WorldWideScience

Sample records for neural probe fabrication

  1. Fabrication and Microassembly of a mm-Sized Floating Probe for a Distributed Wireless Neural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyungwoo Yeon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new class of wireless neural interfaces is under development in the form of tens to hundreds of mm-sized untethered implants, distributed across the target brain region(s. Unlike traditional interfaces that are tethered to a centralized control unit and suffer from micromotions that may damage the surrounding neural tissue, the new free-floating wireless implantable neural recording (FF-WINeR probes will be stand-alone, directly communicating with an external interrogator. Towards development of the FF-WINeR, in this paper we describe the micromachining, microassembly, and hermetic packaging of 1-mm3 passive probes, each of which consists of a thinned micromachined silicon die with a centered Ø(diameter 130 μm through-hole, an Ø81 μm sharpened tungsten electrode, a 7-turn gold wire-wound coil wrapped around the die, two 0201 surface mount capacitors on the die, and parylene-C/Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS coating. The fabricated passive probe is tested under a 3-coil inductive link to evaluate power transfer efficiency (PTE and power delivered to a load (PDL for feasibility assessment. The minimum PTE/PDL at 137 MHz were 0.76%/240 μW and 0.6%/191 μW in the air and lamb head medium, respectively, with coil separation of 2.8 cm and 9 kΩ receiver (Rx loading. Six hermetically sealed probes went through wireless hermeticity testing, using a 2-coil inductive link under accelerated lifetime testing condition of 85 °C, 1 atm, and 100%RH. The mean-time-to-failure (MTTF of the probes at 37 °C is extrapolated to be 28.7 years, which is over their lifetime.

  2. Novel four-sided neural probe fabricated by a thermal lamination process of polymer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soowon; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Joonsoo; Gwon, Tae Mok; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kim, Sung June

    2017-02-15

    Ideally, neural probes should have channels with a three-dimensional (3-D) configuration to record the activities of 3-D neural circuits. Many types of 3-D neural probes have been developed; however, most of them were designed as an array of multiple shanks with electrodes located along one side of the shanks. We developed a novel liquid crystal polymer (LCP)-based neural probe with four-sided electrodes. This probe has electrodes on four sides of the shank, i.e., the front, back and two sidewalls. To generate the proposed configuration of the electrodes, we used a thermal lamination process involving LCP films and laser micromachining. The proposed novel four-sided neural probe, was used to successfully perform in vivo multichannel neural recording in the mouse primary somatosensory cortex. The multichannel neural recording showed that the proposed four-sided neural probe can record spiking activities from a more diverse neuronal population than single-sided probes. This was confirmed by a pairwise Pearson correlation coefficient (Pearson's r) analysis and a cross-correlation analysis. The developed four-sided neural probe can be used to record various signals from a complex neural network. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A transfer process to fabricate ultra-compliant neural probes in dissolvable needles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Xiao Chuan; Khilwani, Rakesh; Forssell, Mats; Burak Ozdoganlar, O.; Fedder, Gary K.

    2017-03-01

    A fabrication approach for ultra-miniature ultra-compliant neural probes with parylene-C insulation that are embedded in biodissolvable insertion needles was previously established by the authors. However, that approach required application of a peeling process to release the probe-needle assembly from its handle wafer. The use of thermal annealing in vacuum to improve encapsulation properties of parylene-C results in increased adhesion to the substrate that undermines the peeling process. In this paper, we introduce a transfer process step that eliminates the peeling process and allows the potential use of a wide range of sacrificial release materials. The transfer step increases the versatility of the overall fabrication approach since it allows the integration of insertion needle and sacrificial release materials that otherwise would not have been compatible with the high-temperature annealing. Several sacrificial release materials, including photoresist, polydimethylsiloxane, mounting adhesive, and liquid wax, are investigated and characterized for suitability in the transfer process. Considering compatibility with the biodissolvable needle attachment, a liquid wax is identified to be an effective material because of its strong adhesion to relevant surfaces, its ability to be spin coated, and its dissolvability in isopropyl alcohol.

  4. NeuroMEMS: Neural Probe Microtechnologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Musallam

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural probe technologies have already had a significant positive effect on our understanding of the brain by revealing the functioning of networks of biological neurons. Probes are implanted in different areas of the brain to record and/or stimulate specific sites in the brain. Neural probes are currently used in many clinical settings for diagnosis of brain diseases such as seizers, epilepsy, migraine, Alzheimer’s, and dementia. We find these devices assisting paralyzed patients by allowing them to operate computers or robots using their neural activity. In recent years, probe technologies were assisted by rapid advancements in microfabrication and microelectronic technologies and thus are enabling highly functional and robust neural probes which are opening new and exciting avenues in neural sciences and brain machine interfaces. With a wide variety of probes that have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date, this review aims to provide an overview of the advances and recent progress in the microfabrication techniques of neural probes. In addition, we aim to highlight the challenges faced in developing and implementing ultralong multi-site recording probes that are needed to monitor neural activity from deeper regions in the brain. Finally, we review techniques that can improve the biocompatibility of the neural probes to minimize the immune response and encourage neural growth around the electrodes for long term implantation studies.

  5. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  6. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    Chronically implanted neural electrode arrays have the potential to be used as neural prostheses in patients with various neurological disorders. While these electrodes perform well in acute recordings, they often fail to function reliably in clinically relevant chronic settings because of glial encapsulation and the loss of neurons. Surface modification of these implants may provide a means of improving their biocompatibility and integration within host brain tissue. The authors proposed a method of improving the brain-implant interface by seeding the implant's surface with a layer of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from adult murine subependyma. Neural progenitor cells may reduce the foreign body reaction by presenting a tissue-friendly surface and repair implant-induced injury and inflammation by releasing neurotrophic factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the growth and differentiation of NPCs on laminin-immobilized probe surfaces and explored the potential impact on transplant survival of these cells. Laminin protein was successfully immobilized on the silicon surface via covalent binding using silane chemistry. The growth, adhesion, and differentiation of NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) on laminin-modified silicon surfaces were characterized in vitro by using immunocytochemical techniques. Shear forces were applied to NPC cultures in growth medium to evaluate their shearing properties. In addition, neural probes seeded with GFP-labeled NPCs cultured in growth medium for 14 days were implanted in murine cortex. The authors assessed the adhesion properties of these cells during implantation conditions. Moreover, the tissue response around NPC-seeded implants was observed after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Significantly improved NPC attachment and growth was found on the laminin-immobilized surface compared with an unmodified control before and after shear force application. The NPCs grown on the laminin-immobilized surface

  7. Fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jan Pihl; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Ole

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a method for fabrication of an all-metal atomic force microscope probe (tip, cantilever and support) for optical read-out, using a combination of silicon micro-machining and electroforming. The paper describes the entire fabrication process for a nickel AFM-probe. In addition...

  8. Photosensitive-polyimide based method for fabricating various neural electrode architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yasuhiro X.; Furukawa, Shigeto; Samejima, Kazuyuki; Hironaka, Naoyuki; Kashino, Makio

    2012-01-01

    An extensive photosensitive-polyimide (PSPI)-based method for designing and fabricating various neural electrode architectures was developed. The method aims to broaden the design flexibility and expand the fabrication capability for neural electrodes to improve the quality of recorded signals and integrate other functions. After characterizing PSPI's properties for micromachining processes, we successfully designed and fabricated various neural electrodes even on a non-flat substrate using only one PSPI as an insulation material and without the time-consuming dry etching processes. The fabricated neural electrodes were an electrocorticogram (ECoG) electrode, a mesh intracortical electrode with a unique lattice-like mesh structure to fixate neural tissue, and a guide cannula electrode with recording microelectrodes placed on the curved surface of a guide cannula as a microdialysis probe. In vivo neural recordings using anesthetized rats demonstrated that these electrodes can be used to record neural activities repeatedly without any breakage and mechanical failures, which potentially promises stable recordings for long periods of time. These successes make us believe that this PSPI-based fabrication is a powerful method, permitting flexible design, and easy optimization of electrode architectures for a variety of electrophysiological experimental research with improved neural recording performance. PMID:22719725

  9. Application of the Wire Bonding Technology to a Flexible Neural Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Koichi; Nakanishi, Motofumi; Makikawa, Masaaki; Asajima, Syuzo; Konishi, Satoshi

    This paper proposes a novel neural probe using flexible metal wire for wire bonding on LSI chip. Wire bonding technology can provide a number of flexible wire arrays. The proposed neural probe is used for a nerve interface for functional electric stimulation (FES) technology which assists the paralysis of living body function by a spinal cord injury. The flexibility of probe will provide low invasive and safe neural interfaces for the nerve tissue from a long term view. We employ a combination of wire bonding and laser machining for the fabrication of aligned flexible probes. Aligned bonded flexible metal wires on electrodes are converted to probe arrays by cutting the bridge between electrodes. Typical dimension of a bonding wire is several tens μm in diameter and is suitable for neural probe to be inserted into nerve bundles. Needle shape is formed by electro-polishing of cut edge. Proposed method can be benefited by advantages of wire bonding as the widespread technology in electronics industry. Developed flexible neural probe based on the proposed technology is estimated as a nerve interface by inserting to a sciatic nerve of a rat.

  10. Braided Multi-Electrode Probes (BMEPs) for Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyo

    Although clinical use of invasive neural interfaces is very limited, due to safety and reliability concerns, the potential benefits of their use in brain machine interfaces (BMIs) seem promising and so they have been widely used in the research field. Microelectrodes as invasive neural interfaces are the core tool to record neural activities and their failure is a critical issue for BMI systems. Possible sources of this failure are neural tissue motions and their interactions with stiff electrode arrays or probes fixed to the skull. To overcome these tissue motion problems, we have developed novel braided multi-electrode probes (BMEPs). By interweaving ultra-fine wires into a tubular braid structure, we obtained a highly flexible multi-electrode probe. In this thesis we described BMEP designs and how to fabricate BMEPs, and explore experiments to show the advantages of BMEPs through a mechanical compliance comparison and a chronic immunohistological comparison with single 50microm nichrome wires used as a reference electrode type. Results from the mechanical compliance test showed that the bodies of BMEPs have 4 to 21 times higher compliance than the single 50microm wire and the tethers of BMEPs were 6 to 96 times higher compliance, depending on combinations of the wire size (9.6microm or 12.7microm), the wire numbers (12 or 24), and the length of tether (3, 5 or 10 mm). Results from the immunohistological comparison showed that both BMEPs and 50microm wires anchored to the skull caused stronger tissue reactions than unanchored BMEPs and 50microm wires, and 50microm wires caused stronger tissue reactions than BMEPs. In in-vivo tests with BMEPs, we succeeded in chronic recordings from the spinal cord of freely jumping frogs and in acute recordings from the spinal cord of decerebrate rats during air stepping which was evoked by mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) stimulation. This technology may provide a stable and reliable neural interface to spinal cord

  11. Challenges of scanning hall microscopy using batch fabricated probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatakeyama, Kodai

    2016-01-01

    Scanning Hall probe microscopy is a widely used technique for quantitative high resolution imaging of magnetic stray fields. Up to now probes with nanometer spatial resolution have only been realized by electron beam lithography, which is a slow and expensive fabrication technique. In this thesis,

  12. Neural engineering from advanced biomaterials to 3D fabrication techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, David

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the principles of advanced 3D fabrication techniques, stem cells and biomaterials for neural engineering. Renowned contributors cover topics such as neural tissue regeneration, peripheral and central nervous system repair, brain-machine interfaces and in vitro nervous system modeling. Within these areas, focus remains on exciting and emerging technologies such as highly developed neuroprostheses and the communication channels between the brain and prostheses, enabling technologies that are beneficial for development of therapeutic interventions, advanced fabrication techniques such as 3D bioprinting, photolithography, microfluidics, and subtractive fabrication, and the engineering of implantable neural grafts. There is a strong focus on stem cells and 3D bioprinting technologies throughout the book, including working with embryonic, fetal, neonatal, and adult stem cells and a variety of sophisticated 3D bioprinting methods for neural engineering applications. There is also a strong focus on b...

  13. Fabric Defect Detection Using Local Homogeneity Analysis and Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rebhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the textile manufacturing industry, fabric defect detection becomes a necessary and essential step in quality control. The investment in this field is more than economical when reduction in labor cost and associated benefits are considered. Moreover, the development of a wholly automated inspection system requires efficient and robust algorithms. To overcome this problem, in this paper, we present a new fabric defect detection scheme which uses the local homogeneity and neural network. Its first step consists in computing a new homogeneity image denoted as H-image. The second step is devoted to the application of the discrete cosine transform (DCT to the H-image and the extraction of different representative energy features of each DCT block. These energy features are used by the back-propagation neural network to judge the existence of fabric defect. Simulations on different fabric images and different defect aspects show that the proposed method achieves an average accuracy of 97.35%.

  14. Device Fabrication and Probing of Discrete Carbon Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-05-06

    Device fabrication on multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using electrical beam lithography (EBL), electron beam induced deposition (EBID), ion beam induced deposition (IBID) methods was carried out, followed by device electrical characterization using a conventional probe station. A four-probe configuration was utilized to measure accurately the electrical resistivity of MWCNTs with similar results obtained from devices fabricated by different methods. In order to reduce the contact resistance of the beam deposited platinum electrodes, single step vacuum thermal annealing was performed. Microscopy and spectroscopy were carried out on the beam deposited electrodes to follow the structural and chemical changes occurring during the vacuum thermal annealing. For the first time, a core-shell type structure was identified on EBID Pt and IBID Pt annealed electrodes and analogous free standing nanorods previously exposed to high temperature. We believe this observation has important implications for transport properties studies of carbon materials. Apart from that, contamination of carbon nanostructure, originating from the device fabrication methods, was also studied. Finally, based on the observations of faster processing time together with higher yield and flexibility for device preparation, we investigated EBID to fabricate devices for other discrete carbon nanostructures.

  15. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Shreiber, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (probe length were the most important features in influencing insertion potential. The model also revealed the effects of manufacturing flaws on insertion potential. PMID:26959021

  16. Development of a stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposite toward biologically optimized, MEMS-based neural probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A. E.; Capadona, J. R.; Shanmuganathan, K.; Hsu, L.; Rowan, S. J.; Weder, C.; Tyler, D. J.; Zorman, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the development of micromachining processes and mechanical evaluation of a stimuli-responsive, mechanically dynamic polymer nanocomposite for biomedical microsystems. This nanocomposite consists of a cellulose nanofiber network encased in a polyvinyl acetate matrix. Micromachined tensile testing structures fabricated from the nanocomposite displayed a reversible and switchable stiffness comparable to bulk samples, with a Young's modulus of 3420 MPa when dry, reducing to ~20 MPa when wet, and a stiff-to-flexible transition time of ~300 s. This mechanically dynamic behavior is particularly attractive for the development of adaptive intracortical probes that are sufficiently stiff to insert into the brain without buckling, but become highly compliant upon insertion. Along these lines, a micromachined neural probe incorporating parylene insulating/moisture barrier layers and Ti/Au electrodes was fabricated from the nanocomposite using a fabrication process designed specifically for this chemical- and temperature-sensitive material. It was found that the parylene layers only slightly increased the stiffness of the probe in the wet state in spite of its much higher Young's modulus. Furthermore, the Ti/Au electrodes exhibited impedance comparable to Au electrodes on conventional substrates. Swelling of the nanocomposite was highly anisotropic favoring the thickness dimension by a factor of 8 to 12, leading to excellent adhesion between the nanocomposite and parylene layers and no discernable deformation of the probes when deployed in deionized water.

  17. Simultaneous in vivo recording of local brain temperature and electrophysiological signals with a novel neural probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Z.; Csernai, M.; Kocsis, K.; Horváth, Á. C.; Pongrácz, A.; Barthó, P.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Temperature is an important factor for neural function both in normal and pathological states, nevertheless, simultaneous monitoring of local brain temperature and neuronal activity has not yet been undertaken. Approach. In our work, we propose an implantable, calibrated multimodal biosensor that facilitates the complex investigation of thermal changes in both cortical and deep brain regions, which records multiunit activity of neuronal populations in mice. The fabricated neural probe contains four electrical recording sites and a platinum temperature sensor filament integrated on the same probe shaft within a distance of 30 µm from the closest recording site. The feasibility of the simultaneous functionality is presented in in vivo studies. The probe was tested in the thalamus of anesthetized mice while manipulating the core temperature of the animals. Main results. We obtained multiunit and local field recordings along with measurement of local brain temperature with accuracy of 0.14 °C. Brain temperature generally followed core body temperature, but also showed superimposed fluctuations corresponding to epochs of increased local neural activity. With the application of higher currents, we increased the local temperature by several degrees without observable tissue damage between 34-39 °C. Significance. The proposed multifunctional tool is envisioned to broaden our knowledge on the role of the thermal modulation of neuronal activity in both cortical and deeper brain regions.

  18. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Polanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes.

  19. Time Multiplexed Active Neural Probe with 1356 Parallel Recording Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan C. Raducanu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a high electrode density and high channel count CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor active neural probe containing 1344 neuron sized recording pixels (20 µm × 20 µm and 12 reference pixels (20 µm × 80 µm, densely packed on a 50 µm thick, 100 µm wide, and 8 mm long shank. The active electrodes or pixels consist of dedicated in-situ circuits for signal source amplification, which are directly located under each electrode. The probe supports the simultaneous recording of all 1356 electrodes with sufficient signal to noise ratio for typical neuroscience applications. For enhanced performance, further noise reduction can be achieved while using half of the electrodes (678. Both of these numbers considerably surpass the state-of-the art active neural probes in both electrode count and number of recording channels. The measured input referred noise in the action potential band is 12.4 µVrms, while using 678 electrodes, with just 3 µW power dissipation per pixel and 45 µW per read-out channel (including data transmission.

  20. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error. The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating

  1. Cavitation controlled acoustic probe for fabric spot cleaning and moisture monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw; Chien, Hual-Te; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for monitoring a fabric. An acoustic probe generates acoustic waves relative to the fabric. An acoustic sensor, such as an accelerometer is coupled to the acoustic probe for generating a signal representative of cavitation activity in the fabric. The generated cavitation activity representative signal is processed to indicate moisture content of the fabric. A feature of the invention is a feedback control signal is generated responsive to the generated cavitation activity representative signal. The feedback control signal can be used to control the energy level of the generated acoustic waves and to control the application of a cleaning solution to the fabric.

  2. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangang Du

    Full Text Available Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  3. Multiplexed, high density electrophysiology with nanofabricated neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiangang; Blanche, Timothy J; Harrison, Reid R; Lester, Henry A; Masmanidis, Sotiris C

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular electrode arrays can reveal the neuronal network correlates of behavior with single-cell, single-spike, and sub-millisecond resolution. However, implantable electrodes are inherently invasive, and efforts to scale up the number and density of recording sites must compromise on device size in order to connect the electrodes. Here, we report on silicon-based neural probes employing nanofabricated, high-density electrical leads. Furthermore, we address the challenge of reading out multichannel data with an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) performing signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and multiplexing functions. We demonstrate high spatial resolution extracellular measurements with a fully integrated, low noise 64-channel system weighing just 330 mg. The on-chip multiplexers make possible recordings with substantially fewer external wires than the number of input channels. By combining nanofabricated probes with ASICs we have implemented a system for performing large-scale, high-density electrophysiology in small, freely behaving animals that is both minimally invasive and highly scalable.

  4. Batch fabrication of scanning microscopy probes for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarajlic, Edin; Vermeer, Rolf; Delalande, M.Y.; Siekman, Martin Herman; Huijink, R.; Fujita, H.; Abelmann, Leon

    2010-01-01

    We present a process for batch fabrication of a novel scanning microscopy probe for thermal and magnetic imaging using standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four freestanding silicon

  5. Application of focused ion beam for the fabrication of AFM probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiytsev, A. S.; Lisitsyn, S. A.; Smirnov, V. A.; Fedotov, A. A.; Varzarev, Yu N.

    2017-10-01

    The results of an experimental study of the probe tips fabrication for critical-dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) using the focused ion beam (FIB) induced deposition are presented. Methods of the FIB-induced deposition of tungsten and carbon onto the tip of an AFM probe are studied. Based on the results obtained in the study, probes for the CD-AFM technique with a tip height about 1 μm and radius of 20 nm were created. The formation of CD-AFM probes by FIB-induced deposition allows creating a high efficiency tool for nanotechnology and nanodiagnostics. The use of modified cantilevers allows minimizing the artefacts of AFM images and increasing the accuracy of the relief measurement. The obtained results can be used for fabrication of AFM probes for express monitoring of the technological process in the manufacturing of the elements for micro- and nanoelectronics.

  6. Neural Implants, Packaging for Biocompatible Implants, and Improving Fabricated Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agger, Elizabeth Rose

    We have completed the circuit design and packaging procedure for an NIH-funded neural implant, called a MOTE (Microscale Optoelectronically Transduced Electrode). Neural recording implants for mice have greatly advanced neuroscience, but they are often damaging and limited in their recording location. This project will result in free-floating implants that cause less damage, provide rapid electronic recording, and increase range of recording across the cortex. A low-power silicon IC containing amplification and digitization sub-circuits is powered by a dual-function gallium arsenide photovoltaic and LED. Through thin film deposition, photolithography, and chemical and physical etching, the Molnar Group and the McEuen Group (Applied and Engineering Physics department) will package the IC and LED into a biocompatible implant approximately 100microm3. The IC and LED are complete and we have begun refining this packaging procedure in the Cornell NanoScale Science & Technology Facility. ICs with 3D time-resolved imaging capabilities can image microorganisms and other biological samples given proper packaging. A portable, flat, easily manufactured package would enable scientists to place biological samples on slides directly above the Molnar group's imaging chip. We have developed a packaging procedure using laser cutting, photolithography, epoxies, and metal deposition. Using a flip-chip method, we verified the process by aligning and adhering a sample chip to a holder wafer. In the CNF, we have worked on a long-term metal-insulator-metal (MIM) capacitor characterization project. Former Fellow and continuing CNF user Kwame Amponsah developed the original procedure for the capacitor fabrication, and another former fellow, Jonilyn Longenecker, revised the procedure and began the arduous process of characterization. MIM caps are useful to clean room users as testing devices to verify electronic characteristics of their active circuitry. This project's objective is to

  7. Probabilistic and Other Neural Nets in Multi-Hole Probe Calibration and Flow Angularity Pattern Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Subbiah; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Noever, David

    1998-01-01

    The use of probabilistic (PNN) and multilayer feed forward (MLFNN) neural networks are investigated for calibration of multi-hole pressure probes and the prediction of associated flow angularity patterns in test flow fields. Both types of networks are studied in detail for their calibration and prediction characteristics. The current formalism can be applied to any multi-hole probe, however the test results for the most commonly used five-hole Cone and Prism probe types alone are reported in this article.

  8. Probes for multidimensional nanospectroscopic imaging and methods of fabrication thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Cabrini, Stefano; Bao, Wei; Melli, Mauro; Yablonovitch, Eli; Schuck, Peter J

    2015-03-17

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to probes for multidimensional nanospectroscopic imaging. In one aspect, a method includes providing a transparent tip comprising a dielectric material. A four-sided pyramidal-shaped structure is formed at an apex of the transparent tip using a focused ion beam. Metal layers are deposited over two opposing sides of the four-sided pyramidal-shaped structure.

  9. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  10. 3D probe array integrated with a front-end 100-channel neural recording ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-Yuan; Yao, Lei; Tan, Kwan Ling; Lim, Ruiqi; Li, Peng; Chen, Weiguo

    2014-12-01

    Brain-machine interface technology can improve the lives of spinal cord injury victims and amputees. A neural interface system, consisting of a 3D probe array and a custom low-power (1 mW) 100-channel (100-ch) neural recording application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), was designed and implemented to monitor neural activity. In this study, a microassembly 3D probe array method using a novel lead transfer technique was proposed to overcome the bonding plane mismatch encountered during orthogonal assembly. The proposed lead transfer technique can be completed using standard micromachining and packaging processes. The ASIC can be stacking-integrated with the probe array, minimizing the form factor of the assembled module. To minimize trauma to brain cells, the profile of the integrated probe array was controlled within 730 μm. The average impedance of the assembled probe was approximately 0.55 MΩ at 1 kHz. To verify the functionality of the integrated neural probe array, bench-top signal acquisitions were performed and discussed.

  11. Lymphocytes as a neural probe : potential for studying psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladkevich, A; Kauffman, HF; Korf, J

    There is an increasing body evidence pointing to a close integration between the central nervous system (CNS) and immunological functions with lymphocytes playing therein a central role. The authors provide arguments to consider blood lymphocytes as a convenient probe of-an albeit-limited number of

  12. Probing many-body localization with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Frank; Regnault, Nicolas; Neupert, Titus

    2017-06-01

    We show that a simple artificial neural network trained on entanglement spectra of individual states of a many-body quantum system can be used to determine the transition between a many-body localized and a thermalizing regime. Specifically, we study the Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain in a random external field. We employ a multilayer perceptron with a single hidden layer, which is trained on labeled entanglement spectra pertaining to the fully localized and fully thermal regimes. We then apply this network to classify spectra belonging to states in the transition region. For training, we use a cost function that contains, in addition to the usual error and regularization parts, a term that favors a confident classification of the transition region states. The resulting phase diagram is in good agreement with the one obtained by more conventional methods and can be computed for small systems. In particular, the neural network outperforms conventional methods in classifying individual eigenstates pertaining to a single disorder realization. It allows us to map out the structure of these eigenstates across the transition with spatial resolution. Furthermore, we analyze the network operation using the dreaming technique to show that the neural network correctly learns by itself the power-law structure of the entanglement spectra in the many-body localized regime.

  13. Neural Probes with Integrated Temperature Sensors for Monitoring Retina and Brain Implantation and Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiaqi; Xie, Hui; Chung, Tsing; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Pang, Stella W

    2017-09-01

    Gold (Au) resistive temperature sensors were integrated on flexible polyimide-based neural probes to monitor temperature changes during neural probe implantation and stimulation. Temperature changes were measured as neural probes were implanted to infer the positions of the neural probes, and as the retina or the deep brain region was stimulated electrically. The temperature sensor consisted of a serpentine Au resistor and surrounded by four Au electrodes with 200 and [Formula: see text] diameter (dia.). The Au temperature sensors had temperature coefficient of 0.32%, and they were biocompatible and small in size. In vivo measurements of temperature changes during implantation and stimulation were carried out in the retina and deep brain region in rats. The desired implantation position was reached when temperature measured by the sensor increased to the calibrated level and became stable. There was no temperature increase when low level stimulation current of 8 and [Formula: see text] each for the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, were applied. When higher level stimulation current of 100 and [Formula: see text] each were applied to the two 200- and 400- [Formula: see text]-dia. electrodes, respectively, maximum temperature increases of 1.2 °C in retina and 1 °C in deep brain region were found.

  14. Vacuum-actuated percutaneous insertion/implantation tool for flexible neural probes and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Heeral; Bennett, William J.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Tooker, Angela C.

    2017-03-07

    A flexible device insertion tool including an elongated stiffener with one or more suction ports, and a vacuum connector for interfacing the stiffener to a vacuum source, for attaching the flexible device such as a flexible neural probe to the stiffener during insertion by a suction force exerted through the suction ports to, and to release the flexible device by removing the suction force.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of probes for combined scanning electrochemical/optical microscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngmi; Bard, Allen J

    2002-08-01

    A technique that combines scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and optical microscopy (OM) was implemented with a new probe tip. The tip for scanning electrochemicaVoptical microscopy (SECM/OM) was constructed by insulating a typical gold-coated near-field scanning optical microscopy tip using electrophoretic anodic paint. Once fabricated, the tip was characterized by steady-state cyclic voltammetry, as well as optical and electrochemical approach experiments. This tip generated a stable steady-state current and well-defined SECM approach curves for both conductive and insulating substrates. Durable tips whose geometry was a ring with < 1 microm as outer ring radius could be consistently fabricated. Simultaneous electrochemical and optical images of an interdigitated array electrode were obtained with a resolution on the micrometer scale, demonstrating good performance of the tip as both an optical and an electrochemical probe for imaging microstructures. The SECM feedback current measurements were successfully employed to determine tip-substrate distances for imaging.

  16. Intracellular Neural Recording with Pure Carbon Nanotube Probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inho Yoon

    Full Text Available The computational complexity of the brain depends in part on a neuron's capacity to integrate electrochemical information from vast numbers of synaptic inputs. The measurements of synaptic activity that are crucial for mechanistic understanding of brain function are also challenging, because they require intracellular recording methods to detect and resolve millivolt- scale synaptic potentials. Although glass electrodes are widely used for intracellular recordings, novel electrodes with superior mechanical and electrical properties are desirable, because they could extend intracellular recording methods to challenging environments, including long term recordings in freely behaving animals. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs can theoretically deliver this advance, but the difficulty of assembling CNTs has limited their application to a coating layer or assembly on a planar substrate, resulting in electrodes that are more suitable for in vivo extracellular recording or extracellular recording from isolated cells. Here we show that a novel, yet remarkably simple, millimeter-long electrode with a sub-micron tip, fabricated from self-entangled pure CNTs can be used to obtain intracellular and extracellular recordings from vertebrate neurons in vitro and in vivo. This fabrication technology provides a new method for assembling intracellular electrodes from CNTs, affording a promising opportunity to harness nanotechnology for neuroscience applications.

  17. Implantation of Neural Probes in the Brain Elicits Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evon S. Ereifej

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Clinical implantation of intracortical microelectrodes has been hindered, at least in part, by the perpetual inflammatory response occurring after device implantation. The neuroinflammatory response observed after device implantation has been correlated to oxidative stress that occurs due to neurological injury and disease. However, there has yet to be a definitive link of oxidative stress to intracortical microelectrode implantation. Thus, the objective of this study is to give direct evidence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation. This study also aims to identify potential molecular targets to attenuate oxidative stress observed postimplantation. Here, we implanted adult rats with silicon non-functional microelectrode probes for 4 weeks and compared the oxidative stress response to no surgery controls through postmortem gene expression analysis and qualitative histological observation of oxidative stress markers. Gene expression analysis results at 4 weeks postimplantation indicated that EH domain-containing 2, prion protein gene (Prnp, and Stearoyl-Coenzyme A desaturase 1 (Scd1 were all significantly higher for animals implanted with intracortical microelectrode probes compared to no surgery control animals. To the contrary, NADPH oxidase activator 1 (Noxa1 relative gene expression was significantly lower for implanted animals compared to no surgery control animals. Histological observation of oxidative stress showed an increased expression of oxidized proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids concentrated around the implant site. Collectively, our results reveal there is a presence of oxidative stress following intracortical microelectrode implantation compared to no surgery controls. Further investigation targeting these specific oxidative stress linked genes could be beneficial to understanding potential mechanisms and downstream therapeutics that can be utilized to reduce oxidative stress-mediated damage

  18. Flexible deep brain neural probes based on a parylene tube structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Kim, Eric; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Jinsheng; Xu, Yong

    2018-01-01

    Most microfabricated neural probes have limited shank length, which prevents them from reaching many deep brain structures. This paper reports deep brain neural probes with ultra-long penetrating shanks based on a simple but novel parylene tube structure. The mechanical strength of the parylene tube shank is temporarily enhanced during implantation by inserting a metal wire. The metal wire can be removed after implantation, making the implanted probe very flexible and thus minimizing the stress caused by micromotions of brain tissues. Optogenetic stimulation and chemical delivery capabilities can be potentially integrated by taking advantage of the tube structure. Single-shank prototypes with a shank length of 18.2 mm have been developed. The microfabrication process comprises of deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) of silicon, parylene conformal coating/refilling, and XeF2 isotropic silicon etching. In addition to bench-top insertion characterization, the functionality of developed probes has been preliminarily demonstrated by implanting into the amygdala of a rat and recording neural signals.

  19. Identification of Industrial Furnace Temperature for Sintering Process in Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Using NARX Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Sutarya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear system identification is becoming an important tool which can be used to improve control performance and achieve robust fault-tolerant behavior. Among the different nonlinear identification techniques, methods based on neural network model are gradually becoming established not only in the academia, but also in industrial application. An identification scheme of nonlinear systems for sintering furnace temperature in nuclear fuel fabrication using neural network autoregressive with exogenous inputs (NNARX model investigated in this paper. The main contribution of this paper is to identify the appropriate model and structure to be applied in control temperature in the sintering process in nuclear fuel fabrication, that is, a nonlinear dynamical system. Satisfactory agreement between identified and experimental data is found with normalized sum square error 1.9e-03 for heating step and 6.3859e-08 for soaking step. That result shows the model successfully predict the evolution of the temperature in the furnace.

  20. Towards the fabrication of artificial 3D microdevices for neural cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew A; Ortega, Ílida; Kelly, Stephen; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2015-04-01

    This work reports first steps towards the development of artificial neural stem cell microenvironments for the control and assessment of neural stem cell behaviour. Stem cells have been shown to be found in specific, supportive microenvironments (niches) and are believed to play an important role in tissue regeneration mechanisms. These environments are intricate spaces with chemical and biological features. Here we present work towards the development of physically defined microdevices in which neural and neural stem cells can be studied in 3-dimensions. We have approached this challenge by creating bespoke, microstructured polymer environments using both 2-photon polymerisation and soft lithography techniques. Specifically, we have designed and fabricated biodegradable microwell-shaped devices using an in house synthetized polymer (4-arm photocurable poly-lactid acid) on a bespoke 2-photon polymerisation (2PP) set-up. We have studied swelling and degradation of the constructs as well as biocompatibility. Moreover, we have explored the potential of these constructs as artificial neural cell substrates by culturing NG108-15 cells (mouse neuroblastoma; rat glioma hybrid) and human neural progenitor cells on the microstructures. Finally, we have studied the effects of our artificial microenvironments upon neurite length and cell density.

  1. Individual carbon nanotube probes and field emitters fabrication and their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Guangyu

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in 1999, they have attracted much attention due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties and potential applications. Yet their nanosize makes the study of individual CNTs easier said than done. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with nanotube cores have been synthesized with conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The single multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) sticks out as a tip of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up the individual CNT tips, focused ion beam (FIB) technique is applied to cut and adhere the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first adhered on a micro-manipulator with the FIB welding function. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on any geometry of solid samples such as conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) silicon tips. The procedures developed for the FIB assisted individual CNT tip fabrication will be described in detail. Because of their excellent electrical and stable chemical properties, individual CNTs are potential candidates as electron guns for electron based microscopes to produce highly coherent electron beams. Due to the flexibility of the FIB fabrication, the individual CNT tips can be easily fabricated on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission (FE) experimentation. Another promising application for individual CNT tips is as AFM probes. The high aspect ratio and mechanical resilience make individual CNTs ideal for scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tips. Atomic force microscopy with nanotube tips allows us to image relatively deep features of the sample surface at near nanometer resolution. Characterization of AFM with individual CNT tips and field emission properties of single CNT emitters will be studied and presented.

  2. Yarn-dyed fabric defect classification based on convolutional neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Junfeng; Dong, Amei; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Kaibing

    2017-09-01

    Considering that manual inspection of the yarn-dyed fabric can be time consuming and inefficient, we propose a yarn-dyed fabric defect classification method by using a convolutional neural network (CNN) based on a modified AlexNet. CNN shows powerful ability in performing feature extraction and fusion by simulating the learning mechanism of human brain. The local response normalization layers in AlexNet are replaced by the batch normalization layers, which can enhance both the computational efficiency and classification accuracy. In the training process of the network, the characteristics of the defect are extracted step by step and the essential features of the image can be obtained from the fusion of the edge details with several convolution operations. Then the max-pooling layers, the dropout layers, and the fully connected layers are employed in the classification model to reduce the computation cost and extract more precise features of the defective fabric. Finally, the results of the defect classification are predicted by the softmax function. The experimental results show promising performance with an acceptable average classification rate and strong robustness on yarn-dyed fabric defect classification.

  3. Measurements with fluorescent probes in primary neural cultures; improved multiwell techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Avi; Tanso, Rita

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging techniques are valuable tools for the pharmacological characterization of CNS drugs. Dissected cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) are an important model system in the study of mechanisms of excitotoxicity, glutamate receptors and transporters. Widely applied techniques use fluorescent probes loaded in neural cells cultured on glass supports. CGN, however, require at least 7 days for differentiation and over time cells tend to cluster and loose adherence to the glass substrate. This problem is accentuated in small wells (e.g. 96-well plates). CGN were grown on large coverslips (60 x 24 mm) and measurements made with a designed mountable multiwell in 48 regions on 4 coverslips at a time. The UV ratiometric probe fura-2 was used to measure glutamatergic calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) responses induced by NMDA. The IC(50) of NMDA receptor antagonists was determined from inhibition curves with 6 doses and 8 parallels per experiment. The method was validated by comparing with published data for the dose response to NMDA and glycine and IC(50) values for ion-channel block by Mg(2+) and MK-801. Resolution is enhanced with the new technique since it allows measurement of multiple doses on cells from the same batch. It has advantages to cuvette techniques because cells have intact dendritic tree and synaptic function and it is a convenient method to obtain reliable dose-response curves for NMDA channel modulators on differentiated neural cells.

  4. The Design Fabrication Installation & Evaluation of the Balance Probe Monitor for Large Centrifuges at a National Laboratory Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, Jonathan Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Balance Probe Monitors were designed, fabricated, installed, and evaluated at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the 22,600 g kg (50,000 g lb) direct drive electromotor driven large centrifuges. These centrifuges provide a high onset/decay rate g environment. The Balance Probe Monitor is physically located near a centrifuge’s Capacitance Probe, a crucial sensor for the centrifuge’s sustainability. The Balance Probe Monitor will validate operability of the centrifuge. Most importantly, it is used for triggering a kill switch under the condition that the centrifuge displacement value exceeds allowed tolerances. During operational conditions, the Capacitance Probe continuously detects the structural displacement of the centrifuge and an adjoining AccuMeasure 9000 translates this displacement into an output voltage.

  5. Optimizing the fabrication of aluminum-coated fiber probes and their application to optical near-field lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, S; Holme, NCR; Ramanujam, PS

    1998-01-01

    We report on routine fabrication of fiber probes suitable for metal coating. We have investigated how aperture sizes ranging from 75 to 300 nm can be produced using an appropriate set of pulling parameters in a combined heating/pulling process. The quality of the metal coating has been investigat...

  6. Enhanced biocompatibility of neural probes by integrating microstructures and delivering anti-inflammatory agents via microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Kim, Eric; Meggo, Anika; Gandhi, Sachin; Luo, Hao; Kallakuri, Srinivas; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Jinsheng

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Biocompatibility is a major issue for chronic neural implants, involving inflammatory and wound healing responses of neurons and glial cells. To enhance biocompatibility, we developed silicon-parylene hybrid neural probes with open architecture electrodes, microfluidic channels and a reservoir for drug delivery to suppress tissue responses. Approach. We chronically implanted our neural probes in the rat auditory cortex and investigated (1) whether open architecture electrode reduces inflammatory reaction by measuring glial responses; and (2) whether delivery of antibiotic minocycline reduces inflammatory and tissue reaction. Four weeks after implantation, immunostaining for glial fibrillary acid protein (astrocyte marker) and ionizing calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1 (macrophages/microglia cell marker) were conducted to identify immunoreactive astrocyte and microglial cells, and to determine the extent of astrocytes and microglial cell reaction/activation. A comparison was made between using traditional solid-surface electrodes and newly-designed electrodes with open architecture, as well as between deliveries of minocycline and artificial cerebral-spinal fluid diffused through microfluidic channels. Main results. The new probes with integrated micro-structures induced minimal tissue reaction compared to traditional electrodes at 4 weeks after implantation. Microcycline delivered through integrated microfluidic channels reduced tissue response as indicated by decreased microglial reaction around the neural probes implanted. Significance. The new design will help enhance the long-term stability of the implantable devices.

  7. Dimension Estimation of Rectangular Cracks Using Impedance Changes of the Eddy Current Probe with a Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Babaei

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a method for estimating the dimension of rectangular cracks is proposed. The use of Eddy current (ECnondestructive testing (NDT based on probe impedance changes on the crack regions is considered. The artificialneural network estimates the dimension of new cracks using impedance changes of the eddy current probe. Theexperimental results and finite element method (FEM results are used for training the artificial neural network. Byincreasing the number of experiments, the results of the finite element method are not necessary. The simulationresults are very promising.

  8. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Emissive Probes to Determine the Plasma Potential of the Plumes of Various Electric Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Erinna M.

    2005-01-01

    A significant problem in the use of electric thrusters in spacecraft is the formation of low-energy ions in the thruster plume. Low-energy ions are formed in the plume via random collisions between high-velocity ions ejected from the thruster and slow-moving neutral atoms of propellant effusing from the engine. The sputtering of spacecraft materials due to interactions with low-energy ions may result in erosion or contamination of the spacecraft. The trajectory of these ions is determined primarily by the plasma potential of the plume. Thus, accurate characterization of the plasma potential is essential to predicting low-energy ion contamination. Emissive probes were utilized to determine the plasma potential. When the ion and electron currents to the probe are balanced, the potential of such probes float to the plasma potential. Two emissive probes were fabricated; one utilizing a DC power supply, another utilizing a rectified AC power source. Labview programs were written to coordinate and automate probe motion in the thruster plume. Employing handshaking interaction, these motion programs were synchronized to various data acquisition programs to ensure precision and accuracy of the measurements. Comparing these experimental values to values from theoretical models will allow for a more accurate prediction of low-energy ion interaction.

  9. A Neural Network Approach for Identifying Particle Pitch Angle Distributions in Van Allen Probes Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, V. M.; Vieira, L. E. A.; Medeiros, C.; Da Silva, L. A.; Alves, L. R.; Koga, D.; Sibeck, D. G.; Walsh, B. M.; Kanekal, S. G.; Jauer, P. R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of particle pitch angle distributions (PADs) has been used as a means to comprehend a multitude of different physical mechanisms that lead to flux variations in the Van Allen belts and also to particle precipitation into the upper atmosphere. In this work we developed a neural network-based data clustering methodology that automatically identifies distinct PAD types in an unsupervised way using particle flux data. One can promptly identify and locate three well-known PAD types in both time and radial distance, namely, 90deg peaked, butterfly, and flattop distributions. In order to illustrate the applicability of our methodology, we used relativistic electron flux data from the whole month of November 2014, acquired from the Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope instrument on board the Van Allen Probes, but it is emphasized that our approach can also be used with multiplatform spacecraft data. Our PAD classification results are in reasonably good agreement with those obtained by standard statistical fitting algorithms. The proposed methodology has a potential use for Van Allen belt's monitoring.

  10. Fabrication of micropatterned hydrogels for neural culture systems using dynamic mask projection photolithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, J Lowry; Jennings, Scott R; Moore, Michael J

    2011-02-11

    Increasingly, patterned cell culture environments are becoming a relevant technique to study cellular characteristics, and many researchers believe in the need for 3D environments to represent in vitro experiments which better mimic in vivo qualities. Studies in fields such as cancer research, neural engineering, cardiac physiology, and cell-matrix interaction have shown cell behavior differs substantially between traditional monolayer cultures and 3D constructs. Hydrogels are used as 3D environments because of their variety, versatility and ability to tailor molecular composition through functionalization. Numerous techniques exist for creation of constructs as cell-supportive matrices, including electrospinning, elastomer stamps, inkjet printing, additive photopatterning, static photomask projection-lithography, and dynamic mask microstereolithography. Unfortunately, these methods involve multiple production steps and/or equipment not readily adaptable to conventional cell and tissue culture methods. The technique employed in this protocol adapts the latter two methods, using a digital micromirror device (DMD) to create dynamic photomasks for crosslinking geometrically specific poly-(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, induced through UV initiated free radical polymerization. The resulting "2.5D" structures provide a constrained 3D environment for neural growth. We employ a dual-hydrogel approach, where PEG serves as a cell-restrictive region supplying structure to an otherwise shapeless but cell-permissive self-assembling gel made from either Puramatrix or agarose. The process is a quick simple one step fabrication which is highly reproducible and easily adapted for use with conventional cell culture methods and substrates. Whole tissue explants, such as embryonic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), can be incorporated into the dual hydrogel constructs for experimental assays such as neurite outgrowth. Additionally, dissociated cells can be encapsulated in the

  11. Color matching of fabric blends: hybrid Kubelka-Munk + artificial neural network based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furferi, Rocco; Governi, Lapo; Volpe, Yary

    2016-11-01

    Color matching of fabric blends is a key issue for the textile industry, mainly due to the rising need to create high-quality products for the fashion market. The process of mixing together differently colored fibers to match a desired color is usually performed by using some historical recipes, skillfully managed by company colorists. More often than desired, the first attempt in creating a blend is not satisfactory, thus requiring the experts to spend efforts in changing the recipe with a trial-and-error process. To confront this issue, a number of computer-based methods have been proposed in the last decades, roughly classified into theoretical and artificial neural network (ANN)-based approaches. Inspired by the above literature, the present paper provides a method for accurate estimation of spectrophotometric response of a textile blend composed of differently colored fibers made of different materials. In particular, the performance of the Kubelka-Munk (K-M) theory is enhanced by introducing an artificial intelligence approach to determine a more consistent value of the nonlinear function relationship between the blend and its components. Therefore, a hybrid K-M+ANN-based method capable of modeling the color mixing mechanism is devised to predict the reflectance values of a blend.

