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Sample records for neural plate development

  1. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network Development in Multiwell Microelectrode Array Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentiall...

  2. Focal adhesion kinase protein regulates Wnt3a gene expression to control cell fate specification in the developing neural plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonar, Yuri; Gutkovich, Yoni E.; Root, Heather; Malyarova, Anastasia; Aamar, Emil; Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Elias, Sarah; Elkouby, Yaniv M.; Frank, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase protein localized to regions called focal adhesions, which are contact points between cells and the extracellular matrix. FAK protein acts as a scaffold to transfer adhesion-dependent and growth factor signals into the cell. Increased FAK expression is linked to aggressive metastatic and invasive tumors. However, little is known about its normal embryonic function. FAK protein knockdown during early Xenopus laevis development anteriorizes the embryo. Morphant embryos express increased levels of anterior neural markers, with reciprocally reduced posterior neural marker expression. Posterior neural plate folding and convergence-extension is also inhibited. This anteriorized phenotype resembles that of embryos knocked down zygotically for canonical Wnt signaling. FAK and Wnt3a genes are both expressed in the neural plate, and Wnt3a expression is FAK dependent. Ectopic Wnt expression rescues this FAK morphant anteriorized phenotype. Wnt3a thus acts downstream of FAK to balance anterior–posterior cell fate specification in the developing neural plate. Wnt3a gene expression is also FAK dependent in human breast cancer cells, suggesting that this FAK–Wnt linkage is highly conserved. This unique observation connects the FAK- and Wnt-signaling pathways, both of which act to promote cancer when aberrantly activated in mammalian cells. PMID:21551070

  3. Fate map of the chicken neural plate at stage 4.

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    Fernández-Garre, Pedro; Rodríguez-Gallardo, Lucia; Gallego-Díaz, Victoria; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Puelles, Luis

    2002-06-01

    A detailed fate map was obtained for the early chick neural plate (stages 3d/4). Numerous overlapping plug grafts were performed upon New-cultured chick embryos, using fixable carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester to label donor chick tissue. The specimens were harvested 24 hours after grafting and reached in most cases stages 9-11 (early neural tube). The label was detected immunocytochemically in wholemounts, and cross-sections were later obtained. The positions of the graft-derived cells were classified first into sets of purely neural, purely non-neural and mixed grafts. Comparisons between these sets established the neural plate boundary at stages 3d/4. Further analysis categorized graft contributions to anteroposterior and dorsoventral subdivisions of the early neural tube, including data on the floor plate and the eye field. The rostral boundary of the neural plate was contained within the earliest expression domain of the Ganf gene, and the overall shape of the neural plate was contrasted and discussed with regard to the expression patterns of the genes Plato, Sox2, Otx2 and Dlx5 (and others reported in the literature) at stages 3d/4.

  4. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  6. Fate Specification of Neural Plate Border by Canonical Wnt Signaling and Grhl3 is Crucial for Neural Tube Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Yoshida, Chiharu; Mochida, Kyoko; Ellwanger, Kristina; Niehrs, Christof; Matsuo, Isao

    2015-06-01

    During primary neurulation, the separation of a single-layered ectodermal sheet into the surface ectoderm (SE) and neural tube specifies SE and neural ectoderm (NE) cell fates. The mechanisms underlying fate specification in conjunction with neural tube closure are poorly understood. Here, by comparing expression profiles between SE and NE lineages, we observed that uncommitted progenitor cells, expressing stem cell markers, are present in the neural plate border/neural fold prior to neural tube closure. Our results also demonstrated that canonical Wnt and its antagonists, DKK1/KREMEN1, progressively specify these progenitors into SE or NE fates in accord with the progress of neural tube closure. Additionally, SE specification of the neural plate border via canonical Wnt signaling is directed by the grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) transcription factor. Thus, we propose that the fate specification of uncommitted progenitors in the neural plate border by canonical Wnt signaling and its downstream effector Grhl3 is crucial for neural tube closure. This study implicates that failure in critical genetic factors controlling fate specification of progenitor cells in the neural plate border/neural fold coordinated with neural tube closure may be potential causes of human neural tube defects.

  7. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  8. SNW1 is a critical regulator of spatial BMP activity, neural plate border formation, and neural crest specification in vertebrate embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Y Wu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP gradients provide positional information to direct cell fate specification, such as patterning of the vertebrate ectoderm into neural, neural crest, and epidermal tissues, with precise borders segregating these domains. However, little is known about how BMP activity is regulated spatially and temporally during vertebrate development to contribute to embryonic patterning, and more specifically to neural crest formation. Through a large-scale in vivo functional screen in Xenopus for neural crest fate, we identified an essential regulator of BMP activity, SNW1. SNW1 is a nuclear protein known to regulate gene expression. Using antisense morpholinos to deplete SNW1 protein in both Xenopus and zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that dorsally expressed SNW1 is required for neural crest specification, and this is independent of mesoderm formation and gastrulation morphogenetic movements. By exploiting a combination of immunostaining for phosphorylated Smad1 in Xenopus embryos and a BMP-dependent reporter transgenic zebrafish line, we show that SNW1 regulates a specific domain of BMP activity in the dorsal ectoderm at the neural plate border at post-gastrula stages. We use double in situ hybridizations and immunofluorescence to show how this domain of BMP activity is spatially positioned relative to the neural crest domain and that of SNW1 expression. Further in vivo and in vitro assays using cell culture and tissue explants allow us to conclude that SNW1 acts upstream of the BMP receptors. Finally, we show that the requirement of SNW1 for neural crest specification is through its ability to regulate BMP activity, as we demonstrate that targeted overexpression of BMP to the neural plate border is sufficient to restore neural crest formation in Xenopus SNW1 morphants. We conclude that through its ability to regulate a specific domain of BMP activity in the vertebrate embryo, SNW1 is a critical regulator of neural plate

  9. Active Vibration Control of the Smart Plate Using Artificial Neural Network Controller

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    Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The active vibration control (AVC of a rectangular plate with single input and single output approach is investigated using artificial neural network. The cantilever plate of finite length, breadth, and thickness having piezoelectric patches as sensors/actuators fixed at the upper and lower surface of the metal plate is considered for examination. The finite element model of the cantilever plate is utilized to formulate the whole strategy. The compact RIO and MATLAB simulation software are exercised to get the appropriate results. The cantilever plate is subjected to impulse input and uniform white noise disturbance. The neural network is trained offline and tuned with LQR controller. The various training algorithms to tune the neural network are exercised. The best efficient algorithm is finally considered to tune the neural network controller designed for active vibration control of the smart plate.

  10. Xeya3 regulates survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells within the anterior neural plate of Xenopus embryos.

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    Kriebel, Martin; Müller, Frank; Hollemann, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    The transcriptional coactivater and tyrosine phosphatase eyes absent (eya) is vital for eye development in Drosophila. We identified a vertebrate member of the Eya family, Xeya3, which is expressed in the anterior neural plate, including the eye field. Overexpression of wild-type Xeya3 or of a phosphatase-negative version of Xeya3 creates massive enlargements of brain and retinal tissues, mainly caused by overproliferation of neural precursor cells. On the other hand, suppression of Xeya3 function induces local apoptosis within the sensorial layer of the anterior neuroectoderm. Thus, Xeya3 is key factor for the formation and size control of brain and eyes in vertebrates. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Neural crest development in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R; Berres, Mark E

    2014-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Some affected individuals possess distinctive craniofacial deficits, but many more lack overt facial changes. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying these deficits would inform their diagnostic utility. Our understanding of these mechanisms is challenged because ethanol lacks a single receptor when redirecting cellular activity. This review summarizes our current understanding of how ethanol alters neural crest development. Ample evidence shows that ethanol causes the "classic" fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) face (short palpebral fissures, elongated upper lip, deficient philtrum) because it suppresses prechordal plate outgrowth, thereby reducing neuroectoderm and neural crest induction and causing holoprosencephaly. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) at premigratory stages elicits a different facial appearance, indicating FASD may represent a spectrum of facial outcomes. PAE at this premigratory period initiates a calcium transient that activates CaMKII and destabilizes transcriptionally active β-catenin, thereby initiating apoptosis within neural crest populations. Contributing to neural crest vulnerability are their low antioxidant responses. Ethanol-treated neural crest produce reactive oxygen species and free radical scavengers attenuate their production and prevent apoptosis. Ethanol also significantly impairs neural crest migration, causing cytoskeletal rearrangements that destabilize focal adhesion formation; their directional migratory capacity is also lost. Genetic factors further modify vulnerability to ethanol-induced craniofacial dysmorphology and include genes important for neural crest development, including shh signaling, PDFGA, vangl2, and ribosomal biogenesis. Because facial and brain development are mechanistically and functionally linked, research into ethanol's effects on neural crest also informs our understanding of ethanol's CNS pathologies. © 2014

  12. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

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    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  13. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K.; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D’Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096717696; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric C; Zon, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly

  14. Developments of Mindlin-Reissner Plate Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1960s, how to develop high-performance plate bending finite elements based on different plate theories has attracted a great deal of attention from finite element researchers, and numerous models have been successfully constructed. Among these elements, the most popular models are usually formulated by two theoretical bases: the Kirchhoff plate theory and the Mindlin-Reissener plate theory. Due to the advantages that only C0 continuity is required and the effect of transverse shear strain can be included, the latter one seems more rational and has obtained more attention. Through abundant works, different types of Mindlin-Reissener plate models emerged in many literatures and have been applied to solve various engineering problems. However, it also brings FEM users a puzzle of how to choose a “right” one. The main purpose of this paper is to present an overview of the development history of the Mindlin-Reissner plate elements, exhibiting the state-of-art in this research field. At the end of the paper, a promising method for developing “shape-free” plate elements is recommended.

