized by hypertrophic olivary degeneration, a trans-synaptic degeneration following loss of neuronal input to the inferior olivary nucleus due to an interruption of the Guillain-Mollaret triangle usually by a hemorrhage. However, the neural pathways underlying the disorder are uncertain. In an attempt to understand the pathologic neural pathways, we examined the metabolic correlates of this tremulous condition. Brain FDG PET scans were acquired in 8 patients with OPM (age, 49.9{+-}4.6 y: all males: 7 with pontine hemorrhage, 1 with diffuse brainstem infarction) and age-matched 50 healthy males (age, 50.7{+-} 9.0) and the regional glucose metabolism compared using SPM99. For group analysis, the hemispheres containing lesions were assigned to the right side of the brain. Patients with OPM had significant hypometabolism in the ipsilateral (to the lesion) brainstem and superior temporal and parahippocampal gyri (P < 0.05 corrected, k = 100). By contrast, there was significant hypermetabolism in the contralateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, thalamus, middle frontal gyrus and precuneus (P < 0.05 corrected, k=l00). Our data demonstrate the distinct metabolic changes between several ipsilateral and contralateral brain regions (hypometabolism vs. hypermetabolism) in patients with OPM. This may provide clues for understanding the neural pathways underlying the disorder.

  6. Effectiveness of a Treatment Involving Soft Tissue Techniques and/or Neural Mobilization Techniques in the Management of Tension-Type Headache: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Velasco-Roldán, Olga; Pecos-Martín, Daniel; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Jesús; Llabrés-Bennasar, Bartomeu; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effects of a protocol involving soft tissue techniques and/or neural mobilization techniques in the management of patients with frequent episodic tension-type headache (FETTH) and those with chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled before and after trial. Rehabilitation area of the local hospital and a private physiotherapy center. Patients (N=97; 78 women, 19 men) diagnosed with FETTH or CTTH were randomly assigned to groups A, B, C, or D. (A) Placebo superficial massage; (B) soft tissue techniques; (C) neural mobilization techniques; (D) a combination of soft tissue and neural mobilization techniques. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) in the temporal muscles (points 1 and 2) and supraorbital region (point 3), the frequency and maximal intensity of pain crisis, and the score in the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6) were evaluated. All variables were assessed before the intervention, at the end of the intervention, and 15 and 30 days after the intervention. Groups B, C, and D had an increase in PPT and a reduction in frequency, maximal intensity, and HIT-6 values in all time points after the intervention as compared with baseline and group A (P<.001 for all cases). Group D had the highest PPT values and the lowest frequency and HIT-6 values after the intervention. The application of soft tissue and neural mobilization techniques to patients with FETTH or CTTH induces significant changes in PPT, the characteristics of pain crisis, and its effect on activities of daily living as compared with the application of these techniques as isolated interventions. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Classification of bifurcations regions in IVOCT images using support vector machine and artificial neural network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, C. D. N.; Costa Filho, C. F. F.; Macedo, M. M. G.; Gutierrez, M. A.; Costa, M. G. F.

    2017-03-01

    Studies in intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) have demonstrated the importance of coronary bifurcation regions in intravascular medical imaging analysis, as plaques are more likely to accumulate in this region leading to coronary disease. A typical IV-OCT pullback acquires hundreds of frames, thus developing an automated tool to classify the OCT frames as bifurcation or non-bifurcation can be an important step to speed up OCT pullbacks analysis and assist automated methods for atherosclerotic plaque quantification. In this work, we evaluate the performance of two state-of-the-art classifiers, SVM and Neural Networks in the bifurcation classification task. The study included IV-OCT frames from 9 patients. In order to improve classification performance, we trained and tested the SVM with different parameters by means of a grid search and different stop criteria were applied to the Neural Network classifier: mean square error, early stop and regularization. Different sets of features were tested, using feature selection techniques: PCA, LDA and scalar feature selection with correlation. Training and test were performed in sets with a maximum of 1460 OCT frames. We quantified our results in terms of false positive rate, true positive rate, accuracy, specificity, precision, false alarm, f-measure and area under ROC curve. Neural networks obtained the best classification accuracy, 98.83%, overcoming the results found in literature. Our methods appear to offer a robust and reliable automated classification of OCT frames that might assist physicians indicating potential frames to analyze. Methods for improving neural networks generalization have increased the classification performance.

  8. Neural Plasticity Is Involved in Physiological Sleep, Depressive Sleep Disturbances, and Antidepressant Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Meng-Qi Zhang; Rui Li; Yi-Qun Wang; Zhi-Li Huang

    2017-01-01

    Depression, which is characterized by a pervasive and persistent low mood and anhedonia, greatly impacts patients, their families, and society. The associated and recurring sleep disturbances further reduce patient’s quality of life. However, therapeutic sleep deprivation has been regarded as a rapid and robust antidepressant treatment for several decades, which suggests a complicated role of sleep in development of depression. Changes in neural plasticity are observed during physiological sl...

  9. Neural fuzzy digital filtering: multivariate identifier filters involving multiple inputs and multiple outputs (MIMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos García Infante

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available  Multivariate identifier filters (multiple inputs and multiple outputs - MIMO are adaptive digital systems having a loop in accordance with an objective function to adjust matrix parameter convergence to observable reference system dynamics. One way of complying with this condition is to use fuzzy logic inference mechanisms which interpret and select the best matrix parameter from a knowledge base. Such selection mechanisms with neural networks can provide a response from the best operational level for each change in state (Shannon, 1948. This paper considers the MIMO digital filter model using neuro fuzzy digital filtering to find an adaptive  parameter matrix which is integrated into the Kalman filter by the transition matrix. The filter uses the neural network as back-propagation into the fuzzy mechanism to do this, interpreting its variables and its respective levels and selecting the best values for automatically adjusting transition matrix values. The Matlab simulation describes the neural fuzzy digital filter giving an approximation of exponential convergence seen in functional error. 

  10. Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Regional Specific Neural Precursors in Chemically Defined Medium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Slaven; Laínez, Sergio; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojkovic, Petra; Pérez-Aragó, Maria Amparo; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Moreno-Palanques, Rubén; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2008-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. Methodology and Principal Findings The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA) or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF) and caudalizing (RA) signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages. PMID:18461168

  11. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to regional specific neural precursors in chemically defined medium conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaven Erceg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (hESC provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF and caudalizing (RA signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages.

  12. Bioimpedance Harmonic Analysis as a Diagnostic Tool to Assess Regional Circulation and Neural Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudraya, I. S.; Revenko, S. V.; Khodyreva, L. A.; Markosyan, T. G.; Dudareva, A. A.; Ibragimov, A. R.; Romich, V. V.; Kirpatovsky, V. I.

    2013-04-01

    The novel technique based on harmonic analysis of bioimpedance microvariations with original hard- and software complex incorporating a high-resolution impedance converter was used to assess the neural activity and circulation in human urinary bladder and penis in patients with pelvic pain, erectile dysfunction, and overactive bladder. The therapeutic effects of shock wave therapy and Botulinum toxin detrusor injections were evaluated quantitatively according to the spectral peaks at low 0.1 Hz frequency (M for Mayer wave), respiratory (R) and cardiac (C) rhythms with their harmonics. Enhanced baseline regional neural activity identified according to M and R peaks was found to be presumably sympathetic in pelvic pain patients, and parasympathetic - in patients with overactive bladder. Total pulsatile activity and pulsatile resonances found in the bladder as well as in the penile spectrum characterised regional circulation and vascular tone. The abnormal spectral parameters characteristic of the patients with genitourinary diseases shifted to the norm in the cases of efficient therapy. Bioimpedance harmonic analysis seems to be a potent tool to assess regional peculiarities of circulatory and autonomic nervous activity in the course of patient treatment.

  13. Neural activity in the reward-related brain regions predicts implicit self-esteem: A novel validity test of psychological measures using neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izuma, Keise; Kennedy, Kate; Fitzjohn, Alexander; Sedikides, Constantine; Shibata, Kazuhisa

    2018-03-01

    Self-esteem, arguably the most important attitudes an individual possesses, has been a premier research topic in psychology for more than a century. Following a surge of interest in implicit attitude measures in the 90s, researchers have tried to assess self-esteem implicitly to circumvent the influence of biases inherent in explicit measures. However, the validity of implicit self-esteem measures remains elusive. Critical tests are often inconclusive, as the validity of such measures is examined in the backdrop of imperfect behavioral measures. To overcome this serious limitation, we tested the neural validity of the most widely used implicit self-esteem measure, the implicit association test (IAT). Given the conceptualization of self-esteem as attitude toward the self, and neuroscience findings that the reward-related brain regions represent an individual's attitude or preference for an object when viewing its image, individual differences in implicit self-esteem should be associated with neural signals in the reward-related regions during passive-viewing of self-face (the most obvious representation of the self). Using multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA) on functional MRI (fMRI) data, we demonstrate that the neural signals in the reward-related regions were robustly associated with implicit (but not explicit) self-esteem, thus providing unique evidence for the neural validity of the self-esteem IAT. In addition, both implicit and explicit self-esteem were related, although differently, to neural signals in regions involved in self-processing. Our finding highlights the utility of neuroscience methods in addressing fundamental psychological questions and providing unique insights into important psychological constructs. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Physiological evidence of neural pathways involved in reflexogenic penile erection in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampin, O; Giuliano, F; Dompeyre, P; Rousseau, J P

    1994-10-24

    To elucidate neural pathways responsible for the occurrence of reflexogenic erections, the response of the corpus cavernosum to electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) was measured in anesthetized, acutely spinalized rats. Stimulation elicited a dramatic increase in intracavernous pressure (ICP). ICP response was decreased by 70% after sectioning the pelvic nerve homolaterally to the stimulated DNP and abolished after bilateral section. ICP response was not impaired by curarization, but its latency was lengthened. Thus we physiologically evidenced a reflex loop independent from supraspinal centers between DNP and the pelvic nerve supporting penile reflexogenic erection.

  15. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline indirectly increases the proliferation of adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursors: an involvement of astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuken Boku

    Full Text Available Antidepressants increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult dentate gyrus (DG, which is considered to be involved in the therapeutic action of antidepressants. However, the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. By using cultured adult rat DG-derived neural precursors (ADP, we have already shown that antidepressants have no direct effects on ADP. Therefore, antidepressants may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG via unknown indirect mechanism. We have also shown that amitriptyline (AMI, a tricyclic antidepressant, induces the expressions of GDNF, BDNF, FGF2 and VEGF, common neurogenic factors, in primary cultured astrocytes (PCA. These suggest that AMI-induced factors in astrocytes may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of AMI-induced factors and conditioned medium (CM from PCA treated with AMI on ADP proliferation. The effects of CM and factors on ADP proliferation were examined with BrdU immunocytochemistry. AMI had no effect on ADP proliferation, but AMI-treated CM increased it. The receptors of GDNF, BDNF and FGF2, but not VEGF, were expressed in ADP. FGF2 significantly increased ADP proliferation, but not BDNF and GDNF. In addition, both of a specific inhibitor of FGF receptors and anti-FGF2 antibody significantly counteracted the increasing effect of CM on ADP proliferation. In addition, FGF2 in brain is mainly derived from astrocytes that are key components of the neurogenic niches in adult DG. These suggest that AMI may increase ADP proliferation indirectly via PCA and that FGF2 may a potential candidate to mediate such an indirect effect of AMI on ADP proliferation via astrocytes.

  16. Detection and classification of the breast abnormalities in digital mammograms via regional Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Masni, M A; Al-Antari, M A; Park, J M; Gi, G; Kim, T Y; Rivera, P; Valarezo, E; Han, S-M; Kim, T-S

    2017-07-01

    Automatic detection and classification of the masses in mammograms are still a big challenge and play a crucial role to assist radiologists for accurate diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a novel computer-aided diagnose (CAD) system based on one of the regional deep learning techniques: a ROI-based Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) which is called You Only Look Once (YOLO). Our proposed YOLO-based CAD system contains four main stages: mammograms preprocessing, feature extraction utilizing multi convolutional deep layers, mass detection with confidence model, and finally mass classification using fully connected neural network (FC-NN). A set of training mammograms with the information of ROI masses and their types are used to train YOLO. The trained YOLO-based CAD system detects the masses and classifies their types into benign or malignant. Our results show that the proposed YOLO-based CAD system detects the mass location with an overall accuracy of 96.33%. The system also distinguishes between benign and malignant lesions with an overall accuracy of 85.52%. Our proposed system seems to be feasible as a CAD system capable of detection and classification at the same time. It also overcomes some challenging breast cancer cases such as the mass existing in the pectoral muscles or dense regions.

  17. REGION OF NON-INTEREST BASED DIGITAL IMAGE WATERMARKING USING NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibi Isac

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Copyrights protection of digital data become inevitable in current world. Digital watermarks have been recently proposed as secured scheme for copyright protection, authentication, source tracking, and broadcast monitoring of video, audio, text data and digital images. In this paper a method to embed a watermark in region of non-interest (RONI and a method for adaptive calculation of strength factor using neural network are proposed. The embedding and extraction processes are carried out in the transform domain by using Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT. Finally, the algorithm robustness is tested against noise addition attacks and geometric distortion attacks. The results authenticate that the proposed watermarking algorithm does not degrade the quality of cover image as the watermark is inserted only in region of non-interest and is resistive to attacks.

  18. A hybrid neural network system for prediction and recognition of promoter regions in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Bo; Li, Tao

    2005-05-01

    This paper proposes a high specificity and sensitivity algorithm called PromPredictor for recognizing promoter regions in the human genome. PromPredictor extracts compositional features and CpG islands information from genomic sequence, feeding these features as input for a hybrid neural network system (HNN) and then applies the HNN for prediction. It combines a novel promoter recognition model, coding theory, feature selection and dimensionality reduction with machine learning algorithm. Evaluation on Human chromosome 22 was approximately 66% in sensitivity and approximately 48% in specificity. Comparison with two other systems revealed that our method had superior sensitivity and specificity in predicting promoter regions. PromPredictor is written in MATLAB and requires Matlab to run. PromPredictor is freely available at http://www.whtelecom.com/Prompredictor.htm.

  19. Adaptive Steganalysis Based on Selection Region and Combined Convolutional Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghui Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Digital image steganalysis is the art of detecting the presence of information hiding in carrier images. When detecting recently developed adaptive image steganography methods, state-of-art steganalysis methods cannot achieve satisfactory detection accuracy, because the adaptive steganography methods can adaptively embed information into regions with rich textures via the guidance of distortion function and thus make the effective steganalysis features hard to be extracted. Inspired by the promising success which convolutional neural network (CNN has achieved in the fields of digital image analysis, increasing researchers are devoted to designing CNN based steganalysis methods. But as for detecting adaptive steganography methods, the results achieved by CNN based methods are still far from expected. In this paper, we propose a hybrid approach by designing a region selection method and a new CNN framework. In order to make the CNN focus on the regions with complex textures, we design a region selection method by finding a region with the maximal sum of the embedding probabilities. To evolve more diverse and effective steganalysis features, we design a new CNN framework consisting of three separate subnets with independent structure and configuration parameters and then merge and split the three subnets repeatedly. Experimental results indicate that our approach can lead to performance improvement in detecting adaptive steganography.

  20. Vertebral body integrity: a review of various anatomical factors involved in the lumbar region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash; Prabhu, L V; Saralaya, V V; Pai, M M; Ranade, A V; Singh, G; Madhyastha, S

    2007-07-01

    The body of the vertebra can be affected in the majority of the conditions involving the lumbar spine. Multiple references, both books and periodicals, have been reviewed, and the anatomical factors responsible for the vertebral body integrity in the lumbar spine have been included under the following important areas, namely, morphology, development, genetics, microscopic examination using histology, structural architecture, blood supply, neuromuscular control, and biomechanics. The anatomy provides a three-dimensional frame work to support the interaction between the physiological and pathological alterations. The body of the vertebra can be affected in a majority of acute or chronic conditions involving the lumbar spine. The etiology of these conditions is multifactorial, which has been dealt with in previous studies sporadically. This study aims to review and incorporate the important anatomical factors which can influence the integrity of vertebral bodies in the lumbar region and manifest as low back pain. Multiple references, both books and periodicals, have been reviewed for the literature. Electronic databases, including Medline and PubMed, were used to collect the latest information. They were finally arranged in an anatomical framework for the article. An attempt has been made to cover these relevant issues in an integrated way in the article and have been structured into introduction, morphology, development, genetics, microscopic examination using histology, structural architecture, blood supply, neuromuscular control, biomechanics, and conclusion. The aforementioned anatomical aspects, some of which have received less attention in the literature, may be helpful to clinicians for restoring the mobility, stability, and load bearing capacity of the lumbar spine as well as planning better management strategies, especially for the chronic low back pain. In our article all the anatomical factors affecting the integrity of vertebral body, including the

  1. Acute stress evokes sexually dimorphic, stressor-specific patterns of neural activation across multiple limbic brain regions in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ankit; Chaudhari, Karina; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2018-03-01

    Stress enhances the risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Stress responses vary across sex and may underlie the heightened vulnerability to psychopathology in females. Here, we examined the influence of acute immobilization stress (AIS) and a two-day short-term forced swim stress (FS) on neural activation in multiple cortical and subcortical brain regions, implicated as targets of stress and in the regulation of neuroendocrine stress responses, in male and female rats using Fos as a neural activity marker. AIS evoked a sex-dependent pattern of neural activation within the cingulate and infralimbic subdivisions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), lateral septum (LS), habenula, and hippocampal subfields. The degree of neural activation in the mPFC, LS, and habenula was higher in males. Female rats exhibited reduced Fos positive cell numbers in the dentate gyrus hippocampal subfield, an effect not observed in males. We addressed whether the sexually dimorphic neural activation pattern noted following AIS was also observed with the short-term stress of FS. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the amygdala, FS similar to AIS resulted in robust increases in neural activation in both sexes. The pattern of neural activation evoked by FS was distinct across sexes, with a heightened neural activation noted in the prelimbic mPFC subdivision and hippocampal subfields in females and differed from the pattern noted with AIS. This indicates that the sex differences in neural activation patterns observed within stress-responsive brain regions are dependent on the nature of stressor experience.

  2. The influence of group membership on the neural correlates involved in empathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eres, Robert; Molenberghs, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Empathy involves affective, cognitive, and emotion regulative components. The affective component relies on the sharing of emotional states with others and is discussed here in relation to the human Mirror System...

  3. Neural mechanisms underlying stop-and-restart difficulties: involvement of the motor and perceptual systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Yamanaka

    Full Text Available The ability to suddenly stop a planned movement or a movement being performed and restart it after a short interval is an important mechanism that allows appropriate behavior in response to contextual or environmental changes. However, performing such stop-and-restart movements smoothly is difficult at times. We investigated performance (response time of stop-and-restart movements using a go/stop/re-go task and found consistent stop-and-restart difficulties after short (~100 ms stop-to-restart intervals (SRSI, and an increased probability of difficulties after longer (>200 ms SRSIs, suggesting that two different mechanisms underlie stop-and-restart difficulties. Next, we investigated motor evoked potentials (MEPs in a moving muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation during a go/stop/re-go task. In re-go trials with a short SRSI (100 ms, the MEP amplitude continued to decrease after the re-go-signal onset, indicating that stop-and-restart difficulties with short SRSIs might be associated with a neural mechanism in the human motor system, namely, stop-related suppression of corticomotor (CM excitability. Finally, we recorded electroencephalogram (EEG activity during a go/stop/re-go task and performed a single-trial-based EEG power and phase time-frequency analysis. Alpha-band EEG phase locking to re-go-signal, which was only observed in re-go trials with long SRSI (250 ms, weakened in the delayed re-go response trials. These EEG phase dynamics indicate an association between stop-and-restart difficulties with long SRSIs and a neural mechanism in the human perception system, namely, decreased probability of EEG phase locking to visual stimuli. In contrast, smooth stop-and-restart human movement can be achieved in re-go trials with sufficient SRSI (150-200 ms, because release of stop-related suppression and simultaneous counter-activation of CM excitability may occur as a single task without second re-go-signal perception. These results

  4. Neural mechanisms underlying stop-and-restart difficulties: involvement of the motor and perceptual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Kentaro; Nozaki, Daichi

    2013-01-01

    The ability to suddenly stop a planned movement or a movement being performed and restart it after a short interval is an important mechanism that allows appropriate behavior in response to contextual or environmental changes. However, performing such stop-and-restart movements smoothly is difficult at times. We investigated performance (response time) of stop-and-restart movements using a go/stop/re-go task and found consistent stop-and-restart difficulties after short (~100 ms) stop-to-restart intervals (SRSI), and an increased probability of difficulties after longer (>200 ms) SRSIs, suggesting that two different mechanisms underlie stop-and-restart difficulties. Next, we investigated motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in a moving muscle induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation during a go/stop/re-go task. In re-go trials with a short SRSI (100 ms), the MEP amplitude continued to decrease after the re-go-signal onset, indicating that stop-and-restart difficulties with short SRSIs might be associated with a neural mechanism in the human motor system, namely, stop-related suppression of corticomotor (CM) excitability. Finally, we recorded electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during a go/stop/re-go task and performed a single-trial-based EEG power and phase time-frequency analysis. Alpha-band EEG phase locking to re-go-signal, which was only observed in re-go trials with long SRSI (250 ms), weakened in the delayed re-go response trials. These EEG phase dynamics indicate an association between stop-and-restart difficulties with long SRSIs and a neural mechanism in the human perception system, namely, decreased probability of EEG phase locking to visual stimuli. In contrast, smooth stop-and-restart human movement can be achieved in re-go trials with sufficient SRSI (150-200 ms), because release of stop-related suppression and simultaneous counter-activation of CM excitability may occur as a single task without second re-go-signal perception. These results suggest that

  5. Let7a involves in neural stem cell differentiation relating with TLX level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juhyun; Cho, Kyoung Joo; Oh, Yumi; Lee, Jong Eun

    2015-07-10

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the potential for differentiation into neurons known as a groundbreaking therapeutic solution for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. To resolve the therapeutic efficiency of NSCs, recent researchers have focused on the study on microRNA's role in CNS. Some micro RNAs have been reported significant functions in NSC self-renewal and differentiation through the post-transcriptional regulation of neurogenesis genes. MicroRNA-Let7a (Let7a) has known as the regulator of diverse cellular mechanisms including cell differentiation and proliferation. In present study, we investigated whether Let7a regulates NSC differentiation by targeting the nuclear receptor TLX, which is an essential regulator of NSC self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. We performed the following experiments: western blot analysis, TaqMan assay, RT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry to confirm the alteration of NSCs. Our data showed that let7a play important roles in controlling NSC fate determination. Thus, manipulating Let-7A and TLX could be a novel strategy to enhance the efficiency of NSC's neuronal differentiation for CNS disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural and sympathetic activity associated with exploration in decision-making: Further evidence for involvement of insula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki eOhira

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that sympathetic activity was associated with exploration in decision-making indexed by entropy, which is a concept in information theory and indexes randomness of choices or the degree of deviation from sticking to recent experiences of gains and losses, and that activation of the anterior insula mediated this association. The current study aims to replicate and to expand these findings in a situation where contingency between options and outcomes is manipulated. Sixteen participants performed a stochastic decision-making task in which we manipulated a condition with low uncertainty of gain/loss (contingent-reward condition and a condition with high uncertainty of gain/loss (random-reward condition. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured by 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET, and cardiovascular parameters and catecholamine in the peripheral blood were measured, during the task. In the contingent-reward condition, norepinephrine as an index of sympathetic activity was positively correlated with entropy indicating exploration in decision-making. Norepinephrine was negatively correlated with neural activity in the right posterior insula, rostral anterior cingulate cortex, and dorsal pons, suggesting neural bases for detecting changes of bodily states. Furthermore, right anterior insular activity was negatively correlated with entropy, suggesting influences on exploration in decision-making. By contrast, in the random-reward condition, entropy correlated with activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal and parietal cortices but not with sympathetic activity. These findings suggest that influences of sympathetic activity on exploration in decision-making and its underlying neural mechanisms might be dependent on the degree of uncertainty of situations.

  7. Fluid region segmentation in OCT images based on convolution neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Liu, Xiaoming; Fu, Tianyu; Yang, Zhou

    2017-07-01

    In the retinal image, characteristics of fluid have great significance for diagnosis in eye disease. In the clinical, the segmentation of fluid is usually conducted manually, but is time-consuming and the accuracy is highly depend on the expert's experience. In this paper, we proposed a segmentation method based on convolution neural network (CNN) for segmenting the fluid from fundus image. The B-scans of OCT are segmented into layers, and patches from specific region with annotation are used for training. After the data set being divided into training set and test set, network training is performed and a good segmentation result is obtained, which has a significant advantage over traditional methods such as threshold method.

  8. A study on the possible involvement of the PAX3 gene in human neural tube defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hol, F.A.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Geurds, M.P.A. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are congenital malformations of the central nervous system which are generally attributed to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Recently, the molecular defect responsible for the phenotype of the Splotch mouse, a monogenic model system for NTD, was determined. A mutation disrupts the homeodomain of the gene for Pax3. In humans, mutations in the cognate gene for PAX3 can cause Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is associated with NTD. Based on these findings, PAX3 can be regarded as a candidate gene for human NTD. To test this hypothesis we have screened the DNA of 39 familial and 70 sporadic NTD patients for mutations in the coding exons and flanking intron sequences of the PAX3 gene. SSC analysis revealed abnormal bands in exon 2, exon 5, exon 6 and exon 7 in different patients. A missense mutation was identified in exon 6 downstream from the homeodomain in several patients resulting in an amino acid substitution (Thr315Lys) in the protein. However, the same substitution was detected in unaffected controls suggesting no biological significance. Above shifts most likely represent polymorphisms that are irrelevant for NTD. A conspicuous SSC-band shift was observed in exon 5 of one familial patient with spina bifida. Sequencing revealed that the patient was heterozygous for a 5 bp deletion upstream of the homeodomain. The deletion causes a frameshift, which leads to premature termination of translation. Mild characteristics of WS were detected in several members of the family including the index patient. DNA analysis showed co-segregation of the mutation with these symptoms. Although PAX3 mutations can increase the penetrance of NTD in families with WS, our results show that their presence is not sufficient to cause NTD.

  9. A method for locating regions containing neural activation at a given confidence level from MEG data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, D.M.; George, J.S.

    1996-02-01

    The MEG inverse problem does not have a general, unique solution. Unless restrictive model assumptions are made, there are generally many more free parameters than measurements and there exist silent sources - current distributions which produce no external magnetic field. By weighting solutions according to how well each fits our prior notion about what properties good solutions should have, it may be possible to obtain a single current distribution that best fits the data and our expectations. However, in general there will still exist a number of different current distributions which fit both the data and our prior expectations sufficiently well. For example, a simulated data set based on a single or several dipoles can generally be fit equally well by a distributed current minimum-norm reconstruction. In experimental data it is often possible to find a relatively small number of dipoles which both fit the data and have a norm not much larger than that of the minimum-norm solution. Moreover, the few-dipole solutions often have currents in different regions than the corresponding minimum-norm solution. Because there exist well-fitting current distributions which may have current in significantly different locations, it can be misleading to infer locations of stimulus-correlated neural activity based on a single, best-fitting current distribution. we demonstrate here a method for inferring the location and number of regions containing neural activation by considering all possible current distributions within a given model (not just the most likely one) weighted according to how well each fits both the data and our prior expectations.

  10. LOAD FORECASTING FOR POWER SYSTEM PLANNING AND OPERATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK AT AL BATINAH REGION OMAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HUSSEIN A. ABDULQADER

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Load forecasting is essential part for the power system planning and operation. In this paper the modeling and design of artificial neural network for load forecasting is carried out in a particular region of Oman. Neural network approach helps to reduce the problem associated with conventional method and has the advantage of learning directly from the historical data. The neural network here uses data such as past load; weather information like humidity and temperatures. Once the neural network is trained for the past set of data it can give a prediction of future load. This reduces the capital investment reducing the equipments to be installed. The actual data are taken from the Mazoon Electrical Company, Oman. The data of load for the year 2007, 2008 and 2009 are collected for a particular region called Al Batinah in Oman and trained using neural networks to forecast the future. The main objective is to forecast the amount of electricity needed for better load distribution in the areas of this region in Oman. The load forecasting is done for the year 2010 and is validated for the accuracy.

  11. Neural substrates involved in anger induced by audio-visual film clips among patients with alcohol dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Sook; Lee, Bae Hwan; Sohn, Jin-Hun

    2016-07-08

    Very little is known about the neural circuitry underlying anger processing among alcoholics. The purpose of this study was to examine the altered brain activity of alcoholic individuals during transient anger emotion. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), 18 male patients diagnosed with alcohol dependence in an inpatient alcohol treatment facility and 16 social drinkers with similar demographics were scanned during the viewing of anger-provoking film clips. While there was no significant difference in the level of experienced anger between alcohol-dependent patients and non-alcoholic controls, significantly greater activation was observed in the bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the right precentral gyrus among alcoholic patients compared to the normal controls. In summary, specific brain regions were identified that are associated with anger among patients with alcohol dependency.

  12. Nodes and networks in the neural architecture for language: Broca's region and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagoort, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Current views on the neurobiological underpinnings of language are discussed that deviate in a number of ways from the classical Wernicke-Lichtheim-Geschwind model. More areas than Broca's and Wernicke's region are involved in language. Moreover, a division along the axis of language production and

  13. Brain regions involved in observing and trying to interpret dog behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Charlotte; van der Wiel, Alko; Brass, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Humans and dogs have interacted for millennia. As a result, humans (and especially dog owners) sometimes try to interpret dog behaviour. While there is extensive research on the brain regions that are involved in mentalizing about other peoples' behaviour, surprisingly little is known of whether we use these same brain regions to mentalize about animal behaviour. In this fMRI study we investigate whether brain regions involved in mentalizing about human behaviour are also engaged when observing dog behaviour. Here we show that these brain regions are more engaged when observing dog behaviour that is difficult to interpret compared to dog behaviour that is easy to interpret. Interestingly, these results were not only obtained when participants were instructed to infer reasons for the behaviour but also when they passively viewed the behaviour, indicating that these brain regions are activated by spontaneous mentalizing processes.

  14. The influence of group membership on the neural correlates involved in empathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eEres

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Empathy involves affective, cognitive and emotion regulative components. The affective component relies on the sharing of emotional states with others and is discussed here in relation to the human Mirror System. On the other hand, the cognitive component is related to understanding the mental states of others and draws upon literature surrounding Theory of Mind. The final component, emotion regulation depends on executive function and is responsible for managing the degree to which explicit empathic responses are made. This mini-review provides information on how each of the three components is individually affected by group membership and how this leads to in-group bias.

  15. The influence of group membership on the neural correlates involved in empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eres, Robert; Molenberghs, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Empathy involves affective, cognitive, and emotion regulative components. The affective component relies on the sharing of emotional states with others and is discussed here in relation to the human Mirror System. On the other hand, the cognitive component is related to understanding the mental states of others and draws upon literature surrounding Theory of Mind (ToM). The final component, emotion regulation, depends on executive function and is responsible for managing the degree to which explicit empathic responses are made. This mini-review provides information on how each of the three components is individually affected by group membership and how this leads to in-group bias.

  16. Region stability analysis and tracking control of memristive recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Gang; Zeng, Zhigang; Shen, Yanjun

    2018-02-01

    Memristor is firstly postulated by Leon Chua and realized by Hewlett-Packard (HP) laboratory. Research results show that memristor can be used to simulate the synapses of neurons. This paper presents a class of recurrent neural network with HP memristors. Firstly, it shows that memristive recurrent neural network has more compound dynamics than the traditional recurrent neural network by simulations. Then it derives that n dimensional memristive recurrent neural network is composed of [Formula: see text] sub neural networks which do not have a common equilibrium point. By designing the tracking controller, it can make memristive neural network being convergent to the desired sub neural network. At last, two numerical examples are given to verify the validity of our result. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A regional GNSS-VTEC model over Nigeria using neural networks: A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Okoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A neural network model of the Global Navigation Satellite System – vertical total electron content (GNSS-VTEC over Nigeria is developed. A new approach that has been utilized in this work is the consideration of the International Reference Ionosphere's (IRI's critical plasma frequency (foF2 parameter as an additional neuron for the network's input layer. The work also explores the effects of using various other input layer neurons like disturbance storm time (DST and sunspot number. All available GNSS data from the Nigerian Permanent GNSS Network (NIGNET were used, and these cover the period from 2011 to 2015, for 14 stations. Asides increasing the learning accuracy of the networks, the inclusion of the IRI's foF2 parameter as an input neuron is ideal for making the networks to learn long-term solar cycle variations. This is important especially for regions, like in this work, where the GNSS data is available for less than the period of a solar cycle. The neural network model developed in this work has been tested for time-varying and spatial performances. The latest 10% of the GNSS observations from each of the stations were used to test the forecasting ability of the networks, while data from 2 of the stations were entirely used for spatial performance testing. The results show that root-mean-squared-errors were generally less than 8.5 TEC units for all modes of testing performed using the optimal network. When compared to other models, the model developed in this work was observed to reduce the prediction errors to about half those of the NeQuick and the IRI model.

  18. Lithium promotes neural precursor cell proliferation: evidence for the involvement of the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhaoxia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lithium, a drug that has long been used to treat bipolar disorder and some other human pathogenesis, has recently been shown to stimulate neural precursor growth. However, the involved mechanism is not clear. Here, we show that lithium induces proliferation but not survival of neural precursor cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that the effect of lithium mainly involved activation of the transcription factor NF-AT and specific induction of a subset of proliferation-related genes. While NF-AT inactivation by specific inhibition of its upstream activator calcineurin antagonized the effect of lithium on the proliferation of neural precursor cells, specific inhibition of the NF-AT inhibitor GSK-3β, similar to lithium treatment, promoted neural precursor cell proliferation. One important function of lithium appeared to increase inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, leading to GSK-3β suppression and subsequent NF-AT activation. Moreover, lithium-induced proliferation of neural precursor cells was independent of its role in inositol depletion. These findings not only provide mechanistic insights into the clinical effects of lithium, but also suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy for bipolar disorder and other neural diseases by targeting the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling.

  19. Mapping regional forest fire probability using artificial neural network model in a Mediterranean forest ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Satir

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Forest fires are one of the most important factors in environmental risk assessment and it is the main cause of forest destruction in the Mediterranean region. Forestlands have a number of known benefits such as decreasing soil erosion, containing wild life habitats, etc. Additionally, forests are also important player in carbon cycle and decreasing the climate change impacts. This paper discusses forest fire probability mapping of a Mediterranean forestland using a multiple data assessment technique. An artificial neural network (ANN method was used to map forest fire probability in Upper Seyhan Basin (USB in Turkey. Multi-layer perceptron (MLP approach based on back propagation algorithm was applied in respect to physical, anthropogenic, climate and fire occurrence datasets. Result was validated using relative operating characteristic (ROC analysis. Coefficient of accuracy of the MLP was 0.83. Landscape features input to the model were assessed statistically to identify the most descriptive factors on forest fire probability mapping using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Landscape features like elevation (R = −0.43, tree cover (R = 0.93 and temperature (R = 0.42 were strongly correlated with forest fire probability in the USB region.

  20. Neural activity in the posterior superior temporal region during eye contact perception correlates with autistic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Naoya; Kitamura, Hideaki; Murakami, Hiroatsu; Kameyama, Shigeki; Sasagawa, Mutsuo; Egawa, Jun; Endo, Taro; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2013-08-09

    The present study investigated the relationship between neural activity associated with gaze processing and autistic traits in typically developed subjects using magnetoencephalography. Autistic traits in 24 typically developed college students with normal intelligence were assessed using the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ). The Minimum Current Estimates method was applied to estimate the cortical sources of magnetic responses to gaze stimuli. These stimuli consisted of apparent motion of the eyes, displaying direct or averted gaze motion. Results revealed gaze-related brain activations in the 150-250 ms time window in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), and in the 150-450 ms time window in medial prefrontal regions. In addition, the mean amplitude in the 150-250 ms time window in the right pSTS region was modulated by gaze direction, and its activity in response to direct gaze stimuli correlated with AQ score. pSTS activation in response to direct gaze is thought to be related to higher-order social processes. Thus, these results suggest that brain activity linking eye contact and social signals is associated with autistic traits in a typical population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural networks involved in self-judgement in young and elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyers, Dorothée; Collette, Fabienne; D'Argembeau, Arnaud; Majerus, Steve; Salmon, Eric

    2010-10-15

    Recent studies have shown that both young and elderly subjects activate the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) when they make self-referential judgements. However, the VMPFC might interact with different brain regions during self-referencing in the two groups. In this study, based on data from Ruby et al. (2009), we have explored this issue using psychophysiological interaction analyses. Young and elderly participants had to judge adjectives describing personality traits in reference to the self versus a close friend or relative (the other), taking either a first-person or a third-person perspective. The physiological factor was the VMPFC activity observed in all participants during self-judgement, and the psychological factor was the self versus other referential process. The main effect of first-person perspective in both groups revealed that the VMPFC was co-activated with the left parahippocampal gyrus and the precuneus for self versus other judgments. The main effect of age showed a stronger correlation between activity in the VMPFC and the lingual gyrus in young compared to elderly subjects. Finally, in the interaction, the VMPFC was specifically co-activated with the orbitofrontal gyrus and the precentral gyrus when elderly subjects took a first-person perspective for self-judgements. No significant result was observed for the interaction in young subjects. These findings show that, although the VMPFC is engaged by both young and older adults when making self-referential judgements, this brain structure interacts differently with other brain regions as a function of age and perspective. These differences might reflect a tendency by older people to engage in more emotional/social processing than younger adults when making self-referential judgements with a first-person perspective. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Landslide susceptibility assessment of SE Bartin (West Black Sea region, Turkey by artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ercanoglu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are significant natural hazards in Turkey, second only to earthquakes with respect to economic losses and casualties. The West Black Sea region of Turkey is known as one of the most landslide-prone regions in the country. The work presented in this paper is aimed at evaluating landslide susceptibility in a selected area in the West Black Sea region using Artificial Neural Network (ANN method. A total of 317 landslides were identified and mapped in the area by extensive field work and by use of air photo interpretations to build a landslide inventory map. A landslide database was then derived automatically from the landslide inventory map. To evaluate landslide susceptibility, six input parameters (slope angle, slope aspect, topographical elevation, topographical shape, wetness index, and vegetation index were used. To obtain maps of these parameters, Digital Elevation Model (DEM and ASTER satellite imagery of the study area were used. At the first stage, all data were normalized in [0, 1] interval, and parameter effects on landslide occurrence were expressed using Statistical Index values (Wi. Then, landslide susceptibility analyses were performed using an ANN. Finally, performance of the resulting map and the applied methodology is discussed relative to performance indicators, such as predicted areal extent of landslides and the strength of relation (rij value. Much of the areal extents of the landslides (87.2% were classified as susceptible to landsliding, and rij value of 0.85 showed a high degree of similarity. In addition to these, at the final stage, an independent validation strategy was followed by dividing the landslide data set into two parts and 82.5% of the validation data set was found to be correctly classified as landslide susceptible areas. According to these results, it is concluded that the map produced by the ANN is reliable and methodology applied in the study produced high performance, and satisfactory results.

  3. Regional neural response differences in the determination of faces or houses positioned in a wide visual field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Yan, Tianyi; Wu, Jinglong; Chen, Kewei; Imajyo, Satoshi; Ohno, Seiichiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    In human visual cortex, the primary visual cortex (V1) is considered to be essential for visual information processing; the fusiform face area (FFA) and parahippocampal place area (PPA) are considered as face-selective region and places-selective region, respectively. Recently, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study showed that the neural activity ratios between V1 and FFA were constant as eccentricities increasing in central visual field. However, in wide visual field, the neural activity relationships between V1 and FFA or V1 and PPA are still unclear. In this work, using fMRI and wide-view present system, we tried to address this issue by measuring neural activities in V1, FFA and PPA for the images of faces and houses aligning in 4 eccentricities and 4 meridians. Then, we further calculated ratio relative to V1 (RRV1) as comparing the neural responses amplitudes in FFA or PPA with those in V1. We found V1, FFA, and PPA showed significant different neural activities to faces and houses in 3 dimensions of eccentricity, meridian, and region. Most importantly, the RRV1s in FFA and PPA also exhibited significant differences in 3 dimensions. In the dimension of eccentricity, both FFA and PPA showed smaller RRV1s at central position than those at peripheral positions. In meridian dimension, both FFA and PPA showed larger RRV1s at upper vertical positions than those at lower vertical positions. In the dimension of region, FFA had larger RRV1s than PPA. We proposed that these differential RRV1s indicated FFA and PPA might have different processing strategies for encoding the wide field visual information from V1. These different processing strategies might depend on the retinal position at which faces or houses are typically observed in daily life. We posited a role of experience in shaping the information processing strategies in the ventral visual cortex.

  4. The Consolidation of Object and Context Recognition Memory Involve Different Regions of the Temporal Lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderas, Israela; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J.; Salgado-Tonda, Paloma; Chavez-Hurtado, Julio; McGaugh, James L.; Bermudez-Rattoni, Federico

    2008-01-01

    These experiments investigated the involvement of several temporal lobe regions in consolidation of recognition memory. Anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, was infused into the hippocampus, perirhinal cortex, insular cortex, or basolateral amygdala of rats immediately after the sample phase of object or object-in-context recognition memory…

  5. Re-establishing the relationship with the public: Regional journalism and citizens' involvement in the news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, E.A.H.M.; Schaap, G.J.; Bardoel, J.L.H.

    2014-01-01

    Public journalism is viewed by many as a solution to the decreasing media presence and public involvement in regional news media. Core values in this approach are public deliberation, participation, and connectedness. This study investigates the added value of a citizen-centred approach to

  6. High throughput analysis reveals dissociable gene expression profiles in two independent neural systems involved in the regulation of social behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Tyler J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of contextually appropriate social behaviors involves integrated activity across many brain regions. Many songbird species produce complex vocalizations called ‘songs’ that serve to attract potential mates, defend territories, and/or maintain flock cohesion. There are a series of discrete interconnect brain regions that are essential for the successful production of song. The probability and intensity of singing behavior is influenced by the reproductive state. The objectives of this study were to examine the broad changes in gene expression in brain regions that control song production with a brain region that governs the reproductive state. Results We show using microarray cDNA analysis that two discrete brain systems that are both involved in governing singing behavior show markedly different gene expression profiles. We found that cortical and basal ganglia-like brain regions that control the socio-motor production of song in birds exhibit a categorical switch in gene expression that was dependent on their reproductive state. This pattern is in stark contrast to the pattern of expression observed in a hypothalamic brain region that governs the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Subsequent gene ontology analysis revealed marked variation in the functional categories of active genes dependent on reproductive state and anatomical localization. HVC, one cortical-like structure, displayed significant gene expression changes associated with microtubule and neurofilament cytoskeleton organization, MAP kinase activity, and steroid hormone receptor complex activity. The transitions observed in the preoptic area, a nucleus that governs the motivation to engage in singing, exhibited variation in functional categories that included thyroid hormone receptor activity, epigenetic and angiogenetic processes. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of considering the temporal patterns of gene expression

  7. Long-term outcomes for patients with limited stage follicular lymphoma: involved regional radiotherapy versus involved node radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Belinda A; Voss, Nick; Woods, Ryan; Gascoyne, Randy D; Morris, James; Pickles, Tom; Connors, Joseph M; Savage, Kerry J

    2010-08-15

    Given the indolent behavior of follicular lymphoma (FL), it is controversial whether limited stage FL can be cured using radiotherapy (RT). Furthermore, the optimal RT field size is unclear. The authors of this report investigated the long-term outcomes of patients with limited stage FL who received RT alone and studied the impact of reducing the RT field size from involved regional RT (IRRT) to involved node RT with margins up to 5 cm (INRTor=1 adjacent, uninvolved lymph node group(s). INRT60 years, stage IA disease in 76% of patients, elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in 7% of patients, grade 3A tumors in 12% of patients, and lymph node size>or=5 cm in 19% of patients. The 2 RT groups were IRRT (142 patients; 60%) and INRTsurvival (PFS) rate was 49%, and the overall survival (OS) rate was 66%. Only 2 patients developed recurrent disease beyond 10 years. The most common pattern of first failure was a distant recurrence only, which developed in 38% of patients who received IRRT and in 32% of patients who received INRTor=5 cm (P=.008) and male gender (P=.042). Risk factors for OS were age>60 years (Por=5 cm (P=.016), and grade 3A tumors (P=.036). RT field size did not have an impact on PFS or OS. Disease recurrence after 10 years was uncommon in patients who had limited stage FL, suggesting that a cure is possible. Reducing RT fields to INRT

  8. [Gateway Reflex, a regulator of the inflammation feedback loop by regional neural activation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Atsumi, Toru; Murakami, Masaaki

    2015-04-01

    Inflammation is observed in many diseases and disorders. We discovered a key machinery of inflammation, the inflammation amplifier, which is induced by the simultaneous activation of NFκB and STAT3 followed by the hyper-activation of NFκB in non-immune cells, including endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Since that discovery, we found the Gateway Reflex, which describes regional neural activations that enhance the inflammation amplifier to create a gateway for immune cells to bypass the blood-brain barrier. In addition, we have identified over 1,000 positive regulators and over 500 targets of the inflammation amplifier, which include a significant numbers of human disease-associated genes. In parallel, we performed a comprehensive analysis of human disease samples and found that the inflammation amplifier was activated during the development of chronic inflammation. Thus, we concluded that the inflammation amplifier is associated with various human diseases and disorders, including autoimmune diseases, metabolic syndromes, neurodegenerative diseases, and other inflammatory diseases. We are now attempting drug discovery for inflammatory diseases and disorders based on the inflammation amplifier and Gateway Reflex. In this review, we discuss the Gateway Reflex as an example for the neuro-immune interaction in vivo.

  9. International Regional Patterns of R&D Networks Involving Low Tech SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora A.C. Teixeira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of studies have emphasized the spatial proximity of economic activity and its relation to the spatiality of knowledge creation in various types of connections. Far less attention has been paid to the understanding of the determinants of ‘cultural’ and geographical proximity in international R&D cooperation projects involving SMEs and the role of the quality of the Regional Innovation System (RIS. Using a database of completed European Cooperative Research projects, we conclude that: 1 technologically more complex projects are more likely to involve ‘culturally’ and geographically distant partners; 2 RIS related variables determine ‘cultural’ proximity but not geographical proximity; 3 at first sight surprisingly, international cooperation projects involving the 1st promoters of innovation-led regions (high patent propensity and high human capital levels are culturally more distant.

  10. Estimates of global and regional prevalence of neural tube defects for 2015: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencowe, Hannah; Kancherla, Vijaya; Moorthie, Sowmiya; Darlison, Matthew W; Modell, Bernadette

    2018-01-24

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are associated with substantial mortality, morbidity, disability, and psychological and economic costs. Many are preventable with folic acid, and access to appropriate services for those affected can improve survival and quality of life. We used a compartmental model to estimate global and regional birth prevalence of NTDs (live births, stillbirths, and elective terminations of pregnancy) and subsequent under-5 mortality. Data were identified through web-based reviews of birth defect registry databases and systematic literature reviews. Meta-analyses were undertaken where appropriate. For 2015, our model estimated 260,100 (uncertainty interval (UI): 213,800-322,000) NTD-affected birth outcomes worldwide (prevalence 18.6 (15.3-23.0)/10,000 live births). Approximately 50% of cases were elective terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomalies (UI: 59,300 (47,900-74,500)) or stillbirths (57,800 (UI: 35,000-88,600)). Of NTD-affected live births, 117,900 (∼75%) (UI: 105,500-186,600) resulted in under-5 deaths. Our systematic review showed a paucity of high-quality data in the regions of the world with the highest burden. Despite knowledge about prevention, NTDs remain highly prevalent worldwide. Lack of surveillance and incomplete ascertainment of affected pregnancies make NTDs invisible to policy makers. Improved surveillance of all adverse outcomes is needed to improve the robustness of total NTD prevalence estimation, evaluate effectiveness of prevention through folic acid fortification, and improve outcomes through care and rehabilitation. © 2018 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Simultaneously Uncovering the Patterns of Brain Regions Involved in Different Story Reading Subprocesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Leila; Murphy, Brian; Talukdar, Partha; Fyshe, Alona; Ramdas, Aaditya; Mitchell, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders. PMID:25426840

  12. Simultaneously uncovering the patterns of brain regions involved in different story reading subprocesses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Wehbe

    Full Text Available Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders.

  13. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Petrini

    Full Text Available In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music, visual (musician's movements only, and auditory emotional (music only displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  14. The music of your emotions: neural substrates involved in detection of emotional correspondence between auditory and visual music actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Karin; Crabbe, Frances; Sheridan, Carol; Pollick, Frank E

    2011-04-29

    In humans, emotions from music serve important communicative roles. Despite a growing interest in the neural basis of music perception, action and emotion, the majority of previous studies in this area have focused on the auditory aspects of music performances. Here we investigate how the brain processes the emotions elicited by audiovisual music performances. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging, and in Experiment 1 we defined the areas responding to audiovisual (musician's movements with music), visual (musician's movements only), and auditory emotional (music only) displays. Subsequently a region of interest analysis was performed to examine if any of the areas detected in Experiment 1 showed greater activation for emotionally mismatching performances (combining the musician's movements with mismatching emotional sound) than for emotionally matching music performances (combining the musician's movements with matching emotional sound) as presented in Experiment 2 to the same participants. The insula and the left thalamus were found to respond consistently to visual, auditory and audiovisual emotional information and to have increased activation for emotionally mismatching displays in comparison with emotionally matching displays. In contrast, the right thalamus was found to respond to audiovisual emotional displays and to have similar activation for emotionally matching and mismatching displays. These results suggest that the insula and left thalamus have an active role in detecting emotional correspondence between auditory and visual information during music performances, whereas the right thalamus has a different role.

  15. Anastomosing hemangioma involving the para-arotic region: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Min; KIm, Hyun Cheol; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Sang Won; Won, Kyu Yeoun [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Anastomosing hemangioma (AH) is a rare and benign vascular neoplasm that is regarded as a morphological variant of capillary hemangioma. AH has been encountered primarily in the kidney. To our knowledge, para-aortic involvement of AH has not been reported previously. Here, we report a case of slowly progressing AH involving the left para-aortic region in a 72-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer surgery. A contrast-enhanced, dynamic abdominal CT scan revealed that the lesion had peripheral enhancement with slow centripetal fashion, which is an enhancement pattern similar to that of hepatic hemangioma.