  12. Nanoparticle-based and bioengineered probes and sensors to detect physiological and pathological biomarkers in neural cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eMaysinger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs, carbon-based structures (C-dots, graphene and nanodiamonds and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases, ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so (Galileo Galilei.

  13. Nanoparticle-Based and Bioengineered Probes and Sensors to Detect Physiological and Pathological Biomarkers in Neural Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maysinger, Dusica; Ji, Jeff; Hutter, Eliza; Cooper, Elis

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology, a rapidly evolving field, provides simple and practical tools to investigate the nervous system in health and disease. Among these tools are nanoparticle-based probes and sensors that detect biochemical and physiological properties of neurons and glia, and generate signals proportionate to physical, chemical, and/or electrical changes in these cells. In this context, quantum dots (QDs), carbon-based structures (C-dots, grapheme, and nanodiamonds) and gold nanoparticles are the most commonly used nanostructures. They can detect and measure enzymatic activities of proteases (metalloproteinases, caspases), ions, metabolites, and other biomolecules under physiological or pathological conditions in neural cells. Here, we provide some examples of nanoparticle-based and genetically engineered probes and sensors that are used to reveal changes in protease activities and calcium ion concentrations. Although significant progress in developing these tools has been made for probing neural cells, several challenges remain. We review many common hurdles in sensor development, while highlighting certain advances. In the end, we propose some future directions and ideas for developing practical tools for neural cell investigations, based on the maxim "Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so" (Galileo Galilei).

  14. Fabrication of a Highly Aligned Neural Scaffold via a Table Top Stereolithography 3D Printing and Electrospinning().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Jun; Nowicki, Margaret; Harris, Brent; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2017-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is a rapidly emerging technique in the field of tissue engineering to fabricate extremely intricate and complex biomimetic scaffolds in the range of micrometers. Such customized 3D printed constructs can be used for the regeneration of complex tissues such as cartilage, vessels, and nerves. However, the 3D printing techniques often offer limited control over the resolution and compromised mechanical properties due to short selection of printable inks. To address these limitations, we combined stereolithography and electrospinning techniques to fabricate a novel 3D biomimetic neural scaffold with a tunable porous structure and embedded aligned fibers. By employing two different types of biofabrication methods, we successfully utilized both synthetic and natural materials with varying chemical composition as bioink to enhance biocompatibilities and mechanical properties of the scaffold. The resulting microfibers composed of polycaprolactone (PCL) polymer and PCL mixed with gelatin were embedded in 3D printed hydrogel scaffold. Our results showed that 3D printed scaffolds with electrospun fibers significantly improve neural stem cell adhesion when compared to those without the fibers. Furthermore, 3D scaffolds embedded with aligned fibers showed an enhancement in cell proliferation relative to bare control scaffolds. More importantly, confocal microscopy images illustrated that the scaffold with PCL/gelatin fibers greatly increased the average neurite length and directed neurite extension of primary cortical neurons along the fiber. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to create unique 3D neural tissue constructs by combining 3D bioprinting and electrospinning techniques.

  15. Fabrication of tuning-fork based AFM and STM tungsten probe

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Falih, Hisham

    2011-12-01

    We compare the sharpness of tungsten probe tips produced by the single-step and two-step dynamic electrochemical etching processes. A small radius of curvature (RoC) of 25 nm or less was routinely obtained when the two-step electrochemical etching (TEE) process was adopted, while the smallest achievable RoC was ∼10 nm, rendering it suitable for atomic force microscopy (AFM) or scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) applications. © 2011 IEEE.

  16. Design, fabrication, integration and commissioning of an upgraded guiding probe for the VLT unit telescope 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Christoph; Hammersley, Peter; Buzzoni, Bernard; Manescau, Antonio; Arsenault, Robin; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Birkmann, Martin; Mueller, Michael; Salgado, Fernando; Guisard, Stephane; Kroedel, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    As part of the preparation for the arrival of the MUSE instrument to the VLT, it was required to adapt the hosting telescope (UT4) guide probe, to increase its back focal length. This is to allow enough space for the later deployment of the MUSE Adaptive Optics module GALACSI, in-between the telescope adapter rotator and the instrument itself. The UT guide probe is a critical component for the successful operation of the telescope, so its modification to increase the telescope's back focal length, while maintaining full compatibility with the existing operation model and other hardware, was rather demanding. The design, manufacture, assembly and test for the new supporting arm in the UT guiding probe is presented. It mixes the use of novel materials (HB-CESIC® for the mirrors substrates) and state of the art manufacturing techniques (3D printing mould production and rapid casting for the support structure), which allow producing easily a high performance subsystem. Characterization of the system prior delivery to the telescope, its integration in the UT and results after commissioning is presented. Its successful implementation has validated new manufacturing techniques that may prove very useful for future instruments development.

  17. Quantifying Aflatoxin B1 in peanut oil using fabricating fluorescence probes based on upconversion nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuicui; Li, Huanhuan; Koidis, Anastasios; Chen, Quansheng

    2016-08-01

    Rare earth doped upconversion nanoparticles convert near-infrared excitation light into visible emission light. Compared to organic fluorophores and semiconducting nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) offer high photochemical stability, sharp emission bandwidths, and large anti-Stokes shifts. Along with the significant light penetration depth and the absence of autofluorescence in biological samples under infrared excitation, these UCNPs have attracted more and more attention on toxin detection and biological labelling. Herein, the fluorescence probe based on UCNPs was developed for quantifying Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in peanut oil. Based on a specific immunity format, the detection limit for AFB1 under optimal conditions was obtained as low as 0.2 ng·ml- 1, and in the effective detection range 0.2 to 100 ng·ml- 1, good relationship between fluorescence intensity and AFB1 concentration was achieved under the linear ratios up to 0.90. Moreover, to check the feasibility of these probes on AFB1 measurements in peanut oil, recovery tests have been carried out. A good accuracy rating (93.8%) was obtained in this study. Results showed that the nanoparticles can be successfully applied for sensing AFB1 in peanut oil.

  18. Fluorescent probes as a tool for cell population tracking in spontaneously active neural networks derived from human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, M; Joki, T; Ylä-Outinen, L; Skottman, H; Narkilahti, S; Aänismaa, R

    2013-04-30

    Applications such as 3D cultures and tissue modelling require cell tracking with non-invasive methods. In this work, the suitability of two fluorescent probes, CellTracker, CT, and long chain carbocyanine dye, DiD, was investigated for long-term culturing of labeled human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural cells. We found that these dyes did not affect the cell viability. However, proliferation was decreased in DiD labeled cell population. With both dyes the labeling was stable up to 4 weeks. CT and DiD labeled cells could be co-cultured and, importantly, these mixed populations had their normal ability to form spontaneous electrical network activity. In conclusion, human neural cells can be successfully labeled with these two fluorescent probes without significantly affecting the cell characteristics. These labeled cells could be utilized further in e.g. building controlled neuronal networks for neurotoxicity screening platforms, combining cells with biomaterials for 3D studies, and graft development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Fabrication and Demonstration of Mercury Disc-Well Probes for Stripping-Based Cyclic Voltammetry Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Zachary J; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín

    2017-03-07

    Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) is a rising technique for the study of energy storage materials. Hg-based probes allow the extension of SECM investigations to ionic processes, but the risk of irreversible Hg amalgam saturation limits their operation to rapid timescales and dilute analyte solutions. Here, we report a novel fabrication protocol for Hg disc-well ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs), which retain access to stripping information but are less susceptible to amalgam saturation than traditional Hg sphere-caps or thin-films. The amalgamation and stripping behaviors of Hg disc-well UMEs are compared to those of traditional Hg sphere-cap UMEs and corroborated with data from finite element simulations. The improved protection against amalgam saturation allows Hg disc-wells to operate safely in highly concentrated environments at long timescales. The utility of the probes for bulk measurements extends also to SECM studies, where the disc geometry facilitates small tip-substrate gaps and improves both spatial and temporal resolution. Because they can carry out slow, high-resolution anodic stripping voltammetry approaches and imaging in concentrated solutions, Hg disc-well electrodes fill a new analytical niche for studies of ionic reactivity and are a valuable addition to the electrochemical toolbox.

  20. Electrically conducting, ultra-sharp, high aspect-ratio probes for AFM fabricated by electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Jason, E-mail: jason.brown@physics.ox.ac.uk [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Kocher, Paul; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Sharp, David N [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Torimitsu, Keiichi [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Atsugi, 243-0198 (Japan); Ryan, John F [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    We report on the fabrication of electrically conducting, ultra-sharp, high-aspect ratio probes for atomic force microscopy by electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum. Probes of 4.0 ±1.0 nm radius-of-curvature are routinely produced with high repeatability and near-100% yield. Contact-mode topographical imaging of the granular nature of a sputtered gold surface is used to assess the imaging performance of the probes, and the derived power spectral density plots are used to quantify the enhanced sensitivity as a function of spatial frequency. The ability of the probes to reproduce high aspect-ratio features is illustrated by imaging a close-packed array of nanospheres. The electrical resistance of the probes is measured to be of order 100 kΩ. - Highlights: • Electrically conducting, ultra-sharp, high aspect-ratio probes for AFM with radius-of-curvature 4.0±±1.0 nm. • AFM probe fabrication by electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum. • Enhanced spatial resolution demonstrated through AFM of sputtered gold grains. • AFM imaging of deep clefts and recesses on a close-packed array of nanospheres.

  1. Electrically conducting, ultra-sharp, high aspect-ratio probes for AFM fabricated by electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jason; Kocher, Paul; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Sharp, David N; Torimitsu, Keiichi; Ryan, John F

    2013-10-01

    We report on the fabrication of electrically conducting, ultra-sharp, high-aspect ratio probes for atomic force microscopy by electron-beam-induced deposition of platinum. Probes of 4.0 ±1.0 nm radius-of-curvature are routinely produced with high repeatability and near-100% yield. Contact-mode topographical imaging of the granular nature of a sputtered gold surface is used to assess the imaging performance of the probes, and the derived power spectral density plots are used to quantify the enhanced sensitivity as a function of spatial frequency. The ability of the probes to reproduce high aspect-ratio features is illustrated by imaging a close-packed array of nanospheres. The electrical resistance of the probes is measured to be of order 100 kΩ. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The black silicon method IV: the fabrication of three-dimensional structures in silicon with high aspect ratios for scanning probe microscopy and other applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Henricus V.; de Boer, Meint J.; Boer, M.A.; Otter, A.M.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1995-01-01

    The recently developed black silicon method (BSM) is presented as a powerful tool in finding recipes for the fabrication of MEMS building blocks such as Ay-stages. scanning probe tips, inkjet filters, multi-electrodes for neuro-electronic interfaces, and mouldings Lor direct patterning into

  3. Chronic neural probe for simultaneous recording of single-unit, multi-unit, and local field potential activity from multiple brain sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, F.; Bonini, L.; Lanzilotto, M.; Livi, A.; Fogassi, L.; Orban, G. A.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrodes would help increasing spatial resolution and thus open new perspectives for investigating mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy and its treatment. This work describes a new fabrication process for SEEG probes with materials and dimensions similar to clinical probes enabling recording single neuron activity at high spatial resolution. Approach. Polyimide is used as a biocompatible flexible substrate into which platinum electrodes and leads are integrated with a minimal feature size of 5 μm. The polyimide foils are rolled into the cylindrical probe shape at a diameter of 0.8 mm. The resulting probe features match those of clinically approved devices. Tests in saline solution confirmed the probe stability and functionality. Probes were implanted into the brain of one monkey (Macaca mulatta), trained to perform different motor tasks. Suitable configurations including up to 128 electrode sites allow the recording of task-related neuronal signals. Main results. Probes with 32 and 64 electrode sites were implanted in the posterior parietal cortex. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded as early as one hour after implantation. Stable single-unit activity was achieved for up to 26 days after implantation of a 64-channel probe. All recorded signals showed modulation during task execution. Significance. With the novel probes it is possible to record stable biologically relevant data over a time span exceeding the usual time needed for epileptic focus localisation in human patients. This is the first time that single units are recorded along cylindrical polyimide probes chronically implanted 22 mm deep into the

  4. Chronic neural probe for simultaneous recording of single-unit, multi-unit, and local field potential activity from multiple brain sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothof, F; Bonini, L; Lanzilotto, M; Livi, A; Fogassi, L; Orban, G A; Paul, O; Ruther, P

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistant focal epilepsy can be treated by resecting the epileptic focus requiring a precise focus localisation using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) probes. As commercial SEEG probes offer only a limited spatial resolution, probes of higher channel count and design freedom enabling the incorporation of macro and microelectrodes would help increasing spatial resolution and thus open new perspectives for investigating mechanisms underlying focal epilepsy and its treatment. This work describes a new fabrication process for SEEG probes with materials and dimensions similar to clinical probes enabling recording single neuron activity at high spatial resolution. Polyimide is used as a biocompatible flexible substrate into which platinum electrodes and leads are integrated with a minimal feature size of 5 μm. The polyimide foils are rolled into the cylindrical probe shape at a diameter of 0.8 mm. The resulting probe features match those of clinically approved devices. Tests in saline solution confirmed the probe stability and functionality. Probes were implanted into the brain of one monkey (Macaca mulatta), trained to perform different motor tasks. Suitable configurations including up to 128 electrode sites allow the recording of task-related neuronal signals. Probes with 32 and 64 electrode sites were implanted in the posterior parietal cortex. Local field potentials and multi-unit activity were recorded as early as one hour after implantation. Stable single-unit activity was achieved for up to 26 days after implantation of a 64-channel probe. All recorded signals showed modulation during task execution. With the novel probes it is possible to record stable biologically relevant data over a time span exceeding the usual time needed for epileptic focus localisation in human patients. This is the first time that single units are recorded along cylindrical polyimide probes chronically implanted 22 mm deep into the brain of a monkey, which suggests the potential

  5. Isostructural fluorescent and radioactive probes for monitoring neural stem and progenitor cell transplants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaffer, Paul [McMaster Nuclear Reactor, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Gleave, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Lemon, Jennifer A. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Reid, Leslie C. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pacey, Laura K.K. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Farncombe, Troy H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Boreham, Douglas R. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Zubieta, Jon [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244-4100 (United States); Babich, John W. [Molecular Insight Pharmaceuticals Inc., Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Doering, Laurie C. [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Valliant, John F. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4K1 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada)], E-mail: valliant@mcmaster.ca

    2008-02-15

    A construct for tagging neurospheres and monitoring cell transplantations was developed using a new technology for producing luminescent and radiolabeled probes that have identical structures. The HIV1-Tat basic domain derivatives NAcGRKKRRQRRR(SAACQ)G (SAACQ-1) and [NAcGRKKRRQRRR(Re(CO){sub 3}SAACQ)G]{sup +} (ReSAACQ-1) were prepared in excellent yields using the single amino acid chelate-quinoline (SAACQ) ligand and its Re(I) complex and conventional automated peptide synthesis methods. The distribution of the luminescent Re probe, using epifluorescence microscopy, showed that it localized primarily in the cell nucleus with a significant degree of association on the nuclear envelope. A smaller amount was found to be dispersed in the cytoplasm. The {sup 99m}Tc analogue was then prepared in 43{+-}7% (n=12) yield and very high effective specific activity. Following incubation, average uptake of the probe in neurospheres ranged between 10 and 20 Bq/cell. As determined by colorimetric assays, viability for cells labeled with high effective specific activity {sup 99m}TcSAACQ-1 was 97{+-}4% at 2 h postlabeling and 85{+-}25% at 24 h postlabeling for incubation activities ranging from 245 to 8900 Bq/cell. DNA analysis showed that at these levels, there was no significant difference between the extent of DNA damage in the treated cells versus control cells. A series of preliminary SPECT/CT studies of transplants in mice were performed, which showed that the strategy is convenient and feasible and that it is possible to routinely assess procedures noninvasively and determine the number of cells transplanted.

  6. Spike detection from noisy neural data in linear-probe recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekawa, Takashi; Ota, Keisuke; Murayama, Masanori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous recordings of multiple neuron activities with multi-channel extracellular electrodes are widely used for studying information processing by the brain's neural circuits. In this method, the recorded signals containing the spike events of a number of adjacent or distant neurons must be correctly sorted into spike trains of individual neurons, and a variety of methods have been proposed for this spike sorting. However, spike sorting is computationally difficult because the recorded signals are often contaminated by biological noise. Here, we propose a novel method for spike detection, which is the first stage of spike sorting and hence crucially determines overall sorting performance. Our method utilizes a model of extracellular recording data that takes into account variations in spike waveforms, such as the widths and amplitudes of spikes, by detecting the peaks of band-pass-filtered data. We show that the new method significantly improves the cost-performance of multi-channel electrode recordings by increasing the number of cleanly sorted neurons. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Multi-array silicon probes with integrated optical fibers: light-assisted perturbation and recording of local neural circuits in the behaving animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Sébastien; Zemelman, Boris V; Barbic, Mladen; Losonczy, Attila; Buzsáki, György; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2010-06-01

    Recordings of large neuronal ensembles and neural stimulation of high spatial and temporal precision are important requisites for studying the real-time dynamics of neural networks. Multiple-shank silicon probes enable large-scale monitoring of individual neurons. Optical stimulation of genetically targeted neurons expressing light-sensitive channels or other fast (milliseconds) actuators offers the means for controlled perturbation of local circuits. Here we describe a method to equip the shanks of silicon probes with micron-scale light guides for allowing the simultaneous use of the two approaches. We then show illustrative examples of how these compact hybrid electrodes can be used in probing local circuits in behaving rats and mice. A key advantage of these devices is the enhanced spatial precision of stimulation that is achieved by delivering light close to the recording sites of the probe. When paired with the expression of light-sensitive actuators within genetically specified neuronal populations, these devices allow the relatively straightforward and interpretable manipulation of network activity.

  8. A Fiber-Optic Probe Design for Combustion Chamber Flame Detection Applications-Design Criteria, Performance Specifications, and Fabrication Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Stephen E.; Harper, Samuel E.

    2001-01-01

    This paper documents the design and development of the fiber-optic probes utilized in the flame detection systems used in NASA Langley Research Center's 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel (8-ft HTT). Two independent flame detection systems are utilized to monitor the presence and stability of the main-burner and pilot-level flames during facility operation. Due to the harsh environment within the combustor, the successful development of a rugged and efficient fiber-optic probe was a critical milestone in the development of these flame detection systems. The final optical probe design for the two flame detection systems resulted from research that was conducted in Langley's 7-in High Temperature Pilot Tunnel (7-in HTT). A detailed description of the manufacturing process behind the optical probes used in the 8-ft HTT is provided in Appendix A of this report.

  9. Design and fabrication of a new compound probe for plasma flux measurement in IR-T1 tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, R; Ghoranneviss, M; Salar Elahi, A

    2017-09-01

    A new compound probe is designed, built, and installed on an IR-T1 tokamak to flow measurements in the plasma edge region. The first results of using this probe on the IR-T1 tokamak are presented. The plasma parameters such as plasma current, loop voltage, floating potential, ion and electron saturation currents, electron temperature, plasma potential, and plasma flow velocities are measured in this work. The results show that the electron temperature and the plasma potential in the edge area are 14 eV and 44 V, respectively. The results indicate that the mean value of a parallel Mach number is 0.5 while the mean value of a perpendicular Mach number is almost zero. The large parallel flow velocity (about 17 km/s) and the negligible perpendicular flow velocity are also seen in this work. The most important advantage of using this compound probe is that it can not only save space and vacuum ports but also measure more physical quantities at the same time, contributing to further physical analysis.

  10. One-pot fabrication of FRET-based fluorescent probe for detecting copper ion and sulfide anion in 100% aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Peisheng; Yu, Maolin; Long, Yunfei; Yi, Pinggui

    2017-04-01

    The design of effective tools for detecting copper ion (Cu2 +) and sulfide anion (S2 -) is of great importance due to the abnormal level of Cu2 + and S2 - has been associated with an increase in risk of many diseases. Herein, we report on the fabrication of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based fluorescent probe PF (PEI-FITC) for detecting Cu2 + and S2 - in 100% aqueous media via a facile one-pot method by covalent linking fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) with branched-polyethylenimine (b-PEI). PF could selectively coordinate with Cu2 + among 10 metal ions to form PF-Cu2 + complex, resulting in fluorescence quenching through FRET mechanism. Furthermore, the in situ generated PF-Cu2 + complex can be used to selectively detect S2 - based on the displacement approach, resulting in an off-on type sensing. There is no obvious interference from other anions, such as Cl-, NO3-, ClO4-, SO42 -, HCO3-, CO32 -, Br-, HPO42 -, F- and S2O32 -. In addition, PF was successfully used to determine Cu2 + and S2 - in human serum and tap water samples. Therefore, the FRET-based probe PF may provide a new method for selective detection of multifarious analysts in biological and environmental applications, and even hold promise for application in more complicated systems.

  11. SU-8-based microneedles for in vitro neural applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuna, Ane; Gabriel, Gemma; Menéndez de la Prida, Liset; Tijero, María; Guimerá, Anton; Berganzo, Javier; Salido, Rafa; Villa, Rosa; Fernández, Luis J.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents novel design, fabrication, packaging and the first in vitro neural activity recordings of SU-8-based microneedles. The polymer SU-8 was chosen because it provides excellent features for the fabrication of flexible and thin probes. A microprobe was designed in order to allow a clean insertion and to minimize the damage caused to neural tissue during in vitro applications. In addition, a tetrode is patterned at the tip of the needle to obtain fine-scale measurements of small neuronal populations within a radius of 100 µm. Impedance characterization of the electrodes has been carried out to demonstrate their viability for neural recording. Finally, probes are inserted into 400 µm thick hippocampal slices, and simultaneous action potentials with peak-to-peak amplitudes of 200-250 µV are detected.

  12. Polymer neural interface with dual-sided electrodes for neural stimulation and recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Angela; Tolosa, Vanessa; Shah, Kedar G; Sheth, Heeral; Felix, Sarah; Delima, Terri; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2012-01-01

    We present here a demonstration of a dual-sided, 4-layer metal, polyimide-based electrode array suitable for neural stimulation and recording. The fabrication process outlined here utilizes simple polymer and metal deposition and etching steps, with no potentially harmful backside etches or long exposures to extremely toxic chemicals. These polyimide-based electrode arrays have been tested to ensure they are fully biocompatible and suitable for long-term implantation; their flexibility minimizes the injury and glial scarring that can occur at the implantation site. The creation of dual-side electrode arrays with more than two layers of trace metal enables the fabrication of neural probes with more electrodes without a significant increase in probe size. This allows for more stimulation/recording sites without inducing additional injury and glial scarring.

  13. Fabrication of Nerve Growth Factor Encapsulated Aligned Poly(ε-Caprolactone Nanofibers and Their Assessment as a Potential Neural Tissue Engineering Scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jue Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury is a serious clinical problem to be solved. There has been no breakthrough so far and neural tissue engineering offers a promising approach to promote the regeneration of peripheral neural injuries. In this study, emulsion electrospinning technique was introduced as a flexible and promising technique for the fabrication of random (R and aligned (A Poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL-Nerve Growth Factor (NGF&Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA nanofibrous scaffolds [(R/A-PCL-NGF&BSA], where NGF and BSA were encapsulated in the core while PCL form the shell. Random and aligned pure PCL, PCL-BSA, and PCL-NGF nanofibers were also produced for comparison. The scaffolds were characterized by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM and water contact angle test. Release study showed that, with the addition of stabilizer BSA, a sustained release of NGF from emulsion electrospun PCL nanofibers was observed over 28 days. [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt; MTS] assay revealed that (R/A-PCL-NGF and (R/A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffolds favored cell growth and showed no cytotoxicity to PC12 cells. Laser scanning confocal microscope images exhibited that the A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffold increased the length of neurites and directed neurites extension along the fiber axis, indicating that the A-PCL-NGF&BSA scaffold has a potential for guiding nerve tissue growth and promoting nerve regeneration.

  14. Novel high-viscosity polyacrylamidated chitosan for neural tissue engineering: fabrication of anisotropic neurodurable scaffold via molecular disposition of persulfate-mediated polymer slicing and complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Naidoo, Dinesh; Pillay, Viness

    2012-10-29

    Macroporous polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan scaffolds for neural tissue engineering were fabricated with varied synthetic and viscosity profiles. A novel approach and mechanism was utilized for polyacrylamide grafting onto chitosan using potassium persulfate (KPS) mediated degradation of both polymers under a thermally controlled environment. Commercially available high molecular mass polyacrylamide was used instead of the acrylamide monomer for graft copolymerization. This grafting strategy yielded an enhanced grafting efficiency (GE = 92%), grafting ratio (GR = 263%), intrinsic viscosity (IV = 5.231 dL/g) and viscometric average molecular mass (MW = 1.63 × 106 Da) compared with known acrylamide that has a GE = 83%, GR = 178%, IV = 3.901 dL/g and MW = 1.22 × 106 Da. Image processing analysis of SEM images of the newly grafted neurodurable scaffold was undertaken based on the polymer-pore threshold. Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR spectral analyses in conjugation with DSC were used for the characterization and comparison of the newly grafted copolymers. Static Lattice Atomistic Simulations were employed to investigate and elucidate the copolymeric assembly and reaction mechanism by exploring the spatial disposition of chitosan and polyacrylamide with respect to the reactional profile of potassium persulfate. Interestingly, potassium persulfate, a peroxide, was found to play a dual role initially degrading the polymers-"polymer slicing"-thereby initiating the formation of free radicals and subsequently leading to synthesis of the high molecular mass polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan (PAAm-g-CHT)-"polymer complexation". Furthermore, the applicability of the uniquely grafted scaffold for neural tissue engineering was evaluated via PC12 neuronal cell seeding. The novel PAAm-g-CHT exhibited superior neurocompatibility in terms of cell infiltration owing to the anisotropic porous architecture, high molecular mass mediated robustness, superior hydrophilicity as well as

  15. Novel High-Viscosity Polyacrylamidated Chitosan for Neural Tissue Engineering: Fabrication of Anisotropic Neurodurable Scaffold via Molecular Disposition of Persulfate-Mediated Polymer Slicing and Complexation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viness Pillay

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Macroporous polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan scaffolds for neural tissue engineering were fabricated with varied synthetic and viscosity profiles. A novel approach and mechanism was utilized for polyacrylamide grafting onto chitosan using potassium persulfate (KPS mediated degradation of both polymers under a thermally controlled environment. Commercially available high molecular mass polyacrylamide was used instead of the acrylamide monomer for graft copolymerization. This grafting strategy yielded an enhanced grafting efficiency (GE = 92%, grafting ratio (GR = 263%, intrinsic viscosity (IV = 5.231 dL/g and viscometric average molecular mass (MW = 1.63 × 106 Da compared with known acrylamide that has a GE = 83%, GR = 178%, IV = 3.901 dL/g and MW = 1.22 × 106 Da. Image processing analysis of SEM images of the newly grafted neurodurable scaffold was undertaken based on the polymer-pore threshold. Attenuated Total Reflectance-FTIR spectral analyses in conjugation with DSC were used for the characterization and comparison of the newly grafted copolymers. Static Lattice Atomistic Simulations were employed to investigate and elucidate the copolymeric assembly and reaction mechanism by exploring the spatial disposition of chitosan and polyacrylamide with respect to the reactional profile of potassium persulfate. Interestingly, potassium persulfate, a peroxide, was found to play a dual role initially degrading the polymers—“polymer slicing”—thereby initiating the formation of free radicals and subsequently leading to synthesis of the high molecular mass polyacrylamide-grafted-chitosan (PAAm-g-CHT—“polymer complexation”. Furthermore, the applicability of the uniquely grafted scaffold for neural tissue engineering was evaluated via PC12 neuronal cell seeding. The novel PAAm-g-CHT exhibited superior neurocompatibility in terms of cell infiltration owing to the anisotropic porous architecture, high molecular mass mediated robustness

  16. An Iterative Procedure for Optimizing the Performance of the Fuzzy-Neural Job Cycle Time Estimation Approach in a Wafer Fabrication Factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toly Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the cycle time of each job in a wafer fabrication factory is a critical task to every wafer manufacturer. In recent years, a number of hybrid approaches based on job classification (either preclassification or postclassification for cycle time estimation have been proposed. However, the problem with these methods is that the input variables are not independent. In order to solve this problem, principal component analysis (PCA is considered useful. In this study, a classifying fuzzy-neural approach, based on the combination of PCA, fuzzy c-means (FCM, and back propagation network (BPN, is proposed to estimate the cycle time of a job in a wafer fabrication factory. Since job classification is an important part of the proposed methodology, a new index is proposed to assess the validity of the classification of jobs. The empirical relationship between the S value and the estimation performance is also found. Finally, an iterative process is employed to deal with the outliers and to optimize the overall estimation performance. A real case is used to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Based on the experimental results, the estimation accuracy of the proposed methodology was significantly better than those of the existing approaches.

  17. FABRIC QUALITY CONTROL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem KISAOĞLU

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Woven fabric quality depends on yarn properties at first, then weaving preparation and weaving processes. Defect control of grey and finished fabric is done manually on the lighted tables or automatically. Fabrics can be controlled by the help of the image analysis method. In image system the image of fabrics can be digitized by video camera and after storing controlled by the various processing. Recently neural networks, fuzzy logic, best wavelet packet model on automatic fabric inspection are developed. In this study the advantages and disadvantages of manual and automatic, on-line fabric inspection systems are given comparatively.

  18. Why are friends special? Implementing a social interaction simulation task to probe the neural correlates of friendship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güroğlu, Berna; Haselager, Gerbert J T; van Lieshout, Cornelis F M; Takashima, Atsuko; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén

    2008-01-15

    Friendships form one of the most proximal contexts with a critical role in mental health and social and psychological development. Yet, the neurobiological basis of this crucial developmental factor is largely uninvestigated. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the interaction with friends is associated with specific activity increases in brain areas known to be involved in interpersonal phenomena, such as empathy, and in reward expectancy. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we assessed neural activity in a social interaction simulation task implementing the factors 'type of relationship' (peers vs. familiar celebrities) and 'emotional valence' (positive (liked), negative (disliked), and neutral (neither liked nor disliked)). In this design, all stimuli were selected individually for each of the 28 participants and positive peers constituted the friends. Participants were asked to approach a stimulus, to avoid it, or remain neutral. Behavioral results confirmed the expectations in the sense that the participants approached positive stimuli more often than they approached neutral, which were also more often approached than negative stimuli. Moreover, peers were more often approached than celebrities were. Imaging results revealed, among others, three regions of particular interest as selectively more strongly activated when subjects interacted with their friends than with other peers and celebrities: the amygdala and hippocampus, the nucleus accumbens, and the ventro-medial prefrontal cortex. These results might highlight the role of empathy and reward-related processes in friendship. Thus, we may have identified a potential mechanism by which friendships exert such a critical role in development and mental health.

  19. Desien, ConstruThe design, fabrication and evaluation of egg weighing device using capacitive sensor and neural networksction and Evaluation of Egg Weighing Device Using Capacitive Sensor and Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Khalili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Grading agricultural products always has a particular important position for submission to domestic and overseas markets. The grading causes more profitable product ranges and customer satisfaction. Grading treatment is carried out based on various parameters such as color, ripeness level, dimensions and weight. Product weight is one of the most effective parameters in grading operation. Egg weight is directly related to the smallness and coarseness of eggs. In egg grading, the largeness value is very important in marketing. This research aimed to design, fabricate and evaluate the egg weighing system based on its dielectric properties. Materials and Methods: To perform this research, the stages of work are divided into several sections including, design and construction of the hardware section, writing code for the software section to collect data, conducting nondestructive tests and data collection, analysis of obtained data using artificial intelligence, and giving the results of analysis for device calibration of the system as the software code. The large eggs as dielectric substances cause more increase in the capacity of the capacitive sensor. Furthermore, by derivation of a relation between capacity of capacitive sensor and egg weight, one can predict the weight of the sample. A prototype unit of weighing system was designed and fabricated. The designed unit was composed of a chassis, a voltage source, a sinusoidal signal generator, a voltage measurement unit, an AVR micro controller, a COM port, a capacitive sensor, and an LCD and a keyboard. Neural network technique was used for egg weight prediction. The designed net receives 16 voltage values at different frequencies as inputs and its output is the egg weight. In order to calibrate and evaluate the weighing unit, 150 fresh egg samples were provided on egg laying day from a local poultry farm. Experiments were divided into three groups. The experiments were carried out on

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  1. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte

    2012-01-01

    and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings......Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  2. Systematic approaches for targeting an atom-probe tomography sample fabricated in a thin TEM specimen: Correlative structural, chemical and 3-D reconstruction analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baik, Sung-Il; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N

    2018-01-01

    Atom-probe tomography (APT) is a unique analysis tool that enables true three-dimensional (3-D) analyses with sub-nano scale spatial resolution. Recent implementations of the local-electrode atom-probe (LEAP) tomograph with ultraviolet laser pulsing have significantly expanded the research applications of APT. The small field-of-view of a needle-shaped specimen with a less than 100 nm diam. is, however, a major limitation for analyzing materials. The systematic approaches for site-specific targeting of an APT nanotip in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) of a thin sample are introduced to solve the geometrical limitations of a sharpened APT nanotip. In addition to "coupling APT to TEM", the technique presented here allows for targeting the preparation of an APT tip based on TEM observation of a much larger area than what is captured in the APT tip. The correlative methods have synergies for not only high-resolution structural analyses but also for obtaining chemical information. Chemical analyses in a TEM, both energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), are performed and compared with the APT chemical analyses of a carbide phase (M 7 C 3 ) precipitate at a grain boundary in a Ni-based alloy. Additionally, a TEM image of a sharpened APT nanotip is utilized for calculation of the detection area ratio of an APT nanotip by comparison with a TEM image for precise tomographic reconstructions. A grain-boundary/carbide precipitate triple junction is used to attain precise positioning of an APT nanotip in an analyzed TEM specimen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The solar probe antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriale, W. A.; Randolph, J. E.; Embuido, E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper details the design of the antenna intended for use on the Solar Probe Mission. The antenna consists of a carbon-carbon reflector jointly used as the antenna and thermal shield and helical feed using tungsten wire and ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials for the back plate, coaxial cable waveguide. A complete prototype feed assembly was fabricated and tested.

  4. Analysis of atomic distribution in as-fabricated Zircaloy-2 claddings by atom probe tomography under high-energy pulsed laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawabe, T., E-mail: sawabe@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Sonoda, T.; Kitajima, S. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Iwado Kita 2-11-1, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Kameyama, T. [Tokai University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kitakaname 4-1-1, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    The properties of second-phase particles (SPPs) in Zircaloy-2 claddings are key factors influencing the corrosion resistance of the alloy. The chemical compositions of Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} and Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs were investigated by means of pulsed laser atom probe tomography. In order to prevent specimen fracture and to analyse wide regions of the specimen, the pulsed laser energy was increased to 2.0 nJ. This gave a high yield of average of 3 × 10{sup 7} ions per specimen. The Zr (Fe, Cr){sub 2} SPPs contained small amounts of Ni and Si atoms, while in Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs almost all the Si was concentrated and the ratio of Zr: (Fe + Ni + Si) was 2:1. Atomic concentrations of the Zr-matrix and the SPPs were identified by two approaches: the first by using all the visible peaks of the mass spectrum and the second using the representative peaks with the natural abundance of the corresponding atoms. It was found that the change in the concentration between the Zr-matrix and the SPPs can be estimated more accurately by the second method, although Sn concentration in the Zr{sub 2}(Fe, Ni) SPPs is slightly overestimated.

  5. Fabrication of valine-functionalized graphene quantum dots and its use as a novel optical probe for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, Zhou; Zhangyi, Li; Zaijun, Li

    2017-01-15

    The functionalization of graphene quantum dots has become a powerful method to modulate its chemical, electronic and optical properties for various applications. In the study, we reported a facile synthesis of valine-functionalized graphene quantum dots (Val-GQDs) and its use as a novel fluorescent probe for optical detection of Hg2+. Herein, Val-GQDs was synthesized by the thermal pyrolysis of citric acid and valine. The resulting Val-GQDs has an average size of 3nm and the edge of graphene sheets contains the rich of hydrophilic groups, leading to a high water-solubility. Compared to the GQDs prepared by thermal pyrolysis of citric acid, Val-GQDs exhibits a stronger fluorescence (>10-fold) and better photostability (>4-fold). Interestingly, the existence of valine moieties in the Val-GQDs results in a more sensitive fluorescent response to Hg2+. The fluorescent signal will linearly decrease with the increase of Hg2+ concentration in the range from 0.8nM to 1μM with the correlation coefficient of 0.992. The detection limit is 0.4nM (S/N=3), which the sensitivity is >14-fold that of GQDs. The analytical method provides the prominent advantage of sensitivity, selectivity and stability. It has been successfully applied in the optical detection of Hg2+ in real water samples. The study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of functionalized GQDs to meet the needs of further applications in sensing and catalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Fabrication of valine-functionalized graphene quantum dots and its use as a novel optical probe for sensitive and selective detection of Hg2 +

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, Zhou; Zhangyi, Li; Zaijun, Li

    2017-01-01

    The functionalization of graphene quantum dots has become a powerful method to modulate its chemical, electronic and optical properties for various applications. In the study, we reported a facile synthesis of valine-functionalized graphene quantum dots (Val-GQDs) and its use as a novel fluorescent probe for optical detection of Hg2 +. Herein, Val-GQDs was synthesized by the thermal pyrolysis of citric acid and valine. The resulting Val-GQDs has an average size of 3 nm and the edge of graphene sheets contains the rich of hydrophilic groups, leading to a high water-solubility. Compared to the GQDs prepared by thermal pyrolysis of citric acid, Val-GQDs exhibits a stronger fluorescence (> 10-fold) and better photostability (> 4-fold). Interestingly, the existence of valine moieties in the Val-GQDs results in a more sensitive fluorescent response to Hg2 +. The fluorescent signal will linearly decrease with the increase of Hg2 + concentration in the range from 0.8 nM to 1 μM with the correlation coefficient of 0.992. The detection limit is 0.4 nM (S/N = 3), which the sensitivity is > 14-fold that of GQDs. The analytical method provides the prominent advantage of sensitivity, selectivity and stability. It has been successfully applied in the optical detection of Hg2 + in real water samples. The study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of functionalized GQDs to meet the needs of further applications in sensing and catalysis.

  7. Electrospun Collagen/Silk Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: Fiber Fabrication, Post-Treatment Optimization, and Application in Neural Differentiation of Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bofan

    Biocompatible scaffolds mimicking the locally aligned fibrous structure of native extracellular matrix (ECM) are in high demand in tissue engineering. In this thesis research, unidirectionally aligned fibers were generated via a home-built electrospinning system. Collagen type I, as a major ECM component, was chosen in this study due to its support of cell proliferation and promotion of neuroectodermal commitment in stem cell differentiation. Synthetic dragline silk proteins, as biopolymers with remarkable tensile strength and superior elasticity, were also used as a model material. Good alignment, controllable fiber size and morphology, as well as a desirable deposition density of fibers were achieved via the optimization of solution and electrospinning parameters. The incorporation of silk proteins into collagen was found to significantly enhance mechanical properties and stability of electrospun fibers. Glutaraldehyde (GA) vapor post-treatment was demonstrated as a simple and effective way to tune the properties of collagen/silk fibers without changing their chemical composition. With 6-12 hours GA treatment, electrospun collagen/silk fibers were not only biocompatible, but could also effectively induce the polarization and neural commitment of stem cells, which were optimized on collagen rich fibers due to the unique combination of biochemical and biophysical cues imposed to cells. Taken together, electrospun collagen rich composite fibers are mechanically strong, stable and provide excellent cell adhesion. The unidirectionally aligned fibers can accelerate neural differentiation of stem cells, representing a promising therapy for neural tissue degenerative diseases and nerve injuries.

  8. Probing the Dielectric Properties of Ultrathin Al/Al2O3/Al Trilayers Fabricated Using in Situ Sputtering and Atomic Layer Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Jagaran; Wilt, Jamie; Liu, Bo; Wu, Judy

    2018-01-12

    Dielectric properties of ultrathin Al2O3 (1.1-4.4 nm) in metal-insulator-metal (M-I-M) Al/Al2O3/Al trilayers fabricated in situ using an integrated sputtering and atomic layer deposition (ALD) system were investigated. An M-I interfacial layer (IL) formed during the pre-ALD sample transfer even under high vacuum has a profound effect on the dielectric properties of the Al2O3 with a significantly reduced dielectric constant (εr) of 0.5-3.3 as compared to the bulk εr ∼ 9.2. Moreover, the observed soft-type electric breakdown suggests defects in both the M-I interface and the Al2O3 film. By controlling the pre-ALD exposure to reduce the IL to a negligible level, a high εr up to 8.9 was obtained on the ALD Al2O3 films with thicknesses from 3.3 to 4.4 nm, corresponding to an effective oxide thickness (EOT) of ∼1.4-1.9 nm, respectively, which are comparable to the EOTs found in high-K dielectrics like HfO2 at 3-4 nm in thickness and further suggest that the ultrathin ALD Al2O3 produced in optimal conditions may provide a low-cost alternative gate dielectric for CMOS. While εr decreases at a smaller Al2O3 thickness, the hard-type dielectric breakdown at 32 MV/cm and in situ scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealed band gap ∼2.63 eV comparable to that of an epitaxial Al2O3 film. This suggests that the IL is unlikely a dominant reason for the reduced εr at the Al2O3 thickness of 1.1-2.2 nm but rather a consequence of the electron tunneling as confirmed in the transport measurement. This result demonstrates the critical importance in controlling the IL to achieving high-performance ultrathin dielectric in MIM structures.

  9. Sub-10-nm intracellular bioelectronic probes from nanowire-nanotube heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tian-Ming; Duan, Xiaojie; Jiang, Zhe; Dai, Xiaochuan; Xie, Ping; Cheng, Zengguang; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-01-28

    The miniaturization of bioelectronic intracellular probes with a wide dynamic frequency range can open up opportunities to study biological structures inaccessible by existing methods in a minimally invasive manner. Here, we report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of intracellular bioelectronic devices with probe sizes less than 10 nm. The devices are based on a nanowire-nanotube heterostructure in which a nanowire field-effect transistor detector is synthetically integrated with a nanotube cellular probe. Sub-10-nm nanotube probes were realized by a two-step selective etching approach that reduces the diameter of the nanotube free-end while maintaining a larger diameter at the nanowire detector necessary for mechanical strength and electrical sensitivity. Quasi-static water-gate measurements demonstrated selective device response to solution inside the nanotube, and pulsed measurements together with numerical simulations confirmed the capability to record fast electrophysiological signals. Systematic studies of the probe bandwidth in different ionic concentration solutions revealed the underlying mechanism governing the time response. In addition, the bandwidth effect of phospholipid coatings, which are important for intracellular recording, was investigated and modeled. The robustness of these sub-10-nm bioelectronics probes for intracellular interrogation was verified by optical imaging and recording the transmembrane resting potential of HL-1 cells. These ultrasmall bioelectronic probes enable direct detection of cellular electrical activity with highest spatial resolution achieved to date, and with further integration into larger chip arrays could provide a unique platform for ultra-high-resolution mapping of activity in neural networks and other systems.

  10. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  11. Scanning microscopic four-point conductivity probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Hansen, Torben Mikael; Bøggild, Peter

    2002-01-01

    the conducting material either for a silicon wafer or a single probe unit. Using shadow masking photolithography an electrode spacing (pitch) down to 1.1 mum was obtained, with cantilever separation down to 200 run. Characterisation measurements have shown the microscopic probes to be mechanically very flexible......A method for fabricating microscopic four-point probes is presented. The method uses silicon-based microfabrication technology involving only two patterning steps. The last step in the fabrication process is an unmasked deposition of the conducting probe material, and it is thus possible to select...

  12. Cultured neural networks: Optimisation of patterned network adhesiveness and characterisation of their neural activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Ruardij, T.G.; Marani, Enrico; Roelofsen, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    One type of future, improved neural interface is the "cultured probe"?. It is a hybrid type of neural information transducer or prosthesis, for stimulation and/or recording of neural activity. It would consist of a microelectrode array (MEA) on a planar substrate, each electrode being covered and

  13. Hybrid intracerebral probe with integrated bare LED chips for optogenetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Suleman; Gentet, Luc J; Fiáth, Richárd; Schwaerzle, Michael; Borel, Mélodie; David, François; Barthó, Péter; Ulbert, István; Paul, Oliver; Ruther, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    This article reports on the development, i.e., the design, fabrication, and validation of an implantable optical neural probes designed for in vivo experiments relying on optogenetics. The probes comprise an array of ten bare light-emitting diode (LED) chips emitting at a wavelength of 460 nm and integrated along a flexible polyimide-based substrate stiffened using a micromachined ladder-like silicon structure. The resulting mechanical stiffness of the slender, 250-μm-wide, 65-μm-thick, and 5- and 8-mm-long probe shank facilitates its implantation into neural tissue. The LEDs are encapsulated by a fluropolymer coating protecting the implant against the physiological conditions in the brain. The electrical interface to the external control unit is provided by 10-μm-thick, highly flexible polyimide cables making the probes suitable for both acute and chronic in vivo experiments. Optical and electrical properties of the probes are reported, as well as their in vivo validation in acute optogenetic studies in transgenic mice. The depth-dependent optical stimulation of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons is demonstrated by altering the brain activity in the cortex and the thalamus. Local network responses elicited by 20-ms-long light pulses of different optical power (20 μW and 1 mW), as well as local modulation of single unit neuronal activity to 1-s-long light pulses with low optical intensity (17 μW) are presented. The ability to modulate neural activity makes these devices suitable for a broad variety of optogenetic experiments.