  15. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  16. Tectonic development of the Maya plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charleston, S.; Concit, S.C.; Sanchez, R.

    1985-01-01

    The Maya Plate is located at the southern margin of the North American Plate, it comprises from north to south, the following tectonic provinces: The Yucatan Platform, (including the lowlands of Peten and the oil-rich offshore platform of the Campeche Bank), the Macuspana basin, the Salt Basin, the NW-SE trending Sierra de Chiapas Folded Belt, the Chiapas depression and the Ciapas Massif. During the past, the deformation of the Maya Plate, have been attributed to the Laramide Orogeny. The present study develops a model based on the interaction between the Maya, Caribbean and the oceanic Cocos-plates, assuming that during the Middle Miocene, the development of the left-lateral Motagua Fault between the Maya and Caribbean plates, displaced the Yucatan Platform in a southwestward direction. It is consider that the combine action of two opposite forces, was responsible for the development of most of the Sierra de Chiapas major anticlines and synclines. Finally the model suggests that these structures, were later affected by trans-compressive forces, originated as a secondary response, due to the development of several left-lateral transcurrent faults, associated with the Polochic Fault System.

  17. Numerical Simulation and Artificial Neural Network Modeling for Predicting Welding-Induced Distortion in Butt-Welded 304L Stainless Steel Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanareddy, V. V.; Chandrasekhar, N.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthukumaran, S.; Vasantharaja, P.

    2016-02-01

    In the present study, artificial neural network modeling has been employed for predicting welding-induced angular distortions in autogenous butt-welded 304L stainless steel plates. The input data for the neural network have been obtained from a series of three-dimensional finite element simulations of TIG welding for a wide range of plate dimensions. Thermo-elasto-plastic analysis was carried out for 304L stainless steel plates during autogenous TIG welding employing double ellipsoidal heat source. The simulated thermal cycles were validated by measuring thermal cycles using thermocouples at predetermined positions, and the simulated distortion values were validated by measuring distortion using vertical height gauge for three cases. There was a good agreement between the model predictions and the measured values. Then, a multilayer feed-forward back propagation neural network has been developed using the numerically simulated data. Artificial neural network model developed in the present study predicted the angular distortion accurately.

  18. Optogenetic stimulation of multiwell MEA plates for neural and cardiac applications

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    Clements, Isaac P.; Millard, Daniel C.; Nicolini, Anthony M.; Preyer, Amanda J.; Grier, Robert; Heckerling, Andrew; Blum, Richard A.; Tyler, Phillip; McSweeney, K. M.; Lu, Yi-Fan; Hall, Diana; Ross, James D.

    2016-03-01

    Microelectrode array (MEA) technology enables advanced drug screening and "disease-in-a-dish" modeling by measuring the electrical activity of cultured networks of neural or cardiac cells. Recent developments in human stem cell technologies, advancements in genetic models, and regulatory initiatives for drug screening have increased the demand for MEA-based assays. In response, Axion Biosystems previously developed a multiwell MEA platform, providing up to 96 MEA culture wells arrayed into a standard microplate format. Multiwell MEA-based assays would be further enhanced by optogenetic stimulation, which enables selective excitation and inhibition of targeted cell types. This capability for selective control over cell culture states would allow finer pacing and probing of cell networks for more reliable and complete characterization of complex network dynamics. Here we describe a system for independent optogenetic stimulation of each well of a 48-well MEA plate. The system enables finely graded control of light delivery during simultaneous recording of network activity in each well. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derived cardiomyocytes and rodent primary neuronal cultures, we demonstrate high channel-count light-based excitation and suppression in several proof-of-concept experimental models. Our findings demonstrate advantages of combining multiwell optical stimulation and MEA recording for applications including cardiac safety screening, neural toxicity assessment, and advanced characterization of complex neuronal diseases.

  19. Development of microtitre plates for electrokinetic assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, J. P. H.; Goater, A. D.; Menachery, A.; Pethig, R.; Rizvi, N. H.

    2007-02-01

    Electrokinetic processes have wide ranging applications in microsystems technology. Their optimum performance at micro and nano dimensions allows their use both as characterization and diagnostic tools and as a means of general particle manipulation. Within analytical studies, measurement of the electrokinesis of biological cells has the sensitivity and selectivity to distinguish subtle differences between cell types and cells undergoing changes and is gaining acceptance as a diagnostic tool in high throughput screening for drug discovery applications. In this work the development and manufacture of an electrokinetic-based microtitre plate is described. The plate is intended to be compatible with automated sample loading and handling systems. Manufacturing of the microtitre plate, which employs indium tin oxide microelectrodes, has been entirely undertaken using excimer and ultra-fast pulsed laser micromachining due to its flexibility in materials processing and accuracy in microstructuring. Laser micromachining has the ability to rapidly realize iterations in device prototype design while also having the capability to be scaled up for large scale manufacture. Device verification is achieved by the measurement of the electrorotation and dielectrophoretic properties of yeast cells while the flexibility of the developed microtitre plate is demonstrated by the selective separation of live yeast from polystyrene microbeads.

  20. Kcnip1 a Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor regulates the size of the neural plate in Xenopus.

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    Néant, Isabelle; Mellström, Britt; Gonzalez, Paz; Naranjo, Jose R; Moreau, Marc; Leclerc, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    In amphibian embryos, our previous work has demonstrated that calcium transients occurring in the dorsal ectoderm at the onset of gastrulation are necessary and sufficient to engage the ectodermal cells into a neural fate by inducing neural specific genes. Some of these genes are direct targets of calcium. Here we search for a direct transcriptional mechanism by which calcium signals are acting. The only known mechanism responsible for a direct action of calcium on gene transcription involves an EF-hand Ca²⁺ binding protein which belongs to a group of four proteins (Kcnip1 to 4). Kcnip protein can act in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner as a transcriptional repressor by binding to a specific DNA sequence, the Downstream Regulatory Element (DRE) site. In Xenopus, among the four kcnips, we show that only kcnip1 is timely and spatially present in the presumptive neural territories and is able to bind DRE sites in a Ca²⁺-dependent manner. The loss of function of kcnip1 results in the expansion of the neural plate through an increased proliferation of neural progenitors. Later on, this leads to an impairment in the development of anterior neural structures. We propose that, in the embryo, at the onset of neurogenesis Kcnip1 is the Ca²⁺-dependent transcriptional repressor that controls the size of the neural plate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. A modular neural network classifier for the recognition of occluded characters in automatic license plate reading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, JAG; Broersma, A; Spaanenburg, L; Ruan, D; Dhondt, P; Kerre, EE

    2002-01-01

    Occlusion is the most common reason for lowered recognition yield in free-flow license-plate reading systems. (Non-)occluded characters can readily be learned in separate neural networks but not together. Even a small proportion of occluded characters in the training set will already significantly

  2. Enabled (Xena) regulates neural plate morphogenesis, apical constriction, and cellular adhesion required for neural tube closure in Xenopus.

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    Roffers-Agarwal, Julaine; Xanthos, Jennifer B; Kragtorp, Katherine A; Miller, Jeffrey R

    2008-02-15

    Regulation of cellular adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics is essential for neurulation, though it remains unclear how these two processes are coordinated. Members of the Ena/VASP family of proteins are localized to sites of cellular adhesion and actin dynamics and lack of two family members, Mena and VASP, in mice results in failure of neural tube closure. The precise mechanism by which Ena/VASP proteins regulate this process, however, is not understood. In this report, we show that Xenopus Ena (Xena) is localized to apical adhesive junctions of neuroepithelial cells during neurulation and that Xena knockdown disrupts cell behaviors integral to neural tube closure. Changes in the shape of the neural plate as well as apical constriction within the neural plate are perturbed in Xena knockdown embryos. Additionally, we demonstrate that Xena is essential for cell-cell adhesion. These results demonstrate that Xena plays an integral role in coordinating the regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular adhesion during neurulation in Xenopus.

  3. Neural plasticity of development and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, Adriana

    2010-06-01

    Development and learning are powerful agents of change across the lifespan that induce robust structural and functional plasticity in neural systems. An unresolved question in developmental cognitive neuroscience is whether development and learning share the same neural mechanisms associated with experience-related neural plasticity. In this article, I outline the conceptual and practical challenges of this question, review insights gleaned from adult studies, and describe recent strides toward examining this topic across development using neuroimaging methods. I suggest that development and learning are not two completely separate constructs and instead, that they exist on a continuum. While progressive and regressive changes are central to both, the behavioral consequences associated with these changes are closely tied to the existing neural architecture of maturity of the system. Eventually, a deeper, more mechanistic understanding of neural plasticity will shed light on behavioral changes across development and, more broadly, about the underlying neural basis of cognition. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Rolling Force Prediction in Heavy Plate Rolling Based on Uniform Differential Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of the rolling force is critical to assuring the quality of the final product in steel manufacturing. Exit thickness of plate for each pass is calculated from roll gap, mill spring, and predicted roll force. Ideal pass scheduling is dependent on a precise prediction of the roll force in each pass. This paper will introduce a concept that allows obtaining the material model parameters directly from the rolling process on an industrial scale by the uniform differential neural network. On the basis of the characteristics that the uniform distribution can fully characterize the solution space and enhance the diversity of the population, uniformity research on differential evolution operator is made to get improved crossover with uniform distribution. When its original function is transferred with a transfer function, the uniform differential evolution algorithms can quickly solve complex optimization problems. Neural network structure and weights threshold are optimized by uniform differential evolution algorithm, and a uniform differential neural network is formed to improve rolling force prediction accuracy in process control system.