  16. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic regions repeatedly involved in divergence among plant-specialized pea aphid biotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhaud, P; Peccoud, J; Mahéo, F; Mieuzet, L; Jaquiéry, J; Simon, J-C

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the genetic bases of biological diversification is a long-standing goal in evolutionary biology. Here, we investigate whether replicated cases of adaptive divergence involve the same genomic regions in the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, a large complex of genetically differentiated biotypes, each specialized on different species of legumes. A previous study identified genomic regions putatively involved in host-plant adaptation and/or reproductive isolation by performing a hierarchical genome scan in three biotypes. This led to the identification of 11 F(ST) outliers among 390 polymorphic microsatellite markers. In this study, the outlier status of these 11 loci was assessed in eight biotypes specialized on other host plants. Four of the 11 previously identified outliers showed greater genetic differentiation among these additional biotypes than expected under the null hypothesis of neutral evolution (α Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  18. Classifying region of interests from mammograms with breast cancer into BIRADS using Artificial Neural Networks

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    Estefanía D. Avalos-Rivera

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers among female diseases all over the world. Early diagnosis and treatment is particularly important in reducing the mortality rate. This research is focused on the prevention of breast cancer, therefore it is important to detect micro-calcifications (MCs which are a sign of early stage breast cancer. Micro-calcifications are tiny deposits of calcium which are visible on mammograms as they present as tiny white spots. A computer-aided diagnosis system (CAD is created with the development of computer technology that way radiologists are aided improving their diagnostics while using CAD as a second reader. We are aiming to classify into BIRADS 2, 3 and 4 which are the stages when the cancer can be prevented and a fourth category called No lesion which are veins and tissue that our high pass Gaussian filter detects. This research focuses on classification using ANN (Artificial Neural Network. Experimenting with the categories to classify into using ANN, the results were the following: into the four mentioned before an overall accuracy of 71% was obtained, then joining categories BIRADS 2 and 3 into one and classifying into 3 categories gave an 80% of accuracy. Joining this two categories was the result of analizing the ROC curve and observation of the ROI images of the MCs as the regions measured are very alike in this two categories and variation is that MCs are more present in BIRADS 3 than in BIRADS 2. Data matrix was reduced using PCA (Principal Component Analysis but it did not gave better results so it was discarded as the ANN accuracy to classify was reduced to a 69.8%.

  19. A novel lead design enables selective deep brain stimulation of neural populations in the subthalamic region

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Kees J.; Verhagen, Rens; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; McIntyre, Cameron C.; Bour, Lo J.; Heida, Ciska; Veltink, Peter H.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The clinical effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease are sensitive to the location of the DBS lead within the STN. New high density (HD) lead designs have been created which are hypothesized to provide additional degrees of freedom in shaping the stimulating electric field. The objective of this study is to compare the performances of a new HD lead with a conventional cylindrical contact (CC) lead. Approach. A computational model, consisting of a finite element electric field model combined with multi-compartment neuron and axon models representing different neural populations in the subthalamic region, was used to evaluate the two leads. We compared ring-mode and steering-mode stimulation with the HD lead to single contact stimulation with the CC lead. These stimulation modes were tested for the lead: (1) positioned in the centroid of the STN, (2) shifted 1 mm towards the internal capsule (IC), and (3) shifted 2 mm towards the IC. Under these conditions, we quantified the number of STN neurons that were activated without activating IC fibers, which are known to cause side-effects. Main results. The modeling results show that the HD lead is able to mimic the stimulation effect of the CC lead. Additionally, in steering-mode stimulation there was a significant increase of activated STN neurons compared to the CC mode. Significance. From the model simulations we conclude that the HD lead in steering-mode with optimized stimulation parameter selection can stimulate more STN cells. Next, the clinical impact of the increased number of activated STN cells should be tested and balanced across the increased complexity of identifying the optimized stimulation parameter settings for the HD lead.

  20. Regional differences in the expression of laminin isoforms during mouse neural tube development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Andrew J.; Carvalho, Rita; Wallace, Adam; Sorokin, Lydia; Sasaki, Takako; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Many significant human birth defects originate around the time of neural tube closure or early during post-closure nervous system development. For example, failure of the neural tube to close generates anencephaly and spina bifida, faulty cell cycle progression is implicated in primary microcephaly, while defective migration of neuroblasts can lead to neuronal migration disorders such as lissencephaly. At the stage of neural tube closure, basement membranes are becoming organised around the neuroepithelium, and beneath the adjacent non-neural surface ectoderm. While there is circumstantial evidence to implicate basement membrane dynamics in neural tube and surface ectodermal development, we have an incomplete understanding of the molecular composition of basement membranes at this stage. In the present study, we examined the developing basement membranes of the mouse embryo at mid-gestation (embryonic day 9.5), with particular reference to laminin composition. We performed in situ hybridization to detect the mRNAs of all eleven individual laminin chains, and immunohistochemistry to identify which laminin chains are present in the basement membranes. From this information, we inferred the likely laminin variants and their tissues of origin: that is, whether a given basement membrane laminin is contributed by epithelium, mesenchyme, or both. Our findings reveal major differences in basement composition along the body axis, with the rostral neural tube (at mandibular arch and heart levels) exhibiting many distinct laminin variants, while the lumbar level where the neural tube is just closing shows a much simpler laminin profile. Moreover, there appears to be a marked difference in the extent to which the mesenchyme contributes laminin variants to the basement membrane, with potential contribution of several laminins rostrally, but no contribution caudally. This information paves the way towards a mechanistic analysis of basement membrane laminin function during early

  1. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Patti eAdank; Nuttall, Helen E.; Briony eBanks; Dan eKennedy-Higgins

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006). Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented...

  2. A regional neural network model for predicting mean daily river water temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Tyler; DeWeber, Jefferson Tyrell

    2014-01-01

    Water temperature is a fundamental property of river habitat and often a key aspect of river resource management, but measurements to characterize thermal regimes are not available for most streams and rivers. As such, we developed an artificial neural network (ANN) ensemble model to predict mean daily water temperature in 197,402 individual stream reaches during the warm season (May–October) throughout the native range of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the eastern U.S. We compared four models with different groups of predictors to determine how well water temperature could be predicted by climatic, landform, and land cover attributes, and used the median prediction from an ensemble of 100 ANNs as our final prediction for each model. The final model included air temperature, landform attributes and forested land cover and predicted mean daily water temperatures with moderate accuracy as determined by root mean squared error (RMSE) at 886 training sites with data from 1980 to 2009 (RMSE = 1.91 °C). Based on validation at 96 sites (RMSE = 1.82) and separately for data from 2010 (RMSE = 1.93), a year with relatively warmer conditions, the model was able to generalize to new stream reaches and years. The most important predictors were mean daily air temperature, prior 7 day mean air temperature, and network catchment area according to sensitivity analyses. Forest land cover at both riparian and catchment extents had relatively weak but clear negative effects. Predicted daily water temperature averaged for the month of July matched expected spatial trends with cooler temperatures in headwaters and at higher elevations and latitudes. Our ANN ensemble is unique in predicting daily temperatures throughout a large region, while other regional efforts have predicted at relatively coarse time steps. The model may prove a useful tool for predicting water temperatures in sampled and unsampled rivers under current conditions and future projections of climate

  3. A regional neural network ensemble for predicting mean daily river water temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWeber, Jefferson Tyrell; Wagner, Tyler

    2014-09-01

    Water temperature is a fundamental property of river habitat and often a key aspect of river resource management, but measurements to characterize thermal regimes are not available for most streams and rivers. As such, we developed an artificial neural network (ANN) ensemble model to predict mean daily water temperature in 197,402 individual stream reaches during the warm season (May-October) throughout the native range of brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in the eastern U.S. We compared four models with different groups of predictors to determine how well water temperature could be predicted by climatic, landform, and land cover attributes, and used the median prediction from an ensemble of 100 ANNs as our final prediction for each model. The final model included air temperature, landform attributes and forested land cover and predicted mean daily water temperatures with moderate accuracy as determined by root mean squared error (RMSE) at 886 training sites with data from 1980 to 2009 (RMSE = 1.91 °C). Based on validation at 96 sites (RMSE = 1.82) and separately for data from 2010 (RMSE = 1.93), a year with relatively warmer conditions, the model was able to generalize to new stream reaches and years. The most important predictors were mean daily air temperature, prior 7 day mean air temperature, and network catchment area according to sensitivity analyses. Forest land cover at both riparian and catchment extents had relatively weak but clear negative effects. Predicted daily water temperature averaged for the month of July matched expected spatial trends with cooler temperatures in headwaters and at higher elevations and latitudes. Our ANN ensemble is unique in predicting daily temperatures throughout a large region, while other regional efforts have predicted at relatively coarse time steps. The model may prove a useful tool for predicting water temperatures in sampled and unsampled rivers under current conditions and future projections of climate and land use

  4. Molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtype C gp-120 regions potentially involved in virus adaptive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Cenci

    Full Text Available The role of variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 in immune escape of HIV has been investigated. However, there is scant information on how conserved gp120 regions contribute to virus escaping. Here we have studied how molecular sequence characteristics of conserved C3, C4 and V3 regions of clade C HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in HIV entry and are target of the immune response, are modulated during the disease course. We found an increase of "shifting" putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGSs in the α2 helix (in C3 and in C4 and an increase of sites under positive selection pressure in the α2 helix during the chronic stage of disease. These sites are close to CD4 and to co-receptor binding sites. We also found a negative correlation between electric charges of C3 and V4 during the late stage of disease counteracted by a positive correlation of electric charges of α2 helix and V5 during the same stage. These data allow us to hypothesize possible mechanisms of virus escape involving constant and variable regions of gp120. In particular, new mutations, including new PNGSs occurring near the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites could potentially affect receptor binding affinity and shield the virus from the immune response.

  5. Neural Differentiation of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Involves Activation of the Wnt5a/JNK Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeong Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are a powerful resource for cell-based transplantation therapies, but understanding of stem cell differentiation at the molecular level is not clear yet. We hypothesized that the Wnt pathway controls stem cell maintenance and neural differentiation. We have characterized the transcriptional expression of Wnt during the neural differentiation of hADSCs. After neural induction, the expressions of Wnt2, Wnt4, and Wnt11 were decreased, but the expression of Wnt5a was increased compared with primary hADSCs in RT-PCR analysis. In addition, the expression levels of most Fzds and LRP5/6 ligand were decreased, but not Fzd3 and Fzd5. Furthermore, Dvl1 and RYK expression levels were downregulated in NI-hADSCs. There were no changes in the expression of ß-catenin and GSK3ß. Interestingly, Wnt5a expression was highly increased in NI-hADSCs by real time RT-PCR analysis and western blot. Wnt5a level was upregulated after neural differentiation and Wnt3, Dvl2, and Naked1 levels were downregulated. Finally, we found that the JNK expression was increased after neural induction and ERK level was decreased. Thus, this study shows for the first time how a single Wnt5a ligand can activate the neural differentiation pathway through the activation of Wnt5a/JNK pathway by binding Fzd3 and Fzd5 and directing Axin/GSK-3ß in hADSCs.

  6. Regional Variation in Primary Care Involvement at the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankuda, Claire K; Petterson, Stephen M; Wingrove, Peter; Bazemore, Andrew W

    2017-01-01

    Variation in end-of-life care in the United States is frequently driven by the health care system. We assessed the association of primary care physician involvement at the end of life with end-of-life care patterns. We analyzed 2010 Medicare Part B claims data for US hospital referral regions (HRRs). The independent variable was the ratio of primary care physicians to specialist visits in the last 6 months of life. Dependent variables included the rate of hospital deaths, hospital and intensive care use in the last 6 months of life, percentage of patients seen by more than 10 physicians, and Medicare spending in the last 2 years of life. Robust linear regression analysis was used to measure the association of primary care physician involvement at the end of life with the outcome variables, adjusting for regional characteristics. We assessed 306 HRRs, capturing 1,107,702 Medicare Part B beneficiaries with chronic disease who died. The interquartile range of the HRR ratio of primary care to specialist end-of-life visits was 0.77 to 1.21. HRRs with high vs low primary care physician involvement at the end of life had significantly different patient, population, and health system characteristics. Adjusting for these differences, HRRs with the greatest primary care physician involvement had lower Medicare spending in the last 2 years of life ($65,160 vs $69,030; P = .003) and fewer intensive care unit days in the last 6 months of life (2.90 vs 4.29; P care physician involvement in end-of-life care have overall less intensive end-of-life care. © 2017 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  7. Characterization of the promoter region of biosynthetic enzyme genes involved in berberine biosynthesis in Coptis japonica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Yamada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of alkaloids is rather specific to certain plant species. However, berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, is relatively broadly distributed in the plant kingdom. Thus, berberine biosynthesis has been intensively investigated, especially using Coptis japonica cell cultures. Almost all biosynthetic enzyme genes have already been characterized at the molecular level. Particularly, two transcription factors (TFs, a plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, and a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor, CjbHLH1, were shown to comprehensively regulate berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica cells. In this study, we characterized the promoter region of some biosynthetic enzyme genes and associated cis-acting elements involved in the transcriptional regulation via two TFs. The promoter regions of three berberine biosynthetic enzyme genes (CYP80B2, 4’OMT and CYP719A1 were isolated, and their promoter activities were dissected by a transient assay involving the sequentially truncated promoter::luciferase (LUC reporter constructs. Furthermore, transactivation activities of CjWRKY1 were determined using the truncated promoter::LUC reporter constructs or constructs with mutated cis-elements. These results suggest the involvement of a putative W-box in the regulation of biosynthetic enzyme genes. Direct binding of CjWRKY1 to the W-box DNA sequence was also confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA and by a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay. In addition, CjbHLH1 also activated transcription from truncated 4’OMT and CYP719A1 promoters independently of CjWRKY1, suggesting the involvement of a putative E-box. Unexpected transcriptional activation of biosynthetic enzyme genes via a non-W-box sequence and by CjWRKY1 as well as the possible involvement of a GCC-box in berberine biosynthesis in C. japonica are discussed.

  8. Generation of Regionally Specified Neural Progenitors and Functional Neurons from Human Embryonic Stem Cells under Defined Conditions

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    Agnete Kirkeby

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To model human neural-cell-fate specification and to provide cells for regenerative therapies, we have developed a method to generate human neural progenitors and neurons from human embryonic stem cells, which recapitulates human fetal brain development. Through the addition of a small molecule that activates canonical WNT signaling, we induced rapid and efficient dose-dependent specification of regionally defined neural progenitors ranging from telencephalic forebrain to posterior hindbrain fates. Ten days after initiation of differentiation, the progenitors could be transplanted to the adult rat striatum, where they formed neuron-rich and tumor-free grafts with maintained regional specification. Cells patterned toward a ventral midbrain (VM identity generated a high proportion of authentic dopaminergic neurons after transplantation. The dopamine neurons showed morphology, projection pattern, and protein expression identical to that of human fetal VM cells grafted in parallel. VM-patterned but not forebrain-patterned neurons released dopamine and reversed motor deficits in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

  9. Poor ability to resist tempting calorie rich food is linked to altered balance between neural systems involved in urge and self-control

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qinghua; Xiao, Lin; Xue, Gui; Wong, Savio; Ames, Susan L.; Schembre, Susan M.; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Background The loss of self-control or inability to resist tempting/rewarding foods, and the development of less healthful eating habits may be explained by three key neural systems: (1) a hyper-functioning striatum system driven by external rewarding cues; (2) a hypo-functioning decision-making and impulse control system; and (3) an altered insula system involved in the translation of homeostatic and interoceptive signals into self-awareness and what may be subjectively experienced as a feel...

  10. Carcinoma Cuniculatum of the Right Thenar Region with Bone Involvement and Lymph Node Metastases

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    Robert Feldmann

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is the second most common type of skin cancer after basal cell carcinoma (BCC. The overall prevalence of BCC is 3 times higher than that of SCC, but this can vary when looking at specific locations such as the hand, where SCC is much more common than BCC. Carcinoma (or epithelioma cuniculatum is a rare variant of SCC. It was originally described as a verrucous carcinoma of the soles. Exceptionally, it can arise in other parts of the skin. We report a rare case of carcinoma cuniculatum of the right thenar region with bone and lymph node involvement.

  11. Characterization of regions of chromosomes 12 and 16 involved in nephroblastoma tumorigenesis.

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    Austruy, E; Candon, S; Henry, I; Gyapay, G; Tournade, M F; Mannens, M; Callen, D; Junien, C; Jeanpierre, C

    1995-12-01

    There are at least three loci involved in Wilms' tumor (WT) tumorigenesis: WT1 in 11p13, WT2 in 11p15.5, and WT3, as yet unmapped. A compilation of cytogenetic data published for 107 WT revealed that deletion of chromosome 16 and duplication of chromosome 12 occur as frequently as the well-documented 11p deletions. Allelic imbalance for chromosomes 16 and 12 was investigated in a series of 28 WT. By use of a large panel of restriction fragment length polymorphisms and (CA)n probes, we demonstrated loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for 16q in seven (25%) of the tumors. The whole length of 16q was involved in six of the tumors. Moreover, consistent with a previous report of 16q13 LOH in a sporadic WT and a constitutional breakpoint with a Beckwith-Wiedemann patient, we map a region of particular interest to between D16S308 and D16S320. The assumption that 16q LOH may be an early event was based on: 1) the detection of 16q LOH in one case of nephroblastomatosis; 2) the presence of a complete (clonal) 16q LOH in a tumor with partial (mosaic) 11p LOH; and 3) 16q LOH as the sole abnormality in one WT. By quantification of chromosome 12 allelic imbalance, we detected duplication in 18% of the total series and in 25% of the sporadic unilateral cases. The common region extended from the centromere to D12S7 in 12q21.1-q23. We also suggest that the various pathogenetically important loci are not equally involved in the different forms of WT and that their sequential involvement may differ.

  12. Self-Organizing Maps Neural Networks Applied to the Classification of Ethanol Samples According to the Region of Commercialization

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    Aline Regina Walkoff

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical-chemical analysis data were collected, from 998 ethanol samples of automotive ethanol commercialized in the northern, midwestern and eastern regions of the state of Paraná. The data presented self-organizing maps (SOM neural networks, which classified them according to those regions. The self-organizing maps best configuration had a 45 x 45 topology and 5000 training epochs, with a final learning rate of 6.7x10-4, a final neighborhood relationship of 3x10-2 and a mean quantization error of 2x10-2. This neural network provided a topological map depicting three separated groups, each one corresponding to samples of a same region of commercialization. Four maps of weights, one for each parameter, were presented. The network established the pH was the most important variable for classification and electrical conductivity the least one. The self-organizing maps application allowed the segmentation of alcohol samples, therefore identifying them according to the region of commercialization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i4.982

  13. Efficient genome editing of genes involved in neural crest development using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongzhen; Cheng, Tina Tsz Kwan; Shi, Zhaoying; Liu, Ziran; Lei, Yong; Wang, Chengdong; Shi, Weili; Chen, Xiongfeng; Qi, Xufeng; Cai, Dongqing; Feng, Bo; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The RNA guided CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have been proven to be effective for gene disruption in various animal models including Xenopus tropicalis. The neural crest (NC) is a transient cell population during embryonic development and contributes to a large variety of tissues. Currently, loss-of-function studies on NC development in X. tropicalis are largely based on morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. It is worthwhile establishing targeted gene knockout X. tropicails line using CRISPR/Cas9 system to study NC development. We utilized CRISPR/Cas9 to disrupt genes that are involved in NC formation in X. tropicalis embryos. A single sgRNA and Cas9 mRNA synthesized in vitro, were co-injected into X. tropicalis embryos at one-cell stage to induce single gene disruption. We also induced duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions in X. tropicalis by injecting Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9 was assessed in X. tropicalis embryos and the Cas9 nickase was used to reduce the off-target cleavages. Finally, we crossed the G0 mosaic frogs with targeted mutations to wild type frogs and obtained the germline transmission. Total 16 target sites in 15 genes were targeted by CRISPR/Cas9 and resulted in successful indel mutations at 14 loci with disruption efficiencies in a range from 9.3 to 57.8 %. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of generation of duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions by using Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. We observed that CRISPR/Cas9 displays obvious off-target effects at some loci in X. tropicalis embryos. Such off-target cleavages was reduced by using the D10A Cas9 nickase. Finally, the Cas9 induced indel mutations were efficiently passed to G1 offspring. Our study proved that CRISPR/Cas9 could mediate targeted gene mutation in X. tropicalis with high efficiency. This study expands the application of CRISPR/Cas9 platform in X. tropicalis and set a basis for studying NC development using genetic

  14. Identifying gp85-regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus binding to B-lymphocytes.

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    Urquiza, Mauricio; Suarez, Jorge; Lopez, Ramses; Vega, Erika; Patino, Helena; Garcia, Javier; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Guzman, Fanny; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2004-06-18

    Epstein-Barr virus lacking glycoprotein gp85 cannot infect B-cells and epithelial cells. The gp85 belongs to the molecular complex required for virus invasion of B-lymphocyte or epithelial cells. Moreover, there is evidence that gp85 is necessary for virus attachment to epithelial cells. Thirty-six peptides from the entire gp85-sequence were tested in epithelial and lymphoblastoid cell line binding assays to identify gp85-regions involved in virus-cell interaction. Five of these peptides presented high binding activity to Raji, Ramos, P3HR-1, and HeLa cells, but not to erythrocytes; Raji-cell affinity constants were between 80 and 140nM. Of these five peptides, 11435 ((181)TYKRVTEKGDEHVLSLVFGK(200)), 11436 ((201)TKDLPDLRGPFSYPSLTSAQ(220)), and 11438 ((241)YFVPNLKDMFSRAVTMTAAS(260)) bound to a 65kDa protein on Raji-cell surface. These peptides and antibodies induced by them (recognising live EBV-infected cells) inhibited Epstein-Barr virus interaction with cord blood lymphocytes. It is thus probable that gp85-regions defined by peptides 11435, 11436, and 11438 are involved in EBV invasion of B-lymphocytes.

  15. Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 064

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Timothy; Saifer, Steffen; Forehand, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    This document presents a summary of the larger report, "Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region." Although the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) spells out parent involvement requirements for schools in need of improvement, the majority of the Northwest Region school improvement plans…

  16. 40LoVe and Samba are involved in Xenopus neural development and functionally distinct from hnRNP AB.

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    Maria Andreou

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs comprise a large group of modular RNA-binding proteins classified according to their conserved domains. This modular nature, coupled with a large choice of alternative splice variants generates functional diversity. Here, we investigate the biological differences between 40LoVe, its splice variant Samba and its pseudoallele hnRNP AB in neural development. Loss of function experiments lead to defects in neural development with reduction of eye size, which stem primarily from increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in neural tissues. Despite very high homology between 40LoVe/Samba and hnRNP AB, these proteins display major differences in localization, which appear to be in part responsible for functional differences. Specifically, we show that the 40Love/Samba carboxy-terminal domain (GRD enables nucleocytoplasmic shuttling behavior. This domain is slightly different in hnRNP AB, leading to nuclear-restricted localization. Finally, we show that shuttling is required for 40LoVe/Samba function in neural development.

  17. Deep neural networks show an equivalent and often superior performance to dermatologists in onychomycosis diagnosis: Automatic construction of onychomycosis datasets by region-based convolutional deep neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Woohyung; Kim, Myoung Shin; Na, Jung Im; Park, Ilwoo

    2018-01-01

    Although there have been reports of the successful diagnosis of skin disorders using deep learning, unrealistically large clinical image datasets are required for artificial intelligence (AI) training. We created datasets of standardized nail images using a region-based convolutional neural network (R-CNN) trained to distinguish the nail from the background. We used R-CNN to generate training datasets of 49,567 images, which we then used to fine-tune the ResNet-152 and VGG-19 models. The validation datasets comprised 100 and 194 images from Inje University (B1 and B2 datasets, respectively), 125 images from Hallym University (C dataset), and 939 images from Seoul National University (D dataset). The AI (ensemble model; ResNet-152 + VGG-19 + feedforward neural networks) results showed test sensitivity/specificity/ area under the curve values of (96.0 / 94.7 / 0.98), (82.7 / 96.7 / 0.95), (92.3 / 79.3 / 0.93), (87.7 / 69.3 / 0.82) for the B1, B2, C, and D datasets. With a combination of the B1 and C datasets, the AI Youden index was significantly (p = 0.01) higher than that of 42 dermatologists doing the same assessment manually. For B1+C and B2+ D dataset combinations, almost none of the dermatologists performed as well as the AI. By training with a dataset comprising 49,567 images, we achieved a diagnostic accuracy for onychomycosis using deep learning that was superior to that of most of the dermatologists who participated in this study. PMID:29352285

  18. Abnormal regional spontaneous neural activity in visual pathway in retinal detachment patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

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    Huang X

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Xin Huang,1,2,* Dan Li,3,* Hai-Jun Li,3 Yu-Lin Zhong,1 Shelby Freeberg,4 Jing Bao,1 Xian-Jun Zeng,3 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Jiangxi Province Clinical Ophthalmology Institute, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Eye Center, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate changes of brain neural homogeneity in retinal detachment (RD patients using the regional homogeneity (ReHo method to understand their relationships with clinical features. Materials and methods: A total of 30 patients with RD (16 men and 14 women, and 30 healthy controls (HCs (16 men and 14 women closely matched in age and sex were recruited. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed for all subjects. The ReHo method was used to investigate the brain regional neural homogeneity. Patients with RD were distinguished from HCs by receiver operating characteristic curve. The relationships between the mean ReHo signal values in many brain regions and clinical features in RD patients were calculated by Pearson correlation analysis. Results: Compared with HCs, RD patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in the right occipital lobe, right superior temporal gyrus, bilateral cuneus and left middle frontal gyrus. Moreover, we found that the mean ReHo signal of the bilateral cuneus showed positive relationships with the duration of the RD (r=0.392, P=0.032. Conclusion: The RD patients showed brain neural homogeneity dysfunction in the visual pathway, which may underline the pathological mechanism

  19. Prion replication occurs in endogenous adult neural stem cells and alters their neuronal fate: involvement of endogenous neural stem cells in prion diseases.

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    Aroa Relaño-Ginès

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases, leading to severe incapacity and death. They are characterized in the brain by prion amyloid deposits, vacuolisation, astrocytosis, neuronal degeneration, and by cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments. There is no treatment for these disorders and stem cell therapy therefore represents an interesting new approach. Gains could not only result from the cell transplantation, but also from the stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC or by the combination of both approaches. However, the development of such strategies requires a detailed knowledge of the pathology, particularly concerning the status of the adult neurogenesis and endogenous NSC during the development of the disease. During the past decade, several studies have consistently shown that NSC reside in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS and that adult neurogenesis occurs throughout the adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle or the Dentate Gyrus of the hippocampus. Adult NSC are believed to constitute a reservoir for neuronal replacement during normal cell turnover or after brain injury. However, the activation of this system does not fully compensate the neuronal loss that occurs during neurodegenerative diseases and could even contribute to the disease progression. We investigated here the status of these cells during the development of prion disorders. We were able to show that NSC accumulate and replicate prions. Importantly, this resulted in the alteration of their neuronal fate which then represents a new pathologic event that might underlie the rapid progression of the disease.

  20. Conserved regions of ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP are involved in interactions with its substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2013-08-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a ubiquitous and essential site-specific eukaryotic endoribonuclease involved in the metabolism of a wide range of RNA molecules. RNase MRP is a ribonucleoprotein with a large catalytic RNA moiety that is closely related to the RNA component of RNase P, and multiple proteins, most of which are shared with RNase P. Here, we report the results of an ultraviolet-cross-linking analysis of interactions between a photoreactive RNase MRP substrate and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP holoenzyme. The results show that the substrate interacts with phylogenetically conserved RNA elements universally found in all enzymes of the RNase P/MRP family, as well as with a phylogenetically conserved RNA region that is unique to RNase MRP, and demonstrate that four RNase MRP protein components, all shared with RNase P, interact with the substrate. Implications for the structural organization of RNase MRP and the roles of its components are discussed.

  1. Pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions: differentiation using MRI

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    Choi, S.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, B.J. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: bjkwon@radiol.snu.ac.kr; Na, D.G. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.-H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Han, M.H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, K.-H. [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Clinical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    Aims: To determine the differential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of pituitary adenoma, craniopharyngioma, and Rathke cleft cyst involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions. Materials and methods: The MRI images of 64 patients with pituitary adenoma (n = 38), craniopharyngioma (n = 13), or Rathke cleft cyst (n = 13) were retrospectively reviewed by three neuroradiologists. The following characteristics were evaluated: shape, volume, extent, component characteristics, signal intensities of solid portions on T2-weighted images, signal intensities of cystic portions on T1-weighted images, and enhancement patterns of solid portions and cyst walls of tumours. Fisher's exact test applied with Bonferroni correction was used for multiple comparison. A flowchart for differential diagnosis was constructed based on statistical analysis of the results. Results: A snowman shape, solid characteristics, and homogeneous enhancement of the solid portion were more common in pituitary adenomas (p < 0.017). A superiorly lobulated shape, third ventricle compression by superior tumour extension, mixed solid and cystic characteristics, and reticular enhancement of the solid portion were more common in craniopharyngiomas (p < 0.017). Finally, an ovoid shape, a small tumour volume, cystic characteristics, and no or thin cyst wall enhancement were more common in Rathke cleft cysts (p < 0.017). The flowchart yielded diagnostic accuracies as follows: 92.1% in pituitary adenoma; 92.3% in craniopharyngioma; 92.3% in Rathke cleft cyst; and 92.2% overall. Conclusion: A combination of MRI findings is helpful in the differential diagnosis of the three tumours involving both intrasellar and suprasellar regions.

  2. The Artificial Neural Network Estimation for Daily and Hourly Rice Evapotranspiration in the Region of Red Soil, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Yuanshu; Ruthaikarn, Buaphean; Jin, Xinyi; Pang, Bo

    The evapotranspiration estimation is a key item for irrigation program. It has the important practical significance for high stable yield and water-saving in the region of red soil, South China. Penman-Monteith equation, recommended by FAO, is verified to be the most effective calculation to actual evaporation in many regions of the world. The only default is it has to use complete meteorological factors. To solve this problem, we are trying to find out a artificial neural network model (ANN) which can easily get its information and easy to calculate as well as guaranteed accuracy. A Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) system and automatic weather station were employed for simultaneous measurement of actual evapotranspiration above the rice field. The frequency of 20-min recording provided the possibility for the estimation of daily and hourly evapotranspiration. The determined coefficient from the artificial neural network model on daily scale R2 is 0.9642, while hourly scale R2 is 0.9880. The reason was that the hourly scale training samples was greater than the daily scale measures. In general, the model gives an effective and feasible way for the evaluation of paddy rice evapotranspiration by the conventional parameters.

  3. The gateway theory: how regional neural activation creates a gateway for immune cells via an inflammation amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Hideki; Arima, Yasunobu; Kamimura, Daisuke; Murakami, Masaaki

    2013-01-01

    The inflammation amplifier, a nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB)feedback loop in non-immune cells including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, describes how NF-kB-mediated transcriptions are enhanced to induce the inflammation in the presence of signal Tranducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation. It was originally discovered in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis mouse models and has since been shown to be associated with various human diseases and disorders including autoimmune diseases, metabolic syndromes, neurodegenerative diseases, and other inflammatory diseases. The amplifier begins with IL-17, which acts as the main signal to express NF-kB-mediated transcriptions, and IL-6, an NF-kB target, which functions as a fuel for the inflammation amplifier. Indeed, other NF-kB targets including various chemokines also act as effector molecules that cause local accumulation of various immune cells and subsequent inflammation. Through extensive studies in the multiple sclerosis model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we recently demonstrated that regional neural activation induces excess activation of the inflammation amplifier at specific blood vessels in the fifth lumbar cord, creating a gateway for immune cells to enter the central nervous system (CNS). We thus propose the gateway theory to describe how regional neural activation enables immune cells to enter the CNS from the blood and argue that this theory might provide novel therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases and disorders.

  4. Causes of fatal childhood accidents involving head injury in northern region, 1979-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharples, P M; Storey, A; Aynsley-Green, A; Eyre, J A

    1990-11-24

    To examine the causes and circumstances surrounding fatal accidents involving head injuries in children in the Northern region. Retrospective review of the hospital case notes, necropsy reports, and records of the coroners' inquests. Northern Regional Health Authority. All 255 children aged less than 16 years who died with a head injury during 1979-86. Cause of injury and circumstances of accident according to reports of inquests; injury severity score; number of fatal accidents and mortality per 100,000 children in 10 groups of local authority wards ranked according to their score on the overall deprivation index; and distance of site of accident from child's home. Of the 255 children who died after a head injury, 136 (53%) children were playing at the time of the accident. 195 (76%) children sustained the head injury in road traffic accidents, 135 as pedestrians, 35 as cyclists, and 25 as passengers in a vehicle. In 120 accidents in child pedestrians the primary cause of accident was the unsafe behaviour of the child. 172 (67%) accidents occurred within one to two km of the child's home and 153 (63%) between 3 pm and 9 pm. The mortality was significantly related to social deprivation; excluding eight children injured while on holiday in the region, 15-fold decrease in mortality was recorded between the local authority wards that ranked highest on the overall deprivation index and those that ranked lowest (14.0/100,000 children, group 10 v 0.9/100,000, group 1 respectively, p less than 0.00001). The finding that most accidents occurred in children living in deprived areas who were playing unsupervised near their home suggests that childhood mortality might be appreciably reduced if children at play were protected from traffic, particularly in socially deprived areas.

  5. Dynamic changes in Ezh2 gene occupancy underlie its involvement in neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation towards oligodendrocytes.

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    Falak Sher

    Full Text Available The polycomb group protein Ezh2 is an epigenetic repressor of transcription originally found to prevent untimely differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We previously demonstrated that Ezh2 is also expressed in multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs. We showed that Ezh2 expression is downregulated during NSC differentiation into astrocytes or neurons. However, high levels of Ezh2 remained present in differentiating oligodendrocytes until myelinating. This study aimed to elucidate the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and in premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pOLs.We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to detect the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and pOLs. We found 1532 target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs. During NSC differentiation, the occupancy of these genes by Ezh2 was alleviated. However, when the NSCs differentiated into oligodendrocytes, 393 of these genes remained targets of Ezh2. Analysis of the target genes indicated that the repressive activity of Ezh2 in NSCs concerns genes involved in stem cell maintenance, in cell cycle control and in preventing neural differentiation. Among the genes in pOLs that were still repressed by Ezh2 were most prominently those associated with neuronal and astrocytic committed cell lineages. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in NSCs caused loss of stem cell characteristics, blocked their proliferation and ultimately induced apoptosis. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in pOLs resulted in derangement of the oligodendrocytic phenotype, due to re-expression of neuronal and astrocytic genes, and ultimately in apoptosis.Our data indicate that the epigenetic repressor Ezh2 in NSCs is crucial for proliferative activity and maintenance of neural stemness. During differentiation towards oligodendrocytes, Ezh2 repression continues particularly to suppress other neural fate choices. Ezh2 is completely downregulated during differentiation towards neurons and astrocytes allowing transcription

  6. A genomic region involved in the formation of adhesin fibers in Bacillus cereus biofilms

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    Joaquín eCaro-Astorga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a bacterial pathogen that is responsible for many recurrent disease outbreaks due to food contamination. Spores and biofilms are considered the most important reservoirs of B. cereus in contaminated fresh vegetables and fruits. Biofilms are bacterial communities that are difficult to eradicate from biotic and abiotic surfaces because of their stable and extremely strong extracellular matrix. These extracellular matrixes contain exopolysaccharides, proteins, extracellular DNA, and other minor components. Although B. cereus can form biofilms, the bacterial features governing assembly of the protective extracellular matrix are not known. Using the well-studied bacterium B. subtilis as a model, we identified two genomic loci in B. cereus, which encodes two orthologs of the amyloid-like protein TasA of B. subtilis and a SipW signal peptidase. Deletion of this genomic region in B. cereus inhibited biofilm assembly; notably, mutation of the putative signal peptidase SipW caused the same phenotype. However, mutations in tasA or calY did not completely prevent biofilm formation; strains that were mutated for either of these genes formed phenotypically different surface attached biofilms. Electron microscopy studies revealed that TasA polymerizes to form long and abundant fibers on cell surfaces, whereas CalY does not aggregate similarly. Heterologous expression of this amyloid-like cassette in a B. subtilis strain lacking the factors required for the assembly of TasA amyloid-like fibers revealed i the involvement of this B. cereus genomic region in formation of the air-liquid interphase pellicles and ii the intrinsic ability of TasA to form fibers similar to the amyloid-like fibers produced by its B. subtilis ortholog.

  7. Estimating Full Regional Skeletal Muscle Fibre Orientation from B-Mode Ultrasound Images Using Convolutional, Residual, and Deconvolutional Neural Networks

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    Ryan Cunningham

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation into the feasibility of using deep learning methods for developing arbitrary full spatial resolution regression analysis of B-mode ultrasound images of human skeletal muscle. In this study, we focus on full spatial analysis of muscle fibre orientation, since there is an existing body of work with which to compare results. Previous attempts to automatically estimate fibre orientation from ultrasound are not adequate, often requiring manual region selection, feature engineering, providing low-resolution estimations (one angle per muscle and deep muscles are often not attempted. We build upon our previous work in which automatic segmentation was used with plain convolutional neural network (CNN and deep residual convolutional network (ResNet architectures, to predict a low-resolution map of fibre orientation in extracted muscle regions. Here, we use deconvolutions and max-unpooling (DCNN to regularise and improve predicted fibre orientation maps for the entire image, including deep muscles, removing the need for automatic segmentation and we compare our results with the CNN and ResNet, as well as a previously established feature engineering method, on the same task. Dynamic ultrasound images sequences of the calf muscles were acquired (25 Hz from 8 healthy volunteers (4 male, ages: 25–36, median 30. A combination of expert annotation and interpolation/extrapolation provided labels of regional fibre orientation for each image. Neural networks (CNN, ResNet, DCNN were then trained both with and without dropout using leave one out cross-validation. Our results demonstrated robust estimation of full spatial fibre orientation within approximately 6° error, which was an improvement on previous methods.

  8. Effectiveness of Folic Acid Fortified Flour for Prevention of Neural Tube Defects in a High Risk Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haochen; De Steur, Hans; Chen, Gong; Zhang, Xiaotian; Pei, Lijun; Gellynck, Xavier; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2016-03-09

    Despite efforts to tackle folate deficiency and Neural Tube Defects (NTDs) through folic acid fortification, its implementation is still lacking where it is needed most, highlighting the need for studies that evaluate the effectiveness of folic acid fortified wheat flour in a poor, rural, high-risk, NTD region of China. One of the most affected regions, Shanxi Province, was selected as a case study. A community intervention was carried out in which 16,648 women of child-bearing age received fortified flour (eight villages) and a control group received ordinary flour (three villages). NTD birth prevalence and biological indicators were measured two years after program initiation at endline only. The effect on the NTD burden was calculated using the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) method. In the intervention group, serum folate level was higher than in the control group. NTDs in the intervention group were 68.2% lower than in the control group (OR = 0.313, 95% CI = 0.207-0473, p < 0.001). In terms of DALYs, burden in intervention group was approximately 58.5% lower than in the control group. Flour fortification was associated with lower birth prevalence and burden of NTDs in economically developing regions with a high risk of NTDs. The positive findings confirm the potential of fortification when selecting an appropriate food vehicle and target region. As such, this study provides support for decision makers aiming for the implementation of (mandatory) folic acid fortification in China.

  9. Effectiveness of Folic Acid Fortified Flour for Prevention of Neural Tube Defects in a High Risk Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haochen Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite efforts to tackle folate deficiency and Neural Tube Defects (NTDs through folic acid fortification, its implementation is still lacking where it is needed most, highlighting the need for studies that evaluate the effectiveness of folic acid fortified wheat flour in a poor, rural, high-risk, NTD region of China. One of the most affected regions, Shanxi Province, was selected as a case study. A community intervention was carried out in which 16,648 women of child-bearing age received fortified flour (eight villages and a control group received ordinary flour (three villages. NTD birth prevalence and biological indicators were measured two years after program initiation at endline only. The effect on the NTD burden was calculated using the disability-adjusted life years (DALYs method. In the intervention group, serum folate level was higher than in the control group. NTDs in the intervention group were 68.2% lower than in the control group (OR = 0.313, 95% CI = 0.207–0473, p < 0.001. In terms of DALYs, burden in intervention group was approximately 58.5% lower than in the control group. Flour fortification was associated with lower birth prevalence and burden of NTDs in economically developing regions with a high risk of NTDs. The positive findings confirm the potential of fortification when selecting an appropriate food vehicle and target region. As such, this study provides support for decision makers aiming for the implementation of (mandatory folic acid fortification in China.

  10. Parent Involvement Activities in School Improvement Plans in the Northwest Region. Issues & Answers. REL 2008-No. 064

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Timothy; Saifer, Steffen; Forehand, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    Although the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB) spells out parent involvement requirements for schools in need of improvement, the majority of the Northwest Region school improvement plans reviewed failed to include such provisions. Reported findings include: (1) Despite a wide range of parent involvement practices discussed in legislation…

  11. System Model Bias Processing Approach for Regional Coordinated States Information Involved Filtering

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    Zebo Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Kalman filtering applications, the conventional dynamic model which connects the states information of two consecutive epochs by state transition matrix is usually predefined and assumed to be invariant. Aiming to improve the adaptability and accuracy of dynamic model, we propose multiple historical states involved filtering algorithm. An autoregressive model is used as the dynamic model which is subsequently combined with observation model for deriving the optimal window-recursive filter formulae in the sense of minimum mean square error principle. The corresponding test statistics characteristics of system residuals are discussed in details. The test statistics of regional predicted residuals are then constructed in a time-window for model bias testing with two hypotheses, that is, the null and alternative hypotheses. Based on the innovations test statistics, we develop a model bias processing procedure including bias detection, location identification, and state correction. Finally, the minimum detectable bias and bias-to-noise ratio are both computed for evaluating the internal and external reliability of overall system, respectively.

  12. A Kohonen neural network description of scoliosis fused regions and their corresponding Lenke classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezghani, N; Phan, P; Mitiche, A; Labelle, H; de Guise, J A

    2012-03-01

    Surgical instrumentation for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a complex procedure where selection of the appropriate curve segment to fuse, i.e., fusion region, is a challenging decision in scoliosis surgery. Currently, the Lenke classification model is used for fusion region evaluation and surgical planning. Retrospective evaluation of Lenke classification and fusion region results was performed. Using a database of 1,776 surgically treated AIS cases, we investigated a topologically ordered self organizing Kohonen network, trained using Cobb angle measurements, to determine the relationship between the Lenke class and the fusion region selection. Specifically, the purpose was twofold (1) produce two spatially matched maps, one of Lenke classes and the other of fusion regions, and (2) associate these two maps to determine where the Lenke classes correlate with the fused spine regions. Topologically ordered maps obtained using a multi-center database of surgically treated AIS cases, show that the recommended fusion region agrees with the Lenke class except near boundaries between Lenke map classes. Overall agreement was 88%. The Lenke classification and fusion region agree in the majority of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis when reviewed retrospectively. The results indicate the need for spinal fixation instrumentation variation associated with the Lenke classification.

  13. The morphology of the sella turcica in velocardiofacial syndrome suggests involvement of a neural crest developmental field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted, Kirsten; Boers, Maria; Kjaer, Inger

    2010-01-01

    was to measure the cranial base angles in individuals with VCFS and, if possible, to discover the developmental field that may be involved in the condition. The study included 33 patients with VCFS from the Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, Denmark. The genotype was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization......, hypothyroidism, and posterior brain abnormality), suggest involvement of a specific developmental field....

  14. DNA methylation aberrations rather than polymorphisms of FZD3 gene increase the risk of spina bifida in a high-risk region for neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Shaofang; Wang, Li; Chang, Shaoyan; Lu, Xiaoling; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Lihua; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Bao, Yihua; Zhao, Huizhi; Zou, Jizhen; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of neural tube defects (NTDs) have indicated roles for the Fzd3 gene and the planar cell polarity signaling pathway in convergent extension. We investigated the involvement of FZD3 in genetic and epigenetic mechanisms associated with human NTDs, especially spina bifida. We explored the effects of variants spanning the FZD3 gene in NTDs and examined the role of aberrant methylation of the FZD3 promoter on gene expression in brain tissue in spina bifida. Six FZD3 single nucleotide polymorphisms were genotyped using a MassARRAY system in tissue from 165 NTD fetuses and 152 controls. DNA methylation aberrations in the FZD3 promoter region were detected using a MassARRAY EpiTYPER (17 CpG units from -500 to -2400 bp from the transcription start site) in brain tissue from 77 spina bifida and 74 control fetuses. None of the six single nucleotide polymorphisms evaluated were significantly associated with spina bifida, but the mean methylation level was significantly higher in spina bifida samples (13.70%) compared with control samples (10.91%) (p = 0.001). In terms of specific sites, DNA methylation levels were significantly higher in the spina bifida samples at 14 of the 17 CpG units, which mostly included in R2 region. FZD3 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with methylation of the FZD3 promoter region, especially the R2 region (R = 0.970; p = 0.001) in HeLa cells. The results of this study suggest that DNA methylation plays an important role in FZD3 gene expression regulation and may be associated with an increased risk of spina bifida. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Potential Habitat Modelling of Ferula ovina Using Artificial Neural Network in Fereydunshahr Region, Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Rahmati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution maps have been widely developed based on ecological niche theory together with statistical and geographical information system in plant ecology. The current study aimed to evaluate Artificial Neural Network (ANN in mapping potential habitat of Ferula ovina Boiss in Ferydunshar rangelands, Isfahan. This is known as valuable forage and medicinal species. Environmental data (independent variables and species occurrence data (dependent variable were required to determine potential habitat of a given species. Some physical and chemical soil properties, climate and physiographic variables were mapped for the entire studied area using krigging and inverse distance weighting methods. F. ovina occurrence data were collected from 278 sites including 137 presence and 141 absence sites. The relationships between the studied environmental variables and F. ovina occurrence data were explored using ANN method. According to the sensitivity analysis, occurrence of F. ovina mostly correlated with silt and sand percentage, elevation slope, and organic matter. Model evaluation based on Kappa coefficient (0.66 and Receiver operating characteristic (ROC=0.9 showed good model fitness in relation to reality on local scales. The ANN technique enables managers to identify appropriate areas for rehabilitation practices such as direct seeding and planting.                       

  16. Generation of Integration-free and Region-Specific Neural Progenitors from Primate Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Lu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal and adult human and monkey fibroblasts were infected with Sendai virus containing the Yamanaka factors for 24 hr, then they were cultured in a chemically defined medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, transforming growth factor (TGF-β inhibitor SB431542, and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β inhibitor CHIR99021 at 39°C for inactivation of the virus. Induced neural progenitor (iNP colonies appeared as early as day 13 and can be expanded for >20 passages. Under the same defined condition, no induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC colonies formed at either 37°C or 39°C. The iNPs predominantly express hindbrain genes and differentiate into hindbrain neurons, and when caudalized, they produced an enriched population of spinal motor neurons. Following transplantation into the forebrain, the iNP-derived cells retained the hindbrain identity. The ability to generate defined, integration-free iNPs from adult primate fibroblasts under a defined condition with predictable fate choices will facilitate disease modeling and therapeutic development.

  17. Selectively stimulating neural populations in the subthalamic region using a novel deep brain stimulation lead design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Kees Joab; Verhagen, R.; Bour, L.J.; Heida, Tjitske

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the Subthalamic Nucleus (STN) is widely used in advanced stages of Parkinson's disease(PD) and has proven to be an effective treatment of the various motor symptoms. The therapy involves implanting a lead consisting of multiple electrodes in the STN through which

  18. Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair neural development in rat hippocampus: involvement of doublecortin and NCAM-180

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Developmental iodine deficiency results in inadequate thyroid hormone (TH), which damages the hippocampus. Here, we explored the roles of hippocampal doublecortin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-180 in developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism. Methods Two developmental rat models were established with either an iodine-deficient diet, or propylthiouracil (PTU)-adulterated water (5 ppm or 15 ppm) to impair thyroid function, in pregnant rats from gestational day 6 until postnatal day (PN) 28. Silver-stained neurons and protein levels of doublecortin and NCAM-180 in several hippocampal subregions were assessed on PN14, PN21, PN28, and PN42. Results The results show that nerve fibers in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats were injured on PN28 and PN42. Downregulation of doublecortin and upregulation of NCAM-180 were observed in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats from PN14 on. These alterations were irreversible by the restoration of serum TH concentrations on PN42. Conclusion Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair the expression of doublecortin and NCAM-180, leading to nerve fiber malfunction and thus impairments in hippocampal development. PMID:20412599

  19. Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair neural development in rat hippocampus: involvement of doublecortin and NCAM-180

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Jiapeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental iodine deficiency results in inadequate thyroid hormone (TH, which damages the hippocampus. Here, we explored the roles of hippocampal doublecortin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM-180 in developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism. Methods Two developmental rat models were established with either an iodine-deficient diet, or propylthiouracil (PTU-adulterated water (5 ppm or 15 ppm to impair thyroid function, in pregnant rats from gestational day 6 until postnatal day (PN 28. Silver-stained neurons and protein levels of doublecortin and NCAM-180 in several hippocampal subregions were assessed on PN14, PN21, PN28, and PN42. Results The results show that nerve fibers in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats were injured on PN28 and PN42. Downregulation of doublecortin and upregulation of NCAM-180 were observed in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats from PN14 on. These alterations were irreversible by the restoration of serum TH concentrations on PN42. Conclusion Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair the expression of doublecortin and NCAM-180, leading to nerve fiber malfunction and thus impairments in hippocampal development.