  14. Nanobits: customizable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Rajendra; Shaik, Hassan Uddin; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    We present here a proof-of-principle study of scanning probe tips defined by planar nanolithography and integrated with AFM probes using nanomanipulation. The so-called 'nanobits' are 2-4 mu m long and 120-150 nm thin flakes of Si3N4 or SiO2, fabricated by electron beam lithography and standard...... silicon processing. Using a microgripper they were detached from an array and fixed to a standard pyramidal AFM probe or alternatively inserted into a tipless cantilever equipped with a narrow slit. The nanobit-enhanced probes were used for imaging of deep trenches, without visible deformation, wear...... or dislocation of the tips of the nanobit after several scans. This approach allows an unprecedented freedom in adapting the shape and size of scanning probe tips to the surface topology or to the specific application....

  15. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  16. In vivo evaluation of a neural stem cell-seeded prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, E. K.; Seymour, J. P.; Yandamuri, S.; Kipke, D. R.

    2009-04-01

    Neural prosthetics capable of recording or stimulating neuronal activity may restore function for patients with motor and sensory deficits resulting from injury or degenerative disease. However, overcoming inconsistent recording quality and stability in chronic applications remains a significant challenge. A likely reason for this is the reactive tissue response to the devices following implantation into the brain, which is characterized by neuronal loss and glial encapsulation. We have developed a neural stem cell-seeded probe to facilitate integration of a synthetic prosthesis with the surrounding brain tissue. We fabricated parylene devices that include an open well seeded with neural stem cells encapsulated in an alginate hydrogel scaffold. Quantitative and qualitative data describing the distribution of neuronal, glial, and progenitor cells surrounding seeded and control devices are reported over four time points spanning 3 months. Neuronal loss and glial encapsulation associated with cell-seeded probes were mitigated during the initial week of implantation and exacerbated by 6 weeks post-insertion compared to control conditions. We hypothesize that graft cells secrete neuroprotective and neurotrophic factors that effect the desired healing response early in the study, with subsequent cell death and scaffold degradation accounting for a reversal of these results later. Applications of this biohybrid technology include future long-term neural recording and sensing studies.

  17. Versatile, modular 3D microelectrode arrays for neuronal ensemble recordings: from design to fabrication, assembly, and functional validation in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barz, F.; Livi, A.; Lanzilotto, M.; Maranesi, M.; Bonini, L.; Paul, O.; Ruther, P.

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Application-specific designs of electrode arrays offer an improved effectiveness for providing access to targeted brain regions in neuroscientific research and brain machine interfaces. The simultaneous and stable recording of neuronal ensembles is the main goal in the design of advanced neural interfaces. Here, we describe the development and assembly of highly customizable 3D microelectrode arrays and demonstrate their recording performance in chronic applications in non-human primates. Approach. System assembly relies on a microfabricated stacking component that is combined with Michigan-style silicon-based electrode arrays interfacing highly flexible polyimide cables. Based on the novel stacking component, the lead time for implementing prototypes with altered electrode pitches is minimal. Once the fabrication and assembly accuracy of the stacked probes have been characterized, their recording performance is assessed during in vivo chronic experiments in awake rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) trained to execute reaching-grasping motor tasks. Main results. Using a single set of fabrication tools, we implemented three variants of the stacking component for electrode distances of 250, 300 and 350 µm in the stacking direction. We assembled neural probes with up to 96 channels and an electrode density of 98 electrodes mm-2. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the shank alignment is accurate to a few µm at an angular alignment better than 1°. Three 64-channel probes were chronically implanted in two monkeys providing single-unit activity on more than 60% of all channels and excellent recording stability. Histological tissue sections, obtained 52 d after implantation from one of the monkeys, showed minimal tissue damage, in accordance with the high quality and stability of the recorded neural activity. Significance. The versatility of our fabrication and assembly approach should significantly support the development of ideal interface geometries for a broad

  18. Digital fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The Winter 2012 (vol. 14 no. 3) issue of the Nexus Network Journal features seven original papers dedicated to the theme “Digital Fabrication”. Digital fabrication is changing architecture in fundamental ways in every phase, from concept to artifact. Projects growing out of research in digital fabrication are dependent on software that is entirely surface-oriented in its underlying mathematics. Decisions made during design, prototyping, fabrication and assembly rely on codes, scripts, parameters, operating systems and software, creating the need for teams with multidisciplinary expertise and different skills, from IT to architecture, design, material engineering, and mathematics, among others The papers grew out of a Lisbon symposium hosted by the ISCTE-Instituto Universitario de Lisboa entitled “Digital Fabrication – A State of the Art”. The issue is completed with four other research papers which address different mathematical instruments applied to architecture, including geometric tracing system...

  19. Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbert, Paul A.; Hiers, Robert S., Jr.

    Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

  20. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  2. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Jørgensen, Anna Neustrup; Noesgaard, Signe Schack

    2016-01-01

    to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...

  3. Self-sensing of dielectric elastomer actuator enhanced by artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhihang; Chen, Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Dielectric elastomer (DE) is a type of soft actuating material, the shape of which can be changed under electrical voltage stimuli. DE materials have promising usage in future’s soft actuators and sensors, such as soft robotics, energy harvesters, and wearable sensors. In this paper, a stripe DE actuator with integrated sensing capability is designed, fabricated, and characterized. Since the strip actuator can be approximated as a compliant capacitor, it is possible to detect the actuator’s displacement by analyzing the actuator’s impedance change. An integrated sensing scheme that adds a high frequency probing signal into actuation signal is developed. Electrical impedance changes in the probing signal are extracted by fast Fourier transform algorithm, and nonlinear data fitting methods involving artificial neural network are implemented to detect the actuator’s displacement. A series of experiments show that by improving data processing and analyzing methods, the integrated sensing method can achieve error level of lower than 1%.

  4. Neural recording and modulation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ritchie; Canales, Andres; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-01-01

    In the mammalian nervous system, billions of neurons connected by quadrillions of synapses exchange electrical, chemical and mechanical signals. Disruptions to this network manifest as neurological or psychiatric conditions. Despite decades of neuroscience research, our ability to treat or even to understand these conditions is limited by the capability of tools to probe the signalling complexity of the nervous system. Although orders of magnitude smaller and computationally faster than neurons, conventional substrate-bound electronics do not recapitulate the chemical and mechanical properties of neural tissue. This mismatch results in a foreign-body response and the encapsulation of devices by glial scars, suggesting that the design of an interface between the nervous system and a synthetic sensor requires additional materials innovation. Advances in genetic tools for manipulating neural activity have fuelled the demand for devices that are capable of simultaneously recording and controlling individual neurons at unprecedented scales. Recently, flexible organic electronics and bio- and nanomaterials have been developed for multifunctional and minimally invasive probes for long-term interaction with the nervous system. In this Review, we discuss the design lessons from the quarter-century-old field of neural engineering, highlight recent materials-driven progress in neural probes and look at emergent directions inspired by the principles of neural transduction.

  5. Three dimensional living neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnenberger, Anna; McLeod, Robert R.; Basta, Tamara; Stowell, Michael H. B.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate holographic optical tweezing combined with step-and-repeat maskless projection micro-stereolithography for fine control of 3D positioning of living cells within a 3D microstructured hydrogel grid. Samples were fabricated using three different cell lines; PC12, NT2/D1 and iPSC. PC12 cells are a rat cell line capable of differentiation into neuron-like cells NT2/D1 cells are a human cell line that exhibit biochemical and developmental properties similar to that of an early embryo and when exposed to retinoic acid the cells differentiate into human neurons useful for studies of human neurological disease. Finally induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) were utilized with the goal of future studies of neural networks fabricated from human iPSC derived neurons. Cells are positioned in the monomer solution with holographic optical tweezers at 1064 nm and then are encapsulated by photopolymerization of polyethylene glycol (PEG) hydrogels formed by thiol-ene photo-click chemistry via projection of a 512x512 spatial light modulator (SLM) illuminated at 405 nm. Fabricated samples are incubated in differentiation media such that cells cease to divide and begin to form axons or axon-like structures. By controlling the position of the cells within the encapsulating hydrogel structure the formation of the neural circuits is controlled. The samples fabricated with this system are a useful model for future studies of neural circuit formation, neurological disease, cellular communication, plasticity, and repair mechanisms.

  6. Advanced Technology Cloud Particle Probe for UAS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase II SPEC will design, fabricate and flight test a state-of-the-art combined cloud particle probe called the Hawkeye. Hawkeye is the culmination of two...

  7. Soft stylus probes for scanning electrochemical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Träuble, Markus; Li, Fei; Busnel, Jean-Marc; Gassner, Anne-Laure; Hojeij, Mohamad; Wittstock, Gunther; Girault, Hubert H

    2009-08-15

    A soft stylus microelectrode probe has been developed to carry out scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) of rough, tilted, and large substrates in contact mode. It is fabricated by first ablating a microchannel in a polyethylene terephthalate thin film and filling it with a conductive carbon ink. After curing the carbon track and lamination with a polymer film, the V-shaped stylus was cut thereby forming a probe, with the cross section of the carbon track at the tip being exposed either by UV-photoablation machining or by blade cutting followed by polishing to produce a crescent moon-shaped carbon microelectrode. The probe properties have been assessed by cyclic voltammetry, approach curves, and line scans over electrochemically active and inactive substrates of different roughness. The influence of probe bending on contact mode imaging was then characterized using simple patterns. Boundary element method simulations were employed to rationalize the distance-dependent electrochemical response of the soft stylus probes.

  8. Nanobits - exchangable and customisable scanning probe tips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yildiz, Izzet

    Invention of atomic force microscopy (AFM) pioneered a novel aspect for the surface metrology concept. A range of scanning probe methods have been developed over the years based on different sorts of tip-surface interaction: electrical, optical, thermal, force. Reproducible and fast fabrication...

  9. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  10. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Micro- and nanodevices integrated with biomolecular probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapan, Yunus; Icoz, Kutay; Gurkan, Umut A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how biomolecules, proteins and cells interact with their surroundings and other biological entities has become the fundamental design criterion for most biomedical micro- and nanodevices. Advances in biology, medicine, and nanofabrication technologies complement each other and allow us to engineer new tools based on biomolecules utilized as probes. Engineered micro/nanosystems and biomolecules in nature have remarkably robust compatibility in terms of function, size, and physical properties. This article presents the state of the art in micro- and nanoscale devices designed and fabricated with biomolecular probes as their vital constituents. General design and fabrication concepts are presented and three major platform technologies are highlighted: microcantilevers, micro/nanopillars, and microfluidics. Overview of each technology, typical fabrication details, and application areas are presented by emphasizing significant achievements, current challenges, and future opportunities. PMID:26363089

  12. An Ethology of Urban Fabric(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Thomsen, Bodil Marie Stavning

    2014-01-01

    The article explores a non-metaphorical understanding of urban fabric(s), shifting the attention from a bird’s eye perspective to the actual, textural manifestations of a variety of urban fabric(s) to be studied in their real, processual, ecological and ethological complexity within urban life. We...... effectuate this move by bringing into resonance a range of intersecting fields that all deal with urban fabric(s) in complementary ways (interaction design and urban design activism, fashion, cultural theory, philosophy, urban computing)....

  13. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  14. Fabrication and Prototyping Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose: The Fabrication and Prototyping Lab for composite structures provides a wide variety of fabrication capabilities critical to enabling hands-on research and...

  15. A multichannel integrated circuit for electrical recording of neural activity, with independent channel programmability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Lopez, Carolina; Prodanov, Dimiter; Braeken, Dries; Gligorijevic, Ivan; Eberle, Wolfgang; Bartic, Carmen; Puers, Robert; Gielen, Georges

    2012-04-01

    Since a few decades, micro-fabricated neural probes are being used, together with microelectronic interfaces, to get more insight in the activity of neuronal networks. The need for higher temporal and spatial recording resolutions imposes new challenges on the design of integrated neural interfaces with respect to power consumption, data handling and versatility. In this paper, we present an integrated acquisition system for in vitro and in vivo recording of neural activity. The ASIC consists of 16 low-noise, fully-differential input channels with independent programmability of its amplification (from 100 to 6000 V/V) and filtering (1-6000 Hz range) capabilities. Each channel is AC-coupled and implements a fourth-order band-pass filter in order to steeply attenuate out-of-band noise and DC input offsets. The system achieves an input-referred noise density of 37 nV/√Hz, a NEF of 5.1, a CMRR > 60 dB, a THD noise ratios.

  16. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Robert A.; Conti, Armond E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  17. Fabrication of recyclable superhydrophobic cotton fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sang Wook; Park, Eun Ji; Jeong, Myung-Geun; Kim, Il Hee; Seo, Hyun Ook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Kim, Kwang-Dae; Kim, Young Dok

    2017-04-01

    Commercial cotton fabric was coated with SiO2 nanoparticles wrapped with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, and the resulting material surface showed a water contact angle greater than 160°. The superhydrophobic fabric showed resistance to water-soluble contaminants and maintained its original superhydrophobic properties with almost no alteration even after many times of absorption-washing cycles of oil. Moreover, superhydrophobic fabric can be used as a filter to separate oil from water. We demonstrated a simple method of fabrication of superhydrophobic fabric with potential interest for use in a variety of applications.

  18. Microfour-point probe for studying electronic transport through surface states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian Leth; Grey, Francois; Shiraki, I.

    2000-01-01

    Microfour-point probes integrated on silicon chips have been fabricated with probe spacings in the range 4-60 mum. They provide a simple robust device for electrical transport measurements at surfaces, bridging the gap between conventional macroscopic four-point probes and scanning tunneling...

  19. Free-standing kinked nanowire transistor probes for targeted intracellular recording in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Quan; Jiang, Zhe; Xu, Lin; Gao, Ruixuan; Mai, Liqiang; Lieber, Charles M.

    2014-02-01

    Recording intracellular (IC) bioelectrical signals is central to understanding the fundamental behaviour of cells and cell networks in, for example, neural and cardiac systems. The standard tool for IC recording, the patch-clamp micropipette is applied widely, yet remains limited in terms of reducing the tip size, the ability to reuse the pipette and ion exchange with the cytoplasm. Recent efforts have been directed towards developing new chip-based tools, including micro-to-nanoscale metal pillars, transistor-based kinked nanowires and nanotube devices. These nanoscale tools are interesting with respect to chip-based multiplexing, but, so far, preclude targeted recording from specific cell regions and/or subcellular structures. Here we overcome this limitation in a general manner by fabricating free-standing probes in which a kinked silicon nanowire with an encoded field-effect transistor detector serves as the tip end. These probes can be manipulated in three dimensions within a standard microscope to target specific cells or cell regions, and record stable full-amplitude IC action potentials from different targeted cells without the need to clean or change the tip. Simultaneous measurements from the same cell made with free-standing nanowire and patch-clamp probes show that the same action potential amplitude and temporal properties are recorded without corrections to the raw nanowire signal. In addition, we demonstrate real-time monitoring of changes in the action potential as different ion-channel blockers are applied to cells, and multiplexed recording from cells by independent manipulation of two free-standing nanowire probes.

  20. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  1. Recent advances in neural recording microsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    The accelerating pace of research in neuroscience has created a considerable demand for neural interfacing microsystems capable of monitoring the activity of large groups of neurons. These emerging tools have revealed a tremendous potential for the advancement of knowledge in brain research and for the development of useful clinical applications. They can extract the relevant control signals directly from the brain enabling individuals with severe disabilities to communicate their intentions to other devices, like computers or various prostheses. Such microsystems are self-contained devices composed of a neural probe attached with an integrated circuit for extracting neural signals from multiple channels, and transferring the data outside the body. The greatest challenge facing development of such emerging devices into viable clinical systems involves addressing their small form factor and low-power consumption constraints, while providing superior resolution. In this paper, we survey the recent progress in the design and the implementation of multi-channel neural recording Microsystems, with particular emphasis on the design of recording and telemetry electronics. An overview of the numerous neural signal modalities is given and the existing microsystem topologies are covered. We present energy-efficient sensory circuits to retrieve weak signals from neural probes and we compare them. We cover data management and smart power scheduling approaches, and we review advances in low-power telemetry. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the remaining challenges and by highlighting the emerging trends in the field.

  2. Recent Advances in Neural Recording Microsystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Gosselin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The accelerating pace of research in neuroscience has created a considerable demand for neural interfacing microsystems capable of monitoring the activity of large groups of neurons. These emerging tools have revealed a tremendous potential for the advancement of knowledge in brain research and for the development of useful clinical applications. They can extract the relevant control signals directly from the brain enabling individuals with severe disabilities to communicate their intentions to other devices, like computers or various prostheses. Such microsystems are self-contained devices composed of a neural probe attached with an integrated circuit for extracting neural signals from multiple channels, and transferring the data outside the body. The greatest challenge facing development of such emerging devices into viable clinical systems involves addressing their small form factor and low-power consumption constraints, while providing superior resolution. In this paper, we survey the recent progress in the design and the implementation of multi-channel neural recording Microsystems, with particular emphasis on the design of recording and telemetry electronics. An overview of the numerous neural signal modalities is given and the existing microsystem topologies are covered. We present energy-efficient sensory circuits to retrieve weak signals from neural probes and we compare them. We cover data management and smart power scheduling approaches, and we review advances in low-power telemetry. Finally, we conclude by summarizing the remaining challenges and by highlighting the emerging trends in the field.

  3. Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwindling Jerome

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This course presents an overview of the concepts of the neural networks and their aplication in the framework of High energy physics analyses. After a brief introduction on the concept of neural networks, the concept is explained in the frame of neuro-biology, introducing the concept of multi-layer perceptron, learning and their use as data classifer. The concept is then presented in a second part using in more details the mathematical approach focussing on typical use cases faced in particle physics. Finally, the last part presents the best way to use such statistical tools in view of event classifers, putting the emphasis on the setup of the multi-layer perceptron. The full article (15 p. corresponding to this lecture is written in french and is provided in the proceedings of the book SOS 2008.

  4. Flexible, Penetrating Brain Probes Enabled by Advances in Polymer Microfabrication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahuva Weltman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of high-fidelity, long-term neural recordings in vivo is critically important to advance neuroscience and brain–machine interfaces. For decades, rigid materials such as metal microwires and micromachined silicon shanks were used as invasive electrophysiological interfaces to neurons, providing either single or multiple electrode recording sites. Extensive research has revealed that such rigid interfaces suffer from gradual recording quality degradation, in part stemming from tissue damage and the ensuing immune response arising from mechanical mismatch between the probe and brain. The development of “soft” neural probes constructed from polymer shanks has been enabled by advancements in microfabrication; this alternative has the potential to mitigate mismatch-related side effects and thus improve the quality of recordings. This review examines soft neural probe materials and their associated microfabrication techniques, the resulting soft neural probes, and their implementation including custom implantation and electrical packaging strategies. The use of soft materials necessitates careful consideration of surgical placement, often requiring the use of additional surgical shuttles or biodegradable coatings that impart temporary stiffness. Investigation of surgical implantation mechanics and histological evidence to support the use of soft probes will be presented. The review concludes with a critical discussion of the remaining technical challenges and future outlook.

  5. A Fluorescent, Genetically-Encoded Voltage Probe Capable of Resolving Action Potentials: e43454

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lauren Barnett; Jelena Platisa; Marko Popovic; Vincent A Pieribone; Thomas Hughes

    2012-01-01

      There is a pressing need in neuroscience for genetically-encoded, fluorescent voltage probes that can be targeted to specific neurons and circuits to allow study of neural activity using fluorescent imaging...

  6. A fluorescent, genetically-encoded voltage probe capable of resolving action potentials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barnett, Lauren; Platisa, Jelena; Popovic, Marko; Pieribone, Vincent A; Hughes, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need in neuroscience for genetically-encoded, fluorescent voltage probes that can be targeted to specific neurons and circuits to allow study of neural activity using fluorescent imaging...

  7. Robustness of the ATLAS pixel clustering neural network algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00407780; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proton-proton collisions at the energy frontier puts strong constraints on track reconstruction algorithms. In the ATLAS track reconstruction algorithm, an artificial neural network is utilised to identify and split clusters of neighbouring read-out elements in the ATLAS pixel detector created by multiple charged particles. The robustness of the neural network algorithm is presented, probing its sensitivity to uncertainties in the detector conditions. The robustness is studied by evaluating the stability of the algorithm's performance under a range of variations in the inputs to the neural networks. Within reasonable variation magnitudes, the neural networks prove to be robust to most variation types.

  8. Neural art appraisal of painter: Dali or Picasso?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hiromi; Sawahata, Yasuhito; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2009-12-09

    One can infer an artist's identity from his or her artworks, but little is known about the neural representation of such elusive categorization. Here, we constructed a 'neural art appraiser' based on machine-learning methods that predicted the painter from the functional MRI activity pattern elicited by a painting. We found that Dali's and Picasso's artworks could be accurately classified based on brain activity alone, and that broadly distributed brain activity contributed to the neural prediction. Our approach provides a new means to probe into complex neural processes underlying art experiences.

  9. Parallel Probe Readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, W.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis techniques are developed to read out nanoscale probes and arrays of probes.The main targeted application area is probe-based data storage.The work also contributes to other areas, such as metrology, biological sensing, materials research and nano-electro-mechanical switches. First, an

  10. Feedforward Neural Network for Force Coding of an MRI-Compatible Tactile Sensor Array Based on Fiber Bragg Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Saccomandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the development and characterization of a fiber optic tactile sensor based on Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG technology. The sensor is a 3 × 3 array of FBGs encapsulated in a PDMS compliant polymer. The strain experienced by each FBG is transduced into a Bragg wavelength shift and the inverse characteristics of the sensor were computed by means of a feedforward neural network. A 21 mN RMSE error was achieved in estimating the force over the 8 N experimented load range while including all probing sites in the neural network training procedure, whereas the median force RMSE was 199 mN across the 200 instances of a Monte Carlo randomized selection of experimental sessions to evaluate the calibration under generalized probing conditions. The static metrological properties and the possibility to fabricate sensors with relatively high spatial resolution make the proposed design attractive for the sensorization of robotic hands. Furthermore, the proved MRI-compatibility of the sensor opens other application scenarios, such as the possibility to employ the array for force measurement during functional MRI-measured brain activation.

  11. Hardware Acceleration of Adaptive Neural Algorithms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Conrad D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    As tradit ional numerical computing has faced challenges, researchers have turned towards alternative computing approaches to reduce power - per - computation metrics and improve algorithm performance. Here, we describe an approach towards non - conventional computing that strengthens the connection between machine learning and neuroscience concepts. The Hardware Acceleration of Adaptive Neural Algorithms (HAANA) project ha s develop ed neural machine learning algorithms and hardware for applications in image processing and cybersecurity. While machine learning methods are effective at extracting relevant features from many types of data, the effectiveness of these algorithms degrades when subjected to real - world conditions. Our team has generated novel neural - inspired approa ches to improve the resiliency and adaptability of machine learning algorithms. In addition, we have also designed and fabricated hardware architectures and microelectronic devices specifically tuned towards the training and inference operations of neural - inspired algorithms. Finally, our multi - scale simulation framework allows us to assess the impact of microelectronic device properties on algorithm performance.

  12. Solid state physics: advanced spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Aghion, Stefano

    Thin films of hybrid solar cells and metal oxide semiconductors -IGZO in particular– and homogeneous PMMA polymers have been studied at the Positron Laboratory (L-NESS centre, Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Como). A slow energy positron beam and a positron lifetime spectrometer have been employed for these studies. The positron spectroscopy information have been correlated with electrical and optical properties of the materials. The chemical composition and the morphology of voids and porosities in hybrid solar cells and thin film metal oxide semiconductors have been studied, and a strong correlation between positronium fraction, S-parameter and the electrical properties of these materials has been found. In PMMA polymers, free volume measurements have shown that the optical properties of the material depend on the presence of monomer residual fraction and even slight changes in the dimensions and concentration of free volumes. Positrons have been also applied to the study of positron to positr...

  13. Reverse-symmetry waveguides: Theory and fabrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horvath, R.; Lindvold, Lars René; Larsen, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    We present an extensive theoretical analysis of reverse-symmetry waveguides with special focus on their potential application as sensor components in aqueous media and demonstrate a novel method for fabrication of such waveguides. The principle of reverse symmetry is based on making the refractiv...... has the advantage of deeper penetration of the evanescent electromagnetic field into the cover medium, theoretically permitting higher sensitivity to analytes compared to traditional waveguide designs. We present calculated sensitivities and probing depths of conventional and reverse...

  14. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitamin, before and during pregnancy prevents most neural tube defects. Neural tube defects are usually diagnosed before the infant is ... or imaging tests. There is no cure for neural tube defects. The nerve damage and loss of function ...

  15. Neural processing of natural sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Frédéric E; Elie, Julie E

    2014-06-01

    We might be forced to listen to a high-frequency tone at our audiologist's office or we might enjoy falling asleep with a white-noise machine, but the sounds that really matter to us are the voices of our companions or music from our favourite radio station. The auditory system has evolved to process behaviourally relevant natural sounds. Research has shown not only that our brain is optimized for natural hearing tasks but also that using natural sounds to probe the auditory system is the best way to understand the neural computations that enable us to comprehend speech or appreciate music.

  16. Fabrication of Superhydrophilic Wool Fabrics By Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong

    Because of the fatty layer on its surface, wool fiber is hydrophobic, which results in poor water absorption and wicking properties that affect the comfort of wool textiles. The purpose of this research is to improve the wettability and comfort of wool textiles using nanotechnology. To reveal the knowledge gaps and ensure the originality of this study, a critical review of literature was conducted in relevant areas. To achieve the objectives of the research, a simple method for fabricating environmentally stable superhydrophilic wool fabrics was developed. Silica sols with diameters of 27 nm were prepared and then coated on the surface of pristine wool fibers to form an ultrathin layer, increasing both the surface roughness and energy. The morphology and composition of silica-sol-coated wool fabrics were characterized by a combination of SEM, TEM, FTIR, and XPS measurements. After evaluating the wettability and washing durability of the silica-sol-coated wool fabrics, it was found that the durability of these wool fabrics needed to be improved. To achieve superhydrophilic wool fabrics with good washing durability, reactive siloxane was functionalized on wool fiber surface, and an ultrathin silica nanoparticles layer was grafted on the surface by in-situ growth method. To evaluate the wettability change of silica grafted wool fabric, in addition to the contact angle, in-depth characterizations of water absorbing and drying properties of wool fabrics were measured. According to Chinese National Standard (GB/T 21655.1-2008 and GB/T 21655.2-2009), the prepared silica grafted wool fabric has excellent water absorbing and quick drying properties that can be maintained after washing 20 times in a washing machine. The strategy of siloxane bonding and in-situ growth was successfully extended to durable multifunctional wool fabrics combined with superhydrophilic, self-cleaning, and antibacterial properties. To study the relationships between functional properties and nano

  17. Nanofabrication of magnetic scanned-probe microscope sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Chong, B K

    2001-01-01

    experiments were carried out under ambient conditions. The experiments required no extra preparation to be done to the specimen before imaging and measurements were carried out under ambient conditions. These probes offer the prospect of direct magnetic field measurement, non- invasiveness, very close proximity, possible local manipulation, better control over the tip- specimen interaction distance and topographic imaging. It is hoped that these magnetic microscope probes will be of great interest and general utility for academic and industrial magneticians. This thesis presents the development of novel magnetic sensor combined with Atomic Force Microscope probe (AFM) using conventional semiconductor processing techniques and Electron Beam Lithography (EBL). The fabrication of these magnetic sensors was performed on a common micromachined silicon substrate using a generic batch fabrication technique. Sub-micron Hall bar for Scanning Hall probe Microscopy (SHPM) and electromagnetic force coil magnet for Scanni...

  18. Crimp-Imbalanced Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    references of Howland describe plain-woven fabrics possessing cover factors (CF) up to one hundred percent for warp fibers at the weft center and in excess...iso-crimped multi-layered fabrics. [0087] Key advantages over current crimped fabric armor systems are discussed here. First, regions of oblique

  19. Innovative Magnetic-Field Array Probe for TRUST Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    H- field; Probe Array; Counterfeit Detection; IC Trust . Introduction Counterfeiting is a huge flail that still continues to serve in the...Innovative Magnetic-Field Array Probe for TRUST Integrated Circuits   contains the RF-switch matrix and broad-band (BB) low noise amplifiers (LNAs...fabricated, tested and used for IC’s TRUST . Measurement setup has been proposed for system validation and of IC scanning surface. Validation test of the

  20. Neuroelectronic interfacing with cultured multielectrode arrays toward a cultured probe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Mouveroux, Jean-Marie; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Heida, Tjitske; Ruardij, T.G.; Marani, Enrico; Lakke, Egbert

    2001-01-01

    Efficient and selective electrical stimulation and recording of neural activity in peripheral, spinal, or central pathways requires multielectrode arrays at micrometer scale. ¿Cultured probe¿ devices are being developed, i.e., cell-cultured planar multielectrode arrays (MEAs). They may enhance

  1. Photochemical cutting of fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltch, Martin S.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for the cutting of garment patterns from one or more layers of fabric. A laser capable of producing laser light at an ultraviolet wavelength is utilized to shine light through a pattern, such as a holographic phase filter, and through a lens onto the one or more layers of fabric. The ultraviolet laser light causes rapid photochemical decomposition of the one or more layers of fabric, but only along the pattern. The balance of the fabric of the one or more layers of fabric is undamaged.

  2. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  3. Remote Microelectronics Fabrication Laboratory MEFLab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Machotka

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, there has been a move towards using remote laboratories in engineering education. The majority of these laboratories are static, involving limited user-controlled mechanical movements. The University of South Australia has developed such a laboratory, called NetLab that has been successfully utilized for teaching both on-campus and transnational programs in electrical and electronics engineering. Following this success, we are now developing a remote laboratory for microelectronic fabrication, MEFLab. The first stage of the development is a remote laboratory for visual inspection and testing of electronic circuits directly on the silicon wafer under a microscope which is normally conducted in a cleanroom. The major challenge of this project is the accurate positioning of micro-probes remotely over the internet. This paper presents the details of the setup of this new remote laboratory, with a particular emphasis on the development of the hardware, software and graphical user interface.

  4. High spatial resolution probes for neurobiology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunning, D. E.; Kenney, C. J.; Litke, A. M.; Mathieson, K.

    2009-06-01

    Position-sensitive biological neural networks, such as the brain and the retina, require position-sensitive detection methods to identify, map and study their behavior. Traditionally, planar microelectrodes have been employed to record the cell's electrical activity with device limitations arising from the electrode's 2-D nature. Described here is the development and characterization of an array of electrically conductive micro-needles aimed at addressing the limitations of planar electrodes. The capability of this array to penetrate neural tissue improves the electrode-cell electrical interface and allows more complicated 3-D networks of neurons, such as those found in brain slices, to be studied. State-of-the-art semiconductor fabrication techniques were used to etch and passivate conformally the metal coat and fill high aspect ratio holes in silicon. These are subsequently transformed into needles with conductive tips. This process has enabled the fabrication of arrays of unprecedented dimensions: 61 hexagonally close-packed electrodes, ˜200 μm tall with 60 μm spacing. Electroplating the tungsten tips with platinum ensure suitable impedance values (˜600 kΩ at 1 kHz) for the recording of neuronal signals. Without compromising spatial resolution of the neuronal recordings, this array adds a new and exciting dimension to the study of biological neural networks.

  5. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  6. Fundamental size limitations of micro four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Petersen, Dirch Hjorth; Hansen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    The continued down-scaling of integrated circuits and magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJ) for hard disc read heads presents a challenge to current metrology technology. The four-point probes (4PP), currently used for sheet resistance characterization in these applications, therefore must be down......-scaled as well in order to correctly characterize the extremely thin films used. This presents a four-point probe design and fabrication challenge. We analyze the fundamental limitation on down-scaling of a generic micro four-point probe (M4PP) in a comprehensive study, where mechanical, thermal, and electrical...

  7. High numerical aperture imaging by using multimode fibers with micro-fabricated optics

    KAUST Repository

    Bianchi, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Controlling light propagation into multimode optical fibers through spatial light modulators provides highly miniaturized endoscopes and optical micromanipulation probes. We increase the numerical aperture up to nearly 1 by micro-optics fabricated on the fiber-end.

  8. Formative Assessment Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  9. Inflatable traversing probe seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimarchi, Paul A.

    1991-01-01

    An inflatable seal acts as a pressure-tight zipper to provide traversing capability for instrumentation rakes and probes. A specially designed probe segment with a teardrop cross-section in the vicinity of the inflatable seal minimizes leakage at the interface. The probe is able to travel through a lengthwise slot in a pressure vessel or wind tunnel section, while still maintaining pressure integrity. The design uses two commercially available inflatable seals, opposing each other, to cover the probe slot in a wind tunnel wall. Proof-of-concept tests were conducted at vessel pressures up to 30 psig, with seals inflated to 50 psig, showing no measurable leakage along the seal's length or around the probe teardrop cross-section. This seal concept can replace the existing technology of sliding face plate/O-ring systems in applications where lengthwise space is limited.

  10. Moral transgressions corrupt neural representations of value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crockett, Molly J; Siegel, Jenifer Z; Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2017-06-01

    Moral systems universally prohibit harming others for personal gain. However, we know little about how such principles guide moral behavior. Using a task that assesses the financial cost participants ascribe to harming others versus themselves, we probed the relationship between moral behavior and neural representations of profit and pain. Most participants displayed moral preferences, placing a higher cost on harming others than themselves. Moral preferences correlated with neural responses to profit, where participants with stronger moral preferences had lower dorsal striatal responses to profit gained from harming others. Lateral prefrontal cortex encoded profit gained from harming others, but not self, and tracked the blameworthiness of harmful choices. Moral decisions also modulated functional connectivity between lateral prefrontal cortex and the profit-sensitive region of dorsal striatum. The findings suggest moral behavior in our task is linked to a neural devaluation of reward realized by a prefrontal modulation of striatal value representations.

  11. Studying Electrical Conductivity Using a 3D Printed Four-Point Probe Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Santino, Luciano M.; Acharya, Shinjita; Anandarajah, Hari; D'Arcy, Julio M.

    2017-01-01

    The design and fabrication of functional scientific instrumentation allows students to forge a link between commonly reported numbers and physical material properties. Here, a two-point and four-point probe station for measuring electrical properties of solid materials is fabricated via 3D printing utilizing an inexpensive benchtop…

  12. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-02-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electrode layers on the nanowires, and a subsequent partial etching process. The fabricated nanowire probes had an approximately 60-nm diameter and were intracellular. These probes interfaced with a GH3 cell and measured the spontaneous action potential. It successfully measured the action potential, which rapidly reached a steady state with average peak amplitude of approximately 10 mV, duration of approximately 140 ms, and period of 0.9 Hz.

  13. Fabricating architectural volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feringa, Jelle; Søndergaard, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    The 2011 edition of Fabricate inspired a number of collaborations, this article seeks to highlight three of these. There is a common thread amongst the projects presented: sharing the ambition to close the rift between design and fabrication while incorporating structural design aspects early on...

  14. Fabrics in Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Anne Louise

    2007-01-01

    sensing of fabrics in function. It is proposed that tactile and visual sensing of fabrics is a way to investigate and express emotional utility values. The further purpose is to use experiments with repertory grid models as part of the mapping of the entire research project and also as a basis...

  15. Magnetic fabrics in amphibolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Andrea Regina; Hirt, Ann M.; Kunze, Karsten

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic fabrics are used as indicators for mineral fabrics and thus tectonic settings. In particular, the maximum and minimum magnetic susceptibilities are often taken as representation of the direction of macroscopic lineation and pole to foliation of a rock, respectively. In rocks consisting mainly of amphiboles, the paramagnetic fabric is controlled by the preferential orientation of the amphibole crystals. These crystals normally have their c-axis aligned with lineation, however, the maximum susceptibility is parallel to the crystallographic b-axis, leading to more complicated relationships between the orientations of the magnetic fabric and mineral fabric. Here we describe magnetic fabrics in two amphibolites, both deformed and containing 70 % hornblende. Both amphibolites possess significant magnetic anisotropy with the minimum susceptibility normal to foliation. However, maximum susceptibility and lineation are parallel in one amphibolite, whereas they deviate in the other. Numerical models, which simulate the magnetic anisotropy based on the measured crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of hornblende and single crystal anisotropy, can reproduce the observed magnetic fabrics in these samples. Furthermore, synthetic models help explain for which types of CPO the magnetic and mineral lineations are parallel to each other, and when they are not aligned to one another. The results presented here will help in future interpretation of mineral fabrics in amphibole-bearing rocks.

  16. Smart Fabrics Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Cory; Potter, Elliott; Potter, Elliott; McCabe, Mary; Baggerman, Clint

    2010-01-01

    Advances in Smart Fabrics technology are enabling an exciting array of new applications for NASA exploration missions, the biomedical community, and consumer electronics. This report summarizes the findings of a brief investigation into the state of the art and potential applications of smart fabrics to address challenges in human spaceflight.

  17. Nanomaterial-based activatable imaging probes: from design to biological applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingjing; Cheng, Fangfang; Huang, Haiping; Li, Lingling; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2015-11-07

    Activatable imaging probes as alternatives to "always on" imaging probes have attracted more and more attention due to their improved sensitivity and specificity. They are commonly designed to amplify or boost imaging signals only in response to specific biomolecular recognition or interaction. Thus, the design strategies play a vital role in the fabrication of activatable imaging probes. In this review, we focus on the design mechanisms and biological applications of those nanomaterial-based activatable imaging probes reported in the past five years, benefitting greatly from the good development of nanotechnology. These probes not only include the most studied activatable fluorescence imaging probes, but also cover more activatable MR imaging probes based on nanoparticle contrast agents and activatable photoacoustic imaging probes, providing more bases for clinical translation.

  18. Smart chip with selective micro-probes on Si(111) IC chips for detecting nerve potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Makoto; Kawano, Takeshi; Takao, Hidekuni; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2003-10-01

    A large number of single crystal Si micro-probes on Si(111) were fabricated selectively using VLS (Vapor-Liquid-Solid) growth method after IC process. The Si probes can be grown with a high aspect ratio more than a few hundreds. A diameter of the probes can be controlled from sub-micron to a few hundred microns. The Si probe position on the chip is also controlled and the chip with IC circuits can work even after the Si probe growth. Conductivity of the Si probes was controlled by using phosphorous diffusion, resulting in a resistivity of 10-2 Ω×cm from 104 Ω×cm for a diffusion temperature of 1100°C. In in-vivo studies, penetrating micro-probe array of low impedance such as the VLS growth Si probes has been desired, therefore electrical and mechanical properties were studied detected successfully.

  19. Electrical conduction through surface superstructures measured by microscopic four-point probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasegawa, S.; Shiraki, I.; Tanabe, F.

    2003-01-01

    (STM) are used for measurements of four-point probe conductivity. The probe spacing can be changed from 500 nm to 1 mm. The other method involves monolithic micro-four-point probes, fabricated on silicon chips, whose probe spacing is fixed around several mum. These probes are installed in scanning......For in-situ measurements of the local electrical conductivity of well-defined crystal surfaces in ultra-high vacuum, we have developed two kinds of microscopic four-point probe methods. One involves a "four-tip STM prober," in which four independently driven tips of a scanning tunneling microscope......-electron-microscopy/electron-diffraction chambers, in which the structures of sample surfaces and probe positions are observed in situ. The probes can be positioned precisely on aimed areas on the sample with the aid of piezoactuators. By the use of these machines, the surface sensitivity in conductivity measurements has been greatly enhanced...

  20. Foldable polymers as probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alexander D. Q.; Wang, Wei

    2007-07-03

    Disclosed herein are novel probes, which can be used to detect and identify target molecules of interest in a sample. The disclosed probes can be used to monitor conformational changes induced by molecular recognition events in addition to providing signaling the presence and/or identity of a target molecule. Methods, including solid phase synthesis techniques, for making probe molecules that exhibit changes in their optical properties upon target molecule binding are described in the disclosure. Also disclosed herein are novel chromophore moieties, which have tailored fluorescent emission spectra.

  1. Dimensional Control in Corner Lithography for Wafer-Scale Fabrication of Nano-Apertures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate a new method to fabricate 3D-oriented nanostructures in wafer scale, and apply it to fabricate a nano-apertures at the apex of a pyramid. A number of new technologies require the use of apertures to serve as electrical, nano fluidic or optical probes. Controlling the

  2. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  3. Development of diagnosis and treatment technology for brain disease using quantum material and nano probe pin device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Uhn; Choi, Sang H.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Song, Kyo D.; Park, Yeonjoon

    2011-04-01

    New medical device technology is essential for diagnosing, monitoring, and curing wide spectrum of diseases, anomalies and inflictions. For neural applications, currently available devices are generally limited to either a curing or a probing function. In this paper we review the technology requirements for new neural probe and cure device technology currently under development. The concept of probe-pin device that integrates the probes for neurochemistry, neuroelectricity, temperature and pressure into a single embodiment with a wireless power transmission was designed for the purpose of deep brain feedback stimulation (DBFS) with insitu neural monitoring. The probe considered for monitoring neurochemistry is a microspectrometer. The feature and size of micro-spectrometer are defined for the DBFS device. Two types of wireless power transmission technology were studied for DBFS device operation. The test results of pig skin showed that both power transmission technologies demonstrated the feasibility of power feed through human tissue.

  4. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  5. Nanoscale microwave microscopy using shielded cantilever probes

    KAUST Repository

    Lai, Keji

    2011-04-21

    Quantitative dielectric and conductivity mapping in the nanoscale is highly desirable for many research disciplines, but difficult to achieve through conventional transport or established microscopy techniques. Taking advantage of the micro-fabrication technology, we have developed cantilever-based near-field microwave probes with shielded structures. Sensitive microwave electronics and finite-element analysis modeling are also utilized for quantitative electrical imaging. The system is fully compatible with atomic force microscope platforms for convenient operation and easy integration of other modes and functions. The microscope is ideal for interdisciplinary research, with demonstrated examples in nano electronics, physics, material science, and biology.

  6. Modified Coaxial Probe Feeds for Layered Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.

    2006-01-01

    In a modified configuration of a coaxial probe feed for a layered printed-circuit antenna (e.g., a microstrip antenna), the outer conductor of the coaxial cable extends through the thickness of at least one dielectric layer and is connected to both the ground-plane conductor and a radiator-plane conductor. This modified configuration simplifies the incorporation of such radio-frequency integrated circuits as power dividers, filters, and low-noise amplifiers. It also simplifies the design and fabrication of stacked antennas with aperture feeds.

  7. Introduction to neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    James, Frederick E

    1994-02-02

    1. Introduction and overview of Artificial Neural Networks. 2,3. The Feed-forward Network as an inverse Problem, and results on the computational complexity of network training. 4.Physics applications of neural networks.

  8. Morphological neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, G.X.; Sussner, P. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The theory of artificial neural networks has been successfully applied to a wide variety of pattern recognition problems. In this theory, the first step in computing the next state of a neuron or in performing the next layer neural network computation involves the linear operation of multiplying neural values by their synaptic strengths and adding the results. Thresholding usually follows the linear operation in order to provide for nonlinearity of the network. In this paper we introduce a novel class of neural networks, called morphological neural networks, in which the operations of multiplication and addition are replaced by addition and maximum (or minimum), respectively. By taking the maximum (or minimum) of sums instead of the sum of products, morphological network computation is nonlinear before thresholding. As a consequence, the properties of morphological neural networks are drastically different than those of traditional neural network models. In this paper we consider some of these differences and provide some particular examples of morphological neural network.

  9. Fabricating a shoulder somatoprosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, I; Schortz, R H; Levy, M; Lepley, J B

    1981-05-01

    A technique for the fabrication of a shoulder prosthesis has been described. The prosthesis has proven to be an effective means of rehabilitating a patient following an intrascapulothoracic amputation. The patient may once again wear clothing without having it adjusted to conform to the defect. Such rehabilitation has been of great psychologic value for patients and their families as well. The impression and processing procedures are effective for the fabrication of a shoulder prosthesis. The principles of this technique may be applied to the fabrication of other large somatoprostheses.

  10. Nano-biotechnology: carbon nanofibres as improved neural and orthopaedic implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Thomas J.; Waid, Michael C.; McKenzie, Janice L.; Price, Rachel L.; Ejiofor, Jeremiah U.