  5. Development and mechanical properties of a locking T-plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane R. Mesquita

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study aimed to develop a locking T-plate and to evaluate its mechanical properties in synthetic models. A titanium 2.7mm T-plate was designed with a shaft containing three locked screw holes and one dynamic compression hole, and a head with two locked screw holes. Forty T-shaped polyurethane blocks, and 20 T-plates were used for mechanical testing. Six bone-plate constructs were tested to failure, three in axial compression and three in cantilever bending. Fourteen bone-plate constructs were tested for failure in fatigue, seven in axial compression and seven in cantilever bending. In static testing higher values of axial compression test than cantilever bending test were observed for all variables. In axial compression fatigue testing all bone-plate constructs withstood 1,000,000 cycles. Four bone-plate constructs failure occurred before 1,000,000 cycles in cantilever bending fatigue testing. In conclusion, the locking T-plate tested has mechanical properties that offer greatest resistance to fracture under axial loading than bending forces.

  6. Dynamics of BMP and Hes1/Hairy1 signaling in the dorsal neural tube underlies the transition from neural crest to definitive roof plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Erez; Avraham, Oshri; Kahane, Nitza; Ofek, Shai; Kumar, Deepak; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2016-03-24

    The dorsal midline region of the neural tube that results from closure of the neural folds is generally termed the roof plate (RP). However, this domain is highly dynamic and complex, and is first transiently inhabited by prospective neural crest (NC) cells that sequentially emigrate from the neuroepithelium. It only later becomes the definitive RP, the dorsal midline cells of the spinal cord. We previously showed that at the trunk level of the axis, prospective RP progenitors originate ventral to the premigratory NC and progressively reach the dorsal midline following NC emigration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the end of NC production and formation of the definitive RP remain virtually unknown. Based on distinctive cellular and molecular traits, we have defined an initial NC and a subsequent RP stage, allowing us to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the transition between the two phases. We demonstrate that in spite of the constant production of BMP4 in the dorsal tube at both stages, RP progenitors only transiently respond to the ligand and lose competence shortly before they arrive at their final location. In addition, exposure of dorsal tube cells at the NC stage to high levels of BMP signaling induces premature RP traits, such as Hes1/Hairy1, while concomitantly inhibiting NC production. Reciprocally, early inhibition of BMP signaling prevents Hairy1 mRNA expression at the RP stage altogether, suggesting that BMP is both necessary and sufficient for the development of this RP-specific trait. Furthermore, when Hes1/Hairy1 is misexpressed at the NC stage, it inhibits BMP signaling and downregulates BMPR1A/Alk3 mRNA expression, transcription of BMP targets such as Foxd3, cell-cycle progression, and NC emigration. Reciprocally, Foxd3 inhibits Hairy1, suggesting that repressive cross-interactions at the level of, and downstream from, BMP ensure the temporal separation between both lineages. Together, our data suggest that BMP signaling is

  7. Development of composite plate for compact silencer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Y. S.; Liu, Y.; Cheung, H. Y.; Xi, Q.; Lau, K. T.

    2012-05-01

    A compact flow-through plate silencer is constructed for low frequency noise control using new reinforced composite plates. The concept comes from the previous theoretical study [L. Huang, Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 119 (2006) 2628-2638] which concerns a clamped supported plate enclosed by rigid cavities. When the grazing incident sound wave comes and induces the plate into the vibration, it will radiate sound and reflect sound. Such sound reflection causes a desirable noise reduction from low to medium frequency with wide broadband. The structural property of the very light plate with high bending stiffness is very crucial element in such plate silencer. In this study, an approach to fabricate new reinforced composite panel with light weight and high flexibility to increase the bending stiffness is developed in order to realize the function of this plate silencer practically. The plate silencer can be constructed in more compact size compared with the previous two-plate silencer with two rectangular cavities and the performance with the stopband of the range from 229 to 618 Hz, in which the transmission loss is higher than 10 dB over the whole frequency band without flow or with flow at the speed of 15 m/s, can be achieved. The experimental data also proves that the non-uniform clamped plates with thinner ends perform very well. To implement the use of such silencer practically in controlling noise at different dominant frequency ranges, a design chart has been established for searching the optimal bending stiffness and corresponding stopband at different geometries.

  8. PLATE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Joyce; Hjulmand, Lise-Lotte

    2008-01-01

    the Project in Language Assessment for Teaching in English (PLATE) language professionals from CBS’s Language Center observe teachers and provide feedback using evaluation criteria from the Common European Framework for Reference (CEFR) supplemented by some additional criteria which take the LSP nature......’s level of English is sufficient for the increasing number of courses offered in English each semester. This paper addresses these concerns and describes a pilot project initiated in 2003 at CBS to gauge the overall English language proficiency of those teaching content courses in English. Through...

  9. Planar polarization of Vangl2 in the vertebrate neural plate is controlled by Wnt and Myosin II signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Ossipova

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate neural tube forms as a result of complex morphogenetic movements, which require the functions of several core planar cell polarity (PCP proteins, including Vangl2 and Prickle. Despite the importance of these proteins for neurulation, their subcellular localization and the mode of action have remained largely unknown. Here we describe the anteroposterior planar cell polarity (AP-PCP of the cells in the Xenopus neural plate. At the neural midline, the Vangl2 protein is enriched at anterior cell edges and that this localization is directed by Prickle, a Vangl2-interacting protein. Our further analysis is consistent with the model, in which Vangl2 AP-PCP is established in the neural plate as a consequence of Wnt-dependent phosphorylation. Additionally, we uncover feedback regulation of Vangl2 polarity by Myosin II, reiterating a role for mechanical forces in PCP. These observations indicate that both Wnt signaling and Myosin II activity regulate cell polarity and cell behaviors during vertebrate neurulation.

  10. Development of a cryopreservation procedure using aluminium cryo-plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shin-ichi; Rafique, Tariq; Priyantha, Wickramage Saman; Fukui, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Toshikazu; Niino, Takao

    2011-01-01

    A cryopreservation procedure using an aluminium cryo-plate was successfully developed using in vitro-grown Dalmatian chrysanthemum (Tanacetum cinerariifolium) shoot tips. Shoot cultures were cold-hardened at 5 degree C on MS medium containing 0.5 M sucrose over a period of 20 to 40 days. Shoot tips with basal plate (1.0-1.5 x 1.0 mm) were dissected from shoot cultures and precultured at 5 degree C for 2 days on MS medium containing 0.5 M sucrose. Precultured shoot tips were placed on aluminium cryo-plates (7 mm x 37 mm x 0.5 mm) with 10 wells (diameter 1.5 mm, depth 0.75 mm) and embedded in alginate gel. Osmoprotection was performed by immersing the cryo-plates for 30 or 60 min in 25 ml pipetting reservoirs filled with loading solution (2 M glycerol + 1.4 M sucrose). For dehydration, the loading solution was replaced with PVS 7M vitrification solution (30 percent glycerol, 19.5 percent ethylene glycol and 0.6 M sucrose in liquid MS basal medium), which was applied for 40 min. After rapid immersion in liquid nitrogen, shoot tips attached to the cryo-plates were rewarmed by immersion in cryotubes containing 2 ml 1 M sucrose solution. Using this procedure, regrowth of cryopreserved shoot tips of line 28v-75 reached 77 degree. This protocol was successfully applied to six additional lines, with high regrowth percentages ranging from 65 to 90 percent. By contrast, the modified vitrification protocol tested as a reference produced only moderate regrowth percentages. This new method displays many advantages and will facilitate large scale cryostorage in genebank.

  11. Preliminary developments of MTR plates with uranium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, J.P.; Laudamy, P. [CERCA, Romans (France); Richter, K. [Institut fuer Transurane, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    In the opinion of CERCA, the total weight of Uranium per MTR plate (without changing the external dimensions) cannot be further increased using U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. Limits have been reached on plates with a thicker meat or loaded to 6g Ut/cm{sup 3}. The use of a denser fuel like Uranium mononitride could permit an increase in these limits. A collaboration between the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU), Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, and CERCA has been set ut. The preliminary studies at the ITU to check compatibility between aluminium and UN proved that there are no metallurgical interactions below 500{degrees}C. Feasibility of the manufacturing, on a laboratory scale at CERCA, of depleted Uranium mononitride plates loaded to 7 g Ut/cm{sup 3} has been demonstrated. The manufacturing process, however, is only one aspect of the development of a new fuel. The experience gained in the case of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} has shown that the development of a new fuel requires considerable time and financial investment. Such a development certainly represents an effort of about 10 years.

  12. The Development and Evaluation of a Portion Plate for Youth: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, Amy M.; Randall, Edin T.; Tharp, Stephanie; Germann, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To develop and evaluate a portion plate for adolescents (Nutri-plate). Methods: Sixteen African American adolescents (mean age = 12.94 years; 66% male) were randomized to participate in either plate design or nutrition education sessions. Adolescents' input was used to create the Nutri-plate, and participants' food selection and intake…

  13. Metabolic syndromes and neural crest development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Berio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to investigate for the possible connection between abnormal neural crest cell (NCC development and NCC-derived abnormal facial and cerebral structures in 3 children with pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH and in 10 cases with oxidative phosphorylation deficiency diagnosed from the Author by standard laboratory assays [i.e. 3 cases of Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, 2 cases of Leigh syndrome, 1 case of KSS with De Toni-Debrè-Fanconi and rachitis (Berio disease, 1 case of KSS with aortic insuffiency and sub-aortic septum hyperthophy, 3 cases of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia]. There patients presented with hyperlactacidemia, hyperpyruvicemia and facial abnormalities, similar to those observed in the fetal alcohol syndrome (a typical neurocristopathy due to PDH deficiency, down-regulating NCC genes. The Author hypothesizes that the metabolic defect of scarce energy production is responsible of abnormal NCC proliferation/migration and consequent facial abnormalities.