  20. A Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System (PhyNNeSS) for multimodal interactive virtual environments involving nonlinear deformable objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Suvranu; Deo, Dhannanjay; Sankaranarayanan, Ganesh; Arikatla, Venkata S

    2011-08-01

    BACKGROUND: While an update rate of 30 Hz is considered adequate for real time graphics, a much higher update rate of about 1 kHz is necessary for haptics. Physics-based modeling of deformable objects, especially when large nonlinear deformations and complex nonlinear material properties are involved, at these very high rates is one of the most challenging tasks in the development of real time simulation systems. While some specialized solutions exist, there is no general solution for arbitrary nonlinearities. METHODS: In this work we present PhyNNeSS - a Physics-driven Neural Networks-based Simulation System - to address this long-standing technical challenge. The first step is an off-line pre-computation step in which a database is generated by applying carefully prescribed displacements to each node of the finite element models of the deformable objects. In the next step, the data is condensed into a set of coefficients describing neurons of a Radial Basis Function network (RBFN). During real-time computation, these neural networks are used to reconstruct the deformation fields as well as the interaction forces. RESULTS: We present realistic simulation examples from interactive surgical simulation with real time force feedback. As an example, we have developed a deformable human stomach model and a Penrose-drain model used in the Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery (FLS) training tool box. CONCLUSIONS: A unique computational modeling system has been developed that is capable of simulating the response of nonlinear deformable objects in real time. The method distinguishes itself from previous efforts in that a systematic physics-based pre-computational step allows training of neural networks which may be used in real time simulations. We show, through careful error analysis, that the scheme is scalable, with the accuracy being controlled by the number of neurons used in the simulation. PhyNNeSS has been integrated into SoFMIS (Software Framework for Multimodal

  1. Individual Differences in Neural Regions Functionally Related to Real and Imagined Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wymbs, Nicholas F.; Ingham, Roger J.; Ingham, Janis C.; Paolini, Katherine E.; Grafton, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent brain imaging investigations of developmental stuttering show considerable disagreement regarding which regions are related to stuttering. These divergent findings have been mainly derived from group studies. To investigate functional neurophysiology with improved precision, an individual-participant approach (N = 4) using event-related…

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berline eFopa Fomeju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the

  3. Comparative genomic analysis of duplicated homoeologous regions involved in the resistance of Brassica napus to stem canker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fopa Fomeju, Berline; Falentin, Cyril; Lassalle, Gilles; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria J.; Delourme, Régine

    2015-01-01

    All crop species are current or ancient polyploids. Following whole genome duplication, structural and functional modifications result in differential gene content or regulation in the duplicated regions, which can play a fundamental role in the diversification of genes underlying complex traits. We have investigated this issue in Brassica napus, a species with a highly duplicated genome, with the aim of studying the structural and functional organization of duplicated regions involved in quantitative resistance to stem canker, a disease caused by the fungal pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans. Genome-wide association analysis on two oilseed rape panels confirmed that duplicated regions of ancestral blocks E, J, R, U, and W were involved in resistance to stem canker. The structural analysis of the duplicated genomic regions showed a higher gene density on the A genome than on the C genome and a better collinearity between homoeologous regions than paralogous regions, as overall in the whole B. napus genome. The three ancestral sub-genomes were involved in the resistance to stem canker and the fractionation profile of the duplicated regions corresponded to what was expected from results on the B. napus progenitors. About 60% of the genes identified in these duplicated regions were single-copy genes while less than 5% were retained in all the duplicated copies of a given ancestral block. Genes retained in several copies were mainly involved in response to stress, signaling, or transcription regulation. Genes with resistance-associated markers were mainly retained in more than two copies. These results suggested that some genes underlying quantitative resistance to stem canker might be duplicated genes. Genes with a hydrolase activity that were retained in one copy or R-like genes might also account for resistance in some regions. Further analyses need to be conducted to indicate to what extent duplicated genes contribute to the expression of the resistance phenotype

  4. Involvement of the endosomal-lysosomal system correlates with regional pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Gelpi, Ellen; Ströbel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    these with the severity of neuropathologic changes. In regions with mild pathology and scant abnormal prion protein (PrP) deposition, neurons showed an increased volume of Rab5-immunopositive early endosomes. In contrast, neurons in regions with prominent pathology had an increased volume of cathepsin D- or B...... correlate with regional pathology. Overloading of this system might impair the function of lysosomal enzymes and thus may mimic some features of lysosomal storage disorders. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jul...

  5. Oleanolic Acid Induces Differentiation of Neural Stem Cells to Neurons: An Involvement of Transcription Factor Nkx-2.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Ning

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs harbor the potential to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes under normal conditions and/or in response to tissue damage. NSCs open a new way of treatment of the injured central nervous system and neurodegenerative disorders. Thus far, few drugs have been developed for controlling NSC functions. Here, the effect as well as mechanism of oleanolic acid (OA, a pentacyclic triterpenoid, on NSC function was investigated. We found OA significantly inhibited neurosphere formation in a dose-dependent manner and achieved a maximum effect at 10 nM. OA also reduced 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU incorporation into NSCs, which was indicative of inhibited NSC proliferation. Western blotting analysis revealed the protein levels of neuron-specific marker tubulin-βIII (TuJ1 and Mash1 were increased whilst the astrocyte-specific marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP decreased. Immunofluorescence analysis showed OA significantly elevated the percentage of TuJ1-positive cells and reduced GFAP-positive cells. Using DNA microarray analysis, 183 genes were differentially regulated by OA. Through transcription factor binding site analyses of the upstream regulatory sequences of these genes, 87 genes were predicted to share a common motif for Nkx-2.5 binding. Finally, small interfering RNA (siRNA methodology was used to silence Nkx-2.5 expression and found silence of Nkx-2.5 alone did not change the expression of TuJ-1 and the percentage of TuJ-1-positive cells. But in combination of OA treatment and silence of Nkx-2.5, most effects of OA on NSCs were abolished. These results indicated that OA is an effective inducer for NSCs differentiation into neurons at least partially by Nkx-2.5-dependent mechanism.

  6. Filtrado digital neuronal difuso: caso MIMO Neural fuzzy digital filtering: multivariate identifier filters involving multiple inputs and multiple outputs (MIMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medel Juárez José de J.

    2011-05-01

    convergence to observable reference system dynamics. One way of complying with this condition is to use fuzzy logic inference mechanisms which interpret and select the best matrix parameter from a knowledge base. Such selection mechanisms with neural networks can provide a response from the best operational level for each change in state (Shannon, 1948. This paper considers the MIMO digital filter model using neuro fuzzy digital filtering to find an adaptive  parameter matrix which is integrated into the Kalman filter by the transition matrix. The filter uses the neural network as back-propagation into the fuzzy mechanism to do this, interpreting its variables and its respective levels and selecting the best values for automatically adjusting transition matrix values. The Matlab simulation describes the neural fuzzy digital filter giving an approximation of exponential convergence seen in functional error.

     

  7. Dynamic Changes in Ezh2 Gene Occupancy Underlie Its Involvement in Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation towards Oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Olah, Marta; Copray, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Background The polycomb group protein Ezh2 is an epigenetic repressor of transcription originally found to prevent untimely differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We previously demonstrated that Ezh2 is also expressed in multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). We showed that Ezh2 expression is downregulated during NSC differentiation into astrocytes or neurons. However, high levels of Ezh2 remained present in differentiating oligodendrocytes until myelinating. This study aimed to elucidate the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and in premyelinating oligodendrocytes (pOLs). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing to detect the target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs and pOLs. We found 1532 target genes of Ezh2 in NSCs. During NSC differentiation, the occupancy of these genes by Ezh2 was alleviated. However, when the NSCs differentiated into oligodendrocytes, 393 of these genes remained targets of Ezh2. Analysis of the target genes indicated that the repressive activity of Ezh2 in NSCs concerns genes involved in stem cell maintenance, in cell cycle control and in preventing neural differentiation. Among the genes in pOLs that were still repressed by Ezh2 were most prominently those associated with neuronal and astrocytic committed cell lineages. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in NSCs caused loss of stem cell characteristics, blocked their proliferation and ultimately induced apoptosis. Suppression of Ezh2 activity in pOLs resulted in derangement of the oligodendrocytic phenotype, due to re-expression of neuronal and astrocytic genes, and ultimately in apoptosis. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the epigenetic repressor Ezh2 in NSCs is crucial for proliferative activity and maintenance of neural stemness. During differentiation towards oligodendrocytes, Ezh2 repression continues particularly to suppress other neural fate choices. Ezh2 is completely downregulated during differentiation

  8. Neuron-Glia Crosstalk and Neuropathic Pain: Involvement in the Modulation of Motor Activity in the Orofacial Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Zakir; Unno, Shumpei; Ando, Hiroshi; Masuda, Yuji; Kitagawa, Junichi

    2017-09-26

    Neuropathic orofacial pain (NOP) is a debilitating condition. Although the pathophysiology remains unclear, accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of multiple mechanisms in the development of neuropathic pain. Recently, glial cells have been shown to play a key pathogenetic role. Nerve injury leads to an immune response near the site of injury. Satellite glial cells are activated in the peripheral ganglia. Various neural and immune mediators, released at the central terminals of primary afferents, lead to the sensitization of postsynaptic neurons and the activation of glia. The activated glia, in turn, release pro-inflammatory factors, further sensitizing the neurons, and resulting in central sensitization. Recently, we observed the involvement of glia in the alteration of orofacial motor activity in NOP. Microglia and astroglia were activated in the trigeminal sensory and motor nuclei, in parallel with altered motor functions and a decreased pain threshold. A microglial blocker attenuated the reduction in pain threshold, reduced the number of activated microglia, and restored motor activity. We also found an involvement of the astroglial glutamate-glutamine shuttle in the trigeminal motor nucleus in the alteration of the jaw reflex. Neuron-glia crosstalk thus plays an important role in the development of pain and altered motor activity in NOP.

  9. Functional overlap between regions involved in speech perception and in monitoring one's own voice during speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zane Z; Munhall, Kevin G; Johnsrude, Ingrid S

    2010-08-01

    The fluency and the reliability of speech production suggest a mechanism that links motor commands and sensory feedback. Here, we examined the neural organization supporting such links by using fMRI to identify regions in which activity during speech production is modulated according to whether auditory feedback matches the predicted outcome or not and by examining the overlap with the network recruited during passive listening to speech sounds. We used real-time signal processing to compare brain activity when participants whispered a consonant-vowel-consonant word ("Ted") and either heard this clearly or heard voice-gated masking noise. We compared this to when they listened to yoked stimuli (identical recordings of "Ted" or noise) without speaking. Activity along the STS and superior temporal gyrus bilaterally was significantly greater if the auditory stimulus was (a) processed as the auditory concomitant of speaking and (b) did not match the predicted outcome (noise). The network exhibiting this Feedback Type x Production/Perception interaction includes a superior temporal gyrus/middle temporal gyrus region that is activated more when listening to speech than to noise. This is consistent with speech production and speech perception being linked in a control system that predicts the sensory outcome of speech acts and that processes an error signal in speech-sensitive regions when this and the sensory data do not match.

  10. Gene expression meta-analysis identifies chromosomal regions involved in ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Mads; Jochumsen, Kirsten M; Mogensen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    Ovarian cancer cells exhibit complex karyotypic alterations causing deregulation of numerous genes. Some of these genes are probably causal for cancer formation and local growth, whereas others are causal for metastasis and recurrence. By using publicly available data sets, we have investigated...... the relation of gene expression and chromosomal position to identify chromosomal regions of importance for early recurrence of ovarian cancer. By use of *Gene Set Enrichment Analysis*, we have ranked chromosomal regions according to their association to survival. Over-representation analysis including 1...... summarized mutation load in these regions by a combined mutation score that is statistical significantly associated to survival by analysis in the data sets used for identification of the regions. Furthermore, the prognostic value of the combined mutation score was validated in an independent large data set...

  11. Learning Oriented Region-based Convolutional Neural Networks for Building Detection in Satellite Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The automated building detection in aerial images is a fundamental problem encountered in aerial and satellite images analysis. Recently, thanks to the advances in feature descriptions, Region-based CNN model (R-CNN for object detection is receiving an increasing attention. Despite the excellent performance in object detection, it is problematic to directly leverage the features of R-CNN model for building detection in single aerial image. As we know, the single aerial image is in vertical view and the buildings possess significant directional feature. However, in R-CNN model, direction of the building is ignored and the detection results are represented by horizontal rectangles. For this reason, the detection results with horizontal rectangle cannot describe the building precisely. To address this problem, in this paper, we proposed a novel model with a key feature related to orientation, namely, Oriented R-CNN (OR-CNN. Our contributions are mainly in the following two aspects: 1 Introducing a new oriented layer network for detecting the rotation angle of building on the basis of the successful VGG-net R-CNN model; 2 the oriented rectangle is proposed to leverage the powerful R-CNN for remote-sensing building detection. In experiments, we establish a complete and bran-new data set for training our oriented R-CNN model and comprehensively evaluate the proposed method on a publicly available building detection data set. We demonstrate State-of-the-art results compared with the previous baseline methods.

  12. Learning Oriented Region-based Convolutional Neural Networks for Building Detection in Satellite Remote Sensing Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Gong, W.; Hu, Y.; Chen, Y.; Ding, Y.

    2017-05-01

    The automated building detection in aerial images is a fundamental problem encountered in aerial and satellite images analysis. Recently, thanks to the advances in feature descriptions, Region-based CNN model (R-CNN) for object detection is receiving an increasing attention. Despite the excellent performance in object detection, it is problematic to directly leverage the features of R-CNN model for building detection in single aerial image. As we know, the single aerial image is in vertical view and the buildings possess significant directional feature. However, in R-CNN model, direction of the building is ignored and the detection results are represented by horizontal rectangles. For this reason, the detection results with horizontal rectangle cannot describe the building precisely. To address this problem, in this paper, we proposed a novel model with a key feature related to orientation, namely, Oriented R-CNN (OR-CNN). Our contributions are mainly in the following two aspects: 1) Introducing a new oriented layer network for detecting the rotation angle of building on the basis of the successful VGG-net R-CNN model; 2) the oriented rectangle is proposed to leverage the powerful R-CNN for remote-sensing building detection. In experiments, we establish a complete and bran-new data set for training our oriented R-CNN model and comprehensively evaluate the proposed method on a publicly available building detection data set. We demonstrate State-of-the-art results compared with the previous baseline methods.

  13. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  14. The active principle region of Buyang Huanwu decoction induced differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jinghui; Wan, Yi; Chi, Jianhuai; Shen, Dekai; Wu, Tingting; Li, Weimin; Du, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    The present study induced in vitro-cultured passage 4 bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells to differentiate into neural-like cells with a mixture of alkaloid, polysaccharide, aglycone, glycoside, essential oils, and effective components of Buyang Huanwu decoction (active principle region of decoction for invigorating yang for recuperation). After 28 days, nestin and neuron-specific enolase were expressed in the cytoplasm. Reverse transcription-PCR and western blot analyses showed that nestin and neuron-specific enolase mRNA and protein expression was greater in the active principle region group compared with the original formula group. Results demonstrated that the active principle region of Buyang Huanwu decoction induced greater differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells into neural-like cells in vitro than the original Buyang Huanwu decoction formula. PMID:25806066

  15. Mapping the brain's orchestration during speech comprehension: task-specific facilitation of regional synchrony in neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keil Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How does the brain convert sounds and phonemes into comprehensible speech? In the present magnetoencephalographic study we examined the hypothesis that the coherence of electromagnetic oscillatory activity within and across brain areas indicates neurophysiological processes linked to speech comprehension. Results Amplitude-modulated (sinusoidal 41.5 Hz auditory verbal and nonverbal stimuli served to drive steady-state oscillations in neural networks involved in speech comprehension. Stimuli were presented to 12 subjects in the following conditions (a an incomprehensible string of words, (b the same string of words after being introduced as a comprehensible sentence by proper articulation, and (c nonverbal stimulations that included a 600-Hz tone, a scale, and a melody. Coherence, defined as correlated activation of magnetic steady state fields across brain areas and measured as simultaneous activation of current dipoles in source space (Minimum-Norm-Estimates, increased within left- temporal-posterior areas when the sound string was perceived as a comprehensible sentence. Intra-hemispheric coherence was larger within the left than the right hemisphere for the sentence (condition (b relative to all other conditions, and tended to be larger within the right than the left hemisphere for nonverbal stimuli (condition (c, tone and melody relative to the other conditions, leading to a more pronounced hemispheric asymmetry for nonverbal than verbal material. Conclusions We conclude that coherent neuronal network activity may index encoding of verbal information on the sentence level and can be used as a tool to investigate auditory speech comprehension.

  16. Common and distinct neural networks involved in fMRI studies investigating morality: an ALE meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eres, Robert; Louis, Winnifred R; Molenberghs, Pascal

    2017-07-27

    Morality is an important social construct necessary for understanding what is right and wrong. Neuroimaging studies investigating morality have used a wide variety of paradigms and implicated many different brain areas. Yet, it remains unclear whether differences amongst morality tasks are the cause for such heterogeneous findings. Therefore, in the present study, a series of activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses were conducted on 123 datasets (inclusive of 1963 participants) to address this question. The ALE meta-analyses revealed a series of common brain areas associated with all moral tasks, including medial prefrontal cortex, lateral orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, temporoparietal junction, and precuneus. However, individual and contrast analyses also revealed unique networks associated with each moral modality, suggesting that different moral tasks recruit specialised brain regions.

  17. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahan, Muhittin; Yakut, Emre

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010). Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin). The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm). Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 ( 98%) was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE) of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE) 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  18. Interevent times estimation of major and continuous earthquakes in Hormozgan region based on radial basis function neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Mosavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to estimate the time of important earthquakes in Hormozgan region with magnitude greater than 5.5 based on the Radial Basis Function (RBF Neural Network (NN models. Input vector to the network is composed of different seismicity rates between main events that are calculated in convenient and reliable way to create optimized training methods. It helps network with a limited number of training data to estimation. It is common for earthquakes modeling by data-driven methods in this case. In addition, the proposed method is combined with Rosenberg cluster method to remove aftershocks events from the history of catalog for NN to better process the data. The results show that created RBF model successfully estimates the interevent times between large and sequence earthquakes that can be used as a tool to predict earthquake, so that comparison with other NN structure, for example Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP NN, reveals the superiority of the proposed method. Because of superiority proposed method has higher accuracy, lower costs and simpler network structure.

  19. Estimation of monthly global solar radiation in the eastern Mediterranean region in Turkey by using artificial neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahan Muhittin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an artificial neural network (ANN model was used to estimate monthly average global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for selected 5 locations in Mediterranean region for period of 18 years (1993-2010. Meteorological and geographical data were taken from Turkish State Meteorological Service. The ANN architecture designed is a feed-forward back-propagation model with one-hidden layer containing 21 neurons with hyperbolic tangent sigmoid as the transfer function and one output layer utilized a linear transfer function (purelin. The training algorithm used in ANN model was the Levenberg Marquand back propagation algorith (trainlm. Results obtained from ANN model were compared with measured meteorological values by using statistical methods. A correlation coefficient of 97.97 (~98% was obtained with root mean square error (RMSE of 0.852 MJ/m2, mean square error (MSE of 0.725 MJ/m2, mean absolute bias error (MABE 10.659MJ/m2, and mean absolute percentage error (MAPE of 4.8%. Results show good agreement between the estimated and measured values of global solar radiation. We suggest that the developed ANN model can be used to predict solar radiation another location and conditions.

  20. Transcriptomic analysis across nasal, temporal, and macular regions of human neural retina and RPE/choroid by RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, S Scott; Wagner, Alex H; DeLuca, Adam P; Drack, Arlene V; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A; Zeng, Shemin; Braun, Terry A; Mullins, Robert F; Scheetz, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    Proper spatial differentiation of retinal cell types is necessary for normal human vision. Many retinal diseases, such as Best disease and male germ cell associated kinase (MAK)-associated retinitis pigmentosa, preferentially affect distinct topographic regions of the retina. While much is known about the distribution of cell types in the retina, the distribution of molecular components across the posterior pole of the eye has not been well-studied. To investigate regional difference in molecular composition of ocular tissues, we assessed differential gene expression across the temporal, macular, and nasal retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid of human eyes using RNA-Seq. RNA from temporal, macular, and nasal retina and RPE/choroid from four human donor eyes was extracted, poly-A selected, fragmented, and sequenced as 100 bp read pairs. Digital read files were mapped to the human genome and analyzed for differential expression using the Tuxedo software suite. Retina and RPE/choroid samples were clearly distinguishable at the transcriptome level. Numerous transcription factors were differentially expressed between regions of the retina and RPE/choroid. Photoreceptor-specific genes were enriched in the peripheral samples, while ganglion cell and amacrine cell genes were enriched in the macula. Within the RPE/choroid, RPE-specific genes were upregulated at the periphery while endothelium associated genes were upregulated in the macula. Consistent with previous studies, BEST1 expression was lower in macular than extramacular regions. The MAK gene was expressed at lower levels in macula than in extramacular regions, but did not exhibit a significant difference between nasal and temporal retina. The regional molecular distinction is greatest between macula and periphery and decreases between different peripheral regions within a tissue. Datasets such as these can be used to prioritize candidate genes for possible involvement in retinal diseases with

  1. The evolution of vertebrate somatostatin receptors and their gene regions involves extensive chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Daza Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatostatin and its related neuroendocrine peptides have a wide variety of physiological functions that are mediated by five somatostatin receptors with gene names SSTR1-5 in mammals. To resolve their evolution in vertebrates we have investigated the SSTR genes and a large number of adjacent gene families by phylogeny and conserved synteny analyses in a broad range of vertebrate species. Results We find that the SSTRs form two families that belong to distinct paralogons. We observe not only chromosomal similarities reflecting the paralogy relationships between the SSTR-bearing chromosome regions, but also extensive rearrangements between these regions in teleost fish genomes, including fusions and translocations followed by reshuffling through intrachromosomal rearrangements. These events obscure the paralogy relationships but are still tractable thanks to the many genomes now available. We have identified a previously unrecognized SSTR subtype, SSTR6, previously misidentified as either SSTR1 or SSTR4. Conclusions Two ancestral SSTR-bearing chromosome regions were duplicated in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidizations (2R. One of these ancestral SSTR genes generated SSTR2, -3 and -5, the other gave rise to SSTR1, -4 and -6. Subsequently SSTR6 was lost in tetrapods and SSTR4 in teleosts. Our study shows that extensive chromosomal rearrangements have taken place between related chromosome regions in teleosts, but that these events can be resolved by investigating several distantly related species.

  2. Identification of three gp350/220 regions involved in Epstein-Barr virus invasion of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Mauricio; Lopez, Ramses; Patiño, Helena; Rosas, Jaiver E; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2005-10-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) invasion of B-lymphocytes involves EBV gp350/220 binding to B-lymphocyte CR2. The anti-gp350 monoclonal antibody (mAb)-72A1 Fab inhibits this binding and therefore blocks EBV invasion of target cells. However, gp350/220 regions interacting with mAb 72A1 and involved in EBV invasion of target cells have not yet been identified. This work reports three gp350/220 regions, defined by peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences, that are involved in EBV binding to B-lymphocytes. Peptides 11382, 11389, and 11416 bound to CR2(+) but not to CR2(-) cells, inhibited EBV invasion of cord blood lymphocytes (CBLs), were recognized by mAb 72A1, and inhibited mAb 72A1 binding to EBV. Peptides 11382 and 11416 binding to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) induced interleukin-6 protein synthesis in these cells, this phenomenon being inhibited by mAb 72A1. The same behavior has been reported for gp350/220 binding to PBLs. Anti-peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 antibodies inhibited EBV binding and EBV invasion of PBLs and CBLs. Peptide 11382, 11389, and 11416 sequences presented homology with the C3dg regions coming into contact with CR2 (C3dg and gp350 bound to similar CR2 regions). These peptides could be used in designing strategies against EBV infection.

  3. Identification of the regions involved in phonological assembly using a novel paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Tae; Waters, Dafydd; Price, Cathy J; Kherif, Ferath; Woll, Bencie; MacSweeney, Mairéad

    2015-11-01

    Here we adopt a novel strategy to investigate phonological assembly. Participants performed a visual lexical decision task in English in which the letters in words and letterstrings were delivered either sequentially (promoting phonological assembly) or simultaneously (not promoting phonological assembly). A region of interest analysis confirmed that regions previously associated with phonological assembly, in studies contrasting different word types (e.g. words versus pseudowords), were also identified using our novel task that controls for a number of confounding variables. Specifically, the left pars opercularis, the superior part of the ventral precentral gyrus and the supramarginal gyrus were all recruited more during sequential delivery than simultaneous delivery, even when various psycholinguistic characteristics of the stimuli were controlled. This suggests that sequential delivery of orthographic stimuli is a useful tool to explore how readers, with various levels of proficiency, use sublexical phonological processing during visual word recognition. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Male partner involvement in the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV infection in Mwanza Region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Munda; Mmbaga, Elia John; Mohamed, Ahmed Abade; Kishimba, Rogath Saika

    2017-01-01

    Globally, there are 3.3 million children Transmission (PMTCT) coverage of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has increased to 77%, the MTCT rate remains high (15%). Poor male partner involvement in PMTCT services is one of the factors contributing to reduced effectiveness of the PMTCT and hence failure to achieve the elimination of maternal to child transmission of HIV. This study examined the predictors of male involvement in PMTCT services in Mwanza Region, Tanzania from perspectives of the mother. A cross sectional study involving selected health facilities was conducted in Mwanza urban from October 2013 through January 2014. HIV positive pregnant women attending ante-natal clinic (ANC) were interviewed using a semi structured questionnaire. Univariate analysis was used to describe the study respondents where bivariate and logistic regression was used to determine predictors of male involvement. A total of 300 HIV positive mothers attending ANC with the mean age of 27.5 + 5.6 were interviewed. Few mothers (24.7%) had their male partners involved in PMTCT. Predictors of male partner involvement in PMTCT were mothers being proactive (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 28.6; Confidence Interval (CI) 7-116), perceived partners knowledge on PMTCT (AOR 24.6, CI 5.9-102.8), exposure to TV/Radio announcements on PMTCT (AOR 4.6, CI 1.5-14) and married status of the mother (AOR 3.7, CI 1.5-9). Mothers who never wanted to be escorted by their male partners and busy partners were associated with reduced odds of male involvement into PMTCT (AOR 0.07, CI 0.007-0.68) and (AOR 0.46 CI 0.21-0.99) respectively. Male partner involvement was associated with 98% reduced odds of violence (Crude Odds Ratio 0.018 CI 0.002-0.14). Male partner involvement in PMTCT is still low in Mwanza Region. Proactive mothers, partner's knowledge on PMTCT and announcements from television/radio were the major facilitating factors for male involvement in PMTCT as perceived by mothers. Busy male

  5. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  6. Menstrual cycle-dependent neural plasticity in the adult human brain is hormone, task, and region specific.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.S.E.; Weis, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Reuber, M.; Beyenburg, S.; Klaver, P.; Fell, J.; Greiff, A. de; Ruhlmann, J.; Reul, J.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    In rodents, cyclically fluctuating levels of gonadal steroid hormones modulate neural plasticity by altering synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis. Alterations of mood and cognition observed during the menstrual cycle suggest that steroid-related plasticity also occurs in humans. Cycle

  7. Hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy involving deep supratentorial regions: does only blood pressure matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ho Park

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 42-year-old female patient who presented with high arterial blood pressure of 245/150 mmHg and hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy that involved the brainstem and extensive supratentorial deep gray and white matter. The lesions were nearly completely resolved several days after stabilization of the arterial blood pressure. Normal diffusion-weighted imaging findings and high apparent diffusion coefficient values suggested that the main pathomechanism was vasogenic edema owing to severe hypertension. On the basis of a literature review, the absolute value of blood pressure or whether the patient can control his/her blood pressure seems not to be associated with the degree of the lesions evident on magnetic resonance imaging. It remains to be determined if the acceleration rate and the duration of elevated arterial blood pressure might play a key role in the development of the hypertensive encephalopathy pattern.

  8. Reducing uncertainty in flood frequency analyses: A comparison of local and regional approaches involving information on extreme historical floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, K.; Nguyen, C. C.; Payrastre, O.; Gaume, E.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a detailed comparison of local and regional approaches for flood frequency analyses, with a special emphasis on the effects of (a) the information on extreme floods used in the analysis (historical data or recent extreme floods observed at ungauged sites), and (b) the assumptions associated with regional approaches (statistical homogeneity of considered series, independence of observations). The results presented are based on two case studies: the Ard e ̀ che and Argens rivers regions in south-east of France. Four approaches are compared: 1 - local analysis based on continuous measured series, 2 - local analysis with historical information, 3 - regional index-flood analysis based on continuous series, 4 - regional analysis involving information on extremes (including both historical floods and recent floods observed at ungauged sites). The inference approach used is based on a GEV distribution and a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov Chain approach for parameters estimation. The comparison relies both on (1) available observed datasets and (2) Monte Carlo simulations in order to evaluate the effects of sampling variability and to analyze the possible influence of regional heterogeneities. The results indicate that a relatively limited level of regional heterogeneity, which may not be detected through homogeneity tests, may significantly affect the performances of regional approaches. These results also illustrate the added value of information on extreme floods, historical floods or recent floods observed at ungauged sites, in both local and regional approaches. As far as possible, gathering such information and incorporating it into flood frequency studies should be promoted. Finally, the presented Monte Carlo simulations appear as an interesting analysis tool for adapting the estimation strategy to the available data for each specific case study.

  9. Identification of genomic regions involved in resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from wild Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jiaqin; Ding, Yijuan; Lu, Kun; Wei, Dayong; Liu, Yao; Disi, Joseph Onwusemu; Li, Jiana; Liu, Liezhao; Liu, Shengyi; McKay, John; Qian, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The lack of resistant source has greatly restrained resistance breeding of rapeseed (Brassica napus, AACC) against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum which causes severe yield losses in rapeseed production all over the world. Recently, several wild Brassica oleracea accessions (CC) with high level of resistance have been identified (Mei et al. in Euphytica 177:393-400, 2011), bringing a new hope to improve Sclerotinia resistance of rapeseed. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Sclerotinia resistance from wild B. oleracea, an F2 population consisting of 149 genotypes, with several clones of each genotypes, was developed from one F1 individual derived from the cross between a resistant accession of wild B. oleracea (B. incana) and a susceptible accession of cultivated B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The F2 population was evaluated for Sclerotinia reaction in 2009 and 2010 under controlled condition. Significant differences among genotypes and high heritability for leaf and stem reaction indicated that genetic components accounted for a large portion of the phenotypic variance. A total of 12 QTL for leaf resistance and six QTL for stem resistance were identified in 2 years, each explaining 2.2-28.4 % of the phenotypic variation. The combined effect of alleles from wild B. oleracea reduced the relative susceptibility by 22.5 % in leaves and 15 % in stems on average over 2 years. A 12.8-cM genetic region on chromosome C09 of B. oleracea consisting of two major QTL intervals for both leaf and stem resistance was assigned into a 2.7-Mb genomic region on chromosome A09 of B. rapa, harboring about 30 putative resistance-related genes. Significant negative corrections were found between flowering time and relative susceptibility of leaf and stem. The association of flowering time with Sclerotinia resistance is discussed.

  10. Family history of alcoholism interacts with alcohol to affect brain regions involved in behavioral inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareken, David A; Dzemidzic, Mario; Wetherill, Leah; Eiler, William; Oberlin, Brandon G; Harezlak, Jaroslaw; Wang, Yang; O'Connor, Sean J

    2013-07-01

    Impulsive behavior is associated with both alcohol use disorders and a family history of alcoholism (FHA). One operational definition of impulsive behavior is the stop-signal task (SST) which measures the time needed to stop a ballistic hand movement. Employ functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study right frontal responses to stop signals in heavy drinking subjects with and without FHA, and as a function of alcohol exposure. Twenty-two family history-positive (FHP; age = 22.7 years, SD = 1.9) and 18 family history-negative (FHN; age = 23.7, SD = 1.8) subjects performed the SST in fMRI in two randomized visits: once during intravenous infusion of alcohol, clamped at a steady-state breath alcohol (BrAC) concentration of 60 mg/dL, and once during infusion of placebo saline. An independent reference group (n = 13, age = 23.7, SD = 1.8) was used to identify a priori right prefrontal regions activated by successful inhibition (Inh) trials, relative to "Go" trials that carried no need for inhibition [Inh > Go]. FHA interacted with alcohol exposure in right prefrontal cortex, where alcohol reduced [Inh > Go] activation in FHN subjects but not in FHP subjects. Within this right frontal cortical region, stop-signal reaction time also correlated negatively with [Inh > Go] activation, suggesting that the [Inh > Go] activity was related to inhibitory behavior. The results are consistent with the low level of response theory (Schuckit, J Stud Alcohol 55:149-158, 1980; Quinn and Fromme, Alcohol Clin Exp Res 35:1759-1770, 2011), with FHP being less sensitive to alcohol's effects.

  11. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  12. Structure/function analysis of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase central isoform-specific region: involvement in PKC regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Sandrine V; Duran, Marie-Josée; Carr, Deborah L; Pressley, Thomas A

    2002-11-01

    Specific functions served by the various Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase alpha-isoforms are likely to originate in regions of structural divergence within their primary structures. The isoforms are nearly identical, with the exception of the NH(2) terminus and a 10-residue region near the center of each molecule (isoform-specific region; ISR). Although the NH(2) terminus has been clearly identified as a source of isoform functional diversity, other regions seem to be involved. We investigated whether the central ISR could also contribute to isoform variability. We constructed chimeric molecules in which the central ISRs of rat alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-isoforms were exchanged. After stable transfection into opossum kidney cells, the chimeras were characterized for two properties known to differ dramatically among the isoforms: their K(+) deocclusion pattern and their response to PKC activation. Comparisons with rat full-length alpha(1)- and alpha(2)-isoforms expressed under the same conditions suggest an involvement of the central ISR in the response to PKC but not in K(+) deocclusion.

  13. An alternative approach for estimating above ground biomass using Resourcesat-2 satellite data and artificial neural network in Bundelkhand region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Dibyendu; Singh, J P; Deb, Shovik; Datta, Debajit; Ghosh, Arunava; Chaurasia, R S

    2017-10-20

    Determination of above ground biomass (AGB) of any forest is a longstanding scientific endeavor, which helps to estimate net primary productivity, carbon stock and other biophysical parameters of that forest. With advancement of geospatial technology in last few decades, AGB estimation now can be done using space-borne and airborne remotely sensed data. It is a well-established, time saving and cost effective technique with high precision and is frequently applied by the scientific community. It involves development of allometric equations based on correlations of ground-based forest biomass measurements with vegetation indices derived from remotely sensed data. However, selection of the best-fit and explanatory models of biomass estimation often becomes a difficult proposition with respect to the image data resolution (spatial and spectral) as well as the sensor platform position in space. Using Resourcesat-2 satellite data and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), this pilot scale study compared traditional linear and nonlinear models with an artificial intelligence-based non-parametric technique, i.e. artificial neural network (ANN) for formulation of the best-fit model to determine AGB of forest of the Bundelkhand region of India. The results confirmed the superiority of ANN over other models in terms of several statistical significance and reliability assessment measures. Accordingly, this study proposed the use of ANN instead of traditional models for determination of AGB and other bio-physical parameters of any dry deciduous forest of tropical sub-humid or semi-arid area. In addition, large numbers of sampling sites with different quadrant sizes for trees, shrubs, and herbs as well as application of LiDAR data as predictor variable were recommended for very high precision modelling in ANN for a large scale study.

  14. dp53 Restrains ectopic neural stem cell formation in the Drosophila brain in a non-apoptotic mechanism involving Archipelago and cyclin E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingshi Ouyang

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that tumor-initiating stem cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs possibly originating from normal stem cells may be the root cause of certain malignancies. How stem cell homeostasis is impaired in tumor tissues is not well understood, although certain tumor suppressors have been implicated. In this study, we use the Drosophila neural stem cells (NSCs called neuroblasts as a model to study this process. Loss-of-function of Numb, a key cell fate determinant with well-conserved mammalian counterparts, leads to the formation of ectopic neuroblasts and a tumor phenotype in the larval brain. Overexpression of the Drosophila tumor suppressor p53 (dp53 was able to suppress ectopic neuroblast formation caused by numb loss-of-function. This occurred in a non-apoptotic manner and was independent of Dacapo, the fly counterpart of the well-characterized mammalian p53 target p21 involved in cellular senescence. The observation that dp53 affected Edu incorporation into neuroblasts led us to test the hypothesis that dp53 acts through regulation of factors involved in cell cycle progression. Our results show that the inhibitory effect of dp53 on ectopic neuroblast formation was mediated largely through its regulation of Cyclin E (Cyc E. Overexpression of Cyc E was able to abrogate dp53's ability to rescue numb loss-of-function phenotypes. Increasing Cyc E levels by attenuating Archipelago (Ago, a recently identified transcriptional target of dp53 and a negative regulator of Cyc E, had similar effects. Conversely, reducing Cyc E activity by overexpressing Ago blocked ectopic neuroblast formation in numb mutant. Our results reveal an intimate connection between cell cycle progression and NSC self-renewal vs. differentiation control, and indicate that p53-mediated regulation of ectopic NSC self-renewal through the Ago/Cyc E axis becomes particularly important when NSC homeostasis is perturbed as in numb loss-of-function condition. This has

  15. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  16. Dysfunctional involvement of emotion and reward brain regions on social decision making in excess weight adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo-García, Antonio; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Rio-Valle, Jacqueline S; Lacomba, Juan A; Lagos, Francisco M; Soriano-Mas, Carles

    2015-01-01

    Obese adolescents suffer negative social experiences, but no studies have examined whether obesity is associated with dysfunction of the social brain or whether social brain abnormalities relate to disadvantageous traits and social decisions. We aimed at mapping functional activation differences in the brain circuitry of social decision making in adolescents with excess versus normal weight, and at examining whether these separate patterns correlate with reward/punishment sensitivity, disordered eating features, and behavioral decisions. In this fMRI study, 80 adolescents aged 12 to 18 years old were classified in two groups based on age adjusted body mass index (BMI) percentiles: normal weight (n = 44, BMI percentiles 5th-84th) and excess weight (n = 36, BMI percentile ≥ 85th). Participants were scanned while performing a social decision-making task (ultimatum game) in which they chose to "accept" or "reject" offers to split monetary stakes made by another peer. Offers varied in fairness (Fair vs. Unfair) but in all cases "accepting" meant both players win the money, whereas "rejecting" meant both lose it. We showed that adolescents with excess weight compared to controls display significantly decreased activation of anterior insula, anterior cingulate, and midbrain during decisions about Unfair versus Fair offers. Moreover, excess weight subjects show lower sensitivity to reward and more maturity fears, which correlate with insula activation. Indeed, blunted insula activation accounted for the relationship between maturity fears and acceptance of unfair offers. Excess weight adolescents have diminished activation of brain regions essential for affective tracking of social decision making, which accounts for the association between maturity fears and social decisions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Exercise increases mTOR signaling in brain regions involved in cognition and emotional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Brian A; Hake, Holly S; Ishiwata, Takayuki; Farmer, Caroline E; Loetz, Esteban C; Fleshner, Monika; Bland, Sondra T; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2017-04-14

    Exercise can enhance learning and memory and produce resistance against stress-related psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety. In rats, these beneficial effects of exercise occur regardless of exercise controllability: both voluntary and forced wheel running produce stress-protective effects. The mechanisms underlying these beneficial effects of exercise remain unknown. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a translation regulator important for cell growth, proliferation, and survival. mTOR has been implicated in enhancing learning and memory as well as antidepressant effects. Moreover, mTOR is sensitive to exercise signals such as metabolic factors. The effects of exercise on mTOR signaling, however, remain unknown. The goal of the present study was to test the hypothesis that exercise, regardless of controllability, increases levels of phosphorylated mTOR (p-mTOR) in brain regions important for learning and emotional behavior. Rats were exposed to 6 weeks of either sedentary (locked wheel), voluntary, or forced wheel running conditions. At 6 weeks, rats were sacrificed during peak running and levels of p-mTOR were measured using immunohistochemistry. Overall, both voluntary and forced exercise increased p-mTOR-positive neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and amygdala compared to locked wheel controls. Exercise, regardless of controllability, also increased numbers of p-mTOR-positive glia in the striatum, hippocampus, and amygdala. For both neurons and glia, the largest increase in p-mTOR positive cells was observed after voluntary running, with forced exercise causing a more modest increase. Interestingly, voluntary exercise preferentially increased p-mTOR in astrocytes (GFAP+), while forced running increased p-mTOR in microglia (CD11+) in the inferior dentate gyrus. Results suggest that mTOR signaling is sensitive to exercise, but subtle differences exist depending on exercise controllability

  18. Net analyte signal-based simultaneous determination of antazoline and naphazoline using wavelength region selection by experimental design-neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmateenejad, Bahram; Ghavami, Raoof; Miri, Ramin; Shamsipur, Majtaba

    2006-02-15

    Net analyte signal (NAS)-based multivariate calibration methods were employed for simultaneous determination of anthazoline and naphazoline. The NAS vectors calculated from the absorbance data of the drugs mixture were used as input for classical least squares (CLS), principal component and partial least squares regression PCR and PLS methods. A wavelength selection strategy was used to find the best wavelength region for each drug separately. As a new procedure, we proposed an experimental design-neural network strategy for wavelength region optimization. By use of a full factorial design method, some different wavelength regions were selected by taking into account different spectral parameters including the starting wavelength, the ending wavelength and the wavelength interval. The performance of all the multivariate calibration methods, in all selected wavelength regions for both drugs, was evaluated by calculating a fitness function based on the root mean square error of calibration and validation. A three-layered feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN) model with back-propagation learning algorithm was employed to model the nonlinear relationship between the spectral parameters and fitness of each regression method. From the resulted ANN models, the spectral regions in which lowest fitness could be obtained were chosen. Comparison of the results revealed that the net NAS-PLS resulted in lower prediction error than the other models. The proposed NAS-based calibration method was successfully applied to the simultaneous analyses of anthazoline and naphazoline in a commercial eye drop sample.

  19. Neural-network-based prediction techniques for single station modeling and regional mapping of the foF2 and M(3000F2 ionospheric characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Xenos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Neural-Network-based single-station hourly daily foF2 and M(3000F2 modelling of 15 European ionospheric stations is investigated. The data used are neural networks and hourly daily values from the period 1964- 1988 for training the neural networks and from the period 1989-1994 for checking the prediction accuracy. Two types of models are presented for the F2-layer critical frequency prediction and two for the propagation factor M(3000F2. The first foF2 model employs the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12 and the local noon F2- layer critical frequency of the previous day. The second foF2 model, which introduces a new regional mapping technique, employs the Juliusruh neural network model and uses the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, and the previous day F2-layer critical frequency measured at Juliusruh at noon. The first M(3000F2 model employs the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, its ± 3 h deviations and the local noon cosine of the solar zenith angle (cos c12. The second model, which introduces a new M(3000F2 mapping technique, employs Juliusruh neural network model and uses the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, and the previous day F2-layer critical frequency measured at Juliusruh at noon.

  20. Lhx1 in the proximal region of the optic vesicle permits neural retina development in the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Kawaue

    2012-08-01

    How the eye forms has been one of the fundamental issues in developmental biology. The retinal anlage first appears as the optic vesicle (OV evaginating from the forebrain. Subsequently, its distal portion invaginates to form the two-walled optic cup, which develops into the outer pigmented and inner neurosensory layers of the retina. Recent work has shown that this optic-cup morphogenesis proceeds as a self-organizing activity without any extrinsic molecules. However, intrinsic factors that regulate this process have not been elucidated. Here we show that a LIM-homeobox gene, Lhx1, normally expressed in the proximal region of the nascent OV, induces a second neurosensory retina formation from the outer pigmented retina when overexpressed in the chicken OV. Lhx2, another LIM-homeobox gene supposed to be involved in early OV formation, could not substitute this function of Lhx1, while Lhx5, closely related to Lhx1, could replace it. Conversely, knockdown of Lhx1 expression by RNA interference resulted in the formation of a small or pigmented vesicle. These results suggest that the proximal region demarcated by Lhx1 expression permits OV development, eventually dividing the two retinal domains.

  1. Neural bases of accented speech perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti eAdank

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Adank, Evans, Stuart-Smith, & Scott, 2009; Floccia, Goslin, Girard, & Konopczynski, 2006. Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012 for an in-depth overview of behavioural aspects of accent processing.

  2. Neural bases of accented speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adank, Patti; Nuttall, Helen E; Banks, Briony; Kennedy-Higgins, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of unfamiliar regional and foreign accents represents a challenging task for the speech perception system (Floccia et al., 2006; Adank et al., 2009). Despite the frequency with which we encounter such accents, the neural mechanisms supporting successful perception of accented speech are poorly understood. Nonetheless, candidate neural substrates involved in processing speech in challenging listening conditions, including accented speech, are beginning to be identified. This review will outline neural bases associated with perception of accented speech in the light of current models of speech perception, and compare these data to brain areas associated with processing other speech distortions. We will subsequently evaluate competing models of speech processing with regards to neural processing of accented speech. See Cristia et al. (2012) for an in-depth overview of behavioral aspects of accent processing.

  3. Pax7 lineage contributions to the mammalian neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Murdoch

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are vertebrate-specific multipotent cells that contribute to a variety of tissues including the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and craniofacial bones and cartilage. Abnormal development of the neural crest is associated with several human maladies including cleft/lip palate, aggressive cancers such as melanoma and neuroblastoma, and rare syndromes, like Waardenburg syndrome, a complex disorder involving hearing loss and pigment defects. We previously identified the transcription factor Pax7 as an early marker, and required component for neural crest development in chick embryos. In mammals, Pax7 is also thought to play a role in neural crest development, yet the precise contribution of Pax7 progenitors to the neural crest lineage has not been determined.Here we use Cre/loxP technology in double transgenic mice to fate map the Pax7 lineage in neural crest derivates. We find that Pax7 descendants contribute to multiple tissues including the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest, which in the cranial cartilage form a distinct regional pattern. The Pax7 lineage, like the Pax3 lineage, is additionally detected in some non-neural crest tissues, including a subset of the epithelial cells in specific organs.These results demonstrate a previously unappreciated widespread distribution of Pax7 descendants within and beyond the neural crest. They shed light regarding the regionally distinct phenotypes observed in Pax3 and Pax7 mutants, and provide a unique perspective into the potential roles of Pax7 during disease and development.

  4. Autonomic neural control of the cardiovascular system in patients with Behçet's disease in the absence of neurological involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Tansel; Tekin, Abdullah; Tufan, Müge; Altay, Hakan; Tekin, Göknur; Bilgi, Muhammet; Özin, Bülent; Yücel, Eftal; Müderrisoğlu, Haldun

    2012-10-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a chronic multi-system disease presenting with recurrent oral and genital ulceration, and relapsing uveitis. Heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is a marker of parasympathetic activity. A delayed recovery of systolic blood pressure (SBP) after exercise might reflect sympathetic hyperactivity. The analysis of variations in heart rate has also been used to determine the balance between sympathetic and vagal nerve activities in the heart. Our objective was to determine HRR, the SBP response to exercise and heart rate variability (HRV) in patients with BD in the absence of neurological involvement. The study population consisted of 32 patients with BD and 30 healthy controls who were matched with respect to age, sex, and physical activity. Heart rate recovery was calculated as the difference between heart rate at peak exercise and heart rate at 1, 2, and 3 min of recovery. Blood pressure recovery indexes were determined by dividing the systolic blood pressure at 2 and 3 min in recovery to the systolic blood pressure at peak exercise. In patients with BD, mean HRR at 1 min (HRR1) were not significantly different than that of controls (21 ± 7 vs 20 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.50). Although, resting mean SBP of patients with BD was higher than controls (121 ± 13 vs 115 ± 12 mmHg, p = 0.039), the SBP recovery indices of the patients with BD at 2 and 3 min were similar to those of controls (0.84 ± 0.07 vs 0.84 ± 0.09, p = 0.89 and 0.78 ± 0.09 vs 0.78 ± 0.08, p = 0.93, respectively). Both time domain and frequency domain parameters of patients with BD were similar to that of controls. This study shows that the patients with BD have normal HRR1 and normal SBP response to exercise and normal HRV. These findings might suggest unaltered autonomic neural control of the cardiovascular system in this disorder in the absence of neurological involvement.

  5. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An Approach for Identifying of Fusarium Infected Maize Grains by Spectral Analysis in the Visible and Near Infrared Region, SIMCA Models, Parametric and Neural Classifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetelina Draganova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available An approach for identifying of Fusarium infected single maize grains based on diffuse reflectance in visible and near infrared region is proposed in the paper. Spectral characteristics were collected in the range 400-2500 nm in steps of 2 nm. Soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA is used for data processing. Maize grains classification is based on SIMCA classifier and Probabilistic neural network (PNN. Recognition accuracy which is achieved for both classes of grains is respectively 99.89% for healthy, and 93.7% for infected.

  7. Young adult smokers' neural response to graphic cigarette warning labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E. Green

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: In this sample of young adult smokers, GWLs promoted neural activation in brain regions involved in cognitive and affective decision-making and memory formation and the effects of GWLs did not differ on branded or plain cigarette packaging. These findings complement other recent neuroimaging GWL studies conducted with older adult smokers and with adolescents by demonstrating similar patterns of neural activation in response to GWLs among young adult smokers.

  8. Structural insights into the human RyR2 N-terminal region involved in cardiac arrhythmias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borko, Ľubomír; Bauerová-Hlinková, Vladena, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk; Hostinová, Eva; Gašperík, Juraj [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Beck, Konrad [Cardiff University School of Dentistry, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XY Wales (United Kingdom); Lai, F. Anthony [Cardiff University School of Medicine, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Zahradníková, Alexandra, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Molecular Physiology and Genetics, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Vlárska 5, 833 34 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ševčík, Jozef, E-mail: vladena.bauerova@savba.sk [Institute of Molecular Biology, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 21, 845 51 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-11-01

    X-ray and solution structures of the human RyR2 N-terminal region were obtained under near-physiological conditions. The structure exhibits a unique network of interactions between its three domains, revealing an important stabilizing role of the central helix. Human ryanodine receptor 2 (hRyR2) mediates calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, enabling cardiomyocyte contraction. The N-terminal region of hRyR2 (amino acids 1–606) is the target of >30 arrhythmogenic mutations and contains a binding site for phosphoprotein phosphatase 1. Here, the solution and crystal structures determined under near-physiological conditions, as well as a homology model of the hRyR2 N-terminal region, are presented. The N-terminus is held together by a unique network of interactions among its three domains, A, B and C, in which the central helix (amino acids 410–437) plays a prominent stabilizing role. Importantly, the anion-binding site reported for the mouse RyR2 N-terminal region is notably absent from the human RyR2. The structure concurs with the differential stability of arrhythmogenic mutations in the central helix (R420W, I419F and I419F/R420W) which are owing to disparities in the propensity of mutated residues to form energetically favourable or unfavourable contacts. In solution, the N-terminus adopts a globular shape with a prominent tail that is likely to involve residues 545–606, which are unresolved in the crystal structure. Docking the N-terminal domains into cryo-electron microscopy maps of the closed and open RyR1 conformations reveals C{sup α} atom movements of up to 8 Å upon channel gating, and predicts the location of the leucine–isoleucine zipper segment and the interaction site for spinophilin and phosphoprotein phosphatase 1 on the RyR surface.