    2004-01-01

    For the continuous monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment of neural tissue, implantable probes are required. However, sometimes such neural probes (usually composed of silicon) become encapsulated with non-conductive, undesirable glial scar tissue. Similarly for orthopaedic implants, biomaterials (usually titanium and/or titanium alloys) often become encapsulated with undesirable soft fibrous, not hard bony, tissue. Although possessing intriguing electrical and mechanical properties for neural and orthopaedic applications, carbon nanofibres/nanotubes have not been widely considered for these applications to date. The present work developed a carbon nanofibre reinforced polycarbonate urethane (PU) composite in an attempt to determine the possibility of using carbon nanofibres (CNs) as either neural or orthopaedic prosthetic devices. Electrical and mechanical characterization studies determined that such composites have properties suitable for neural and orthopaedic applications. More importantly, cell adhesion experiments revealed for the first time the promise these materials have to increase neural (nerve cell) and osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions. In contrast, functions of cells that contribute to glial scar-tissue formation for neural prostheses (astrocytes) and fibrous-tissue encapsulation events for bone implants (fibroblasts) decreased on PU composites containing increasing amounts of CNs. In this manner, this study provided the first evidence of the future that CN formulations may have towards interacting with neural and bone cells which is important for the design of successful neural probes and orthopaedic implants, respectively.

  11. In situ fabrication of a tunable microlens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Yichuan; Qiu, Rui; Fang, Wei; Tong, Limin

    2015-08-15

    We demonstrate an optofluidic variable-focus microlens formed by a solid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) meniscus channel wall and a tunable liquid lens body. A novel method for in situ fabrication of the meniscus channel wall is developed by introducing liquid PDMS prepolymer into a microchannel followed by curing. Three-light manipulation techniques including tunable optical focusing, collimating, and diverging are realized by varying the refractive index (RI) of liquid lens body. Also, we present an absorption measurement of methylene blue (MB) with a collimated probing light, achieving a detection limit of 0.25 μM by using a 5-mm-long detection cell.

  12. Huygens probe on target

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    In October 1997, a Titan/Centaur rocket lifting-off from Cape Canaveral will boost the spacecraft into a 6.7 year trajectory to reach Saturn. The trajectory will use two swing-bys of Venus in April 1998 and June 1999, followed by an Earth swing-by in August 1999 and a Jupiter swing-by in December 2000 to boost speed and reach Saturn in July 2004. A few months after going into orbit around Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft will release the Huygens probe for its descent through the atmosphere of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. The Huygens probe will measure the abundance of elements and compounds in Titan's atmosphere, the distribution of trace gases and aerosols, winds, temperature, pressure and surface state and its composition. A multi-spectral camera on the probe will provide images of the landscape of Titan. Titan is a unique planetary body in the solar system. It has an atmosphere which is primarily nitrogen. but is also rich in hydrocarbons. Due to the vast distance of the Saturnian system from the Sun, this atmosphere is at a very low temperature, thus greatly slowing down all the chemical processes. A study of this atmosphere will throw light on the development of our own atmosphere and contribute to our understanding of the origins of life on Earth. The Huygens probe is being developed by ESA with Aerospatiale (F) as the industrial prime contractor. Since the start of the programme in April 1990, very good progress has been made in design and hardware development. The entry into the Titan atmosphere will result in a very high surface temperature on the probe, generated as it decelerates due to the friction of the upper atmospheric layers. After the probe has slowed down sufficiently, a system of parachutes ensures a slow descent to the surface of Titan in approximately two and a half hours. The scientific measurements can only begin after the heat shield, which is needed to protect the probe during the high temperature entry phase, has been ejected

  13. Deterioration of airplane fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, FR

    1922-01-01

    The observation that airplane fabrics, after long use, lose their original strength, caused the German Experimental Institute for Aviation to carry out a series of experiments on the effect of weathering on the cloth covering of airplane wings and fuselages.

  14. Model for resonant plasma probe.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Hebner, Gregory Albert; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Coats, Rebecca Sue

    2007-04-01

    This report constructs simple circuit models for a hairpin shaped resonant plasma probe. Effects of the plasma sheath region surrounding the wires making up the probe are determined. Electromagnetic simulations of the probe are compared to the circuit model results. The perturbing effects of the disc cavity in which the probe operates are also found.

  15. Morphological Computation of Haptic Perception of a Controllable Stiffness Probe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nantachai Sornkarn

    Full Text Available When people are asked to palpate a novel soft object to discern its physical properties such as texture, elasticity, and even non-homogeneity, they not only regulate probing behaviors, but also the co-contraction level of antagonistic muscles to control the mechanical impedance of fingers. It is suspected that such behavior tries to enhance haptic perception by regulating the function of mechanoreceptors at different depths of the fingertips and proprioceptive sensors such as tendon and spindle sensors located in muscles. In this paper, we designed and fabricated a novel two-degree of freedom variable stiffness indentation probe to investigate whether the regulation of internal stiffness, indentation, and probe sweeping velocity (PSV variables affect the accuracy of the depth estimation of stiff inclusions in an artificial silicon phantom using information gain metrics. Our experimental results provide new insights into not only the biological phenomena of haptic perception but also new opportunities to design and control soft robotic probes.

  16. Encapsulated tips for reliable nanoscale conduction in scanning probe technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskaran, Harish; Sebastian, Abu; Drechsler, Ute; Despont, Michel

    2009-03-11

    Nanoscale tip apexes of conducting cantilever probes are important enablers for several conducting probe technologies that require reliable long-term operation, while preserving the nanoscale integrity of the tip apex. In this paper, the concept of an encapsulated tip with a nanoscale conducting core is presented. A method to fabricate such tips on conducting silicon microcantilevers is described. Long-term conduction and wear reliability of these nanoscale tips are evaluated systematically, and their ability to operate for sliding distances greater than 2 m in conduction and 11 m in wear on amorphous carbon is demonstrated. These results are expected to have an impact on the future of conducting probe-based technologies such as probe-based nanometrology, data storage and nanolithography.

  17. High-Resolution and Frequency, Printed Miniature Magnetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Picard, Julian

    2013-10-01

    Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) is developing a technique to significantly reduce the cost and development time of producing magnetic field diagnostics. EHT is designing probes that can be printed on flexible PCBs thereby allowing for extremely small coils to be produced while essentially eliminating the time to wind the coils. The coil size can be extremely small when coupled with the EHT Hybrid Integrator, which is capable of high bandwidth measurements over short and long pulse durations. This integrator is currently being commercialized with the support of a DOE SBIR. Additionally, the flexible PCBs allow probes to be attached to complex surface and/or probes that have a complex 3D structure to be designed and fabricated. During the Phase I, EHT will design and construct magnetic field probes on flexible PCBs, which will be tested at the University of Washington's HIT-SI experiment and in EHT's material science plasma reactor. Funding provided by DOE SBIR/STTR Program.

  18. Superabsorbent Multilayer Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coreale, J. V.; Dawn, F. S.

    1982-01-01

    Material contains gel-forming polymer and copolymer that absorb from 70 to 200 times their weight of liquid. Superabsorbent Polymer and Copolymer form gels to bind and retain liquid in multiply fabric. Until reaction between liquid and absorbent masses forms gel, backing layer retains liquids within fabric; also allows material to "breathe." Possible applications include baby diapers, female hygiene napkins, and hospital bedpads. Might also have uses in improvement of dry soil.

  19. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levesque, Stephen [EWI, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

  20. The infinite line pressure probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englund, D. R.; Richards, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The infinite line pressure probe provides a means for measuring high frequency fluctuating pressures in difficult environments. A properly designed infinite line probe does not resonate; thus its frequency response is not limited by acoustic resonance in the probe tubing, as in conventional probes. The characteristics of infinite line pressure probes are reviewed and some applications in turbine engine research are described. A probe with a flat-oval cross section, permitting a constant-impedance pressure transducer installation, is described. Techniques for predicting the frequency response of probes with both circular and flat-oval cross sections are also cited.

  1. Fabric space radiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Krotiuk, W.J.; Webb, B.J.; Prater, J.T.; Bates, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Future Air Force space missions will require thermal radiators that both survive in the hostile space environment and stow away for minimal bulk during launch. Advances in all aspects of radiator design, construction, and analysis will be necessary to enable such future missions. Currently, the best means for obtaining high strength along with flexibility is through structures known as fabrics. The development of new materials and bonding techniques has extended the application range of fabrics into areas traditionally dominated by monolithic and/or metallic structures. Given that even current spacecraft heat rejection considerations tend to dominate spacecraft design and mass, the larger and more complex designs of the future face daunting challenges in thermal control. Ceramic fabrics bonded to ultra-thin metal liners (foils) have the potential of achieving radiator performance levels heretofore unattainable, and of readily matching the advances made in other branches of spacecraft design. The research effort documented here indicates that both pumped loops and heat pipes constructed in ceramic fabrics stand to benefit in multiple ways. Flexibility and low mass are the main advantages exhibited by fabric radiators over conventional metal ones. We feel that fabric radiators have intrinsic merits not possessed by any other radiator design and need to be researched further. 26 refs., 16 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Optimization of nanofountain probe microfabrication enables large-scale nanopatterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safi, Asmahan; Kang, Wonmo; Czapleski, David; Divan, Ralu; Moldovan, Nicolae; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2013-12-01

    A technological gap in nanomanufacturing has prevented the translation of many nanomaterial discoveries into real-world commercialized products. Bridging this gap requires a paradigm shift in methods for fabricating nanoscale devices in a reliable and repeatable fashion. Here we present the optimized fabrication of a robust and scalable nanoscale delivery platform, the nanofountain probe (NFP), for parallel direct-write of functional materials. Microfabrication of a new generation of NFP was realized with the aim of increasing the uniformity of the device structure. Optimized probe geometry was integrated into the design and fabrication process by modifying the precursor mask dimensions and by using an isotropic selective dry etching of the outer shell that defines the protrusion area. Probes with well-conserved sharp tips and controlled protrusion lengths were obtained. Sealing effectiveness of the channels was optimized. A conformal tetraethyl orthosilicate based oxide layer increased the sealing efficacy while minimizing the required thickness. A compensation scheme based on the residual stresses in each layer was implemented to minimize bending of the cantilever after releasing the device. The device was tested by patterning ferritin catalyst arrays on silicon dioxide with sub-100 nm resolution. The optimized probes increased the control over the parallel patterning resolution which enables manufacturing of ordered arrays of nanomaterials.

  3. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Hughes, Stephen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Soares, Paulo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic School, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR 80215-901 (Brazil); Popat, Ketul C., E-mail: ketul.popat@colostate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. - Highlights: • Titania nanotube arrays can be fabricated with to have loosely or densely packed morphologies. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell differentiation towards neuronal lineage.

  4. The role of simulation in the design of a neural network chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Utpal; Roppel, Thaddeus A.; Padgett, Mary L.

    1993-01-01

    An iterative, simulation-based design procedure for a neural network chip is introduced. For this design procedure, the goal is to produce a chip layout for a neural network in which the weights are determined by transistor gate width-to-length ratios. In a given iteration, the current layout is simulated using the circuit simulator SPICE, and layout adjustments are made based on conventional gradient-decent methods. After the iteration converges, the chip is fabricated. Monte Carlo analysis is used to predict the effect of statistical fabrication process variations on the overall performance of the neural network chip.

  5. Imaging of neurosphere oxygenation with phosphorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Zhdanov, Alexander V; Nolan, Yvonne M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2013-12-01

    Multicellular spheroids are useful models of mammalian tissue for studies of cell proliferation, differentiation, replacement therapies and drug action. Having a size of 100-500 μm they mimic in vivo micro-environment and characteristic gradients of O2, pH and nutrients. We describe the use of cell-penetrating O2 probes based on phosphorescent Pt-porphyrins to perform high-resolution 2D and 3D mapping of O2 in spheroid structures by live cell fluorescence imaging technique. Optimised procedures for preparation of neurospheres from cortical neural cells isolated from embryonic rat brain, their staining with the phosphorescent O2 probes NanO2 and MM2 and subsequent analysis of oxygenation on different live cell imaging platforms, including widefield and confocal phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (PLIM), conventional confocal and two-photon ratiometric intensity based O2 detection are presented. This is followed by a series of physiological experiments in which oxygenation patterns of the neurospheres are correlated with culturing conditions (atmospheric hypoxia and hyperoxia, size, growth factors), distribution of stem cells, mature neurons and astrocytes, HIF-2α stabilisation and responses to metabolic stimulation. The O2 imaging method allows multiplexing with many conventional fluorescent probes to perform multi-parametric imaging analysis of cells in 3D microenvironment. It can be applied to other types of spheroids and 3D tissue models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Plastron Respiration Using Commercial Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Atherton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A variety of insect and arachnid species are able to remain submerged in water indefinitely using plastron respiration. A plastron is a surface-retained film of air produced by surface morphology that acts as an oxygen-carbon dioxide exchange surface. Many highly water repellent and hydrophobic surfaces when placed in water exhibit a silvery sheen which is characteristic of a plastron. In this article, the hydrophobicity of a range of commercially available water repellent fabrics and polymer membranes is investigated, and how the surface of the materials mimics this mechanism of underwater respiration is demonstrated allowing direct extraction of oxygen from oxygenated water. The coverage of the surface with the plastron air layer was measured using confocal microscopy. A zinc/oxygen cell is used to consume oxygen within containers constructed from the different membranes, and the oxygen consumed by the cell is compared to the change in oxygen concentration as measured by an oxygen probe. By comparing the membranes to an air-tight reference sample, it was found that the membranes facilitated oxygen transfer from the water into the container, with the most successful membrane showing a 1.90:1 ratio between the cell oxygen consumption and the change in concentration within the container.

  7. A two-dimensional flow sensor with integrated micro thermal sensing elements and a back propagation neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2013-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s-30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  8. Evolvable Neural Software System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A.

    2009-01-01

    The Evolvable Neural Software System (ENSS) is composed of sets of Neural Basis Functions (NBFs), which can be totally autonomously created and removed according to the changing needs and requirements of the software system. The resulting structure is both hierarchical and self-similar in that a given set of NBFs may have a ruler NBF, which in turn communicates with other sets of NBFs. These sets of NBFs may function as nodes to a ruler node, which are also NBF constructs. In this manner, the synthetic neural system can exhibit the complexity, three-dimensional connectivity, and adaptability of biological neural systems. An added advantage of ENSS over a natural neural system is its ability to modify its core genetic code in response to environmental changes as reflected in needs and requirements. The neural system is fully adaptive and evolvable and is trainable before release. It continues to rewire itself while on the job. The NBF is a unique, bilevel intelligence neural system composed of a higher-level heuristic neural system (HNS) and a lower-level, autonomic neural system (ANS). Taken together, the HNS and the ANS give each NBF the complete capabilities of a biological neural system to match sensory inputs to actions. Another feature of the NBF is the Evolvable Neural Interface (ENI), which links the HNS and ANS. The ENI solves the interface problem between these two systems by actively adapting and evolving from a primitive initial state (a Neural Thread) to a complicated, operational ENI and successfully adapting to a training sequence of sensory input. This simulates the adaptation of a biological neural system in a developmental phase. Within the greater multi-NBF and multi-node ENSS, self-similar ENI s provide the basis for inter-NBF and inter-node connectivity.

  9. Fabrication of PDMS architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    The study report novel, yet simple and flexible fabrication method for micro channel patterning PDMS thin mold on glass surfaces, the method allows microstructures with critical dimensions to be formed using PDMS. Micro channel production is a two-step process. First, soft photolithography methods are implemented to fabricate a reusable mold. The mold is then used to create the micro channel, which consists of SU8, PDMS and glass. The micro channel design was performed using AutoCAD and the fabrication begins by creating a replicable mold. The mold is created on a glass slide. by spin-coating speed between 500 to 1250rpm with an acceleration of 100 rpm/s for 100 and 15 second ramp up and down speed respectively. Channel flow rate based on concentration were measured by analyzing the recorded flow profiles which was collected from the high powered microscope at. 80µ, 70µm, 50µm for inlet channel 1, 2, 3 respectively the channel flow were compared for flow efficiency at different concentrations and Re. Thus, the simplicity of device structure and fabrication makes it feasible to miniaturize it for the development of point-of-care kits, facilitating its use in both clinical and non-clinical environments. With its simple geometric structure and potential for mass commercial fabrication, the device can be developed to become a portable photo detection sensor that can be use for both environmental and diagnostic application.

  10. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  11. Probing the Solar Interior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 3. Probing the Solar Interior Hearing the Heartbeats of the Sun. Ashok Ambastha. General Article Volume 3 Issue 3 March 1998 pp 18-31. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  13. Terahertz scanning probe microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klapwijk, T.M.

    2014-01-01

    The invention provides aterahertz scanning probe microscope setup comprising (i) a terahertz radiation source configured to generate terahertz radiation; (ii) a terahertz lens configured to receive at least part of the terahertz radiation from the terahertz radiation source; (iii) a cantilever unit

  14. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  15. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  16. Probe selection algorithm for oligonucleotide array-based medium-resolution genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y; Peng, S; Gao, H; Cheng, J

    2004-11-01

    Medium-resolution genotyping has the goal of distinguishing different subgroups instead of each element in a group. An oligonucleotide array provides an inexpensive, high-throughput method to identify differences in DNA sequence among individuals, which is fundamental for genotyping. As the cost and difficulty of designing and fabricating the oligonucleotide array dramatically increase with the number of probes used, it is therefore important to have a design with a minimum number of probes meeting the requirement of medium-resolution genotyping. The first algorithm for designing and selecting probes for oligonucleotide array-based medium-resolution typing is reported. The goal in deriving the algorithm was to select a minimum number of probes from a large probe set on the premise of minimum loss of resolution. The algorithm, which was based on entropy, conditional entropy and mutual information theory, was used to select the minimum number of probes from a large probe set. The algorithm was tested on a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) sequence data set Thirty probes were selected from 390 probes for HLA-A, and 60 probes were selected from 767 probes for HLA-B. Although the number of probes was reduced by almost ten times, the distinguishability was reduced only a little, by 0.45% (from 99.90% to 99.45%) for HLA-A and 0.27% (from 99.84% to 99.57%) for HLA-B, respectively. This is a satisfactory and practical result.

  17. Mechanosensitive membrane probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin, Marta; Verolet, Quentin; Soleimanpour, Saeideh; Matile, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    This article assembles pertinent insights behind the concept of planarizable push-pull probes. As a response to the planarization of their polarized ground state, a red shift of their excitation maximum is expected to report on either the disorder, the tension, or the potential of biomembranes. The combination of chromophore planarization and polarization contributes to various, usually more complex processes in nature. Examples include the color change of crabs or lobsters during cooking or the chemistry of vision, particularly color vision. The summary of lessons from nature is followed by an overview of mechanosensitive organic materials. Although often twisted and sometimes also polarized, their change of color under pressure usually originates from changes in their crystal packing. Intriguing exceptions include the planarization of several elegantly twisted phenylethynyl oligomers and polymers. Also mechanosensitive probes in plastics usually respond to stretching by disassembly. True ground-state planarization in response to molecular recognition is best exemplified with the binding of thoughtfully twisted cationic polythiophenes to single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides. Molecular rotors, en vogue as viscosity sensors in cells, operate by deplanarization of the first excited state. Pertinent recent examples are described, focusing on λ-ratiometry and intracellular targeting. Complementary to planarization of the ground state with twisted push-pull probes, molecular rotors report on environmental changes with quenching or shifts in emission rather than absorption. The labeling of mechanosensitive channels is discussed as a bioengineering approach to bypass the challenge to create molecular mechanosensitivity and use biological systems instead to sense membrane tension. With planarizable push-pull probes, this challenge is met not with twistome screening, but with "fluorescent flippers," a new concept to insert large and bright monomers into oligomeric

  18. Consciousness and neural plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    In contemporary consciousness studies the phenomenon of neural plasticity has received little attention despite the fact that neural plasticity is of still increased interest in neuroscience. We will, however, argue that neural plasticity could be of great importance to consciousness studies....... If consciousness is related to neural processes it seems, at least prima facie, that the ability of the neural structures to change should be reflected in a theory of this relationship "Neural plasticity" refers to the fact that the brain can change due to its own activity. The brain is not static but rather...... a dynamic entity, which physical structure changes according to its use and environment. This change may take the form of growth of new neurons, the creation of new networks and structures, and change within network structures, that is, changes in synaptic strengths. Plasticity raises questions about...

  19. ANOMALY NETWORK INTRUSION DETECTION SYSTEM BASED ON DISTRIBUTED TIME-DELAY NEURAL NETWORK (DTDNN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LAHEEB MOHAMMAD IBRAHIM

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a hierarchical off-line anomaly network intrusion detection system based on Distributed Time-Delay Artificial Neural Network is introduced. This research aims to solve a hierarchical multi class problem in which the type of attack (DoS, U2R, R2L and Probe attack detected by dynamic neural network. The results indicate that dynamic neural nets (Distributed Time-Delay Artificial Neural Network can achieve a high detection rate, where the overall accuracy classification rate average is equal to 97.24%.

  20. ITA Sensor Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Joel; Gibson, Christopher; Bergamaschi, Flavio; Marcus, Kelvin; Pham, Tien; Pressley, Ryan; Verma, Gunjan

    2009-05-01

    The diverse sensor types and networking technologies commonly used in fielded sensro networks provide a unique set of challenges [1] in the areas of sensor identification, interoperability, and sensor data consumability. The ITA Senor Fabric is a middleware infrastructure - developed as part of the International Technology Alliance (ITA)[2] in Network and Information Science - that addresses these challenges by providing unified access to, and management of, sensor networks. The Fabric spans the network from command and control, through forward operating bases, and out to mobile forces and fielded sensors, maximizing the availability and utility of intelligence information to users.

  1. Fuzzy and neural control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1992-01-01

    Fuzzy logic and neural networks provide new methods for designing control systems. Fuzzy logic controllers do not require a complete analytical model of a dynamic system and can provide knowledge-based heuristic controllers for ill-defined and complex systems. Neural networks can be used for learning control. In this chapter, we discuss hybrid methods using fuzzy logic and neural networks which can start with an approximate control knowledge base and refine it through reinforcement learning.

  2. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  3. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  4. Neural Systems Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As part of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and The Institute for System Research, the Neural Systems Laboratory studies the functionality of the...

  5. A neural flow estimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Ivan Harald Holger; Bogason, Gudmundur; Bruun, Erik

    1995-01-01

    is implemented using switched-current technique and is capable of estimating flow in the μl/s range. The neural estimator is built around a multiplierless neural network, containing 96 synaptic weights which are updated using the LMS1-algorithm. An experimental chip has been designed that operates at 5 V......This paper proposes a new way to estimate the flow in a micromechanical flow channel. A neural network is used to estimate the delay of random temperature fluctuations induced in a fluid. The design and implementation of a hardware efficient neural flow estimator is described. The system...

  6. Development of a nanowire based titanium needle probe sensor for glucose monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Devesh C.

    The need for continuous monitoring of various physiological functions such as blood glucose levels, neural functions and cholesterol levels has fostered the research and development of various schemes of biosensors to sense and help control the respective function. The needs of patients for sensors with minimal discomfort, longer life and better performance have necessitated the development towards smaller and more efficient sensors. In addition, the need for higher functionality from smaller sensors has led to the development of sensors with multiple electrodes, each electrode capable of sensing a different body function. Such multi-electrode sensors need to be fabricated using micro-fabrication processes in order to achieve precise control over the size, shape and placement of the electrodes. Multielectrode sensors fabricated using silicon and polymers have been demonstrated. One physiological function that attracts widespread interest is continuous glucose monitoring in our blood, since Diabetes affects millions of people all over the world. Significant deviations of blood glucose levels from the normal levels of 4-8 mM can cause fainting, coma and damage to the eyes, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. For chronic patients, continuous monitoring of glucose levels is essential for accurate and timely treatment. A few continuous monitoring sensors are available in the market, but they have problems and cannot replace the strip type one-time glucose monitoring systems as yet. To address this need, large scale research efforts have been targeted towards continuous monitoring. The demand for higher accuracy and sensitivity has motivated researchers to evaluate the use of nanostructures in sensing. The large surface area-to-volume ratio of such structures could enable further miniaturization and push the detection limits, potentially enabling even single molecule detection. This research involved the development of a biocompatible titanium needle probe sensor for

  7. Fabrication activity for nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malureanu, Radu; Chung, Il-Sug; Carletti, Luca

    We present the fabrication and characterization of new structures and materials to be used in nanophotonics. The first structure presented is a fractal metallic metasurface designed to be used as a high-sensitivity sensor for 810nm wavelength. A second structure is a high index contrast grating...

  8. cotton fabric 51

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Some salient properties of cotton cellulose which requires it to be treated with additives to improve its versatility were examined taken ... modification of the cotton cellulose upon resination with methylolmelamine phosphate. Keywords: Cotton Fabric ..... Decomposition of Pure Cellulose and Pulp. Paper. Polym Degrad Stab.

  9. Lithographic fabrication of nanoapertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, James G.

    2003-01-01

    A new class of silicon-based lithographically defined nanoapertures and processes for their fabrication using conventional silicon microprocessing technology have been invented. The new ability to create and control such structures should significantly extend our ability to design and implement chemically selective devices and processes.

  10. Astigmatism corrected common path probe for optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarpal; Yamada, Daisuke; Tearney, Guillermo

    2017-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) catheters for intraluminal imaging are subject to various artifacts due to reference-sample arm dispersion imbalances and sample arm beam astigmatism. The goal of this work was to develop a probe that minimizes such artifacts. Our probe was fabricated using a single mode fiber at the tip of which a glass spacer and graded index objective lens were spliced to achieve the desired focal distance. The signal was reflected using a curved reflector to correct for astigmatism caused by the thin, protective, transparent sheath that surrounds the optics. The probe design was optimized using Zemax, a commercially available optical design software. Common path interferometric operation was achieved using Fresnel reflection from the tip of the focusing graded index objective lens. The performance of the probe was tested using a custom designed spectrometer-based OCT system. The probe achieved an axial resolution of 15.6 μm in air, a lateral resolution 33 μm, and a sensitivity of 103 dB. A scattering tissue phantom was imaged to test the performance of the probe for astigmatism correction. Images of the phantom confirmed that this common-path, astigmatism-corrected OCT imaging probe had minimal artifacts in the axial, and lateral dimensions. In this work, we developed an astigmatism-corrected, common path probe that minimizes artifacts associated with standard OCT probes. This design may be useful for OCT applications that require high axial and lateral resolutions. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:312-318, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Fully Integrated, Miniature, High-Frequency Flow Probe Utilizing MEMS Leadless SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned, Alex; Kurtz, Anthony; Shang, Tonghuo; Goodman, Scott; Giemette. Gera (d)

    2013-01-01

    This work focused on developing, fabricating, and fully calibrating a flowangle probe for aeronautics research by utilizing the latest microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), leadless silicon on insulator (SOI) sensor technology. While the concept of angle probes is not new, traditional devices had been relatively large due to fabrication constraints; often too large to resolve flow structures necessary for modern aeropropulsion measurements such as inlet flow distortions and vortices, secondary flows, etc. Mea surements of this kind demanded a new approach to probe design to achieve sizes on the order of 0.1 in. (.3 mm) diameter or smaller, and capable of meeting demanding requirements for accuracy and ruggedness. This approach invoked the use of stateof- the-art processing techniques to install SOI sensor chips directly onto the probe body, thus eliminating redundancy in sensor packaging and probe installation that have historically forced larger probe size. This also facilitated a better thermal match between the chip and its mount, improving stability and accuracy. Further, the leadless sensor technology with which the SOI sensing element is fabricated allows direct mounting and electrical interconnecting of the sensor to the probe body. This leadless technology allowed a rugged wire-out approach that is performed at the sensor length scale, thus achieving substantial sensor size reductions. The technology is inherently capable of high-frequency and high-accuracy performance in high temperatures and harsh environments.

  12. Physical probing of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfeldt, Florian; Schmidt, Christoph F.

    2017-11-01

    In the last two decades, it has become evident that the mechanical properties of the microenvironment of biological cells are as important as traditional biochemical cues for the control of cellular behavior and fate. The field of cell and matrix mechanics is quickly growing and so is the development of the experimental approaches used to study active and passive mechanical properties of cells and their surroundings. Within this topical review we will provide a brief overview, on the one hand, over how cellular mechanics can be probed physically, how different geometries allow access to different cellular properties, and, on the other hand, how forces are generated in cells and transmitted to the extracellular environment. We will describe the following experimental techniques: atomic force microscopy, traction force microscopy, magnetic tweezers, optical stretcher and optical tweezers pointing out both their advantages and limitations. Finally, we give an outlook on the future of the physical probing of cells.

  13. Neural Networks: Implementations and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, E.; Veelenturf, L.P.J.; Jain, L.C.

    1996-01-01

    Artificial neural networks, also called neural networks, have been used successfully in many fields including engineering, science and business. This paper presents the implementation of several neural network simulators and their applications in character recognition and other engineering areas

  14. Multifunctional universal SPM nanoprobe fabrication with laser technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiko, V. P.; Golubok, A. O.; Levichev, V. V.; Zuong, Z.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2009-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a high spatial resolution method of surface topography visualization and measurement of its local properties. The detecting of interaction arising between the sharp solid-state probe and the sample surface is the foundation of SPM. In dependence from nature of this interaction the scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM), etc. are distinguished. The spatial resolution of all types of probe microscopy determines both sharpness of increasing of interaction between a probe and a sample at their approach, and shape and size of a top of a solid-state probe. So, the progress in SPM information capabilities is highly depends on probe properties and first of all on properly fabricated aperture size. Fabrication procedures are rather complicated because of nanometric scale size of aperture and hard requirements to reproducibility and need to be improved. The way how to do it by laser-assisted drawing-out is involving of feed-back in a processing procedure-results in two types of feedback for the process of drawing-out has been suggested, tested and installed into the technological set-up. Different probes have been fabricated by above mentioned laser-assisted stretching during this work: SNOM types from optical fibers, micropipettes from quartz glass capillaries, micropipettes with microwires inside and with metallic covers outside. Some examples of application of above mentioned combined probes for cell membrane technology are described. Most important from them are topographical studying of cells and bacteria in living condition (in liquid) and studying of the mechanical properties of cell (rigidity of cell membrane) using the nanopipette as a tip of a force sensor. Except for that using the model sample the measurement of ion current that runs through nanopipette which also carries out a role of a tip of a force sensor have been done. Thus it is shown, that using

  15. Dyeing fabrics with metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, Georgia

    2002-06-01

    Traditionally, in textile dyeing, metals have been used as mordants or to improve the color produced by a natural or synthetic dye. In biomedical research and clinical diagnostics gold colloids are used as sensitive signals to detect the presence of pathogens. It has been observed that when metals are finely divided, a distinct color may result that is different from the color of the metal in bulk. For example, when gold is finely divided it may appear black, ruby or purple. This can be seen in biomedical research when gold colloids are reduced to micro-particles. Bright color signals are produced by few nanometer-sized particles. Dr. William Todd, a researcher in the Department of Veterinary Science at the Louisiana State University, developed a method of dyeing fabrics with metals. By using a reagent to bond the metal particles deep into the textile fibers and actually making the metal a part of the chemistry of the fiber. The chemicals of the fabric influence the resulting color. The combination of the element itself, the size of the particle, the chemical nature of the particle and the interaction of the metal with the chemistry of the fabric determine the actual hue. By using different elements, reagents, textiles and solvents a broad range of reproducible colors and tones can be created. Metals can also be combined into alloys, which will produce a variety of colors. The students of the ISCC chapter at the Fashion Institute of Technology dyed fabric using Dr. Todd's method and created a presentation of the results. They also did a demonstration of dyeing fabrics with metals.

  16. Novel Eddycurrent Probe Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    oVCut MVc AVu inc F C -- -(1)(-jlOOO AZC (23)0 --2--M F1 (23) If the Thevenin source voltages, V0, are adjusted so that Vinc is the same for both the...as small as 1.2 cm. The differential probe assembly was spring loaded about a pivot post (see Figure 12) so it could scan noncircular or eccentric

  17. Space Probe Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Managed by Marshall Space Flight Center, the Space Tug was a reusable multipurpose space vehicle designed to transport payloads to different orbital inclinations. Utilizing mission-specific combinations of its three primary modules (crew, propulsion, and cargo) and a variety of supplementary kits, the Space Tug was capable of numerous space applications. This 1970 artist's concept depicts the Tug's propulsion module launching a space probe into lunar orbit.

  18. Vertical nanowire probes for intracellular signaling of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Ilsoo; Kim, So-Eun; Jeong, Du-Won; Kim, Ju-Jin; Rhim, Hyewhon; Ahn, Jae-Pyeong; Park, Seung-Han; Choi, Heon-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The single living cell action potential was measured in an intracellular mode by using a vertical nanoelectrode. For intracellular interfacing, Si nanowires were vertically grown in a controlled manner, and optimum conditions, such as diameter, length, and nanowire density, were determined by culturing cells on the nanowires. Vertical nanowire probes were then fabricated with a complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process including sequential deposition of the passivation and electr...

  19. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  20. Hard Probes at RHIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielčíková Jana

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of jets and heavy flavour, the so called hard probes, play a crucial role in understanding properties of hot and dense nuclear matter created in high energy heavy-ion collisions. The measurements at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC showed that in central Au+Au collisons at RHIC energy ( √sNN = 200 GeV the nuclear matter created has properties close to those of perfect liquid, manifests partonic degrees of freedom and is opaque to hard probes. In order to draw quantitative conclusions on properties of this hot and dense nuclear matter reference measurements in proton-proton collisions and d+Au collisions are essential to estimate cold nuclear matter effects. In this proceedings a review of recent results on hard probes measurements in p+p, d+Au and A+A collisions as well as of beam energy dependence of jet quenching from STAR and PHENIX experiments at RHIC is presented.

  1. Probing dimensionality using a simplified 4-probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldby, Snorre B; Evenstad, Otto M; Cooil, Simon P; Wells, Justin W

    2017-10-04

    4-probe electrical measurements have been in existence for many decades. One of the most useful aspects of the 4-probe method is that it is not only possible to find the resistivity of a sample (independently of the contact resistances), but that it is also possible to probe the dimensionality of the sample. In theory, this is straightforward to achieve by measuring the 4-probe resistance as a function of probe separation. In practice, it is challenging to move all four probes with sufficient precision over the necessary range. Here, we present an alternative approach. We demonstrate that the dimensionality of the conductive path within a sample can be directly probed using a modified 4-probe method in which an unconventional geometry is exploited; three of the probes are rigidly fixed, and the position of only one probe is changed. This allows 2D and 3D (and other) contributions the to resistivity to be readily disentangled. The required experimental instrumentation can be vastly simplified relative to traditional variable spacing 4-probe instruments.

  2. Critical Branching Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical…

  3. Kunstige neurale net

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørning, Annette

    1994-01-01

    Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse.......Artiklen beskæftiger sig med muligheden for at anvende kunstige neurale net i forbindelse med datamatisk procession af naturligt sprog, specielt automatisk talegenkendelse....

  4. Towards Automated and Objective Assessment of Fabric Pilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocco Furferi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pilling is a complex property of textile fabrics, representing, for the final user, a non-desired feature to be controlled and measured by companies working in the textile industry. Traditionally, pilling is assessed by visually comparing fabrics with reference to a set of standard images, thus often resulting in inconsistent quality control. A number of methods using machine vision have been proposed all over the world, with almost all sharing the idea that pilling can be assessed by determining the number of pills or the area occupied by the pills on the fabric surface. In the present work a different approach is proposed: instead of determining the number of pills, a machine vision-based procedure is devised with the aim of extracting a number of parameters characterizing the fabric. These are then used to train an artificial neural network to automatically grade the fabrics in terms of pilling. Tested against a set of differently pilled fabrics, the method shows its effectiveness.

  5. Effect of Chamfer Angle on the Calibration Curves of Five Hole Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nekkanti Sitaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Five hole probes are extensively used for measurement of total and static pressures, flow angles, velocity and its components in turbomachinery, and other aerodynamic flows. Their operating range is usually limited to 30–40° depending on the type of the probe head. The chamfer angle of the probe is usually taken around 45°. Recent studies on three hole probes have shown that 30° chamfer angle is desirable for unsteady flow measurements. Hence the present investigation is undertaken to find the optimum chamfer angle of five-hole probes. A special five-hole probe of 9.6 mm head diameter and 3 mm diameter pressure take off tubes was designed and fabricated. The large size of the probe was chosen to minimize machining inaccuracies. The probe chamfer angle was varied from 30° to 60° in 5° steps. For each of the chamfer angles, the probe was calibrated in the range of −30° to +30° in 5° interval and the calibration curves are presented. In addition the sensitivities of the calibration coefficients are determined. It is concluded that five-hole probe with a chamfer angle 30° has large operating range, while five-hole probe with a chamfer angle of 50° has good sensitivity.

  6. Status report, canister fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Claes-Goeran; Eriksson, Peter; Westman, Marika [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Emilsson, Goeran [CSM Materialteknik AB, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2004-06-01

    The report gives an account of the development of material and fabrication technology for copper canisters with cast inserts during the period from 2000 until the start of 2004. The engineering design of the canister and the choice of materials in the constituent components described in previous status reports have not been significantly changed. In the reference canister, the thickness of the copper shell is 50 mm. Fabrication of individual components with a thinner copper thickness is done for the purpose of gaining experience and evaluating fabrication and inspection methods for such canisters. As a part of the development of cast inserts, computer simulations of the casting processes and techniques used at the foundries have been performed for the purpose of optimizing the material properties. These properties have been evaluated by extensive tensile testing and metallographic inspection of test material taken from discs cut at different points along the length of the inserts. The testing results exhibit a relatively large spread. Low elongation values in certain tensile test specimens are due to the presence of poorly formed graphite, porosities, slag or other casting defects. It is concluded in the report that it will not be possible to avoid some presence of observed defects in castings of this size. In the deep repository, the inserts will be exposed to compressive loading and the observed defects are not critical for strength. An analysis of the strength of the inserts and formulation of relevant material requirements must be based on a statistical approach with probabilistic calculations. This work has been initiated and will be concluded during 2004. An initial verifying compression test of a canister in an isostatic press has indicated considerable overstrength in the structure. Seamless copper tubes are fabricated by means of three methods: extrusion, pierce and draw processing, and forging. It can be concluded that extrusion tests have revealed a

  7. Nanometre-scale deposition of colloidal Au particles using electrophoresis in a nanopipette probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, F.; Nagami, S.; Sumiya, Y.; Sasaki, A.

    2007-03-01

    We describe a novel technique of local electrophoretic deposition of colloidal particles using a scanning probe microscope with a nanopipette probe filled with a colloidal solution. The colloidal solution including nanometre-scale particles was put into the nanopipette probe. A thin metal wire was inserted into the nanopipette probe as an electrode for the electrophoretic deposition. With the probe edge nearly in contact with the conductive surface and with an electric potential applied between the electrode and the surface, the colloidal particles migrated toward the edge of the probe, causing them to be deposited on the surface. It was possible for nanometre-scale Au colloidal particles in an aqueous solution to be deposited on Si surfaces. The size of the Au dots could be modified by adjusting the deposition time and voltage. Dot array and line patterns were successfully plotted on the surface. This technique of local deposition should provide the possibility for fabricating nanostructures such as nanomachines and nanoelectronics.

  8. Comparative evaluation of probing depth and clinical attachment level using a manual probe and Florida probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kour, Amandeep; Kumar, Ashish; Puri, Komal; Khatri, Manish; Bansal, Mansi; Gupta, Geeti

    2016-01-01

    To compare and evaluate the intra- and inter-examiner efficacy and reproducibility of the first-generation manual (Williams) probe and the third-generation Florida probe in terms of measuring pocket probing depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL). Forty subjects/4000 sites were included in this comparative, cross-sectional study. Group- and site-wise categorizations were done. Based on gingival index, PD, and CAL, patients were divided into four groups, i.e., periodontally healthy, gingivitis, mild to moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis. Further, based on these parameters, a total of 4000 sites, with 1000 sites in each category randomly selected from these 40 patients, were taken. Full mouth PD and CAL measurements were recorded with two probes, by Examiner 1 and on Ramfjord teeth by Examiner 2. Full mouth and Ramfjord teeth group- and site-wise PD obtained with the manual probe by both the examiners were statistically significantly deeper than that obtained with the Florida probe. The full mouth and Ramfjord teeth mean CAL measurement by Florida probe was higher as compared to manual probe in mild to moderate periodontitis group and sites, whereas in severe periodontitis group and sites, manual probe recorded higher CAL as compared to Florida probe. Mean PD and CAL measurements were deeper with the manual probe as compared to the Florida probe in all the groups and sites, except for the mild-moderate periodontitis group and sites where the CAL measurements with the manual probe were less than the Florida probe. Manual probe was more reproducible and showed less interexaminer variability as compared to the Florida probe.

  9. Wearable probes for service design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullane, Aaron; Laaksolahti, Jarmo Matti; Svanæs, Dag

    2014-01-01

    Probes are used as a design method in user-centred design to allow end-users to inform design by collecting data from their lives. Probes are potentially useful in service innovation, but current probing methods require users to interrupt their activity and are consequently not ideal for use...... by service employees in reflecting on the delivery of a service. In this paper, we present the ‘wearable probe’, a probe concept that captures sensor data without distracting service employees. Data captured by the probe can be used by the service employees to reflect and co-reflect on the service journey......, helping to identify opportunities for service evolution and innovation....

  10. Integrated microfluidic linking chip for scanning probe nanolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Kee Suk; Wang, Xuefeng; Shaikh, Kashan; Bullen, David; Goluch, Edgar; Zou, Jun; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2004-07-01

    This letter reports an architecture for a microfluidic chip that dresses (inks) multiple nanolithography tips in a high-density array in a parallel and multiplexed fashion. The microfluidic chip consists of multiple precision patterned thin-film poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) patches serving as porous inking pads. Inking chemicals are supplied from loading reservoirs to the inking pads through microfluidic channels. The gas-permeable thin PDMS membranes allow ink molecules to diffuse through while preventing bulk liquid from overflowing or evaporating. The inking chip provides high-density inking, easy loading of inks, and reduced evaporation losses. We present the fabrication process and inking of scanning probe contact printing probes and commercial nitride probes.

  11. A novel microthermal probe for the measurement of perfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ming; Kausik, Aditya; Podhajsky, Ronald J.; Mahajan, Roop L.

    2009-02-01

    Using micro-fabrication techniques a micro thermal probe has been developed in our laboratory to measure the thermal conductivity of biological tissues. This paper presents our latest experimental results which demonstrate the usefulness of the micro thermal probe in mapping the complicated perfusion field inside biological tissues. A perfused pig liver model has been constructed to simulate in vivo conditions. The portal vein and hepatic artery of a porcine liver were intubated and connected to a perfusion circuit. Saline water was perfused through the liver driven by a peristaltic pump. By varying the pumping rate of the perfused model, we measured the effective thermal conductivity at different perfusion rates in different locations. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity varies with the square root of the perfusion rate. Also, by rotating the micro probes, we observed a strong directional dependence of the effective thermal conductivity, revealing that perfusion is not a scalar but a vector field.

  12. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  13. The Fabric of Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Andrew

    David Deutsch, The Fabric of Reality (London: Allen Lane, 1997), x+390 pp., ISBN 0-713-990619, hardback. David Deutsch's popular book, The Fabric of Reality, has already won acclaim as a sustained and comprehensible explanation of his own worldview, which encompasses his four main strands of quantum physics, epistemology, computation and evolution, as well as the many connections between them. Deutsch is a strong opponent of reductionism, and the latter three strands are 'high level' theories compared to quantum physics; but all four are to be regarded as fundamental because they are the theories that provide the deepest explanations. Deutsch considers that his worldview may be called the first genuine Theory of Everything; it would stand in strong contrast to the reductionist theories given that title at present. In fact he believes his approach may enable us to unify and explain not just science, but philosophy, logic, mathematics, ethics, politics and aesthetics.

  14. Fabrication of diamond shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Biener, Juergen; Wild, Christoph; Woerner, Eckhard

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for fabricating diamond shells is introduced. The fabrication of such shells is a multi-step process, which involves diamond chemical vapor deposition on predetermined mandrels followed by polishing, microfabrication of holes, and removal of the mandrel by an etch process. The resultant shells of the present invention can be configured with a surface roughness at the nanometer level (e.g., on the order of down to about 10 nm RMS) on a mm length scale, and exhibit excellent hardness/strength, and good transparency in the both the infra-red and visible. Specifically, a novel process is disclosed herein, which allows coating of spherical substrates with optical-quality diamond films or nanocrystalline diamond films.

  15. Fabrication of freeform optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Todd; Medicus, Kate; DeGroote Nelson, Jessica

    2015-08-01

    Freeform surfaces on optical components have become an important design tool for optical designers. Non-rotationally symmetric optical surfaces have made solving complex optical problems easier. The manufacturing and testing of these surfaces has been the technical hurdle in freeform optic's wide-spread use. Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) optics manufacturing technology has made the fabrication of optical components more deterministic and streamlined for traditional optics and aspheres. Optimax has developed a robust freeform optical fabrication CNC process that includes generation, high speed VIBE polishing, sub-aperture figure correction, surface smoothing and testing of freeform surfaces. Metrology of freeform surface is currently achieved with coordinate measurement machines (CMM) for lower resolution and interferometry with computer generated holograms (CGH) for high resolution irregularity measurements.