  14. Effects of Spaceflight on Drosophila Neural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshishian, Haig S.

    1997-01-01

    The major goal from the animal side, however, has been achieved, namely to develop Drosophila lines where we can assay individual neuromuscular endings directly without dissection. This was achieved by means of using the GAL4-UAS system, where we have succeeded in establishing stocks of flies where the key neuromuscular connections can be assayed directly in undissected larvae by means of the expression of endogenously fluorescent reporters in the specific motor endings. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter allows scoring of neural anatomy en-masse in whole mount using fluorescent microscopy without the need for either dissection or specific labeling. Two stocks have been developed. The first, which we developed first, uses the S65T mutant form, which has a dramatically brighter expression than the native protein. This animal will use GAL4 drivers with expression under the control of the elav gene, and which will ensure expression in all neurons of the embryo and larva. The second transgenic animal we have developed is of a novel kind, and makes use of dicistronic design, so that two copies of the protein will be expressed per insert. We have also developed a tricistronic form, but this has not yet been transformed into flies, and we do not imagine that this third line will be ready in time for the flight.

  15. Development of Portable Automatic Number Plate Recognition System on Android Mobile Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutholib, Abdul; Gunawan, Teddy S.; Chebil, Jalel; Kartiwi, Mira

    2013-12-01

    The Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR) System has performed as the main role in various access control and security, such as: tracking of stolen vehicles, traffic violations (speed trap) and parking management system. In this paper, the portable ANPR implemented on android mobile phone is presented. The main challenges in mobile application are including higher coding efficiency, reduced computational complexity, and improved flexibility. Significance efforts are being explored to find suitable and adaptive algorithm for implementation of ANPR on mobile phone. ANPR system for mobile phone need to be optimize due to its limited CPU and memory resources, its ability for geo-tagging image captured using GPS coordinates and its ability to access online database to store the vehicle's information. In this paper, the design of portable ANPR on android mobile phone will be described as follows. First, the graphical user interface (GUI) for capturing image using built-in camera was developed to acquire vehicle plate number in Malaysia. Second, the preprocessing of raw image was done using contrast enhancement. Next, character segmentation using fixed pitch and an optical character recognition (OCR) using neural network were utilized to extract texts and numbers. Both character segmentation and OCR were using Tesseract library from Google Inc. The proposed portable ANPR algorithm was implemented and simulated using Android SDK on a computer. Based on the experimental results, the proposed system can effectively recognize the license plate number at 90.86%. The required processing time to recognize a license plate is only 2 seconds on average. The result is consider good in comparison with the results obtained from previous system that was processed in a desktop PC with the range of result from 91.59% to 98% recognition rate and 0.284 second to 1.5 seconds recognition time.

  16. The Effects of GABAergic Polarity Changes on Episodic Neural Network Activity in Developing Neural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Blanco

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Early in development, neural systems have primarily excitatory coupling, where even GABAergic synapses are excitatory. Many of these systems exhibit spontaneous episodes of activity that have been characterized through both experimental and computational studies. As development progress the neural system goes through many changes, including synaptic remodeling, intrinsic plasticity in the ion channel expression, and a transformation of GABAergic synapses from excitatory to inhibitory. What effect each of these, and other, changes have on the network behavior is hard to know from experimental studies since they all happen in parallel. One advantage of a computational approach is that one has the ability to study developmental changes in isolation. Here, we examine the effects of GABAergic synapse polarity change on the spontaneous activity of both a mean field and a neural network model that has both glutamatergic and GABAergic coupling, representative of a developing neural network. We find some intuitive behavioral changes as the GABAergic neurons go from excitatory to inhibitory, shared by both models, such as a decrease in the duration of episodes. We also find some paradoxical changes in the activity that are only present in the neural network model. In particular, we find that during early development the inter-episode durations become longer on average, while later in development they become shorter. In addressing this unexpected finding, we uncover a priming effect that is particularly important for a small subset of neurons, called the “intermediate neurons.” We characterize these neurons and demonstrate why they are crucial to episode initiation, and why the paradoxical behavioral change result from priming of these neurons. The study illustrates how even arguably the simplest of developmental changes that occurs in neural systems can present non-intuitive behaviors. It also makes predictions about neural network behavioral changes

  17. Advances in Artificial Neural Networks - Methodological Development and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artificial neural networks as a major soft-computing technology have been extensively studied and applied during the last three decades. Research on backpropagation training algorithms for multilayer perceptron networks has spurred development of other neural network training algorithms for other ne...

  18. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige Snider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators. Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest

  19. Testing Neural Models of the Development of Infant Visual Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, John E.; Hunter, Sharon K.

    2002-01-01

    Several models of the development of infant visual attention have used information about neural development. Most of these models have been based on nonhuman animal studies and have relied on indirect measures of neural development in human infants. This article discusses methods for studying a “neurodevelopmental” model of infant visual attention using indirect and direct measures of cortical activity. We concentrate on the effect of attention on eye movement control and show how animal-base...

  20. Development of site-specific locking plates for acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Zhang, Li-Hai; Zhang, Ying-Ze; He, Chun-Qing; Zhang, Li-Cheng; Wang, Yan; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2013-05-01

    Site-specific locking plates have gained popularity for the treatment of fractures. However, the clinical use of a site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures remains untested due to production limits. To design a universal site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures, the 3-dimensional (3D) photographic records of 171 pelvises were retrospectively studied to generate a universal posterior innominate bone surface. Using 3D photographical processing software, the 3D coordinate system was reset according to bony landmarks and was scaled based on the acetabular diameter to allow a direct comparison between surfaces. The measured surface was separated into measurement units. At each measurement unit, the authors calculated the average z-axis values in all samples and obtained the 3D coordinate values of the point cloud that could be reconstructed into the universal surface. A plate was subsequently designed in 3D photographical processing software, and the orientation and distribution of locking screws was included. To manufacture a plate, the data were entered into Unigraphics NX version 6.0 software (Siemens PLM Software, Co, Ltd, Plano, Texas) and a CNC digital milling machine (FANUC Co, Ltd, Yamanashi, Japan). The resulting locking plate fit excellently with the reduced bone surface intraoperatively. Plate contouring was avoided intraoperatively. Universal 3.5-mm locking screws locked successfully into the plate, and their orientations were consistent with the design. No screw yielded to acetabular penetration. This method of designing a site-specific acetabular locking plate is practical, and the plates are suitable for clinical use. These site-specific locking plates may be an option for the treatment of acetabular fractures, particularly in elderly patients. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Genetics and development of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Andrew J.; Greene, Nicholas D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital defects of neural tube closure (neural tube defects; NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe disorders of the fetus and newborn. Disturbance of any of the sequential events of embryonic neurulation produce NTDs, with the phenotype (e.g. anencephaly, spina bifida) varying depending on the region of neural tube that remains open. While mutation of more than 200 genes is known to cause NTDs in mice, the pattern of occurrence in humans suggests a multifactorial polygenic or oligogenic aetiology. This emphasises the importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the origin of these defects. A number of cell biological functions are essential for neural tube closure, with defects of the cytoskeleton, cell cycle and molecular regulation of cell viability prominent among the mouse NTD mutants. Many transcriptional regulators and proteins that affect chromatin structure are also required for neural tube closure, although the downstream molecular pathways regulated by these proteins is unknown. Some key signalling pathways for NTDs have been identified: over-activation of sonic hedgehog signalling and loss of function in the planar cell polarity (non-canonical Wnt) pathway are potent causes of NTD, with requirements also for retinoid and inositol signalling. Folic acid supplementation is an effective method for primary prevention of a proportion of NTDs, in both humans and mice, although the embryonic mechanism of folate action remains unclear. Folic acid-resistant cases can be prevented by inositol supplementation in mice, raising the possibility that this could lead to an additional preventive strategy for human NTDs in future. PMID:19918803

  2. Recent research on the growth plate: Advances in fibroblast growth factor signaling in growth plate development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangli; Zhou, Siru; Chen, Hangang; Du, Xiaolan; Chen, Lin

    2014-08-01

    Skeletons are formed through two distinct developmental actions, intramembranous ossification and endochondral ossification. During embryonic development, most bone is formed by endochondral ossification. The growth plate is the developmental center for endochondral ossification. Multiple signaling pathways participate in the regulation of endochondral ossification. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling has been found to play a vital role in the development and maintenance of growth plates. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs can cause multiple genetic skeletal diseases with disordered endochondral ossification. Clarifying the molecular mechanisms of FGFs/FGFRs signaling in skeletal development and genetic skeletal diseases will have implications for the development of therapies for FGF-signaling-related skeletal dysplasias and growth plate injuries. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in elucidating the role of FGFs/FGFRs signaling in growth plate development, genetic skeletal disorders, and the promising therapies for those genetic skeletal diseases resulting from FGFs/FGFRs dysfunction. Finally, we also examine the potential important research in this field in the future. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria oocytes' contact plate structure and development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid S Adonin

    Full Text Available One of the A. aurita medusa main mesoglea polypeptides, mesoglein, has been described previously. Mesoglein belongs to ZP-domain protein family and therefore we focused on A.aurita oogenesis. Antibodies against mesoglein (AB RA47 stain the plate in the place where germinal epithelium contacts oocyte on the paraffin sections. According to its position, we named the structure found the "contact plate". Our main instrument was AB against mesoglein. ZP-domain occupies about half of the whole amino acid sequence of the mesoglein. Immunoblot after SDS-PAGE and AU-PAGE reveals two charged and high M(r bands among the female gonad germinal epithelium polypeptides. One of the gonads' polypeptides M(r corresponds to that of mesogleal cells, the other ones' M(r is higher. The morphological description of contact plate formation is the subject of the current work. Two types of AB RA47 positive granules were observed during progressive oogenesis stages. Granules form the contact plate in mature oocyte. Contact plate of A.aurita oocyte marks its animal pole and resembles Zona Pellucida by the following features: (1 it attracts spermatozoids; (2 the material of the contact plate is synthesized by oocyte and stored in granules; (3 these granules and the contact plate itself contain ZP domain protein(s; (4 contact plate is an extracellular structure made up of fiber bundles similar to those of conventional Zona Pellucida.