  9. High Dose Involved Field Radiation Therapy as Salvage for Loco-Regional Recurrence of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Nam, Heerim; Park, Hee Chul; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Shim, Young Mog; Kim, Jhingook; Kim, Kwhanmien; Ahn, Jin Seok; Ahn, Myung-Ju; Park, Keunchil

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effectiveness of salvage radiation therapy (RT) in patients with loco-regional recurrences (LRR) following initial complete resection of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and assess prognostic factors affecting survivals. Materials and Methods Between 1994 and 2007, 64 patients with LRR after surgery of NSCLC were treated with high dose RT alone (78.1%) or concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT, 21.9%) at Samsung Medical Center. Twenty-nine patients (45.3%) had local recurrence, 26 patients (40.6%) had regional recurrence and 9 patients (14.1%) had recurrence of both components. The median RT dose was 54 Gy (range, 44-66 Gy). The radiation target volume included the recurrent lesions only. Results The median follow-up time from the start of RT in survivors was 32.0 months. The rates of in-field failure free survival, intra-thoracic failure free survival and extra-thoracic failure free survival at 2 years were 52.3%, 33.9% and 59.4%, respectively. The median survival after RT was 18.5 months, and 2-year overall survival (OS) rate was 47.9%. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, the interval from surgery till recurrence and CCRT were significant prognostic factors for OS. Conclusion The current study demonstrates that involved field salvage RT is effective for LRR of NSCLC following surgery. PMID:23074111

  10. Surgical Management of Giant Cell Tumors in Temporomandibular Joint Region Involving Lateral Skull Base: A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Ma, Chunyue; Wang, Liang; Li, Jun; Wu, Yiqun; Sun, Jian

    2016-11-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCTs) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region invading the lateral skull base are relatively uncommon. The management of these lesions is still controversial because of their proximity to vital neurovascular structures. Although sporadically reported, the clinical outcomes of such disease after surgery are still largely unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 28 patients with resectable GCTs in the TMJ region involving the lateral skull base treated from 1994 to 2013. A multidisciplinary team, formed by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, neurosurgeons, and otorhinolaryngologists, had surgically treated all these patients by craniomaxillofacial resection. Clinical variables, different treatment modalities, and outcomes are compared. Representative cases also are presented. Our case series consisted of 15 male and 13 female patients with a median age of 41 years. The median follow-up duration for our series was 5.4 years (range, 0.8-18.5 years). The average tumor size measured 8.6 cm. Most of the GCTs (n = 19, 67.9%) extended through the skull base bones into the brain parenchyma and other surrounding soft tissues. Titanium meshes for cranioplasty of skull base bones was used in 9 patients (32.1%), whereas temporalis fascia (n = 5, 17.9%) or free flaps (n = 6, 21.4%) were used more frequently for duraplasty. A postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak was found in only 1 patient. During follow-up, the local control rate reached 85.7%. Thoroughness of tumor resection (hazard ratio, 15.763; 95% confidence interval, 1.630-152.437; P = .017) was found to be associated with recurrence-free survival. Craniomaxillofacial surgery for GCTs in the TMJ region invading the skull base is feasible in selected patients. A meticulous plan via a multidisciplinary approach is mandatory for the success of such treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The non-conserved region of MRP is involved in the virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Fu, Yang; Ma, Caifeng; He, Yanan; Yu, Yanfei; Du, Dechao; Yao, Huochun; Lu, Chengping; Zhang, Wei

    2017-10-03

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is an important epidemic virulence marker with an unclear role in bacterial infection. To investigate the biologic functions of MRP, 3 mutants named Δmrp, Δmrp domain 1 (Δmrp-d1), and Δmrp domain 2 (Δmrp-d2) were constructed to assess the phenotypic changes between the parental strain and the mutant strains. The results indicated that MRP domain 1 (MRP-D1, the non-conserved region of MRP from a virulent strain, a.a. 242-596) played a critical role in adherence of SS2 to host cells, compared with MRP domain 1* (MRP-D1*, the non-conserved region of MRP from a low virulent strain, a.a. 239-598) or MRP domain 2 (MRP-D2, the conserved region of MRP, a.a. 848-1222). We found that MRP-D1 but not MRP-D2, could bind specifically to fibronectin (FN), factor H (FH), fibrinogen (FG), and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Additionally, we confirmed that mrp-d1 mutation significantly inhibited bacteremia and brain invasion in a mouse infection model. The mrp-d1 mutation also attenuated the intracellular survival of SS2 in RAW246.7 macrophages, shortened the growth ability in pig blood and decreased the virulence of SS2 in BALB/c mice. Furthermore, antiserum against MRP-D1 was found to dramatically impede SS2 survival in pig blood. Finally, immunization with recombinant MRP-D1 efficiently enhanced murine viability after SS2 challenge, indicating its potential use in vaccination strategies. Collectively, these results indicated that MRP-D1 is involved in SS2 virulence and eloquently demonstrate the function of MRP in pathogenesis of infection.

  12. Differential activation of brain regions involved with error-feedback and imitation based motor simulation when observing self and an expert's actions in pilots and non-pilots on a complex glider landing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Daniel E; Terzibas, Cengiz; Cassel, Daniel B; Callan, Akiko; Kawato, Mitsuo; Sato, Masa-Aki

    2013-05-15

    In this fMRI study we investigate neural processes related to the action observation network using a complex perceptual-motor task in pilots and non-pilots. The task involved landing a glider (using aileron, elevator, rudder, and dive brake) as close to a target as possible, passively observing a replay of one's own previous trial, passively observing a replay of an expert's trial, and a baseline do nothing condition. The objective of this study is to investigate two types of motor simulation processes used during observation of action: imitation based motor simulation and error-feedback based motor simulation. It has been proposed that the computational neurocircuitry of the cortex is well suited for unsupervised imitation based learning, whereas, the cerebellum is well suited for error-feedback based learning. Consistent with predictions, pilots (to a greater extent than non-pilots) showed significant differential activity when observing an expert landing the glider in brain regions involved with imitation based motor simulation (including premotor cortex PMC, inferior frontal gyrus IFG, anterior insula, parietal cortex, superior temporal gyrus, and middle temporal MT area) than when observing one's own previous trial which showed significant differential activity in the cerebellum (only for pilots) thought to be concerned with error-feedback based motor simulation. While there was some differential brain activity for pilots in regions involved with both Execution and Observation of the flying task (potential Mirror System sites including IFG, PMC, superior parietal lobule) the majority was adjacent to these areas (Observation Only Sites) (predominantly in PMC, IFG, and inferior parietal loblule). These regions showing greater activity for observation than for action may be involved with processes related to motor-based representational transforms that are not necessary when actually carrying out the task. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dynamic Changes in Ezh2 Gene Occupancy Underlie Its Involvement in Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Differentiation towards Oligodendrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Olah, Marta; Copray, Sjef

    2012-01-01

    Background: The polycomb group protein Ezh2 is an epigenetic repressor of transcription originally found to prevent untimely differentiation of pluripotent embryonic stem cells. We previously demonstrated that Ezh2 is also expressed in multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs). We showed that Ezh2

  14. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  15. Regional differences in glutathione accumulation pathways in the rat cornea: Mapping of amino acid transporters involved in glutathione synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandarajah, Vithushiya; Li, Bo; Umapathy, Ankita; Donaldson, Paul J; Lim, Julie C

    2017-08-01

    In this study we have sought to complete the identification and localisation of uptake pathways involved in accumulating precursor amino acids involved in GSH synthesis in the rat cornea. To do this, we performed reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) to identify the Excitatory Amino Acid Transporters (EAAT 1-5) responsible for glutamate uptake, and glycine transporters (GLYT 1-2) at the transcript level. Western blotting was used to verify protein expression, while immunolabelling of sagittal sections was used to localise transporters to the different layers of the cornea. Immunolabelling of en face sections was used to examine the subcellular distribution of proteins in the corneal endothelium. Our findings revealed EAAT 1-5 and GLYT 1-2 to be expressed at the transcript and protein level in the rat cornea. Immunohistochemistry revealed all amino acid transporters to be localised to the epithelium. In the majority of cases, labelling was restricted to the epithelium, and labelling absent from the stroma or endothelium. However, EAAT 4 and GLYT 2 labelling was detected in the stroma with EAAT 4 labelling also present in the endothelium. Overall, the identification of amino acid transporters strongly supports the existence of an intracellular GSH synthesis pathway in the rat corneal epithelium. This suggests that regional differences in GSH accumulation pathways exist, with direct uptake of GSH and intracellular synthesis of GSH restricted to the endothelial and epithelial cell layers, respectively. This information is important in the design of targeted strategies to enhance GSH levels in specific layers of the cornea to prevent against oxidative damage, corneal swelling and loss of corneal transparency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inversion of Schlumberger resistivity sounding data from the critically dynamic Koyna region using the Hybrid Monte Carlo-based neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maiti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Koyna region is well-known for its triggered seismic activities since the hazardous earthquake of M=6.3 occurred around the Koyna reservoir on 10 December 1967. Understanding the shallow distribution of resistivity pattern in such a seismically critical area is vital for mapping faults, fractures and lineaments. However, deducing true resistivity distribution from the apparent resistivity data lacks precise information due to intrinsic non-linearity in the data structures. Here we present a new technique based on the Bayesian neural network (BNN theory using the concept of Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation scheme. The new method is applied to invert one and two-dimensional Direct Current (DC vertical electrical sounding (VES data acquired around the Koyna region in India. Prior to apply the method on actual resistivity data, the new method was tested for simulating synthetic signal. In this approach the objective/cost function is optimized following the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling based algorithm and each trajectory was updated by approximating the Hamiltonian differential equations through a leapfrog discretization scheme. The stability of the new inversion technique was tested in presence of correlated red noise and uncertainty of the result was estimated using the BNN code. The estimated true resistivity distribution was compared with the results of singular value decomposition (SVD-based conventional resistivity inversion results. Comparative results based on the HMC-based Bayesian Neural Network are in good agreement with the existing model results, however in some cases, it also provides more detail and precise results, which appears to be justified with local geological and structural details. The new BNN approach based on HMC is faster and proved to be a promising inversion scheme to interpret complex and non-linear resistivity problems. The HMC-based BNN results

  17. Restoration of sodic soils involving chemical and biological amendments and phytoremediation by Eucalyptus camaldulensis in a semiarid region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenivasan, R; Prasath, V; Mohanraj, R

    2015-06-01

    Salt-affected soils in semiarid regions impede the agricultural productivity and degrade the ecosystem health. In South India, several hectares of land are salt-affected, where the evapotranspiration exceeds the annual precipitation. This study is an attempt to ameliorate sodic soils, by an experiment involving chemical treatment (addition of gypsum), organic amendments (decomposed bagasse pith and green manuring with Sesbania rostrata) and phytoremediation by plantation of Eucalyptus camaldulensis. The prime focus is to minimize the use of gypsum and improve the soil health in terms of nutrients, microbial population and enzyme activity in addition to sodicity reclamation. At the end of the third year, a reduction of 10 % in soil pH, 33 % in electrical conductivity and 20 % in exchangeable sodium percentage was achieved compared to the initial values. Three- to fourfold increases in organic carbon content were observed. Significant improvement in the available major and micronutrients of soil, microbial growth and enzyme activity was observed, suggesting phytoremediation by E. camaldulensis as a sustainable option for restoration of similar kind of degraded lands.

  18. Signaling by the heavy-metal sensor CusS involves rearranged helical interactions in specific transmembrane regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Danny Ka Chun; Ma, Yongzheng; Xia, Tingying; Luk, Jakson Chak Hon; Yan, Aixin

    2016-06-01

    Two-component systems (TCSs) play important roles in the adaptation of bacteria to stress. Despite their increasingly well understood mechanistic features, it remains poorly understood how TCSs transduce signals across membranes. Here, we use the E. coli Cu/Ag-responsive CusSR TCS as a model to investigate the roles of CusS transmembrane (TM) residues. Proline scanning of TM1 domain led to identification of the T17P, F18P, and S21P variants, which display higher kinase activities relative to wild type. A single point mutation, V202G, in the adjacent TM2 domain specifically suppresses the hyperactivities of these mutants. Disulfide crosslinking analysis demonstrated that T17 and V202 are situated in close proximity, and Cys residues substituted at those two positions form exclusive intramolecular crosslinks when CusS is in the signaling-inactive state. In the signaling-active variant of CusS, however, only intermolecular crosslinking between the two Cys residues could be observed, suggesting that destabilization of an intramolecular constraint and a subsequent rearrangement of helical interactions in this TM region is involved in the activation of CusS. An analogous TM helical interface in the P. aeruginosa heavy metal sensor kinase CzcS is also observed. Together, these results suggested a conserved transmembrane signal transduction mechanism in the heavy metal sensing TCSs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Non-Linearity Explanation in Artificial Neural Network Application with a Case Study of Fog Forecast Over Delhi Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, K.; Dimri, A. P.

    2016-05-01

    Fog affects human life in a number of ways by reducing the visibility, hence affecting critical infrastructure, transportation, tourism or by the formation of frost, thus harming the standing crops. Smog is becoming a regular phenomenon in urban areas which is highly toxic to humans. Delhi was chosen as the area of study as it encounters all these hazards of fog stated apart from other political and economic reasons. The complex relationship behind the parameters and processes behind the formation of fog makes it extremely difficult to model and forecast it accurately. It is attempted to forecast the fog and understand its dynamics through a statistical downscaling technique of artificial neural network which is deemed accurate for short-term forecasting and usually outperform time-series models. The backpropagation neural network, which is a gradient descent algorithm where the network weights are moved along the negative of the gradient of the performance function, has been used for our analysis. Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) supported National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data had been used for carrying out the simulations. The model was found to have high accuracy but lacking in skill. An attempt has been made to present the data in a binary form by determining a threshold by the contingency table approach followed by its critical analysis. It is found that the calculation of an optimum threshold was also difficult to fix as the parameters of fog formation on which the model has been has been trained had shown some changes in their trend over a period of time.

  20. Detection and Localization of Robotic Tools in Robot-Assisted Surgery Videos Using Deep Neural Networks for Region Proposal and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarikaya, Duygu; Corso, Jason J; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-07-01

    Video understanding of robot-assisted surgery (RAS) videos is an active research area. Modeling the gestures and skill level of surgeons presents an interesting problem. The insights drawn may be applied in effective skill acquisition, objective skill assessment, real-time feedback, and human-robot collaborative surgeries. We propose a solution to the tool detection and localization open problem in RAS video understanding, using a strictly computer vision approach and the recent advances of deep learning. We propose an architecture using multimodal convolutional neural networks for fast detection and localization of tools in RAS videos. To the best of our knowledge, this approach will be the first to incorporate deep neural networks for tool detection and localization in RAS videos. Our architecture applies a region proposal network (RPN) and a multimodal two stream convolutional network for object detection to jointly predict objectness and localization on a fusion of image and temporal motion cues. Our results with an average precision of 91% and a mean computation time of 0.1 s per test frame detection indicate that our study is superior to conventionally used methods for medical imaging while also emphasizing the benefits of using RPN for precision and efficiency. We also introduce a new data set, ATLAS Dione, for RAS video understanding. Our data set provides video data of ten surgeons from Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA, performing six different surgical tasks on the daVinci Surgical System (dVSS) with annotations of robotic tools per frame.

  1. Comparison Study on the Estimation of the Spatial Distribution of Regional Soil Metal(loid)s Pollution Based on Kriging Interpolation and BP Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhenyi; Zhou, Shenglu; Su, Quanlong; Yi, Haomin; Wang, Junxiao

    2017-12-26

    Soil pollution by metal(loid)s resulting from rapid economic development is a major concern. Accurately estimating the spatial distribution of soil metal(loid) pollution has great significance in preventing and controlling soil pollution. In this study, 126 topsoil samples were collected in Kunshan City and the geo-accumulation index was selected as a pollution index. We used Kriging interpolation and BP neural network methods to estimate the spatial distribution of arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) pollution in the study area. Additionally, we introduced a cross-validation method to measure the errors of the estimation results by the two interpolation methods and discussed the accuracy of the information contained in the estimation results. The conclusions are as follows: data distribution characteristics, spatial variability, and mean square errors (MSE) of the different methods showed large differences. Estimation results from BP neural network models have a higher accuracy, the MSE of As and Cd are 0.0661 and 0.1743, respectively. However, the interpolation results show significant skewed distribution, and spatial autocorrelation is strong. Using Kriging interpolation, the MSE of As and Cd are 0.0804 and 0.2983, respectively. The estimation results have poorer accuracy. Combining the two methods can improve the accuracy of the Kriging interpolation and more comprehensively represent the spatial distribution characteristics of metal(loid)s in regional soil. The study may provide a scientific basis and technical support for the regulation of soil metal(loid) pollution.

  2. Comparison Study on the Estimation of the Spatial Distribution of Regional Soil Metal(loids Pollution Based on Kriging Interpolation and BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyi Jia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil pollution by metal(loids resulting from rapid economic development is a major concern. Accurately estimating the spatial distribution of soil metal(loid pollution has great significance in preventing and controlling soil pollution. In this study, 126 topsoil samples were collected in Kunshan City and the geo-accumulation index was selected as a pollution index. We used Kriging interpolation and BP neural network methods to estimate the spatial distribution of arsenic (As and cadmium (Cd pollution in the study area. Additionally, we introduced a cross-validation method to measure the errors of the estimation results by the two interpolation methods and discussed the accuracy of the information contained in the estimation results. The conclusions are as follows: data distribution characteristics, spatial variability, and mean square errors (MSE of the different methods showed large differences. Estimation results from BP neural network models have a higher accuracy, the MSE of As and Cd are 0.0661 and 0.1743, respectively. However, the interpolation results show significant skewed distribution, and spatial autocorrelation is strong. Using Kriging interpolation, the MSE of As and Cd are 0.0804 and 0.2983, respectively. The estimation results have poorer accuracy. Combining the two methods can improve the accuracy of the Kriging interpolation and more comprehensively represent the spatial distribution characteristics of metal(loids in regional soil. The study may provide a scientific basis and technical support for the regulation of soil metal(loid pollution.

  3. Neural correlates of paediatric dysgraphia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoorn, Jessika F; Maathuis, Carel G B; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2013-11-01

    Writing is an important skill that is related both to school performance and to psychosocial outcomes such as the child's self-esteem. Deficits in handwriting performance are frequently encountered in children with developmental coordination disorder. This review focuses on what is known about the neural correlates of atypical handwriting in children. Knowledge of the neural correlates is derived from studies using clinical case designs (e.g. lesion studies), studies using neuroimaging, and assessment of minor neurological dysfunction. The two functional imaging studies suggest a contribution of cortical areas and the cerebellum. The largest study indicated that cortical areas in all regions of the brain are involved (frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital). The two lesion studies confirmed cerebellar involvement. The findings of the study on minor neurological dysfunction in children with writing problems correspond to the imaging results. The limited data on the neural substrate of paediatric dysgraphia suggest that at least a subset of the children with dysgraphia have dysfunctions in extensive supraspinal networks. In others, dysfunction may be restricted to either the cerebellum or specific cortical sites. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  4. A neural basis for general intelligence

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, J.; Seitz, R.J.; Kolodny, J.; Bor, D.; Herzog, H; Ahmed, A.; Newell, F. N.; Emslie, H

    2000-01-01

    Universal positive correlations between different cognitive tests motivate the concept of "general intelligence" or Spearman's g. Here the neural basis for g is investigated by means of positron emission tomography. Spatial, verbal, and perceptuo-motor tasks with high-g involvement are compared with matched Low-g control tasks. In contrast to the common view that g reflects a broad sample of major cognitive functions, high-g tasks do not show diffuse recruitment of multiple brain regions. Ins...

  5. Bifurcation Scenarios of Neural Firing Patterns across Two Separated Chaotic Regions as Indicated by Theoretical and Biological Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaguang Gu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear dynamics can be used to identify relationships between different firing patterns, which play important roles in the information processing. The present study provides novel biological experimental findings regarding complex bifurcation scenarios from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking with chaotic firing patterns. These bifurcations were found to be similar to those simulated using the Hindmarsh-Rose model across two separated chaotic regions. One chaotic region lay between period-1 and period-2 burstings. This region has not attracted much attention. The other region is a well-known comb-shaped chaotic region, and it appears after period-2 bursting. After period-2 bursting, the chaotic firings lay in a period-adding bifurcation scenario or in a period-doubling bifurcation cascade. The deterministic dynamics of the chaotic firing patterns were identified using a nonlinear prediction method. These results provided details regarding the processes and dynamics of bifurcation containing the chaotic bursting between period-1 and period-2 burstings and other chaotic firing patterns within the comb-shaped chaotic region. They also provided details regarding the relationships between different firing patterns in parameter space.

  6. Daily global solar radiation modelling using multi-layer perceptron neural networks in semi-arid region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mawloud GUERMOUI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of Daily Global Solar Radiation (DGSR has been a major goal for solar energy application. However, solar radiation measurements are not a simple task for several reasons. In the cases where data are not available, it is very common the use of computational models to estimate the missing data, which are based mainly of the search for relationships between weather variables, such as temperature, humidity, sunshine duration, etc. In this respect, the present study focuses on the development of artificial neural network (ANN model for estimation of daily global solar radiation on horizontal surface in Ghardaia city (South Algeria. In this analysis back-propagation algorithm is applied. Daily mean air temperature, relative humidity and sunshine duration was used as climatic inputs parameters, while the daily global solar radiation (DGSR was the only output of the ANN. We have evaluated Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP models to estimate DGSR using three year of measurement (2005-2008. It was found that MLP-model based on sunshine duration and mean air temperature give accurate results in term of Mean Absolute Bias Error, Root Mean Square Error, Relative Square Error and Correlation Coefficient. The obtained values of these indicators are 0.67 MJ/m², 1.28 MJ/m², 6.12%and 98.18%, respectively which shows that MLP is highly qualified for DGSR estimation in semi-arid climates.

  7. Neural networks combined with region growing techniques for tumor detection in [18F]-fluorothymidine dynamic positron emission tomography breast cancer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cseh, Zoltan; Kenny, Laura; Swingland, James; Bose, Subrata; Turheimer, Federico E.

    2013-03-01

    Early detection and precise localization of malignant tumors has been a primary challenge in medical imaging in recent years. Functional modalities play a continuously increasing role in these efforts. Image segmentation algorithms which enable automatic, accurate tumor visualization and quantification on noisy positron emission tomography (PET) images would significantly improve the quality of treatment planning processes and in turn, the success of treatments. In this work a novel multistep method has been applied in order to identify tumor regions in 4D dynamic [18F] fluorothymidine (FLT) PET studies of patients with locally advanced breast cancer. In order to eliminate the effect of inherently detectable high inhomogeneity inside tumors, specific voxel-kinetic classes were initially introduced by finding characteristic FLT-uptake curves with K-means algorithm on a set of voxels collected from each tumor. Image voxel sets were then split based on voxel time-activity curve (TAC) similarities, and models were generated separately on each voxel set. At first, artificial neural networks, in comparison with linear classification algorithms were applied to distinguish tumor and healthy regions relying on the characteristics of TACs of the individual voxels. The outputs of the best model with very high specificity were then used as input seeds for region shrinking and growing techniques, the application of which considerably enhanced the sensitivity and specificity (78.65% +/- 0.65% and 98.98% +/- 0.03%, respectively) of the final image segmentation model.

  8. Remote sensing of harmful algal events in optically complex waters using regionally specific neural network-based algorithms for MERIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Castro Fernandez, M.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J.

    2013-08-01

    In typical case 2 waters an accurate remote sensing retrieval of chlorophyll a (chla) is still challenging. There is a widespread understanding that universally applicable water constituent retrieval algorithms are currently not feasible, shifting the research focus to regionally specific implementations of powerful inversion methods. This study takes advantage of regionally specific chlorophyll a (chla) algorithms, which were developed by the authors of this abstract in previous works, and the characteristics of Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) in order to study harmful algal events in the optically complex waters of the Galician Rias (NW). Harmful algal events are a frequent phenomenon in this area with direct and indirect impacts to the mussel production that constitute a very important economic activity for the local community. More than 240 106 kg of mussel per year are produced in these highly primary productive upwelling systems. A MERIS archive from nine years (2003-2012) was analysed using regionally specific chla algorithms. The latter were developed based on Multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural networks and fuzzy c-mean clustering techniques (FCM). FCM specifies zones (based on water leaving reflectances) where the retrieval algorithms normally provide more reliable results. Monthly chla anomalies and other statistics were calculated for the nine years MERIS archive. These results were then related to upwelling indices and other associated measurements to determine the driver forces for specific phytoplankton blooms. The distribution and changes of chla are also discussed.

  9. Keypoint Density-Based Region Proposal for Fine-Grained Object Detection and Classification Using Regions with Convolutional Neural Network Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    2014), with Regions of Interest (ROIs) and the final convolutional filters being given as input to the ROI pooling layer . The 13 convolutional layers ...gave rise to specialized part models that operate by transfer of likely locations (Goering et al., 2014), which achieved high classification and...pipeline. The existing evaluations and applications of R-CNN have focused on standard coarse (rather than fine-grained) detection and classification tasks

  10. Immediate Neural Plasticity Involving Reaction Time in a Saccadic Eye Movement Task is Intact in Children With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolozza, Angelina; Munoz, Douglas P; Brien, Donald; Reynolds, James N

    2016-11-01

    Saccades are rapid eye movements that bring an image of interest onto the retina. Previous research has found that in healthy individuals performing eye movement tasks, the location of a previous visual target can influence performance of the saccade on the next trial. This rapid behavioral adaptation represents a form of immediate neural plasticity within the saccadic circuitry. Our studies have shown that children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) are impaired on multiple saccade measures. We therefore investigated these previous trial effects in typically developing children and children with FASD to measure sensory neural plasticity and how these effects vary with age and pathology. Both typically developing control children (n = 102; mean age = 10.54 ± 3.25; 48 males) and children with FASD (n = 66; mean age = 11.85 ± 3.42; 35 males) were recruited from 5 sites across Canada. Each child performed a visually guided saccade task. Reaction time and saccade amplitude were analyzed and then assessed based on the previous trial. There was a robust previous trial effect for both reaction time and amplitude, with both the control and FASD groups displaying faster reaction times and smaller saccades during alternation trials (visual target presented on the opposite side to the previous trial). Children with FASD exhibited smaller overall mean amplitude and smaller amplitude selectively on alternation trials compared with controls. The effect of the previous trial on reaction time and amplitude did not differ across childhood and adolescent development. Children with FASD did not display any significant reaction time differences, despite exhibiting numerous deficits in motor and higher level cognitive control over saccades in other studies. These results suggest that this form of immediate neural plasticity in response to sensory information before saccade initiation remains intact in children with FASD. In contrast, the previous trial effect on

  11. Brain Regions Involved in the Learning and Application of Reward Rules in a Two-Deck Gambling Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartstra, E.; Oldenburg, J. F. E.; Van Leijenhorst, L.; Rombouts, S. A. R. B.; Crone, E. A.

    2010-01-01

    Decision-making involves the ability to choose between competing actions that are associated with uncertain benefits and penalties. The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which mimics real-life decision-making, involves learning a reward-punishment rule over multiple trials. Patients with damage to ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) show deficits…

  12. The effect of pulsed electric fields on the electrotactic migration of human neural progenitor cells through the involvement of intracellular calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hisamitsu; Edin, Fredrik; Li, Hao; Liu, Wei; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous electric fields (EFs) are required for the physiological control of the central nervous system development. Application of the direct current EFs to neural stem cells has been studied for the possibility of stem cell transplantation as one of the therapies for brain injury. EFs generated within the nervous system are often associated with action potentials and synaptic activity, apparently resulting in a pulsed current in nature. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of pulsed EF, which can reduce the cytotoxicity, on the migration of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs). We applied the mono-directional pulsed EF with a strength of 250mV/mm to hNPCs for 6h. The migration distance of the hNPCs exposed to pulsed EF was significantly greater compared with the control not exposed to the EF. Pulsed EFs, however, had less of an effect on the migration of the differentiated hNPCs. There was no significant change in the survival of hNPCs after exposure to the pulsed EF. To investigate the role of Ca 2+ signaling in electrotactic migration of hNPCs, pharmacological inhibition of Ca 2+ channels in the EF-exposed cells revealed that the electrotactic migration of hNPCs exposed to Ca 2+ channel blockers was significantly lower compared to the control group. The findings suggest that the pulsed EF induced migration of hNPCs is partly influenced by intracellular Ca 2+ signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Neural progenitor cell proliferation in the hypothalamus is involved in acquired heat tolerance in long-term heat-acclimated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Katakura, Masanori; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Hara, Toshiko; Hashimoto, Michio; Shido, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Constant exposure to moderate heat facilitates progenitor cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the hypothalamus of heat-acclimated (HA) rats. In this study, we investigated neural phenotype and responsiveness to heat in HA rats' hypothalamic newborn cells. Additionally, the effect of hypothalamic neurogenesis on heat acclimation in rats was evaluated. Male Wistar rats (5 weeks old) were housed at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 32°C for 6 days (STHA) or 40 days (LTHA), while control (CN) rats were kept at a Ta of 24°C for 6 days (STCN) or 40 days (LTCN). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was intraperitoneally injected daily for five consecutive days (50 mg/kg/day) after commencing heat exposure. The number of hypothalamic BrdU-immunopositive (BrdU+) cells in STHA and LTHA rats was determined immunohistochemically in brain samples and found to be significantly greater than those in respective CN groups. In LTHA rats, approximately 32.6% of BrdU+ cells in the preoptic area (POA) of the anterior hypothalamus were stained by GAD67, a GABAergic neuron marker, and 15.2% of BrdU+ cells were stained by the glutamate transporter, a glutamatergic neuron marker. In addition, 63.2% of BrdU+ cells in the POA were immunolabeled with c-Fos. Intracerebral administration of the mitosis inhibitor, cytosine arabinoside (AraC), interfered with the proliferation of neural progenitor cells and acquired heat tolerance in LTHA rats, whereas the selected ambient temperature was not changed. These results demonstrate that heat exposure generates heat responsive neurons in the POA, suggesting a pivotal role in autonomic thermoregulation in long-term heat-acclimated rats.

  14. In a non-human primate model, aging disrupts the neural control of intestinal smooth muscle contractility in a region-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, L; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2014-03-01

    Incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders increase with age. However, there is a paucity of knowledge about the aging mechanisms leading to GI dysmotility. Motility in the GI tract is a function of smooth muscle contractility, which is modulated in part by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Evidence suggests that aging impairs the ENS, thus we tested the hypothesis that senescence in the GI tract precipitates abnormalities in smooth muscle and neurally mediated contractility in a region-specific manner. Jejunal and colonic circular muscle strips were isolated from young (4-10 years) and old (18+ years) baboons. Myogenic responses were investigated using potassium chloride (KCl) and carbachol (CCh). Neurally mediated contractile responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and were recorded in the absence and presence of atropine (1 μM) or NG-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 μM). The myogenic responses to KCl in the jejunum and colon were unaffected by age. In the colon, but not the jejunum, CCh-induced contractile responses were reduced in aged animals. Compared to young baboons, there was enhanced EFS-induced contractility of old baboon jejunal smooth muscle in contrast to the reduced contractility in the colon. The effect of atropine on the EFS response was lower in aged colonic tissue, suggesting reduced participation of acetylcholine. In aged jejunal tissue, higher contractile responses to EFS were found to be due to reduced nitregic inhibition. These findings provide key evidence for the importance of intestinal smooth muscle and ENS senescence in age-associated GI motility disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Autoimmune Responses to Soluble Aggregates of Amyloidogenic Proteins Involved in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Overlapping Aggregation Prone and Autoimmunogenic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Thangakani, A. Mary; Nagarajan, R.; Singh, Satish K.; Velmurugan, D.; Gromiha, M. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Why do patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases generate autoantibodies that selectively bind soluble aggregates of amyloidogenic proteins? Presently, molecular basis of interactions between the soluble aggregates and human immune system is unknown. By analyzing sequences of experimentally validated T-cell autoimmune epitopes, aggregating peptides, amyloidogenic proteins and randomly generated peptides, here we report overlapping regions that likely drive aggregation as well as generate autoantibodies against the aggregates. Sequence features, that make short peptides susceptible to aggregation, increase their incidence in human T-cell autoimmune epitopes by 4–6 times. Many epitopes are predicted to be significantly aggregation prone (aggregation propensities ≥10%) and the ones containing experimentally validated aggregating regions are enriched in hydrophobicity by 10–20%. Aggregate morphologies also influence Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) - types recognized by the aggregating regions containing epitopes. Most (88%) epitopes that contain amyloid fibril forming regions bind HLA-DR, while majority (63%) of those containing amorphous β-aggregating regions bind HLA-DQ. More than two-thirds (70%) of human amyloidogenic proteins contain overlapping regions that are simultaneously aggregation prone and auto-immunogenic. Such regions help clear soluble aggregates by generating selective autoantibodies against them. This can be harnessed for early diagnosis of proteinopathies and for drug/vaccine design against them. PMID:26924748

  16. Radioactive fallout and neural tube defects

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nejat Akar

    2015-07-10

    Jul 10, 2015 ... Neural tube defects;. Anencephaly;. Spina bifida. Abstract Possible link between radioactivity and the occurrence of neural tube defects is a long lasting debate ... Neural tube defects, are one of the common congenital mal- formations ... ent cities of Turkey (˙Izmir/Aegean Region; Trabzon/Black Sea region ...

  17. Paleozoic-involving thrust array in the central Sierras Interiores (South Pyrenean Zone, Central Pyrenees): regional implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L.; Cuevas, J.; Tubía, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    This work deals with the structural evolution of the Sierras Interiores between the Tena and Aragon valleys. The Sierras Interiores is a WNW-trending mountain range that bounds the South Pyrenean Zone to the north and that is characterized by a thrust-fold system with a strong lithological control that places preferably decollements in Triassic evaporites. In the studied area of the Sierras Interiores Cenomanian limestones cover discordantly the Paleozoic rocks of the Axial Zone because there is a stratigraphic lacuna developed from Triassic to Late Cretaceous times. A simple lithostratigraphy of the study area is made up of Late Cenomanian to Early Campanian limestones with grey colour and massive aspect in landscape (170 m, Lower calcareous section), Campanian to Maastrichtian brown coloured sandstones (400-600 m, Marboré sandstones) and, finally, Paleocene light-coloured massive limestones (130-230 m), that often generate the higher topographic levels of the Sierras Interiores due to their greater resistance to erosion. Above the sedimentary sequence of the Sierras Interiores, the Jaca Basin flysch succession crops out discordantly. Based on a detailed mapping of the studied area of the Sierras Interiores, together with well and structural data of the Jaca Basin (Lanaja, 1987; Rodríguez and Cuevas, 2008) we have constructed a 12 km long NS cross section, approximately parallel to the movement direction deduced for this region (Rodríguez et al., 2011). The main structure is a thrust array made up of at least four Paleozoic-involving thrusts (the deeper thrust system) of similar thickness in a probably piggyback sequence, some of which are blind thrusts that generate fold-propagation-folds in upper levels. The higher thrust of the thrust array crops out duplicating the lower calcareous section all over the Sierras Interiores. The emplacement of the deeper thrust system generated the tightness of previous structures: south directed piggyback duplexes (the upper

  18. An assessment of public involvement for the 2006 regional transportation coordination planning process in selected Texas cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Regional mobility is cumbersome, confusing, and often a frustrating experience for many Texans. Those living in : larger urban areas have access to public transportation, while others depend on social service agencies and are : required to meet finan...

  19. Neural substrates of decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broche-Pérez, Y; Herrera Jiménez, L F; Omar-Martínez, E

    2016-06-01

    Decision-making is the process of selecting a course of action from among 2 or more alternatives by considering the potential outcomes of selecting each option and estimating its consequences in the short, medium and long term. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has traditionally been considered the key neural structure in decision-making process. However, new studies support the hypothesis that describes a complex neural network including both cortical and subcortical structures. The aim of this review is to summarise evidence on the anatomical structures underlying the decision-making process, considering new findings that support the existence of a complex neural network that gives rise to this complex neuropsychological process. Current evidence shows that the cortical structures involved in decision-making include the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This process is assisted by subcortical structures including the amygdala, thalamus, and cerebellum. Findings to date show that both cortical and subcortical brain regions contribute to the decision-making process. The neural basis of decision-making is a complex neural network of cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical connections which includes subareas of the PFC, limbic structures, and the cerebellum. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Restricted spontaneous in vitro differentiation and region-specific migration of long-term expanded fetal human neural precursor cells after transplantation into the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Singec, Ilyas; Maciaczyk, Donata; Klein, Alexander; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Human fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) are investigated for their potential as a cell source for cell-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the limited availability of fetal tissue and insufficient understanding of the lineage-dependent pattern of survival, migration, and differentiation following engraftment are still unresolved issues. In the current study hNSCs derived from different brain regions were long-term expanded in vitro to yield proliferating neurospheres giving rise to neurons, astro-, and oligodendroglial cells and assessed for their potential for migration, differentiation, and anatomical integration following intracerebral grafting into rats. hNSCs isolated from neocortex, striatum, midbrain, and spinal cord (SC) proliferated following in vitro differentiation, and showed a significant decrease of newly formed neurons along the rostrocaudal axis of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Most of the mature neurons were positive for the neurotransmitter GABA. In vivo all cell types survived up to 9 weeks posttransplantation. Intrastriatally grafted hNSCs migrated extensively along white matter tracts reaching both rostral (forceps minor) and caudal (midbrain, cerebral peduncle) brain regions. The majority of migratory cells expressed the stem cell marker, nestin. A fraction of grafted cells acquired a neuronal phenotype expressing doublecortin, beta-III-tubulin, or GABA. These data demonstrate efficient in vitro propagation, region-specific long-term survival, long-distance migration, and neuronal differentiation of hNSCs after transplantation into the adult rat brain. The availability of a large pool of in vitro expanded nestin-positive cells offers the possibility for further ex vivo manipulations and the recruitment of different neuronal phenotypes for cell replacement strategies for CNS disorders.

  1. Neural correlates of a single-session massage treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Sliz, D.; Smith, A.; Wiebking, C.; Northoff, G.; Hayley, S.

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the immediate neurophysiological effects of different types of massage in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Much attention has been given to the default mode network, a set of brain regions showing greater activity in the resting state. These regions (i.e. insula, posterior and anterior cingulate, inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortices) have been postulated to be involved in the neural correlates of consciousness, speci...

  2. Two immigrants with tuberculosis of the ear, nose, and throat region with skull base and cranial nerve involvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardus, R.A.; Jansen, J.C.; Steens, S.C.A.; Arend, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report two immigrants with tuberculosis of the skull base and a review of the literature. A Somalian man presented with bilateral otitis media, hearing loss, and facial and abducens palsy. Imaging showed involvement of both mastoid and petrous bones, extending via the skull base to the

  3. Neural plasticity and its initiating conditions in tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, L E

    2017-12-12

    Deafferentation caused by cochlear pathology (which can be hidden from the audiogram) activates forms of neural plasticity in auditory pathways, generating tinnitus and its associated conditions including hyperacusis. This article discusses tinnitus mechanisms and suggests how these mechanisms may relate to those involved in normal auditory information processing. Research findings from animal models of tinnitus and from electromagnetic imaging of tinnitus patients are reviewed which pertain to the role of deafferentation and neural plasticity in tinnitus and hyperacusis. Auditory neurons compensate for deafferentation by increasing their input/output functions (gain) at multiple levels of the auditory system. Forms of homeostatic plasticity are believed to be responsible for this neural change, which increases the spontaneous and driven activity of neurons in central auditory structures in animals expressing behavioral evidence of tinnitus. Another tinnitus correlate, increased neural synchrony among the affected neurons, is forged by spike-timing-dependent neural plasticity in auditory pathways. Slow oscillations generated by bursting thalamic neurons verified in tinnitus animals appear to modulate neural plasticity in the cortex, integrating tinnitus neural activity with information in brain regions supporting memory, emotion, and consciousness which exhibit increased metabolic activity in tinnitus patients. The latter process may be induced by transient auditory events in normal processing but it persists in tinnitus, driven by phantom signals from the auditory pathway. Several tinnitus therapies attempt to suppress tinnitus through plasticity, but repeated sessions will likely be needed to prevent tinnitus activity from returning owing to deafferentation as its initiating condition.

  4. A Grounded Theory for Regional Development through the IT Offshoring Industry with the Triple-Helix Involvment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal de la Garza, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative grounded study was to explore the thoughts, experiences, and needs of potential clients and of the triple-helix members with the intention to establish a framework to support the development of the regional economy through the information technology (IT) and business processing outsourcing (BPO) offshoring industry.…

  5. Logistic regression and artificial neural network models for mapping of regional-scale landslide susceptibility in volcanic mountains of West Java (Indonesia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngadisih, Bhandary, Netra P.; Yatabe, Ryuichi; Dahal, Ranjan K.

    2016-05-01

    West Java Province is the most landslide risky area in Indonesia owing to extreme geo-morphological conditions, climatic conditions and densely populated settlements with immense completed and ongoing development activities. So, a landslide susceptibility map at regional scale in this province is a fundamental tool for risk management and land-use planning. Logistic regression and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) models are the most frequently used tools for landslide susceptibility assessment, mainly because they are capable of handling the nature of landslide data. The main objective of this study is to apply logistic regression and ANN models and compare their performance for landslide susceptibility mapping in volcanic mountains of West Java Province. In addition, the model application is proposed to identify the most contributing factors to landslide events in the study area. The spatial database built in GIS platform consists of landslide inventory, four topographical parameters (slope, aspect, relief, distance to river), three geological parameters (distance to volcano crater, distance to thrust and fault, geological formation), and two anthropogenic parameters (distance to road, land use). The logistic regression model in this study revealed that slope, geological formations, distance to road and distance to volcano are the most influential factors of landslide events while, the ANN model revealed that distance to volcano crater, geological formation, distance to road, and land-use are the most important causal factors of landslides in the study area. Moreover, an evaluation of the model showed that the ANN model has a higher accuracy than the logistic regression model.

  6. Body Region Involvement and Quality of Life in Psoriasis: Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial of Adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, April W; Villanueva Quintero, Delfina Guadalupe; Echeverría, Cristina M; Gu, Yihua; Karunaratne, Mahinda; Reyes Servín, Ofelia

    2016-12-01

    Psoriasis severity and treatment responsiveness vary by body region, which differentially impacts quality of life (QoL). The objective of the study was to examine adalimumab efficacy by body region and regional response and QoL relationship. Patients (n = 1212) with moderate-to-severe psoriasis were randomized 2:1 to 80 mg at week 0, followed by adalimumab 40 mg or placebo every other week for 16 weeks in the double-blind REVEAL study. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) responses and Dermatology Life Quality Index outcomes were analyzed. Week 16 regional mean PASI improvements were significantly greater with adalimumab (83.1 ± 1.57, 81.3 ± 1.58, 75.7 ± 1.34, and 73.9 ± 1.26% in the trunk, head, upper extremities, and lower extremities, respectively; all p < 0.001 vs. placebo). Likewise, percentages of patients with regional PASI ≥75/≥90/100% reduction from baseline were significantly higher with adalimumab (all p < 0.001); adalimumab responses were greater for the trunk (77.9/65.0/59.1%) and head (74.6/66.1/62.8%; all p ≤ 0.0001 vs. lower) than upper (67.7/45.1/39.6%; p = 0.4, p = 0.04, p = 0.0005, respectively, vs. lower) and lower extremities (65.7/40.0/31.3%). Adalimumab significantly improved Dermatology Life Quality Index scores vs. placebo (8.2- vs 1.7-point decrease from baseline; p < 0.001). The study was a post hoc analysis. Adalimumab treatment resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in disease severity and QoL. QoL improvements were associated with PASI responses in all body regions. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00237887.

  7. Processing by MRE11 is involved in the sensitivity of subtelomeric regions to DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Keiko; Han, Limei; Miller, Douglas; Murnane, John P

    2015-09-18

    The caps on the ends of chromosomes, called telomeres, keep the ends of chromosomes from appearing as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevent chromosome fusion. However, subtelomeric regions are sensitive to DSBs, which in normal cells is responsible for ionizing radiation-induced cell senescence and protection against oncogene-induced replication stress, but promotes chromosome instability in cancer cells that lack cell cycle checkpoints. We have previously reported that I-SceI endonuclease-induced DSBs near telomeres in a human cancer cell line are much more likely to generate large deletions and gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs) than interstitial DSBs, but found no difference in the frequency of I-SceI-induced small deletions at interstitial and subtelomeric DSBs. We now show that inhibition of MRE11 3'-5' exonuclease activity with Mirin reduces the frequency of large deletions and GCRs at both interstitial and subtelomeric DSBs, but has little effect on the frequency of small deletions. We conclude that large deletions and GCRs are due to excessive processing of DSBs, while most small deletions occur during classical nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ). The sensitivity of subtelomeric regions to DSBs is therefore because they are prone to undergo excessive processing, and not because of a deficiency in C-NHEJ in subtelomeric regions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. The neural basis of monitoring goal progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael eBenn

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The neural basis of progress monitoring has received relatively little attention compared to other sub-processes that are involved in goal directed behavior such as motor control and response inhibition. Studies of error-monitoring have identified the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as a structure that is sensitive to conflict detection, and triggers corrective action. However, monitoring goal progress involves monitoring correct as well as erroneous events over a period of time. In the present research, 20 healthy participants underwent fMRI while playing a game that involved monitoring progress towards either a numerical or a visuo-spatial target. The findings confirmed the role of the dACC in detecting situations in which the current state may conflict with the desired state, but also revealed activations in the frontal and parietal regions, pointing to the involvement of processes such as attention and working memory in monitoring progress over time. In addition, activation of the cuneus was associated with monitoring progress towards a specific target presented in the visual modality. This is the first time that activation in this region has been linked to higher-order processing of goal-relevant information, rather than low-level anticipation of visual stimuli. Taken together, these findings identify the neural substrates involved in monitoring progress over time, and how these extend beyond activations observed in conflict and error monitoring.

  9. Is Drosophila-microbe association species-specific or region specific? A study undertaken involving six Indian Drosophila species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Kopal; Khanna, Radhika; Mohanty, Sujata

    2017-06-01

    The present work aims to identify the microbial diversity associated with six Indian Drosophila species using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and to discover the nature of their distribution across species and eco-geographic regions. Whole fly gDNA of six Drosophila species were used to generate sequences in an Illumina platform using NGS technology. De novo based assembled raw reads were blasted against the NR database of NCBI using BLASTn for identification of their bacterial loads. We have tried to include Drosophila species from different taxonomical groups and subgroups and from three different eco-climatic regions India; four species belong to Central India, while the rest two, D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, belong to West and South India to determine both their species-wise and region-wide distribution. We detected the presence of 33 bacterial genera across all six study species, predominated by the class Proteobacteria. Amongst all, D. melanogaster was found to be the most diverse by carrying around 85% of the bacterial diversity. Our findings infer both species-specific and environment-specific nature of the bacterial species inhabiting the Drosophila host. Though the present results are consistent with most of the earlier studies, they also remain incoherent with some. The present study outcome on the host-bacteria association and their species specific adaptation may provide some insight to understand the host-microbial interactions and the phenotypic implications of microbes on the host physiology. The knowledge gained may be importantly applied into the recent insect and pest population control strategy going to implement through gut microflora in India and abroad.

  10. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart...

  11. Genome wide expression profiling of the mesodiencephalic region identifies novel factors involved in early and late dopaminergic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Chakrabarty

    2012-05-01

    Meso-diencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA neurons are critical for motor control and cognitive functioning and their loss or dysfunction is associated with disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD, schizophrenia and addiction. However, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying mdDA neuron development and maintenance. Here, we determined the spatiotemporal map of genes involved in the development of mdDA neurons to gain further insight into their molecular programming. Genome-wide gene expression profiles of the developing ventral mesencephalon (VM were compared at different developmental stages leading to the identification of novel regulatory roles of neuronal signaling through nicotinic acthylcholine receptors (Chrna6 and Chrnb3 subunits and the identification of novel transcription factors (Oc2 and 3 involved in the generation of the mdDA neuronal field. We show here that Pitx3, in cooperation with Nurr1, is the critical component in the activation of the Chrna6 and Chrnb3 subunits in mdDA neurons. Furthermore, we provide evidence of two divergent regulatory pathways resulting in the expression of Chrna6 and Chrnb3 respectively.

  12. Comparative In silico Study of Sex-Determining Region Y (SRY Protein Sequences Involved in Sex-Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Vakili Azghandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The SRY gene (SRY provides instructions for making a transcription factor called the sex-determining region Y protein. The sex-determining region Y protein causes a fetus to develop as a male. In this study, SRY of 15 spices included of human, chimpanzee, dog, pig, rat, cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, horse, zebra, frog, urial, dolphin and killer whale were used for determine of bioinformatic differences. Methods: Nucleotide sequences of SRY were retrieved from the NCBI databank. Bioinformatic analysis of SRY is done by CLC Main Workbench version 5.5 and ClustalW (http:/www.ebi.ac.uk/clustalw/ and MEGA6 softwares. Results: The multiple sequence alignment results indicated that SRY protein sequences from Orcinus orca (killer whale and Tursiopsaduncus (dolphin have least genetic distance of 0.33 in these 15 species and are 99.67% identical at the amino acid level. Homosapiens and Pantroglodytes (chimpanzee have the next lowest genetic distance of 1.35 and are 98.65% identical at the amino acid level. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the SRY proteins are conserved in the 15 species, and their evolutionary relationships are similar.

  13. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system.

    OpenAIRE

    Westra Mirjam; van der Weerd Rick WP; Huygen Frank JPM; Niehof Sjoerd P; Zijlstra Freek J

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease. The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared imaging) obtained during temperature provocation. The secondary objective was to obtain information about the involvement of the sympathetic system in CRPS1. Methods We studied 12 patients in whom CRPS1 ...

  14. Two Immigrants with Tuberculosis of the Ear, Nose, and Throat Region with Skull Base and Cranial Nerve Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate A. Richardus

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report two immigrants with tuberculosis of the skull base and a review of the literature. A Somalian man presented with bilateral otitis media, hearing loss, and facial and abducens palsy. Imaging showed involvement of both mastoid and petrous bones, extending via the skull base to the nasopharynx, suggesting tuberculosis which was confirmed by characteristic histology and positive auramine staining, while Ziehl-Neelsen staining and PCR were negative. A Sudanese man presented with torticollis and deviation of the uvula due to paresis of N. IX and XI. Imaging showed a retropharyngeal abscess and lysis of the clivus. Histology, acid-fast staining, and PCR were negative. Both patients had a positive Quantiferon TB Gold in-tube result and improved rapidly after empiric treatment for tuberculosis. Cultures eventually yielded M. tuberculosis. These unusual cases exemplify the many faces of tuberculosis and the importance to include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of unexplained problems.