  16. Fabrication of Nanochannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqi Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nature has inspired the fabrication of intelligent devices to meet the needs of the advanced community and better understand the imitation of biology. As a biomimetic nanodevice, nanochannels/nanopores aroused increasing interest because of their potential applications in nanofluidic fields. In this review, we have summarized some recent results mainly focused on the design and fabrication of one-dimensional nanochannels, which can be made of many materials, including polymers, inorganics, biotic materials, and composite materials. These nanochannels have some properties similar to biological channels, such as selectivity, voltage-dependent current fluctuations, ionic rectification current and ionic gating, etc. Therefore, they show great potential for the fields of biosensing, filtration, and energy conversions. These advances can not only help people to understand the living processes in nature, but also inspire scientists to develop novel nanodevices with better performance for mankind.

  17. Evaluation of ion collection area in Faraday probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Daniel L; Gallimore, Alec D

    2010-06-01

    A Faraday probe with three concentric rings was designed and fabricated to assess the effect of gap width and collector diameter in a systematic study of the diagnostic ion collection area. The nested Faraday probe consisted of two concentric collector rings and an outer guard ring, which enabled simultaneous current density measurements on the inner and outer collectors. Two versions of the outer collector were fabricated to create gaps of 0.5 and 1.5 mm between the rings. Distribution of current density in the plume of a low-power Hall thruster ion source was measured in azimuthal sweeps at constant radius from 8 to 20 thruster diameters downstream of the exit plane with variation in facility background pressure. A new analytical technique is proposed to account for ions collected in the gap between the Faraday probe collector and guard ring. This method is shown to exhibit excellent agreement between all nested Faraday probe configurations, and to reduce the magnitude of integrated ion beam current to levels consistent with Hall thruster performance analyses. The technique is further studied by varying the guard ring bias potential with a fixed collector bias potential, thereby controlling ion collection in the gap. Results are in agreement with predictions based on the proposed analytical technique. The method is applied to a past study comparing the measured ion current density profiles of two Faraday probe designs. These findings provide new insight into the nature of ion collection in Faraday probe diagnostics, and lead to improved accuracy with a significant reduction in measurement uncertainty.

  18. Accurate borehole probe calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tchen, T.; Eisler, P. (CSIRO, Mount Waverley, Vic. (Australia). Division of Geomechanics)

    The In Situ Minerals Analysis Group in the CSIRO Division of Geomechanics has developed quantitative borehole logging techniques applicable to iron-ore and coal deposits. They are used currently to determine the formation density, either the iron-ore grades or the raw coal-ash contents, as appropriate, and the borehole diameter. The in-situ analyses depend on probe-calibration equations which were formulated by linear regression analysis that related the probe's spectral outputs with the required geological variable. Calibration equations consisting of a linear combination of first-order terms gave excellent assaying accuracy. The group achieved further improvements in assaying accuracy by developing a more generalised calibration model based on second-order terms and cross-product terms of the probe's spectral parameters. The logging data used for the statistical analysis were recorded in mine development boreholes at three Pilbara iron-ore mines and at a Queensland coal mine. Application of the generalised model, in place of the first-order model, resulted in a reduction of the root mean square (RMS) deviation between assays obtained in the laboratory and by logging, of about 15% relative for iron-ore grades and of about 8% relative for raw coal-ash content. The study also shows that the accuracy obtained using the conventional, non-spectrometric calibration model is inferior to that obtained by using either of the two spectrometric models, where the comparisons made are based on the same set of logging data. 8 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  20. Research Update: Platinum-elastomer mesocomposite as neural electrode coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan R. Minev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum is electrochemically stable and biocompatible, and remains the preferred material for the fabrication of implantable neural electrodes. In a foil or film format, platinum is mechanically stiff compared to interfaced biological tissue. We report a soft, highly stable platinum-elastomer composite that offers both mechanical compliance and the electrochemical properties of platinum. We demonstrate the high-performance of the novel mesocomposite printed on stretchable microelectrodes both in vitro and in vivo. The platinum-elastomer composite is a new promising coating for chronic neural interfaces.

  1. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  2. Low-Cost Detection of Thin Film Stress during Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a simple, cost-effective optical method for thin film stress measurements during growth and/or subsequent annealing processes. Stress arising in thin film fabrication presents production challenges for electronic devices, sensors, and optical coatings; it can lead to substrate distortion and deformation, impacting the performance of thin film products. NASA's technique measures in-situ stress using a simple, noncontact fiber optic probe in the thin film vacuum deposition chamber. This enables real-time monitoring of stress during the fabrication process and allows for efficient control of deposition process parameters. By modifying process parameters in real time during fabrication, thin film stress can be optimized or controlled, improving thin film product performance.

  3. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  4. On the neural mechanisms subserving consciousness and attention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eTallon-Baudry

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consciousness, as described in the experimental literature, is a multi-faceted phenomenon, that impinges on other well-studied concepts such as attention and control. Do consciousness and attention refer to different aspects of the same core phenomenon, or do they correspond to distinct functions? One possibility to address this question is to examine the neural mechanisms underlying consciousness and attention. If consciousness and attention pertain to the same concept, they should rely on shared neural mechanisms. Conversely, if their underlying mechanisms are distinct, then consciousness and attention should be considered as distinct entities. This paper therefore reviews neurophysiological facts arguing in favor or against a tight relationship between consciousness and attention. Three neural mechanisms that have been associated with both attention and consciousness are examined (neural amplification, involvement of the fronto-parietal network, and oscillatory synchrony, to conclude that the commonalities between attention and consciousness at the neural level may have been overestimated. Last but not least, experiments in which both attention and consciousness were probed at the neural level point toward a dissociation between the two concepts. It therefore appears from this review that consciousness and attention rely on distinct neural properties, although they can interact at the behavioral level. It is proposed that a "cumulative influence model", in which attention and consciousness correspond to distinct neural mechanisms feeding a single decisional process leading to behavior, fits best with available neural and behavioral data. In this view, consciousness should not be considered as a top-level executive function but should rather be defined by its experiential properties.

  5. MEMS-based Ni-B probe with enhanced mechanical properties for fine pitch testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyongtae; Kwon, Hong-Beom; Ahn, Hye-Rin; Kim, Yong-Jun

    2017-12-01

    We fabricated and characterized microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based Ni-B probes with enhanced mechanical properties for fine pitch testing. The Ni-B micro-probes were compared with conventional Ni-Co micro-probes in terms of the mechanical performance and thermal effect. The elastic modulus and hardness of Ni-B were found to be 240.4 and 10.9 GPa, respectively, which surpass those of Ni-Co. The Ni-B micro-probes had a higher contact force than the Ni-Co micro-probes by an average of 41.38% owing to the higher elastic modulus. The Ni-B micro-probes had a lower average permanent deformation than the Ni-Co micro-probes after the same overdrive was applied for 1 h by 56.58 µm. The temperature was found to have a negligible effect on the Ni-B micro-probes. These results show that Ni-B micro-probes are useful for fine pitch testing and a potential candidate for replacing conventional Ni-Co micro-probes owing to their advanced mechanical and thermal characteristics.

  6. Sensing lymphoma cells based on a cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptide probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu, E-mail: kzsuga@maebashi-it.ac.jp [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Shinohara, Hiroki; Kadoya, Toshihiko [Maebashi Institute of Technology, Gunma 371-0816 (Japan); Kuramitz, Hideki [Department of Environmental Biology and Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan)

    2016-06-14

    To electrochemically sense lymphoma cells (U937), we fabricated a multifunctional peptide probe that consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. Electron-transfer peptides derive from cysteine residue combined with the C-terminals of four tyrosine residues (Y{sub 4}). A peptide whereby Y{sub 4}C is bound to the C-terminals of protegrin 1 (RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH{sub 2}) is known to be an apoptosis-inducing agent against U937 cells, and is referred to as a peptide-1 probe. An oxidation response of the peptide-1 probe has been observed due to a phenolic hydroxyl group, and this response is decreased by the uptake of the peptide probe into the cells. To improve the cell membrane permeability against U937 cells, the RGGR at the N-terminals of the peptide-1 probe was replaced by RRRR (peptide-2 probe). In contrast, RNRCKGTDVQAWY{sub 4}C (peptide-3 probe), which recognizes ovalbumin, was constructed as a control. Compared with the other probes, the change in the peak current of the peptide-2 probe was the greatest at low concentrations and occurred in a short amount of time. Therefore, the cell membrane permeability of the peptide-2 probe was increased based on the arginine residues and the apoptosis-inducing peptides. The peak current was linear and ranged from 100 to 1000 cells/ml. The relative standard deviation of 600 cells/ml was 5.0% (n = 5). Furthermore, the membrane permeability of the peptide probes was confirmed using fluorescent dye. - Highlights: • We constructed a multifunctional peptide probe for the electrochemical sensing of lymphoma cells. • The peptide probe consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. • The electrode response of the peptide probe changes due to selective uptake into the cells.

  7. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  8. [Neural codes for perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, R; Salinas, E; Hernández, A; Zainos, A; Lemus, L; de Lafuente, V; Luna, R

    This article describes experiments designed to show the neural codes associated with the perception and processing of tactile information. The results of these experiments have shown the neural activity correlated with tactile perception. The neurones of the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) represent the physical attributes of tactile perception. We found that these representations correlated with tactile perception. By means of intracortical microstimulation we demonstrated the causal relationship between S1 activity and tactile perception. In the motor areas of the frontal lobe is to be found the connection between sensorial and motor representation whilst decisions are being taken. S1 generates neural representations of the somatosensory stimuli which seen to be sufficient for tactile perception. These neural representations are subsequently processed by central areas to S1 and seem useful in perception, memory and decision making.

  9. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  10. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  11. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  12. Neural network applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Mary L.; Desai, Utpal; Roppel, T.A.; White, Charles R.

    1993-01-01

    A design procedure is suggested for neural networks which accommodates the inclusion of such knowledge-based systems techniques as fuzzy logic and pairwise comparisons. The use of these procedures in the design of applications combines qualitative and quantitative factors with empirical data to yield a model with justifiable design and parameter selection procedures. The procedure is especially relevant to areas of back-propagation neural network design which are highly responsive to the use of precisely recorded expert knowledge.

  13. Building Neural Net Software

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Costa, José Félix

    1999-01-01

    In a recent paper [Neto et al. 97] we showed that programming languages can be translated on recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. The goal was not efficiency but simplicity. Indeed we used a number-theoretic approach to machine programming, where (integer) numbers were coded in a unary fashion, introducing a exponential slow down in the computations, with respect to a two-symbol tape Turing machine. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theo...

  14. NEMEFO: NEural MEteorological FOrecast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasero, E.; Moniaci, W.; Meindl, T.; Montuori, A. [Polytechnic of Turin (Italy). Dept. of Electronics

    2004-07-01

    Artificial Neural Systems are a well-known technique used to classify and recognize objects. Introducing the time dimension they can be used to forecast numerical series. NEMEFO is a ''nowcasting'' tool, which uses both statistical and neural systems to forecast meteorological data in a restricted area close to a meteorological weather station in a short time range (3 hours). Ice, fog, rain are typical events which can be anticipated by NEMEFO. (orig.)

  15. The Galaxy Evolution Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Jason; Galaxy Evolution Probe Team

    2018-01-01

    The Galaxy Evolution Probe (GEP) is a concept for a far-infrared observatory to survey large regions of sky for star-forming galaxies from z = 0 to beyond z = 3. Our knowledge of galaxy formation is incomplete and requires uniform surveys over a large range of redshifts and environments to accurately describe mass assembly, star formation, supermassive black hole growth, interactions between these processes, and what led to their decline from z ~ 2 to the present day. Infrared observations are sensitive to dusty, star-forming galaxies, which have bright polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and warm dust continuum in the rest-frame mid infrared and cooler thermal dust emission in the far infrared. Unlike previous far-infrared continuum surveys, the GEP will measure photometric redshifts commensurate with galaxy detections from PAH emission and Si absorption features, without the need for obtaining spectroscopic redshifts of faint counterparts at other wavelengths.The GEP design includes a 2 m diameter telescope actively cooled to 4 K and two instruments: (1) An imager covering 10 to 300 um with 25 spectral resolution R ~ 8 bands (with lower R at the longest wavelengths) to detect star-forming galaxies and measure their redshifts photometrically. (2) A 23 – 190 um, R ~ 250 dispersive spectrometer for redshift confirmation and identification of obscured AGN using atomic fine-structure lines. Lines including [Ne V], [O IV], [O III], [O I], and [C II] will probe gas physical conditions, radiation field hardness, and metallicity. Notionally, the GEP will have a two-year mission: galaxy surveys with photometric redshifts in the first year and a second year devoted to follow-up spectroscopy. A comprehensive picture of star formation in galaxies over the last 10 billion years will be assembled from cosmologically relevant volumes, spanning environments from field galaxies and groups, to protoclusters, to dense galaxy clusters.Commissioned by NASA, the

  16. Comparative Analysis of Soft Computing Models in Prediction of Bending Rigidity of Cotton Woven Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, R.; Behera, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative prediction of fabric mechanical properties is an essential requirement for design engineering of textile and apparel products. In this work, the possibility of prediction of bending rigidity of cotton woven fabrics has been explored with the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and two hybrid methodologies, namely Neuro-genetic modeling and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) modeling. For this purpose, a set of cotton woven grey fabrics was desized, scoured and relaxed. The fabrics were then conditioned and tested for bending properties. With the database thus created, a neural network model was first developed using back propagation as the learning algorithm. The second model was developed by applying a hybrid learning strategy, in which genetic algorithm was first used as a learning algorithm to optimize the number of neurons and connection weights of the neural network. The Genetic algorithm optimized network structure was further allowed to learn using back propagation algorithm. In the third model, an ANFIS modeling approach was attempted to map the input-output data. The prediction performances of the models were compared and a sensitivity analysis was reported. The results show that the prediction by neuro-genetic and ANFIS models were better in comparison with that of back propagation neural network model.

  17. Neural prostheses and biomedical microsystems in neurological rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, K P

    2007-01-01

    Interfaces between electrodes and the neural system differ with respect to material and shape depending on their intended application and fabrication method. This chapter will review the different electrode designs regarding the technological implementation and fabrication process. Furthermore this book chapter will describe electrodes for interfacing the peripheral nerves like cuff, book or helix as well as electrodes for interfacing the cortex like needle arrays. The implantation method and mechanical interaction between the electrode and the nervous tissue were taken into consideration. To develop appropriate microtechnological assembling strategies that ensure proper interfacing between the tiny electrodes and microelectronics or connectors is one of the major challenges. The integration of electronics into the system helps to improve the reliability of detecting neural signals and reduces the size of the implants. Promising results with these novel electrodes will pave the road for future developments such as visual prosthetics or improved control of artificial limbs in paralyzed patients.

  18. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  19. Carbon-Ag/AgCl probes for detection of cell activity in droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, Kosuke; Ono, Kaoru; Arai, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Shiku, Hitoshi; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2013-04-16

    In this study, we fabricated a probe consisting of a carbon nanoelectrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode for detecting the activity of cells in single droplets. HeLa cells were confined into a single droplet, and the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the cells was electrochemically measured using the probe inserted into the droplet. The ALP of the confined cells catalyzed the hydrolysis of p-aminophenyl phosphate (PAPP) to yield p-aminophenol (PAP) that gave electrochemical responses. Since the tip of the carbon-Ag/AgCl probe is very small, it is useful for electrochemical analysis of cells using droplets.

  20. Fabrication of zein nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecha, Jarupat

    The concerns on the increase of polluting plastic wastes as well as the U.S. dependence on imported petrochemical products have driven an attention towards alternative biodegradable polymers from renewable resources. Zein protein, a co-product from ethanol production from corn, is a good candidate. This research project aims to increase zein value by adopting nanotechnology for fabricating advanced zein packaging films and zein microfluidic devices. Two nanotechnology approaches were focused: the polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique where the nanocomposite structures were created in the zein matrix, and the soft lithography and the microfluidic devices where the micro and nanopatterns were created on the zein film surfaces. The polymer nanoclay nanocomposite technique was adopted in the commonly used zein film fabrication processes which were solvent casting and extrusion blowing methods. The two methods resulted in partially exfoliated nanocomposite structures. The impact of nanoclays on the physical properties of zein films strongly depended on the film preparation techniques. The impact of nanoclay concentration was more pronounced in the films made by extrusion blowing technique than by the solvent casting technique. As the processability limitation for the extrusion blowing technique of the zein sample containing hight nanoclay content, the effect of the nanoclay content on the rheological properties of zein hybrid resins at linear and nonlinear viscoelastic regions were further investigated. A pristine zein resin exhibited soft solid like behavior. On the other hand, the zein hybrid with nanoclay content greater than 5 wt.% showed more liquid like behavior, suggesting that the nanoclays interrupted the entangled zein network. There was good correspondence between the experimental data and the predictions of the Wagner model for the pristine zein resins. However, the model failed to predict the steady shear properties of the zein nanoclay nanocomposite

  1. FPGA Simulation Engine for Customized Construction of Neural Microcircuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Hugh T.; Cong, Jason; Wu, Di

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe an FPGA-based platform for high-performance and low-power simulation of neural microcircuits composed from integrate-and-fire (IAF) neurons. Based on high-level synthesis, our platform uses design templates to map hierarchies of neuron model to logic fabrics. This approach bypasses high design complexity and enables easy optimization and design space exploration. We demonstrate the benefits of our platform by simulating a variety of neural microcircuits that perform oscillatory path integration, which evidence suggests may be a critical building block of the navigation system inside a rodent’s brain. Experiments show that our FPGA simulation engine for oscillatory neural microcircuits can achieve up to 39× speedup compared to software benchmarks on commodity CPU, and 232× energy reduction compared to embedded ARM core. PMID:25584120

  2. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  3. Non-inductive current probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1977-01-01

    The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is......The current probe described is a low-cost, shunt resistor for monitoring current pulses in e.g., pulsed lasers. Rise time is...

  4. AFIP-2 Fabrication Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn Moore

    2010-02-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full-size Plate In Center Flux Trap Position (AFIP)-2 experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP 2 experiment to be irradiated in the Idaho National Laboratory ATR. This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  5. AFIP-6 Fabrication Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn A. Moore; M. Craig Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-6 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  6. Filter Fabrics for Airport Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-01

    pneumatically filling a woven polypropylene stocking with sand and vibrating it into a prebored hole, while another method uses a polyester nonwoven fabric...Selected Nonwoven Filter Fabrics," Letter Report, June 1977, U. S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, CE, Vicksburg, Miss. 18. BalL, J. E...woven and nonwoven plastic filter fabric. It has been developed based on limited field performance observations and the laboratory test evaluation of

  7. Ultraviolet Protection by Fabric Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The increasing emission of greenhouse gases has evoked the human being to save the ozone layer and minimize the risk of ultraviolet radiation (UVR. Various fabric structures have been explored to achieve desired ultraviolet protection factor (UPF in various situations. Objective. In this study, the effect of various filament configurations like twisted, flat, intermingled, and textured in multifilament yarns on fabric in different combinations is assessed in order to engineer a fabric of better ultraviolet protection factor (UPF. Methods. In order to engineer a fabric having optimum UV protection with sufficient comfort level in multifilament woven fabrics, four different yarn configurations, intermingled, textured, twisted, and flat, were used to develop twelve different fabric samples. The most UV absorbing and most demanding fibre polyethylene terephthalate (PET was considered in different filament configuration. Results. The combinations of intermingled warp with flat, intermingled, and textured weft provided excellent UVR protection comparatively at about 22.5 mg/cm2 fabric areal density. The presence of twisted yarn reduced the UV protection due to enhanced openness in fabric structure. Conclusion. The appropriate combination of warp and weft threads of different configuration should be selected judiciously in order to extract maximum UV protection and wear comfort attributes in multifilament woven PET fabrics.

  8. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices....

  9. Mobile Probes in Mobile Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Blomhøj, Ulla; Duvaa, Uffe

    In this paper experiences from using mobile probes in educational design of a mobile learning application is presented. The probing process stems from the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. In the project, the mobile phone was not only acting...... as an agent for acquiring empirical data (as the situation in hitherto mobile probe settings) but was also the technological medium for which data should say something about (mobile learning). Consequently, not only the content of the data but also the ways in which data was delivered and handled, provided...... a valuable dimension for investigating mobile use. The data was collected at the same time as design activities took place and the collective data was analysed based on user experience goals and cognitive processes from interaction design and mobile learning. The mobile probe increased the knowledge base...

  10. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Dennis P [Albuquerque, NM; Walkington, Phil [Albuquerque, NM; Rackow, Kirk A [Albuquerque, NM; Hohman, Ed [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-04-01

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  11. Nozzle fabrication technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    This invention relates to techniques for fabricating hour glass throat or convergent divergent nozzle shapes, and more particularly to new and improved techniques for forming rocket nozzles from electrically conductive material and forming cooling channels in the wall thereof. The concept of positioning a block of electrically conductive material so that its axis is set at a predetermined skew angle with relation to a travelling electron discharge machine electrode and thereafter revolving the body about its own axis to generate a hyperbolic surface of revolution, either internal or external is novel. The method will generate a rocket nozzle which may be provided with cooling channels using the same control and positioning system. The configuration of the cooling channels so produced are unique and novel. Also the method is adaptable to nonmetallic material using analogous cutting tools, such as, water jet, laser, abrasive wire and hot wire.

  12. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  13. Fabrication of Pillar Shaped Electrode Arrays for Artificial Retinal Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung June Kim

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyimide has been widely applied to neural prosthetic devices, such as the retinal implants, due to its well-known biocompatibility and ability to be micropatterned. However, planar films of polyimide that are typically employed show a limited ability in reducing the distance between electrodes and targeting cell layers, which limits site resolution for effective multi-channel stimulation. In this paper, we report a newly designed device with a pillar structure that more effectively interfaces with the target. Electrode arrays were successfully fabricated and safely implanted inside the rabbit eye in suprachoroidal space. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT showed well-preserved pillar structures of the electrode without damage. Bipolar stimulation was applied through paired sites (6:1 and the neural responses were successfully recorded from several regions in the visual cortex. Electrically evoked cortical potential by the pillar electrode array stimulation were compared to visual evoked potential under full-field light stimulation.

  14. Combined nanoprobes for scanning probe microscopy: laser technology for processing and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veiko, V. P.; Golubok, A. O.; Zuong, Z.; Varkentina, N. V.; Yakovlev, E. B.

    2008-02-01

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a high spatial resolution method of surface topography visualization and measurement of its local properties. The detecting of interaction arising between the sharp solid-state probe and the sample surface is the foundation of SPM. In dependence from nature of this interaction the scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), scanning force microscopy (SFM), scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM), etc. are distinguished. The spatial resolution of all types of probe microscopy determins both sharpness of increasing of interaction between a probe and a sample at their approach, and shape and size of a top of a solid-state probe. So, the progress in SPM information capabilities is highly depends from probe properties and first of all from properly fabricated aperture size. Fabrication procedures are rather complicated because of nanometric scale size of aperture and hard requirements to reproducibility and need to be improved. The way how to do it is involving of feed-back in a processing procedure-results in two types of feedback for the process of drawing-out has been suggested, tested and installed into the technological set-up. Different probes have been fabricated by laser-assisted drawing-out during this work: SNOM types from optical fibers, micropipettes from quartz glass capillaries, micropipettes with microwires inside and with metallic covers outside. Some examples of application of above mentioned combined probes for cell membrane technology are described. Most important from them are topographical studying of cells and bacteria in living condition (in liquid) and studying of the mechanical properties of cell (rigidity of cell membrane) using the nanopipette as a tip of a force sensor. Also measurement of ion current that runs through cell membrane during its metabolic process using the nanopipette as well as in the well-known patch-clamp method have been done.

  15. Transient Astrophysics Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jordan

    2017-08-01

    Transient Astrophysics Probe (TAP), selected by NASA for a funded Concept Study, is a wide-field high-energy transient mission proposed for flight starting in the late 2020s. TAP’s main science goals, called out as Frontier Discovery areas in the 2010 Decadal Survey, are time-domain astrophysics and counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) detections. The mission instruments include unique imaging soft X-ray optics that allow ~500 deg2 FoV in each of four separate modules; a high sensitivity, 1 deg2 FoV soft X-ray telescope based on single crystal silicon optics; a passively cooled, 1 deg2 FoV Infrared telescope with bandpass 0.6-3 micron; and a set of ~8 small NaI gamma-ray detectors. TAP will observe many events per year of X-ray transients related to compact objects, including tidal disruptions of stars, supernova shock breakouts, neutron star bursts and superbursts, and high redshift Gamma-Ray Bursts. Perhaps most exciting is TAP’s capability to observe X-ray and IR counterparts of GWs involving stellar mass black holes detected by LIGO/Virgo, and possibly X-ray counterparts of GWs from supermassive black holes, detected by LISA and Pulsar Timing Arrays.

  16. Hyperbolic Hopfield neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M

    2013-02-01

    In recent years, several neural networks using Clifford algebra have been studied. Clifford algebra is also called geometric algebra. Complex-valued Hopfield neural networks (CHNNs) are the most popular neural networks using Clifford algebra. The aim of this brief is to construct hyperbolic HNNs (HHNNs) as an analog of CHNNs. Hyperbolic algebra is a Clifford algebra based on Lorentzian geometry. In this brief, a hyperbolic neuron is defined in a manner analogous to a phasor neuron, which is a typical complex-valued neuron model. HHNNs share common concepts with CHNNs, such as the angle and energy. However, HHNNs and CHNNs are different in several aspects. The states of hyperbolic neurons do not form a circle, and, therefore, the start and end states are not identical. In the quantized version, unlike complex-valued neurons, hyperbolic neurons have an infinite number of states.

  17. Neural Semantic Encoders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkhdalai, Tsendsuren; Yu, Hong

    2017-04-01

    We present a memory augmented neural network for natural language understanding: Neural Semantic Encoders. NSE is equipped with a novel memory update rule and has a variable sized encoding memory that evolves over time and maintains the understanding of input sequences through read, compose and write operations. NSE can also access multiple and shared memories. In this paper, we demonstrated the effectiveness and the flexibility of NSE on five different natural language tasks: natural language inference, question answering, sentence classification, document sentiment analysis and machine translation where NSE achieved state-of-the-art performance when evaluated on publically available benchmarks. For example, our shared-memory model showed an encouraging result on neural machine translation, improving an attention-based baseline by approximately 1.0 BLEU.

  18. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  19. Introduction to Artificial Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan

    1999-01-01

    The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks.......The note addresses introduction to signal analysis and classification based on artificial feed-forward neural networks....

  20. Deconvolution using a neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehman, S.K.

    1990-11-15

    Viewing one dimensional deconvolution as a matrix inversion problem, we compare a neural network backpropagation matrix inverse with LMS, and pseudo-inverse. This is a largely an exercise in understanding how our neural network code works. 1 ref.

  1. Mesh electronics: a new paradigm for tissue-like brain probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Yang, Xiao; Zhou, Tao; Lieber, Charles M

    2017-12-01

    Existing implantable neurotechnologies for understanding the brain and treating neurological diseases have intrinsic properties that have limited their capability to achieve chronically-stable brain interfaces with single-neuron spatiotemporal resolution. These limitations reflect what has been dichotomy between the structure and mechanical properties of living brain tissue and non-living neural probes. To bridge the gap between neural and electronic networks, we have introduced the new concept of mesh electronics probes designed with structural and mechanical properties such that the implant begins to 'look and behave' like neural tissue. Syringe-implanted mesh electronics have led to the realization of probes that are neuro-attractive and free of the chronic immune response, as well as capable of stable long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity at the single-neuron level. This review provides a historical overview of a 10-year development of mesh electronics by highlighting the tissue-like design, syringe-assisted delivery, seamless neural tissue integration, and single-neuron level chronic recording stability of mesh electronics. We also offer insights on unique near-term opportunities and future directions for neuroscience and neurology that now are available or expected for mesh electronics neurotechnologies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Wang Ai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  3. Genetically encoded fluorescent redox probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Wei; Ai, Hui-Wang

    2013-11-11

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, advantages and pitfalls. Our recent work on reaction-based encoded probes that are responsive to particular redox signaling molecules is also reviewed. Future challenges and directions are also commented.

  4. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L [Denver, CO; Hambarian, Artak [Yerevan, AM

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  5. Prototype of a single probe Compton camera for laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, A.; Nakamura, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.; Sakuma, I.

    2017-02-01

    Image-guided surgery (IGS) is performed using a real-time surgery navigation system with three-dimensional (3D) position tracking of surgical tools. IGS is fast becoming an important technology for high-precision laparoscopic surgeries, in which the field of view is limited. In particular, recent developments in intraoperative imaging using radioactive biomarkers may enable advanced IGS for supporting malignant tumor removal surgery. In this light, we develop a novel intraoperative probe with a Compton camera and a position tracking system for performing real-time radiation-guided surgery. A prototype probe consisting of Ce :Gd3 Al2 Ga3 O12 (GAGG) crystals and silicon photomultipliers was fabricated, and its reconstruction algorithm was optimized to enable real-time position tracking. The results demonstrated the visualization capability of the radiation source with ARM = ∼ 22.1 ° and the effectiveness of the proposed system.

  6. Neural Network Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kai; Salamon, Peter

    1990-01-01

    We propose several means for improving the performance an training of neural networks for classification. We use crossvalidation as a tool for optimizing network parameters and architecture. We show further that the remaining generalization error can be reduced by invoking ensembles of similar...... networks....

  7. Neural systems for control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omidvar, Omid; Elliott, David L

    1997-01-01

    ... is reprinted with permission from A. Barto, "Reinforcement Learning," Handbook of Brain Theory and Neural Networks, M.A. Arbib, ed.. The MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, pp. 804-809, 1995. Chapter 4, Figures 4-5 and 7-9 and Tables 2-5, are reprinted with permission, from S. Cho, "Map Formation in Proprioceptive Cortex," International Jour...

  8. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pregnancies each year in the United States. A baby’s neural tube normally develops into the brain and spinal cord. ... fluid in the brain. This is called hydrocephalus. Babies with this condition are treated with surgery to insert a tube (called a shunt) into the brain. The shunt ...

  9. Tunneling spectroscopy using a probe qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkley, A. J.; Przybysz, A. J.; Lanting, T.; Harris, R.; Dickson, N.; Altomare, F.; Amin, M. H.; Bunyk, P.; Enderud, C.; Hoskinson, E.; Johnson, M. W.; Ladizinsky, E.; Neufeld, R.; Rich, C.; Smirnov, A. Yu.; Tolkacheva, E.; Uchaikin, S.; Wilson, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a quantum tunneling spectroscopy technique that requires only low-bandwidth control. The method involves coupling a probe qubit to the system under study to create a localized probe state. The energy of the probe state is then scanned with respect to the unperturbed energy levels of the probed system. Incoherent tunneling transitions that flip the state of the probe qubit occur when the energy bias of the probe is close to an eigenenergy of the probed system. Monitoring these transitions allows the reconstruction of the probed system eigenspectrum. We demonstrate this method on an rf SQUID flux qubit.

  10. Listener: a probe into information based material specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Karmon, Ayelet

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the thinking and making of the architectural research probe Listener. Developed as an interdisciplinary collaboration between textile design and architecture, Listener explores how information based fabrication technologies are challenging the material practices of architecture....... The paper investigates how textile design can be understood as a model for architectural production providing new strategies for material specification and allowing the thinking of material as inherently variegated and performative. The paper traces the two fold information based strategies present...... in the Listener project. Firstly, the paper presents the design strategy leading to the development of bespoke interfaces between parametric design and CNC based textile fabrication. Secondly, by integrating structural and actuated materials the paper presents the making of a new class of materials...

  11. Probing local work function of electron emitting Si-nanofacets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Tanmoy; Som, Tapobrata

    2017-10-01

    Large area, Si-nanofacets are synthesized by obliquely incident low energy Ar+-ion-beam bombardment at room temperature (RT). The field emission properties of such nanofacets are studied based on current-voltage measurements and the Fowler-Nordheim equation. Low turn-on field with relatively high current density is obtained due to the shape and an overall rough morphology. We demonstrate a tunable field emission property from the silicon nanofacets by varying the ion exposure time. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) in conjunction with Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements provide the information on the aspect ratio and confirms the presence of native oxide layer near the apexes of the facets, respectively. The inhomogeneous oxidation leads to an increase in the local work function at the apexes of the facets, restricting the electron emission from the same. Due to its room temperature fabrication, the present method is of great significance to the low-cost vacuum field emission devices fabrication.

  12. Gold nanocone near-field scanning optical microscopy probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Monika; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Altoe, M Virginia P; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Kern, Dieter P

    2011-04-26

    Near-field scanning optical microscopy enables the simultaneous topographical and subdiffraction limited optical imaging of surfaces. A process is presented for the implementation of single individually engineered gold cones at the tips of atomic force microscopy cantilevers. These cantilevers act as novel high-performance optical near-field probes. In the fabrication, thin-film metallization, electron beam induced deposition of etch masks, and Ar ion milling are combined. The cone constitutes a well-defined highly efficient optical antenna with a tip radius on the order of 10 nm and an adjustable plasmon resonance frequency. The sharp tip enables high resolution topographical imaging. By controllably varying the cone size, the resonance frequency can be adapted to the application of choice. Structural properties of these sharp-tipped probes are presented together with topographical images recorded with a cone probe. The antenna functionality is demonstrated by gathering the near-field enhanced Raman signature of individual carbon nanotubes with a gold cone scanning probe.

  13. A three dimensional probe positioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T; Sun, X; Dorf, L; Furno, I; Lapenta, G

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  14. A three dimensional probe positionera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrator, T.; Sun, X.; Dorf, L.; Furno, I.; Lapenta, G.

    2008-10-01

    In order to sort out the physics that is important in many plasma experiments, data in three dimensions (3D) are becoming necessary. Access to the usual cylindrical vacuum vessel is typically restricted to radially or axially insertable probes that can pivot. The space that can be explored usually has significant restrictions either because probe travel must be along a travel path, or a "wobbly" probe positioner requires one to map between a moveable coordinate system and a preferred laboratory coordinate system. This could for example introduce errors in measurements of vector quantities such as magnetic field or flow. We describe the design and implementation of a 3D probe positioner that slides in two dimensions on a double O-ring seal and radially inserts along the third dimension. The net result is that a 3D space can be explored in a laboratory Cartesian reference frame.

  15. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M.; Balcom, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid.

  16. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M; Balcom, B J

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. FBG sensor probes with epoxy for tracing the maximum strain of structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jooeun; Kim, Mi Hyun; Kwon, Il Bum [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Sun [FINISA Korea Co. Ltd., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Kyung [Agency for Defence Development, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Structures can be evaluated their health status by allowable loading criteria. These criteria can be determined by the maximum strain. Therefore, in order to detect this maximum strain of structures, fiber optic Bragg grating(FBG) sensor probes are newly designed and fabricated to perform the memorizing detection even if the sensor system is on-and-off. The probe is constructed with an FBG optical fiber embedded in silver epoxy. When the load is applied and removed on the structure, the residual strain remains in the silver epoxy to memorize the maximum strain effect. In this study, a commercial Al-foil bonded FBG sensor probe was tested to investigate the detection feasibility at first. FBG sensor probes with silver epoxy were fabricated as three different sizes. The detection feasibility of maximum strain was studied by doing the tensile tests of CFRP specimens bonded with these FBG sensor probes. It was investigated the sensitivity coefficient defined as the maximum strain divided by the residual strain. The highest sensitivity was 0.078 of the thin probe having the thickness of 2 mm.

  18. Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of Miniature Optic Gas Sensor (MOGS) Probe Technology" project will investigate newly developed optic gas sensors delivered from a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Phase II effort. A ventilation test rig will be designed and fabricated to test the sensors while integrated with a Suited Manikin Test Apparatus (SMTA). Once the sensors are integrated, a series of test points will be completed to verify that the sensors can withstand Advanced Suit Portable Life Support System (PLSS) environments and associated human metabolic profiles for changes in pressure and levels of Oxygen (ppO2), carbon dioxide (ppCO2), and humidity (ppH2O).

  19. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Redox Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Hui-Wang Ai; Wei Ren

    2013-01-01

    Redox processes are involved in almost every cell of the body as a consequence of aerobic life. In the past decades, redox biology has been increasingly recognized as one of the key themes in cell signaling. The progress has been accelerated by development of fluorescent probes that can monitor redox conditions and dynamics in cells and cell compartments. This short paper focuses on fluorescent redox probes that are genetically encoded, and discusses their properties, molecular mechanism, adv...

  20. The navigation of space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  1. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuang Xiong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments.

  2. A Novel Dog-Bone Oscillating AFM Probe with Thermal Actuation and Piezoresistive Detection †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhuang; Mairiaux, Estelle; Walter, Benjamin; Faucher, Marc; Buchaillot, Lionel; Legrand, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    In order to effectively increase the resonance frequency and the quality factor of atomic force microscope (AFM) probes, a novel oscillating probe based on a dog-bone shaped MEMS resonator was conceived, designed, fabricated and evaluated. The novel probe with 400 μm in length, 100 μm in width and 5 μm in thickness was enabled to feature MHz resonance frequencies with integrated thermal actuation and piezoresistive detection. Standard silicon micromachining was employed. Both electrical and optical measurements were carried out in air. The resonance frequency and the quality factor of the novel probe were measured to be 5.4 MHz and 4000 respectively, which are much higher than those (about several hundreds of kHz) of commonly used cantilever probes. The probe was mounted onto a commercial AFM set-up through a dedicated probe-holder and circuit board. Topographic images of patterned resist samples were obtained. It is expected that the resonance frequency and the measurement bandwidth of such probes will be further increased by a proper downscaling, thus leading to a significant increase in the scanning speed capability of AFM instruments. PMID:25365463

  3. A Miniature Four-Hole Probe for Measurement of Three-Dimensional Flow with Large Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravirai Jangir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A miniature four-hole probe with a sensing area of 1.284 mm2 to minimise the measurement errors due to the large pressure and velocity gradients that occur in highly three-dimensional turbomachinery flows is designed, fabricated, calibrated, and validated. The probe has good spatial resolution in two directions, thus minimising spatial and flow gradient errors. The probe is calibrated in an open jet calibration tunnel at a velocity of 50 m/s in yaw and pitch angles range of ±40 degrees with an interval of 5 degrees. The calibration coefficients are defined, determined, and presented. Sensitivity coefficients are also calculated and presented. A lookup table method is used to determine the four unknown quantities, namely, total and static pressures and flow angles. The maximum absolute errors in yaw and pitch angles are 2.4 and 1.3 deg., respectively. The maximum absolute errors in total, static, and dynamic pressures are 3.4, 3.9, and 4.9% of the dynamic pressures, respectively. Measurements made with this probe, a conventional five-hole probe and a miniature Pitot probe across a calibration section, demonstrated that the errors due to gradient and surface proximity for this probe are considerably reduced compared to the five-hole probe.

  4. Fabric circuits and method of manufacturing fabric circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Scully, Robert C. (Inventor); Trevino, Robert C. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A flexible, fabric-based circuit comprises a non-conductive flexible layer of fabric and a conductive flexible layer of fabric adjacent thereto. A non-conductive thread, an adhesive, and/or other means may be used for attaching the conductive layer to the non-conductive layer. In some embodiments, the layers are attached by a computer-driven embroidery machine at pre-determined portions or locations in accordance with a pre-determined attachment layout before automated cutting. In some other embodiments, an automated milling machine or a computer-driven laser using a pre-designed circuit trace as a template cuts the conductive layer so as to separate an undesired portion of the conductive layer from a desired portion of the conductive layer. Additional layers of conductive fabric may be attached in some embodiments to form a multi-layer construct.

  5. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kafi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C, C(RGD4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot or three dimensional (rod or pillar like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD, graphene oxide (GO and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  6. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  7. An optical microsystem for wireless neural recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, P; Ziaie, B

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe an optical microsystem for wireless neural recording. The system incorporated recording electrodes, integrated electronics, surface-mount LEDs, and a CCD camera. The components were mounted on a PCB platform having a total dimension of 2.2 x 2.2 cm(2), 4 integrated biopotential amplifiers (IBA) and 16 LEDs. The IBAs having a bandwidth of 0.1-93.5Hz with the midband gain of 38 dB were fabricated using AMI 1.6microm technology. The simulated local field potentials (LFP) were amplified and used to drive the LEDs. A CCD camera with a temporal resolution of 30FPS was used to capture the image and retrieve the signal.

  8. Natural fabric of Hildegardia populifolia composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Guduri, BBR

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Hildegardia populofolia fabric content, fabric orientation, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and silane coupling agent treatment on the surface properties of the fabric, mechanical and fracture properties of Hildegardia populifolia...

  9. Fabrication of integrated metallic MEMS devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yalcinkaya, Arda Deniz; Ravnkilde, Jan Tue; Hansen, Ole

    2002-01-01

    A simple and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible fabrication technique for microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices is presented. The fabrication technology makes use of electroplated metal layers. Among the fabricated devices, high quality factor microresonators...

  10. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Fluorescent, Genetically-Encoded Voltage Probe Capable of Resolving Action Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren Barnett; Jelena Platisa; Marko Popovic; Pieribone, Vincent A.; Thomas Hughes

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need in neuroscience for genetically-encoded, fluorescent voltage probes that can be targeted to specific neurons and circuits to allow study of neural activity using fluorescent imaging. We created 90 constructs in which the voltage sensing portion (S1-S4) of Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (CiVSP) was fused to circularly permuted eGFP. This led to ElectricPk, a probe that is an order of magnitude faster (taus ~1-2 ms) than any currently published fluores...

  12. Plasmonic components fabrication via nanoimprint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    A review report on nanoimprinted plasmonic components is given. The fabrication of different metal–dielectric geometries and nanostructured surfaces that support either propagating or localized surface plasmon modes is discussed. The main characteristics and advantages of the nanoimprint technology...... for the fabrication of various plasmonic structures are outlined. The discussion of plasmonic waveguiding structures focuses on planar waveguides based on metal strips embedded into a dielectric and on profiled metal surfaces. Nanoimprint-based fabrication of two-dimensional nanostructured plasmonic surfaces...... for enhanced transmission studies and sensor applications is also discussed. Throughout the report, the main fabrication schemes are described, as well as the challenges facing future manufacturing of plasmonic components for device applications....

  13. Geoacoustic Physical Model Fabrication Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Fabricates three-dimensional rough surfaces (e.g., fractals, ripples) out of materials such as PVC or wax to simulate the roughness properties associated...

  14. Fabric Structures Team Technology Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    testManufacturing Quilt Lines ofNon-Woven Composite , methods used, and overall benefits achieved. Payoff: • Enhanced non-woven composite tent liners... method on general purpose shelter fabric, as well as on tent liner fabrics. •Demonstrated efficacy with numerous biological and chemical agents Carbon...based Polymer gel electrolyte Ventana Reseach Corp. • Light-activated, reactive photocatalytic coatings that generate & reversibly store

  15. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Childs; Hao Li; Daniella M. Lewittes; Biqin Dong; Wenzhong Liu; Xiao Shu; Cheng Sun; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-01-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spe...

  16. Washable and antibacterial superhydrophbic fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Junfei; Wang, Zhile; Wang, Fajun; Xue, Mingshan; Li, Wen; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2016-02-01

    Inspired by the high adherence of mussel and the excellent water repellency of lotus leaf, superhydrophobic fabric is fabricated via the sequential deposition of polydopamine, Ag2O, and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol, which shows excellent washability and high anti-bacterial activity due to the strong interfacial interaction and the surface silver species as well as the non-wettability, respectively.

  17. Fabricating plasmonic components for nanophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boltasseva, Alexandra; Nielsen, Rasmus Bundgaard; Jeppesen, Claus

    2009-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed.......We report on experimental realization of different metal-dielectric structures that are used as surface plasmon polariton waveguides and as plasmonic metamaterials. Fabrication approaches based on different lithographic and deposition techniques are discussed....

  18. Silicone nanocomposite coatings for fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Kenneth (Inventor); Lee, Stein S. (Inventor); Singhal, Amit (Inventor); Ou, Runqing (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A silicone based coating for fabrics utilizing dual nanocomposite fillers providing enhanced mechanical and thermal properties to the silicone base. The first filler includes nanoclusters of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and a metal oxide and a second filler of exfoliated clay nanoparticles. The coating is particularly suitable for inflatable fabrics used in several space, military, and consumer applications, including airbags, parachutes, rafts, boat sails, and inflatable shelters.

  19. Volume Control of Metal-Plating Deposition Using a Nanopipette Probe by Controlling Electric Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, So; Keino, Takuya; Iwata, Futoshi

    2010-08-01

    We describe a novel volume control technique for local metal-plating deposition using a scanning probe microscope with a nanopipette probe. The nanopipette probe, a thermally pulled capillary glass tube, was filled with CuSO4 electrolyte solution. A Cu dot was electrochemically deposited on an Au surface when the nanopipette probe was nearly in contact with the surface by applying a dc bias voltage between the electrolyte solution and the surface. The volume of the deposited Cu dot was dependent on the electric charge during the electrochemical reaction. By controlling the electric charge during the deposition, it was possible to control the volume of the Cu dot. This technique of local metal plating with deposition volume control is applicable for the fabrication of various nanometer-scale structures in fields such as nanomechanics and nanoelectronics.