  4. Advances in Artificial Neural Networks – Methodological Development and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Huang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks as a major soft-computing technology have been extensively studied and applied during the last three decades. Research on backpropagation training algorithms for multilayer perceptron networks has spurred development of other neural network training algorithms for other networks such as radial basis function, recurrent network, feedback network, and unsupervised Kohonen self-organizing network. These networks, especially the multilayer perceptron network with a backpropagation training algorithm, have gained recognition in research and applications in various scientific and engineering areas. In order to accelerate the training process and overcome data over-fitting, research has been conducted to improve the backpropagation algorithm. Further, artificial neural networks have been integrated with other advanced methods such as fuzzy logic and wavelet analysis, to enhance the ability of data interpretation and modeling and to avoid subjectivity in the operation of the training algorithm. In recent years, support vector machines have emerged as a set of high-performance supervised generalized linear classifiers in parallel with artificial neural networks. A review on development history of artificial neural networks is presented and the standard architectures and algorithms of artificial neural networks are described. Furthermore, advanced artificial neural networks will be introduced with support vector machines, and limitations of ANNs will be identified. The future of artificial neural network development in tandem with support vector machines will be discussed in conjunction with further applications to food science and engineering, soil and water relationship for crop management, and decision support for precision agriculture. Along with the network structures and training algorithms, the applications of artificial neural networks will be reviewed as well, especially in the fields of agricultural and biological

  5. Development of fast-timing microchannel plate photomultiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Junqi

    2017-09-01

    Planar microchannel plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) with bialkali photocathodes are able to achieve single photon detection with excellent time (picosecond) and spatial (millimeter) resolution. They have recently drawn great interests in experiments requiring time of flight (TOF) measurement and/or Cherenkov imaging. The Argonne MCP-PMT detector group has recently designed and fabricated 6 cm × 6 cm MCP-PMTs. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) method is used to grow resistive and secondary emission layers to functionalize the glass capillary array. Initial characterization indicates that these MCP-PMTs exhibits a transit-time spread of 57 psec at single photoelectron detection mode and of 27 psec at multi photoelectron mode ( 100 photoelectrons). The MCP-PMTs were also tested at Fermilab test beam facility for its particle detection performance and rate capability, showing high rate capability up to 75 kHz/cm2 , higher than the requirement for future electron-ion collider (EIC) experiment. A recent magnetic field test at ANL g-2 magnetic facility shows that the gain of MCP-PMT does not degrade until 0.75 Tesla, comparable to the current commercially available MCP-PMTs. Further improvement of its magnetic field performance is currently under developing by reducing the MCP pore size and spacing between inside components. The progress on the MCP-PMT development at ANL will be presented and discussed in the presentation.

  6. Shared molecular networks in orofacial and neural tube development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousa, Youssef A; Mansour, Tamer A; Seada, Haitham; Matoo, Samaneh; Schutte, Brian C

    2017-01-30

    Single genetic variants can affect multiple tissues during development. Thus it is possible that disruption of shared gene regulatory networks might underlie syndromic presentations. In this study, we explore this idea through examination of two critical developmental programs that control orofacial and neural tube development and identify shared regulatory factors and networks. Identification of these networks has the potential to yield additional candidate genes for poorly understood developmental disorders and assist in modeling and perhaps managing risk factors to prevent morbidly and mortality. We reviewed the literature to identify genes common between orofacial and neural tube defects and development. We then conducted a bioinformatic analysis to identify shared molecular targets and pathways in the development of these tissues. Finally, we examine publicly available RNA-Seq data to identify which of these genes are expressed in both tissues during development. We identify common regulatory factors in orofacial and neural tube development. Pathway enrichment analysis shows that folate, cancer and hedgehog signaling pathways are shared in neural tube and orofacial development. Developing neural tissues differentially express mouse exencephaly and cleft palate genes, whereas developing orofacial tissues were enriched for both clefting and neural tube defect genes. These data suggest that key developmental factors and pathways are shared between orofacial and neural tube defects. We conclude that it might be most beneficial to focus on common regulatory factors and pathways to better understand pathology and develop preventative measures for these birth defects. Birth Defects Research 109:169-179, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Development of high efficiency collector plates. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santala, T.; Sabol, R.

    1976-02-01

    Composite metal technology was used to manufacture intermetallic compound (IC) absorption surfaces and to combine them integrally with composite metal tube-in-sheet collector plates. Five material systems in which Al was one component metal and Fe, Cr, or Ni and their alloy was the other pair, were evaluated. All intermetallic compounds had high solar absorptance ..cap alpha.. approx. = 0.9. The AlNi was most promising and ..cap alpha.. > or = 0.95 and epsilon approx. = 0.3 were obtained over a broad range of compounding conditions. After eight months exposure in a flat plate collector enclosure the characteristic properties of AlNi surfaces remained virtually unchanged. Only LCS/Cu composite metal tube-in-sheet collector plates could be manufactured successfully. The technical difficulties associated with integrating the intermetallic compound and tube-in-sheet technologies make the manufacturing of composite metal collector plates at the time being economically unfeasible.

  8. Development of Intermediate Cooling Technology and Its Control for Two-Stand Plate Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In a plate rolling production line, thermomechanically controlled processing is critical for plate quality. In this paper, a set of intermediate cooling equipment of a two-stand plate mill with super density nozzles, medium pressure, and small flow is developed. Based on a simplified dynamic model, a cooling control scheme with combined feedforward, feedback, and adaptive algorithms is put forward. The new controlled rolling process and the highly efficient control system improve the controlled rolling efficiency by an average of 17.66%. The proposed intermediate cooling system can also effectively inhibit the growth of austenite grain, improve the impact toughness and yield strength of Q345B steel plate, reduce the formation of secondary oxide scale on the plate surface and the chromatic aberration of the plate surface, and greatly improve the surface quality of the steel plate.

  9. Genome Stability by DNA Polymerase β in Neural Progenitors Contributes to Neuronal Differentiation in Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Kohei; Uyeda, Akiko; Shida, Mitsuhiro; Hirayama, Teruyoshi; Yagi, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko; Sugo, Noriyuki

    2017-08-30

    DNA repair is crucial for genome stability in the developing cortex, as somatic de novo mutations cause neurological disorders. However, how DNA repair contributes to neuronal development is largely unknown. To address this issue, we studied the spatiotemporal roles of DNA polymerase β (Polβ), a key enzyme in DNA base excision repair pathway, in the developing cortex using distinct forebrain-specific conditional knock-out mice, Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) and Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Polβ expression was absent in both neural progenitors and postmitotic neurons in Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice, whereas only postmitotic neurons lacked Polβ expression in Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. We found that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were frequently detected during replication in cortical progenitors of Emx1-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Increased DSBs remained in postmitotic cells, which resulted in p53-mediated neuronal apoptosis. This neuronal apoptosis caused thinning of the cortical plate, although laminar structure was normal. In addition, accumulated DSBs also affected growth of corticofugal axons but not commissural axons. These phenotypes were not observed in Nex-Cre/Polβ (fl/fl) mice. Moreover, cultured Polβ-deficient neural progenitors exhibited higher sensitivity to the base-damaging agent methylmethanesulfonate, resulting in enhanced DSB formation. Similar damage was found by vitamin C treatment, which induces TET1-mediated DNA demethylation via 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. Together, genome stability mediated by Polβ-dependent base excision repair is crucial for the competence of neural progenitors, thereby contributing to neuronal differentiation in cortical development.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT DNA repair is crucial for development of the nervous system. However, how DNA polymerase β (Polβ)-dependent DNA base excision repair pathway contributes to the process is still unknown. We found that loss of Polβ in cortical progenitors rather than postmitotic neurons led to

  10. An overview on development of neural network technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Shin

    1993-01-01

    The study has been to obtain a bird's-eye view of the current neural network technology and the neural network research activities in NASA. The purpose was two fold. One was to provide a reference document for NASA researchers who want to apply neural network techniques to solve their problems. Another one was to report out survey results regarding NASA research activities and provide a view on what NASA is doing, what potential difficulty exists and what NASA can/should do. In a ten week study period, we interviewed ten neural network researchers in the Langley Research Center and sent out 36 survey forms to researchers at the Johnson Space Center, Lewis Research Center, Ames Research Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory. We also sent out 60 similar forms to educators and corporation researchers to collect general opinions regarding this field. Twenty-eight survey forms, 11 from NASA researchers and 17 from outside, were returned. Survey results were reported in our final report. In the final report, we first provided an overview on the neural network technology. We reviewed ten neural network structures, discussed the applications in five major areas, and compared the analog, digital and hybrid electronic implementation of neural networks. In the second part, we summarized known NASA neural network research studies and reported the results of the questionnaire survey. Survey results show that most studies are still in the development and feasibility study stage. We compared the techniques, application areas, researchers' opinions on this technology, and many aspects between NASA and non-NASA groups. We also summarized their opinions on difficulties encountered. Applications are considered the top research priority by most researchers. Hardware development and learning algorithm improvement are the next. The lack of financial and management support is among the difficulties in research study. All researchers agree that the use of neural networks could result in

  11. Discovering plate boundaries: Laboratory and classroom exercises using geodetic data to develop students' understanding of plate motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.