  15. Gene co-expression analysis identifies brain regions and cell types involved in migraine pathophysiology: a GWAS-based study using the Allen Human Brain Atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eising, Else; Huisman, Sjoerd M H; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Vijfhuizen, Lisanne S; Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Kurth, Tobias; Ikram, M Arfan; Freilinger, Tobias; Kaprio, Jaakko; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta R; Zwart, John-Anker; Quaye, Lydia; Strachan, David P; Kubisch, Christian; Dichgans, Martin; Davey Smith, George; Stefansson, Kari; Palotie, Aarno; Chasman, Daniel I; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M; de Vries, Boukje; Nyholt, Dale R; Lelieveldt, Boudewijn P F; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2016-04-01

    Migraine is a common disabling neurovascular brain disorder typically characterised by attacks of severe headache and associated with autonomic and neurological symptoms. Migraine is caused by an interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over a dozen genetic loci associated with migraine. Here, we integrated migraine GWAS data with high-resolution spatial gene expression data of normal adult brains from the Allen Human Brain Atlas to identify specific brain regions and molecular pathways that are possibly involved in migraine pathophysiology. To this end, we used two complementary methods. In GWAS data from 23,285 migraine cases and 95,425 controls, we first studied modules of co-expressed genes that were calculated based on human brain expression data for enrichment of genes that showed association with migraine. Enrichment of a migraine GWAS signal was found for five modules that suggest involvement in migraine pathophysiology of: (i) neurotransmission, protein catabolism and mitochondria in the cortex; (ii) transcription regulation in the cortex and cerebellum; and (iii) oligodendrocytes and mitochondria in subcortical areas. Second, we used the high-confidence genes from the migraine GWAS as a basis to construct local migraine-related co-expression gene networks. Signatures of all brain regions and pathways that were prominent in the first method also surfaced in the second method, thus providing support that these brain regions and pathways are indeed involved in migraine pathophysiology.

  16. Renal angiomyolipoma: report of three cases with regional lymph node involvement and/or with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csanaky, G; Szereday, Z; Magyarlaki, T; Méhes, G; Herbert, T; Buzogány, I

    1995-01-01

    Angiomyolipomas (AMLs) are benign hamartoid tumors which frequently occur in tuberous sclerosis (TS). They may be manifest at different organ sites such as kidneys, lymph nodes, liver and lung and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The nature of multiple organ involvement in AML (metastasis versus multicentric synchronous tumors), the malignant transformation and the relation of AML to RCC have not been sufficiently clarified. Three cases of renal AMLs in patients with tuberous sclerosis associated with lymphangioleiomyomatosis of the paraaortic lymph nodes and/or with RCC are reported. The concise clinical history of the patients as well as the findings of histology, immunohistochemistry and quantitative DNA analysis are presented. The multicentric form of AML and coincidence of renal AML and RCC were observed in 2 patients. AML and RCC were found within the same focus in one of the cases. RCCs were either aneuploid or "near diploid", whereas one of the multicentric AMLs showed a discordant DNA ploidy pattern, namely aneuploidy in the kidney and diploidy in the lymph nodes. The presented cases (all of them underwent periaortic lymphadenectomy) suggest that lymph node involvement in renal AML may be more frequent than expected (1-2% of all AMLs) on the basis of the few reported cases. The discordant DNA ploidy (renal versus lymph node lesions) observed in one of the cases with multicentric AML implies synchronous tumor growth at different sites rather than metastatic disease. The intimate coexistance of RCC and AML (RCC revealed by immunohistochemistry within a larger mass of renal AML) may indicate that malignant transformation of an AML should only be accepted, if such a coincidence is unequivocally excluded.

  17. Identification of β-Dystrobrevin as a Direct Target of miR-143: Involvement in Early Stages of Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Maria Teresa; Spinello, Isabella; Paolillo, Rosa; Macchia, Gianfranco; Boe, Alessandra; Ceccarini, Marina; Labbaye, Catherine; Macioce, Pompeo

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a genetic disorder that results in a gradual breakdown of muscle, is associated to mild to severe cognitive impairment in about one-third of dystrophic patients. The brain dysfunction is independent of the muscular pathology, occurs early, and is most likely due to defects in the assembly of the Dystrophin-associated Protein Complex (DPC) during embryogenesis. We have recently described the interaction of the DPC component β-dystrobrevin with members of complexes that regulate chromatin dynamics, and suggested that β-dystrobrevin may play a role in the initiation of neuronal differentiation. Since oxygen concentrations and miRNAs appear as well to be involved in the cellular processes related to neuronal development, we have studied how these factors act on β-dystrobrevin and investigated the possibility of their functional interplay using the NTera-2 cell line, a well-established model for studying neurogenesis. We followed the pattern of expression and regulation of β-dystrobrevin during the early stages of neuronal differentiation induced by exposure to retinoic acid (RA) under hypoxia as compared with normoxia, and found that β-dystrobrevin expression is regulated during RA-induced differentiation of NTera-2 cells. We also found that β-dystrobrevin pattern is delayed under hypoxic conditions, together with a delay in the differentiation and an increase in the proliferation rate of cells. We identified miRNA-143 as a direct regulator of β-dystrobrevin expression, demonstrated that β-dystrobrevin is expressed in the nucleus and showed that, in line with our previous in vitro results, β-dystrobrevin is a repressor of synapsin I in live cells. Altogether the newly identified regulatory pathway miR-143/β-dystrobrevin/synapsin I provides novel insights into the functions of β-dystrobrevin and opens up new perspectives for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuronal involvement in muscular dystrophy.

  18. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynun N. Begum

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in a supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared with those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the “neurosphederm”. The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared with the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42–60 days. With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse brains compared with the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays.

  19. Effects of oxytocin and vasopressin on the neural response to unreciprocated cooperation within brain regions involved in stress and anxiety in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Hackett, Patrick D; DeMarco, Ashley C; Feng, Chunliang; Stair, Sabrina; Haroon, Ebrahim; Ditzen, Beate; Pagnoni, Giuseppe; Rilling, James K

    2016-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are characterized by hyperactivity in both the amygdala and the anterior insula. Interventions that normalize activity in these areas may therefore be effective in treating anxiety disorders. Recently, there has been significant interest in the potential use of oxytocin (OT), as well as vasopressin (AVP) antagonists, as treatments for anxiety disorders. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, pharmaco- fMRI study, 153 men and 151 women were randomized to treatment with either 24 IU intranasal OT, 20 IU intranasal AVP, or placebo and imaged with fMRI as they played the iterated Prisoner's Dilemma game with same-sex human and computer partners. In men, OT attenuated the fMRI response to unreciprocated cooperation (CD), a negative social interaction, within the amygdala and anterior insula. This effect was specific to interactions with human partners. In contrast, among women, OT unexpectedly attenuated the amygdala and anterior insula response to unreciprocated cooperation from computer but not human partners. Among women, AVP did not significantly modulate the response to unreciprocated cooperation in either the amygdala or the anterior insula. However, among men, AVP attenuated the BOLD response to CD outcomes with human partners across a relatively large cluster including the amygdala and the anterior insula, which was contrary to expectations. Our results suggest that OT may decrease the stress of negative social interactions among men, whereas these effects were not found in women interacting with human partners. These findings support continued investigation into the possible efficacy of OT as a treatment for anxiety disorders.

  20. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Reveals Auditory and Frontal Cortical Regions Involved with Speech Perception and Loudness Adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Berding

    Full Text Available Considerable progress has been made in the treatment of hearing loss with auditory implants. However, there are still many implanted patients that experience hearing deficiencies, such as limited speech understanding or vanishing perception with continuous stimulation (i.e., abnormal loudness adaptation. The present study aims to identify specific patterns of cerebral cortex activity involved with such deficiencies. We performed O-15-water positron emission tomography (PET in patients implanted with electrodes within the cochlea, brainstem, or midbrain to investigate the pattern of cortical activation in response to speech or continuous multi-tone stimuli directly inputted into the implant processor that then delivered electrical patterns through those electrodes. Statistical parametric mapping was performed on a single subject basis. Better speech understanding was correlated with a larger extent of bilateral auditory cortex activation. In contrast to speech, the continuous multi-tone stimulus elicited mainly unilateral auditory cortical activity in which greater loudness adaptation corresponded to weaker activation and even deactivation. Interestingly, greater loudness adaptation was correlated with stronger activity within the ventral prefrontal cortex, which could be up-regulated to suppress the irrelevant or aberrant signals into the auditory cortex. The ability to detect these specific cortical patterns and differences across patients and stimuli demonstrates the potential for using PET to diagnose auditory function or dysfunction in implant patients, which in turn could guide the development of appropriate stimulation strategies for improving hearing rehabilitation. Beyond hearing restoration, our study also reveals a potential role of the frontal cortex in suppressing irrelevant or aberrant activity within the auditory cortex, and thus may be relevant for understanding and treating tinnitus.

  1. Positron Emission Tomography Imaging Reveals Auditory and Frontal Cortical Regions Involved with Speech Perception and Loudness Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berding, Georg; Wilke, Florian; Rode, Thilo; Haense, Cathleen; Joseph, Gert; Meyer, Geerd J; Mamach, Martin; Lenarz, Minoo; Geworski, Lilli; Bengel, Frank M; Lenarz, Thomas; Lim, Hubert H

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the treatment of hearing loss with auditory implants. However, there are still many implanted patients that experience hearing deficiencies, such as limited speech understanding or vanishing perception with continuous stimulation (i.e., abnormal loudness adaptation). The present study aims to identify specific patterns of cerebral cortex activity involved with such deficiencies. We performed O-15-water positron emission tomography (PET) in patients implanted with electrodes within the cochlea, brainstem, or midbrain to investigate the pattern of cortical activation in response to speech or continuous multi-tone stimuli directly inputted into the implant processor that then delivered electrical patterns through those electrodes. Statistical parametric mapping was performed on a single subject basis. Better speech understanding was correlated with a larger extent of bilateral auditory cortex activation. In contrast to speech, the continuous multi-tone stimulus elicited mainly unilateral auditory cortical activity in which greater loudness adaptation corresponded to weaker activation and even deactivation. Interestingly, greater loudness adaptation was correlated with stronger activity within the ventral prefrontal cortex, which could be up-regulated to suppress the irrelevant or aberrant signals into the auditory cortex. The ability to detect these specific cortical patterns and differences across patients and stimuli demonstrates the potential for using PET to diagnose auditory function or dysfunction in implant patients, which in turn could guide the development of appropriate stimulation strategies for improving hearing rehabilitation. Beyond hearing restoration, our study also reveals a potential role of the frontal cortex in suppressing irrelevant or aberrant activity within the auditory cortex, and thus may be relevant for understanding and treating tinnitus.

  2. Exploring the spatio-temporal neural basis of face learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Xu, Yang; Jew, Carol A; Pyles, John A; Kass, Robert E; Tarr, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Humans are experts at face individuation. Although previous work has identified a network of face-sensitive regions and some of the temporal signatures of face processing, as yet, we do not have a clear understanding of how such face-sensitive regions support learning at different time points. To study the joint spatio-temporal neural basis of face learning, we trained subjects to categorize two groups of novel faces and recorded their neural responses using magnetoencephalography (MEG) throughout learning. A regression analysis of neural responses in face-sensitive regions against behavioral learning curves revealed significant correlations with learning in the majority of the face-sensitive regions in the face network, mostly between 150-250 ms, but also after 300 ms. However, the effect was smaller in nonventral regions (within the superior temporal areas and prefrontal cortex) than that in the ventral regions (within the inferior occipital gyri (IOG), midfusiform gyri (mFUS) and anterior temporal lobes). A multivariate discriminant analysis also revealed that IOG and mFUS, which showed strong correlation effects with learning, exhibited significant discriminability between the two face categories at different time points both between 150-250 ms and after 300 ms. In contrast, the nonventral face-sensitive regions, where correlation effects with learning were smaller, did exhibit some significant discriminability, but mainly after 300 ms. In sum, our findings indicate that early and recurring temporal components arising from ventral face-sensitive regions are critically involved in learning new faces.

  3. Identification and characterization of the regions involved in the nuclear translocation of the heterodimeric leishmanial DNA topoisomerase IB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Prada

    Full Text Available Leishmania donovani, the causative organism for visceral leishmaniasis, contains a unique heterodimeric DNA-topoisomerase IB (LdTopIB. LdTopIB is a heterodimer made up of a large subunit and a small subunit that must interact with each other to build an active enzyme able to solve the topological tensions on the DNA. As LdTopIB is located within the nucleus, one or more nuclear localization signals (NLS should exist to ensure its nuclear translocation. In this report three novel NLS have been identified through a sequential deletion study of the genes encoding of both subunits fused to that encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. NLS1 is a highly basic sequence of 43 amino acids in the C-terminal extension of the large protomer. We found two well-defined sequences in the small protomer: NLS2 is a 10-amino acid motif located in the N-terminal extension of the protein; NLS3 consists of a complex region of 28 amino acids placed in the vicinity of the catalytic Tyr-222 included at the conserved SKINY signature within the C-terminal. Furthermore, by means of yeast cell viability assays, conducted with several LdTopIB chimeras lacking any of the NLS motives, we have revealed that both subunits are transported independently to the nucleus. There was no evidence of LdTopIB accumulation in mitochondria or association to the kinetoplast DNA network. The results rule out the former hypothesis, which attributes nucleocytoplasmic transport of LdTopIB entirely to the large subunit. The LdTopIB is localized to the nucleus only.

  4. Regional lymph node involvement in T1 papillary thyroid carcinoma: a bicentric prospective SPECT/CT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mustafa, Mona [Ludwig Maximilian University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Klinikum Grosshadern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Kuwert, Torsten; Linke, Rainer; Schmidt, Daniela [University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Weber, Kathrin; Knesewitsch, Peter; Haug, Alexander; Bartenstein, Peter [Ludwig Maximilian University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Negele, Thomas [Hospital Martha Maria, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Hybrid imaging combining single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 131}I and X-ray computed tomography (CT) performed at radioablation (RA) for thyroid carcinoma more accurately detects regional lymph node metastases (LNM) than does planar imaging. In this bicentric prospective study we used hybrid imaging in conjunction with histopathological examination to measure LNM frequency in a consecutive group of patients referred for RA due to stage T1 papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). At the Departments of Nuclear Medicine of the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich and the Friedrich Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg SPECT/spiral CT is routinely performed in all PTC subjects at the time of RA. Screening of our SPECT/CT databases for PTC patients with T1 histology produced 98 patients from Munich and 53 patients from Erlangen, including 96 of 151 patients with microcarcinoma. In 69 patients of the entire group, cervical lymph node dissection had been performed, whereas nodal staging in the remaining 82 subjects was based on SPECT/CT. LNM incidence in the whole group was 26% [95% confidence interval (CI): 20-33%] versus 22% (95% CI: 15-31%) in the microcarcinoma subgroup. SPECT/CT was more accurate in 24.5% of our patients than planar imaging with regard to nodal staging. LNM occurs in one quarter of all patients with T1 PTC, and also in the subset with microcarcinoma. Performing {sup 131}I SPECT/CT, either with therapeutic or diagnostic radioactivities, directly after thyroidectomy should provide more accurate staging of T1 PTC, thus facilitating optimal therapeutic management. (orig.)

  5. Electroacupuncture decreases excessive alcohol consumption involving reduction of FosB/ΔFosB levels in reward-related brain regions.

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    Jing Li

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for alcohol abuse, a major public health problem in the U.S. and worldwide. There are only three FDA-approved drugs for treatment of alcohol abuse (naltrexone, acamprosate and disulfuram. On average these drugs yield only moderate success in reducing long-term alcohol consumption. Electroacupuncture has been shown to alleviate various drugs of abuse, including alcohol. Although previous studies have shown that electroacupuncture reduced alcohol consumption, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. ΔFosB and FosB are members of the Fos family of transcription factors implicated in neural plasticity in drug addiction; a connection between electroacupuncture's treatment of alcohol abuse and the Fos family has not been established. In this study, we trained rats to drink large quantities of ethanol in a modified intermittent access two-bottle choice drinking procedure. When rats achieved a stable baseline of ethanol consumption, electroacupuncture (100 Hz or 2 Hz, 30 min each day was administered at Zusanli (ST36 for 6 consecutive days. The level of FosB/ΔFosB in reward-related brain regions was assessed by immunohistochemistry. We found that the intake of and preference for ethanol in rats under 100 Hz, but not 2 Hz electroacupuncture regiment were sharply reduced. The reduction was maintained for at least 72 hours after the termination of electroacupuncture treatment. Conversely, 100 Hz electroacupuncture did not alter the intake of and preference for the natural rewarding agent sucrose. Additionally, FosB/ΔFosB levels in the prefrontal cortex, striatal region and the posterior region of ventral tegmental area were increased following excessive ethanol consumption, but were reduced after six-day 100 Hz electroacupuncture. Thus, this study demonstrates that six-day 100 Hz electroacupuncture treatment effectively reduces ethanol consumption and preference in rats that chronically drink excessive amount of

  6. Suppression subtractive hybridization identifies bacterial genomic regions that are possibly involved in hBD-2 regulation by enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadimi, Darab; Hassan, Mohamed; Njeru, Patrisio Njiru; de Vrese, Michael; Geis, Arnold; Shalabi, Samweul I; Abdel-Razek, Sabah T; Abdel-Khair, Abd El-Al A; Heller, Knut J; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Human β-defensin 2 (hBD-2) is an inducible antimicrobial peptide synthesized by the epithelium to counteract bacterial adherence and invasion. It has been suggested that probiotic bacteria sustain gut barrier function via induction of defensins. The goals of this study were (i) to evaluate the potential immunomodulatory effects of 11 different Lactobacillus fermentum strains isolated from Kimere, an African fermented pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) dough, on the hBD-2 secretion by human intestinal CaCo-2 cell line and (ii) to examine genetic differences between two strains of L. fermentum (K2-Lb4 and K11-Lb3) which differed in their effect on the production of hBD-2 in this study. Totally, 46 strains of L. fermentum from Kimere were isolated and characterized using molecular biology methods including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. After performing time- and dose-experiments, CaCo-2 cells were incubated with or without bacteria for 12 h. L. fermentum PZ1162 was included as the positive control. Cell-free supernatants were analyzed for hBD-2 protein by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To identify potential bacterial genes associated with hBD-2 regulation, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) was used. Among the 11 strains tested, only two strains of bacteria, K11-Lb3 and K2-Lb6, significantly induced the production of hBD-2 by CaCo-2 cells. This effect was strain-specific, dose-dependent and particularly seems to be bacterial genomic-dependent as manifested by SSH. L. fermentum strains with and without hBD-2 inducing effect differed in genes encoding proteins involved in glycosylation of cell-wall proteins e.g. glycosyltransferase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 2-epimerase, rod shape-determining protein MreC, lipoprotein precursors, sugar ABC transporters, and glutamine ABC transporter ATP-binding protein. This study implies that certain strains of L. fermentum isolated from Kimere may stimulate the intestinal innate defense through the

  7. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

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    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  8. Reduced-folate carrier (RFC is expressed in placenta and yolk sac, as well as in cells of the developing forebrain, hindbrain, neural tube, craniofacial region, eye, limb buds and heart

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    Prasad Puttur

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Folate is essential for cellular proliferation and tissue regeneration. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize folates de novo, tightly regulated cellular uptake processes have evolved to sustain sufficient levels of intracellular tetrahydrofolate cofactors to support biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, and some amino acids (serine, methionine. Though reduced-folate carrier (RFC is one of the major proteins mediating folate transport, knowledge of the developmental expression of RFC is lacking. We utilized in situ hybridization and immunolocalization to determine the developmental distribution of RFC message and protein, respectively. Results In the mouse, RFC transcripts and protein are expressed in the E10.0 placenta and yolk sac. In the E9.0 to E11.5 mouse embryo RFC is widely detectable, with intense signal localized to cell populations in the neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart. During early development, RFC is expressed throughout the eye, but by E12.5, RFC protein becomes localized to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Conclusions Clinical studies show a statistical decrease in the number of neural tube defects, craniofacial abnormalities, cardiovascular defects and limb abnormalities detected in offspring of female patients given supplementary folate during pregnancy. The mechanism, however, by which folate supplementation ameliorates the occurrence of developmental defects is unclear. The present work demonstrates that RFC is present in placenta and yolk sac and provides the first evidence that it is expressed in the neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart during organogenesis. These findings suggest that rapidly dividing cells in the developing neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart may be particularly susceptible to folate deficiency.

  9. Trends in Deaths Involving Heroin and Synthetic Opioids Excluding Methadone, and Law Enforcement Drug Product Reports, by Census Region - United States, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Julie K; Gladden, R Matthew; Seth, Puja

    2017-09-01

    Opioid overdose deaths quadrupled from 8,050 in 1999 to 33,091 in 2015 and accounted for 63% of drug overdose deaths in the United States in 2015. During 2010-2015, heroin overdose deaths quadrupled from 3,036 to 12,989 (1). Sharp increases in the supply of heroin and illicitly manufactured fentanyl (IMF) are likely contributing to increased deaths (2-6). CDC examined trends in unintentional and undetermined deaths involving heroin or synthetic opioids excluding methadone (i.e., synthetic opioids)* by the four U.S. Census regions during 2006-2015. Drug exhibits (i.e., drug products) obtained by law enforcement and reported to the Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA's) National Forensic Laboratory Information System (NFLIS) that tested positive for heroin or fentanyl (i.e., drug reports) also were examined. All U.S. Census regions experienced substantial increases in deaths involving heroin from 2006 to 2015. Since 2010, the South and West experienced increases in heroin drug reports, whereas the Northeast and Midwest experienced steady increases during 2006-2015.(†) In the Northeast, Midwest, and South, deaths involving synthetic opioids and fentanyl drug reports increased considerably after 2013. These broad changes in the U.S. illicit drug market highlight the urgent need to track illicit drugs and enhance public health interventions targeting persons using or at high risk for using heroin or IMF.

  10. The neural bases for valuing social equality.

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    Aoki, Ryuta; Yomogida, Yukihito; Matsumoto, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    The neural basis of how humans value and pursue social equality has become a major topic in social neuroscience research. Although recent studies have identified a set of brain regions and possible mechanisms that are involved in the neural processing of equality of outcome between individuals, how the human brain processes equality of opportunity remains unknown. In this review article, first we describe the importance of the distinction between equality of outcome and equality of opportunity, which has been emphasized in philosophy and economics. Next, we discuss possible approaches for empirical characterization of human valuation of equality of opportunity vs. equality of outcome. Understanding how these two concepts are distinct and interact with each other may provide a better explanation of complex human behaviors concerning fairness and social equality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

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    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  12. The neural basis of task switching changes with skill acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimura, Koji; Cazalis, Fabienne; Stover, Elena R S; Poldrack, Russell A

    2014-01-01

    Learning novel skills involves reorganization and optimization of cognitive processing involving a broad network of brain regions. Previous work has shown asymmetric costs of switching to a well-trained task vs. a poorly-trained task, but the neural basis of these differential switch costs is unclear. The current study examined the neural signature of task switching in the context of acquisition of new skill. Human participants alternated randomly between a novel visual task (mirror-reversed word reading) and a highly practiced one (plain word reading), allowing the isolation of task switching and skill set maintenance. Two scan sessions were separated by 2 weeks, with behavioral training on the mirror reading task in between the two sessions. Broad cortical regions, including bilateral prefrontal, parietal, and extrastriate cortices, showed decreased activity associated with learning of the mirror reading skill. In contrast, learning to switch to the novel skill was associated with decreased activity in a focal subcortical region in the dorsal striatum. Switching to the highly practiced task was associated with a non-overlapping set of regions, suggesting substantial differences in the neural substrates of switching as a function of task skill. Searchlight multivariate pattern analysis also revealed that learning was associated with decreased pattern information for mirror vs. plain reading tasks in fronto-parietal regions. Inferior frontal junction and posterior parietal cortex showed a joint effect of univariate activation and pattern information. These results suggest distinct learning mechanisms task performance and executive control as a function of learning.

  13. The neural basis of task switching changes with skill acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji eJimura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning novel skills involves reorganization and optimization of cognitive processing involving a broad network of brain regions. Previous work has shown asymmetric costs of switching to a well-trained task versus a poorly-trained task, but the neural basis of these differential switch costs is unclear. The current study examined the neural signature of task switching in the context of acquisition of new skill. Human participants alternated randomly between a novel visual task (mirror-reversed word reading and a highly practiced one (plain word reading, allowing the isolation of task switching and skill set maintenance. Two scan sessions were separated by two weeks, with behavioral training on the mirror reading task in between the two sessions. Broad cortical regions, including bilateral prefrontal, parietal, and extrastriate cortices, showed decreased activity associated with learning of the mirror reading skill. In contrast, learning to switch to the novel skill was associated with decreased activity in a focal subcortical region in the dorsal striatum. Switching to the highly practiced task was associated with a non-overlapping set of regions, suggesting substantial differences in the neural substrates of switching as a function of task skill. Searchlight multivariate pattern analysis also revealed that learning was associated with decreased pattern information for mirror versus plain reading tasks in fronto-parietal regions. Inferior frontal junction and posterior parietal cortex showed a joint effect of univariate activation and pattern information. These results suggest distinct learning mechanisms task performance and executive control as a function of learning.

  14. Details of out-field regional recurrence after involved-field irradiation with concurrent chemotherapy for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

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    Zhang X

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoli Zhang,1,2 Jinming Yu,1,2 Minghuan Li,2 Hui Zhu2 1Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Shandong Cancer Hospital affiliated to Shandong University, Shandong Academy of Medical Sciences, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns of out-field regional recurrence after involved-field irradiation (IFI in definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT for locally advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (LA-ESCC and identify the possible risk factors. Patients and methods: Eighty patients with LA-ESCC who received CCRT with IFI between January 2003 and January 2009 at the Shandong Cancer Hospital were recruited and analyzed. Imaging scans demonstrating first sites of failure were compared with original computed tomography-based radiation treatment plans, and failure patterns were defined as in-field, out-field regional (failures in initially uninvolved regional nodes, and distant failures. Results: After a median follow-up time of 52.6 months, 24 patients had evidence of out-field regional failure, 43 patients had evidence of in-field failure, and 33 patients had the evidence of distant failure. Multivariate analysis revealed that out-field regional failure was associated with clinical tumor status (T4 vs T1–3, odds ratio [OR] =6.547, P=0.002, tumor length (>8 cm vs ≤8 cm, OR =4.130, P=0.036, response to CCRT (complete response vs no complete response, OR =2.646, P=0.035, and in-field failure (no in-field failure vs in-field failure, OR =1.32, P=0.016. Survival analyses indicated that, compared to in-field failure or distant failure alone group, out-field regional failure alone group tended to have longer overall (P=0.006 and progression-free survival (P=0.164. Conclusion: Our data suggested that the predominant failure pattern after IFI was not out-field regional failure, which also did not influence survival

  15. Neural substrates of sublexical processing for spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarco, Andrew T; Wilson, Stephen M; Rising, Kindle; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Beeson, Pélagie M

    2017-01-01

    We used fMRI to examine the neural substrates of sublexical phoneme-grapheme conversion during spelling in a group of healthy young adults. Participants performed a writing-to-dictation task involving irregular words (e.g., choir), plausible nonwords (e.g., kroid), and a control task of drawing familiar geometric shapes (e.g., squares). Written production of both irregular words and nonwords engaged a left-hemisphere perisylvian network associated with reading/spelling and phonological processing skills. Effects of lexicality, manifested by increased activation during nonword relative to irregular word spelling, were noted in anterior perisylvian regions (posterior inferior frontal gyrus/operculum/precentral gyrus/insula), and in left ventral occipito-temporal cortex. In addition to enhanced neural responses within domain-specific components of the language network, the increased cognitive demands associated with spelling nonwords engaged domain-general frontoparietal cortical networks involved in selective attention and executive control. These results elucidate the neural substrates of sublexical processing during written language production and complement lesion-deficit correlation studies of phonological agraphia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neural network modeling of emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the history and development of computational neural network modeling of cognitive and behavioral processes that involve emotion. The exposition starts with models of classical conditioning dating from the early 1970s. Then it proceeds toward models of interactions between emotion and attention. Then models of emotional influences on decision making are reviewed, including some speculative (not and not yet simulated) models of the evolution of decision rules. Through the late 1980s, the neural networks developed to model emotional processes were mainly embodiments of significant functional principles motivated by psychological data. In the last two decades, network models of these processes have become much more detailed in their incorporation of known physiological properties of specific brain regions, while preserving many of the psychological principles from the earlier models. Most network models of emotional processes so far have dealt with positive and negative emotion in general, rather than specific emotions such as fear, joy, sadness, and anger. But a later section of this article reviews a few models relevant to specific emotions: one family of models of auditory fear conditioning in rats, and one model of induced pleasure enhancing creativity in humans. Then models of emotional disorders are reviewed. The article concludes with philosophical statements about the essential contributions of emotion to intelligent behavior and the importance of quantitative theories and models to the interdisciplinary enterprise of understanding the interactions of emotion, cognition, and behavior.

  17. The neural basis of emotions varies over time: different regions go with onset- and offset-bound processes underlying emotion intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Résibois, Maxime; Verduyn, Philippe; Delaveau, Pauline; Rotgé, Jean-Yves; Kuppens, Peter; Van Mechelen, Iven; Fossati, Philippe

    2017-08-01

    According to theories of emotion dynamics, emotions unfold across two phases in which different types of processes come to the fore: emotion onset and emotion offset. Differences in onset-bound processes are reflected by the degree of explosiveness or steepness of the response at onset, and differences in offset-bound processes by the degree of accumulation or intensification of the subsequent response. Whether onset- and offset-bound processes have distinctive neural correlates and, hence, whether the neural basis of emotions varies over time, still remains unknown. In the present fMRI study, we address this question using a recently developed paradigm that allows to disentangle explosiveness and accumulation. Thirty-one participants were exposed to neutral and negative social feedback, and asked to reflect on its contents. Emotional intensity while reading and thinking about the feedback was measured with an intensity profile tracking approach. Using non-negative matrix factorization, the resulting profile data were decomposed in explosiveness and accumulation components, which were subsequently entered as continuous regressors of the BOLD response. It was found that the neural basis of emotion intensity shifts as emotions unfold over time with emotion explosiveness and accumulation having distinctive neural correlates. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehof, Sjoerd P; Huygen, Frank J P M; van der Weerd, Rick W P; Westra, Mirjam; Zijlstra, Freek J

    2006-05-12

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease. The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared imaging) obtained during temperature provocation. The secondary objective was to obtain information about the involvement of the sympathetic system in CRPS1. We studied 12 patients in whom CRPS1 was diagnosed according to the criteria of Bruehl. High and low whole body cooling and warming induced and reduced sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. The degree of vasoconstrictor activity in both hands was monitored using a videothermograph. The sensitivity and specificity of the calculation methods used to assess the thermographic images were calculated. The temperature difference between the hands in the CRPS patients increases significantly when the sympathetic system is provoked. At both the maximum and minimum vasoconstriction no significant differences were found in fingertip temperatures between both hands. The majority of CRPS1 patients do not show maximal obtainable temperature differences between the involved and contralateral extremity at room temperature (static measurement). During cold and warm temperature challenges this temperature difference increases significantly. As a result a higher sensitivity and specificity could be achieved in the diagnosis of CRPS1. These findings suggest that the sympathetic efferent system is involved in CRPS1.

  19. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system

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    Westra Mirjam

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1 is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease. The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared imaging obtained during temperature provocation. The secondary objective was to obtain information about the involvement of the sympathetic system in CRPS1. Methods We studied 12 patients in whom CRPS1 was diagnosed according to the criteria of Bruehl. High and low whole body cooling and warming induced and reduced sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity. The degree of vasoconstrictor activity in both hands was monitored using a videothermograph. The sensitivity and specificity of the calculation methods used to assess the thermographic images were calculated. Results The temperature difference between the hands in the CRPS patients increases significantly when the sympathetic system is provoked. At both the maximum and minimum vasoconstriction no significant differences were found in fingertip temperatures between both hands. Conclusion The majority of CRPS1 patients do not show maximal obtainable temperature differences between the involved and contralateral extremity at room temperature (static measurement. During cold and warm temperature challenges this temperature difference increases significantly. As a result a higher sensitivity and specificity could be achieved in the diagnosis of CRPS1. These findings suggest that the sympathetic efferent system is involved in CRPS1.

  20. Neural systems for tactual memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, E; Petrides, M; Evans, A

    1996-04-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural systems involved in the memory processing of experiences through touch. 2. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with positron emission tomography by means of the water bolus H2(15)O methodology in human subjects as they performed tasks involving different levels of tactual memory. In one of the experimental tasks, the subjects had to palpate nonsense shapes to match each one to a previously learned set, thus requiring constant reference to long-term memory. The other experimental task involved judgements of the recent recurrence of shapes during the scanning period. A set of three control tasks was used to control for the type of exploratory movements and sensory processing inherent in the two experimental tasks. 3. Comparisons of the distribution of activity between the experimental and the control tasks were carried out by means of the subtraction method. In relation to the control conditions, the two experimental tasks requiring memory resulted in significant changes within the posteroventral insula and the central opercular region. In addition, the task requiring recall from long-term memory yielded changes in the perirhinal cortex. 4. The above findings demonstrated that a ventrally directed parietoinsular pathway, leading to the posteroventral insula and the perirhinal cortex, constitutes a system by which long-lasting representations of tactual experiences are formed. It is proposed that the posteroventral insula is involved in tactual feature analysis, by analogy with the similar role of the inferotemporal cortex in vision, whereas the perirhinal cortex is further involved in the integration of these features into long-lasting representations of somatosensory experiences.

  1. Computed tomography evaluation of loco-regional involvement of squamous cell carcinoma of the vocal cord; Avaliacao por tomografia computadorizada do envolvimento loco-regional do carcinoma espinocelular de corda vocal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Roberto Guido Santos; Rapoport, Abrao [Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Curso de Pos-graduacao em Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco; Souza, Ricardo Pires de [Complexo Hospitalar Heliopolis, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem; Soares, Aldemir Humberto [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: ricapires@ig.com.br

    2001-08-01

    We reviewed the case notes and computed tomography scans of 22 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the vocal cord, in the period between 1992 and 1998. Interobserver concordance for all cases and accuracy and concordance between the methods for the operated patients were evaluated using the kappa test. Concordance was classified as follows: excellent for evaluating tumoral involvement of the thyroid and cricoid cartilages, extra laryngeal extension and lymph node staging; very good for tumoral involvement of vocal cords, posterior commissure and para glottic space; good for tumoral involvement of the supraglottic and sub glottic regions and tumoral staging; regular for tumoral involvement of the anterior commissure and arytenoid cartilage. The combination of clinical and computed tomography evaluation for T staging resulted in an accuracy and concordance with the pathological results of 89.47% and 84.9%, respectively, which were superior to isolated clinical or computed tomography analysis. The accuracy and pathological concordance of computed tomography for N staging was 100%, which was superior to clinical evaluation. (author)

  2. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  3. Précis of Neural organization: structure, function, and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, M A; Erdi, P

    2000-08-01

    NEURAL ORGANIZATION: Structure, function, and dynamics shows how theory and experiment can supplement each other in an integrated, evolving account of the brain's structure, function, and dynamics. (1) STRUCTURE: Studies of brain function and dynamics build on and contribute to an understanding of many brain regions, the neural circuits that constitute them, and their spatial relations. We emphasize Szentágothai's modular architectonics principle, but also stress the importance of the microcomplexes of cerebellar circuitry and the lamellae of hippocampus. (2) FUNCTION: Control of eye movements, reaching and grasping, cognitive maps, and the roles of vision receive a functional decomposition in terms of schemas. Hypotheses as to how each schema is implemented through the interaction of specific brain regions provide the basis for modeling the overall function by neural networks constrained by neural data. Synthetic PET integrates modeling of primate circuitry with data from human brain imaging. (3) DYNAMICS: Dynamic system theory analyzes spatiotemporal neural phenomena, such as oscillatory and chaotic activity in both single neurons and (often synchronized) neural networks, the self-organizing development and plasticity of ordered neural structures, and learning and memory phenomena associated with synaptic modification. Rhythm generation involves multiple levels of analysis, from intrinsic cellular processes to loops involving multiple brain regions. A variety of rhythms are related to memory functions. The Précis presents a multifaceted case study of the hippocampus. We conclude with the claim that language and other cognitive processes can be fruitfully studied within the framework of neural organization that the authors have charted with John Szentágothai.

  4. Brain regions involved in subprocesses of small-space episodic object-location memory: a systematic review of lesion and functional neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kathrin; Eschen, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Object-location memory (OLM) enables us to keep track of the locations of objects in our environment. The neurocognitive model of OLM (Postma, A., Kessels, R. P. C., & Van Asselen, M. (2004). The neuropsychology of object-location memory. In G. L. Allen (Ed.), Human spatial memory: Remembering where (pp. 143-160). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum, Postma, A., Kessels, R. P. C., & Van Asselen, M. (2008). How the brain remembers and forgets where things are: The neurocognition of object-location memory. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 1339-1345. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2008.05.001 ) proposes that distinct brain regions are specialised for different subprocesses of OLM (object processing, location processing, and object-location binding; categorical and coordinate OLM; egocentric and allocentric OLM). It was based mainly on findings from lesion studies. However, recent episodic memory studies point to a contribution of additional or different brain regions to object and location processing within episodic OLM. To evaluate and update the neurocognitive model of OLM, we therefore conducted a systematic literature search for lesion as well as functional neuroimaging studies contrasting small-space episodic OLM with object memory or location memory. We identified 10 relevant lesion studies and 8 relevant functional neuroimaging studies. We could confirm some of the proposals of the neurocognitive model of OLM, but also differing hypotheses from episodic memory research, about which brain regions are involved in the different subprocesses of small-space episodic OLM. In addition, we were able to identify new brain regions as well as important research gaps.

  5. Frontal Eye Field, Where Art Thou? Anatomy, function and non-invasive manipulation of frontal regions involved in eye movements and associated cognitive operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine eVernet

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The planning, control and execution of eye movements in 3D space relies on a distributed system of cortical and subcortical brain regions. Within this network, the Eye Fields have been described in animals as cortical regions in which electrical stimulation is able to trigger eye movements and influence their latency or accuracy. This review will focus on the Frontal Eye Field (FEF a hub region located in Humans in the vicinity of the pre-central sulcus and the dorsal-most portion of the superior frontal sulcus. The straightforward localization of the FEF through electrical stimulation in animals is difficult to translate to the healthy human brain, particularly with non-invasive neuroimaging techniques. Hence, in the first part of this review, we will describe attempts made to characterize the anatomical localization of this area in the human brain. The outcome of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, Magneto-encephalography (MEG and particularly, non-invasive mapping methods such a Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS will be described and the variability of FEF localization across individuals and mapping techniques will be discussed. In the second part of this review, we will address the role of the FEF. We will explore its involvement both in the physiology of fixation, saccade, pursuit and vergence movements and in associated cognitive processes such as attentional orienting, visual awareness and perceptual modulation. Finally in the third part, we will review recent evidence suggesting the high level of malleability and plasticity of these regions and associated networks to non-invasive stimulation. The exploratory, diagnostic and therapeutic interest of such interventions for the modulation and improvement of perception in 3D space will be discussed.

  6. Neural Computations in Binaural Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hermann

    Binaural hearing helps humans and animals to localize and unmask sounds. Here, binaural computations in the barn owl's auditory system are discussed. Barn owls use the interaural time difference (ITD) for azimuthal sound localization, and they use the interaural level difference (ELD) for elevational sound localization. ITD and ILD and their precursors are processed in separate neural pathways, the time pathway and the intensity pathway, respectively. Representation of ITD involves four main computational steps, while the representation of ILD is accomplished in three steps. In the discussion neural processing in the owl's auditory system is compared with neural computations present in mammals.

  7. Anomalous neural circuit function in schizophrenia during a virtual Morris water task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folley, Bradley S; Astur, Robert; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince D; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2010-02-15

    Previous studies have reported learning and navigation impairments in schizophrenia patients during virtual reality allocentric learning tasks. The neural bases of these deficits have not been explored using functional MRI despite well-explored anatomic characterization of these paradigms in non-human animals. Our objective was to characterize the differential distributed neural circuits involved in virtual Morris water task performance using independent component analysis (ICA) in schizophrenia patients and controls. Additionally, we present behavioral data in order to derive relationships between brain function and performance, and we have included a general linear model-based analysis in order to exemplify the incremental and differential results afforded by ICA. Thirty-four individuals with schizophrenia and twenty-eight healthy controls underwent fMRI scanning during a block design virtual Morris water task using hidden and visible platform conditions. Independent components analysis was used to deconstruct neural contributions to hidden and visible platform conditions for patients and controls. We also examined performance variables, voxel-based morphometry and hippocampal subparcellation, and regional BOLD signal variation. Independent component analysis identified five neural circuits. Mesial temporal lobe regions, including the hippocampus, were consistently task-related across conditions and groups. Frontal, striatal, and parietal circuits were recruited preferentially during the visible condition for patients, while frontal and temporal lobe regions were more saliently recruited by controls during the hidden platform condition. Gray matter concentrations and BOLD signal in hippocampal subregions were associated with task performance in controls but not patients. Patients exhibited impaired performance on the hidden and visible conditions of the task, related to negative symptom severity. While controls showed coupling between neural circuits, regional

  8. Exploring the neural correlates of visual creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Sook-Lei; Dandekar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Although creativity has been called the most important of all human resources, its neural basis is still unclear. In the current study, we used fMRI to measure neural activity in participants solving a visuospatial creativity problem that involves divergent thinking and has been considered a canonical right hemisphere task. As hypothesized, both the visual creativity task and the control task as compared to rest activated a variety of areas including the posterior parietal cortex bilaterally and motor regions, which are known to be involved in visuospatial rotation of objects. However, directly comparing the two tasks indicated that the creative task more strongly activated left hemisphere regions including the posterior parietal cortex, the premotor cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the medial PFC. These results demonstrate that even in a task that is specialized to the right hemisphere, robust parallel activity in the left hemisphere supports creative processing. Furthermore, the results support the notion that higher motor planning may be a general component of creative improvisation and that such goal-directed planning of novel solutions may be organized top-down by the left DLPFC and by working memory processing in the medial prefrontal cortex. PMID:22349801

  9. The solution structure of REF2-I reveals interdomain interactions and regions involved in binding mRNA export factors and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, Alexander P; Hautbergue, Guillaume M; Tintaru, Aura M; Lian, Lu-Yun; Wilson, Stuart A

    2006-11-01

    The RNA binding and export factor (REF) family of mRNA export adaptors are found in several nuclear protein complexes including the spliceosome, TREX, and exon junction complexes. They bind RNA, interact with the helicase UAP56/DDX39, and are thought to bridge the interaction between the export factor TAP/NXF1 and mRNA. REF2-I consists of three domains, with the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain positioned in the middle. Here we dissect the interdomain interactions of REF2-I and present the solution structure of a functionally competent double domain (NM; residues 1-155). The N-terminal domain comprises a transient helix (N-helix) linked to the RRM by a flexible arm that includes an Arg-rich region. The N-helix, which is required for REF2-I function in vivo, overlaps the highly conserved REF-N motif and, together with the adjacent Arg-rich region, interacts transiently with the RRM. RNA interacts with REF2-I through arginine-rich regions in its N- and C-terminal domains, but we show that it also interacts weakly with the RRM. The mode of interaction is unusual for an RRM since it involves loops L1 and L5. NMR signal mapping and biochemical analysis with NM indicate that DDX39 and TAP interact with both the N and RRM domains of REF2-I and show that binding of these proteins and RNA will favor an open conformation for the two domains. The proximity of the RNA, TAP, and DDX39 binding sites on REF2-I suggests their binding may be mutually exclusive, which would lead to successive ligand binding events in the course of mRNA export.

  10. A computational approach identifies two regions of Hepatitis C Virus E1 protein as interacting domains involved in viral fusion process

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    El Sawaf Gamal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The E1 protein of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV can be dissected into two distinct hydrophobic regions: a central domain containing an hypothetical fusion peptide (FP, and a C-terminal domain (CT comprising two segments, a pre-anchor and a trans-membrane (TM region. In the currently accepted model of the viral fusion process, the FP and the TM regions are considered to be closely juxtaposed in the post-fusion structure and their physical interaction cannot be excluded. In the present study, we took advantage of the natural sequence variability present among HCV strains to test, by purely sequence-based computational tools, the hypothesis that in this virus the fusion process involves the physical interaction of the FP and CT regions of E1. Results Two computational approaches were applied. The first one is based on the co-evolution paradigm of interacting peptides and consequently on the correlation between the distance matrices generated by the sequence alignment method applied to FP and CT primary structures, respectively. In spite of the relatively low random genetic drift between genotypes, co-evolution analysis of sequences from five HCV genotypes revealed a greater correlation between the FP and CT domains than respect to a control HCV sequence from Core protein, so giving a clear, albeit still inconclusive, support to the physical interaction hypothesis. The second approach relies upon a non-linear signal analysis method widely used in protein science called Recurrence Quantification Analysis (RQA. This method allows for a direct comparison of domains for the presence of common hydrophobicity patterns, on which the physical interaction is based upon. RQA greatly strengthened the reliability of the hypothesis by the scoring of a lot of cross-recurrences between FP and CT peptides hydrophobicity patterning largely outnumbering chance expectations and pointing to putative interaction sites. Intriguingly, mutations in the CT

  11. Involvement of the carboxyl-terminal region of the yeast peroxisomal half ABC transporter Pxa2p in its interaction with Pxa1p and in transporter function.

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    Cheng-Yi Chuang

    Full Text Available The peroxisome is a single membrane-bound organelle in eukaryotic cells involved in lipid metabolism, including β-oxidation of fatty acids. The human genetic disorder X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD is caused by mutations in the ABCD1 gene (encoding ALDP, a peroxisomal half ATP-binding cassette [ABC] transporter. This disease is characterized by defective peroxisomal β-oxidation and a large accumulation of very long-chain fatty acids in brain white matter, adrenal cortex, and testis. ALDP forms a homodimer proposed to be the functional transporter, whereas the peroxisomal transporter in yeast is a heterodimer comprising two half ABC transporters, Pxa1p and Pxa2p, both orthologs of human ALDP. While the carboxyl-terminal domain of ALDP is engaged in dimerization, it remains unknown whether the same region is involved in the interaction between Pxa1p and Pxa2p.Using a yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that the carboxyl-terminal region (CT of Pxa2p, but not of Pxa1p, is required for their interaction. Further analysis indicated that the central part of the CT (designated CT2 of Pxa2p was indispensable for its interaction with the carboxyl terminally truncated Pxa1_NBD. An interaction between the CT of Pxa2p and Pxa1_NBD was not detected, but could be identified in the presence of Pxa2_NBD-CT1. A single mutation of two conserved residues (aligned with X-ALD-associated mutations at the same positions in ALDP in the CT2 of the Pxa2_NBD-CT protein impaired its interaction with Pxa1_NBD or Pxa1_NBD-CT, resulting in a mutant protein that exhibited a proteinase K digestion profile different from that of the wild-type protein. Functional analysis of these mutant proteins on oleate plates indicated that they were defective in transporter function.The CT of Pxa2p is involved in its interaction with Pxa1p and in transporter function. This concept may be applied to human ALDP studies, helping to establish the pathological mechanism for CT-related X

  12. Object Classification Using Substance Based Neural Network

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    P. Sengottuvelan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Object recognition has shown tremendous increase in the field of image analysis. The required set of image objects is identified and retrieved on the basis of object recognition. In this paper, we propose a novel classification technique called substance based image classification (SIC using a wavelet neural network. The foremost task of SIC is to remove the surrounding regions from an image to reduce the misclassified portion and to effectively reflect the shape of an object. At first, the image to be extracted is performed with SIC system through the segmentation of the image. Next, in order to attain more accurate information, with the extracted set of regions, the wavelet transform is applied for extracting the configured set of features. Finally, using the neural network classifier model, misclassification over the given natural images and further background images are removed from the given natural image using the LSEG segmentation. Moreover, to increase the accuracy of object classification, SIC system involves the removal of the regions in the surrounding image. Performance evaluation reveals that the proposed SIC system reduces the occurrence of misclassification and reflects the exact shape of an object to approximately 10–15%.

  13. Abnormal neural responses to social exclusion in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradin, Victoria B; Waiter, Gordon; Kumar, Poornima; Stickle, Catriona; Milders, Maarten; Matthews, Keith; Reid, Ian; Hall, Jeremy; Steele, J Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Social exclusion is an influential concept in politics, mental health and social psychology. Studies on healthy subjects have implicated the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in emotional and social information processing, in neural responses to social exclusion. Impairments in social interactions are common in schizophrenia and are associated with reduced quality of life. Core symptoms such as delusions usually have a social content. However little is known about the neural underpinnings of social abnormalities. The aim of this study was to investigate the neural substrates of social exclusion in schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls underwent fMRI while participating in a popular social exclusion paradigm. This task involves passing a 'ball' between the participant and two cartoon representations of other subjects. The extent of social exclusion (ball not being passed to the participant) was parametrically varied throughout the task. Replicating previous findings, increasing social exclusion activated the mPFC in controls. In contrast, patients with schizophrenia failed to modulate mPFC responses with increasing exclusion. Furthermore, the blunted response to exclusion correlated with increased severity of positive symptoms. These data support the hypothesis that the neural response to social exclusion differs in schizophrenia, highlighting the mPFC as a potential substrate of impaired social interactions.

  14. Estimation of Effectivty Connectivity via Data-Driven Neural Modeling

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    Dean Robert Freestone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research introduces a new method for functional brain imaging via a process of model inversion. By estimating parameters of a computational model, we are able to track effective connectivity and mean membrane potential dynamics that cannot be directly measured using electrophysiological measurements alone. The ability to track the hidden aspects of neurophysiology will have a profound impact on the way we understand and treat epilepsy. For example, under the assumption the model captures the key features of the cortical circuits of interest, the framework will provide insights into seizure initiation and termination on a patient-specific basis. It will enable investigation into the effect a particular drug has on specific neural populations and connectivity structures using minimally invasive measurements. The method is based on approximating brain networks using an interconnected neural population model. The neural population model is based on a neural mass model that describes the functional activity of the brain, capturing the mesoscopic biophysics and anatomical structure. The model is made subject-specific by estimating the strength of intra-cortical connections within a region and inter-cortical connections between regions using a novel Kalman filtering method. We demonstrate through simulation how the framework can be used the track the mechanisms involved in seizure initiation and termination.