  20. Specialized probes based on hydroxyapatite calcium for heart tissues research by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, Mikhail, E-mail: cloudjyk@yandex.ru; Golubok, Alexander [St. Petersburg National Research University of Information Technologies, Mechanics and Optics (ITMO University), Kronverkskii pr. 49, St. Petersburg, 197101 (Russian Federation); Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Rizhskii pr. 26, St. Petersburg, 190103 (Russian Federation); Gulyaev, Nikolai [Military Medical Academy named after S.M. Kirov, Academic Lebedev str. 6, St. Petersburg, 194044 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-17

    The new specialized AFM-probes with hydroxyapatite structures for atomic force microscopy of heart tissues calcification were created and studied. A process of probe fabrication is demonstrated. The adhesive forces between specialized hydroxyapatite probe and endothelium/subendothelial layers were investigated. It was found that the adhesion forces are significantly higher for the subendothelial layers. We consider that it is connected with the formation and localization of hydroxyapatite in the area of subendothelial layers of heart tissues. In addition, the roughness analysis and structure visualization of the endothelial surface of the heart tissue were carried out. The results show high efficiency of created specialized probes at study a calcinations process of the aortic heart tissues.

  1. Transillumination and reflectance probes for in vivo near-IR imaging of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth A.; Staninec, Michal; Tom, Henry; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the utility of near infrared (NIR) imaging for caries detection employing transillumination and reflectance imaging geometries. Three intra-oral NIR imaging probes were fabricated for the acquisition of in vivo, real time videos using a high definition InGaAs SWIR camera and near-IR broadband light sources. Two transillumination probes provide occlusal and interproximal images using 1300-nm light where water absorption is low and enamel manifests the highest transparency. A third reflectance probe utilizes cross polarization and operates at >1500-nm, where water absorption is higher which reduces the reflectivity of sound tissues, significantly increasing lesion contrast. These probes are being used in an ongoing clinical study to assess the diagnostic performance of NIR imaging for the detection of caries lesions in teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons.

  2. Neural network technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, James A.

    1991-01-01

    A whole new arena of computer technologies is now beginning to form. Still in its infancy, neural network technology is a biologically inspired methodology which draws on nature's own cognitive processes. The Software Technology Branch has provided a software tool, Neural Execution and Training System (NETS), to industry, government, and academia to facilitate and expedite the use of this technology. NETS is written in the C programming language and can be executed on a variety of machines. Once a network has been debugged, NETS can produce a C source code which implements the network. This code can then be incorporated into other software systems. Described here are various software projects currently under development with NETS and the anticipated future enhancements to NETS and the technology.

  3. Analysis of neural data

    CERN Document Server

    Kass, Robert E; Brown, Emery N

    2014-01-01

    Continual improvements in data collection and processing have had a huge impact on brain research, producing data sets that are often large and complicated. By emphasizing a few fundamental principles, and a handful of ubiquitous techniques, Analysis of Neural Data provides a unified treatment of analytical methods that have become essential for contemporary researchers. Throughout the book ideas are illustrated with more than 100 examples drawn from the literature, ranging from electrophysiology, to neuroimaging, to behavior. By demonstrating the commonality among various statistical approaches the authors provide the crucial tools for gaining knowledge from diverse types of data. Aimed at experimentalists with only high-school level mathematics, as well as computationally-oriented neuroscientists who have limited familiarity with statistics, Analysis of Neural Data serves as both a self-contained introduction and a reference work.

  4. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  5. Neural networks for triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denby, B. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Campbell, M. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Bedeschi, F. (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA)); Nesti, F. (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  7. Neurally-mediated sincope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, I; Cytron, J; Jhanjee, R; Nguyen, J; Benditt, D G

    2009-08-01

    Syncope is a syndrome characterized by a relatively sudden, temporary and self-terminating loss of consciousness; the causes may vary, but they have in common a temporary inadequacy of cerebral nutrient flow, usually due to a fall in systemic arterial pressure. However, while syncope is a common problem, it is only one explanation for episodic transient loss of consciousness (TLOC). Consequently, diagnostic evaluation should start with a broad consideration of real or seemingly real TLOC. Among those patients in whom TLOC is deemed to be due to ''true syncope'', the focus may then reasonably turn to assessing the various possible causes; in this regard, the neurally-mediated syncope syndromes are among the most frequently encountered. There are three common variations: vasovagal syncope (often termed the ''common'' faint), carotid sinus syndrome, and the so-called ''situational faints''. Defining whether the cause is due to a neurally-mediated reflex relies heavily on careful history taking and selected testing (e.g., tilt-test, carotid massage). These steps are important. Despite the fact that neurally-mediated faints are usually relatively benign from a mortality perspective, they are nevertheless only infrequently an isolated event; neurally-mediated syncope tends to recur, and physical injury resulting from falls or accidents, diminished quality-of-life, and possible restriction from employment or avocation are real concerns. Consequently, defining the specific form and developing an effective treatment strategy are crucial. In every case the goal should be to determine the cause of syncope with sufficient confidence to provide patients and family members with a reliable assessment of prognosis, recurrence risk, and treatment options.

  8. The Neural Noisy Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Lei; Blunsom, Phil; Dyer, Chris; Grefenstette, Edward; Kocisky, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    We formulate sequence to sequence transduction as a noisy channel decoding problem and use recurrent neural networks to parameterise the source and channel models. Unlike direct models which can suffer from explaining-away effects during training, noisy channel models must produce outputs that explain their inputs, and their component models can be trained with not only paired training samples but also unpaired samples from the marginal output distribution. Using a latent variable to control ...

  9. Implementation and characterization of a quartz tuning fork based probe consisted of discrete resonators for dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Terunobu; de Rooij, Nicolaas F; Staufer, Urs; Detterbeck, Manfred; Braendlin, Dominik; Waldmeier, Simon; Scheidiger, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The quartz tuning fork based probe {e.g., Akiyama et al. [Appl. Surf. Sci. 210, 18 (2003)]}, termed "A-Probe," is a self-sensing and self-actuating (exciting) probe for dynamic mode atomic force microscope (AFM) operation. It is an oscillatory force sensor consisting of the two discrete resonators. This paper presents the investigations on an improved A-Probe: its batch fabrication and assembly, mounting on an AFM head, electrical setup, characterization, and AFM imaging. The fundamental features of the A-Probe are electrically and optically characterized in "approach-withdraw" experiments. Further investigations include the frequency response of an A-Probe to small mechanical vibrations externally applied to the tip and the effective loading force yielding between the tip and the sample during the periodic contact. Imaging of an electronic chip, a compact disk stamper, carbon nanotubes, and Si beads is demonstrated with this probe at ambient conditions in the so-called frequency modulation mode. A special probe substrate, which can snap on a receptacle fixed on an AFM head, and a special holder including a preamplifier electronic are introduced. We hope that the implementation and characterization of the A-Probe described in this paper will provide hints for new scanning probe techniques.

  10. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, John [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  12. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive

  13. Hand-held survey probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kevin L [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  14. Spaser as a biological probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Weingold, Robert; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nolan, Jacqueline; Harrington, Walter; Kuchyanov, Alexander S.; Parkhomenko, Roman G.; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid; Biris, Alexandru S.; Plekhanov, Alexander I.; Stockman, Mark I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2017-06-01

    Understanding cell biology greatly benefits from the development of advanced diagnostic probes. Here we introduce a 22-nm spaser (plasmonic nanolaser) with the ability to serve as a super-bright, water-soluble, biocompatible probe capable of generating stimulated emission directly inside living cells and animal tissues. We have demonstrated a lasing regime associated with the formation of a dynamic vapour nanobubble around the spaser that leads to giant spasing with emission intensity and spectral width >100 times brighter and 30-fold narrower, respectively, than for quantum dots. The absorption losses in the spaser enhance its multifunctionality, allowing for nanobubble-amplified photothermal and photoacoustic imaging and therapy. Furthermore, the silica spaser surface has been covalently functionalized with folic acid for molecular targeting of cancer cells. All these properties make a nanobubble spaser a promising multimodal, super-contrast, ultrafast cellular probe with a single-pulse nanosecond excitation for a variety of in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications.

  15. Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting The EXIN Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Cirrincione, Giansalvo

    2008-01-01

    Written by three leaders in the field of neural based algorithms, Neural Based Orthogonal Data Fitting proposes several neural networks, all endowed with a complete theory which not only explains their behavior, but also compares them with the existing neural and traditional algorithms. The algorithms are studied from different points of view, including: as a differential geometry problem, as a dynamic problem, as a stochastic problem, and as a numerical problem. All algorithms have also been analyzed on real time problems (large dimensional data matrices) and have shown accurate solutions. Wh

  16. Permittivity measurements using coaxial probes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver Riera, Bartomeu

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to characterize, using the ADS software, the coaxial probe provided by the faculty ETSETB and utilize such probe in order to calculate the permittivity of different materials El objetivo principal de esta tesis el de caracterizar, con el programa ADS, la sonda coaxial proporcionada por la facultad de la ETSETB y utilizar-la para el calculo de la permitividad de diferentes materiales. L'objectiu d'aquesta tesis es el de caracteritzar, amb el programa ...

  17. Radioactive Probes on Ferromagnetic Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    On the (broad) basis of our studies of nonmagnetic radioactive probe atoms on magnetic surfaces and at interfaces, we propose to investigate the magnetic interaction of magnetic probe atoms with their immediate environment, in particular of rare earth (RE) elements positioned on and in ferromagnetic surfaces. The preparation and analysis of the structural properties of such samples will be performed in the UHV chamber HYDRA at the HMI/Berlin. For the investigations of the magnetic properties of RE atoms on surfaces Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) measurements and Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MS) in the UHV chamber ASPIC (Apparatus for Surface Physics and Interfaces at CERN) are proposed.

  18. Probe Project Status and Accomplishments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burris, RD

    2001-05-07

    The Probe project has completed its first full year of operation. In this document we will describe the status of the project as of December 31, 2000. We will describe the equipment configuration, then give brief descriptions of the various projects undertaken to date. We will mention first those projects performed for outside entities and then those performed for the benefit of one of the Probe sites. We will then describe projects that are under consideration, including some for which initial actions have been taken and others which are somewhat longer-term.

  19. Neural Correlates of Stimulus Reportability

    OpenAIRE

    Hulme, Oliver J.; Friston, Karl F.; Zeki, Semir

    2009-01-01

    Most experiments on the “neural correlates of consciousness” employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged...

  20. Symbolic processing in neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Neto, João Pedro; Hava T Siegelmann; Costa,J.Félix

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we show that programming languages can be translated into recurrent (analog, rational weighted) neural nets. Implementation of programming languages in neural nets turns to be not only theoretical exciting, but has also some practical implications in the recent efforts to merge symbolic and sub symbolic computation. To be of some use, it should be carried in a context of bounded resources. Herein, we show how to use resource bounds to speed up computations over neural nets, thro...

  1. Fabrication of ceramic components using freeze-form extrusion fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tieshu

    2007-12-01

    A novel, environmentally friendly solid freeform fabrication method called Freeze-form Extrusion Fabrication (FEF) has been developed for the fabrication of high temperature and ultra-high temperature ceramic-based components. The method is based on deposition of ceramic pastes using water as the medium. The FEF system components and their interaction are examined, and the main process parameters affecting part geometry are defined. Three-dimensional (3D) shaped components have been fabricated by extrusion deposition of the ceramic paste in a layer-by-layer fashion. The feasibility of this process has been demonstrated by building components having a simple geometry, such as cylinders and solid or hollow cones. Hollow cones have also been fabricated to demonstrate the ability to build structures with sloped walls. Sintered samples have achieved 98% and 96% of their theoretical density for Al 2O3 and ZrB2, respectively. The dispersion of ZrB2 particles in an aqueous medium was investigated. In aqueous systems, the surface of ZrB2 consists of a thin layer of ZrO2 that controls the surface chemistry and surface charge. Measurements showed that the ZrB2 had an isoelectric point of pH = 4.7 and a maximum zeta potential of -50 mV at pH = 9. Either an ionic ammonium polyacrylate or a nonionic alkoxylated polyether increased the zeta potential of ZrB2 by as much as 60 mV, to -110 mV. Viscosity measurements were used to optimize dispersant concentrations. High solids loading (˜45 vol.% ZrB2) aqueous pastes were prepared. The pastes had viscosities of 40--50 Pa·s-1, which was acceptable for extrusion. The pastes were used to fabricate 3-D components from ZrB2. The microstructure of sintered ZrB2 consisted of equiaxed B4C with an average grain size of 4.3 mum and small equiaxed and large elongated ZrB2 grains with an average grain size of 40 mum. For longitude and transverse deposited samples, the elastic moduli were E = 435 and 417 GPa, the flexural strength sigmaf = 353

  2. Reliability Modeling of Microelectromechanical Systems Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera. J. Sebastian

    2000-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are a broad and rapidly expanding field that is currently receiving a great deal of attention because of the potential to significantly improve the ability to sense, analyze, and control a variety of processes, such as heating and ventilation systems, automobiles, medicine, aeronautical flight, military surveillance, weather forecasting, and space exploration. MEMS are very small and are a blend of electrical and mechanical components, with electrical and mechanical systems on one chip. This research establishes reliability estimation and prediction for MEMS devices at the conceptual design phase using neural networks. At the conceptual design phase, before devices are built and tested, traditional methods of quantifying reliability are inadequate because the device is not in existence and cannot be tested to establish the reliability distributions. A novel approach using neural networks is created to predict the overall reliability of a MEMS device based on its components and each component's attributes. The methodology begins with collecting attribute data (fabrication process, physical specifications, operating environment, property characteristics, packaging, etc.) and reliability data for many types of microengines. The data are partitioned into training data (the majority) and validation data (the remainder). A neural network is applied to the training data (both attribute and reliability); the attributes become the system inputs and reliability data (cycles to failure), the system output. After the neural network is trained with sufficient data. the validation data are used to verify the neural networks provided accurate reliability estimates. Now, the reliability of a new proposed MEMS device can be estimated by using the appropriate trained neural networks developed in this work.

  3. Stem Cell Bioprinting: Functional 3D Neural Mini-Tissues from Printed Gel-Based Bioink and Human Neural Stem Cells (Adv. Healthcare Mater. 12/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qi; Tomaskovic-Crook, Eva; Lozano, Rodrigo; Chen, Yu; Kapsa, Robert M; Zhou, Qi; Wallace, Gordon G; Crook, Jeremy M

    2016-06-01

    On page 1429 G. G. Wallace, J. M. Crook, and co-workers report the first example of fabricating neural tissue by 3D bioprinting human neural stem cells. A novel polysaccharide based bioink preserves stem cell viability and function within the printed construct, enabling self-renewal and differentiation to neurons and supporting neuroglia. Neurons are predominantly GABAergic, establish networks, are spontaneously active, and show a bicuculline induced increased calcium response. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  5. Neural Correlates of Face Detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xu, Xiaokun; Biederman, Irving

    2014-01-01

    Although face detection likely played an essential adaptive role in our evolutionary past and in contemporary social interactions, there have been few rigorous studies investigating its neural correlates...

  6. Braided multi-electrode probes: mechanical compliance characteristics and recordings from spinal cords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taegyo; Branner, Almut; Gulati, Tanuj; Giszter, Simon F.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. To test a novel braided multi-electrode probe design with compliance exceeding that of a 50 µm microwire, thus reducing micromotion- and macromotion-induced tissue stress. Approach. We use up to 24 ultra-fine wires interwoven into a tubular braid to obtain a highly flexible multi-electrode probe. The tether-portion wires are simply non-braided extensions of the braid structure, allowing the microprobe to follow gross neural tissue movements. Mechanical calculation and direct measurements evaluated bending stiffness and axial compression forces in the probe and tether system. These were compared to 50 µm nichrome microwire standards. Recording tests were performed in decerebrate animals. Main results. Mechanical bending tests on braids comprising 9.6 or 12.7 µm nichrome wires showed that implants (braided portions) had 4 to 21 times better mechanical compliance than a single 50 µm wire and non-braided tethers were 6 to 96 times better. Braided microprobes yielded robust neural recordings from animals' spinal cords throughout cord motions. Significance. Microwire electrode arrays that can record and withstand tissue micro- and macromotion of spinal cord tissues are demonstrated. This technology may provide a stable chronic neural interface into spinal cords of freely moving animals, is extensible to various applications, and may reduce mechanical tissue stress.

  7. Sub-meninges Implantation Reduces Immune Response to Neural Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwardt, Neil T.; Stokol, Jodi; Rennaker, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Glial scar formation around neural interfaces inhibits their ability to acquire usable signals from the surrounding neurons. To improve neural recording performance, the inflammatory response and glial scarring must be minimized. Previous work has indicated that meningeally derived cells participate in the immune response, and it is possible that the meninges may grow down around the shank of a neural implant, contributing to the formation of the glial scar. This study examines whether the glial scar can be reduced by placing a neural probe completely below the meninges. Rats were implanted with sets of loose microwire implants placed either completely below the meninges or implanted conventionally with the upper end penetrating the meninges, but not attached to the skull. Histological analysis was performed 4 weeks following surgical implantation to evaluate the glial scar. Our results found that sub-meninges implants showed an average reduction in reactive astrocyte activity of 63% compared to trans-meninges implants. Microglial activity was also reduced for sub-meninges implants. These results suggest that techniques that isolate implants from the meninges offer the potential to reduce the encapsulation response which should improve chronic recording quality and stability. PMID:23370311

  8. Metallic Reactor Fuel Fabrication for SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Ko, Young-Mo; Woo, Yoon-Myung; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Lee, Chan-Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The metal fuel for an SFR has such advantages such as simple fabrication procedures, good neutron economy, high thermal conductivity, excellent compatibility with a Na coolant, and inherent passive safety 1. U-Zr metal fuel for SFR is now being developed by KAERI as a national R and D program of Korea. The fabrication technology of metal fuel for SFR has been under development in Korea as a national nuclear R and D program since 2007. The fabrication process for SFR fuel is composed of (1) fuel slug casting, (2) loading and fabrication of the fuel rods, and (3) fabrication of the final fuel assemblies. Fuel slug casting is the dominant source of fuel losses and recycled streams in this fabrication process. Fabrication on the rod type metallic fuel was carried out for the purpose of establishing a practical fabrication method. Rod-type fuel slugs were fabricated by injection casting. Metallic fuel slugs fabricated showed a general appearance was smooth.

  9. SUB-SLAB PROBE INSTALLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sub-slab sampling has become an integral part of vapor intrusion investigations. It is now recommended in guidance documents developed by EPA and most states. A method for sub-slab probe installation was devised in 2002, presented at conferences through 2005, and finally docume...

  10. Sensitivity improvement of optical fiber acoustic probe for all-optical photoacoustic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Atsushi; Iwai, Katsumasa; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    An acoustic probe based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer composed of a polymer film attached to the end of an optical fiber was designed and fabricated for an endoscopic, all-optical photoacoustic imaging system. The finesse of the interferometer was improved by forming a half-mirror at the end of the fiber and a partial reflection mirror on the outer surface of the polymer film. A photoacoustic imaging system was constructed by combining the fiber-optic acoustic probe with a bundle of hollow optical fibers used for the excitation of the photoacoustic wave, and an image of blood capillaries in a fish ovarian membrane was successfully obtained.

  11. Work on Planetary Atmospheres and Planetary Atmosphere Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Peter

    1999-01-01

    A summary final report of work accomplished is presented. Work was performed in the following areas: (1) Galileo Probe science analysis, (2) Galileo probe Atmosphere Structure Instrument, (3) Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Structure/Meteorology instrument, (4) Mars Pathfinder data analysis, (5) Science Definition for future Mars missions, (6) Viking Lander data analysis, (7) winds in Mars atmosphere Venus atmospheric dynamics, (8) Pioneer Venus Probe data analysis, (9) Pioneer Venus anomaly analysis, (10) Discovery Venus Probe Titan probe instrument design, and (11) laboratory studies of Titan probe impact phenomena. The work has resulted in more than 10 articles published in archive journals, 2 encyclopedia articles, and many working papers. This final report is organized around the four planets on which there was activity, Jupiter, Mars, Venus, and Titan, with a closing section on Miscellaneous Activities. A major objective was to complete the fabrication, test, and evaluation of the atmosphere structure experiment on the Galileo probe, and to receive, analyze and interpret data received from the spacecraft. The instrument was launched on April 14, 1989. Calibration data were taken for all experiment sensors. The data were analyzed, fitted with algorithms, and summarized in a calibration report for use in analyzing and interpreting data returned from Jupiter's atmosphere. The sensors included were the primary science pressure, temperature and acceleration sensors, and the supporting engineering temperature sensors. Computer programs were written to decode the Experiment Data Record and convert the digital numbers to physical quantities, i.e., temperatures, pressures, and accelerations. The project office agreed to obtain telemetry of checkout data from the probe. Work to extend programs written for use on the Pioneer Venus project included: (1) massive heat shield ablation leading to important mass loss during entry; and (2) rapid planet rotation, which introduced

  12. A complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible monocantilever 12-point probe for conductivity measurements on the nanoscale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lauge; Bøggild, Peter; Wells, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    We present a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatible, nanoscale 12-point-probe based on TiW electrodes placed on a SiO2 monocantilever. Probes are mass fabricated on Si wafers by a combination of electron beam and UV lithography, realizing TiW electrode tips with a width down to 250 nm...... and a probe pitch of 500 nm. In-air four-point measurements have been performed on indium tin oxide, ruthenium, and titanium-tungsten, showing good agreement with values obtained by other four-point probes. In-vacuum four-point resistance measurements have been performed on clean Bi(111) using different probe...... spacings. The results show the expected behavior for bulk Bi, indicating that the contribution of electronic surface states to the transport properties is very small. (C) 2008 American Institute of Physics....

  13. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  14. Optics in neural computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Michael John

    In all attempts to emulate the considerable powers of the brain, one is struck by both its immense size, parallelism, and complexity. While the fields of neural networks, artificial intelligence, and neuromorphic engineering have all attempted oversimplifications on the considerable complexity, all three can benefit from the inherent scalability and parallelism of optics. This thesis looks at specific aspects of three modes in which optics, and particularly volume holography, can play a part in neural computation. First, holography serves as the basis of highly-parallel correlators, which are the foundation of optical neural networks. The huge input capability of optical neural networks make them most useful for image processing and image recognition and tracking. These tasks benefit from the shift invariance of optical correlators. In this thesis, I analyze the capacity of correlators, and then present several techniques for controlling the amount of shift invariance. Of particular interest is the Fresnel correlator, in which the hologram is displaced from the Fourier plane. In this case, the amount of shift invariance is limited not just by the thickness of the hologram, but by the distance of the hologram from the Fourier plane. Second, volume holography can provide the huge storage capacity and high speed, parallel read-out necessary to support large artificial intelligence systems. However, previous methods for storing data in volume holograms have relied on awkward beam-steering or on as-yet non- existent cheap, wide-bandwidth, tunable laser sources. This thesis presents a new technique, shift multiplexing, which is capable of very high densities, but which has the advantage of a very simple implementation. In shift multiplexing, the reference wave consists of a focused spot a few millimeters in front of the hologram. Multiplexing is achieved by simply translating the hologram a few tens of microns or less. This thesis describes the theory for how shift

  15. Pulse coded biologically motivated neural-type MOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This project has two aspects, one for ONR and one for AFOSR. The ONR portion is devoted to obtaining hardware implementations for the physiological representations used in the program SYNETSIM developed by the neurophysiologist Dr. D. Hartline of Bekesy Laboratories. The AFOSR portion is for evaluation capabilities of the pulse code philosophy of neural networks. On the ONR portion of the research, several chips have been fabricated for SYNETSIM pools and a neural arithmetic unit based upon the pools. Also, a number of modifications have been made to SYNETSIM to make it a much more user-friendly program. Several papers have been presented at international conferences and the DRIVER module is under continued investigation for VLSI realization. The means to implement long term potentiation are also under continued investigation. On the AFOSR portion, a means of realizing any Hopfield-type network via pulse coded circuits was obtained.

  16. Neural substrates of approach-avoidance conflict decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupperle, Robin L; Melrose, Andrew J; Francisco, Alex; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2015-02-01

    Animal approach-avoidance conflict paradigms have been used extensively to operationalize anxiety, quantify the effects of anxiolytic agents, and probe the neural basis of fear and anxiety. Results from human neuroimaging studies support that a frontal-striatal-amygdala neural circuitry is important for approach-avoidance learning. However, the neural basis of decision-making is much less clear in this context. Thus, we combined a recently developed human approach-avoidance paradigm with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify neural substrates underlying approach-avoidance conflict decision-making. Fifteen healthy adults completed the approach-avoidance conflict (AAC) paradigm during fMRI. Analyses of variance were used to compare conflict to nonconflict (avoid-threat and approach-reward) conditions and to compare level of reward points offered during the decision phase. Trial-by-trial amplitude modulation analyses were used to delineate brain areas underlying decision-making in the context of approach/avoidance behavior. Conflict trials as compared to the nonconflict trials elicited greater activation within bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and caudate, as well as right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Right caudate and lateral PFC activation was modulated by level of reward offered. Individuals who showed greater caudate activation exhibited less approach behavior. On a trial-by-trial basis, greater right lateral PFC activation related to less approach behavior. Taken together, results suggest that the degree of activation within prefrontal-striatal-insula circuitry determines the degree of approach versus avoidance decision-making. Moreover, the degree of caudate and lateral PFC activation related to individual differences in approach-avoidance decision-making. Therefore, the approach-avoidance conflict paradigm is ideally suited to probe anxiety-related processing differences during approach-avoidance decision

  17. Stirling Microregenerators Fabricated and Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2004-01-01

    A mesoscale Stirling refrigerator patented by the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently under development. This refrigerator has a predicted efficiency of 30 percent of Carnot and potential uses in electronics, sensors, optical and radiofrequency systems, microarrays, and microsystems. The mesoscale Stirling refrigerator is most suited to volume-limited applications that require cooling below the ambient or sink temperature. Primary components of the planar device include two diaphragm actuators that replace the pistons found in traditional-scale Stirling machines and a microregenerator that stores and releases thermal energy to the working gas during the Stirling cycle. Diaphragms are used to eliminate frictional losses and bypass leakage concerns associated with pistons, while permitting reversal of the hot and cold sides of the device during operation to allow precise temperature control. Three candidate microregenerators were fabricated under NASA grants for initial evaluation: two constructed of porous ceramic, which were fabricated by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, and one made of multiple layers of nickel and photoresist, which was fabricated by Polar Thermal Technologies. The candidate regenerators are being tested by Johns Hopkins Applied Physics in a custom piezoelectric-actuated test apparatus designed to produce the Stirling refrigeration cycle. In parallel with the regenerator testing, Johns Hopkins is using deep reactive ion etching to fabricate electrostatically driven, comb-drive diaphragm actuators. These actuators will drive the Stirling cycle in the prototype device. The top photograph shows the porous ceramic microregenerators. Two microregenerators were fabricated with coarse pores and two with fine pores. The bottom photograph shows the test apparatus parts for evaluating the microregenerators, including the layered nickel-and-photoresist regenerator fabricated using LIGA techniques.

  18. High pressure optical combustion probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, S.D.; Richards, G.A.

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center has developed a combustion probe for monitoring flame presence and heat release. The technology involved is a compact optical detector of the OH radical`s UV fluorescence. The OH Monitor/Probe is designed to determine the flame presence and provide a qualitative signal proportional to the flame intensity. The probe can be adjusted to monitor a specific volume in the combustion zone to track spatial fluctuations in the flame. The probe is capable of nanosecond time response and is usually slowed electronically to fit the flame characteristics. The probe is a sapphire rod in a stainless steel tube which may be inserted into the combustion chamber and pointed at the flame zone. The end of the sapphire rod is retracted into the SS tube to define a narrow optical collection cone. The collection cone may be adjusted to fit the experiment. The fluorescence signal is collected by the sapphire rod and transmitted through a UV transmitting, fused silica, fiber optic to the detector assembly. The detector is a side window photomultiplier (PMT) with a 310 run line filter. A Hamamatsu photomultiplier base combined with a integral high voltage power supply permits this to be a low voltage device. Electronic connections include: a power lead from a modular DC power supply for 15 VDC; a control lead for 0-1 volts to control the high voltage level (and therefore gain); and a lead out for the actual signal. All low voltage connections make this a safe and easy to use device while still delivering the sensitivity required.

  19. MQXFS1 Quadrupole Fabrication Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Anerella, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bossert, R. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cavanna, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cheng, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Chlachidize, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Cooley, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dietderich, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Felice, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ferracin, P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Ghosh, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hafalia, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Holik, E. F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bermudez, S. Izquierdo [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Juchno, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Krave, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Marchevsky, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muratore, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Nobrega, F. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pan, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perez, J. C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Pong, I. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Prestemon, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ravaioli, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sabbi, G. L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Santini, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmalzle, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stoynev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Strauss, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Vallone, G. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wang, X. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Yu, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-07-16

    This report presents the fabrication and QC data of MQXFS1, the first short model of the low-beta quadrupoles (MQXF) for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade. It describes the conductor, the coils, and the structure that make the MQXFS1 magnet. Qualification tests and non-conformities are also presented and discussed. The fabrication of MQXFS1 was started before the finalization of conductor and coil design for MQXF magnets. Two strand design were used (RRP 108/127 and RRP 132/169). Cable and coil cross-sections were “first generation”.

  20. Fabrication Aware Form-finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm Pedersen, Ole; Larsen, Niels Martin; Pigram, Dave

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a design and construction method that combines two distinct material systems with fabrication aware form-finding and file-to-factory workflows. The method enables the fluent creation of complex materially efficient structures comprising high populations of geometrically unique...... parts. The first material system employs a novel rotated joint design to allow the structural tuning of quasi-reciprocal timber frame elements fabricated from multi-axis machined plywood sheet stock. The second em-loys discontinuous post-tensioning to assemble unique precast concrete components...

  1. A fluorescent, genetically-encoded voltage probe capable of resolving action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lauren; Platisa, Jelena; Popovic, Marko; Pieribone, Vincent A; Hughes, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There is a pressing need in neuroscience for genetically-encoded, fluorescent voltage probes that can be targeted to specific neurons and circuits to allow study of neural activity using fluorescent imaging. We created 90 constructs in which the voltage sensing portion (S1-S4) of Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (CiVSP) was fused to circularly permuted eGFP. This led to ElectricPk, a probe that is an order of magnitude faster (taus ~1-2 ms) than any currently published fluorescent protein-based voltage probe. ElectricPk can follow the rise and fall of neuronal action potentials with a modest decrease in fluorescence intensity (~0.7% ΔF/F). The probe has a nearly linear fluorescence/membrane potential response to both hyperpolarizing and depolarizing steps. This is the first probe based on CiVSP that captures the rapid movements of the voltage sensor, suggesting that voltage probes designed with circularly permuted fluorescent proteins may have some advantages.

  2. A fluorescent, genetically-encoded voltage probe capable of resolving action potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Barnett

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need in neuroscience for genetically-encoded, fluorescent voltage probes that can be targeted to specific neurons and circuits to allow study of neural activity using fluorescent imaging. We created 90 constructs in which the voltage sensing portion (S1-S4 of Ciona intestinalis voltage sensitive phosphatase (CiVSP was fused to circularly permuted eGFP. This led to ElectricPk, a probe that is an order of magnitude faster (taus ~1-2 ms than any currently published fluorescent protein-based voltage probe. ElectricPk can follow the rise and fall of neuronal action potentials with a modest decrease in fluorescence intensity (~0.7% ΔF/F. The probe has a nearly linear fluorescence/membrane potential response to both hyperpolarizing and depolarizing steps. This is the first probe based on CiVSP that captures the rapid movements of the voltage sensor, suggesting that voltage probes designed with circularly permuted fluorescent proteins may have some advantages.

  3. Fabrication and electronic transport studies of single nanocrystal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, David Louis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-01

    Semiconductor and metallic nanocrystals exhibit interesting electronic transport behavior as a result of electrostatic and quantum mechanical confinement effects. These effects can be studied to learn about the nature of electronic states in these systems. This thesis describes several techniques for the electronic study of nanocrystals. The primary focus is the development of novel methods to attach leads to prefabricated nanocrystals. This is because, while nanocrystals can be readily synthesized from a variety of materials with excellent size control, means to make electrical contact to these nanocrystals are limited. The first approach that will be described uses scanning probe microscopy to first image and then electrically probe surfaces. It is found that electronic investigations of nanocrystals by this technique are complicated by tip-sample interactions and environmental factors such as salvation and capillary forces. Next, an atomic force microscope technique for the catalytic patterning of the surface of a self assembled monolayer is described. In principle, this nano-fabrication technique can be used to create electronic devices which are based upon complex arrangements of nanocrystals. Finally, the fabrication and electrical characterization of a nanocrystal-based single electron transistor is presented. This device is fabricated using a hybrid scheme which combines electron beam lithography and wet chemistry to bind single nanocrystals in tunneling contact between closely spaced metallic leads. In these devices, both Au and CdSe nanocrystals show Coulomb blockade effects with characteristic energies of several tens of meV. Additional structure is seen the transport behavior of CdSe nanocrystals as a result of its electronic structure.

  4. Analysis of neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Heiden, Uwe

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this work is a unified and general treatment of activity in neural networks from a mathematical pOint of view. Possible applications of the theory presented are indica­ ted throughout the text. However, they are not explored in de­ tail for two reasons : first, the universal character of n- ral activity in nearly all animals requires some type of a general approach~ secondly, the mathematical perspicuity would suffer if too many experimental details and empirical peculiarities were interspersed among the mathematical investigation. A guide to many applications is supplied by the references concerning a variety of specific issues. Of course the theory does not aim at covering all individual problems. Moreover there are other approaches to neural network theory (see e.g. Poggio-Torre, 1978) based on the different lev­ els at which the nervous system may be viewed. The theory is a deterministic one reflecting the average be­ havior of neurons or neuron pools. In this respect the essay is writt...

  5. Novel four-point-probe design and nanorobotic dual endeffector strategy for electrical characterization of as-grown SWCNT bundles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichhorn, V; Fatikow, S; Sardan Sukas, Özlem

    2010-01-01

    by chemical vapor deposition. A new design of microstructured four-point-probes is proposed and fabricated allowing for direct contacting of vertically aligned bundles of SWCNTs. A nanorobotic setup is upgraded into a dual endeffector system to achieve good electrical contact between four...

  6. Artificial Neural Networks·

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    differences between biological neural networks (BNNs) of the brain and ANN s. A thorough understanding of ... neurons. Artificial neural models are loosely based on biology since a complete understanding of the .... A learning scheme for updating a neuron's connections (weights) was proposed by Donald Hebb in 1949.

  7. Neural Networks for Optimal Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process.......Two neural networks are trained to act as an observer and a controller, respectively, to control a non-linear, multi-variable process....

  8. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  9. Neptune Polar Orbiter with Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienstock, Bernard; Atkinson, David; Baines, Kevin; Mahaffy, Paul; Steffes, Paul; Atreya, Sushil; Stern, Alan; Wright, Michael; Willenberg, Harvey; Smith, David; hide

    2005-01-01

    The giant planets of the outer solar system divide into two distinct classes: the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which consist mainly of hydrogen and helium; and the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, which are believed to contain significant amounts of the heavier elements oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon and sulfur. Detailed comparisons of the internal structures and compositions of the gas giants with those of the ice giants will yield valuable insights into the processes that formed the solar system and, perhaps, other planetary systems. By 2012, Galileo, Cassini and possibly a Jupiter Orbiter mission with microwave radiometers, Juno, in the New Frontiers program, will have yielded significant information on the chemical and physical properties of Jupiter and Saturn. A Neptune Orbiter with Probes (NOP) mission would deliver the corresponding key data for an ice giant planet. Such a mission would ideally study the deep Neptune atmosphere to pressures approaching and possibly exceeding 1000 bars, as well as the rings, Triton, Nereid, and Neptune s other icy satellites. A potential source of power would be nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). Such an ambitious mission requires that a number of technical issues be investigated, however, including: (1) atmospheric entry probe thermal protection system (TPS) design, (2) probe structural design including seals, windows, penetrations and pressure vessel, (3) digital, RF subsystem, and overall communication link design for long term operation in the very extreme environment of Neptune's deep atmosphere, (4) trajectory design allowing probe release on a trajectory to impact Neptune while allowing the spacecraft to achieve a polar orbit of Neptune, (5) and finally the suite of science instruments enabled by the probe technology to explore the depths of the Neptune atmosphere. Another driving factor in the design of the Orbiter and Probes is the necessity to maintain a fully operational flight system during the lengthy transit time

  10. Structuring a multi-nodal neural network in vitro within a novel design microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wijdeven, Rosanne; Ramstad, Ola Huse; Bauer, Ulrich Stefan; Halaas, Øyvind; Sandvig, Axel; Sandvig, Ioanna

    2018-01-02

    Neural network formation is a complex process involving axon outgrowth and guidance. Axon guidance is facilitated by structural and molecular cues from the surrounding microenvironment. Micro-fabrication techniques can be employed to produce microfluidic chips with a highly controlled microenvironment for neural cells enabling longitudinal studies of complex processes associated with network formation. In this work, we demonstrate a novel open microfluidic chip design that encompasses a freely variable number of nodes interconnected by axon-permissible tunnels, enabling structuring of multi-nodal neural networks in vitro. The chip employs a partially open design to allow high level of control and reproducibility of cell seeding, while reducing shear stress on the cells. We show that by culturing dorsal root ganglion cells (DRGs) in our microfluidic chip, we were able to structure a neural network in vitro. These neurons were compartmentalized within six nodes interconnected through axon growth tunnels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the additional benefit of open top design by establishing a 3D neural culture in matrigel and a neuronal aggregate 3D culture within the chips. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a novel microfluidic chip design applicable to structuring complex neural networks in vitro, thus providing a versatile, highly relevant platform for the study of neural network dynamics applicable to developmental and regenerative neuroscience.

  11. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    interface with the CNS. In 2013, two symposia were held independently to discuss this problem: one was held at the International Neuromodulation Society's 11th World Congress in Berlin and supported by the International Neuromodulation Society1 and the other at the 6th International Neural Engineering conference in San Diego2 and was supported by the NSF. Clearly, the neuromodulation and the neural engineering communities are keen to solve this problem. Experts from the field were assembled to discuss the problems and potential solutions. Although many important points were raised, few emerged as key issues. (1) The ability to access remotely and reliably internal neural signals . Although some of the technological problems have already been solved, this ability to access neural signals is still a significant problem since reliable and robust transcutaneous telemetry systems with large numbers of signals, each with wide bandwidth, are not readily available to researchers. (2) A translation strategy taking basic research to the clinic . The lack of understanding of the biological response to implanted constructs and the inability to monitor the sites and match the mechanical properties of the probe to the neural tissue properties continue to be an unsolved problem. In addition, the low levels of collaboration among neuroscientists, clinicians, patients and other stakeholders throughout different phases of research and development were considered to be significant impediments to progress. (3) Fundamental tools development procedures for neural interfacing . There are many laboratories testing various devices with different sets of criteria, but there is no consensus on the failure modes. The reliability, robustness of metrics and testing standards for such devices have not been established, either in academia or in industry. To start addressing this problem, the FDA has established a laboratory to test the reliability of some neural devices. Although the discussion was mostly

  12. Neural fields theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Graben, Peter; Potthast, Roland; Wright, James

    2014-01-01

    With this book, the editors present the first comprehensive collection in neural field studies, authored by leading scientists in the field - among them are two of the founding-fathers of neural field theory. Up to now, research results in the field have been disseminated across a number of distinct journals from mathematics, computational neuroscience, biophysics, cognitive science and others. Starting with a tutorial for novices in neural field studies, the book comprises chapters on emergent patterns, their phase transitions and evolution, on stochastic approaches, cortical development, cognition, robotics and computation, large-scale numerical simulations, the coupling of neural fields to the electroencephalogram and phase transitions in anesthesia. The intended readership are students and scientists in applied mathematics, theoretical physics, theoretical biology, and computational neuroscience. Neural field theory and its applications have a long-standing tradition in the mathematical and computational ...

  13. The Neural Correlates of Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tiffany A.; Bartholow, Bruce D.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral analyses are a natural choice for understanding the wide-ranging behavioral consequences of racial stereotyping and prejudice. However, neuroimaging and electrophysiological research has recently considered the neural mechanisms that underlie racial categorization and the activation and application of racial stereotypes and prejudice, revealing exciting new insights. Work reviewed here points to the importance of neural structures previously associated with face processing, semantic knowledge activation, evaluation, and self-regulatory behavioral control, allowing for the specification of a neural model of race processing. We show how research on the neural correlates of race can serve to link otherwise disparate lines of evidence on the neural underpinnings of a broad array of social-cognitive phenomena, and consider implications for effecting change in race relations. PMID:19896410

  14. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... examined, and it appears that considering 'normal' neural network models with, say, 500 samples, the problem of over-fitting is neglible, and therefore it is not taken into consideration afterwards. Numerous model types, often met in control applications, are implemented as neural network models...... Kalmann filter) representing state space description. The potentials of neural networks for control of non-linear processes are also examined, focusing on three different groups of control concepts, all considered as generalizations of known linear control concepts to handle also non-linear processes...

  15. Microfluidic fabrication of plasmonic microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, J.; Jin, Mingliang; Eijkel, Jan C.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Zhou, G.F.; Shui, L.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the plasmonic microcapsules with well-ordered nanoparticles embedded in polymer network fabricated by using a microfluidic device. The well-ordered nanoparticle arrays on the microcapsule form high-density uniform “hot-spots‿ with a deposited metal film, on which the localized

  16. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  17. Fabrication of green polymeric membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Dooli

    2017-06-16

    Provided herein are methods of fabricating membranes using polymers with functionalized groups such as sulfone (e.g., PSf and PES), ether (e.g., PES), acrylonitrile (e.g., PAN), fluoride(e.g., pvdf and other fluoropolymers), and imide (e.g., extem) and ionic liquids. Also provided are membranes made by the provided methods.

  18. Transverse permeability of woven fabrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grouve, Wouter Johannes Bernardus; Akkerman, Remko; Loendersloot, Richard; van den Berg, S.

    2008-01-01

    The transverse permeability is an essential input in describing the consolidation process of CETEX® laminates. A two-dimensional, finite difference based, Stokes flow solver has been developed to determine the mesoscopic permeability of arbitrary fabric structures. The use of a multigrid solver

  19. The Danish fabricated metal industry:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Teis

    2010-01-01

    . This is less the case for low-tech industries, but their economic importance continues to be large, however. It is thus interesting to analyse how they manage to remain competitive. The analysis focuses on a case study of the fabricated metal industry by identifying the innovation strategies followed by firms...

  20. Timing matters: Using optogenetics to chronically manipulate neural circuits and rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Sidor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to probe defined neural circuits with both the spatial and temporal resolution imparted by optogenetics has transformed the field of neuroscience. Although much attention has been paid to the advantages of manipulating neural activity at millisecond timescales in order to elicit time-locked neural responses, little consideration has been given to the manipulation of circuit activity at physiologically relevant times of day, across multiple days. Nearly all biological events are governed by the circadian clock and exhibit 24-hour rhythms in activity. Indeed, neural circuit activity itself exhibits a daily rhythm with distinct temporal peaks in activity occurring at specific times of the day. Therefore, experimentally probing circuit function within and across physiologically relevant time windows (minutes to hours in behaving animals is fundamental to understanding the function of any one particular circuit within the intact brain. Furthermore, understanding how circuit function changes with repeated manipulation is important for modeling the circuit-wide disruptions that occur with chronic disease states. Here, we review recent advances in optogenetic technology that allow for chronic, temporally specific, control of circuit activity and provide examples of chronic optogenetic paradigms that have been utilized in the search for the neural circuit basis of behaviors relevant to human neuropsychiatric disease.

  1. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  2. Thermoelectrically-cooled variable-temperature probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, R. M.; Richmond, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    Variable-temperature probe for electron spectroscopy requires no cryogenic liquids or resistance heating elements. Device consists of heat sink, probe tip, and nickel-plated copper body which resists oxidation and transfers heat efficiently between tip and heat sink.