    2010-12-01

    available, the Jules Verne Voyager (JVV) interactive map tools are available online and are very well received by educators in introductory Earth science courses. In response to requests for easily accessible and usable data, UNAVCO built the Data for Educators webpage, incorporating an embedded Google Map with GPS locations and providing current GPS time series plots and downloadable data from the Plate Boundary Observatory. To extend and update the datasets available to our community, UNAVCO has developed a GPS velocity viewer using Google Maps technology and provides a learning- focused KMZ combining geophysical data sets for Google-Earth. By combining near real-time geodetic data with modern visualization tools into inquiry-based learning resources, students are deepening their understanding about the active nature of plate margins and gain a solid foundation for learning future concepts. UNAVCO is a non-profit, membership-governed consortium funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative high performance thin layer chromatography analysis of Calendula officinalis using high resolution plate imaging and artificial neural network data modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, S; Loescher, Christine M

    2013-10-10

    Calendula officinalis, commonly known Marigold, has been traditionally used for its anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of an artificial neural network (ANN) to analyse thin layer chromatography (TLC) chromatograms as fingerprint patterns for quantitative estimation of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and rutin in Calendula plant extracts. By applying samples with different weight ratios of marker compounds to the system, a database of chromatograms was constructed. A hundred and one signal intensities in each of the HPTLC chromatograms were correlated to the amounts of applied chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, and rutin using an ANN. The developed ANN correlation was used to quantify the amounts of 3 marker compounds in calendula plant extracts. The minimum quantifiable level (MQL) of 610, 190 and 940 ng and the limit of detection (LD) of 183, 57 and 282 ng were established for chlorogenic, caffeic acid and rutin, respectively. A novel method for quality control of herbal products, based on HPTLC separation, high resolution digital plate imaging and ANN data analysis has been developed. The proposed method can be adopted for routine evaluation of the phytochemical variability in calendula extracts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Micro-Structured Fluorescent Plates for High-resolution Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Takuro; Yasuda, Ryo; Iikura, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Masahito

    We have developed novel fluorescent plates for high-resolution imaging. The devices consist of capillary plates and fine phosphor grains; specifically, each capillary is filled with the grains. The fabricated fluorescent plates were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The observation revealed that all capillaries were well filled with grains. Imaging experiments were performed using a small X-ray source. Results show that the fluorescent plates are expected to be compatible with both high spatial resolution and good detection efficiency.

  14. Development of the Gliding Hole of the Dynamics Compression Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, U. A.; Suyitno; Magetsari, R.; Mahardika, M.

    2017-02-01

    The gliding hole of the dynamics compression plate is designed to facilitate relative movement of pedicle screw during surgery application. The gliding hole shape is then geometrically complex. The gliding hole manufactured using machining processes used to employ ball-nose cutting tool. Then, production cost is expensive due to long production time. This study proposed to increase productivity of DCP products by introducing forming process (cold forming). The forming process used to involve any press tool devices. In the closed die forming press tool is designed with little allowance, then work-pieces is trapped in the mould after forming. Therefore, it is very important to determine hole geometry and dimensions of raw material in order to success on forming process. This study optimized the hole sizes with both geometry analytics and experiments. The success of the forming process was performed by increasing the holes size on the raw materials. The holes size need to be prepared is diameter of 5.5 mm with a length of 11.4 mm for the plate thickness 3 mm and diameter of 6 mm with a length of 12.5 mm for the plate thickness 4 mm.

  15. Early neural network development history: the age of Camelot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart, R C; Dobbins, R W

    1990-01-01

    What the authors refer to as the first of four ages in the development of neural networks is discussed. It begins about a century ago with the American psychologist William James, and ends in 1969 with the publication of the book by M. Minsky and S. Papert on perceptrons. The history of this period is reviewed, focusing on people rather than just on theory or technology. The contributions of a number of individuals are discussed and related to how neural network tools are being implemented today. The selection of individuals discussed is somewhat arbitrary and not exhaustive, as the intent is to provide a broad sampling of people who contributed to current neural network technology. Besides James, the authors cover the work of W.C. McCulloch and W. Pitts (1943), D. Hebb (1949), and B. Widrow and M. Hoff (1960).

  16. A Constructive Neural-Network Approach to Modeling Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a particular computational modeling approach to the study of psychological development--that of constructive neural networks. This approach is applied to a variety of developmental domains and issues, including Piagetian tasks, shift learning, language acquisition, number comparison, habituation of visual attention, concept…

  17. Development of modularity in the neural activity of children's brains

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    We study how modularity of the human brain changes as children develop into adults. Theory suggests that modularity can enhance the response function of a networked system subject to changing external stimuli. Thus, greater cognitive performance might be achieved for more modular neural activity, and modularity might likely increase as children develop. The value of modularity calculated from fMRI data is observed to increase during childhood development and peak in young adulthood. Head moti...

  18. Comparing between predicted output temperature of flat-plate solar collector and experimental results: computational fluid dynamics and artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Nadi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The significant of solar energy as a renewable energy source, clean and without damage to the environment, for the production of electricity and heat is of great importance. Furthermore, due to the oil crisis as well as reducing the cost of home heating by 70%, solar energy in the past two decades has been a favorite of many researchers. Solar collectors are devices for collecting solar radiant energy through which this energy is converted into heat and then heat is transferred to a fluid (usually air or water. Therefore, a key component in performance improvement of solar heating system is a solar collector optimization under different testing conditions. However, estimation of output parameters under different testing conditions is costly, time consuming and mostly impossible. As a result, smart use of neural networks as well as CFD (computational fluid dynamics to predict the properties with which desired output would have been acquired is valuable. To the best of our knowledge, there are no any studies that compare experimental results with CFD and ANN. Materials and Methods A corrugated galvanized iron sheet of 2 m length, 1 m wide and 0.5 mm in thickness was used as an absorber plate for absorbing the incident solar radiation (Fig. 1 and 2. Corrugations in absorber were caused turbulent air and improved heat transfer coefficient. Computational fluid dynamics K-ε turbulence model was used for simulation. The following assumptions are made in the analysis. (1 Air is a continuous medium and incompressible. (2 The flow is steady and possesses have turbulent flow characteristics, due to the high velocity of flow. (3 The thermal-physical properties of the absorber sheet and the absorber tube are constant with respect to the operating temperature. (4 The bottom side of the absorber tube and the absorber plate are assumed to be adiabatic. Artificial neural network In this research a one-hidden-layer feed-forward network based on the

  19. LRP2 mediates folate uptake in the developing neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Esther; Mecklenburg, Nora; Cabrera, Robert M; Willnow, Thomas E; Hammes, Annette

    2014-05-15

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 2 (LRP2) is a multifunctional cell-surface receptor expressed in the embryonic neuroepithelium. Loss of LRP2 in the developing murine central nervous system (CNS) causes impaired closure of the rostral neural tube at embryonic stage (E) 9.0. Similar neural tube defects (NTDs) have previously been attributed to impaired folate metabolism in mice. We therefore asked whether LRP2 might be required for the delivery of folate to neuroepithelial cells during neurulation. Uptake assays in whole-embryo cultures showed that LRP2-deficient neuroepithelial cells are unable to mediate the uptake of folate bound to soluble folate receptor 1 (sFOLR1). Consequently, folate concentrations are significantly reduced in Lrp2(-/-) embryos compared with control littermates. Moreover, the folic-acid-dependent gene Alx3 is significantly downregulated in Lrp2 mutants. In conclusion, we show that LRP2 is essential for cellular folate uptake in the developing neural tube, a crucial step for proper neural tube closure. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Sequentially acting Sox transcription factors in neural lineage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsland, Maria; Ramsköld, Daniel; Zaouter, Cécile; Klum, Susanne; Sandberg, Rickard; Muhr, Jonas

    2011-12-01

    Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells can generate all cell types, but how cell lineages are initially specified and maintained during development remains largely unknown. Different classes of Sox transcription factors are expressed during neurogenesis and have been assigned important roles from early lineage specification to neuronal differentiation. Here we characterize the genome-wide binding for Sox2, Sox3, and Sox11, which have vital functions in ES cells, neural precursor cells (NPCs), and maturing neurons, respectively. The data demonstrate that Sox factor binding depends on developmental stage-specific constraints and reveal a remarkable sequential binding of Sox proteins to a common set of neural genes. Interestingly, in ES cells, Sox2 preselects for neural lineage-specific genes destined to be bound and activated by Sox3 in NPCs. In NPCs, Sox3 binds genes that are later bound and activated by Sox11 in differentiating neurons. Genes prebound by Sox proteins are associated with a bivalent chromatin signature, which is resolved into a permissive monovalent state upon binding of activating Sox factors. These data indicate that a single key transcription factor family acts sequentially to coordinate neural gene expression from the early lineage specification in pluripotent cells to later stages of neuronal development.

  1. Development of neural mechanisms for machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenio, Artur M

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a humanoid robot's perceptual mechanisms through the use of learning aids. We describe methods to enable learning on a humanoid robot using learning aids such as books, drawing materials, boards, educational videos or other children toys. Visual properties of objects are learned and inserted into a recognition scheme, which is then applied to acquire new object representations - we propose learning through developmental stages. Inspired in infant development, we will also boost the robot's perceptual capabilities by having a human caregiver performing educational and play activities with the robot (such as drawing, painting or playing with a toy train on a railway). We describe original algorithms to extract meaningful percepts from such learning experiments. Experimental evaluation of the algorithms corroborates the theoretical framework.

  2. Development of a Resistive Plate Chamber with heat strengthened glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, G.; Datar, V. M.; Kalmani, S. D.; Mondal, N. K.; Mondal, S.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R. R.