  15. Multiple neural mechanisms for coloring words in synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Takemasa; Noguchi, Yasuki; Koga, Hiroki; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Saiki, Jun; Kakigi, Ryusuke; Kita, Shinichi

    2014-07-01

    Grapheme-color synesthesia is a phenomenon in which achromatic letters/digits automatically induce particular colors. When multiple letters are integrated into a word, some synesthetes perceive that all those letters are changed into the same color, reporting lexical color to that word. Previous psychological studies found several "rules" that determine those lexical colors. The colors to most words are determined by the first letters of the words, while some words in ordinal sequences have their specific colors. Recent studies further reported the third case where lexical colors might be influenced by semantic information of words. Although neural mechanisms determining those lexical colors remained unknown, here we identified three separate neural systems in the synesthete's brain underlying three rules for illusory coloring of words. In addition to the occipito-temporal and parietal regions previously found to be associated with the grapheme-color synesthesia, neural systems for lexical coloring extended to linguistic areas in the left inferior frontal and anterior temporal regions that were engaged in semantic analyses of words. Those results indicate an involvement of wider and higher neural networks than previously assumed in a production of synesthetic colors to visual stimuli and further showed a multiplicity of synesthetic mechanisms represented in the single brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Hinge Region of Bovine Zona Pellucida Glycoprotein ZP3 Is Involved in the Formation of the Sperm-Binding Active ZP3/ZP4 Complex

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    Kaori Suzuki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The zona pellucida (ZP surrounds the mammalian oocyte and mediates species-selective sperm-oocyte interactions. Bovine ZP consists of glycoproteins ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4. Neither ZP3 nor ZP4 alone shows inhibitory activity for the binding of sperm to the ZP; however, this activity is seen with the ZP3/ZP4 heterocomplex. Here, we constructed a series of bovine ZP3 mutants to identify the ZP4-binding site on ZP3. Each ZP3 mutant was co-expressed with ZP4 using a baculovirus-Sf9 cell expression system and examined for interaction with ZP4 as well as inhibitory activity for sperm-ZP binding. N-terminal fragment Arg-32 to Arg-160 of ZP3 interacted with ZP4 and inhibited sperm-ZP binding, whereas fragment Arg-32 to Thr-155 showed much weaker interaction with ZP4. Mutation of N-glycosylated Asn-146 to Asp in the N-terminal fragment Arg-32 to Glu-178 of ZP3 did not interrupt the interaction of this fragment with ZP4, but it did reduce the inhibitory activity of the complex for sperm-ZP binding. In contrast, mutation of N-glycosylated Asn-124 to Asp did not significantly reduce the activity. Taken together, these results suggest that one of the ZP4 binding sites exists in the flexible hinge region of ZP3 and that the N-glycosylation in this region is involved in the sperm binding.

  17. The Hinge Region of Bovine Zona Pellucida Glycoprotein ZP3 Is Involved in the Formation of the Sperm-Binding Active ZP3/ZP4 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kaori; Tatebe, Nanami; Kojima, Sayuri; Hamano, Ayumi; Orita, Misaki; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    The zona pellucida (ZP) surrounds the mammalian oocyte and mediates species-selective sperm-oocyte interactions. Bovine ZP consists of glycoproteins ZP2, ZP3, and ZP4. Neither ZP3 nor ZP4 alone shows inhibitory activity for the binding of sperm to the ZP; however, this activity is seen with the ZP3/ZP4 heterocomplex. Here, we constructed a series of bovine ZP3 mutants to identify the ZP4-binding site on ZP3. Each ZP3 mutant was co-expressed with ZP4 using a baculovirus-Sf9 cell expression system and examined for interaction with ZP4 as well as inhibitory activity for sperm-ZP binding. N-terminal fragment Arg-32 to Arg-160 of ZP3 interacted with ZP4 and inhibited sperm-ZP binding, whereas fragment Arg-32 to Thr-155 showed much weaker interaction with ZP4. Mutation of N-glycosylated Asn-146 to Asp in the N-terminal fragment Arg-32 to Glu-178 of ZP3 did not interrupt the interaction of this fragment with ZP4, but it did reduce the inhibitory activity of the complex for sperm-ZP binding. In contrast, mutation of N-glycosylated Asn-124 to Asp did not significantly reduce the activity. Taken together, these results suggest that one of the ZP4 binding sites exists in the flexible hinge region of ZP3 and that the N-glycosylation in this region is involved in the sperm binding. PMID:26610590

  18. A neural basis for general intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J; Seitz, R J; Kolodny, J; Bor, D; Herzog, H; Ahmed, A; Newell, F N; Emslie, H

    2000-07-21

    Universal positive correlations between different cognitive tests motivate the concept of "general intelligence" or Spearman's g. Here the neural basis for g is investigated by means of positron emission tomography. Spatial, verbal, and perceptuo-motor tasks with high-g involvement are compared with matched low-g control tasks. In contrast to the common view that g reflects a broad sample of major cognitive functions, high-g tasks do not show diffuse recruitment of multiple brain regions. Instead they are associated with selective recruitment of lateral frontal cortex in one or both hemispheres. Despite very different task content in the three high-g-low-g contrasts, lateral frontal recruitment is markedly similar in each case. Many previous experiments have shown these same frontal regions to be recruited by a broad range of different cognitive demands. The results suggest that "general intelligence" derives from a specific frontal system important in the control of diverse forms of behavior.

  19. How the human brain goes virtual: Distinct cortical regions of the person-processing network are involved in self-identification with virtual agents

    OpenAIRE

    Ganesh, S.; van Schie, H. T.; Lange, F.P. de; Thompson, E; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2012-01-01

    Millions of people worldwide engage in online role-playing with their avatar, a virtual agent that represents the self. Previous behavioral studies have indicated that many gamers identify more strongly with their avatar than with their biological self. Through their avatar, gamers develop social networks and learn new social-cognitive skills. The cognitive neurosciences have yet to identify the neural processes that underlie self-identification with these virtual agents. We applied functiona...

  20. Endogenous oscillations of electric potential difference in the cambial region of the pine stem. II. Possible involvement of the oscillations in xylogenesis

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    Wojciech Kurek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct and indirect interrelations between xylogenic processes and the endogenous electric potential difference (PD oscillations generated in the cambial region of isolated tissue blocks from pine trunks were investigated. The frequency of transient PD changes varied during the season and displayed three minima which were concurrent with periods of initiation and termination of cambial activity and with the time of transition from early- to late-wood production. The oscillations were damped by TIBA - an inhibitor of polar auxin transport and stimulated by IAA, but only when the hormone was supplied to the apical end of the tissue block. This suggests that the polar transport of auxin may be involved in generation of the transient PD changes. Results of 2-channel recordings in one tissue block suggest that a part of the recorded oscillations (10-25 % exhibit coordination in space and time: a wave-like pattern along the trunk axis is created by PD changes. The pattern might be a physical carrier of information coordinating processes of growth and differentiation in distant parts of the tree.

  1. Food-Related Neural Circuitry in Prader-Willi Syndrome: Response to High- versus Low-Calorie Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitropoulos, Anastasia; Schultz, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by hyperphagia and food preoccupations. Although dysfunction of the hypothalamus likely has a critical role in hyperphagia, it is only one of several regions involved in the regulation of eating. The purpose of this research was to examine food-related neural circuitry…

  2. Experiencing Past and Future Personal Events: Functional Neuroimaging Evidence on the Neural Bases of Mental Time Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botzung, Anne; Denkova, Ekaterina; Manning, Lilianne

    2008-01-01

    Functional MRI was used in healthy subjects to investigate the existence of common neural structures supporting re-experiencing the past and pre-experiencing the future. Past and future events evocation appears to involve highly similar patterns of brain activation including, in particular, the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior regions and the…

  3. Neural Networks

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    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  4. The neural correlates of temporal reward discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, Anouk; de Water, Erik; Mies, Gabry W

    2013-09-01

    Temporal reward discounting (TD) refers to the decrease in subjective value of a reward when the delay to that reward increases. In recent years, a growing number of studies on the neural correlates of temporal reward discounting have been conducted. This article focuses on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies on TD in humans. First, we describe the different types of tasks (also from behavioral studies) and the dependent variables. Subsequently, we discuss the evidence for three neurobiological models of TD: the dual-systems model, the single-system model and the self-control model. Further, studies in which nontraditional tasks (e.g., with nonmonetary rewards) were used to study TD are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the neural correlates of individual differences in discounting, and its development across the lifespan. We conclude that the evidence for each of the three neurobiological models of TD is mixed, in that all models receive (partial) support, and several studies provide support for multiple models. Because of large differences between studies in task design and analytical approach, it is difficult to draw a firm conclusion regarding which model provides the best explanation of the neural correlates of temporal discounting. We propose that some components of these models can complement each other, and future studies should test the predictions offered by different models against each other. Several future research directions are suggested, including studying the connectivity between brain regions in relation to discounting, and directly comparing the neural mechanisms involved in discounting of monetary and primary rewards. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:523-545. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1246 CONFLICT OF INTEREST: The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Profile of the biodiesel B100 commercialized in the region of Londrina: application of artificial neural networks of the type self organizing maps

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    Vilson Machado de Campos Filho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The 97 samples were grouped according to the year of analysis. For each year, letters from A to D were attributed, between 2010 and 2013; A (33 B (25 C (24 and D (15. The parameters of compliance previously analyzed are those established by the National Agency of Petroleum, Natural Gas and Biofuels (ANP, through resolution ANP 07/2008. The parameters analyzed were density, flash point, peroxide and acid value. The observed values were presented to Artificial Neural Network (ANN Self Organizing MAP (SOM in order to classify, by physical-chemical properties, each sample from year of production. The ANN was trained on different days and randomly divided samples into two groups, training and test set. It was found that SOM network differentiated samples by the year and the compliance parameters, allowing to identify that the density and the flash point were the most significant compliance parameters, so good for the distinction and classification of these samples.

  6. Rare Deleterious PARD3 Variants in the aPKC-Binding Region are Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Human Cranial Neural Tube Defects Via Disrupting Apical Tight Junction Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoli; An, Yu; Gao, Yonghui; Guo, Liu; Rui, Lei; Xie, Hua; Sun, Mei; Lam Hung, Siv; Sheng, Xiaoming; Zou, Jizhen; Bao, Yihua; Guan, Hongyan; Niu, Bo; Li, Zandong; Finnell, Richard H; Gusella, James F; Wu, Bai-Lin; Zhang, Ting

    2017-04-01

    Increasing evidence that mutation of planar cell polarity (PCP) genes contributes to human cranial neural tube defect (NTD) susceptibility prompted us to hypothesize that rare variants of genes in the core apical-basal polarity (ABP) pathway are risk factors for cranial NTDs. In this study, we screened for rare genomic variation of PARD3 in 138 cranial NTD cases and 274 controls. Overall, the rare deleterious variants of PARD3 were significantly associated with increased risk for cranial NTDs (11/138 vs.7/274, P analysis in HEK293T and MDCK cells confirmed abnormal aPKC binding or interaction for two PARD3 variants (p.P913Q and p.D783G), resulting in defective tight junction formation via disrupted aPKC binding. Functional analysis in human neural progenitor cells and chick embryos revealed that PARD3 knockdown gave rise to abnormal cell polarity and compromised the polarization process of neuroepithelial tissue. Our studies suggest that rare deleterious variants of PARD3 in the aPKC-binding region contribute to human cranial NTDs, possibly by disrupting apical tight junction formation and subsequent polarization process of the neuroepithelium. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Concurrent OCT imaging of stimulus evoked retinal neural activation and hemodynamic responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Taeyoon; Wang, Benquan; Lu, Yiming; Chen, Yanjun; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-02-01

    It is well established that major retinal diseases involve distortions of the retinal neural physiology and blood vascular structures. However, the details of distortions in retinal neurovascular coupling associated with major eye diseases are not well understood. In this study, a multi-modal optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging system was developed to enable concurrent imaging of retinal neural activity and vascular hemodynamics. Flicker light stimulation was applied to mouse retinas to evoke retinal neural responses and hemodynamic changes. The OCT images were acquired continuously during the pre-stimulation, light-stimulation, and post-stimulation phases. Stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals (IOSs) and hemodynamic changes were observed over time in blood-free and blood regions, respectively. Rapid IOSs change occurred almost immediately after stimulation. Both positive and negative signals were observed in adjacent retinal areas. The hemodynamic changes showed time delays after stimulation. The signal magnitudes induced by light stimulation were observed in blood regions and did not show significant changes in blood-free regions. These differences may arise from different mechanisms in blood vessels and neural tissues in response to light stimulation. These characteristics agreed well with our previous observations in mouse retinas. Further development of the multimodal OCT may provide a new imaging method for studying how retinal structures and metabolic and neural functions are affected by age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and other diseases, which promises novel noninvasive biomarkers for early disease detection and reliable treatment evaluations of eye diseases.

  8. Neural Correlates of Subliminal Language Processing.

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    Axelrod, Vadim; Bar, Moshe; Rees, Geraint; Yovel, Galit

    2015-08-01

    Language is a high-level cognitive function, so exploring the neural correlates of unconscious language processing is essential for understanding the limits of unconscious processing in general. The results of several functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have suggested that unconscious lexical and semantic processing is confined to the posterior temporal lobe, without involvement of the frontal lobe-the regions that are indispensable for conscious language processing. However, previous studies employed a similarly designed masked priming paradigm with briefly presented single and contextually unrelated words. It is thus possible, that the stimulation level was insufficiently strong to be detected in the high-level frontal regions. Here, in a high-resolution fMRI and multivariate pattern analysis study we explored the neural correlates of subliminal language processing using a novel paradigm, where written meaningful sentences were suppressed from awareness for extended duration using continuous flash suppression. We found that subjectively and objectively invisible meaningful sentences and unpronounceable nonwords could be discriminated not only in the left posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS), but critically, also in the left middle frontal gyrus. We conclude that frontal lobes play a role in unconscious language processing and that activation of the frontal lobes per se might not be sufficient for achieving conscious awareness. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Degranulating mast cells in fibrotic regions of human tumors and evidence that mast cell heparin interferes with the growth of tumor cells through a mechanism involving fibroblasts

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    Kanakubo Emi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mast cells that are present in fibrotic regions of cancer can suppress the growth of tumor cells through an indirect mechanism involving peri-tumoral fibroblasts. Methods We first immunostained a wide variety of human cancers for the presence of degranulated mast cells. In a subsequent series of controlled in vitro experiments, we then co-cultured UACC-812 human breast cancer cells with normal fibroblasts in the presence or absence of different combinations and doses of mast cell tryptase, mast cell heparin, a lysate of the human mast cell line HMC-1, and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF-7, a powerful, heparin-binding growth factor for breast epithelial cells. Results Degranulating mast cells were localized predominantly in the fibrous tissue of every case of breast cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, ovarian cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and Hodgkin's disease that we examined. Mast cell tryptase and HMC-1 lysate had no significant effect on the clonogenic growth of cancer cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. By contrast, mast cell heparin at multiple doses significantly reduced the size and number of colonies of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, especially in the presence of FGF-7. Neither heparin nor FGF-7, individually or in combination, produced any significant effect on the clonogenic growth of breast cancer cells cultured without fibroblasts. Conclusion Degranulating mast cells are restricted to peri-tumoral fibrous tissue, and mast cell heparin is a powerful inhibitor of clonogenic growth of tumor cells co-cultured with fibroblasts. These results may help to explain the well-known ability of heparin to inhibit the growth of primary and metastatic tumors.

  10. Identifying novel transcription factors involved in the inflammatory response by using binding site motif scanning in genomic regions defined by histone acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askovich, Peter S; Ramsey, Stephen A; Diercks, Alan H; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Knijnenburg, Theo A; Aderem, Alan

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune response to pathogenic challenge is a complex, multi-staged process involving thousands of genes. While numerous transcription factors that act as master regulators of this response have been identified, the temporal complexity of gene expression changes in response to pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptor stimulation strongly suggest that additional layers of regulation remain to be uncovered. The evolved pathogen response program in mammalian innate immune cells is understood to reflect a compromise between the probability of clearing the infection and the extent of tissue damage and inflammatory sequelae it causes. Because of that, a key challenge to delineating the regulators that control the temporal inflammatory response is that an innate immune regulator that may confer a selective advantage in the wild may be dispensable in the lab setting. In order to better understand the complete transcriptional response of primary macrophages to the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we designed a method that integrates temporally resolved gene expression and chromatin-accessibility measurements from mouse macrophages. By correlating changes in transcription factor binding site motif enrichment scores, calculated within regions of accessible chromatin, with the average temporal expression profile of a gene cluster, we screened for transcriptional factors that regulate the cluster. We have validated our predictions of LPS-stimulated transcriptional regulators using ChIP-seq data for three transcription factors with experimentally confirmed functions in innate immunity. In addition, we predict a role in the macrophage LPS response for several novel transcription factors that have not previously been implicated in immune responses. This method is applicable to any experimental situation where temporal gene expression and chromatin-accessibility data are available.

  11. Neural network based system for equipment surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

    1998-04-28

    A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

  12. Neural crest does not contribute to the neck and shoulder in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henning Epperlein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major step during the evolution of tetrapods was their transition from water to land. This process involved the reduction or complete loss of the dermal bones that made up connections to the skull and a concomitant enlargement of the endochondral shoulder girdle. In the mouse the latter is derived from three separate embryonic sources: lateral plate mesoderm, somites, and neural crest. The neural crest was suggested to sustain the muscle attachments. How this complex composition of the endochondral shoulder girdle arose during evolution and whether it is shared by all tetrapods is unknown. Salamanders that lack dermal bone within their shoulder girdle were of special interest for a possible contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral elements and muscle attachment sites, and we therefore studied them in this context. RESULTS: We grafted neural crest from GFP+ fluorescent transgenic axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum donor embryos into white (d/d axolotl hosts and followed the presence of neural crest cells within the cartilage of the shoulder girdle and the connective tissue of muscle attachment sites of the neck-shoulder region. Strikingly, neural crest cells did not contribute to any part of the endochondral shoulder girdle or to the connective tissue at muscle attachment sites in axolotl. CONCLUSIONS: Our results in axolotl suggest that neural crest does not serve a general function in vertebrate shoulder muscle attachment sites as predicted by the "muscle scaffold theory," and that it is not necessary to maintain connectivity of the endochondral shoulder girdle to the skull. Our data support the possibility that the contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral shoulder girdle, which is observed in the mouse, arose de novo in mammals as a developmental basis for their skeletal synapomorphies. This further supports the hypothesis of an increased neural crest diversification during vertebrate evolution.

  13. Neural control of daily and seasonal timing of songbird migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tyler J; Kumar, Vinod

    2017-07-01

    Bird migration is one of most salient annual events in nature. It involves predictable seasonal movements between breeding and non-breeding habitats. Both circadian and circannual clocks are entrained by photoperiodic cues and time daily and seasonal changes in migratory physiology and behavior. This mini-review provides an update on daily and seasonal rhythms of migratory behavior, and examines the neuroendocrine and molecular pathways involved in the timing of migration in songbirds. Recent findings have identified key neural substrates, and suggest the involvement of multiple neuroendocrine regulatory systems in controlling seasonal states in migrants. We propose that four distinct neural substrates are involved in the timing of migration and include (1) pineal gland and suprachiasmatic nucleus (mSCN); (2) a cluster of hypothalamic nuclei, the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH); (3) dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH); and (4) tanycytes along ependymal layer of the 3rd ventricle (3V). Cluster N, a nucleus in the telencephalon involved in the integration of geomagnetic cues, likely maintains functional connectivity with brain regions involved in timing songbird migration. These nuclei form an interconnected network that coordinates daily timing (pineal gland/mSCN), annual photoperiodic response (MBH, 3V), energetic state (MBH, DMH, 3V), and magnetic compass information (i.e., cluster N) for migration in songbirds.

  14. Affective neural response to restricted interests in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Carissa J; Foss-Feig, Jennifer H; Heacock, Jessica; Schauder, Kimberly B; Loring, Whitney A; Rogers, Baxter P; Pryweller, Jennifer R; Newsom, Cassandra R; Cockhren, Jurnell; Cao, Aize; Bolton, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Restricted interests are a class of repetitive behavior in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) whose intensity and narrow focus often contribute to significant interference with daily functioning. While numerous neuroimaging studies have investigated executive circuits as putative neural substrates of repetitive behavior, recent work implicates affective neural circuits in restricted interests. We sought to explore the role of affective neural circuits and determine how restricted interests are distinguished from hobbies or interests in typical development. We compared a group of children with ASD to a typically developing (TD) group of children with strong interests or hobbies, employing parent report, an operant behavioral task, and functional imaging with personalized stimuli based on individual interests. While performance on the operant task was similar between the two groups, parent report of intensity and interference of interests was significantly higher in the ASD group. Both the ASD and TD groups showed increased BOLD response in widespread affective neural regions to the pictures of their own interest. When viewing pictures of other children's interests, the TD group showed a similar pattern, whereas BOLD response in the ASD group was much more limited. Increased BOLD response in the insula and anterior cingulate cortex distinguished the ASD from the TD group, and parent report of the intensity and interference with daily life of the child's restricted interest predicted insula response. While affective neural network response and operant behavior are comparable in typical and restricted interests, the narrowness of focus that clinically distinguishes restricted interests in ASD is reflected in more interference in daily life and aberrantly enhanced insula and anterior cingulate response to individuals' own interests in the ASD group. These results further support the involvement of affective neural networks in repetitive behaviors in ASD. © 2013 The

  15. The Neural Basis of Typewriting: A Functional MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Higashiyama

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrate of typewriting Japanese words and to detect the difference between the neural substrate of typewriting and handwriting, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study in 16 healthy volunteers. All subjects were skillful touch typists and performed five tasks: a typing task, a writing task, a reading task, and two control tasks. Three brain regions were activated during both the typing and the writing tasks: the left superior parietal lobule, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the left premotor cortex close to Exner's area. Although typing and writing involved common brain regions, direct comparison between the typing and the writing task revealed greater left posteromedial intraparietal cortex activation in the typing task. In addition, activity in the left premotor cortex was more rostral in the typing task than in the writing task. These findings suggest that, although the brain circuits involved in Japanese typewriting are almost the same as those involved in handwriting, there are brain regions that are specific for typewriting.

  16. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  17. Neural activity when people solve verbal problems with insight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Jung-Beeman

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available People sometimes solve problems with a unique process called insight, accompanied by an "Aha!" experience. It has long been unclear whether different cognitive and neural processes lead to insight versus noninsight solutions, or if solutions differ only in subsequent subjective feeling. Recent behavioral studies indicate distinct patterns of performance and suggest differential hemispheric involvement for insight and noninsight solutions. Subjects solved verbal problems, and after each correct solution indicated whether they solved with or without insight. We observed two objective neural correlates of insight. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (Experiment 1 revealed increased activity in the right hemisphere anterior superior temporal gyrus for insight relative to noninsight solutions. The same region was active during initial solving efforts. Scalp electroencephalogram recordings (Experiment 2 revealed a sudden burst of high-frequency (gamma-band neural activity in the same area beginning 0.3 s prior to insight solutions. This right anterior temporal area is associated with making connections across distantly related information during comprehension. Although all problem solving relies on a largely shared cortical network, the sudden flash of insight occurs when solvers engage distinct neural and cognitive processes that allow them to see connections that previously eluded them.

  18. Structural and functional neural correlates of music perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limb, Charles J

    2006-04-01

    This review article highlights state-of-the-art functional neuroimaging studies and demonstrates the novel use of music as a tool for the study of human auditory brain structure and function. Music is a unique auditory stimulus with properties that make it a compelling tool with which to study both human behavior and, more specifically, the neural elements involved in the processing of sound. Functional neuroimaging techniques represent a modern and powerful method of investigation into neural structure and functional correlates in the living organism. These methods have demonstrated a close relationship between the neural processing of music and language, both syntactically and semantically. Greater neural activity and increased volume of gray matter in Heschl's gyrus has been associated with musical aptitude. Activation of Broca's area, a region traditionally considered to subserve language, is important in interpreting whether a note is on or off key. The planum temporale shows asymmetries that are associated with the phenomenon of perfect pitch. Functional imaging studies have also demonstrated activation of primitive emotional centers such as ventral striatum, midbrain, amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, and ventral medial prefrontal cortex in listeners of moving musical passages. In addition, studies of melody and rhythm perception have elucidated mechanisms of hemispheric specialization. These studies show the power of music and functional neuroimaging to provide singularly useful tools for the study of brain structure and function.

  19. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andics, A.V.; McQueen, J.M.; Petersson, K.M.; Gal, V.; Rudas, G.; Vidnyanszky, Z.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training

  20. Day-Ahead Natural Gas Demand Forecasting Using Optimized ABC-Based Neural Network with Sliding Window Technique: The Case Study of Regional Basis in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akpinar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increase of energy consumption in the world is reflected in the consumption of natural gas. However, this increment requires additional investment. This effect leads imbalances in terms of demand forecasting, such as applying penalties in the case of error rates occurring beyond the acceptable limits. As the forecasting errors increase, penalties increase exponentially. Therefore, the optimal use of natural gas as a scarce resource is important. There are various demand forecast ranges for natural gas and the most difficult range among these demands is the day-ahead forecasting, since it is hard to implement and makes predictions with low error rates. The objective of this study is stabilizing gas tractions on day-ahead demand forecasting using low-consuming subscriber data for minimizing error using univariate artificial bee colony-based artificial neural networks (ANN-ABC. For this purpose, households and low-consuming commercial users’ four-year consumption data between the years of 2011–2014 are gathered in daily periods. Previous consumption values are used to forecast day-ahead consumption values with sliding window technique and other independent variables are not taken into account. Dataset is divided into two parts. First, three-year daily consumption values are used with a seven day window for training the networks, while the last year is used for the day-ahead demand forecasting. Results show that ANN-ABC is a strong, stable, and effective method with a low error rate of 14.9 mean absolute percentage error (MAPE for training utilizing MAPE with a univariate sliding window technique.

  1. Neural correlates of stimulus reportability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Oliver J; Friston, Karl F; Zeki, Semir

    2009-08-01

    Most experiments on the "neural correlates of consciousness" employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged disc-stimuli and were cued, after variable delays (following stimulus offset), to report the presence or absence of a disc at the cued location, using variable motor actions. By uncoupling stimulus processing, decision, and motor response, we were able to use signal detection theory to deconstruct the neural basis of stimulus reportability. We show that retinotopically specific responses in the early visual cortex correlate with stimulus processing but not decision or report; a network of parietal/temporal regions correlates with decisions but not stimulus presence, whereas classical motor regions correlate with report. These findings provide a basic framework for understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability without the theoretical burden of presupposing a relationship between reportability and consciousness.

  2. Anterior Hox Genes Interact with Components of the Neural Crest Specification Network to Induce Neural Crest Fates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes play a central role in neural crest (NC) patterning particularly in the cranial region of the body. Despite evidence that simultaneous loss of Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 function resulted in NC specification defects, the role of Hox genes in NC specification has remained unclear due to extended genetic redundancy among Hox genes. To circumvent this problem, we expressed anterior Hox genes in the trunk neural tube of the developing chick embryo. This demonstrated that anterior Hox genes play a central role in NC cell specification by rapidly inducing the key transcription factors Snail2 and Msx1/2 and a neural progenitor to NC cell fate switch characterized by cell adhesion changes and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells delaminated from dorsal and medial neural tube levels and generated ectopic neurons, glia progenitors, and melanocytes. The mobilization of the NC genetic cascade was dependent upon bone morphogenetic protein signaling and optimal levels of Notch signaling. Therefore, anterior Hox patterning genes participate in NC specification and EMT by interacting with NC-inducing signaling pathways and regulating the expression of key genes involved in these processes. Stem Cells 2011;29:858–870 PMID:21433221

  3. Neural correlate of vernier acuity tasks assessed by functional MRI (FMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N; Walker, B Michael; Modestino, Edward J; Miki, Atsushi; Terhune, Kyla P; Francis, Ellie L; Haselgrove, John C; Liu, Grant T

    2007-01-01

    Vernier acuity refers to the ability to discern a small offset within a line. However, while Vernier acuity has been extensively studied psychophysically, its neural correlates are uncertain. Based upon previous psychophysical and electrophysiologic data, we hypothesized that extrastriate areas of the brain would be involved in Vernier acuity tasks, so we designed event-related functional MRI (fMRI) paradigms to identify cortical regions of the brain involved in this behavior. Normal subjects identified suprathreshold and subthreshold Vernier offsets. The results suggest a cortical network including frontal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellar regions subserves the observation, processing, interpretation, and acknowledgment of briefly presented Vernier offsets.

  4. Longitudinal associations among family environment, neural cognitive control, and social competence among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungmeen Kim-Spoon

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available During adolescence, prefrontal cortex regions, important in cognitive control, undergo maturation to adapt to changing environmental demands. Ways through which social-ecological factors contribute to adolescent neural cognitive control have not been thoroughly examined. We hypothesize that household chaos is a context that may modulate the associations among parental control, adolescent neural cognitive control, and developmental changes in social competence. The sample involved 167 adolescents (ages 13–14 at Time 1, 53% male. Parental control and household chaos were measured using adolescents’ questionnaire data, and cognitive control was assessed via behavioral performance and brain imaging at Time 1. Adolescent social competence was reported by adolescents at Time 1 and at Time 2 (one year later. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that higher parental control predicted better neural cognitive control only among adolescents living in low-chaos households. The association between poor neural cognitive control at Time 1 and social competence at Time 2 (after controlling for social competence at Time 1 was significant only among adolescents living in high-chaos households. Household chaos may undermine the positive association of parental control with adolescent neural cognitive control and exacerbate the detrimental association of poor neural cognitive control with disrupted social competence development.

  5. Neural circuits in anxiety and stress disorders: a focused review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duval ER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth R Duval, Arash Javanbakht, Israel LiberzonDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Anxiety and stress disorders are among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders. In recent years, multiple studies have examined brain regions and networks involved in anxiety symptomatology in an effort to better understand the mechanisms involved and to develop more effective treatments. However, much remains unknown regarding the specific abnormalities and interactions between networks of regions underlying anxiety disorder presentations. We examined recent neuroimaging literature that aims to identify neural mechanisms underlying anxiety, searching for patterns of neural dysfunction that might be specific to different anxiety disorder categories. Across different anxiety and stress disorders, patterns of hyperactivation in emotion-generating regions and hypoactivation in prefrontal/regulatory regions are common in the literature. Interestingly, evidence of differential patterns is also emerging, such that within a spectrum of disorders ranging from more fear-based to more anxiety-based, greater involvement of emotion-generating regions is reported in panic disorder and specific phobia, and greater involvement of prefrontal regions is reported in generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. We summarize the pertinent literature and suggest areas for continued investigation.Keywords: fear, anxiety, neuroimaging

  6. Distinct representations of subtraction and multiplication in the neural systems for numerosity and language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Jérôme; Mutreja, Rachna; Zhang, Hongchuan; Mehta, Rucha; Desroches, Amy S.; Minas, Jennifer E.; Booth, James R.

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that recent cultural inventions such as symbolic arithmetic recycle evolutionary older neural mechanisms. A central assumption of this hypothesis is that the degree to which a pre-existing mechanism is recycled depends upon the degree of similarity between its initial function and the novel task. To test this assumption, we investigated whether the brain region involved in magnitude comparison in the intraparietal sulcus (IPS), localized by a numerosity comparison task, is recruited to a greater degree by arithmetic problems that involve number comparison (single-digit subtractions) than by problems that involve retrieving facts from memory (single-digit multiplications). Our results confirmed that subtractions are associated with greater activity in the IPS than multiplications, whereas multiplications elicit greater activity than subtractions in regions involved in verbal processing including the middle temporal gyrus and inferior frontal gyrus that were localized by a phonological processing task. Pattern analyses further indicated that the neural mechanisms more active for subtraction than multiplication in the IPS overlap with those involved in numerosity comparison, and that the strength of this overlap predicts inter-individual performance in the subtraction task. These findings provide novel evidence that elementary arithmetic relies on the co-option of evolutionary older neural circuits. PMID:21246667

  7. HOMOZYGOUS DELETION IN A SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINE INVOLVING A 3P21 REGION WITH A MARKED INSTABILITY IN YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; VELDHUIS, PMJF; VANDERVEEN, AY; FRANKE, M; SCHOENMAKERS, EFPM; HULSBEEK, MMF; VANDERHOUT, AH; DELEIJ, L; VANDEVEN, W; BUYS, CHCM

    1994-01-01

    All types of lung carcinoma are characterized by a high frequency of loss of sequences from the short arm of chromosome 3, the smallest region of overlap containing D3F15S2 in band p21. Here we characterize a 440-kilobase segment from this region, which we found homozygously deleted in one of our

  8. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  9. Different neural manifestations of two slow frequency bands in resting functional magnetic resonance imaging: a systemic survey at regional, interregional, and network levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shao-Wei; Li, Da; Weng, Xu-Chu; Northoff, Georg; Li, Dian-Wen

    2014-05-01

    Temporal and spectral perspectives are two fundamental facets in deciphering fluctuating signals. In resting state, the dynamics of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals recorded by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been proven to be strikingly informative (0.01-0.1 Hz). The distinction between slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz) has been described, but the pertinent data have never been systematically investigated. This study used fMRI to measure spontaneous brain activity and to explore the different spectral characteristics of slow-4 and slow-5 at regional, interregional, and network levels, respectively assessed by regional homogeneity (ReHo) and mean amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (mALFF), functional connectivity (FC) patterns, and graph theory. Results of paired t-tests supported/replicated recent research dividing low-frequency BOLD fluctuation into slow-4 and slow-5 for ReHo and mALFF. Interregional analyses showed that for brain regions reaching statistical significance, FC strengths at slow-4 were always weaker than those at slow-5. Community detection algorithm was applied to FC data and unveiled two modules sensitive to frequency effects: one comprised sensorimotor structure, and the other encompassed limbic/paralimbic system. Graph theoretical analysis verified that slow-4 and slow-5 differed in local segregation measures. Although the manifestation of frequency differences seemed complicated, the associated brain regions can be grossly categorized into limbic/paralimbic, midline, and sensorimotor systems. Our results suggest that future resting fMRI research addressing the three above systems either from neuropsychiatric or psychological perspectives may consider using spectrum-specific analytical strategies.

  10. Localization and distribution of superoxide dismutase-1 in the neural tube morphogenesis of chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhage, Prajakta A; Kamble, Lekha K; Bhargava, Shobha Y

    2017-02-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD- 1) is an antioxidant enzyme that regulates the levels of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) by catalyzing the conversion of superoxide radical into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and oxygen. ROS are known to play a significant role in various cellular processes, via redox modification of a variety of molecules that participate in signaling pathways involved in this processes. As the levels of ROS in cells are controlled by the levels of antioxidant enzymes, thus SOD-1 may be indirectly involved in regulating different cellular processes by maintaining the required levels of H2O2. Therefore, in the present study we have investigated the possible involvement of SOD- 1 in the neurulation during the development of chick embryo. During gastrulation, SOD- 1 immunoreactivity was observed throughout the ectoderm and cauda mesoderm areas, however, its presence during neurulation was restricted to certain areas of neural tube particularly in the dorsal neural tube where neural tube closure takes place. Assaying enzyme activity revealed a significant increase in the SOD activity during neurulation. Further, inhibition of SOD- 1 by Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) induced abnormalities in the development of the neural tube. SOD- 1 inhibition specifically affected the closure of neural tube in the anterior region. Thus, here we report the presence of SOD- 1 mainly in the ectoderm and tissues of ectodermal origin during gastrulation to neurulation which suggests that it may be involved in the regulating the cellular processes during neural tube morphogenesis. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Neural responses to advantageous and disadvantageous inequity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus eFliessbach

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we study neural responses to inequitable distributions of rewards despite equal performance. We specifically focus on differences between advantageous (AI and disadvantageous inequity (DI. AI and DI were realized in a hyperscanning fMRI experiment with pairs of subjects simultaneously performing a task in adjacent scanners and observing both subjects' rewards. Results showed i hypoactivation of the ventral striatum under DI but not under AI; ii inequity induced activation of medial and dorsolateral prefrontal regions, that were stronger under DI than AI; iii correlations between subjective evaluations of DI and amygdala activity, and between AI evaluation and right ventrolateral prefrontal activity. Our study provides neurophysiological evidence for different cognitive processes that occur when exposed to DI and AI, respectively. Our data is compatible with the assumption that any form of inequity represents a norm violation, but that important differences between AI and DI emerge from an asymmetric involvement of status concerns.

  12. Neural correlates of a single-session massage treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliz, D; Smith, A; Wiebking, C; Northoff, G; Hayley, S

    2012-03-01

    The current study investigated the immediate neurophysiological effects of different types of massage in healthy adults using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Much attention has been given to the default mode network, a set of brain regions showing greater activity in the resting state. These regions (i.e. insula, posterior and anterior cingulate, inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortices) have been postulated to be involved in the neural correlates of consciousness, specifically in arousal and awareness. We posit that massage would modulate these same regions given the benefits and pleasant affective properties of touch. To this end, healthy participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: 1. Swedish massage, 2. reflexology, 3. massage with an object or 4. a resting control condition. The right foot was massaged while each participant performed a cognitive association task in the scanner. We found that the Swedish massage treatment activated the subgenual anterior and retrosplenial/posterior cingulate cortices. This increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal was maintained only in the former brain region during performance of the cognitive task. Interestingly, the reflexology massage condition selectively affected the retrosplenial/posterior cingulate in the resting state, whereas massage with the object augmented the BOLD response in this region during the cognitive task performance. These findings should have implications for better understanding how alternative treatments might affect resting state neural activity and could ultimately be important for devising new targets in the management of mood disorders.

  13. Maternal neural responses to infant cries and faces: relationships with substance use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eLandi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Substance abuse in pregnant and recently postpartum women is a major public health concern because of effects on the infant and on the ability of the adult to care for the infant. In addition to the negative health effects of teratogenic substances on fetal development, substance use can contribute to difficulties associated with the social and behavioral aspects of parenting. Neural circuits associated with parenting behavior overlap with circuits involved in addiction (e.g., frontal, striatal and limbic systems and thus may be co-opted for the craving/reward cycle associated with substance use and abuse and be less available for parenting. The current study investigates the degree to which neural circuits associated with parenting are disrupted in mothers who are substance-using. Specifically, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural response to emotional infant cues (faces and cries in substance-using compared to non-using mothers. In response to both faces (of varying emotional valence and cries (of varying distress levels, substance-using mothers evidenced reduced neural activation in regions that have been previously implicated in reward and motivation as well as regions involved in cognitive control. Specifically, in response to faces, substance users showed reduced activation in prefrontal regions, including the dorsolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, as well as visual processing (occipital lobes and limbic regions (parahippocampus and amygdala. Similarly, in response to infant cries substance-using mothers showed reduced activation relative to non-using mothers in prefrontal regions, auditory sensory processing regions, insula and limbic regions (parahippocampus and amygdala. These findings suggest that infant stimuli may be less salient for substance-using mothers, and such reduced saliency may impair developing infant-caregiver attachment and the ability of mothers to respond appropriately to their

  14. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and non-contrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of routing and classification types of optimization problems. It was their use in optimization that got me involved with Neural Networks. As it turned out, "optimization" used in this context was somewhat misleading, because while some network configurations could indeed solve certain kinds of optimization problems, the configuring or "training" of a Neural Network itself is an optimization problem, and most of the literature which talked about Neural Nets and optimization in the same breath did not speak to my goal of using Neural Nets to help solve lens optimization problems. I did eventually apply Neural Network to lens optimization, and I will touch on those results. The application of Neural Nets to the problem of lens selection was much more successful, and those results will dominate this paper.

  15. Common proteomic changes in the hippocampus in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder and particular evidence for involvement of cornu ammonis regions 2 and 3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-05-01

    The hippocampus is strongly implicated in schizophrenia and, to a lesser degree, bipolar disorder. Proteomic investigations of the different regions of the hippocampus may help us to clarify the basis and the disease specificity of the changes.

  16. Neural correlates of processing "self-conscious" vs. "basic" emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilead, Michael; Katzir, Maayan; Eyal, Tal; Liberman, Nira

    2016-01-29

    Self-conscious emotions are prevalent in our daily lives and play an important role in both normal and pathological behavior. Despite their immense significance, the neural substrates that are involved in the processing of such emotions are surprisingly under-studied. In light of this, we conducted an fMRI study in which participants thought of various personal events which elicited feelings of negative and positive self-conscious (i.e., guilt, pride) or basic (i.e., anger, joy) emotions. We performed a conjunction analysis to investigate the neural correlates associated with processing events that are related to self-conscious vs. basic emotions, irrespective of valence. The results show that processing self-conscious emotions resulted in activation within frontal areas associated with self-processing and self-control, namely, the mPFC extending to the dACC, and within the lateral-dorsal prefrontal cortex. Processing basic emotions resulted in activation throughout relatively phylogenetically-ancient regions of the cortex, namely in visual and tactile processing areas and in the insular cortex. Furthermore, self-conscious emotions differentially activated the mPFC such that the negative self-conscious emotion (guilt) was associated with a more dorsal activation, and the positive self-conscious emotion (pride) was associated with a more ventral activation. We discuss how these results shed light on the nature of mental representations and neural systems involved in self-reflective and affective processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural Correlates of Attentional Flexibility during Approach and Avoidance Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcott, Rebecca D.; Berkman, Elliot T.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic, momentary approach or avoidance motivational states have downstream effects on eventual goal success and overall well being, but there is still uncertainty about how those states affect the proximal neurocognitive processes (e.g., attention) that mediate the longer-term effects. Attentional flexibility, or the ability to switch between different attentional foci, is one such neurocognitive process that influences outcomes in the long run. The present study examined how approach and avoidance motivational states affect the neural processes involved in attentional flexibility using fMRI with the aim of determining whether flexibility operates via different neural mechanisms under these different states. Attentional flexibility was operationalized as subjects’ ability to switch between global and local stimulus features. In addition to subjects’ motivational state, the task context was manipulated by varying the ratio of global to local trials in a block in light of recent findings about the moderating role of context on motivation-related differences in attentional flexibility. The neural processes involved in attentional flexibility differ under approach versus avoidance states. First, differences in the preparatory activity in key brain regions suggested that subjects’ preparedness to switch was influenced by motivational state (anterior insula) and the interaction between motivation and context (superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule). Additionally, we observed motivation-related differences the anterior cingulate cortex during switching. These results provide initial evidence that motivation-induced behavioral changes may arise via different mechanisms in approach versus avoidance motivational states. PMID:26000735

  18. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Musallam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultralong multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies.

  19. Neural mechanisms of order information processing in working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dolenc

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to encode and maintain the exact order of short sequences of stimuli or events is often crucial to our ability for effective high-order planning. However, it is not yet clear which neural mechanisms underpin this process. Several studies suggest that in comparison with item recognition temporal order coding activates prefrontal and parietal brain regions. Results of various studies tend to favour the hypothesis that the order of the stimuli is represented and encoded on several stages, from primacy and recency estimates to the exact position of the item in a sequence. Different brain regions play a different role in this process. Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex has a more general role in attention, while the premotor cortex is more involved in the process of information grouping. Parietal lobe and hippocampus also play a significant role in order processing as they enable the representation of distance. Moreover, order maintenance is associated with the existence of neural oscillators that operate at different frequencies. Electrophysiological studies revealed that theta and alpha oscillations play an important role in the maintenance of temporal order information. Those EEG oscillations are differentially associated with processes that support the maintenance of order information and item recognition. Various studies suggest a link between prefrontal areas and memory for temporal order, implying that EEG neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex may play a role in the maintenance of information on temporal order.

  20. Engaged listeners: shared neural processing of powerful political speeches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Häcker, Frank E K; Honey, Christopher J; Hasson, Uri

    2015-08-01

    Powerful speeches can captivate audiences, whereas weaker speeches fail to engage their listeners. What is happening in the brains of a captivated audience? Here, we assess audience-wide functional brain dynamics during listening to speeches of varying rhetorical quality. The speeches were given by German politicians and evaluated as rhetorically powerful or weak. Listening to each of the speeches induced similar neural response time courses, as measured by inter-subject correlation analysis, in widespread brain regions involved in spoken language processing. Crucially, alignment of the time course across listeners was stronger for rhetorically powerful speeches, especially for bilateral regions of the superior temporal gyri and medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, during powerful speeches, listeners as a group are more coupled to each other, suggesting that powerful speeches are more potent in taking control of the listeners' brain responses. Weaker speeches were processed more heterogeneously, although they still prompted substantially correlated responses. These patterns of coupled neural responses bear resemblance to metaphors of resonance, which are often invoked in discussions of speech impact, and contribute to the literature on auditory attention under natural circumstances. Overall, this approach opens up possibilities for research on the neural mechanisms mediating the reception of entertaining or persuasive messages. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Neural sources of performance decline during continuous multitasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashimi, Omar; Zanto, Theodore P; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-10-01

    Multitasking performance costs have largely been characterized by experiments that involve two overlapping and punctuated perceptual stimuli, as well as punctuated responses to each task. Here, participants engaged in a continuous performance paradigm during fMRI recording to identify neural signatures associated with multitasking costs under more natural conditions. Our results demonstrated that only a single brain region, the superior parietal lobule (SPL), exhibited a significant relationship with multitasking performance, such that increased activation in the multitasking condition versus the singletasking condition was associated with higher task performance (i.e., least multitasking cost). Together, these results support previous research indicating that parietal regions underlie multitasking abilities and that performance costs are related to a bottleneck in control processes involving the SPL that serves to divide attention between two tasks. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. The human infant brain: A neural architecture able to learn language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine

    2017-02-01

    To understand the type of neural computations that may explain how human infants acquire their native language in only a few months, the study of their neural architecture is necessary. The development of brain imaging techniques has opened the possibilities of studying human infants without discomfort, and although these studies are still sparse, several characteristics are noticeable in the human infant's brain: first, parallel and hierarchical processing pathways are observed before intense exposure to speech with an efficient temporal coding in the left hemisphere and, second, frontal regions are involved from the start in infants' cognition. These observations are certainly not sufficient to explain language acquisition but illustrate a new approach that relies on a better description of infants' brain activity during linguistic tasks, which is compared to results in animals and human adults to clarify the neural bases of language in humans.

  3. The neural correlates of reciprocity are sensitive to prior experience of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceda, Ricardo; Prendes-Alvarez, Stefania; Hsu, Jung-Jiin; Tripathi, Shanti P; Kilts, Clint D; James, G Andrew

    2017-08-14

    Reciprocity is central to human relationships and is strongly influenced by multiple factors including the nature of social exchanges and their attendant emotional reactions. Despite recent advances in the field, the neural processes involved in this modulation of reciprocal behavior by ongoing social interaction are poorly understood. We hypothesized that activity within a discrete set of neural networks including a putative moral cognitive neural network is associated with reciprocity behavior. Nineteen healthy adults underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning while playing the trustee role in the Trust Game. Personality traits and moral development were assessed. Independent component analysis was used to identify task-related functional brain networks and assess their relationship to behavior. The saliency network (insula and anterior cingulate) was positively correlated with reciprocity behavior. A consistent array of brain regions supports the engagement of emotional, self-referential and planning processes during social reciprocity behavior. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Neural mechanisms of social influence in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welborn, B Locke; Lieberman, Matthew D; Goldenberg, Diane; Fuligni, Andrew J; Galván, Adriana; Telzer, Eva H

    2016-01-01

    During the transformative period of adolescence, social influence plays a prominent role in shaping young people's emerging social identities, and can impact their propensity to engage in prosocial or risky behaviors. In this study, we examine the neural correlates of social influence from both parents and peers, two important sources of influence. Nineteen adolescents (age 16-18 years) completed a social influence task during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. Social influence from both sources evoked activity in brain regions implicated in mentalizing (medial prefrontal cortex, left temporoparietal junction, right temporoparietal junction), reward (ventromedial prefrontal cortex), and self-control (right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex). These results suggest that mental state reasoning, social reward and self-control processes may help adolescents to evaluate others' perspectives and overcome the prepotent force of their own antecedent attitudes to shift their attitudes toward those of others. Findings suggest common neural networks involved in social influence from both parents and peers. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Attenuation of β-Amyloid Deposition and Neurotoxicity by Chemogenetic Modulation of Neural Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Peng; Grutzendler, Jaime

    2016-01-13

    Aberrant neural hyperactivity has been observed in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may be a driving force in the progression of amyloid pathology. Evidence for this includes the findings that neural activity may modulate β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide secretion and experimental stimulation of neural activity can increase amyloid deposition. However, whether long-term attenuation of neural activity prevents the buildup of amyloid plaques and associated neural pathologies remains unknown. Using viral-mediated delivery of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), we show in two AD-like mouse models that chronic intermittent increases or reductions of activity have opposite effects on Aβ deposition. Neural activity reduction markedly decreases Aβ aggregation in regions containing axons or dendrites of DREADD-expressing neurons, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Importantly, activity attenuation is associated with a reduction in axonal dystrophy and synaptic loss around amyloid plaques. Thus, modulation of neural activity could constitute a potential therapeutic strategy for ameliorating amyloid-induced pathology in AD. A novel chemogenetic approach to upregulate and downregulate neuronal activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice was implemented. This led to the first demonstration that chronic intermittent attenuation of neuronal activity in vivo significantly reduces amyloid deposition. The study also demonstrates that modulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) release can occur at both axonal and dendritic fields, suggesting the involvement of synaptic and nonsynaptic Aβ release mechanisms. Activity reductions also led to attenuation of the synaptic pathology associated with amyloid plaques. Therefore, chronic attenuation of neuronal activity could constitute a novel therapeutic approach for AD. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/360632-10$15.00/0.

  6. The neural basis of testable and non-testable beliefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathon R Howlett

    Full Text Available Beliefs about the state of the world are an important influence on both normal behavior and psychopathology. However, understanding of the neural basis of belief processing remains incomplete, and several aspects of belief processing have only recently been explored. Specifically, different types of beliefs may involve fundamentally different inferential processes and thus recruit distinct brain regions. Additionally, neural processing of truth and falsity may differ from processing of certainty and uncertainty. The purpose of this study was to investigate the neural underpinnings of assessment of testable and non-testable propositions in terms of truth or falsity and the level of certainty in a belief. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to study 14 adults while they rated propositions as true or false and also rated the level of certainty in their judgments. Each proposition was classified as testable or non-testable. Testable propositions activated the DLPFC and posterior cingulate cortex, while non-testable statements activated areas including inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and an anterior region of the superior frontal gyrus. No areas were more active when a proposition was accepted, while the dorsal anterior cingulate was activated when a proposition was rejected. Regardless of whether a proposition was testable or not, certainty that the proposition was true or false activated a common network of regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate, posterior cingulate, and a region of middle temporal gyrus near the temporo-parietal junction. Certainty in the truth or falsity of a non-testable proposition (a strong belief without empirical evidence activated the insula. The results suggest that different brain regions contribute to the assessment of propositions based on the type of content, while a common network may mediate the influence of beliefs on motivation and behavior based on the level of

  7. Spatially Nonlinear Interdependence of Alpha-Oscillatory Neural Networks under Chan Meditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chen Lo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of our investigation of the effects of Chan meditation on brain electrophysiological behaviors from the viewpoint of spatially nonlinear interdependence among regional neural networks. Particular emphasis is laid on the alpha-dominated EEG (electroencephalograph. Continuous-time wavelet transform was adopted to detect the epochs containing substantial alpha activities. Nonlinear interdependence quantified by similarity index S(X∣Y, the influence of source signal Y on sink signal X, was applied to the nonlinear dynamical model in phase space reconstructed from multichannel EEG. Experimental group involved ten experienced Chan-Meditation practitioners, while control group included ten healthy subjects within the same age range, yet, without any meditation experience. Nonlinear interdependence among various cortical regions was explored for five local neural-network regions, frontal, posterior, right-temporal, left-temporal, and central regions. In the experimental group, the inter-regional interaction was evaluated for the brain dynamics under three different stages, at rest (stage R, pre-meditation background recording, in Chan meditation (stage M, and the unique Chakra-focusing practice (stage C. Experimental group exhibits stronger interactions among various local neural networks at stages M and C compared with those at stage R. The intergroup comparison demonstrates that Chan-meditation brain possesses better cortical inter-regional interactions than the resting brain of control group.