  3. Additives in fibers and fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, R H

    1975-01-01

    The additives and contaminants which occur in textile fibers vary widely, depending on the type of fiber and the pretreatment which it has received. Synthetic fibers such as nylon and polyester contain trace amounts of contaminants such as catalysts and catalyst deactivators which remain after the synthesis of the basic polymers. In addition, there are frequently a number of materials which are added to perform specific functions in almost all man-made fibers. Examples of these would include traces of metals or metal salts used as tracers for identification of specific lots of fiber, TiO2 or similar materials added as delustrants, and a host of organic species added for such special purposes as antistatic agents or flame retardants. There may also be considerable quantities of residual monomer or small oligomers dissolved in the polymer matrix. The situation becomes even more complex after the fibers are converted into fabric form. Numerous materials are applied at various stages of fabric preparation to act as lubricants, sizing agents, antistats, bleaches, and wetting agents to facilitate the processing, but these are normally removed before the fabric reaches the cutters of the ultimate consumers and therefore usually do not constitute potential hazards. However, there are many other chemical agents which are frequently added during the later stages of fabric preparation and which are not designed to be removed. Aside from dyes and printing pigments, the most common additive for apparel fabrics is a durable press treatment. This generally involves the use of materials capable of crosslinking cellulosics by reacting through such functions as N-methylolated amides or related compounds such as ureas and carbamates. These materials pose some potential hazards due to both the nitrogenous bases and the formaldehyde which they usually release. There is usually also some residual catalyst in fabrics which have received such treatments. Other types of chemical treatments

  4. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  5. Design Strategies for Bioorthogonal Smart Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Peyton; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemistry has enabled the selective labeling and detection of biomolecules in living systems. Bioorthogonal smart probes, which become fluorescent or deliver imaging or therapeutic agents upon reaction, allow for the visualization of biomolecules or targeted delivery even in the presence of excess unreacted probe. This review discusses the strategies used in the development of bioorthogonal smart probes and highlights the potential of these probes to further our understanding of biology. PMID:25315039

  6. Probing Solitons in Brane Worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Youm, Donam

    2000-01-01

    We study dynamics of a probe p-brane and a test particle in the field background of fully localized solutions describing the source p-brane within the worldvolume of the source domain wall. We find that the probe dynamics in the background of the source p-brane in one lower dimensions is not reproduced, indicating that p-branes within the worldvolume of domain walls perhaps describe an exotic phase of p-branes in brane worlds. We speculate therefore that a (p+1)-brane where one of its longitudinal directions is along the direction transverse to the domain wall is the right describtion of the p-brane in the brane world with the expected properties.

  7. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    by means of fiber components. Assuming the possibility to use a fiber laser with a fundamental radiation at 1064nm, in-fiber efficient second harmonic generation is achieved by optically poling the core of the waveguide delivering the excitation light to the sample. In this way, Raman spectroscopy...... of the collected Raman scattering from the inner-cladding region of the double-clad fiber, thus replacing the bulk dichroic component normally used to demultiplex the pump and Raman signal. A tunable Rayleigh-rejection filter based on a liquid filled-photonic bandgap fiber is also demonstrated in this work......The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...

  8. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D' Andrea, C B; Dalal, N; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Kuhlmann, S.

    2015-03-15

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  9. Distance probes of dark energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A. G.; Padmanabhan, N.; Aldering, G.; Allen, S. W.; Baltay, C.; Cahn, R. N.; D’Andrea, C. B.; Dalal, N.; Dawson, K. S.; Denney, K. D.; Eisenstein, D. J.; Finley, D. A.; Freedman, W. L.; Ho, S.; Holz, D. E.; Kasen, D.; Kent, S. M.; Kessler, R.; Kuhlmann, S.; Linder, E. V.; Martini, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Perlmutter, S.; Peterson, B. M.; Riess, A. G.; Rubin, D.; Sako, M.; Suntzeff, N. V.; Suzuki, N.; Thomas, R. C.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Woosley, S. E.

    2015-03-01

    This document presents the results from the Distances subgroup of the Cosmic Frontier Community Planning Study (Snowmass 2013). We summarize the current state of the field as well as future prospects and challenges. In addition to the established probes using Type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations, we also consider prospective methods based on clusters, active galactic nuclei, gravitational wave sirens and strong lensing time delays.

  10. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... characterization....

  11. 21 CFR 870.1915 - Thermodilution probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thermodilution probe. 870.1915 Section 870.1915...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1915 Thermodilution probe. (a) Identification. A thermodilution probe is a device that monitors cardiac output by use of...

  12. The Van Allen Probes mission

    CERN Document Server

    Burch, James

    2014-01-01

    This collection of articles provides broad and detailed information about NASA’s Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes) twin-spacecraft Earth-orbiting mission. The mission has the objective of achieving predictive understanding of the dynamic, intense, energetic, dangerous, and presently unpredictable belts of energetic particles that are magnetically trapped in Earth’s space environment above the atmosphere. It documents the science of the radiation belts and the societal benefits of achieving predictive understanding. Detailed information is provided about the Van Allen Probes mission design, the spacecraft, the science investigations, and the onboard instrumentation that must all work together to make unprecedented measurements within a most unforgiving environment, the core of Earth’s most intense radiation regions.
 This volume is aimed at graduate students and researchers active in space science, solar-terrestrial interactions and studies of the up...

  13. Novel fabric pressure sensors: design, fabrication, and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yangyong; Hua, Tao; Zhu, Bo; Li, Qiao; Yi, Weijing; Tao, Xiaoming

    2011-06-01

    Soft and pliable pressure sensors are essential elements in wearable electronics which have wide applications in modern daily lives. This paper presents a family of fabric pressure sensors made by sandwiching a piece of resistive fabric strain sensing element between two tooth-structured layers of soft elastomers. The pressure sensors are capable of measuring pressure from 0 to 2000 kPa, covering the whole range of human-machine interactions. A pressure sensitivity of up to 2.98 × 10 - 3 kPa - 1 was obtained. Theoretical modeling was conducted based on an energy method to predict the load-displacement relationship for various sensor configurations. By adjusting the Young's modulus of the two conversion layers, as well as the geometrical dimensions, the measurement ranges, and sensitivities of the sensors can be quantitatively determined. The sensors are being used for pressure measurements between the human body and garments, shoes, beds, and chairs.

  14. An empirical analysis of thermal protective performance of fabrics used in protective clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sumit; Song, Guowen

    2014-10-01

    Fabric-based protective clothing is widely used for occupational safety of firefighters/industrial workers. The aim of this paper is to study thermal protective performance provided by fabric systems and to propose an effective model for predicting the thermal protective performance under various thermal exposures. Different fabric systems that are commonly used to manufacture thermal protective clothing were selected. Laboratory simulations of the various thermal exposures were created to evaluate the protective performance of the selected fabric systems in terms of time required to generate second-degree burns. Through the characterization of selected fabric systems in a particular thermal exposure, various factors affecting the performances were statistically analyzed. The key factors for a particular thermal exposure were recognized based on the t-test analysis. Using these key factors, the performance predictive multiple linear regression and artificial neural network (ANN) models were developed and compared. The identified best-fit ANN models provide a basic tool to study thermal protective performance of a fabric. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  15. An Optoelectronic Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Mark A. A.; White, Ian H.; Carroll, John E.

    1990-02-01

    We describe and present results of an optoelectronic neural network processing system. The system uses an algorithm based on the Hebbian learning rule to memorise a set of associated vector pairs. Recall occurs by the processing of the input vector with these stored associations in an incoherent optical vector multiplier using optical polarisation rotating liquid crystal spatial light modulators to store the vectors and an optical polarisation shadow casting technique to perform multiplications. Results are detected on a photodiode array and thresholded electronically by a controlling microcomputer. The processor is shown to work in autoassociative and heteroassociative modes with up to 10 stored memory vectors of length 64 (equivalent to 64 neurons) and a cycle time of 50ms. We discuss the limiting factors at work in this system, how they affect its scalability and the general applicability of its principles to other systems.

  16. Neural Darwinism and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Anil K; Baars, Bernard J

    2005-03-01

    Neural Darwinism (ND) is a large scale selectionist theory of brain development and function that has been hypothesized to relate to consciousness. According to ND, consciousness is entailed by reentrant interactions among neuronal populations in the thalamocortical system (the 'dynamic core'). These interactions, which permit high-order discriminations among possible core states, confer selective advantages on organisms possessing them by linking current perceptual events to a past history of value-dependent learning. Here, we assess the consistency of ND with 16 widely recognized properties of consciousness, both physiological (for example, consciousness is associated with widespread, relatively fast, low amplitude interactions in the thalamocortical system), and phenomenal (for example, consciousness involves the existence of a private flow of events available only to the experiencing subject). While no theory accounts fully for all of these properties at present, we find that ND and its recent extensions fare well.

  17. Cortical neural prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B

    2004-01-01

    Control of prostheses using cortical signals is based on three elements: chronic microelectrode arrays, extraction algorithms, and prosthetic effectors. Arrays of microelectrodes are permanently implanted in cerebral cortex. These arrays must record populations of single- and multiunit activity indefinitely. Information containing position and velocity correlates of animate movement needs to be extracted continuously in real time from the recorded activity. Prosthetic arms, the current effectors used in this work, need to have the agility and configuration of natural arms. Demonstrations using closed-loop control show that subjects change their neural activity to improve performance with these devices. Adaptive-learning algorithms that capitalize on these improvements show that this technology has the capability of restoring much of the arm movement lost with immobilizing deficits.

  18. Polymeric lithography editor: Editing lithographic errors with nanoporous polymeric probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Pradeep Ramiah; Zhou, Chuanhong; Dasari, Mallika; Voss, Kay-Obbe; Trautmann, Christina; Kohli, Punit

    2017-01-01

    A new lithographic editing system with an ability to erase and rectify errors in microscale with real-time optical feedback is demonstrated. The erasing probe is a conically shaped hydrogel (tip size, ca. 500 nm) template-synthesized from track-etched conical glass wafers. The “nanosponge” hydrogel probe “erases” patterns by hydrating and absorbing molecules into a porous hydrogel matrix via diffusion analogous to a wet sponge. The presence of an interfacial liquid water layer between the hydrogel tip and the substrate during erasing enables frictionless, uninterrupted translation of the eraser on the substrate. The erasing capacity of the hydrogel is extremely high because of the large free volume of the hydrogel matrix. The fast frictionless translocation and interfacial hydration resulted in an extremely high erasing rate (~785 μm2/s), which is two to three orders of magnitude higher in comparison with the atomic force microscopy–based erasing (~0.1 μm2/s) experiments. The high precision and accuracy of the polymeric lithography editor (PLE) system stemmed from coupling piezoelectric actuators to an inverted optical microscope. Subsequently after erasing the patterns using agarose erasers, a polydimethylsiloxane probe fabricated from the same conical track-etched template was used to precisely redeposit molecules of interest at the erased spots. PLE also provides a continuous optical feedback throughout the entire molecular editing process—writing, erasing, and rewriting. To demonstrate its potential in device fabrication, we used PLE to electrochemically erase metallic copper thin film, forming an interdigitated array of microelectrodes for the fabrication of a functional microphotodetector device. High-throughput dot and line erasing, writing with the conical “wet nanosponge,” and continuous optical feedback make PLE complementary to the existing catalog of nanolithographic/microlithographic and three-dimensional printing techniques. This new

  19. Influence of probe geometry on the response of an electrostatic probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Torben; Crichton, George C; McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1999-01-01

    The response of an electrostatic probe is examined with reference to the probe geometry. The study involves the evaluation of the probe lambda function, from which response-related characteristic parameters can be derived. These parameters enable the probe detection sensitivity Se and spatial...

  20. Preparation of activated carbon fabrics from cotton fabric precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, R.; Dadashian, F.; Abedi, M.

    2017-10-01

    The preparation of activated carbon fabrics (ACFs) from cotton fabric was performed by chemical activation with phosphoric acid (H3PO4). The operation conditions for obtaining the ACFs with the highest the adsorption capacity and process yield, proposed. Optimized conditions were: impregnation ratio of 2, the rate of temperature rising of 7.5 °C min‑1, the activation temperature of 500 °C and the activation time of 30 min. The ACFs produced under optimized conditions was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The surface area and pore volume of carbon nanostructures was characterized by BET nitrogen adsorption isotherm at 77 °K. The pore size distribution calculated from the desorption branch according to BJH method. The iodine number of the prepared ACFs was determined by titration at 30 °C based on the ASTM D4607-94. The results showed the improvement of porous structure, fabric shape, surface area (690 m2/g), total pore volume (0.3216 cm3/g), and well-preserved fibers integrity.

  1. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  2. Preparation of nanowire specimens for laser-assisted atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumtritt, H; Isheim, D; Senz, S; Seidman, D N; Moutanabbir, O

    2014-10-31

    The availability of reliable and well-engineered commercial instruments and data analysis software has led to development in recent years of robust and ergonomic atom-probe tomographs. Indeed, atom-probe tomography (APT) is now being applied to a broader range of materials classes that involve highly important scientific and technological problems in materials science and engineering. Dual-beam focused-ion beam microscopy and its application to the fabrication of APT microtip specimens have dramatically improved the ability to probe a variety of systems. However, the sample preparation is still challenging especially for emerging nanomaterials such as epitaxial nanowires which typically grow vertically on a substrate through metal-catalyzed vapor phase epitaxy. The size, morphology, density, and sensitivity to radiation damage are the most influential parameters in the preparation of nanowire specimens for APT. In this paper, we describe a step-by-step process methodology to allow a precisely controlled, damage-free transfer of individual, short silicon nanowires onto atom probe microposts. Starting with a dense array of tiny nanowires and using focused ion beam, we employed a sequence of protective layers and markers to identify the nanowire to be transferred and probed while protecting it against Ga ions during lift-off processing and tip sharpening. Based on this approach, high-quality three-dimensional atom-by-atom maps of single aluminum-catalyzed silicon nanowires are obtained using a highly focused ultraviolet laser-assisted local electrode atom probe tomograph.

  3. Nanometer-Scale Deposition of Metal Plating Using a Nanopipette Probe in Liquid Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, So; Iwata, Futoshi

    2011-08-01

    We describe a novel technique of a local metal plating using an atomic force microscope (AFM) with a nanopipette probe in liquid condition. A glass nanopipette, filled with CuSO4 electrolyte solution, was used as the AFM probe. An electrode wire inside the electrolyte-filled nanopipette and the conductive surface of a Au-sputtered glass slide were employed as the anode and the cathode, respectively. To avoid drying of the nanopipette solution and clogging of the probe-edge aperture, the edge of the nanopipette was immersed in the same electrolyte solution in a liquid cell placed on the Au substrate. As for controlling the distance between the probe edge and the surface in the liquid, the nanopipette probe glued on a tuning fork quartz crystal resonator was vertically oscillated to use a method of frequency modulation in tapping-mode. By utilizing the probe-surface distance control during the deposition, nanometer-scale Cu dots were successfully deposited on the Au surfaces without diffusion of the deposition even in the liquid condition. This technique of local deposition in a liquid would be applicable for various fields such as the fabrication of micro/nanometer-scale devices and the arrangement of biological samples.

  4. Optimal attentional modulation of neural population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali eBorji

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Top-down attention has often been separately studied in the contexts of eitheroptimal population coding or biasing of visual search. Yet, both are intimatelylinked, as they entail optimally modulating sensory variables in neural populationsaccording to top-down goals. Designing experiments to probe top-down attentionalmodulation is difficult because non-linear population dynamics are hardto predict in the absence of a concise theoretical framework. Here, we describea unified framework that encompasses both contexts. Our work sheds light ontothe ongoing debate on whether attention modulates neural response gain, tuningwidth, and/or preferred feature. We evaluate the framework by conducting simulationsfor two tasks: 1 classification (discrimination of two stimuli sa and sband 2 searching for a target T among distractors D. Results demonstrate that allof gain, tuning, and preferred feature modulation happen to different extents, dependingon stimulus conditions and task demands. The theoretical analysis showsthat task difficulty (linked to difference D between sa and sb, or T and D is acrucial factor in optimal modulation, with different effects in discrimination vs.search. Further, our framework allows us to quantify the relative utility of neuralparameters. In easy tasks (when D is large compared to the density of the neuralpopulation, modulating gains and preferred features is sufficient to yield nearlyoptimal performance; however, in difficult tasks (smaller D, modulating tuningwidth becomes necessary to improve performance. This suggests that the conflictingreports from different experimental studies may be due to differences intasks and in their difficulties. We further propose future electrophysiology experimentsto observe different types of attentional modulation in a same neuron.

  5. Miniaturized fiber-optic ultrasound probes for endoscopic tissue analysis by micro-opto-mechanical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannacci, E; Belsito, L; Mancarella, F; Ferri, M; Veronese, G P; Roncaglia, A; Biagi, E

    2014-06-01

    A new Micro-Opto-Mechanical System (MOMS) technology for the fabrication of optoacoustic probes on optical fiber is presented. The technology is based on the thermoelastic emission of ultrasonic waves from patterned carbon films for generation and on extrinsic polymer Fabry-Perot acousto-optical transducers for detection, both fabricated on miniaturized single-crystal silicon frames used to mount the ultrasonic transducers on the tip of an optical fiber. Thanks to the fabrication process adopted, high miniaturization levels are reached in the MOMS devices, demonstrating fiber-optic emitters and detectors with minimum diameter around 350 and 250 μm respectively. A thorough functional testing of the ultrasound emitters mounted on 200 and 600 μm diameter optical fibers is presented, in which the fiber-optic emitter with a diameter of 200 μm shows generated acoustic pressures with peak-to-peak value up to 2.8 MPa with rather flat emission spectra extended beyond 150 MHz. The possibility to use the presented optoacoustic sources in conjunction with the fiber-optic acousto-optical detectors within a minimally invasive probe is also demonstrated by successfully measuring the ultrasonic echo reflected from a rigid surface immersed in water with various concentration of scatterers. The resulting spectra highlight the possibility to discriminate the effects due to frequency selective attenuation in a very wide range of frequencies within a biological medium using the presented fiber-optic probes.

  6. Fabrication of carbohydrate chips and their use to probe protein-carbohydrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungjin; Lee, Myung-Ryul; Shin, Injae

    2007-01-01

    Carbohydrate microarrays have received considerable attention as an advanced technology for the rapid analysis of carbohydrate-protein interactions. This protocol provides detailed procedures for the preparation of carbohydrate microarrays by immobilizing hydrazide-conjugated carbohydrates on epoxide-derivatized glass slides. In addition, we describe the use we make of these microarrays in glycomics research. Unlike other techniques that require large amounts of samples and long assay times, carbohydrate microarrays are used to carry out the rapid assessment of a number of carbohydrate-recognition events with tiny amounts of carbohydrate samples. Furthermore, the microarray technology is also utilized for the rapid assay of enzyme activities. We are able to routinely prepare carbohydrate microarrays within 12 h by using hydrazide-conjugated carbohydrates and apply these microarrays for the studies of glycan-protein interactions within 8 h.

  7. Design and fabrication of stiff silicon probes : A step towards sophisticated cochlear implant electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawand, N.S.; French, P.J.; Briare, J.J.; Frijns, J.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cochlear implants work on the principle of direct electrical stimulation of the auditory nerve. It has advantages to replace their traditional wired electrodes by a high-density thin-film multielectrode stimulation array which is relatively small in dimensions, stable, resistant to electrolysis, and

  8. Zero voltage mass spectrometry probes and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Wleklinski, Michael Stanley; Bag, Soumabha; Li, Yafeng

    2017-10-10

    The invention generally relates to zero volt mass spectrometry probes and systems. In certain embodiments, the invention provides a system including a mass spectrometry probe including a porous material, and a mass spectrometer (bench-top or miniature mass spectrometer). The system operates without an application of voltage to the probe. In certain embodiments, the probe is oriented such that a distal end faces an inlet of the mass spectrometer. In other embodiments, the distal end of the probe is 5 mm or less from an inlet of the mass spectrometer.

  9. Semiautomatic Probe-And-Drogue Attachment Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanagas, John D.

    1988-01-01

    Spring-loaded pawls provide quick coupling. As probe enters drogue during coupling, three spring-loaded pawls in probe latch probe in drogue, preventing accidental uncoupling. Then worm-gear mechanism turned by standard 0.25-in. (6.35-mm) tool transfers motion to central threaded shaft, extending cap at tip of probe until all play taken up. This centers probe in drogue and renders coupling pawls to extend again. New mechanism useful for coupling modular components in other applications where ease and security of attachment, precise final alignment, and ease of removal important and where stresses and bending reasonably low.

  10. Design and implementation of a hot-wire probe for simultaneous velocity and vorticity vector measurements in boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, S.; Morrill-Winter, C.; Klewicki, J.

    2017-10-01

    A multi-sensor hot-wire probe for simultaneously measuring all three components of velocity and vorticity in boundary layers has been designed, fabricated and implemented in experiments up to large Reynolds numbers. The probe consists of eight hot-wires, compactly arranged in two pairs of orthogonal ×-wire arrays. The ×-wire sub-arrays are symmetrically configured such that the full velocity and vorticity vectors are resolved about a single central location. During its design phase, the capacity of this sensor to accurately measure each component of velocity and vorticity was first evaluated via a synthetic experiment in a set of well-resolved DNS fields. The synthetic experiments clarified probe geometry effects, allowed assessment of various processing schemes, and predicted the effects of finite wire length and wire separation on turbulence statistics. The probe was subsequently fabricated and employed in large Reynolds number experiments in the Flow Physics Facility wind tunnel at the University of New Hampshire. Comparisons of statistics from the actual probe with those from the simulated sensor exhibit very good agreement in trend, but with some differences in magnitude. These comparisons also reveal that the use of gradient information in processing the probe data can significantly improve the accuracy of the spanwise velocity measurement near the wall. To the authors' knowledge, the present are the largest Reynolds number laboratory-based measurements of all three vorticity components in boundary layers.

  11. Nylon fabric reinforced natural rubber compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mazlina Mustafa; Ismail, Ismaliza

    2017-12-01

    Rubber fabric coated is a unique rubber-textile composite, in which technical textile acts as reinforcing material and strength providing material. In rubber textile composite, rubber to fabric adhesion plays the most critical role for determining assembly process and ultimate strength of product. A vulcanisable adhesive for rubber to fabric fabrication of composite material was developed which compatible with rubber as well as fabric. Evaluation of bonding system with respect to peel strength, shear adhesion strength and weave pattern of fabrics were the major determining criteria for selection and optimization of fabric for rubber hose application. Thus adhesive Cohedure with characteristics of high adhesive strength in Natural Rubber Polyester Fabric compound has been developed.

  12. Fabric quality issues related to apparel merchandising

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Das, Sonali

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to develop an understanding of fabric quality related issues and research gaps relevant to apparel manufacturing and merchandising within the South African context. The specific focus is on fabric objective...

  13. Ballistic Response of Fabrics: Model and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Walker Anderson, James D., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Walker (1999)developed an analytical model for the dynamic response of fabrics to ballistic impact. From this model the force, F, applied to the projectile by the fabric is derived to be F = 8/9 (ET*)h^3/R^2, where E is the Young's modulus of the fabric, T* is the "effective thickness" of the fabric and equal to the ratio of the areal density of the fabric to the fiber density, h is the displacement of the fabric on the axis of impact and R is the radius of the fabric deformation or "bulge". Ballistic tests against Zylon^TM fabric have been performed to measure h and R as a function of time. The results of these experiments are presented and analyzed in the context of the Walker model. Walker (1999), Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Ballistics, pp. 1231.

  14. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the "majority-flipping attacker," does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker's outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  15. Cooperating attackers in neural cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Lanir N.; Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2004-06-01

    A successful attack strategy in neural cryptography is presented. The neural cryptosystem, based on synchronization of neural networks by mutual learning, has been recently shown to be secure under different attack strategies. The success of the advanced attacker presented here, called the “majority-flipping attacker,” does not decay with the parameters of the model. This attacker’s outstanding success is due to its using a group of attackers which cooperate throughout the synchronization process, unlike any other attack strategy known. An analytical description of this attack is also presented, and fits the results of simulations.

  16. Neural Computations in Binaural Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hermann

    Binaural hearing helps humans and animals to localize and unmask sounds. Here, binaural computations in the barn owl's auditory system are discussed. Barn owls use the interaural time difference (ITD) for azimuthal sound localization, and they use the interaural level difference (ELD) for elevational sound localization. ITD and ILD and their precursors are processed in separate neural pathways, the time pathway and the intensity pathway, respectively. Representation of ITD involves four main computational steps, while the representation of ILD is accomplished in three steps. In the discussion neural processing in the owl's auditory system is compared with neural computations present in mammals.

  17. Design and optimization of a miniaturized imaging probe for simultaneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, Simon; Vilches, Sergio; Blattmann, Marc; Ataman, Caglar; Zappe, Hans

    2017-02-01

    A highly-integrated MEMS-based bimodal probe design with integrated piezoelectric fiber scanner for simul- taneous endomicroscopy and optical coherence tomography (OCT) is presented. The two modalities rely on spectrally-separated optical paths that run partially in parallel through a micro-optical bench system, which has dimensions of only 13 x 2 x 3mm3 (l x w x h). An integrated tubular piezoelectric fiber scanner is used to perform en face scanning required for three dimensional OCT measurements. This scanning engine has an outer diameter of 0.9mm and a length of 9mm, and features custom fabricated 10 μm thick polyimide flexible interconnect lines to address the four piezoelectric electrodes. As a platform combining a full-field and a scanning imaging modality, the developed probe design constitutes a blue print for a wide range of multi-modal endoscopic imaging probes.

  18. Single-body lensed-fiber scanning probe actuated by magnetic force for optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Eun Jung; Na, Jihoon; Ryu, Seon Young; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2009-06-15

    We propose a fiber-based hand-held scanning probe suitable for the sample arm of an optical imaging system including optical coherence tomography. To achieve compactness, a single-body lensed-fiber and a solenoid actuator were utilized. The focusing lens of the probe was directly formed onto the distal end of a fiber, which eliminated the need for additional optical components and optical alignment. A ferromagnetic iron bead was glued onto the middle of the fiber to enable actuation by magnetic force, which allowed easy fabrication and good practicality. The fiber piece having the built-in fiber lens was forced to oscillate in its resonant frequency. With the implemented probe, optical coherence tomography images of a human fingertip and a pearl were obtained at an imaging speed of 30 frames/s over a scanning range of 4 mm.

  19. Advanced fabrication of hyperbolic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shkondin, Evgeniy; Sukham, Johneph; Panah, Mohammad Esmail Aryaee

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbolic metamaterials can provide unprecedented properties in accommodation of high-k (high wave vector) waves and enhancement of the optical density of states. To reach such performance the metamaterials have to be fabricated with as small imperfections as possible. Here we report on our...... advances in two approaches in fabrication of optical metamaterials. We deposit ultrathin ultrasmooth gold layers with the assistance of organic material (APTMS) adhesion layer. The technology supports the stacking of such layers in a multiperiod construction with alumina spacers between gold films, which...... is expected to exhibit hyperbolic properties in the visible range. As the second approach we apply the atomic layer deposition technique to arrange vertical alignment of layers or pillars of heavily doped ZnO or TiN, which enables us to produce hyperbolic metamaterials for the near- and mid-infrared ranges....

  20. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Michael W; Aslam, Dean M; Janoudi, Abed; Chan, Ho-Yin; Wang, Donna H

    2011-08-15

    Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C) has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM). The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA), due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  1. Polycrystalline-Diamond MEMS Biosensors Including Neural Microelectrode-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diamond is a material of interest due to its unique combination of properties, including its chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Polycrystalline diamond (poly-C has been used in experimental biosensors that utilize electrochemical methods and antigen-antibody binding for the detection of biological molecules. Boron-doped poly-C electrodes have been found to be very advantageous for electrochemical applications due to their large potential window, low background current and noise, and low detection limits (as low as 500 fM. The biocompatibility of poly-C is found to be comparable, or superior to, other materials commonly used for implants, such as titanium and 316 stainless steel. We have developed a diamond-based, neural microelectrode-array (MEA, due to the desirability of poly-C as a biosensor. These diamond probes have been used for in vivo electrical recording and in vitro electrochemical detection. Poly-C electrodes have been used for electrical recording of neural activity. In vitro studies indicate that the diamond probe can detect norepinephrine at a 5 nM level. We propose a combination of diamond micro-machining and surface functionalization for manufacturing diamond pathogen-microsensors.

  2. Structural colors, cosmetics, and fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dushkina, Natalia; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2009-08-01

    Structural colors are non-pigment colors that originate from the scattering of light from ordered microstructures, thin films, and even irregular arrays of scatterers. Examples include the flashing sparks of colors in opals and the brilliant hues of some butterflies such as Morpho rhetenor. Structural colors arise in nature from one or more of a palette of physical mechanisms that are now understood quite well and can be implemented industrially to produce structurally colored paints, fabrics, and cosmetics.

  3. Fabricated Helicopter Transmission Housing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    rotor head, rotor blades, swashplate assembly, main rotor controls, and internal gearing. Flight loads on the fabricated housing were determined for...The servo support brackets react induced loads from the swashplate on the servos. A swashplate guide is mounted to the top of the upper housing and...serves to locate the swashplate and react any induced side loads. The scissor bracket connects the upper main housing and the stationary swashplate

  4. Nanocarbon materials fabricated using plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of fullerenes more than three decades ago, new kinds of nanoscale materials of carbon allotropes called "nanocarbons" have so far been discovered or synthesized at successive intervals as cases such as carbon nanotubes, carbon nanohorns, graphene, carbon nanowalls, and a carbon nanobelt, while nanodiamonds were actually discovered before then. Their attractively excellent mechanical, physical, and chemical properties have driven researchers to continuously create one of the hottest frontiers in materials science and technology. While plasma states have often been involved in their discovery, on the other hand, plasma-based approaches to this exciting field originally hold promising and enormous potentials for advancing and expanding industrial/biomedical applications of nanocarbons of great diversity. This article provides an extensive overview on plasma-fabricated nanocarbon materials, where the term "fabrication" is defined as synthesis, functionalization, and assembly of devices to cover a wide range of issues associated with the step-by-step plasma processes. Specific attention has been paid to the comparative examination between plasma-based and non-plasma methods for fabricating the nanocarobons with an emphasis on the advantages of plasma processing, such as low-temperature/large-scale fabrication and diversity-carrying structure controllability. The review ends with current challenges and prospects including a ripple effect of the nanocarbon studies on the development of related novel nanomaterials such as transition metal dichalcogenides. It contains not only the latest progress in the field for cutting-edge scientists and engineers, but also the introductory guidance to non-specialists such as lower-class graduate students.

  5. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageev, O. A., E-mail: ageev@sfedu.ru [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation); Bykov, Al. V. [NT-MDT (Russian Federation); Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G. [Southern Federal University, Institute for Nanotechnologies, Electronics, and Electronic Equipment Engineering (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  6. Flexible Metal-Fabric Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Cynthia; Nguyen, Hai D.; Ruemmele, Warren; Andish, Kambiz K.; McCalley, Sean

    2005-01-01

    Flexible metal-fabric radiators have been considered as alternative means of dissipating excess heat from spacecraft and space suits. The radiators also may be useful in such special terrestrial applications as rejecting heat from space-suit-like protective suits worn in hot work environments. In addition to flexibility and consequent ease of deployment and installation on objects of varying sizes and shapes, the main advantages of these radiators over conventional rigid radiators are that they weigh less and occupy less volume for a given amount of cooling capacity. A radiator of this type includes conventional stainless-steel tubes carrying a coolant fluid. The main radiating component consists of a fabric of interwoven aluminum-foil strips bonded to the tubes by use of a proprietary process. The strip/tube bonds are strong and highly thermally conductive. Coolant is fed to and from the tubes via flexible stainless-steel manifolds designed to accommodate flexing of, and minimize bending forces on, the fabric. The manifolds are sized to minimize pressure drops and distribute the flow of coolant evenly to all the tubes. The tubes and manifolds are configured in two independent flow loops for operational flexibility and protective redundancy.

  7. Fabricating customized hydrogel contact lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Andre; Li, Hao; Lewittes, Daniella M.; Dong, Biqin; Liu, Wenzhong; Shu, Xiao; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-10-01

    Contact lenses are increasingly used in laboratories for in vivo animal retinal imaging and pre-clinical studies. The lens shapes often need modification to optimally fit corneas of individual test subjects. However, the choices from commercially available contact lenses are rather limited. Here, we report a flexible method to fabricate customized hydrogel contact lenses. We showed that the fabricated hydrogel is highly transparent, with refractive indices ranging from 1.42 to 1.45 in the spectra range from 400 nm to 800 nm. The Young’s modulus (1.47 MPa) and hydrophobicity (with a sessile drop contact angle of 40.5°) have also been characterized experimentally. Retinal imaging using optical coherence tomography in rats wearing our customized contact lenses has the quality comparable to the control case without the contact lens. Our method could significantly reduce the cost and the lead time for fabricating soft contact lenses with customized shapes, and benefit the laboratorial-used contact lenses in pre-clinical studies.

  8. Fluorimetric Mercury Test Strips with Suppressed “Coffee Stains” by a Bio-inspired Fabrication Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yuchun; Shang, Jizhen; Li, Shuying; Feng, Luping; Jiang, Yao; Duan, Zhiqiang; Lv, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Chunxian; Yao, Tiantian; Dong, Zhichao; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Hua

    2016-11-01

    A fluorimetric Hg2+ test strip has been developed using a lotus-inspired fabrication method for suppressing the “coffee stains” toward the uniform distribution of probe materials through creating a hydrophobic drying pattern for fast solvent evaporation. The test strips were first loaded with the model probes of fluorescent gold-silver nanoclusters and then dried in vacuum on the hydrophobic pattern. On the one hand, here, the hydrophobic constraining forces from the lotus surface-like pattern could control the exterior transport of dispersed nanoclusters on strips leading to the minimized “coffee stains”. On the other hand, the vacuum-aided fast solvent evaporation could boost the interior Marangoni flow of probe materials on strips to expect the further improved probe distribution on strips. High aqueous stability and enhanced fluorescence of probes on test strips were realized by the hydrophilic treatment with amine-derivatized silicane. A test strips-based fluorimetry has thereby been developed for probing Hg2+ ions in wastewater, showing the detection performances comparable to the classic instrumental analysis ones. Such a facile and efficient fabrication route for the bio-inspired suppression of “coffee stains” on test strips may expand the scope of applications of test strips-based “point-of-care” analysis methods or detection devices in the biomedical and environmental fields.

  9. Neural Manifolds for the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A; Perich, Matthew G; Miller, Lee E; Solla, Sara A

    2017-06-07

    The analysis of neural dynamics in several brain cortices has consistently uncovered low-dimensional manifolds that capture a significant fraction of neural variability. These neural manifolds are spanned by specific patterns of correlated neural activity, the "neural modes." We discuss a model for neural control of movement in which the time-dependent activation of these neural modes is the generator of motor behavior. This manifold-based view of motor cortex may lead to a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Robust fabric substrates for photonic textile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Pieterson, L.; Bouten, P.C.P.; Kriege, J.C.; Bhattacharya, R.

    2010-01-01

    A fabric substrate is described for electronic textile with robust interwoven connections between the conductive yarns in it. The fabric's robustness, as a function of the electrical reliability of its conductive yarn connections, is shown to hold over large deformations.This fabric is then used to

  11. Shock wave fabricated ceramic-metal nozzles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carton, E.P.; Stuivinga, M.E.C.; Keizers, H.L.J.; Verbeek, H.J.; Put, P.J. van der

    1999-01-01

    Shock compaction was used in the fabrication of high temperature ceramic-based materials. The materials' development was geared towards the fabrication of nozzles for rocket engines using solid propellants, for which the following metal-ceramic (cermet) materials were fabricated and tested: B4C-Ti

  12. Fabrication technology for ODS Alloy MA957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ML Hamilton; DS Gelles; RJ Lobsinger; MM Paxton; WF Brown

    2000-03-16

    A successful fabrication schedule has been developed at Carpenter Technology Corporation for the production of MA957 fuel and blanket cladding. Difficulties with gun drilling, plug drawing and recrystallization were overcome to produce a pilot lot of tubing. This report documents the fabrication efforts of two qualified vendors and the support studies performed at WHC to develop the fabrication-schedule.

  13. Quad-barrel multifunctional electrochemical and ion conductance probe for voltammetric analysis and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadappuram, Binoy Paulose; McKelvey, Kim; Byers, Joshua C; Güell, Aleix G; Colburn, Alex W; Lazenby, Robert A; Unwin, Patrick R

    2015-04-07

    The fabrication and use of a multifunctional electrochemical probe incorporating two independent carbon working electrodes and two electrolyte-filled barrels, equipped with quasi-reference counter electrodes (QRCEs), in the end of a tapered micrometer-scale pipet is described. This "quad-probe" (4-channel probe) was fabricated by depositing carbon pyrolytically into two diagonally opposite barrels of a laser-pulled quartz quadruple-barrelled pipet. After filling the open channels with electrolyte solution, a meniscus forms at the end of the probe and covers the two working electrodes. The two carbon electrodes can be used to drive local electrochemical reactions within the meniscus while a bias between the QRCEs in the electrolyte channels provides an ion conductance signal that is used to control and position the meniscus on a surface of interest. When brought into contact with a surface, localized high resolution amperometric imaging can be achieved with the two carbon working electrodes with a spatial resolution defined by the meniscus contact area. The substrate can be an insulating material or (semi)conductor, but herein, we focus mainly on conducting substrates that can be connected as a third working electrode. Studies using both aqueous and ionic liquid electrolytes in the probe, together with gold and individual single walled carbon nanotube samples, demonstrate the utility of the technique. Substrate generation-dual tip collection measurements are shown to be characterized by high collection efficiencies (approaching 100%). This hybrid configuration of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and scanning electrochemical cell microscopy (SECCM) should be powerful for future applications in electrode mapping, as well as in studies of insulating materials as demonstrated by transient spot redox-titration measurements at an electrostatically charged Teflon surface and at a pristine calcite surface, where a functionalized probe is used to follow the

  14. A programmable analog VLSI neural network processor for communication receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J; Bang, S H; Sheu, B J

    1993-01-01

    An analog VLSI neural network processor was designed and fabricated for communication receiver applications. It does not require prior estimation of the channel characteristics. A powerful channel equalizer was implemented with this processor chip configured as a four-layered perceptron network. The compact synapse cell is realized with an enhanced wide-range Gilbert multiplier circuit. The output neuron consists of a linear current-to-voltage converter and a sigmoid function generator with a controllable voltage gain. Network training is performed by the modified Kalman neuro-filtering algorithm to speed up the convergence process for intersymbol interference and white Gaussian noise communication channels. The learning process is done in the companion DSP board which also keeps the synapse weight for later use of the chip. The VLSI neural network processor chip occupies a silicon area of 4.6 mmx6.8 mm and was fabricated in a 2-mum double-polysilicon CMOS technology. System analysis and experimental results are presented.

  15. Epidemiology of neural tube defects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Abdelbasit, Omar B; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M; Alhussein, Khalid A; Miqdad, Abeer M; Khalil, Mohamed I; Al-Enazy, Naif M; Salih, Mustafa A

    2014-01-01

    To find the prevalence of neural tube defects (NTDs), and compare the findings with local and international data, and highlight the important role of folic acid supplementation and flour fortification with folic acid in preventing NTDs...

  16. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... study of the networks themselves. With this end in view the following restrictions have been made: - Amongst numerous neural network structures, only the Multi Layer Perceptron (a feed-forward network) is applied. - Amongst numerous training algorithms, only four algorithms are examined, all...... in a recursive form (sample updating). The simplest is the Back Probagation Error Algorithm, and the most complex is the recursive Prediction Error Method using a Gauss-Newton search direction. - Over-fitting is often considered to be a serious problem when training neural networks. This problem is specifically...

  17. Memristor-based neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andy

    2013-03-01

    The synapse is a crucial element in biological neural networks, but a simple electronic equivalent has been absent. This complicates the development of hardware that imitates biological architectures in the nervous system. Now, the recent progress in the experimental realization of memristive devices has renewed interest in artificial neural networks. The resistance of a memristive system depends on its past states and exactly this functionality can be used to mimic the synaptic connections in a (human) brain. After a short introduction to memristors, we present and explain the relevant mechanisms in a biological neural network, such as long-term potentiation and spike time-dependent plasticity, and determine the minimal requirements for an artificial neural network. We review the implementations of these processes using basic electric circuits and more complex mechanisms that either imitate biological systems or could act as a model system for them.

  18. Neural Networks in Control Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O.

    simulated process and compared. The closing chapter describes some practical experiments, where the different control concepts and training methods are tested on the same practical process operating in very noisy environments. All tests confirm that neural networks also have the potential to be trained......The intention of this report is to make a systematic examination of the possibilities of applying neural networks in those technical areas, which are familiar to a control engineer. In other words, the potential of neural networks in control applications is given higher priority than a detailed...... study of the networks themselves. With this end in view the following restrictions have been made: - Amongst numerous neural network structures, only the Multi Layer Perceptron (a feed-forward network) is applied. - Amongst numerous training algorithms, only four algorithms are examined, all...

  19. Neural components of altruistic punishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eDu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Altruistic punishment, which occurs when an individual incurs a cost to punish in response to unfairness or a norm violation, may play a role in perpetuating cooperation. The neural correlates underlying costly punishment have only recently begun to be explored. Here we review the current state of research on the neural basis of altruism from the perspectives of costly punishment, emphasizing the importance of characterizing elementary neural processes underlying a decision to punish. In particular, we emphasize three cognitive processes that contribute to the decision to altruistically punish in most scenarios: inequity aversion, cost-benefit calculation, and social reference frame to distinguish self from others. Overall, we argue for the importance of understanding the neural correlates of altruistic punishment with respect to the core computations necessary to achieve a decision to punish.

  20. Complex-Valued Neural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, Akira

    2012-01-01

    This book is the second enlarged and revised edition of the first successful monograph on complex-valued neural networks (CVNNs) published in 2006, which lends itself to graduate and undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, informatics, control engineering, mechanics, robotics, bioengineering, and other relevant fields. In the second edition the recent trends in CVNNs research are included, resulting in e.g. almost a doubled number of references. The parametron invented in 1954 is also referred to with discussion on analogy and disparity. Also various additional arguments on the advantages of the complex-valued neural networks enhancing the difference to real-valued neural networks are given in various sections. The book is useful for those beginning their studies, for instance, in adaptive signal processing for highly functional sensing and imaging, control in unknown and changing environment, robotics inspired by human neural systems, and brain-like information processing, as well as interdisciplina...

  1. CHARGEd with neural crest defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauli, Silke; Bajpai, Ruchi; Borchers, Annette

    2017-10-30

    Neural crest cells are highly migratory pluripotent cells that give rise to diverse derivatives including cartilage, bone, smooth muscle, pigment, and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia. Abnormalities in neural crest-derived tissues contribute to the etiology of CHARGE syndrome, a complex malformation disorder that encompasses clinical symptoms like coloboma, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies, and deafness. Mutations in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) gene are causative of CHARGE syndrome and loss-of-function data in different model systems have firmly established a role of CHD7 in neural crest development. Here, we will summarize our current understanding of the function of CHD7 in neural crest development and discuss possible links of CHARGE syndrome to other developmental disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neural components of altruistic punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Emily; Chang, Steve W C

    2015-01-01

    Altruistic punishment, which occurs when an individual incurs a cost to punish in response to unfairness or a norm violation, may play a role in perpetuating cooperation. The neural correlates underlying costly punishment have only recently begun to be explored. Here we review the current state of research on the neural basis of altruism from the perspectives of costly punishment, emphasizing the importance of characterizing elementary neural processes underlying a decision to punish. In particular, we emphasize three cognitive processes that contribute to the decision to altruistically punish in most scenarios: inequity aversion, cost-benefit calculation, and social reference frame to distinguish self from others. Overall, we argue for the importance of understanding the neural correlates of altruistic punishment with respect to the core computations necessary to achieve a decision to punish.

  3. Pansharpening by Convolutional Neural Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masi, Giuseppe; Cozzolino, Davide; Verdoliva, Luisa; Scarpa, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A new pansharpening method is proposed, based on convolutional neural networks. We adapt a simple and effective three-layer architecture recently proposed for super-resolution to the pansharpening problem...

  4. High-Thermal-Conductivity Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibante, L. P. Felipe

    2012-01-01

    Heat management with common textiles such as nylon and spandex is hindered by the poor thermal conductivity from the skin surface to cooling surfaces. This innovation showed marked improvement in thermal conductivity of the individual fibers and tubing, as well as components assembled from them. The problem is centered on improving the heat removal of the liquid-cooled ventilation garments (LCVGs) used by astronauts. The current design uses an extensive network of water-cooling tubes that introduces bulkiness and discomfort, and increases fatigue. Range of motion and ease of movement are affected as well. The current technology is the same as developed during the Apollo program of the 1960s. Tubing material is hand-threaded through a spandex/nylon mesh layer, in a series of loops throughout the torso and limbs such that there is close, form-fitting contact with the user. Usually, there is a nylon liner layer to improve comfort. Circulating water is chilled by an external heat exchanger (sublimator). The purpose of this innovation is to produce new LCVG components with improved thermal conductivity. This was addressed using nanocomposite engineering incorporating high-thermalconductivity nanoscale fillers in the fabric and tubing components. Specifically, carbon nanotubes were added using normal processing methods such as thermoplastic melt mixing (compounding twin screw extruder) and downstream processing (fiber spinning, tubing extrusion). Fibers were produced as yarns and woven into fabric cloths. The application of isotropic nanofillers can be modeled using a modified Nielsen Model for conductive fillers in a matrix based on Einstein s viscosity model. This is a drop-in technology with no additional equipment needed. The loading is limited by the ability to maintain adequate dispersion. Undispersed materials will plug filtering screens in processing equipment. Generally, the viscosity increases were acceptable, and allowed the filled polymers to still be

  5. Probing Gravity with Spacetime Sirens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffayet, Cédric; Menou, Kristen

    2007-10-01

    A gravitational observatory such as LISA will detect coalescing pairs of massive black holes, accurately measure their luminosity distance, and help identify a host galaxy or an electromagnetic counterpart. If dark energy is a manifestation of modified gravity on large scales, gravitational waves from cosmologically distant spacetime sirens are direct probes of this new physics. For example, a gravitational Hubble diagram based on black hole pair luminosity distances and host galaxy redshifts could reveal a large distance extradimensional leakage of gravity. Various additional signatures may be expected in a gravitational signal propagated over cosmological scales.