    2016-09-01

    The INO-ICAL is a proposed neutrino physics experiment, in which RPCs will be used as active detectors. The Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector will be made of 50 kTon of low carbon magnetized steel layers, tiled with 4 m × 2 m × 56 mm thick plates, alternating with layers of RPCs. The total number of 2 × 2 m2 RPCs required will be about 29000. However, during the assembly of RPCs, handling the 2 × 2 m2 normal float glass of thickness 3 mm is both difficult and risky. This prompted us to make RPCs with toughened glass and to characterize them. Toughened and tempered glass have higher mechanical strength compared to normal float glass and their processing involves controlled thermal or chemical treatment during the industrial production. This paper presents a comparison of the characteristics, such as noise rate, dark current, particle detection efficiency and time resolution, of normal and hardened glass RPCs.

  3. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  4. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M D; Tomko, D L

    1998-11-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. A Development of Force Plate for Biomechanics Analysis of Standing and Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardoyo, S.; Hutajulu, P. T.; Togibasa, O.

    2016-08-01

    Force plates are known as an excellent teaching aid to demonstrate the kinematics and dynamics of motion and commonly used in biomechanics laboratories to measure ground forces involved in the motion of human. It is consist of a metal plate with sensors attached to give an electrical output proportional to the force on the plate. Moreover, force plates are useful for examining the kinetic characteristics of an athlete's movement. They provide information about the external forces involved in movement that can aid a coach or sports scientist to quantitatively evaluate the athlete's skill development. In this study, we develop our prototype of force plate with less than 100,- simply by using flexible force transducer attached inside rubber matt, in the form of square blocks (dimension: 250 mm × 150 mm × 10 mm), with maximum load up to 60 kg. The handmade force plate was tested by applying biomechanics analysis for standing and walking. The testing was done on Experimental Soccer Courses’ students at the Department of Physical Education, Health and Recreation, University of Cenderawasih. The design of the force plate system together with biomechanics analysis will be discussed.

  6. Research and Development of Micro-Alloying High-Strength Shipbuilding Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenye

    Based on the technological requirements and market demand, Nb micro-alloying D36 grade high strength shipbuilding plate has been successfully developed in HBIS. In this papers, the rational chemical compositions design, smelting and rolling process of Nb micro-alloying D36 grade high strength shipbuilding plate were introduced. Its various performance figures not only comply with the rules of nine classification societies of CCS, LR, ABS NK, DNV, BV, GL, KR and RINA but meet users' requirements. It indicates that HBIS have capacity producing Nb micro-alloying D36 grade high strength shipbuilding plate.

  7. Extracellular matrix and its receptors in Drosophila neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadie, Kendal; Baumgartner, Stefan; Prokop, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) and matrix receptors are intimately involved in most biological processes. The ECM plays fundamental developmental and physiological roles in health and disease, including processes underlying the development, maintenance and regeneration of the nervous system. To understand the principles of ECM-mediated functions in the nervous system, genetic model organisms like Drosophila provide simple, malleable and powerful experimental platforms. This article provides an overview of ECM proteins and receptors in Drosophila. It then focuses on their roles during three progressive phases of neural development: 1) neural progenitor proliferation, 2) axonal growth and pathfinding and 3) synapse formation and function. Each section highlights known ECM and ECM-receptor components and recent studies done in mutant conditions to reveal their in vivo functions, all illustrating the enormous opportunities provided when merging work on the nervous system with systematic research into ECM-related gene functions. PMID:21688401

  8. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and Application of Collaborative Optimization Software for Plate - fin Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunzhen, Qiao; Ze, Zhang; Jiangfeng, Guo; Jian, Zhang

    2017-12-01

    This paper introduces the design ideas of the calculation software and application examples for plate - fin heat exchangers. Because of the large calculation quantity in the process of designing and optimizing heat exchangers, we used Visual Basic 6.0 as a software development carrier to design a basic calculation software to reduce the calculation quantity. Its design condition is plate - fin heat exchanger which was designed according to the boiler tail flue gas. The basis of the software is the traditional design method of the plate-fin heat exchanger. Using the software for design and calculation of plate-fin heat exchangers, discovery will effectively reduce the amount of computation, and similar to traditional methods, have a high value.

  10. Development and Application of TMCP Steel Plate in Coal Mining Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqing, Zhang; Liandeng, Yao; aimin, Guo; Sixin, Zhao; Guofa, Wang

    Coal, as the most major energy in China, accounted for about 70% of China's primary energy production and consumption. While the percentage of coal as the primary energy mix would drop in the future due to serious smog pollution partly resulted from coal-burning, the market demand of coal will maintain because the progressive process of urbanization. In order to improve productivity and simultaneously decrease safety accidents, fully-mechanized underground mining technology based on complete equipment of powered support, armored face conveyor, shearer, belt conveyor and road-header have obtained quick development in recent years, of which powered support made of high strength steel plate accounts for 65 percent of total equipment investment, so, the integrated mechanical properties, in particular strength level and weldability, have a significant effects on working service life and productivity. Take hydraulic powered supports as example, this paper places priority to introduce the latest development of high strength steel plates of Q550, Q690 and Q890 for powered supports, as well as metallurgical design conception and production cost-benefits analysis between QT plate and TMCP plate. Through production and application practice, TMCP or DQ plate demonstrate great economic advantages compared with traditional QT plate.

  11. Development and Application of High Strength TMCP Plate for Coal Mining Machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqing, Zhang; Aimin, Guo; Liandeng, Yao

    Coal, as the most major energy in China, accounted for about 70% of China's primary energy production and consumption. While the percentage of coal as the primary energy mix would drop in the future due to serious smog pollution partly resulted from coal-burning, the market demand of coal will maintain because the progressive process of urbanization. In order to improve productivity and simultaneously decrease safety accidents, fully-mechanized underground mining technology based on complete equipment of powered support, armored face conveyor, shearer, belt conveyor and road-header have obtained quick development in recent years, of which powered support made of high strength steel plate accounts for 65 percent of total equipment investment, so, the integrated mechanical properties, in particular strength level and weldability, have a significant effects on working service life and productivity. Take hydraulic powered supports as example, this paper places priority to introduce the latest development of high strength steel plates of Q550, Q690 and Q890, as well as metallurgical design conception and production cost-benefits analysis between QT plate and TMCP plate. Through production and application practice, TMCP or DQ plate demonstrate great economic advantages compared with traditional QT plate.

  12. Development of an Inclined Plate Extractor-Separator for Immiscible Liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zahoor ul Hassan Rizvi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new inclined plates extractor-separator is developed for operation with immiscible liquids in which extraction and separation is achieved in one unit contrary to mixer settlers. The inclined plates extractor-separator combines turbulent jets for contacting, and an inclined plate for separation of the two phases. The inclined plates extractor-separator does not have any moving part inside the vessel. This feature makes it free from the mechanical problems associated with conventional apparatus. The proposed inclined plates extractor-separator was operated in batch mode under various operating conditions to evaluate its performance on the basis of extraction efficiency. Water (light phase was used as solvent to extract ethyl acetate from a heavy phase pool of tetrachloroethylene and ethyl acetate. The ethyl acetate content was analysed using chromatography. A hydrodynamic study was carried out using high speed photography to understand the mechanisms occurring during mass transfer across the two phases. Furthermore, it was found that the proposed inclined plate extractor-separator reduces the overall operating time by 67% and consumes only 13% of the power in comparison to a mixer-settler. A hydraulic power consumption comparison with a mixer settler and a gullwing extractor-separator is also presented.

  13. Copine1 regulates neural stem cell functions during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Sung, Soo-Eun; Cheal Yoo, Jae; Park, Jae-Yong; Yi, Gwan-Su; Heo, Jun Young; Lee, Jae-Ran; Kim, Nam-Soon; Lee, Da Yong

    2018-01-01

    Copine 1 (CPNE1) is a well-known phospholipid binding protein in plasma membrane of various cell types. In brain cells, CPNE1 is closely associated with AKT signaling pathway, which is important for neural stem cell (NSC) functions during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of CPNE1 in the regulation of brain NSC functions during brain development and determined its underlying mechanism. In this study, abundant expression of CPNE1 was observed in neural lineage cells including NSCs and immature neurons in human. With mouse brain tissues in various developmental stages, we found that CPNE1 expression was higher at early embryonic stages compared to postnatal and adult stages. To model developing brain in vitro, we used primary NSCs derived from mouse embryonic hippocampus. Our in vitro study shows decreased proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potential in CPNE1 deficient NSCs. Finally, we found that the deficiency of CPNE1 downregulated mTOR signaling in embryonic NSCs. These data demonstrate that CPNE1 plays a key role in the regulation of NSC functions through the activation of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway during brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. From neural plate to cortical arousal-a neuronal network theory of sleep derived from in vitro "model" systems for primordial patterns of spontaneous bioelectric activity in the vertebrate central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corner, Michael A

    2013-05-22

    In the early 1960s intrinsically generated widespread neuronal discharges were discovered to be the basis for the earliest motor behavior throughout the animal kingdom. The pattern generating system is in fact programmed into the developing nervous system, in a regionally specific manner, already at the early neural plate stage. Such rhythmically modulated phasic bursts were next discovered to be a general feature of developing neural networks and, largely on the basis of experimental interventions in cultured neural tissues, to contribute significantly to their morpho-physiological maturation. In particular, the level of spontaneous synchronized bursting is homeostatically regulated, and has the effect of constraining the development of excessive network excitability. After birth or hatching, this "slow-wave" activity pattern becomes sporadically suppressed in favor of sensory oriented "waking" behaviors better adapted to dealing with environmental contingencies. It nevertheless reappears periodically as "sleep" at several species-specific points in the diurnal/nocturnal cycle. Although this "default" behavior pattern evolves with development, its essential features are preserved throughout the life cycle, and are based upon a few simple mechanisms which can be both experimentally demonstrated and simulated by computer modeling. In contrast, a late onto- and phylogenetic aspect of sleep, viz., the intermittent "paradoxical" activation of the forebrain so as to mimic waking activity, is much less well understood as regards its contribution to brain development. Some recent findings dealing with this question by means of cholinergically induced "aroused" firing patterns in developing neocortical cell cultures, followed by quantitative electrophysiological assays of immediate and longterm sequelae, will be discussed in connection with their putative implications for sleep ontogeny.