  8. Spatially Nonlinear Interdependence of Alpha-Oscillatory Neural Networks under Chan Meditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the results of our investigation of the effects of Chan meditation on brain electrophysiological behaviors from the viewpoint of spatially nonlinear interdependence among regional neural networks. Particular emphasis is laid on the alpha-dominated EEG (electroencephalograph). Continuous-time wavelet transform was adopted to detect the epochs containing substantial alpha activities. Nonlinear interdependence quantified by similarity index S(X∣Y), the influence of source signal Y on sink signal X, was applied to the nonlinear dynamical model in phase space reconstructed from multichannel EEG. Experimental group involved ten experienced Chan-Meditation practitioners, while control group included ten healthy subjects within the same age range, yet, without any meditation experience. Nonlinear interdependence among various cortical regions was explored for five local neural-network regions, frontal, posterior, right-temporal, left-temporal, and central regions. In the experimental group, the inter-regional interaction was evaluated for the brain dynamics under three different stages, at rest (stage R, pre-meditation background recording), in Chan meditation (stage M), and the unique Chakra-focusing practice (stage C). Experimental group exhibits stronger interactions among various local neural networks at stages M and C compared with those at stage R. The intergroup comparison demonstrates that Chan-meditation brain possesses better cortical inter-regional interactions than the resting brain of control group. PMID:24489583

  9. Differences in Parental Involvement Typologies among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y Parents: A Study of Select Bay Area Region of Houston Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloz, Elizabeth Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences existed among generations (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) regarding the levels of parental involvement within each of these generations. Also examined were additional factors such as the parents. socioeconomic status, educational level, marital status, and ethnicity. The…

  10. The Differences in the Involvements of Loci of Promoter Region and Ile50Val in Interleukin-4 Receptor α Chain Gene between Atopic Dermatitis and Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that -3223 T and the -3223 T/Ile50 haplotype were risk factors for AD. Ile50 allele seems to be involved in both JCP and AD. Interactions of the IL-4RA loci may play a role both conferring susceptibility and modulating severity of AD.

  11. Neural scaling laws for an uncertain world

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    The Weber-Fechner law describes the form of psychological space in many behavioral experiments involving perception of one-dimensional physical quantities. If the physical quantity is expressed using multiple neural receptors, then placing receptive fields evenly along a logarithmic scale naturally leads to the psychological Weber-Fechner law. In the visual system, the spacing and width of extrafoveal receptive fields are consistent with logarithmic scaling. Other sets of neural "receptors" appear to show the same qualitative properties, suggesting that this form of neural scaling reflects a solution to a very general problem. This paper argues that these neural scaling laws enable the brain to represent information about the world efficiently without making any assumptions about the statistics of the world. This analysis suggests that the organization of neural scales to represent one-dimensional quantities, including more abstract quantities such as numerosity, time, and allocentric space, should have a uni...

  12. Neural networks with discontinuous/impact activations

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet, Marat

    2014-01-01

    This book presents as its main subject new models in mathematical neuroscience. A wide range of neural networks models with discontinuities are discussed, including impulsive differential equations, differential equations with piecewise constant arguments, and models of mixed type. These models involve discontinuities, which are natural because huge velocities and short distances are usually observed in devices modeling the networks. A discussion of the models, appropriate for the proposed applications, is also provided. This book also: Explores questions related to the biological underpinning for models of neural networks\\ Considers neural networks modeling using differential equations with impulsive and piecewise constant argument discontinuities Provides all necessary mathematical basics for application to the theory of neural networks Neural Networks with Discontinuous/Impact Activations is an ideal book for researchers and professionals in the field of engineering mathematics that have an interest in app...

  13. Thermography imaging during static and controlled thermoregulation in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: diagnostic value and involvement of the central sympathetic system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.P. Niehof (Sjoerd); F.J.P.M. Huygen (Frank); R.W. van der Weerd (Rick); M. Westra (Mirjam); F.J. Zijlstra (Freek)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Complex Regional Pain Syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) is a clinical diagnosis based on criteria describing symptoms of the disease.The main aim of the present study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of calculation methods used to assess thermographic images (infrared

  14. Regional volumes and spatial volumetric distribution of gray matter in the gender dysphoric brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, Elseline; Schagen, Sebastian E E; Kreukels, Baudewijntje P C; Veltman, Dick J; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette; Bakker, J.

    The sexual differentiation of the brain is primarily driven by gonadal hormones during fetal development. Leading theories on the etiology of gender dysphoria (GD) involve deviations herein. To examine whether there are signs of a sex-atypical brain development in GD, we quantified regional neural

  15. Regional volumes and spatial volumetric distribution of gray matter in the gender dysphoric brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, E.; Schagen, S.E.E.; Kreukels, B.P.C.; Veltman, D.J.; Cohen-Kettenis, P.T.; Delemarre-van d Waal, H.A.; Bakkera, J.

    2015-01-01

    The sexual differentiation of the brain is primarily driven by gonadal hormones during fetal development. Leading theories on the etiology of gender dysphoria (GD) involve deviations herein. To examine whether there are signs of a sex-atypical brain development in GD, we quantified regional neural

  16. A Neural Basis for the Acquired Capability for Suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopikrishna Deshpande

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of fatal suicidal behavior in men is an urgent issue as highlighted in the public eye via news sources and media outlets. In this study, we have attempted to address this issue and understand the neural substrates underlying the gender differences in the rate of fatal suicidal behavior. The Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS has proposed an explanation for the seemingly paradoxical relationship between gender and suicidal behavior, i.e. greater non-fatal suicide attempts by women but higher number of deaths by suicide in men. This theory states that possessing suicidal desire (due to conditions such as depression alone is not sufficient for a lethal suicide attempt. It is imperative for an individual to have acquired the capability for suicide (ACS along with suicidal desire in order to die by suicide. Therefore, higher levels of ACS in men may explain why men are more likely to die by suicide than women, despite being less likely to experience suicidal ideation or depression. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis to investigate a potential ACS network that involves neural substrates underlying emotional stoicism, sensation seeking, pain tolerance, and fearlessness of death along with a potential depression network that involves neural substrates that underlie clinical depression. Brain regions commonly found in ACS and depression networks for males and females were further used as seeds to obtain regions functionally and structurally connected to them. We found that the male-specific networks were more widespread and diverse than the female-specific ones. Also, while the former involved motor regions such as the premotor cortex and cerebellum, the latter was dominated by limbic regions. This may support the fact that suicidal desire generally leads to fatal/decisive action in males while in females, it manifests as depression, ideation and generally non-fatal actions. The proposed

  17. Neural mechanism underlying autobiographical memory modulated by remoteness and emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ruiyang; Fu, Yan; Wang, DaHua; Yao, Li; Long, Zhiying

    2012-03-01

    Autobiographical memory is the ability to recollect past events from one's own life. Both emotional tone and memory remoteness can influence autobiographical memory retrieval along the time axis of one's life. Although numerous studies have been performed to investigate brain regions involved in retrieving processes of autobiographical memory, the effect of emotional tone and memory age on autobiographical memory retrieval remains to be clarified. Moreover, whether the involvement of hippocampus in consolidation of autobiographical events is time dependent or independent has been controversial. In this study, we investigated the effect of memory remoteness (factor1: recent and remote) and emotional valence (factor2: positive and negative) on neural correlates underlying autobiographical memory by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. Although all four conditions activated some common regions known as "core" regions in autobiographical memory retrieval, there are some other regions showing significantly different activation for recent versus remote and positive versus negative memories. In particular, we found that bilateral hippocampal regions were activated in the four conditions regardless of memory remoteness and emotional valence. Thus, our study confirmed some findings of previous studies and provided further evidence to support the multi-trace theory which believes that the role of hippocampus involved in autobiographical memory retrieval is time-independent and permanent in memory consolidation.

  18. Localization of neural efficiency of the mathematically gifted brain through a feature subset selection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Gan, John Q; Wang, Haixian

    2015-10-01

    Based on the neural efficiency hypothesis and task-induced EEG gamma-band response (GBR), this study investigated the brain regions where neural resource could be most efficiently recruited by the math-gifted adolescents in response to varying cognitive demands. In this experiment, various GBR-based mental states were generated with three factors (level of mathematical ability, task complexity, and short-term learning) modulating the level of neural activation. A feature subset selection method based on the sequential forward floating search algorithm was used to identify an "optimal" combination of EEG channel locations, where the corresponding GBR feature subset could obtain the highest accuracy in discriminating pairwise mental states influenced by each experiment factor. The integrative results from multi-factor selections suggest that the right-lateral fronto-parietal system is highly involved in neural efficiency of the math-gifted brain, primarily including the bilateral superior frontal, right inferior frontal, right-lateral central and right temporal regions. By means of the localization method based on single-trial classification of mental states, new GBR features and EEG channel-based brain regions related to mathematical giftedness were identified, which could be useful for the brain function improvement of children/adolescents in mathematical learning through brain-computer interface systems.

  19. Parental involvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ezra S Simon

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted in Ghana to investigate, (1) factors that predict parental involvement, (2) the relationship between parental home and school involvement and the educational achievement of adolescents, (3) the relationship between parental authoritativeness and the educational achievement of adolescent students, (4) parental involvement serving as a mediator between their authoritativeness and the educational achievement of the students, and (5) whether parental involvement decreases...

  20. Classification of Urinary Calculi using Feed-Forward Neural Networks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work the results of classification of these types of calculi (using their infrared spectra in the region 1450–450 cm–1) by feed-forward neural networks are presented. Genetic algorithms were used for optimization of neural networks and for selection of the spectral regions most suitable for classification purposes.

  1. Multilayer perceptron neural network for downscaling rainfall in arid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Multilayer perceptron neural network for downscaling rainfall in arid region: A case study of Baluchistan, Pakistan ... A multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network has been proposed in the present study for the downscaling of rainfall in the data scarce arid region of Baluchistan province of Pakistan, which is considered as ...

  2. The positional identity of iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells along the anterior-posterior axis is controlled in a dosage-dependent manner by bFGF and EGF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Shuling; Ochalek, Anna; Szczesna, Karolina

    2016-01-01

    Neural rosettes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been claimed to be a highly robust in vitro cellular model for biomedical application. They are able to propagate in vitro in the presence of mitogens, including basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth...... factor (EGF). However, these two mitogens are also involved in anterior-posterior patterning in a gradient dependent manner along the neural tube axis. Here, we compared the regional identity of neural rosette cells and specific neural subtypes of their progeny propagated with low and high concentrations...... of bFGF and EGF. We observed that low concentrations of bFGF and EGF in the culturing system were able to induce forebrain identity of the neural rosettes and promote subsequent cortical neuronal differentiation. On the contrary, high concentrations of these mitogens stimulate a mid-hindbrain fate...

  3. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    In all attempts to emulate the considerable powers of the brain, one is struck by both its immense size, parallelism, and complexity. While the fields of neural networks, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic engineering have all attempted oversimplifications on the considerable complexity, all three can benefit from the inherent scalability and parallelism of optics. This thesis looks at specific aspects of three modes in which optics, and particularly volume holography, can play a part in neural computation. First, holography serves as the basis of highly-parallel correlators, which are the foundation of optical neural networks. The huge input capability of optical neural networks make them most useful for image processing and image recognition and tracking. These tasks benefit from the shift invariance of optical correlators. In this thesis, I analyze the capacity of correlators, and then present several techniques for controlling the amount of shift invariance. Of particular interest is the Fresnel correlator, in which the hologram is displaced from the Fourier plane. In this case, the amount of shift invariance is limited not just by the thickness of the hologram, but by the distance of the hologram from the Fourier plane. Second, volume holography can provide the huge storage capacity and high speed, parallel read-out necessary to support large artificial intelligence systems. However, previous methods for storing data in volume holograms have relied on awkward beam-steering or on as-yet non- existent cheap, wide-bandwidth, tunable laser sources. This thesis presents a new technique, shift multiplexing, which is capable of very high densities, but which has the advantage of a very simple implementation. In shift multiplexing, the reference wave consists of a focused spot a few millimeters in front of the hologram. Multiplexing is achieved by simply translating the hologram a few tens of microns or less. This thesis describes the theory for how shift

  5. Neural dynamics of phonological processing in the dorsal auditory stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenthal, Einat; Sabri, Merav; Beardsley, Scott A; Mangalathu-Arumana, Jain; Desai, Anjali

    2013-09-25

    Neuroanatomical models hypothesize a role for the dorsal auditory pathway in phonological processing as a feedforward efferent system (Davis and Johnsrude, 2007; Rauschecker and Scott, 2009; Hickok et al., 2011). But the functional organization of the pathway, in terms of time course of interactions between auditory, somatosensory, and motor regions, and the hemispheric lateralization pattern is largely unknown. Here, ambiguous duplex syllables, with elements presented dichotically at varying interaural asynchronies, were used to parametrically modulate phonological processing and associated neural activity in the human dorsal auditory stream. Subjects performed syllable and chirp identification tasks, while event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance images were concurrently collected. Joint independent component analysis was applied to fuse the neuroimaging data and study the neural dynamics of brain regions involved in phonological processing with high spatiotemporal resolution. Results revealed a highly interactive neural network associated with phonological processing, composed of functional fields in posterior temporal gyrus (pSTG), inferior parietal lobule (IPL), and ventral central sulcus (vCS) that were engaged early and almost simultaneously (at 80-100 ms), consistent with a direct influence of articulatory somatomotor areas on phonemic perception. Left hemispheric lateralization was observed 250 ms earlier in IPL and vCS than pSTG, suggesting that functional specialization of somatomotor (and not auditory) areas determined lateralization in the dorsal auditory pathway. The temporal dynamics of the dorsal auditory pathway described here offer a new understanding of its functional organization and demonstrate that temporal information is essential to resolve neural circuits underlying complex behaviors.

  6. Can modular psychological concepts like affect and emotion be assigned to a distinct subset of regional neural circuits?. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Herrmann, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    regional brain systems or neural modules, but rather suggest highly complex and cross-linked neural networks individually shaped by livelong learning and experience [e.g., 6,7,10,13]. This holds in particular true for complex emotional phenomena such as aggression or empathy in social interaction [8,13]. It thus remains questionable, whether - beyond primary sensory and motor-processing - a small number of modular sub-systems sufficiently cover the organisation of specific phenomenological and social features of perception and behaviour [7,10].

  7. Neural Reranking for Named Entity Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jie; Zhang, Yue; Dong, Fei

    2017-01-01

    We propose a neural reranking system for named entity recognition (NER). The basic idea is to leverage recurrent neural network models to learn sentence-level patterns that involve named entity mentions. In particular, given an output sentence produced by a baseline NER model, we replace all entity mentions, such as \\textit{Barack Obama}, into their entity types, such as \\textit{PER}. The resulting sentence patterns contain direct output information, yet is less sparse without specific named ...

  8. Neural Darwinism and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil K; Baars, Bernard J

    2005-03-01

    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the 'dynamic core'). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized properties of consciousness, both physiological (for example, consciousness is associated with widespread, relatively fast, low amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical system), and phenomenal (for example, consciousness involves the existence of a private flow of events available only to the experiencing subject). While no theory accounts fully for all of these properties at present, we find that ND and its recent extensions fare well.

  9. Mutations in the human papillomavirus type 16 E2 protein identify multiple regions of the protein involved in binding to E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, A; Storey, A; Massimi, P; Banks, L

    1995-11-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) DNA replicates episomally and requires two virally expressed proteins, E1 and E2. The E1 protein has both helicase and ATPase activities and is absolutely required for viral DNA replication. The E2 protein is a potent transcriptional activator and greatly increases viral DNA replication by colocalizing E1 to the origin of replication. Recently, we characterized a region of the E2 protein essential for the binding to E1. In this study we have analysed in further detail the nature of the association between E1 and E2. Using an extensive set of E2 mutant proteins we have identified two widely separate regions of the E2 protein which are essential for binding to E1. Interestingly, two E2 mutants which fail to bind E1 also fail to activate gene expression, indicating the existence of multifunctional domains on the E2 protein. In addition, cotransfection of E1 with E2 significantly increases E2 transcriptional activity on an heterologous promoter.

  10. Introduction to neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    James, Frederick E

    1994-02-02

    1. Introduction and overview of Artificial Neural Networks. 2,3. The Feed-forward Network as an inverse Problem, and results on the computational complexity of network training. 4.Physics applications of neural networks.

  11. Neural Correlates of Single- and Dual-Task Walking in the Real World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pizzamiglio

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in mobile brain-body imaging (MoBI technologies have enabled studies of human locomotion where subjects are able to move freely in more ecologically valid scenarios. In this study, MoBI was employed to describe the behavioral and neurophysiological aspects of three different commonly occurring walking conditions in healthy adults. The experimental conditions were self-paced walking, walking while conversing with a friend and lastly walking while texting with a smartphone. We hypothesized that gait performance would decrease with increased cognitive demands and that condition-specific neural activation would involve condition-specific brain areas. Gait kinematics and high density electroencephalography (EEG were recorded whilst walking around a university campus. Conditions with dual tasks were accompanied by decreased gait performance. Walking while conversing was associated with an increase of theta (θ and beta (β neural power in electrodes located over left-frontal and right parietal regions, whereas walking while texting was associated with a decrease of β neural power in a cluster of electrodes over the frontal-premotor and sensorimotor cortices when compared to walking whilst conversing. In conclusion, the behavioral “signatures” of common real-life activities performed outside the laboratory environment were accompanied by differing frequency-specific neural “biomarkers”. The current findings encourage the study of the neural biomarkers of disrupted gait control in neurologically impaired patients.

  12. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Learning to Read Words in a New Language Shapes the Neural Organization of the Prior Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Leilei; Xue, Gui; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Chen, Chuansheng; Zhang, Mingxia; He, Qinghua; Wei, Miao; Dong, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Learning a new language entails interactions with one's prior language(s). Much research has shown how native language affects the cognitive and neural mechanisms of a new language, but little is known about whether and how learning a new language shapes the neural mechanisms of prior language(s). In two experiments in the current study, we used an artificial language training paradigm in combination with fMRI to examine (1) the effects of different linguistic components (phonology and semantics) of a new language on the neural process of prior languages (i.e., native and second languages), and (2) whether such effects were modulated by the proficiency level in the new language. Results of Experiment 1 showed that when the training in a new language involved semantics (as opposed to only visual forms and phonology), neural activity during word reading in the native language (Chinese) was reduced in several reading-related regions, including the left pars opercularis, pars triangularis, bilateral inferior temporal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and inferior occipital gyrus. Results of Experiment 2 replicated the results of Experiment 1 and further found that semantic training also affected neural activity during word reading in the subjects’ second language (English). Furthermore, we found that the effects of the new language were modulated by the subjects’ proficiency level in the new language. These results provide critical imaging evidence for the influence of learning to read words in a new language on word reading in native and second languages. PMID:25447375

  14. Discrete Neural Correlates for the Recognition of Negative Emotions: Insights from Frontotemporal Dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Kumfor

    Full Text Available Patients with frontotemporal dementia have pervasive changes in emotion recognition and social cognition, yet the neural changes underlying these emotion processing deficits remain unclear. The multimodal system model of emotion proposes that basic emotions are dependent on distinct brain regions, which undergo significant pathological changes in frontotemporal dementia. As such, this syndrome may provide important insight into the impact of neural network degeneration upon the innate ability to recognise emotions. This study used voxel-based morphometry to identify discrete neural correlates involved in the recognition of basic emotions (anger, disgust, fear, sadness, surprise and happiness in frontotemporal dementia. Forty frontotemporal dementia patients (18 behavioural-variant, 11 semantic dementia, 11 progressive nonfluent aphasia and 27 healthy controls were tested on two facial emotion recognition tasks: The Ekman 60 and Ekman Caricatures. Although each frontotemporal dementia group showed impaired recognition of negative emotions, distinct associations between emotion-specific task performance and changes in grey matter intensity emerged. Fear recognition was associated with the right amygdala; disgust recognition with the left insula; anger recognition with the left middle and superior temporal gyrus; and sadness recognition with the left subcallosal cingulate, indicating that discrete neural substrates are necessary for emotion recognition in frontotemporal dementia. The erosion of emotion-specific neural networks in neurodegenerative disorders may produce distinct profiles of performance that are relevant to understanding the neurobiological basis of emotion processing.

  15. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  17. Exploring background risk factors for fatigue crashes involving truck drivers on regional roadway networks: a case control study in Jiangxi and Shaanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changkun; Zhang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue driving is a leading cause of traffic fatalities and injuries in China, especially among heavy truck drivers. The present study tried to examine which and how factors within the human-vehicle-roadway-environment system contribute to the occurrence of crashes involving fatigued truck drivers. To reduce such risk on the road, a total of 9168 crashes which occurred in Jiangxi and Shaanxi between 2003 and 2014 were selected to measure the effects of potential factors on fatigue related truck crashes using a case control study. Pearson Chi-square test was used to determine the relationship between crash risk and independent factors, and a stepwise logistic regression model was developed to determine the significant risk factors. According to the data analysis results, driver's gender, age, driving experience, and overspeeding behavior, vehicle's commercial status, overloading conditions and brake performance, road's type, slippery pavement and existence of sharp curve and long steep grade, and time of day, season, weather and visibility conditions, etc. were identified to be significantly associated with fatigue related truck crashes on Jiangxi and Shaanxi highways. Moreover, it is found that (a) in Jiangxi, an employed truck driver has a higher risk of crash involving multi-vehicles or a passenger car at bridge locations, and (b) in Shaanxi, the adult, tunnel location, summer and winter days prohibit statistically significant association with the occurrence of multi-vehicle and single-vehicle run-off-road/rollover crashes. Young employed male truck drivers with less experience are at high risk, especially while driving across sharp curves, down long steep grades, over bridge or through tunnels, during the midnight period, on rainy, snowy or foggy days in rural areas. All these help recommend potential policy initiatives as well as effective safety promotion strategies at the public health scale for professional truck drivers.

  18. China’s Challenges and Its Countermeasures to Hunt the Fugitives Who are Involved in Corruption and Fled to the Asia Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Rong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to identify the main problems faced by the Chinese justice in anticorruption prosecution and to find their solutions. Methods the method of analysis theoretical methods of cognition. Results the article attempts to systemically analyze the lessons of history and legal issues facing in the implementation of anticorruption prosecution in the AsiaPacific region in order to ensure its effectiveness in China. Scientific novelty the research proposes solutions to the problem of corrupt officials escaping from justice and seeks to find a compromise in the issues of international cooperation in this field. Practical significance the Chinese experience can be used in Russia to improve the legal system in the struggle against corruption and the international cooperation on criminal justice matters. nbsp

  19. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Caterer, N R

    2000-01-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded...... in three exons. Exon 3 encodes the carbohydrate recognition domain, which binds to kringle 4 in plasminogen at low levels of Ca(2+). Exon 2 encodes an alpha-helix, which is necessary and sufficient to govern the trimerization of tetranectin by assembling into a triple-helical coiled-coil structural element....... Here we show that the heparin-binding site in tetranectin resides not in the carbohydrate recognition domain but within the N-terminal region, comprising the 16 amino acid residues encoded by exon 1. In particular, the lysine residues in the decapeptide segment KPKKIVNAKK (tetranectin residues 6...

  20. Comparative Investigation of the Genomic Regions Involved in Antigenic Variation of the TprK Antigen among Treponemal Species, Subspecies, and Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Stephanie L.; Puray-Chavez, Maritza; Reid, Tara Brinck; Godornes, Charmie; Molini, Barbara J.; Benzler, Martin; Hartig, Jörg S.; Lukehart, Sheila A.; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Although the three Treponema pallidum subspecies (T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue, and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum), Treponema paraluiscuniculi, and the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc treponeme cause clinically distinct diseases, these pathogens are genetically and antigenically highly related and are able to cause persistent infection. Recent evidence suggests that the putative surface-exposed variable antigen TprK plays an important role in both treponemal immune evasion and persistence. tprK heterogeneity is generated by nonreciprocal gene conversion between the tprK expression site and donor sites. Although each of the above-mentioned species and subspecies has a functional tprK antigenic variation system, it is still unclear why the level of expression and the rate at which tprK diversifies during infection can differ significantly among isolates. To identify genomic differences that might affect the generation and expression of TprK variants among these pathogens, we performed comparative sequence analysis of the donor sites, as well as the tprK expression sites, among eight T. pallidum subsp. pallidum isolates (Nichols Gen, Nichols Sea, Chicago, Sea81-4, Dal-1, Street14, UW104, and UW126), three T. pallidum subsp. pertenue isolates (Gauthier, CDC2, and Samoa D), one T. pallidum subsp. endemicum isolate (Iraq B), the unclassified Fribourg-Blanc isolate, and the Cuniculi A strain of T. paraluiscuniculi. Synteny and sequence conservation, as well as deletions and insertions, were found in the regions harboring the donor sites. These data suggest that the tprK recombination system is harbored within dynamic genomic regions and that genomic differences might be an important key to explain discrepancies in generation and expression of tprK variants among these Treponema isolates. PMID:22661689

  1. Association mapping and haplotype analysis of a 3.1-Mb genomic region involved in Fusarium head blight resistance on wheat chromosome 3BS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyang Hao

    Full Text Available A previous study provided an in-depth understanding of molecular population genetics of European and Asian wheat gene pools using a sequenced 3.1-Mb contig (ctg954 on chromosome 3BS. This region is believed to carry the Fhb1 gene for response to Fusarium head blight. In this study, 266 wheat accessions were evaluated in three environments for Type II FHB response based on the single floret inoculation method. Hierarchical clustering (UPGMA based on a Manhattan dissimilarity matrix divided the accessions into eight groups according to five FHB-related traits which have a high correlation between them; Group VIII comprised six accessions with FHB response levels similar to variety Sumai 3. Based on the compressed mixed linear model (MLM, association analysis between five FHB-related traits and 42 molecular markers along the 3.1-Mb region revealed 12 significant association signals at a threshold of P0.1 and P0.05 within each HapB at r(2>0.1 and P<0.001 showed significant differences between the Hap carried by FHB resistant resources, such as Sumai 3 and Wangshuibai, and susceptible genotypes in HapB3 and HapB6. These results suggest that Fhb1 is located within HapB6, with the possibility that another gene is located at or near HapB3. SSR markers and Haps detected in this study will be helpful in further understanding the genetic basis of FHB resistance, and provide useful information for marker-assisted selection of Fhb1 in wheat breeding.

  2. Plxdc2 is a mitogen for neural progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne F C Miller-Delaney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of different brain regions involves the coordinated control of proliferation and cell fate specification along and across the neuraxis. Here, we identify Plxdc2 as a novel regulator of these processes, using in ovo electroporation and in vitro cultures of mammalian cells. Plxdc2 is a type I transmembrane protein with some homology to nidogen and to plexins. It is expressed in a highly discrete and dynamic pattern in the developing nervous system, with prominent expression in various patterning centres. In the chick neural tube, where Plxdc2 expression parallels that seen in the mouse, misexpression of Plxdc2 increases proliferation and alters patterns of neurogenesis, resulting in neural tube thickening at early stages. Expression of the Plxdc2 extracellular domain alone, which can be cleaved and shed in vivo, is sufficient for this activity, demonstrating a cell non-autonomous function. Induction of proliferation is also observed in cultured embryonic neuroepithelial cells (ENCs derived from E9.5 mouse neural tube, which express a Plxdc2-binding activity. These experiments uncover a direct molecular activity of Plxdc2 in the control of proliferation, of relevance in understanding the role of this protein in various cancers, where its expression has been shown to be altered. They also implicate Plxdc2 as a novel component of the network of signalling molecules known to coordinate proliferation and differentiation in the developing nervous system.

  3. An integrated modelling framework for neural circuits with multiple neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Alok; Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Vemana, Vinith; McGinnity, T M; Prasad, Girijesh; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2017-01-01

    Neuromodulators are endogenous neurochemicals that regulate biophysical and biochemical processes, which control brain function and behaviour, and are often the targets of neuropharmacological drugs. Neuromodulator effects are generally complex partly owing to the involvement of broad innervation, co-release of neuromodulators, complex intra- and extrasynaptic mechanism, existence of multiple receptor subtypes and high interconnectivity within the brain. In this work, we propose an efficient yet sufficiently realistic computational neural modelling framework to study some of these complex behaviours. Specifically, we propose a novel dynamical neural circuit model that integrates the effective neuromodulator-induced currents based on various experimental data (e.g. electrophysiology, neuropharmacology and voltammetry). The model can incorporate multiple interacting brain regions, including neuromodulator sources, simulate efficiently and easily extendable to large-scale brain models, e.g. for neuroimaging purposes. As an example, we model a network of mutually interacting neural populations in the lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus, which are major sources of neuromodulator orexin/hypocretin, serotonin and norepinephrine/noradrenaline, respectively, and which play significant roles in regulating many physiological functions. We demonstrate that such a model can provide predictions of systemic drug effects of the popular antidepressants (e.g. reuptake inhibitors), neuromodulator antagonists or their combinations. Finally, we developed user-friendly graphical user interface software for model simulation and visualization for both fundamental sciences and pharmacological studies. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Neural bases of goal-directed implicit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Maryam; Hosseini, S M Hadi; Takahashi, Makoto; Sugiura, Motoaki; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2009-10-15

    Several neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies have been performed to clarify the neural bases of implicit learning, but the question of which brain regions are involved in different forms of implicit learning, including goal-directed learning and habit learning, has not yet been resolved. The present study sought to clarify the mechanisms of goal-directed implicit learning by examining the sugar production factory (SPF) task in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Several brain regions were identified that contribute to learning in the SPF task. Significant learning-related decreases in brain activity were found in the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL), left superior frontal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, cerebellar vermis, and left inferior frontal gyrus, while significant learning-related increases in activity were observed in the right inferior frontal gyrus, left precenteral gyrus and, left precuneus. Among these regions, we speculate that the IPL and medial frontal gyrus may specifically be involved in the early stage of goal-directed implicit learning. We also attempted to investigate the role of the striatum, which has a significant role in habit learning, during learning of the SPF task. The results of ROI analysis showed no learning-related change in the activity of the striatum. Although some of the observed learning-related activations in this study have also been previously reported in neuroimaging studies of habit learning, the possibility that specific brain regions involved in goal-direct implicit learning cannot be excluded.

  5. Nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchen eWang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural stimulation is a critical technique in treating neurological diseases and investigating brain functions. Traditional electrical stimulation uses electrodes to directly create intervening electric fields in the immediate vicinity of neural tissues. Second-generation stimulation techniques directly use light, magnetic fields or ultrasound in a non-contact manner. An emerging generation of non- or minimally invasive neural stimulation techniques is enabled by nanotechnology to achieve a high spatial resolution and cell-type specificity. In these techniques, a nanomaterial converts a remotely transmitted primary stimulus such as a light, magnetic or ultrasonic signal to a localized secondary stimulus such as an electric field or heat to stimulate neurons. The ease of surface modification and bio-conjugation of nanomaterials facilitates cell-type-specific targeting, designated placement and highly localized membrane activation. This review focuses on nanomaterial-enabled neural stimulation techniques primarily involving opto-electric, opto-thermal, magneto-electric, magneto-thermal and acousto-electric transduction mechanisms. Stimulation techniques based on other possible transduction schemes and general consideration for these emerging neurotechnologies are also discussed.

  6. Rapid neural circuit switching mediated by synaptic plasticity during neural morphallactic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybrand, Zane R; Zoran, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (Lumbriculidae), undergoes a rapid regenerative transformation of its neural circuits following body fragmentation. This type of nervous system plasticity, called neural morphallaxis, involves the remodeling of the giant fiber pathways that mediate rapid head and tail withdrawal behaviors. Extra- and intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that changes in cellular properties and synaptic connections underlie neurobehavioral plasticity during morphallaxis. Sensory-to-giant interneuron connections, undetectable prior to body injury, emerged within hours of segment amputation. The appearance of functional synaptic transmission was followed by interneuron activation, coupling of giant fiber spiking to motor outputs and overt segmental shortening. The onset of morphallactic plasticity varied along the body axis and emerged more rapidly in segments closer to regions of sensory field overlap between the two giant fiber pathways. The medial and lateral giant fibers were simultaneously activated during a transient phase of network remodeling. Thus, synaptic plasticity at sensory-to-giant interneuron connections mediates escape circuit morphallaxis in this regenerating annelid worm. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Neural and behavioral effects of interference resolution in depression and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marc G; Nee, Derek Evan; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Deldin, Patricia; Kross, Ethan; Gonzalez, Richard; Demiralp, Emre; Gotlib, Ian H; Hamilton, Paul; Joormann, Jutta; Waugh, Christian; Jonides, John

    2011-03-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) often ruminate about their depression and their life situations, impairing their concentration and performance on daily tasks. We examined whether rumination might be due to a deficit in the ability to expel negative information from short-term memory (STM), and fMRI was used to examine the neural structures involved in this ability. MDD and healthy control (HC) participants were tested using a directed-forgetting procedure in a short-term item recognition task. As predicted, MDD participants had more difficulty than did HCs in expelling negative, but not positive, words from STM. Overall, the neural networks involved in directed forgetting were similar for both groups, but the MDDs exhibited more spatial variability in activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (a region critical for inhibiting irrelevant information), which may contribute to their relative inability to inhibit negative information.

  8. The neural organization of perception in chess experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Daniel C; Boggan, Amy L; McClelland, M Michelle; Bartlett, James C

    2011-07-20

    The human visual system responds to expertise, and it has been suggested that regions that process faces also process other objects of expertise including chess boards by experts. We tested whether chess and face processing overlap in brain activity using fMRI. Chess experts and novices exhibited face selective areas, but these regions showed no selectivity to chess configurations relative to other stimuli. We next compared neural responses to chess and to scrambled chess displays to isolate areas relevant to expertise. Areas within the posterior cingulate, orbitofrontal cortex, and right temporal cortex were active in this comparison in experts over novices. We also compared chess and face responses within the posterior cingulate and found this area responsive to chess only in experts. These findings indicate that the configurations in chess are not strongly processed by face-selective regions that are selective for faces in individuals who have expertise in both domains. Further, the area most consistently involved in chess did not show overlap with faces. Overall, these results suggest that expert visual processing may be similar at the level of recognition, but need not show the same neural correlates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the Promoter Region of an Arabidopsis Gene for 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid Dioxygenase Involved in Dehydration-Inducible Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnam, Babak; Iuchi, Satoshi; Fujita, Miki; Fujita, Yasunari; Takasaki, Hironori; Osakabe, Yuriko; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Kobayashi, Masatomo; Shinozaki, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Plants respond to dehydration stress and tolerate water-deficit status through complex physiological and cellular processes. Many genes are induced by water deficit. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in tolerance to dehydration stress by inducing many stress genes. ABA is synthesized de novo in response to dehydration. Most of the genes involved in ABA biosynthesis have been identified, and they are expressed mainly in leaf vascular tissues. Of the products of such genes, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) is a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis. One of the five NCED genes in Arabidopsis, AtNCED3, is significantly induced by dehydration. To understand the regulatory mechanism of the early stages of the dehydration stress response, it is important to analyse the transcriptional regulatory systems of AtNCED3. In the present study, we found that an overlapping G-box recognition sequence (5′-CACGTG-3′) at −2248 bp from the transcriptional start site of AtNCED3 is an important cis-acting element in the induction of the dehydration response. We discuss the possible transcriptional regulatory system of dehydration-responsive AtNCED3 expression, and how this may control the level of ABA under water-deficit conditions. PMID:23604098

  10. Stabilization of beta-lactoglobulin by polyols and sugars against temperature-induced denaturation involves diverse and specific structural regions of the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiroli, Alberto; Marengo, Mauro; Fessas, Dimitrios; Ragg, Enzio; Renzetti, Stefano; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania

    2017-11-01

    Temperature sensitivity of bovine milk beta-lactoglobulin (BLG) was assessed in the presence/absence of non-reducing sugars (sucrose and trehalose) and polyols (glycerol and sorbitol). None of them affected the structural features of the protein at room temperature, where the only observed effect was an increased affinity towards hydrophobic probes in the presence of all co-solutes but glycerol. Although most of the observed effects in temperature-ramp experiments are due to entropic effects (fitting within the "preferential exclusion" theory of protein stabilization), this study indicates that each co-solute exhibit different efficacy at stabilizing specific regions of BLG, suggesting that each of them acts in a specific way on the solvent/protein system. The relevance of these observations with respect to systems of practical relevance is discussed, given the widespread use of heat-polymerizing proteins - such as BLG - in many food formulations that very often include significant amounts of sugars and/or polyols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis of regions involved in gene amplification reveals gene overdose in low-grade astrocytic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, Dolores; Bello, M Josefa; Alonso, M Eva; Isla, Alberto; De Campos, Jose M; Vaquero, Jesus; Sarasa, Jose L; Gutierrez, Manuel; Rey, Juan A

    2005-12-01

    We have studied gene amplification of genes located in 1q32 (GAC1, ELF3, MDM4, and ren1), 4q11 (PDGFR-alpha), and in 12q13-14 (MDM2 and CDK4) using quantitative real-time PCR in a group of 86 tumors consisting of 44 WHO grade IV glioblastomas (GBM) (34 primary and 10 secondary tumors), 21 WHO grade III anaplastic astrocytomas (AA), and 21 WHO grade II astrocytomas (AII). Gene amplification was present in 56 of the 86 samples (65%) in at least 1 gene in our series. GAC1 (51%) and MDM4 (27%) were the most frequently amplified genes within the 1q32 amplicon, and their higher amplification frequency was statistically significant (P<0.05, chi) in the low-grade astrocytomas. Concordant co-amplification was determined for ELF3 and ren1 or ren1 and MDM4 in the grade III-IV tumors. MDM2 amplification was significantly more frequent in primary GBM (16%) than was in secondary GBM (0%). The present study shows that gene amplification in the studied regions is already present in low-grade astrocytic tumors and that amplification of some genes may represent another molecular marker to differentiate primary from secondary GBM.

  12. Determination of methylated CpG sites in the promoter region of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT and their involvement in the etiology of tobacco smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is significantly associated with nicotine dependence (ND in humans. In this study, we examined whether there exists any difference in the extent of methylation of CpG dinucleotides in the promoter region of COMT in smokers and nonsmokers by analyzing the methylation status of cytosines at 33 CpG sites through direct sequencing of bisulfite-treated DNA (N = 50 per group. The cytosine was methylated at 13 of 33 CpG sites, and two of these sites showed significant differences between smokers and matched nonsmoker controls. Specifically, in the -193 CpG site, the degree of methylation was 19.1% in smokers and 13.2% in nonsmokers (P < 0.01. This finding was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR using an additional 100 smoker and 100 nonsmoker control samples, which showed the degree of methylation to be 22.2% in smokers and 18.3% in nonsmokers (P < 0.01. For the -39 CpG site, the degree of methylation was 9.2% in smokers, whereas no methylation was found in nonsmoker controls. Together, our findings provide the first molecular explanation at the epigenetic level for the association of ND with methylation of the COMT promoter, implying that methylation plays a role in smoking dependence.

  13. Age-related differences in the neural substrates of cross-modal olfactory recognition memory: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf-Ducastel, Barbara; Murphy, Claire

    2009-08-18

    Impaired ability to remember what has gone before is one of the most distressing aspects of the aging process. Odor recognition memory is particularly vulnerable to the effects of aging, yet the underlying neural substrate is unknown. This study investigated the neural substrate of cross-modal olfactory recognition memory in young and older adults using fMRI. Participants were presented with 16 familiar odors immediately before entering the scanner, and were then tested for retrieval with words, either names of odors previously presented (targets) or names of new odors (foils), while being scanned at 3 T. Activation was reduced in the old subjects, both in regions involved in episodic memory retrieval and in regions involved in olfactory processing. Greater activation in the cerebellum of older adults was observed, suggesting increased response to attentional demands or compensatory mechanisms. Unlike in a number of studies in other sensory modalities, no increase in activation in frontal areas in older adults was observed during retrieval.

  14. Dissociable neural mechanisms underlying the modulation of pain and anxiety? An FMRI pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Wiech

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of pain through beliefs is commonly discussed as a form of emotion regulation. In line with this interpretation, the analgesic effect has been shown to co-occur with reduced anxiety and increased activity in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC, which is a key region of emotion regulation. This link between pain and anxiety modulation raises the question whether the two effects are rooted in the same neural mechanism. In this pilot fMRI study, we compared the neural basis of the analgesic and anxiolytic effect of two types of threat modulation: a "behavioral control" paradigm, which involves the ability to terminate a noxious stimulus, and a "safety signaling" paradigm, which involves visual cues that signal the threat (or absence of threat that a subsequent noxious stimulus might be of unusually high intensity. Analgesia was paralleled by VLPFC activity during behavioral control. Safety signaling engaged elements of the descending pain control system, including the rostral anterior cingulate cortex that showed increased functional connectivity with the periaqueductal gray and VLPFC. Anxiety reduction, in contrast, scaled with dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activation during behavioral control but had no distinct neural signature during safety signaling. Our pilot data therefore suggest that analgesic and anxiolytic effects are instantiated in distinguishable neural mechanisms and differ between distinct stress- and pain-modulatory approaches, supporting the recent notion of multiple pathways subserving top-down modulation of the pain experience. Additional studies in larger cohorts are needed to follow up on these preliminary findings.

  15. The neural bases of the multiplication problem-size effect across countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Jérôme; Lu, Jiayan; Liu, Li; Dong, Qi; Zhou, Xinlin; Booth, James R

    2013-01-01

    Multiplication problems involving large numbers (e.g., 9 × 8) are more difficult to solve than problems involving small numbers (e.g., 2 × 3). Behavioral research indicates that this problem-size effect might be due to different factors across countries and educational systems. However, there is no neuroimaging evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we compared the neural correlates of the multiplication problem-size effect in adults educated in China and the United States. We found a greater neural problem-size effect in Chinese than American participants in bilateral superior temporal regions associated with phonological processing. However, we found a greater neural problem-size effect in American than Chinese participants in right intra-parietal sulcus (IPS) associated with calculation procedures. Therefore, while the multiplication problem-size effect might be a verbal retrieval effect in Chinese as compared to American participants, it may instead stem from the use of calculation procedures in American as compared to Chinese participants. Our results indicate that differences in educational practices might affect the neural bases of symbolic arithmetic.

  16. Cross-Modal Decoding of Neural Patterns Associated with Working Memory: Evidence for Attention-Based Accounts of Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Cowan, Nelson; Péters, Frédéric; Van Calster, Laurens; Phillips, Christophe; Schrouff, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine-learning approach to determine more directly the extent to which common neural patterns characterize retention in verbal WM and visual WM. Verbal WM was assessed via a standard delayed probe recognition task for letter sequences of variable length. Visual WM was assessed via a visual array WM task involving the maintenance of variable amounts of visual information in the focus of attention. We trained a classifier to distinguish neural activation patterns associated with high- and low-visual WM load and tested the ability of this classifier to predict verbal WM load (high-low) from their associated neural activation patterns, and vice versa. We observed significant between-task prediction of load effects during WM maintenance, in posterior parietal and superior frontal regions of the dorsal attention network; in contrast, between-task prediction in sensory processing cortices was restricted to the encoding stage. Furthermore, between-task prediction of load effects was strongest in those participants presenting the highest capacity for the visual WM task. This study provides novel evidence for common, attention-based neural patterns supporting verbal and visual WM. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Cross-Modal Decoding of Neural Patterns Associated with Working Memory: Evidence for Attention-Based Accounts of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerus, Steve; Cowan, Nelson; Péters, Frédéric; Van Calster, Laurens; Phillips, Christophe; Schrouff, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest common neural substrates involved in verbal and visual working memory (WM), interpreted as reflecting shared attention-based, short-term retention mechanisms. We used a machine-learning approach to determine more directly the extent to which common neural patterns characterize retention in verbal WM and visual WM. Verbal WM was assessed via a standard delayed probe recognition task for letter sequences of variable length. Visual WM was assessed via a visual array WM task involving the maintenance of variable amounts of visual information in the focus of attention. We trained a classifier to distinguish neural activation patterns associated with high- and low-visual WM load and tested the ability of this classifier to predict verbal WM load (high–low) from their associated neural activation patterns, and vice versa. We observed significant between-task prediction of load effects during WM maintenance, in posterior parietal and superior frontal regions of the dorsal attention network; in contrast, between-task prediction in sensory processing cortices was restricted to the encoding stage. Furthermore, between-task prediction of load effects was strongest in those participants presenting the highest capacity for the visual WM task. This study provides novel evidence for common, attention-based neural patterns supporting verbal and visual WM. PMID:25146374

  18. Acupuncture stimulation on GB34 activates neural responses associated with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Sujung; Lim, Sabina; Choe, Il-Hwan; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Chung, Kyung-Cheon; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder that is caused by neural defects in the substantia nigra. Numerous studies have reported that acupuncture treatment on GB34 (Yanglingquan) leads to significant improvements in patients with PD and in PD animal models. Studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have shown that patients with PD, compared to healthy participants, have lower neural responses in extensive brain regions including the putamen, thalamus, and the supplementary motor area. This study investigated the reported association between acupuncture point GB34 and PD. Using fMRI, neural responses of 12 patients with PD and 12 healthy participants were examined before and after acupuncture stimulation. Acupuncture stimulation increased neural responses in regions including the substantia nigra, caudate, thalamus, and putamen, which are impaired caused by PD. Areas associated with PD were activated by the acupuncture stimulation on GB34. This shows that acupuncture treatment on GB34 may be effective in improving the symptoms of PD. Although more randomized controlled trials on the topic will be needed, this study shows that acupuncture may be helpful in the treatment of symptoms involving PD. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Neural correlates of regulation of positive and negative emotions: an fmri study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Amanda K Y; Hu, Zhi-Guo; Zhang, John X; Xiao, Zhuang-Wei; Lee, Tatia M C

    2009-06-26

    Regulation of emotion is important for adaptive social functioning and mental well-being. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study identified neural correlates of regulation of positive or negative emotion. Twelve healthy female Chinese participants performed the experimental task that required them to simply view emotional pictures or to regulate their emotions induced by these pictures while their brain activities were monitored by a 1.5 T MRI scanner. The neuroimaging findings indicate that the left superior and lateral frontal regions (BA8/9) are common neural correlates of regulation of both emotions. For regulation of positive or negative emotion, changes of BOLD responses in the prefrontal regions and the left insula are associated with regulation of positive emotion; whereas activity of the left orbitofrontal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate gyrus appears to be involved in regulation of negative emotion. According to the participants' self-report, they appeared to be more effective in regulating positive than negative emotions, which may relate to the distinct patterns of neural activity associated with regulation of the specific emotion. As a conclusion, our findings suggest that there are shared as well as valence-specific neurocognitive mechanisms underlying regulation of positive and negative emotions. Enhanced knowledge about the neural mechanisms of emotion regulation helps improve understanding of the complex interplay of emotion and cognition underlying human behaviors.

  20. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susmikanti, Mike, E-mail: mike@batan.go.id [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Tangerang (Indonesia); Sulistyo, Jos, E-mail: soj@batan.go.id [Center for Nuclear Facilities Engineering, National Nuclear Energy Agency, PUSPIPTEK, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix.

  1. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Sulistyo, Jos

    2014-09-01

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix.

  2. Effect of Explicit Evaluation on Neural Connectivity Related to Listening to Unfamiliar Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Brattico, Elvira; Abu-jamous, Basel; Pereira, Carlos S.; Jacobsen, Thomas; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2017-01-01

    People can experience different emotions when listening to music. A growing number of studies have investigated the brain structures and neural connectivities associated with perceived emotions. However, very little is known about the effect of an explicit act of judgment on the neural processing of emotionally-valenced music. In this study, we adopted the novel consensus clustering paradigm, called binarisation of consensus partition matrices (Bi-CoPaM), to study whether and how the conscious aesthetic evaluation of the music would modulate brain connectivity networks related to emotion and reward processing. Participants listened to music under three conditions – one involving a non-evaluative judgment, one involving an explicit evaluative aesthetic judgment, and one involving no judgment at all (passive listening only). During non-evaluative attentive listening we obtained auditory-limbic connectivity whereas when participants were asked to decide explicitly whether they liked or disliked the music excerpt, only two clusters of intercommunicating brain regions were found: one including areas related to auditory processing and action observation, and the other comprising higher-order structures involved with visual processing. Results indicate that explicit evaluative judgment has an impact on the neural auditory-limbic connectivity during affective processing of music. PMID:29311874

  3. Effect of Explicit Evaluation on Neural Connectivity Related to Listening to Unfamiliar Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People can experience different emotions when listening to music. A growing number of studies have investigated the brain structures and neural connectivities associated with perceived emotions. However, very little is known about the effect of an explicit act of judgment on the neural processing of emotionally-valenced music. In this study, we adopted the novel consensus clustering paradigm, called binarisation of consensus partition matrices (Bi-CoPaM, to study whether and how the conscious aesthetic evaluation of the music would modulate brain connectivity networks related to emotion and reward processing. Participants listened to music under three conditions – one involving a non-evaluative judgment, one involving an explicit evaluative aesthetic judgment, and one involving no judgment at all (passive listening only. During non-evaluative attentive listening we obtained auditory-limbic connectivity whereas when participants were asked to decide explicitly whether they liked or disliked the music excerpt, only two clusters of intercommunicating brain regions were found: one including areas related to auditory processing and action observation, and the other comprising higher-order structures involved with visual processing. Results indicate that explicit evaluative judgment has an impact on the neural auditory-limbic connectivity during affective processing of music.

  4. Separate neural systems value immediate and delayed monetary rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Samuel M; Laibson, David I; Loewenstein, George; Cohen, Jonathan D

    2004-10-15

    When humans are offered the choice between rewards available at different points in time, the relative values of the options are discounted according to their expected delays until delivery. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural correlates of time discounting while subjects made a series of choices between monetary reward options that varied by delay to delivery. We demonstrate that two separate systems are involved in such decisions. Parts of the limbic system associated with the midbrain dopamine system, including paralimbic cortex, are preferentially activated by decisions involving immediately available rewards. In contrast, regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal cortex are engaged uniformly by intertemporal choices irrespective of delay. Furthermore, the relative engagement of the two systems is directly associated with subjects' choices, with greater relative fronto-parietal activity when subjects choose longer term options.

  5. Feedforward Backpropagation Neural Networks in Prediction of Farmer Risk Preferences

    OpenAIRE

    Kastens, Terry L.; Featherstone, Allen M.