  6. Soft QGP probes with ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Graczykowski, Łukasz Kamil

    2016-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions at the LHC a hot and dense medium of deconfided partons, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), is created. Its global properties can be characterized by the measurements of particles in the low transverse momentum (or "soft") regime, which represent the majority of created particles. In this report we outline a selection of measurements of the soft probes by the ALICE experiment in pp, p--Pb, and Pb--Pb collisions. The paper focuses on recent flow measurements via angular correlations and femtoscopic studies. The first ever preliminary analysis of $\\mathrm{K}^0_{\\rm S}\\mathrm{K}^{\\pm}$ femtoscopy is also presented.

  7. Development of Touch Probing System Using a Fiber Stylus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Murakami

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a system that can be used for micro-hole measurement; the system comprises an optical fiber stylus that is 5 µm in diameter. The stylus deflects when it comes into contact with the measured surface; this deflection is measured optically. In this study, the design parameters of the optical system are determined using a ray-tracing method, and a prototype of the probing system is fabricated to verify ray-tracing simulation results; furthermore, the performance of the system is evaluated experimentally. The results show that the design parameters of this system can be determined using ray-tracing; the resolution of the measurement system using this shaft was approximately 3 nm, and the practicality of this system was confirmed by measuring the shape of a micro-hole 100 µm in diameter and 475 µm in depth.

  8. Fool's Gold Footprinting: microfluidic probing of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher D.; Schlatterer, Joerg C.; Brenowitz, Michael; Pollack, Lois

    2012-02-01

    We describe a microfluidic device containing a mineral matrix capable of rapidly generating hydroxyl radicals that enables high-resolution structural studies of nucleic acids. Hydroxyl radicals cleave the solvent accessible backbone of DNA and RNA; the cleavage products can be detected with as fine as single nucleotide resolution. Protection from hydroxyl radical cleavage (footprinting) can identify sites of protein binding or the presence of tertiary structure. Here we report preparation of micron sized particles of iron sulfide (pyrite) and fabrication of a microfluidic prototype that together generate enough hydroxyl radicals within 20 ms to cleave DNA sufficiently for a footprinting analysis to be conducted. This prototype enables the development of high-throughput and/or rapid reaction devices with which to probe nucleic acid folding dynamics and ligand binding.

  9. Clusters of Galaxies as a Probe of the Cosmic Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richstone, Douglas

    1994-05-01

    We focus on the influence of cosmological model on the process of formation of clusters of galaxies. Richstone, Loeb and Turner (1992 ApJ 393, 477) have shown that under the assumptions of hierarchical formation and a Gaussian random field of perturbations, the rate at which matter is currently being added to the most massive virialized structures is a strong function of Omega_0 , and suggested that the observed frequency of substructure in clusters might be a probe of Omega . Evrard, Mohr, Fabricant and Geller (1993 ApJ Letters 419, L9) have shown that it is possible to compare SPH simulations of clusters to X-ray images of clusters using a test measuring the skewness of the image, to explore this effect. We report on calculations done in collaboration with Crone and Evrard, which explore the cosmological dependence of the cluster density profile and various tests of substructure in N-body simulations.

  10. Fluorescent probes for shock compression spectroscopy of microstructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, James M.; Banishev, Alexandr A.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We are developing fluorescent probes to obtain dynamic two-dimensional pressure maps of shocked microstructured materials. We have fabricated silica nano-or micro-spheres doped with rhodamine 6G dye (R6G) which fluoresce strongly, and which may be dispersed throughout a microstructured sample. Alternatively we can grow thin skin layers of dye-doped silica on the surface of particles. The emissive microspheres were embedded in poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and were excited by a quasi-continuous laser. When the samples were shocked to 3-8.4 GPa using laser-driven flyer plates, the emission redshifted and lost intensity. When encapsulating the dye in silica, the emission became brighter and the intensity-loss response became fast enough to monitor nanosecond shock effects. Preliminary data are reported showing the intensity loss in a shocked microstructured medium, an artificial sand, consisting of dye-coated silica microspheres.

  11. Standard Practices for Usage of Inductive Magnetic Field Probes with Application to Electric Propulsion Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Hill, Carrie S.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive magnetic field probes (also known as B-dot probes and sometimes as B-probes or magnetic probes) are useful for performing measurements in electric space thrusters and various plasma accelerator applications where a time-varying magnetic field is present. Magnetic field probes have proven to be a mainstay in diagnosing plasma thrusters where changes occur rapidly with respect to time, providing the means to measure the magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents and even an indirect measure of the plasma current density through the application of Ampère's law. Examples of applications where this measurement technique has been employed include pulsed plasma thrusters and quasi-steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters. The Electric Propulsion Technical Committee (EPTC) of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) was asked to assemble a Committee on Standards (CoS) for Electric Propulsion Testing. The assembled CoS was tasked with developing Standards and Recommended Practices for various diagnostic techniques used in the evaluation of plasma thrusters. These include measurements that can yield either global information related to a thruster and its performance or detailed, local data related to the specific physical processes occurring in the plasma. This paper presents a summary of the standard, describing the preferred methods for fabrication, calibration, and usage of inductive magnetic field probes for use in diagnosing plasma thrusters. Inductive magnetic field probes (also called B-dot probes throughout this document) are commonly used in electric propulsion (EP) research and testing to measure unsteady magnetic fields produced by time-varying currents. The B-dot probe is relatively simple in construction, and requires minimal cost, making it a low-cost technique that is readily accessible to most researchers. While relatively simple, the design of a B-dot probe is not trivial and there are many opportunities for errors in

  12. Sub-micron opto-chemical probes for studying living neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Zadeh, M.; Delgado, J.; Schweizer, F.; Lieberman, R.

    2017-02-01

    We have fabricated sub-micron opto-chemical probes for pH, oxygen and calcium monitoring and demonstrated their application in intracellular and extracellular monitoring of neurons (cortical neuronal cultures and acute hippocampal slices). Using these probes, we have measured extracellular pH in the stratum radiatum of the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus upon stimulation of presynaptic Schaffer collateral axons. Synaptic transmission was monitored using standard electrophysiological techniques. We find that the local pH transiently changes in response to synaptic stimulation. In addition, the geometry of the functionalized region on the probe combined with high sensitivity imaging enables simultaneous monitoring of spatially adjacent but distinct compartments. As proof of concept we impaled cultured neurons with the probe measured calcium and pH inside as well as directly outside of neurons as we changed the pH and calcium concentration in the physiological solution in the perfusion chamber. As such these probes can be used to study the impact of the environment on both cellular and extra-cellular space. Additionally as the chemical properties of the surrounding medium can be controlled and monitored with high precision, these probes enable differential measurement of the target parameter referenced to a stable bath. This approach eliminates the uncertainties associated with non-chemical fluctuations in the fluorescent emission and result in a self-calibrated opto-chemical probe. We have also demonstrated multifunctional probes that are capable of measuring up to three parameters in the extracellular space in brain slices.

  13. What are artificial neural networks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb......Artificial neural networks have been applied to problems ranging from speech recognition to prediction of protein secondary structure, classification of cancers and gene prediction. How do they work and what might they be good for? Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb...

  14. Indices for Testing Neural Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan D. Victor; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    One of the most critical challenges in systems neuroscience is determining the neural code. A principled framework for addressing this can be found in information theory. With this approach, one can determine whether a proposed code can account for the stimulus-response relationship. Specifically, one can compare the transmitted information between the stimulus and the hypothesized neural code with the transmitted information between the stimulus and the behavioral response. If the former is ...

  15. Biologically Inspired Modular Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Azam, Farooq

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation explores the modular learning in artificial neural networks that mainly driven by the inspiration from the neurobiological basis of the human learning. The presented modularization approaches to the neural network design and learning are inspired by the engineering, complexity, psychological and neurobiological aspects. The main theme of this dissertation is to explore the organization and functioning of the brain to discover new structural and learning ...

  16. High MRI performance fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles for tracking neural progenitor cells in an ischemic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Wang, Yao; Tang, Yaohui; Jiao, Zheng; Xie, Chengying; Zhang, Haijiao; Gu, Ping; Wei, Xunbin; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Gu, Hongchen; Zhang, Chunfu

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional probes with high MRI sensitivity and high efficiency for cell labeling are desirable for MR cell imaging. Herein, we have fabricated fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs) for neural progenitor cell (C17.2) MR imaging. FmSiO4@SPIONs were discrete and uniform in size, and had a clear core-shell structure. The magnetic core size was about 10 nm and the fluorescent mesoporous silica coating layer was around 20 nm. Compared with fluorescent dense silica-coated SPIONs (fdSiO4@SPIONs) with a similar size, fmSiO4@SPIONs demonstrated higher MR sensitivity and cell labeling efficiency. When implanted into the right hemisphere of stroke mice, contralateral to the ischemic territory, a small amount of labeled cells were able to be tracked migrating to the lesion sites using a clinical MRI scanner (3 T). More impressively, even when administered intravenously, the labeled cells could also be monitored homing to the ischemic area. MRI observations were corroborated by histological studies of the brain tissues. Our study demonstrated that fmSiO4@SPIONs are highly effective for cell imaging and hold great promise for MRI cell tracking in future.Multifunctional probes with high MRI sensitivity and high efficiency for cell labeling are desirable for MR cell imaging. Herein, we have fabricated fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs) for neural progenitor cell (C17.2) MR imaging. FmSiO4@SPIONs were discrete and uniform in size, and had a clear core-shell structure. The magnetic core size was about 10 nm and the fluorescent mesoporous silica coating layer was around 20 nm. Compared with fluorescent dense silica-coated SPIONs (fdSiO4@SPIONs) with a similar size, fmSiO4@SPIONs demonstrated higher MR sensitivity and cell labeling efficiency. When implanted into the right hemisphere of stroke mice, contralateral to the ischemic territory, a small amount of

  17. Direct fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes using quantum dot-platinum labeled DNA probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gyoyeon [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyeon, E-mail: jylee@kist.re.kr [Chemical Kinomics Research Center, Future Convergence Research Division, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Biological Chemistry, Korea University of Science and Technology, 217, Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-13

    The telomere shortening in chromosomes implies the senescence, apoptosis, or oncogenic transformation of cells. Since detecting telomeres in aging and diseases like cancer, is important, the direct detection of telomeres has been a very useful biomarker. We propose a telomere detection method using a newly synthesized quantum dot (QD) based probe with oligonucleotide conjugation and direct fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). QD-oligonucleotides were prepared with metal coordination bonding based on platinum-guanine binding reported in our previous work. The QD-oligonucleotide conjugation method has an advantage where any sequence containing guanine at the end can be easily bound to the starting QD-Pt conjugate. A synthesized telomeric oligonucleotide was bound to the QD-Pt conjugate successfully and this probe hybridized specifically on the telomere of fabricated MV-4-11 and MOLT-4 chromosomes. Additionally, the QD-telomeric oligonucleotide probe successfully detected the telomeres on the CGH metaphase slide. Due to the excellent photostability and high quantum yield of QDs, the QD-oligonucleotide probe has high fluorescence intensity when compared to the organic dye-oligonucleotide probe. Our QD-oligonucleotide probe, conjugation method of this QD probe, and hybridization protocol with the chromosomes can be a useful tool for chromosome painting and FISH. - Highlights: • We prepared a probe linked between QD and telomeric oligonucleotide with platinum-guanine bonding. • Telomeres were detected by our new telomere probes successfully in three different human metaphase chromosomes. • QDPt-DNA probe has high fluorescence intensity in comparison with organic dye-DNA probe.

  18. Neural-like growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenko, Vitaliy A.

    2000-03-01

    On the basis of the analysis of scientific ideas reflecting the law in the structure and functioning the biological structures of a brain, and analysis and synthesis of knowledge, developed by various directions in Computer Science, also there were developed the bases of the theory of a new class neural-like growing networks, not having the analogue in world practice. In a base of neural-like growing networks the synthesis of knowledge developed by classical theories - semantic and neural of networks is. The first of them enable to form sense, as objects and connections between them in accordance with construction of the network. With thus each sense gets a separate a component of a network as top, connected to other tops. In common it quite corresponds to structure reflected in a brain, where each obvious concept is presented by certain structure and has designating symbol. Secondly, this network gets increased semantic clearness at the expense owing to formation not only connections between neural by elements, but also themselves of elements as such, i.e. here has a place not simply construction of a network by accommodation sense structures in environment neural of elements, and purely creation of most this environment, as of an equivalent of environment of memory. Thus neural-like growing networks are represented by the convenient apparatus for modeling of mechanisms of teleological thinking, as a fulfillment of certain psychophysiological of functions.

  19. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  20. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions.

  1. Monitoring activity in neural circuits with genetically encoded indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Joseph Broussard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in genetically encoded indicators of neural activity (GINAs have greatly advanced the field of systems neuroscience. As they are encoded by DNA, GINAs can be targeted to genetically defined cellular populations. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, most notably multi-photon imaging, GINAs allow chronic simultaneous optical recordings from large populations of neurons or glial cells in awake, behaving mammals, particularly rodents. This large-scale recording of neural activity at multiple temporal and spatial scales has greatly advanced our understanding of the dynamics of neural circuitry underlying behavior—a critical first step toward understanding the complexities of brain function, such as sensorimotor integration and learning.Here, we summarize the recent development and applications of the major classes of GINAs. In particular, we take an in-depth look at the design of available GINA families with a particular focus on genetically encoded calcium indicators, sensors probing synaptic activity, and genetically encoded voltage indicators. Using the family of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP as an example, we review established sensor optimization pipelines. We also discuss practical considerations for end users of GINAs about experimental methods including approaches for gene delivery, imaging system requirements, and data analysis techniques. With the growing toolbox of GINAs and with new microscopy techniques pushing beyond their current limits, the age of light can finally achieve the goal of broad and dense sampling of neuronal activity across time and brain structures to obtain a dynamic picture of brain function.

  2. Soil moisture calibration of TDR multilevel probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrarens Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Time domain reflectometry (TDR probes are increasingly used for field estimation of soil water content. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the multilevel TDR probe under field conditions. For this purpose, eight such TDR probes were installed in small plots that were seeded with beans and sorghum. Data collection from the probes was such that soil moisture readings were automated and logged using a standalone field unit. Neutron probe measurements were used to calibrate the TDR probes. Soil-probe contact and soil compaction were critical to the accuracy of the TDR, especially when a number of TDR probes are combined for a single calibration curve. If each probe is calibrated individually, approximate measurement errors were between 0.005 and 0.015 m³ m-3. However, measurement errors doubled to approximately 0.025 to 0.03 m³ m-3, when TDR probes were combined to yield a single calibration curve.

  3. Micro-fabricated all optical pressure sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havreland, Andreas Spandet; Petersen, Søren Dahl; Østergaard, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Optical pressure sensors can operate in certain harsh application areas where the electrical pressure sensors cannot. However, the sensitivity is often not as good for the optical sensors. This work presents an all optical pressure sensor, which is fabricated by micro fabrication techniques, where...... the sensitivity can be tuned in the fabrication process. The developed sensor design, simplifies the fabrication process leading to a lower fabrication cost, which can make the all optical pressure sensors more competitive towards their electrical counterpart. The sensor has shown promising results and a linear...

  4. Neural correlates of face gender discrimination learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junzhu; Tan, Qingleng; Fang, Fang

    2013-04-01

    Using combined psychophysics and event-related potentials (ERPs), we investigated the effect of perceptual learning on face gender discrimination and probe the neural correlates of the learning effect. Human subjects were trained to perform a gender discrimination task with male or female faces. Before and after training, they were tested with the trained faces and other faces with the same and opposite genders. ERPs responding to these faces were recorded. Psychophysical results showed that training significantly improved subjects' discrimination performance and the improvement was specific to the trained gender, as well as to the trained identities. The training effect indicates that learning occurs at two levels-the category level (gender) and the exemplar level (identity). ERP analyses showed that the gender and identity learning was associated with the N170 latency reduction at the left occipital-temporal area and the N170 amplitude reduction at the right occipital-temporal area, respectively. These findings provide evidence for the facilitation model and the sharpening model on neuronal plasticity from visual experience, suggesting a faster processing speed and a sparser representation of face induced by perceptual learning.

  5. Spiking modular neural networks: A neural network modeling approach for hydrological processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamban Parasuraman; Amin Elshorbagy; Sean K. Carey

    2006-01-01

    .... In this study, a novel neural network model called the spiking modular neural networks (SMNNs) is proposed. An SMNN consists of an input layer, a spiking layer, and an associator neural network layer...

  6. Rectangular waveguide-to-coplanar waveguide transitions at U-band using e-plane probe and wire bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Yunfeng; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents rectangular waveguide-to-coplanar waveguide (CPW) transitions at U-band (40–60 GHz) using E-plane probe and wire bonding. The designs of CPWs based on quartz substrate with and without aluminum cover are explained. The single and double layer rectangular waveguide-to-CPW...... transitions using E-plane probe and wire bonding are designed. The proposed rectangular waveguide-to-CPW transition using wire bonding can provide 10 GHz bandwidth at U-band and does not require extra CPWs or connections between CPWs and chips. A single layer rectangular waveguide-to-CPW transition using E......-plane probe with aluminum package has been fabricated and measured to validate the proposed transitions. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first time that a wire bonding is used as a probe for rectangular waveguide-to-CPW transition at U-band....

  7. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  8. Planar Bragg Grating Sensors—Fabrication and Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. J. G. Sparrow

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the background and technology of planar Bragg grating sensors, reviewing their development and describing the latest developments. The physical operating principles are discussed, relating device operation to user requirements. Recent performance of such devices includes a planar Bragg grating sensor design which allows refractive index resolution of 1.9×10−6 RIU and temperature resolution of 0.03∘C. This sensor design is incorporated into industrialised applications allowing the sensor to be used for real time sensing in intrinsically safe, high-pressure pipelines, or for insertion probe applications such as fermentation. Initial data demonstrating the ability to identify solvents and monitor long term industrial processes is presented. A brief review of the technology used to fabricate the sensors is given along with examples of the flexibility afforded by the technique.

  9. Design and fabrication of aspherical bimorph PZT optics

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, T C; Yeh, Z C; Perng, S Y; Wang, D J; Kuan, C K; Chen, J R; Chen, C T

    2001-01-01

    Bimorph piezoelectric optics with a third-order-polynomial surface is designed and a prototype is fabricated as active optics. Two pairs of silicon (Si) and lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoelectric ceramic are bonded as Si-PZT-PZT-Si together with a multi-electrode or thin film resistor coating used as the control electrode between Si and PZT and metallic films as grounding between the interface of PZT ceramics. A linear voltage is applied to the bimorph PZT optics by probing the control electrodes from a two-channel controllable power supplier. In doing so, the optics surface can achieve a desired third-order-polynomial surface. Reducing hysteresis and creep in bimorph PZT X-ray optics is the only feasible way by inserting an appropriate capacitor in series with bimorph PZT optics to significantly reduce both effects.

  10. Design Thinking for Digital Fabrication in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Hjorth, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we argue that digital fabrication in education may benefit from design thinking, to foster a more profound understanding of digital fabrication processes among students. Two related studies of digital fabrication in education are presented in the paper. In an observational study we...... found that students (eleven to fifteen) lacked an understanding of the complexity of the digital fabrication process impeding on the potentials of digital fabrication in education. In a second explorative research through design study, we investigated how a focus on design thinking affected the students......’ performance in digital fabrication processes. Our findings indicate that design thinking can provide students with a general understanding of the creative and complex process through which artifacts and futures emerge in processes of digital fabrication....

  11. Properties of honeycomb polyester knitted fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, A. F.

    2016-07-01

    The properties of honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics were studied to understand their advantages. Seven honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics and one common polyester weft-knitted fabric were selected for testing. Their bursting strengths, fuzzing and pilling, air permeability, abrasion resistance and moisture absorption and perspiration were studied. The results show that the honeycomb polyester weft-knitted fabrics have excellent moisture absorption and liberation. The smaller their thicknesses and area densities are, the better their moisture absorption and liberation will be. Their anti-fuzzing and anti-pilling is good, whereas their bursting strengths and abrasion resistance are poorer compared with common polyester fabric's. In order to improve the hygroscopic properties of the fabrics, the proportion of the honeycomb microporous structure modified polyester in the fabrics should not be less than 40%.

  12. All-diamond functional surface micro-electrode arrays for brain-slice neural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vahidpour, Farnoosh; Curley, Lowry; Biró, István; McDonald, Matthew; Croux, Dieter; POBEDINSKAS, Paulius; Haenen, Ken; Giugliano, Michele; Zivcova, Zuzana Vlckova; Kavan, Ladislav; Nesladek, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Diamond-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by using nanocrystalline diamond as an insulating layer and conductive boron-doped in order to used them for analysis of brain cortical slices. MEA surface is solely composed of diamond, exposed to the cells. The impedance measurements showed negligible cross-talk between neighbouring diamond microelectrodes. Local field potentials related to neural signals were then successfully recorded from pharmacologically disinhibited rat cor...

  13. EDITORIAL: Designer fabrication: nanotemplates get in shape Designer fabrication: nanotemplates get in shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2013-02-01

    People working in device design rarely see something that works without thinking how it could be made to work better. The work on anodic aluminum oxide materials in this issue provides a case in point [1]. Over the past century researchers have observed, manipulated and exploited the porous structures that result when anodizing aluminum in for example oxalic, sulfuric, and phosphoric acid solutions [1, 2]. The self-organized pore arrays have demonstrated the potential to facilitate high through-put, low-cost fabrication of nanocomposites as well as other nanostructures. The straight self-aligned nanochannels in porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) have long been accepted as an inherent property of these films and for many applications they are an attractive attribute. However, researchers in Taiwan have considered a novel manifestation of AAO materials which may enhance their natural attributes by generating arrays that bend [3]. Their work is an example of how even well studied systems continue to harbour surprises and scope for creative innovation. As the authors point out, 'This novel fan-out platform facilitates probing and handling many signals from different areas on a sample's surface and is therefore promising for applications in detection and manipulation at the nanoscale level'. It has long been recognized that the inter-pore distance, pore diameter and pore depth in AAO can be controlled by changing the anodization conditions. These accommodating features have motivated researchers to seek a better understanding of how to optimize fabrication conditions. A collaboration of researchers in Sweden, Chile and Uruguay studied the structural and optical properties of silver nanowires electrodeposited in commercially available nanoporous alumina templates, with a nominal pore diameter of 20 nm [4]. Their results revealed a decrease in the uniformity of pore filling with increasing deposition overpotential and suggested that overpotentials were preferred for the

  14. Organic Liquids-Responsive β-Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Graphene-Based Fluorescence Probe: Label-Free Selective Detection of Tetrahydrofuran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawen Hu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a label-free graphene-based fluorescence probe used for detection of volatile organic liquids was fabricated by a simple, efficient and low-cost method. To fabricate the probe, a bio-based β-cyclodextrin (β-CD was firstly grafted on reduced graphene surfaces effectively and uniformly, as evidenced by various characterization techniques such as Ultraviolet/Visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The subsequent inclusion of Rhodamine B (RhB into the inner cavities of the β-CD grafted on the graphene surfaces was achieved easily by a solution mixing method, which yielded the graphene-based fluorescent switch-on probe. In addition, the gradual and controllable quenching of RhB by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer from RhB to graphene during the process of stepwise accommodation of the RhB molecules into the β-CD-functionalized graphene was investigated in depth. A wide range of organic solvents was examined using the as-fabricated fluorescence probe, which revealed the highest sensitivity to tetrahydrofuran with the detection limit of about 1.7 μg/mL. Some insight into the mechanism of the different responsive behaviors of the fluorescence sensor to the examined targets was also described.

  15. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  16. Diamond-modified AFM probes: from diamond nanowires to atomic force microscopy-integrated boron-doped diamond electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Waldemar; Kriele, Armin; Hoffmann, René; Sillero, Eugenio; Hees, Jakob; Williams, Oliver A; Yang, Nianjun; Kranz, Christine; Nebel, Christoph E

    2011-06-15

    In atomic force microscopy (AFM), sharp and wear-resistant tips are a critical issue. Regarding scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM), electrodes are required to be mechanically and chemically stable. Diamond is the perfect candidate for both AFM probes as well as for electrode materials if doped, due to diamond's unrivaled mechanical, chemical, and electrochemical properties. In this study, standard AFM tips were overgrown with typically 300 nm thick nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) layers and modified to obtain ultra sharp diamond nanowire-based AFM probes and probes that were used for combined AFM-SECM measurements based on integrated boron-doped conductive diamond electrodes. Analysis of the resonance properties of the diamond overgrown AFM cantilevers showed increasing resonance frequencies with increasing diamond coating thicknesses (i.e., from 160 to 260 kHz). The measured data were compared to performed simulations and show excellent correlation. A strong enhancement of the quality factor upon overgrowth was also observed (120 to 710). AFM tips with integrated diamond nanowires are shown to have apex radii as small as 5 nm and where fabricated by selectively etching diamond in a plasma etching process using self-organized metal nanomasks. These scanning tips showed superior imaging performance as compared to standard Si-tips or commercially available diamond-coated tips. The high imaging resolution and low tip wear are demonstrated using tapping and contact mode AFM measurements by imaging ultra hard substrates and DNA. Furthermore, AFM probes were coated with conductive boron-doped and insulating diamond layers to achieve bifunctional AFM-SECM probes. For this, focused ion beam (FIB) technology was used to expose the boron-doped diamond as a recessed electrode near the apex of the scanning tip. Such a modified probe was used to perform proof-of-concept AFM-SECM measurements. The results show that high-quality diamond probes can be fabricated, which are

  17. Nanobiomaterials for neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases and disorders associated with nervous system such as injuries by trauma and neurodegeneration are shown to be one of the most serious problems in medicine, requiring innovative strategies to trigger and enhance the nerve regeneration. Tissue engineering aims to provide a highly biomimetic environment by using a combination of cells, materials and suitable biological cues, by which the lost body part may be regenerated or even fully rebuilt. Electrospinning, being able to produce extracellular matrix (ECM-like nanostructures with great flexibility in design and choice of materials, have demonstrated their great potential for fabrication of nerve tissue engineered scaffolds. The review here begins with a brief description of the anatomy of native nervous system, which provides basic knowledge and ideas for the design of nerve tissue scaffolds, followed by five main parts in the design of electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds including materials selection, structural design, in vitro bioreactor, functionalization and cellular support. Performances of biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous nerve implant devices are also reviewed. Finally, future directions for advanced electrospun nerve tissue engineered scaffolds are discussed.

  18. Design and testing of microfabricated surgical tools for large animal probe insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, Shelly [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-08-05

    Neural probes provide therapeutic stimulation for neuropsychiatric disorders or record neural activity to investigate the workings of the brain. Researchers utilize 6 mm long temporary silicon stiffeners attached with biodissolvable adhesive to insert flexible neural probes into rat brains, but increasing the probe length fivefold makes inserting large animal probes a significant challenge because of an increased potential for buckling. This study compared the insertion success rates of 6 mm and 30 mm long silicon stiffeners that were 80 μm wide and 30 μm thick, and ascertained the material thickness and modulus of elasticity that would provide successful insertion for a 30 mm probe. Using a microdrive, stiffeners were inserted into an agarose brain phantom at controlled insertion speeds while being video-recorded. Twenty-five percent of the 30 mm silicon stiffeners fully inserted at speeds approximately four times higher than the target rate of 0.13 mm/s, while 100 percent of the 6 mm silicon stiffeners inserted successfully at target speed. Critical buckling loads (Pcr) were calculated for the 6 mm and 30 mm silicon stiffeners, and for 30 mm diamond and tungsten stiffeners, with thicknesses varying from 30-80 μm. Increasing the thickness of the material by 10 μm, 20 μm and 30 μm improved the Pcr by 2.4, 4.7 and 8.2 times, respectively, independent of the material, and substituting diamond for silicon multiplied the buckling capacity by 5.0 times. Stiffeners made of silicon for large animal probe insertion are not strong enough to withstand buckling upon insertion without a significant increase in thickness. Replacing silicon with diamond and increasing the thickness of the stiffener to 50 μm would afford a stiffener with the same Pcr capacity as the 6 mm silicon stiffener that had a 100 percent insertion success rate. Experiments should continue with diamond to determine a minimum thickness that will ensure successful

  19. Spin of Planetary Probes in Atmospheric Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    Probes that enter planetary atmospheres are often spun during entry or descent for a variety of reasons. Their spin rate histories are influenced by often subtle effects. The spin requirements, control methods and flight experience from planetary and earth entry missions are reviewed. An interaction of the probe aerodynamic wake with a drogue parachute, observed in Gemini wind tunnel tests, is discussed in connection with the anomalous spin behaviour of the Huygens probe.

  20. Polymer Composite with Carbon Nanofibers Aligned during Thermal Drawing as a Microelectrode for Chronic Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shan; Grena, Benjamin J B; Kimbrough, Ian F; Thompson, Emily G; Fink, Yoel; Sontheimer, Harald; Yoshinobu, Tatsuo; Jia, Xiaoting

    2017-07-25

    Microelectrodes provide a direct pathway to investigate brain activities electrically from the external world, which has advanced our fundamental understanding of brain functions and has been utilized for rehabilitative applications as brain-machine interfaces. However, minimizing the tissue response and prolonging the functional durations of these devices remain challenging. Therefore, the development of next-generation microelectrodes as neural interfaces is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials toward biocompatible and functional organic materials with a miniature footprint, good flexibility, and reasonable robustness. In this study, we developed a miniaturized all polymer-based neural probe with carbon nanofiber (CNF) composites as recording electrodes via the scalable thermal drawing process. We demonstrated that in situ CNF unidirectional alignment can be achieved during the thermal drawing, which contributes to a drastic improvement of electrical conductivity by 2 orders of magnitude compared to a conventional polymer electrode, while still maintaining the mechanical compliance with brain tissues. The resulting neural probe has a miniature footprint, including a recording site with a reduced size comparable to a single neuron and maintained impedance that was able to capture neural activities. Its stable functionality as a chronic implant has been demonstrated with the long-term reliable electrophysiological recording with single-spike resolution and the minimal tissue response over the extended period of implantation in wild-type mice. Technology developed here can be applied to basic chronic electrophysiological studies as well as clinical implementation for neuro-rehabilitative applications.

  1. Recent Progress in Fluorescent Imaging Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Yen Leng; Swamy, K. M. K.; Yoon, Juyoung

    2015-01-01

    Due to the simplicity and low detection limit, especially the bioimaging ability for cells, fluorescence probes serve as unique detection methods. With the aid of molecular recognition and specific organic reactions, research on fluorescent imaging probes has blossomed during the last decade. Especially, reaction based fluorescent probes have been proven to be highly selective for specific analytes. This review highlights our recent progress on fluorescent imaging probes for biologically important species, such as biothiols, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, metal ions including Zn2+, Hg2+, Cu2+ and Au3+, and anions including cyanide and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). PMID:26402684

  2. Carbon nanoparticle-based fluorescent bioimaging probes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhunia, Susanta Kumar; Saha, Arindam; Maity, Amit Ranjan; Ray, Sekhar C; Jana, Nikhil R

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanoparticle-based imaging probes have advanced current labelling technology and are expected to generate new medical diagnostic tools based on their superior brightness and photostability...

  3. Myelin plasticity, neural activity, and traumatic neural injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondiles, Bethany R; Horner, Philip J

    2018-02-01

    The possibility that adult organisms exhibit myelin plasticity has recently become a topic of great interest. Many researchers are exploring the role of myelin growth and adaptation in daily functions such as memory and motor learning. Here we consider evidence for three different potential categories of myelin plasticity: the myelination of previously bare axons, remodeling of existing sheaths, and the removal of a sheath with replacement by a new internode. We also review evidence that points to the importance of neural activity as a mechanism by which oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are cued to differentiate into myelinating oligodendrocytes, which may potentially be an important component of myelin plasticity. Finally, we discuss demyelination in the context of traumatic neural injury and present an argument for altering neural activity as a potential therapeutic target for remyelination following injury. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 78: 108-122, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Porosity Prediction of Plain Weft Knitted Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Owais Raza Siddiqui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wearing comfort of clothing is dependent on air permeability, moisture absorbency and wicking properties of fabric, which are related to the porosity of fabric. In this work, a plug-in is developed using Python script and incorporated in Abaqus/CAE for the prediction of porosity of plain weft knitted fabrics. The Plug-in is able to automatically generate 3D solid and multifilament weft knitted fabric models and accurately determine the porosity of fabrics in two steps. In this work, plain weft knitted fabrics made of monofilament, multifilament and spun yarn made of staple fibers were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the developed plug-in. In the case of staple fiber yarn, intra yarn porosity was considered in the calculation of porosity. The first step is to develop a 3D geometrical model of plain weft knitted fabric and the second step is to calculate the porosity of the fabric by using the geometrical parameter of 3D weft knitted fabric model generated in step one. The predicted porosity of plain weft knitted fabric is extracted in the second step and is displayed in the message area. The predicted results obtained from the plug-in have been compared with the experimental results obtained from previously developed models; they agreed well.

  5. Role of geometry on the frequency spectra of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A.

    2017-02-01

    Contact resonance atomic force microscopy (CR-AFM) is a specific technique that is used to determine elastic or viscoelastic properties of materials. The success of this technique is highly dependent on the accuracy of frequency spectra that must be measured for both noncontact and the case in which the tip is in contact with the sample of interest. Thus, choosing the right probe is crucial for accurate experiments. U-shaped probes also offer new opportunities for CR-AFM measurements because of certain specific modes that have tip motion parallel to the sample surface such that these resonances can access in-plane sample properties. However, analysis of the spectra from U-shaped probes is much more challenging due to these modes. The geometry of these probes is the main driver for the spectral response. Here, this influence on the resonance frequencies of the commercially fabricated U-shaped probe AN2-300 is evaluated with respect to geometry in terms of leg width, crossbeam width, and crossbeam length. Both noncontact and contact cases are examined with respect to variations of the nominal geometry. An energy distribution approach is also presented to assist with the identification of modes that have close resonances. Finally, this analysis allows recommendations to be made in order to minimize the convergence of multiple resonances for a specific range of measurement parameters.

  6. Fabrication and Calibration of FORTIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Brian T.; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Kruk, Jeffery; Feldman, Paul D.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Li, Mary J.; Rapchun, David A.; Lyness, Eric; Moseley, S. H.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins University sounding rocket group is entering the final fabrication phase of the Far-ultraviolet Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS); a sounding rocket borne multi-object spectro-telescope designed to provide spectral coverage of 43 separate targets in the 900 - 1800 Angstrom bandpass over a 30' x 30' field-of-view. Using "on-the-fly" target acquisition and spectral multiplexing enabled by a GSFC microshutter array, FORTIS will be capable of observing the brightest regions in the far-UV of nearby low redshift (z approximately 0.002 - 0.02) star forming galaxies to search for Lyman alpha escape, and to measure the local gas-to-dust ratio. A large area (approximately 45 mm x 170 mm) microchannel plate detector built by Sensor Sciences provides an imaging channel for targeting flanked by two redundant spectral outrigger channels. The grating is ruled directly onto the secondary mirror to increase efficiency. In this paper, we discuss the recent progress made in the development and fabrication of FORTIS, as well as the results of early calibration and characterization of our hardware, including mirror/grating measurements, detector performance, and early operational tests of the micro shutter arrays.

  7. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ahre, P.E.; Dupuy, P.C.

    1997-08-19

    A mold assembly is disclosed with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10`s of micros ({micro}m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 {micro}m in length up to 150 {micro}m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly. 6 figs.

  8. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Abraham P. (1428 Whitecliff Way, Walnut Creek, CA 94596); Northrup, M. Allen (923 Creston Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Ahre, Paul E. (1299 Gonzaga Ct., Livermore, CA 94550); Dupuy, Peter C. (1736 Waldo Ct., Modesto, CA 95358)

    1997-01-01

    A mold assembly with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10's of micros (.mu.m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 .mu.m in length up to 150 .mu.m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly.

  9. Fabrication of Yb-123 Tapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athur, S.; Balachandran, U.; Salama, K.

    2000-11-15

    While Bi-2223 tapes have been the workhorses of the superconductor industry, their poor performance in applied magnetic fields restrict their use to below 30 K. Melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 PIT tapes offers a simple and scalable technique for fabricating long-length HTS conductors capable of being used at 77 K. Under reduced oxygen partial pressure, the peritectic temperature of Yb-123 is below the melting point of Ag, and this facilitates the adaptation of melt-texturing methods for fabricating these tapes. The effect of melt-processing temperature on current density was also explored; a temperature of 965 C yielded optimal critical current values. The critical current density achieved at 4.2 K was 20,000 A/cm{sup 2}, corresponding to a critical current of 52 A. Based on the above results, an optimal processing zone for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes was determined. These results hold promise for melt-processing of Ag-clad Yb-123 tapes as an alternative to Bi-2223 PIT technology.

  10. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  11. Versatile superamphiphobic cotton fabrics fabricated by coating with SiO2/FOTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Deke; Guo, Zhiguang

    2017-12-01

    A multifunctional superamphiphobic cotton fabric was fabricated by coating silica nanoparticles on the cotton fabric surface and further modification by 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane (FOTS). The fluctuant woven fabric and the fluffy spherical SiO2 nanoparticles constructed a dual micro/nano-structures. The surface free energy of the fabric composite was reduced by FOTS modifier. The interplay of the structured and perfluorinated SiO2 nanoparticles could not only endow the fabric highly liquid repellent ability, but could also to enhance the coating stability. The prepared cotton fabrics exhibited high liquid repellency to water, colza oil and n-hexadecane with lower surface tension, showing a contact angle of 158°, 152°, and 153°, respectively. The results demonstrated that superamphiphobic cotton fabric possessed desirable chemical and mechanical durability, self-cleaning and self-healing property, the robust and multifunctional fabric would find innovative opportunities for practical applications.

  12. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haiying [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044300 (China); Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Jinyi [College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Chengxiao, E-mail: cxzhang@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup −1}. The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  13. Expressive suppression and neural responsiveness to nonverbal affective cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrican, Raluca; Rosenbaum, R. Shayna; Grady, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Optimal social functioning occasionally requires concealment of one’s emotions in order to meet one’s immediate goals and environmental demands. However, because emotions serve an important communicative function, their habitual suppression disrupts the flow of social exchanges and, thus, incurs significant interpersonal costs. Evidence is accruing that the disruption in social interactions, linked to habitual expressive suppression use, stems not only from intrapersonal, but also from interpersonal causes, since the suppressors’ restricted affective displays reportedly inhibit their interlocutors’ emotionally expressive behaviors. However, expressive suppression use is not known to lead to clinically significant social impairments. One explanation may be that over the lifespan, individuals who habitually suppress their emotions come to compensate for their interlocutors’ restrained expressive behaviors by developing an increased sensitivity to nonverbal affective cues. To probe this issue, the present study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to scan healthy older women while they viewed silent videos of a male social target displaying nonverbal emotional behavior, together with a brief verbal description of the accompanying context, and then judged the target’s affect. As predicted, perceivers who reported greater habitual use of expressive suppression showed increased neural processing of nonverbal affective cues. This effect appeared to be coordinated in a top-down manner via cognitive control. Greater neural processing of nonverbal cues among perceivers who habitually suppress their emotions was linked to increased ventral striatum activity, suggestive of increased reward value/personal relevance ascribed to emotionally expressive nonverbal behaviors. These findings thus provide neural evidence broadly consistent with the hypothesized link between habitual use of expressive suppression and compensatory development of increased

  14. Exploring infrared neural stimulation with multimodal nonlinear imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wilson R.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2017-02-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) provides optical control of neural excitability using near to mid-infrared (mid-IR) light, which allows for spatially selective, artifact-free excitation without the introduction of exogenous agents or genetic modification. Although neural excitability is mediated by a transient temperature increase due to water absorption of IR energy, the molecular nature of IR excitability in neural tissue remains unknown. Current research suggests that transient changes in local tissue temperature give rise to a myriad of cellular responses that have been individually attributed to IR mediated excitability. To further elucidate the underlying biophysical mechanisms, we have begun work towards employing a novel multimodal nonlinear imaging platform to probe the molecular underpinnings of INS. Our imaging system performs coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), second-harmonic generation (SHG) and thermal imaging into a single platform that allows for unprecedented co-registration of thermal and biochemical information in real-time. Here, we present our work leveraging CARS and SRS in acute thalamocortical brain slice preparations. We observe the evolution of lipid and protein-specific Raman bands during INS and electrically evoked activity in real-time. Combined with two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation, we offer insight to cellular metabolism and membrane dynamics during INS. Thermal imaging allows for the coregistration of acquired biochemical information with temperature information. Our work previews the versatility and capabilities of coherent Raman imaging combined with multiphoton imaging to observe biophysical phenomena for neuroscience applications.

  15. Multigradient for Neural Networks for Equalizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulhee Lee

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new training algorithm, multigradient, has been published for neural networks and it is reported that the multigradient outperforms the backpropagation when neural networks are used as a classifier. When neural networks are used as an equalizer in communications, they can be viewed as a classifier. In this paper, we apply the multigradient algorithm to train the neural networks that are used as equalizers. Experiments show that the neural networks trained using the multigradient noticeably outperforms the neural networks trained by the backpropagation.

  16. Understanding perception through neural "codes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Walter J

    2011-07-01

    A major challenge for cognitive scientists is to deduce and explain the neural mechanisms of the rapid transposition between stimulus energy and recalled memory-between the specific (sensation) and the generic (perception)-in both material and mental aspects. Researchers are attempting three explanations in terms of neural codes. The microscopic code: cellular neurobiologists correlate stimulus properties with the rates and frequencies of trains of action potentials induced by stimuli and carried by topologically organized axons. The mesoscopic code: cognitive scientists formulate symbolic codes in trains of action potentials from feature-detector neurons of phonemes, lines, odorants, vibrations, faces, etc., that object-detector neurons bind into representations of stimuli. The macroscopic code: neurodynamicists extract neural correlates of stimuli and associated behaviors in spatial patterns of oscillatory fields of dendritic activity, which self-organize and evolve on trajectories through high-dimensional brain state space. This multivariate code is expressed in landscapes of chaotic attractors. Unlike other scientific codes, such as DNA and the periodic table, these neural codes have no alphabet or syntax. They are epistemological metaphors that experimentalists need to measure neural activity and engineers need to model brain functions. My aim is to describe the main properties of the macroscopic code and the grand challenge it poses: how do very large patterns of textured synchronized oscillations form in cortex so quickly? © 2010 IEEE

  17. Neural correlates of stimulus reportability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulme, Oliver J; Friston, Karl F; Zeki, Semir

    2009-08-01

    Most experiments on the "neural correlates of consciousness" employ stimulus reportability as an operational definition of what is consciously perceived. The interpretation of such experiments therefore depends critically on understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability. Using a high volume of fMRI data, we investigated the neural correlates of stimulus reportability using a partial report object detection paradigm. Subjects were presented with a random array of circularly arranged disc-stimuli and were cued, after variable delays (following stimulus offset), to report the presence or absence of a disc at the cued location, using variable motor actions. By uncoupling stimulus processing, decision, and motor response, we were able to use signal detection theory to deconstruct the neural basis of stimulus reportability. We show that retinotopically specific responses in the early visual cortex correlate with stimulus processing but not decision or report; a network of parietal/temporal regions correlates with decisions but not stimulus presence, whereas classical motor regions correlate with report. These findings provide a basic framework for understanding the neural basis of stimulus reportability without the theoretical burden of presupposing a relationship between reportability and consciousness.

  18. Neural Approaches to Machine Consciousness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksander, Igor; Eng., F. R.

    2008-10-01

    `Machine Consciousness', which some years ago might have been suppressed as an inappropriate pursuit, has come out of the closet and is now a legitimate area of research concern. This paper briefly surveys the last few years of worldwide research in this area which divides into rule-based and neural approaches and then reviews the work of the author's laboratory during the last ten years. The paper develops a fresh perspective on this work: it is argued that neural approaches, in this case, digital neural systems, can address phenomenological consciousness. Important clarifications of phenomenology and virtuality which enter this modelling are explained in the early parts of the paper. In neural models, phenomenology is a form of depictive inner representation that has five specific axiomatic features: a sense of self-presence in an external world; a sense of imagination of past experience and fiction; a sense of attention; a capacity for planning; a sense of emotion-based volition that influences planning. It is shown that these five features have separate but integrated support in dynamic neural systems.

  19. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  20. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles A [Albuquerque, NM; Trowbridge, Frank R [Albuquerque, NM

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.