    1996-01-01

    An out-of-sample prediction of Kansas farmers' responses to five surveyed questions involving risk is used to compare ordered multinomial logistic regression models with feedforward backpropagation neural network models. Although the logistic models often predict more accurately than the neural network models in a mean-squared error sense, the neural network models are shown to be more accommodating of loss functions associated with a desire to predict certain combinations of categorical resp...

  6. Ontogeny of avian thermoregulation from a neural point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Baarendse, P.J.J.; Debonne, M.; Decuypere, M.P.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den, H.

    2007-01-01

    The ontogeny of thermoregulation differs among (avian) species, but in all species both neural and endocrinological processes are involved. In this review the neural processes in ontogeny of thermoregulation during the prenatal and early postnatal phase are discussed. Only in a few avian species (chicken, ducklings) the ontogeny of some important neural structures are described. In the early post hatching phase, peripheral and deep-body thermoreceptors are present and functional, even in altr...

  7. The neural bases underlying social risk perception in purchase decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Nozawa, Takayuki; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yomogida, Yukihito; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Akimoto, Yoritaka; Shibuya, Satoru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-05-01

    Social considerations significantly influence daily purchase decisions, and the perception of social risk (i.e., the anticipated disapproval of others) is crucial in dissuading consumers from making purchases. However, the neural basis for consumers' perception of social risk remains undiscovered, and this novel study clarifies the relevant neural processes. A total of 26 volunteers were scanned while they evaluated purchase intention of products (purchase intention task) and their anticipation of others' disapproval for possessing a product (social risk task), using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The fMRI data from the purchase intention task was used to identify the brain region associated with perception of social risk during purchase decision making by using subjective social risk ratings for a parametric modulation analysis. Furthermore, we aimed to explore if there was a difference between participants' purchase decisions and their explicit evaluations of social risk, with reference to the neural activity associated with social risk perception. For this, subjective social risk ratings were used for a parametric modulation analysis on fMRI data from the social risk task. Analysis of the purchase intention task revealed a significant positive correlation between ratings of social risk and activity in the anterior insula, an area of the brain that is known as part of the emotion-related network. Analysis of the social risk task revealed a significant positive correlation between ratings of social risk and activity in the temporal parietal junction and the medial prefrontal cortex, which are known as theory-of-mind regions. Our results suggest that the anterior insula processes consumers' social risk implicitly to prompt consumers not to buy socially unacceptable products, whereas ToM-related regions process such risk explicitly in considering the anticipated disapproval of others. These findings may prove helpful in understanding the mental

  8. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiro eSakaiya

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human and strategy (random, tit-for-tat in repeated prisoner’s dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate and theory of mind (ToM regions (i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex [VMPFC] and precuneus. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (deactivation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during

  9. Neural correlate of human reciprocity in social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaiya, Shiro; Shiraito, Yuki; Kato, Junko; Ide, Hiroko; Okada, Kensuke; Takano, Kouji; Kansaku, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Reciprocity plays a key role maintaining cooperation in society. However, little is known about the neural process that underpins human reciprocity during social interactions. Our neuroimaging study manipulated partner identity (computer, human) and strategy (random, tit-for-tat) in repeated prisoner's dilemma games and investigated the neural correlate of reciprocal interaction with humans. Reciprocal cooperation with humans but exploitation of computers by defection was associated with activation in the left amygdala. Amygdala activation was also positively and negatively correlated with a preference change for human partners following tit-for-tat and random strategies, respectively. The correlated activation represented the intensity of positive feeling toward reciprocal and negative feeling toward non-reciprocal partners, and so reflected reciprocity in social interaction. Reciprocity in social interaction, however, might plausibly be misinterpreted and so we also examined the neural coding of insight into the reciprocity of partners. Those with and without insight revealed differential brain activation across the reward-related circuitry (i.e., the right middle dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal caudate) and theory of mind (ToM) regions [i.e., ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) and precuneus]. Among differential activations, activation in the precuneus, which accompanied deactivation of the VMPFC, was specific to those without insight into human partners who were engaged in a tit-for-tat strategy. This asymmetric (de)activation might involve specific contributions of ToM regions to the human search for reciprocity. Consequently, the intensity of emotion attached to human reciprocity was represented in the amygdala, whereas insight into the reciprocity of others was reflected in activation across the reward-related and ToM regions. This suggests the critical role of mentalizing, which was not equated with reward expectation during social interactions.

  10. Screening for Open Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, David A; Hallahan, Terrence W; Carmichael, Jonathan B

    2016-06-01

    Biochemical prenatal screening was initiated with the use of maternal serum alpha fetoprotein to screen for open neural tube defects. Screening now includes multiple marker and sequential screening protocols involving serum and ultrasound markers to screen for aneuploidy. Recently cell-free DNA screening for aneuploidy has been initiated, but does not screen for neural tube defects. Although ultrasound is highly effective in identifying neural tube defects in high-risk populations, in decentralized health systems maternal serum screening still plays a significant role. Abnormal maternal serum alpha fetoprotein alone or in combination with other markers may indicate adverse pregnancy outcome in the absence of open neural tube defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neural Networks in Mobile Robot Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Janglová

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a path planning and intelligent control of an autonomous robot which should move safely in partially structured environment. This environment may involve any number of obstacles of arbitrary shape and size; some of them are allowed to move. We describe our approach to solving the motion-planning problem in mobile robot control using neural networks-based technique. Our method of the construction of a collision-free path for moving robot among obstacles is based on two neural networks. The first neural network is used to determine the “free” space using ultrasound range finder data. The second neural network “finds” a safe direction for the next robot section of the path in the workspace while avoiding the nearest obstacles. Simulation examples of generated path with proposed techniques will be presented.

  12. Neural Networks in Mobile Robot Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Janglova

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a path planning and intelligent control of an autonomous robot which should move safely in partially structured environment. This environment may involve any number of obstacles of arbitrary shape and size; some of them are allowed to move. We describe our approach to solving the motion-planning problem in mobile robot control using neural networks-based technique. Our method of the construction of a collision-free path for moving robot among obstacles is based on two neural networks. The first neural network is used to determine the "free" space using ultrasound range finder data. The second neural network "finds" a safe direction for the next robot section of the path in the workspace while avoiding the nearest obstacles. Simulation examples of generated path with proposed techniques will be presented.

  13. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya eWatanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group setting, individuals’ perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems’ level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation.

  14. Neural, cognitive, and evolutionary foundations of human altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Abigail A

    2016-01-01

    This article considers three forms of altruism from both a psychological and a neural perspective, with an emphasis on homologies that can be observed across species and potentially illuminate altruism's evolutionary origins. Kin-based altruism benefits biological relatives and, according to the theory of inclusive fitness, is ultimately beneficial to the altruist from a genetic standpoint. Kin selection adequately explains some altruistic behavior, but it is not applicable to much human altruism. Little is known about the neural processes that support it, but they may include cortical regions involved in processing autobiographical memory and the identities of familiar others. Reciprocity-based altruism is performed in expectation of future rewards and is supported by dopaminergic cortico-striatal networks that guide behavior according to anticipated rewards. Care-based altruism is aimed at improving the well-being of distressed and vulnerable individuals and is closely linked to empathic concern. This form of altruism is thought to rely on the subcortical neural systems that support parental care, particularly structures densely populated with receptors for the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin, including the amygdala, stria terminalis, and striatum. The amygdala may be a particularly important convergence point for care-based altruism because of its dual role in responding both to cues that signal infantile vulnerability and those that signal distress. Research on altruism continues to converge across disciplines, but more research linking molecular-level neural processes to altruistic behavior in humans and other species is needed, as is research on how various forms of altruism intersect. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Theory of mind: a neural prediction problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster-Hale, Jorie; Saxe, Rebecca

    2013-09-04

    Predictive coding posits that neural systems make forward-looking predictions about incoming information. Neural signals contain information not about the currently perceived stimulus, but about the difference between the observed and the predicted stimulus. We propose to extend the predictive coding framework from high-level sensory processing to the more abstract domain of theory of mind; that is, to inferences about others' goals, thoughts, and personalities. We review evidence that, across brain regions, neural responses to depictions of human behavior, from biological motion to trait descriptions, exhibit a key signature of predictive coding: reduced activity to predictable stimuli. We discuss how future experiments could distinguish predictive coding from alternative explanations of this response profile. This framework may provide an important new window on the neural computations underlying theory of mind. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The functional role of neural oscillations in non-verbal emotional communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E Symons

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective interpersonal communication depends on the ability to perceive and interpret nonverbal emotional expressions from multiple sensory modalities. Current theoretical models propose that visual and auditory emotion perception involves a network of brain regions including the primary sensory cortices, the superior temporal sulcus (STS, and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC. However, relatively little is known about how the dynamic interplay between these regions gives rise to the perception of emotions. In recent years, there has been increasing recognition of the importance of neural oscillations in mediating neural communication within and between functional neural networks. Here we review studies investigating changes in oscillatory activity during the perception of visual, auditory, and audiovisual emotional expressions, and aim to characterise the functional role of neural oscillations in nonverbal emotion perception. Findings from the reviewed literature suggest that theta band oscillations most consistently differentiate between emotional and neutral expressions. While early theta synchronisation appears to reflect the initial encoding of emotionally salient sensory information, later fronto-central theta synchronisation may reflect the further integration of sensory information with internal representations. Additionally, gamma synchronisation reflects facilitated sensory binding of emotional expressions within regions such as the OFC, STS, and, potentially, the amygdala. However, the evidence is more ambiguous when it comes to the role of oscillations within the alpha and beta frequencies, which vary as a function of modality (or modalities, presence or absence of predictive information, and attentional or task demands. Thus, the synchronisation of neural oscillations within specific frequency bands mediates the rapid detection, integration, and evaluation of emotional expressions. Moreover, the functional coupling of oscillatory activity

  17. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  18. Dissociable neural imprints of perception and grammar in auditory functional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Obleser, Jonas; Kalberlah, Christian; Haynes, John-Dylan; Friederici, Angela D

    2012-03-01

    In language processing, the relative contribution of early sensory and higher cognitive brain areas is still an open issue. A recent controversial hypothesis proposes that sensory cortices show sensitivity to syntactic processes, whereas other studies suggest a wider neural network outside sensory regions. The goal of the current event-related fMRI study is to clarify the contribution of sensory cortices in auditory syntactic processing in a 2 × 2 design. Two-word utterances were presented auditorily and varied both in perceptual markedness (presence or absence of an overt word category marking "-t"), and in grammaticality (syntactically correct or incorrect). A multivariate pattern classification approach was applied to the data, flanked by conventional cognitive subtraction analyses. The combination of methods and the 2 × 2 design revealed a clear picture: The cognitive subtraction analysis found initial syntactic processing signatures in a neural network including the left IFG, the left aSTG, the left superior temporal sulcus (STS), as well as the right STS/STG. Classification of local multivariate patterns indicated the left-hemispheric regions in IFG, aSTG, and STS to be more syntax-specific than the right-hemispheric regions. Importantly, auditory sensory cortices were only sensitive to the overt perceptual marking, but not to the grammaticality, speaking against syntax-inflicted sensory cortex modulations. Instead, our data provide clear evidence for a distinction between regions involved in pure perceptual processes and regions involved in initial syntactic processes. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Glutamate signaling and neural plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahiko

    2013-07-01

    Proper functioning of the nervous system relies on the precise formation of neural circuits during development. At birth, neurons have redundant synaptic connections not only to their proper targets but also to other neighboring cells. Then, functional neural circuits are formed during early postnatal development by the selective strengthening of necessary synapses and weakening of surplus connections. Synaptic connections are also modified so that projection fields of active afferents expand at the expense of lesser ones. We have studied the molecular mechanisms underlying these activity-dependent prunings and the plasticity of synaptic circuitry using gene-engineered mice defective in the glutamatergic signaling system. NMDA-type glutamate receptors are critically involved in the establishment of the somatosensory pathway ascending from the brainstem trigeminal nucleus to the somatosensory cortex. Without NMDA receptors, whisker-related patterning fails to develop, whereas lesion-induced plasticity occurs normally during the critical period. In contrast, mice lacking the glutamate transporters GLAST or GLT1 are selectively impaired in the lesion-induced critical plasticity of cortical barrels, although whisker-related patterning itself develops normally. In the developing cerebellum, multiple climbing fibers initially innervating given Purkinje cells are eliminated one by one until mono-innervation is achieved. In this pruning process, P/Q-type Ca2+ channels expressed on Purkinje cells are critically involved by the selective strengthening of single main climbing fibers against other lesser afferents. Therefore, the activation of glutamate receptors that leads to an activity-dependent increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration plays a key role in the pruning of immature synaptic circuits into functional circuits. On the other hand, glutamate transporters appear to control activity-dependent plasticity among afferent fields, presumably through adjusting

  20. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  1. Appearance matters: neural correlates of food choice and packaging aesthetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N Van der Laan

    Full Text Available Neuro-imaging holds great potential for predicting choice behavior from brain responses. In this study we used both traditional mass-univariate and state-of-the-art multivariate pattern analysis to establish which brain regions respond to preferred packages and to what extent neural activation patterns can predict realistic low-involvement consumer choices. More specifically, this was assessed in the context of package-induced binary food choices. Mass-univariate analyses showed that several regions, among which the bilateral striatum, were more strongly activated in response to preferred food packages. Food choices could be predicted with an accuracy of up to 61.2% by activation patterns in brain regions previously found to be involved in healthy food choices (superior frontal gyrus and visual processing (middle occipital gyrus. In conclusion, this study shows that mass-univariate analysis can detect small package-induced differences in product preference and that MVPA can successfully predict realistic low-involvement consumer choices from functional MRI data.

  2. Appearance matters: neural correlates of food choice and packaging aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Laan, Laura N; De Ridder, Denise T D; Viergever, Max A; Smeets, Paul A M

    2012-01-01

    Neuro-imaging holds great potential for predicting choice behavior from brain responses. In this study we used both traditional mass-univariate and state-of-the-art multivariate pattern analysis to establish which brain regions respond to preferred packages and to what extent neural activation patterns can predict realistic low-involvement consumer choices. More specifically, this was assessed in the context of package-induced binary food choices. Mass-univariate analyses showed that several regions, among which the bilateral striatum, were more strongly activated in response to preferred food packages. Food choices could be predicted with an accuracy of up to 61.2% by activation patterns in brain regions previously found to be involved in healthy food choices (superior frontal gyrus) and visual processing (middle occipital gyrus). In conclusion, this study shows that mass-univariate analysis can detect small package-induced differences in product preference and that MVPA can successfully predict realistic low-involvement consumer choices from functional MRI data.

  3. Cortical regions for judgments of emotions and personality traits from point-light walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Andrea S; Adolphs, Ralph; Tranel, Daniel; Damasio, Hanna

    2004-09-01

    Humans are able to use nonverbal behavior to make fast, reliable judgments of both emotional states and personality traits. Whereas a sizeable body of research has identified neural structures critical for emotion recognition, the neural substrates of personality trait attribution have not been explored in detail. In the present study, we investigated the neural systems involved in emotion and personality trait judgments. We used a type of visual stimulus that is known to convey both emotion and personality information, namely, point-light walkers. We compared the emotion and personality trait judgments made by subjects with brain damage to those made by neurologically normal subjects and then conducted a lesion overlap analysis to identify neural regions critical for these two tasks. Impairments on the two tasks dissociated: Some subjects were impaired at emotion recognition, but judged personality normally; other subjects were impaired on the personality task, but normal at emotion recognition. Moreover, these dissociations in performance were associated with damage to specific neural regions: Right somatosensory cortices were a primary focus of lesion overlap in subjects impaired on the emotion task, whereas left frontal opercular cortices were a primary focus of lesion overlap in subjects impaired on the personality task. These findings suggest that attributions of emotional states and personality traits are accomplished by partially dissociable neural systems.

  4. Neural Networks for Language Identification: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNamara, Shane; Cunningham, Padraig; Byrne, John

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes a neural network for its ability to perform a task involving identification of the language entries in a 19th-century library catalog containing entries in 14 different languages. Compares the neural network's performance with that of trigrams and a suffix/morphology analysis; the trigrams prove to be superior. (AEF)

  5. Ontogeny of avian thermoregulation from a neural point of view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baarendse, P.J.J.; Debonne, M.; Decuypere, M.P.; Kemp, B.; Brand, van den H.

    2007-01-01

    The ontogeny of thermoregulation differs among (avian) species, but in all species both neural and endocrinological processes are involved. In this review the neural processes in ontogeny of thermoregulation during the prenatal and early postnatal phase are discussed. Only in a few avian species

  6. Sequence analysis of the MYC oncogene involved in the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) chromosome translocation in a human leukemia T-cell line indicates that putative regulatory regions are not altered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finver, S.N.; Nishikura, K.; Finger, L.R.; Haluska, F.G.; Finan, J.; Nowell, P.C.; Croce, C.M.

    1988-05-01

    The authors cloned the translocation-associated and homologous normal MYC alleles from SKW-3, a leukemia T-cell line with the t(8; 14)(q24; q11) translocation, and determined the sequence of the MYC oncogene first exon and flanking 5' putative regulatory regions. S1 nuclease protection experiments utilizing a MYC first exon probe demonstrated transcriptional deregulation of the MYC gene associated with the T-cell receptor ..cap alpha.. locus on the 8q + chromosome of SKW-3 cells. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the translocation-associated (8q +) MYC allele identified a single base substitution within the upstream flanking region; the homologous nontranslocated allele contained an additional substitution and a two-base deletion. None of the deletions or substitutions localized to putative 5' regulatory regions. The MYC first exon sequence was germ line in both alleles. These results demonstrate that alterations within the putative 5' MYC regulatory regions are not necessarily involved in MYC deregulation in T-cell leukemias, and they show that juxtaposition of the T-cell receptor ..cap alpha.. locus to a germ-line MYC oncogene results in MYC deregulation.

  7. Neural correlates of imagined and synaesthetic colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Anina N; Williams, Mark A; Puce, Aina; Syngeniotis, Ari; Howard, Matthew A; McGlone, Francis; Mattingley, Jason B

    2006-01-01

    The experience of colour is a core element of human vision. Colours provide important symbolic and contextual information not conveyed by form alone. Moreover, the experience of colour can arise without external stimulation. For many people, visual memories are rich with colour imagery. In the unusual phenomenon of grapheme-colour synaesthesia, achromatic forms such as letters, words and numbers elicit vivid experiences of colour. Few studies, however, have examined the neural correlates of such internally generated colour experiences. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare patterns of cortical activity for the perception of external coloured stimuli and internally generated colours in a group of grapheme-colour synaesthetes and matched non-synaesthetic controls. In a voluntary colour imagery task, both synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes made colour judgements on objects presented as grey scale photographs. In a synaesthetic colour task, we presented letters that elicited synaesthetic colours, and asked participants to perform a localisation task. We assessed the neural activity underpinning these two different forms of colour experience that occur in the absence of chromatic sensory input. In both synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes, voluntary colour imagery activated the colour-selective area, V4, in the right hemisphere. In contrast, the synaesthetic colour task resulted in unique activity for synaesthetes in the left medial lingual gyrus, an area previously implicated in tasks involving colour knowledge. Our data suggest that internally generated colour experiences recruit brain regions specialised for colour perception, with striking differences between voluntary colour imagery and synaesthetically induced colours.

  8. Neural correlates of dysfunctional emotion regulation in major depressive disorder. A systematic review of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rive, Maria M; van Rooijen, Geeske; Veltman, Dick J; Phillips, Mary L; Schene, Aart H; Ruhé, Henricus G

    2013-12-01

    Abnormal emotion processing is a core feature of major depressive disorder (MDD). Since the emergence of functional neuroimaging techniques, many studies have been conducted in MDD subjects to elucidate the underlying abnormalities in the neural systems involved in emotion regulation. In this systematic review, we discuss this research in the context of the neural model of emotion regulation previously described by Phillips et al. (2008). This model differentiates between automatic and voluntary emotion regulation subprocesses. Automatic regulation subprocesses were shown to involve predominantly medial prefrontal cortical structures, in addition to the hippocampus and parahippocampus, while voluntary regulation processes additionally recruited lateral prefrontal cortical regions. In conclusion, although the available data is limited, findings suggest that MDD subjects demonstrate abnormally reduced activity in lateral prefrontal cortices during explicit voluntary control of emotional experience. During early, automatic stages of emotion regulation, on the other hand, MDD subjects appear to achieve successful emotion regulation by recruiting additional lateral prefrontal neural regions, that may be mediated by medial prefrontal, especially rostral/dorsal anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) functioning. Dysfunctional automatic regulation may impair successful voluntary emotion regulation, and may present a target for novel therapeutic approaches in MDD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In contemporary consciousness studies the phenomenon of neural plasticity has received little attention despite the fact that neural plasticity is of still increased interest in neuroscience. We will, however, argue that neural plasticity could be of great importance to consciousness studies....... If consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather...... a dynamic entity, which physical structure changes according to its use and environment. This change may take the form of growth of new neurons, the creation of new networks and structures, and change within network structures, that is, changes in synaptic strengths. Plasticity raises questions about...

  10. Neural correlates of cognitive improvements following cognitive remediation in schizophrenia: a systematic review of randomized trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémence Isaac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive impairments are a core feature in schizophrenia and are linked to poor social functioning. Numerous studies have shown that cognitive remediation can enhance cognitive and functional abilities in patients with this pathology. The underlying mechanism of these behavioral improvements seems to be related to structural and functional changes in the brain. However, studies on neural correlates of such enhancement remain scarce. Objectives: We explored the neural correlates of cognitive enhancement following cognitive remediation interventions in schizophrenia and the differential effect between cognitive training and other therapeutic interventions or patients’ usual care. Method: We searched MEDLINE, PsycInfo, and ScienceDirect databases for studies on cognitive remediation therapy in schizophrenia that used neuroimaging techniques and a randomized design. Search terms included randomized controlled trial, cognitive remediation, cognitive training, rehabilitation, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, electroencephalography, magnetoencephalography, near infrared spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging. We selected randomized controlled trials that proposed multiple sessions of cognitive training to adult patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder and assessed its efficacy with imaging techniques. Results: In total, 15 reports involving 19 studies were included in the systematic review. They involved a total of 455 adult patients, 271 of whom received cognitive remediation. Cognitive remediation therapy seems to provide a neurobiological enhancing effect in schizophrenia. After therapy, increased activations are observed in various brain regions mainly in frontal – especially prefrontal – and also in occipital and anterior cingulate regions during working memory and executive tasks. Several studies provide evidence of an improved functional connectivity after cognitive training, suggesting a

  11. Neural circuitry underlying sentence-level linguistic prosody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yunxia; Gandour, Jackson; Talavage, Thomas; Wong, Donald; Dzemidzic, Mario; Xu, Yisheng; Li, Xiaojian; Lowe, Mark

    2005-11-01

    This study investigates the neural substrates underlying the perception of two sentence-level prosodic phenomena in Mandarin Chinese: contrastive stress (initial vs. final emphasis position) and intonation (declarative vs. interrogative modality). In an fMRI experiment, Chinese and English listeners were asked to selectively attend to either stress or intonation in paired 3-word sentences, and make speeded-response discrimination judgments. Between-group comparisons revealed that the Chinese group exhibited significantly greater activity in the left supramarginal gyrus and posterior middle temporal gyrus relative to the English group for both tasks. These same two regions showed a leftward asymmetry in the stress task for the Chinese group only. For both language groups, rightward asymmetries were observed in the middle portion of the middle frontal gyrus across tasks. All task effects involved greater activity for the stress task as compared to intonation. A left-sided task effect was observed in the posterior middle temporal gyrus for the Chinese group only. Both language groups exhibited a task effect bilaterally in the intraparietal sulcus. These findings support the emerging view that speech prosody perception involves a dynamic interplay among widely distributed regions not only within a single hemisphere but also between the two hemispheres. This model of speech prosody processing emphasizes the role of right hemisphere regions for complex-sound analysis, whereas task-dependent regions in the left hemisphere predominate when language processing is required.

  12. Neural correlates of proactive and reactive aggression in adolescent twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaling; Joshi, Shantanu H; Jahanshad, Neda; Thompson, Paul M; Baker, Laura A

    2017-05-01

    Verbal and physical aggression begin early in life and steadily decline thereafter in normal development. As a result, elevated aggressive behavior in adolescence may signal atypical development and greater vulnerability for negative mental and health outcomes. Converging evidence suggests that brain disturbances in regions involved in impulse control, emotional regulation, and sensation seeking may contribute to heightened aggression. However, little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying subtypes of aggression (i.e., proactive and reactive aggression) and whether they differ between males and females. Using a sample of 106 14-year-old adolescent twins, this study found that striatal enlargement was associated with both proactive and reactive aggression. We also found that volumetric alterations in several frontal regions including smaller middle frontal and larger orbitofrontal cortex were correlated with higher levels of aggression in adolescent twins. In addition, cortical thickness analysis showed that thickness alterations in many overlapping regions including middle frontal, superior frontal, and anterior cingulate cortex and temporal regions were associated with aggression in adolescent twins. Results support the involvement of fronto-limbic-striatal circuit in the etiology of aggression during adolescence. Aggr. Behav. 43:230-240, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fuzzy and neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  14. Neural mechanisms underlying social conformity in an ultimatum game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu eWei

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When individuals’ actions are incongruent with those of the group they belong to, they may change their initial behavior in order to conform to the group norm. This phenomenon is known as social conformity. In the present study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate brain activity in response to group opinion during an ultimatum game. Results showed that participants changed their choices when these choices conflicted with the normative opinion of the group they were members of, especially in conditions of unfair treatment. The fMRI data revealed that a conflict with group norms activated the brain regions involved in norm violations and behavioral adjustment. Furthermore, in the reject-unfair condition, we observed that a conflict with group norms activated the medial frontal gyrus. These findings contribute to recent research examining neural mechanisms involved in detecting violations of social norms, and provide information regarding the neural representation of conformity behavior in an economic game.

  15. Neural mechanisms underlying social conformity in an ultimatum game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhenyu; Zhao, Zhiying; Zheng, Yong

    2013-01-01

    When individuals' actions are incongruent with those of the group they belong to, they may change their initial behavior in order to conform to the group norm. This phenomenon is known as "social conformity." In the present study, we used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate brain activity in response to group opinion during an ultimatum game. Results showed that participants changed their choices when these choices conflicted with the normative opinion of the group they were members of, especially in conditions of unfair treatment. The fMRI data revealed that a conflict with group norms activated the brain regions involved in norm violations and behavioral adjustment. Furthermore, in the reject-unfair condition, we observed that a conflict with group norms activated the medial frontal gyrus. These findings contribute to recent research examining neural mechanisms involved in detecting violations of social norms, and provide information regarding the neural representation of conformity behavior in an economic game.

  16. Spinal Neural Tube Defects in Lagos University Teaching Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of neural tube defects is known to vary among regions. Very little has been reported about the incidence in Sub-Saharan Africa except for the general impression that the prevalent rates are low. Objective: To determine the profile of patients presenting with neural tube defects in Lagos , Nigeria

  17. pen Neural Tube Defects at the National Hospital,

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neural tube defect is the most common congenital abnormality of the central nervous system. Objectives: To document the clinical patterns and neonatal outcome of babies with open neural tube defects at the National Hospital, .... prevalence of these malformations in the region. This is because there are two ...

  18. Neural tumours of the head and neck | Chindia | East African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To document the pattern of occurrence of all primary neural tumours arising in the neck and craniofacial region over the period 1982 to 1991. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Cancer Registry, Nairobi, Kenya. Results: Out of the 289 cases who were identified to have had whole body neural tumours, ...

  19. Neural Systems for Speech and Song in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Grace; Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Schneider, Harry; Hirsch, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Despite language disabilities in autism, music abilities are frequently preserved. Paradoxically, brain regions associated with these functions typically overlap, enabling investigation of neural organization supporting speech and song in autism. Neural systems sensitive to speech and song were compared in low-functioning autistic and age-matched…

  20. Decreased neural precursor cell pool in NADPH oxidase 2-deficiency: From mouse brain to neural differentiation of patient derived iPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Nayernia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is emerging evidence for the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the regulation of stem cells and cellular differentiation. Absence of the ROS-generating NADPH oxidase NOX2 in chronic granulomatous disease (CGD patients, predominantly manifests as immune deficiency, but has also been associated with decreased cognition. Here, we investigate the role of NOX enzymes in neuronal homeostasis in adult mouse brain and in neural cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC. High levels of NOX2 were found in mouse adult neurogenic regions. In NOX2-deficient mice, neurogenic regions showed diminished redox modifications, as well as decrease in neuroprecursor numbers and in expression of genes involved in neural differentiation including NES, BDNF and OTX2. iPSC from healthy subjects and patients with CGD were used to study the role of NOX2 in human in vitro neuronal development. Expression of NOX2 was low in undifferentiated iPSC, upregulated upon neural induction, and disappeared during neuronal differentiation. In human neurospheres, NOX2 protein and ROS generation were polarized within the inner cell layer of rosette structures. NOX2 deficiency in CGD-iPSCs resulted in an abnormal neural induction in vitro, as revealed by a reduced expression of neuroprogenitor markers (NES, BDNF, OTX2, NRSF/REST, and a decreased generation of mature neurons. Vector-mediated NOX2 expression in NOX2-deficient iPSCs rescued neurogenesis. Taken together, our study provides novel evidence for a regulatory role of NOX2 during early stages of neurogenesis in mouse and human.

  1. Large-scale functional neural network correlates of response inhibition: an fMRI meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruibin; Geng, Xiujuan; Lee, Tatia M C

    2017-12-01

    An influential hypothesis from the last decade proposed that regions within the right inferior frontal cortex of the human brain were dedicated to supporting response inhibition. There is growing evidence, however, to support an alternative model, which proposes that neural areas associated with specific inhibitory control tasks co-exist as common network mechanisms, supporting diverse cognitive processes. This meta-analysis of 225 studies comprising 323 experiments examined the common and distinct neural correlates of cognitive processes for response inhibition, namely interference resolution, action withholding, and action cancellation. Activation coordinates for each subcategory were extracted using multilevel kernel density analysis (MKDA). The extracted activity patterns were then mapped onto the brain functional network atlas to derive the common (i.e., process-general) and distinct (i.e., domain-oriented) neural network correlates of these processes. Independent of the task types, activation of the right hemispheric regions (inferior frontal gyrus, insula, median cingulate, and paracingulate gyri) and superior parietal gyrus was common across the cognitive processes studied. Mapping the activation patterns to a brain functional network atlas revealed that the fronto-parietal and ventral attention networks were the core neural systems that were commonly engaged in different processes of response inhibition. Subtraction analyses elucidated the distinct neural substrates of interference resolution, action withholding, and action cancellation, revealing stronger activation in the ventral attention network for interference resolution than action inhibition. On the other hand, action withholding/cancellation primarily engaged the fronto-striatal circuit. Overall, our results suggest that response inhibition is a multidimensional cognitive process involving multiple neural regions and networks for coordinating optimal performance. This finding has significant

  2. Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen E.; Brown, Lucy L.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten women and 7 men married an average of 21.4 years underwent fMRI while viewing facial images of their partner. Control images included a highly familiar acquaintance; a close, long-term friend; and a low-familiar person. Effects specific to the intensely loved, long-term partner were found in: (i) areas of the dopamine-rich reward and basal ganglia system, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal striatum, consistent with results from early-stage romantic love studies; and (ii) several regions implicated in maternal attachment, such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra, Raphe nucleus, thalamus, insular cortex, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate. Correlations of neural activity in regions of interest with widely used questionnaires showed: (i) VTA and caudate responses correlated with romantic love scores and inclusion of other in the self; (ii) GP responses correlated with friendship-based love scores; (iii) hypothalamus and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with sexual frequency; and (iv) caudate, septum/fornix, posterior cingulate and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with obsession. Overall, results suggest that for some individuals the reward-value associated with a long-term partner may be sustained, similar to new love, but also involves brain systems implicated in attachment and pair-bonding. PMID:21208991

  3. Neural correlates of choice behavior related to impulsivity and venturesomeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinvest, Neal S; Elliott, R; McKie, S; Anderson, Ian M

    2011-07-01

    Impulsivity has been associated with several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction and gambling. Impulsive subjects typically have a preference for short-term over long-term rewards and make risky choices. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of self-rated impulsivity and venturesomeness during tasks involving delayed and risky choice. A broader sampling approach was taken by recruiting participants with behaviors that have been linked to impulsivity (gambling N=15, and recreational drug use N=10) and those without these behaviors (N=9). Selection between delayed or probabilistic rewards was associated with activation in fronto-parietal regions in line with previous research. When selecting between delayed rewards, activity within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with impulsivity scores while activity within the orbitofrontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and caudate correlated positively with venturesomeness scores. Selection between probabilistic rewards revealed no correlation between scores and regional activations. The results from this study provide targets for future research investigating the neural substrates of impulsivity. They also provide targets for the further investigation into the pathophysiology of addiction and impulse-control disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Arthur; Fisher, Helen E; Brown, Lucy L

    2012-02-01

    The present study examined the neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ten women and 7 men married an average of 21.4 years underwent fMRI while viewing facial images of their partner. Control images included a highly familiar acquaintance; a close, long-term friend; and a low-familiar person. Effects specific to the intensely loved, long-term partner were found in: (i) areas of the dopamine-rich reward and basal ganglia system, such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and dorsal striatum, consistent with results from early-stage romantic love studies; and (ii) several regions implicated in maternal attachment, such as the globus pallidus (GP), substantia nigra, Raphe nucleus, thalamus, insular cortex, anterior cingulate and posterior cingulate. Correlations of neural activity in regions of interest with widely used questionnaires showed: (i) VTA and caudate responses correlated with romantic love scores and inclusion of other in the self; (ii) GP responses correlated with friendship-based love scores; (iii) hypothalamus and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with sexual frequency; and (iv) caudate, septum/fornix, posterior cingulate and posterior hippocampus responses correlated with obsession. Overall, results suggest that for some individuals the reward-value associated with a long-term partner may be sustained, similar to new love, but also involves brain systems implicated in attachment and pair-bonding.

  5. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  6. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  7. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  8. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Ugajin

    Full Text Available Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica. Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica, on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing.

  9. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing.

  10. Altered Dynamics Between Neural Systems Sub-serving Decisions for Unhealthy Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua eHe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Using BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI techniques, we examined the relationships between activities in the neural systems elicited by the decision stage of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT, and food choices of either vegetables or snacks high in fat and sugar. Twenty-three healthy normal weight adolescents and young adults, ranging in age from 14-21, were studied. Neural systems implicated in decision-making and inhibitory control were engaged by having participants perform the IGT during fMRI scanning. The Youth/Adolescent Questionnaire, a food frequency questionnaire, was used to obtain daily food choices. Higher consumption of vegetables correlated with higher activity in prefrontal cortical regions, namely the left superior frontal gyrus (SFG, and lower activity in sub-cortical regions, namely the right insular cortex. In contrast, higher consumption of fatty and sugary snacks correlated with lower activity in the prefrontal regions, combined with higher activity in the sub-cortical, insular cortex.These results provide preliminary support for our hypotheses that unhealthy food choices in real life are reflected by neuronal changes in key neural systems involved in habits, decision-making and self-control processes. These findings have implications for the creation of decision-making based intervention strategies that promote healthier eating.

  11. Role of SDF1/CXCR4 Interaction in Experimental Hemiplegic Models with Neural Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Suzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been focused on neural cell transplantation because of its promising clinical applications. We have reported that embryonic stem (ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation significantly improved motor functions in a hemiplegic mouse model. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms governing neural regeneration of the damaged motor cortex after the transplantation. Recent investigations disclosed that chemokines participated in the regulation of migration and maturation of neural cell grafts. In this review, we summarize the involvement of inflammatory chemokines including stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1 in neural regeneration after ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation in mouse stroke models.

  12. Survey on Neural Networks Used for Medical Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenghao; He, Lifeng; Suzuki, Kenji; Nakamura, Tsuyoshi; Itoh, Hidenori

    2009-02-01

    This paper aims to present a review of neural networks used in medical image processing. We classify neural networks by its processing goals and the nature of medical images. Main contributions, advantages, and drawbacks of the methods are mentioned in the paper. Problematic issues of neural network application for medical image processing and an outlook for the future research are also discussed. By this survey, we try to answer the following two important questions: (1) What are the major applications of neural networks in medical image processing now and in the nearby future? (2) What are the major strengths and weakness of applying neural networks for solving medical image processing tasks? We believe that this would be very helpful researchers who are involved in medical image processing with neural network techniques.

  13. [Mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobai; Liu, Lu; Zhao, Luopeng; Qu, Zhengyang; Zhu, Yupu; Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Linpeng

    2017-10-12

    Chronic migraine is one of neurological disorders with high rate of disability, but sufficient attention has not been paid in this field. A large number of clinical studies have shown traditional Chinese acupuncture is a kind of effective treatment with less side effects. Through the analysis of literature regarding acupuncture and migraine published from 1981 to 2017 in CNKI and PubMed databases, the mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine was explored. It was believed the progress of chronic migraine involved the changes of neural plasticity in neural structure and function, and the neural plasticity related with neural sensitization during the process of chronic migraine was discussed from three aspects of electrophysiology, molecular chemistry and radiography. Acupuncture could treat and prevent chronic migraine via the mechanism of neural plasticity, but there was no related literature, hindering the further spreading and development of acupuncture for chronic migraine.

  14. Recent advances in neural recording microsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating pace of research in neuroscience has created a considerable demand for neural interfacing microsystems capable of monitoring the activity of large groups of neurons. These emerging tools have revealed a tremendous potential for the advancement of knowledge in brain research and for the development of useful clinical applications. They can extract the relevant control signals directly from the brain enabling individuals with severe disabilities to communicate their intentions to other devices, like computers or various prostheses. Such microsystems are self-contained devices composed of a neural probe attached with an integrated circuit for extracting neural signals from multiple channels, and transferring the data outside the body. The greatest challenge facing development of such emerging devices into viable clinical systems involves addressing their small form factor and low-power consumption constraints, while providing superior resolution. In this paper, we survey the recent progress in the design and the implementation of multi-channel neural recording Microsystems, with particular emphasis on the design of recording and telemetry electronics. An overview of the numerous neural signal modalities is given and the existing microsystem topologies are covered. We present energy-efficient sensory circuits to retrieve weak signals from neural probes and we compare them. We cover data management and smart power scheduling approaches, and we review advances in low-power telemetry. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the remaining challenges and by highlighting the emerging trends in the field.

  15. Recent Advances in Neural Recording Microsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Gosselin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating pace of research in neuroscience has created a considerable demand for neural interfacing microsystems capable of monitoring the activity of large groups of neurons. These emerging tools have revealed a tremendous potential for the advancement of knowledge in brain research and for the development of useful clinical applications. They can extract the relevant control signals directly from the brain enabling individuals with severe disabilities to communicate their intentions to other devices, like computers or various prostheses. Such microsystems are self-contained devices composed of a neural probe attached with an integrated circuit for extracting neural signals from multiple channels, and transferring the data outside the body. The greatest challenge facing development of such emerging devices into viable clinical systems involves addressing their small form factor and low-power consumption constraints, while providing superior resolution. In this paper, we survey the recent progress in the design and the implementation of multi-channel neural recording Microsystems, with particular emphasis on the design of recording and telemetry electronics. An overview of the numerous neural signal modalities is given and the existing microsystem topologies are covered. We present energy-efficient sensory circuits to retrieve weak signals from neural probes and we compare them. We cover data management and smart power scheduling approaches, and we review advances in low-power telemetry. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the remaining challenges and by highlighting the emerging trends in the field.

  16. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  17. Neural Correlates of Predictive Saccades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen M; Peltsch, Alicia; Kilmade, Maureen; Brien, Donald C; Coe, Brian C; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Munoz, Douglas P

    2016-08-01

    Every day we generate motor responses that are timed with external cues. This phenomenon of sensorimotor synchronization has been simplified and studied extensively using finger tapping sequences that are executed in synchrony with auditory stimuli. The predictive saccade paradigm closely resembles the finger tapping task. In this paradigm, participants follow a visual target that "steps" between two fixed locations on a visual screen at predictable ISIs. Eventually, the time from target appearance to saccade initiation (i.e., saccadic RT) becomes predictive with values nearing 0 msec. Unlike the finger tapping literature, neural control of predictive behavior described within the eye movement literature has not been well established and is inconsistent, especially between neuroimaging and patient lesion studies. To resolve these discrepancies, we used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of predictive saccades by contrasting brain areas involved with behavior generated from the predictive saccade task with behavior generated from a reactive saccade task (saccades are generated toward targets that are unpredictably timed). We observed striking differences in neural recruitment between reactive and predictive conditions: Reactive saccades recruited oculomotor structures, as predicted, whereas predictive saccades recruited brain structures that support timing in motor responses, such as the crus I of the cerebellum, and structures commonly associated with the default mode network. Therefore, our results were more consistent with those found in the finger tapping literature.

  18. The neural correlates of emotional prosody comprehension: disentangling simple from complex emotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy Alba-Ferrara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Emotional prosody comprehension (EPC, the ability to interpret another person's feelings by listening to their tone of voice, is crucial for effective social communication. Previous studies assessing the neural correlates of EPC have found inconsistent results, particularly regarding the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC. It remained unclear whether the involvement of the mPFC is linked to an increased demand in socio-cognitive components of EPC such as mental state attribution and if basic perceptual processing of EPC can be performed without the contribution of this region. METHODS: fMRI was used to delineate neural activity during the perception of prosodic stimuli conveying simple and complex emotion. Emotional trials in general, as compared to neutral ones, activated a network comprising temporal and lateral frontal brain regions, while complex emotion trials specifically showed an additional involvement of the mPFC, premotor cortex, frontal operculum and left insula. CONCLUSION: These results indicate that the mPFC and premotor areas might be associated, but are not crucial to EPC. However, the mPFC supports socio-cognitive skills necessary to interpret complex emotion such as inferring mental states. Additionally, the premotor cortex involvement may reflect the participation of the mirror neuron system for prosody processing particularly of complex emotion.

  19. Neural tube morphogenesis in synthetic 3D microenvironments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ranga, Aian; Girgin, Mehmet; Meinhardt, Anea; Eberle, Dominic; Caiazzo, Massimiliano; Tanaka, Elly M; Lutolf, Matthias P

    2016-01-01

    .... We demonstrate how key ECM parameters are involved in specifying cytoskeleton-mediated symmetry-breaking events that ultimately lead to neural tube-like patterning along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis...

  20. Alexia and the Neural Basis of Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. Frank

    1984-01-01

    The historical background of alexia (loss or impairment of the ability to comprehend written or printed language based on damage to the brain) is reviewed, classification and symptomatology considered, theories on the involvement of right hemisphere reading are noted, and the neural basis of reading is postulated. (CL)

  1. Review: Neural correlates of consciousness | Negrao | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A basic understanding of consciousness and its neural correlates is of major importance for all clinicians, especially those involved with patients with altered states of consciousness. In this paper it is shown that consciousness is dependent on the brainstem and thalamus for arousal; that basic cognition is supported by ...

  2. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    Dynamic hand movement increases regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of the contralateral motor sensory cortex (MS1). This increase is eliminated by regional anesthesia of the working arm, indicating the importance of afferent neural input. The purpose of this study was to determine the specific...... type of afferent input required for this cerebral activation. The rCBF was measured at +5.0 and +9.0 cm above the orbitomeatal (OM) plane in 13 subjects during 1) rest; 2) dynamic left-hand contractions; 3) postcontraction ischemia (metaboreceptor afferents); and 4) biceps brachii tendon vibration...... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P neural input from muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  3. Neural correlates of rumination in adolescents with remitted major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie L; Jacobs, Rachel H; Peters, Amy T; Ajilore, Olu; Watkins, Edward R; Langenecker, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to use fMRI to examine the neural correlates of engaging in rumination among a sample of remitted depressed adolescents, a population at high risk for future depressive relapse. A rumination induction task was used to assess differences in the patterns of neural activation during rumination versus a distraction condition among 26 adolescents in remission from major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 15 healthy control adolescents. Self-report depression and rumination, as well as clinician-rated depression, were also assessed among all participants. All of the participants recruited regions in the default mode network (DMN), including the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and medial temporal gyrus, during rumination. Increased activation in these regions during rumination was correlated with increased self-report rumination and symptoms of depression across all participants. Adolescents with rMDD also exhibited greater activation in regions involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing than did healthy peers. The present findings suggest that during ruminative thought, adolescents with rMDD are characterized by increased recruitment of regions within the DMN and in areas involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing.

  4. Neural systems and hormones mediating attraction to infant and child faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhu eLuo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We find infant faces highly attractive as a result of specific features which Konrad Lorenz termed Kindchenschema or baby schema, and this is considered to be an important adaptive trait for promoting protective and caregiving behaviors in adults, thereby increasing the chances of infant survival. This review first examines the behavioral support for this effect and physical and behavioral factors which can influence it. It next reviews the increasing number of neuroimaging and electrophysiological studies investigating the neural circuitry underlying this baby schema effect in both parents and non-parents of both sexes. Next it considers potential hormonal contributions to the baby schema effect in both sexes and then neural effects associated with reduced responses to infant cues in post-partum depression, anxiety and drug taking. Overall the findings reviewed reveal a very extensive neural circuitry involved in our perception of cutenessin infant faces with enhanced activation compared to adult faces being found in brain regions involved in face perception, attention, emotion, empathy, memory, reward and attachment, theory of mind and also control of motor responses.Both mothers and fathers also show evidence for enhanced responses in these same neural systems when viewing their own as opposed to another child. Furthermore, responses to infant cues in many of these neural systems are reduced in mothers with post-partum depression or anxiety or have taken addictive drugs throughout pregnancy. In general reproductively active women tend to rate infant faces as cuter than men, which may reflect both heightened attention to relevant cues and a stronger activation in their brain reward circuitry. Perception of infant cuteness may also be influenced by reproductive hormones with the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin being most strongly associated to date with increased attention andattractionto infant cues in both sexes.

  5. Soldiers and Marksmen Under Fire: Monitoring Performance with Neural Correlates of Small Arms Fire Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eSherwin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Important decisions in the heat of battle occur rapidly and a key aptitude of a good combat soldier is the ability to determine whether he is under fire. This rapid decision requires the soldier to make a judgment in a fraction of a second, based on a barrage of multisensory cues coming from the auditory, tactile and visual domains. The present study uses an auditory oddball paradigm to examine listener ability to differentiate shooter locations from audio recordings of small arms fire. More importantly, we address the neural correlates involved in this rapid decision process by employing single-trial analysis of electroencephalography (EEG. In particular, we examine small arms expert listeners as they differentiate the sounds of small arms firing events recorded at different observer positions relative to a shooter. Using signal detection theory, we find clear neural signatures related to shooter firing angle by identifying the times of neural discrimination on a trial-to-trial basis. Similar to previous results in oddball experiments, we find common windows relative to the response and the stimulus when neural activity discriminates between target stimuli (forward fire: observer 0° to firing angle vs. standards (off-axis fire: observer 90° to firing angle. We also find, using windows of maximum discrimination, that auditory target vs. standard discrimination yields neural sources in Brodmann Area 19 (BA 19, i.e., in the visual cortex. In summary, we show that single-trial analysis of EEG yields informative scalp distributions and source current localization of discriminating activity when the small arms experts discriminate between forward and off-axis fire observer positions. Furthermore, this perceptual decision implicates brain regions involved in visual processing, even though the task is purely auditory. Finally, we utilize these techniques to quantify the level of expertise in these subjects for the chosen task, having implications for

  6. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  7. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  8. Neural tube closure: cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Galea, Gabriel L; Rolo, Ana; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2017-02-15

    Neural tube closure has been studied for many decades, across a range of vertebrates, as a paradigm of embryonic morphogenesis. Neurulation is of particular interest in view of the severe congenital malformations - 'neural tube defects' - that result when closure fails. The process of neural tube closure is complex and involves cellular events such as convergent extension, apical constriction and interkinetic nuclear migration, as well as precise molecular control via the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, Shh/BMP signalling, and the transcription factors Grhl2/3, Pax3, Cdx2 and Zic2. More recently, biomechanical inputs into neural tube morphogenesis have also been identified. Here, we review these cellular, molecular and biomechanical mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, based on studies of various vertebrate species, focusing on the most recent advances in the field. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. A model for integrating elementary neural functions into delayed-response behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Gisiger

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that various cortical regions can implement a wide array of neural processes, yet the mechanisms which integrate these processes into behavior-producing, brain-scale activity remain elusive. We propose that an important role in this respect might be played by executive structures controlling the traffic of information between the cortical regions involved. To illustrate this hypothesis, we present a neural network model comprising a set of interconnected structures harboring stimulus-related activity (visual representation, working memory, and planning, and a group of executive units with task-related activity patterns that manage the information flowing between them. The resulting dynamics allows the network to perform the dual task of either retaining an image during a delay (delayed-matching to sample task, or recalling from this image another one that has been associated with it during training (delayed-pair association task. The model reproduces behavioral and electrophysiological data gathered on the inferior temporal and prefrontal cortices of primates performing these same tasks. It also makes predictions on how neural activity coding for the recall of the image associated with the sample emerges and becomes prospective during the training phase. The network dynamics proves to be very stable against perturbations, and it exhibits signs of scale-invariant organization and cooperativity. The present network represents a possible neural implementation for active, top-down, prospective memory retrieval in primates. The model suggests that brain activity leading to performance of cognitive tasks might be organized in modular fashion, simple neural functions becoming integrated into more complex behavior by executive structures harbored in prefrontal cortex and/or basal ganglia.

  10. Anger under control: neural correlates of frustration as a function of trait aggression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Pawliczek

    Full Text Available Antisocial behavior and aggression are prominent symptoms in several psychiatric disorders including antisocial personality disorder. An established precursor to aggression is a frustrating event, which can elicit anger or exasperation, thereby prompting aggressive responses. While some studies have investigated the neural correlates of frustration and aggression, examination of their relation to trait aggression in healthy populations are rare. Based on a screening of 550 males, we formed two extreme groups, one including individuals reporting high (n=21 and one reporting low (n=18 trait aggression. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI at 3T, all participants were put through a frustration task comprising unsolvable anagrams of German nouns. Despite similar behavioral performance, males with high trait aggression reported higher ratings of negative affect and anger after the frustration task. Moreover, they showed relatively decreased activation in the frontal brain regions and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC as well as relatively less amygdala activation in response to frustration. Our findings indicate distinct frontal and limbic processing mechanisms following frustration modulated by trait aggression. In response to a frustrating event, HA individuals show some of the personality characteristics and neural processing patterns observed in abnormally aggressive populations. Highlighting the impact of aggressive traits on the behavioral and neural responses to frustration in non-psychiatric extreme groups can facilitate further characterization of neural dysfunctions underlying psychiatric disorders that involve abnormal frustration processing and aggression.

  11. Perspectives of TRPV1 Function on the Neurogenesis and Neural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Barrantes, R; Cordova, C; Poblete, H;