  15. DNA methyltransferase 3b is dispensable for mouse neural crest development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget T Jacques-Fricke

    Full Text Available The neural crest is a population of multipotent cells that migrates extensively throughout vertebrate embryos to form diverse structures. Mice mutant for the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b exhibit defects in two neural crest derivatives, the craniofacial skeleton and cardiac ventricular septum, suggesting that DNMT3b activity is necessary for neural crest development. Nevertheless, the requirement for DNMT3b specifically in neural crest cells, as opposed to interacting cell types, has not been determined. Using a conditional DNMT3b allele crossed to the neural crest cre drivers Wnt1-cre and Sox10-cre, neural crest DNMT3b mutants were generated. In both neural crest-specific and fully DNMT3b-mutant embryos, cranial neural crest cells exhibited only subtle migration defects, with increased numbers of dispersed cells trailing organized streams in the head. In spite of this, the resulting cranial ganglia, craniofacial skeleton, and heart developed normally when neural crest cells lacked DNMT3b. This indicates that DNTM3b is not necessary in cranial neural crest cells for their development. We conclude that defects in neural crest derivatives in DNMT3b mutant mice reflect a requirement for DNMT3b in lineages such as the branchial arch mesendoderm or the cardiac mesoderm that interact with neural crest cells during formation of these structures.

  16. Neural development features: Spatio-temporal development of the Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network

    CERN Document Server

    Varier, Sreedevi; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1001044

    2011-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, with information on neural connectivity, three-dimensional position and cell linage provides a unique system for understanding the development of neural networks. Although C. elegans has been widely studied in the past, we present the first statistical study from a developmental perspective, with findings that raise interesting suggestions on the establishment of long-distance connections and network hubs. Here, we analyze the neuro-development for temporal and spatial features, using birth times of neurons and their three-dimensional positions. Comparisons of growth in C. elegans with random spatial network growth highlight two findings relevant to neural network development. First, most neurons which are linked by long-distance connections are born around the same time and early on, suggesting the possibility of early contact or interaction between connected neurons during development. Second, early-born neurons are more highly connected (tendency to form hubs) than late...

  17. High altitude hypoxia as a factor that promotes tibial growth plate development in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shucheng; Zhang, Lihong; Rehman, Mujeeb Ur; Iqbal, Muhammad Kashif; Lan, Yanfang; Mehmood, Khalid; Zhang, Hui; Qiu, Gang; Nabi, Fazul; Yao, Wangyuan; Wang, Meng; Li, Jiakui

    2017-01-01

    Tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) is one of the most common problems in the poultry industry and leads to lameness by affecting the proximal growth plate of the tibia. However, due to the unique environmental and geographical conditions of Tibet, no case of TD has been reported in Tibetan chickens (TBCs). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of high altitude hypoxia on blood parameters and tibial growth plate development in chickens using the complete blood count, morphology, and histological examination. The results of this study showed an undesirable impact on the overall performance, body weight, and mortality of Arbor Acres chickens (AACs) exposed to a high altitude hypoxic environment. However, AACs raised under hypoxic conditions showed an elevated number of red blood cells (RBCs) and an increase in hemoglobin and hematocrit values on day 14 compared to the hypobaric normoxia group. Notably, the morphology and histology analyses showed that the size of tibial growth plates in AACs was enlarged and that the blood vessel density was also higher after exposure to the hypoxic environment for 14 days, while no such change was observed in TBCs. Altogether, our results revealed that the hypoxic environment has a potentially new role in increasing the blood vessel density of proximal tibial growth plates to strengthen and enhance the size of the growth plates, which may provide new insights for the therapeutic manipulation of hypoxia in poultry TD.

  18. Development of high speed computation algorithm for transient analysis of rectangular plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. S.; Jang, D. J. [Chonnam National University, Yeosu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. B.; Jang, J. S.; Moon, D. H. [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    A new transient analysis method for a rectangular plate structure comprised of a large number of plate elements was developed in order to significantly reduce computational time and memory. This algorithm was derived from the combination of the transfer technique of the transfer mass coefficient method, the modeling technique of the finite element method, and the numerical integration technique of Newmark's method. In this paper, the algorithm for the transient analysis of a rectangular plate structure is formulated by the proposed method. In order to verify the computational accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method, the results obtained by the proposed method were compared with those obtained by the finite element method and the finite element-transfer matrix method. The proposed method, the finite element-transfer mass coefficient method, could considerably reduce the computation time without the loss of accuracy, in spite of using small computation memory, by using the transfer rules successively

  19. A homolog of Subtilisin-like Proprotein Convertase 7 is essential to anterior neural development in Xenopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Senturker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Subtilisin-like Proprotein Convertase 7 (SPC7 is a member of the subtilisin/kexin family of pro-protein convertases. It cleaves many pro-proteins to release their active proteins, including members of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP family of signaling molecules. Other SPCs are known to be required during embryonic development but corresponding data regarding SPC7 have not been reported previously. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated that Xenopus SPC7 (SPC7 was expressed predominantly in the developing brain and eye, throughout the neural plate initially, then more specifically in the lens and retina primordia as development progressed. Since no prior functional information has been reported for SPC7, we used gain- and loss-of-function experiments to investigate the possibility that it may also convey patterning or tissue specification information similarly to Furin, SPC4, and SPC6. Overexpression of SPC7 was without effect. In contrast, injection of SPC7 antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MO into a single blastomere at the 2- or 4-cell stage produced marked disruption of head structures; anophthalmia was salient. Bilateral injections suppressed head and eye formation completely. In parallel with suppression of eye and brain development by SPC7 knockdown, expression of early anterior neural markers (Sox2, Otx2, Rx2, and Pax6 and late eye-specific markers (β-Crystallin and Opsin, and of BMP target genes such as Tbx2 and Tbx3, was reduced or eliminated. Taken together, these findings suggest a critical role for SPC7-perhaps, at least in part, due to activation of one or more BMPs-in early patterning of the anterior neural plate and its derivatives. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: SPC7 is required for normal development of the eye and brain, possibly through processing BMPs, though other potential substrates cannot be excluded.

  20. The connections between neural crest development and neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Manrong; Stanke, Jennifer; Lahti, Jill M

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, is an extremely heterogeneous disease both biologically and clinically. Although significant progress has been made in identifying molecular and genetic markers for NB, this disease remains an enigmatic challenge. Since NB is thought to be an embryonal tumor that is derived from precursor cells of the peripheral (sympathetic) nervous system, understanding the development of normal sympathetic nervous system may highlight abnormal events that contribute to NB initiation. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of the peripheral trunk neural crest, the current understanding of how developmental factors may contribute to NB and on recent advances in the identification of important genetic lesions and signaling pathways involved in NB tumorigenesis and metastasis. Finally, we discuss how future advances in identification of molecular alterations in NB may lead to more effective, less toxic therapies, and improve the prognosis for NB patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in development of neural connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert F; McDonald, Craig G; Bergstrom, Hadley C; Ehlinger, Daniel G; Brielmaier, Jennifer M

    2015-08-01

    Adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in development of neural connectivity. A large number of brain changes occur during adolescence as the CNS matures. These changes suggest that the adolescent brain may still be susceptible to developmental alterations by substances which impact its growth. Here we review recent studies on adolescent nicotine which show that the adolescent brain is differentially sensitive to nicotine-induced alterations in dendritic elaboration, in several brain areas associated with processing reinforcement and emotion, specifically including nucleus accumbens, medial prefrontal cortex, basolateral amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and dentate gyrus. Both sensitivity to nicotine, and specific areas responding to nicotine, differ between adolescent and adult rats, and dendritic changes in response to adolescent nicotine persist into adulthood. Areas sensitive to, and not sensitive to, structural remodeling induced by adolescent nicotine suggest that the remodeling generally corresponds to the extended amygdala. Evidence suggests that dendritic remodeling is accompanied by persisting changes in synaptic connectivity. Modeling, electrophysiological, neurochemical, and behavioral data are consistent with the implication of our anatomical studies showing that adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in neural connectivity. Emerging data thus suggest that early adolescence is a period when nicotine consumption, presumably mediated by nicotine-elicited changes in patterns of synaptic activity, can sculpt late brain development, with consequent effects on synaptic interconnection patterns and behavior regulation. Adolescent nicotine may induce a more addiction-prone phenotype, and the structures altered by nicotine also subserve some emotional and cognitive functions, which may also be altered. We suggest that dendritic elaboration and associated changes are mediated by activity-dependent synaptogenesis, acting in part

  2. PERSPECTIVE: Consideration of user priorities when developing neural prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kim D.

    2009-10-01

    For too long there has been separation of basic science, biomedical engineering, clinical science and the people these disciplines are serving. A key ingredient to understanding the real-life consequences of many neurologic disorders that produce physical disabilities, such as spinal cord injury, is to obtain valuable information from the individuals that are actually living with the disorders everyday. This information can be obtained in an objective and usable format, which can then be used to direct biomedical research in a manner that is meaningful to the intended beneficiaries. In particular, the field of neural prosthetics for spinal cord injury can make great strides if user input is obtained throughout the stages of development. Presented here is the perspective of a scientist who also has 20 years of experience living with a cervical spinal cord injury.

  3. Development and Evolution of Neural Networks in an Artificial Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Astor, J C; Astor, Jens C.; Adami, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    We present a model of decentralized growth for Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) inspired by the development and the physiology of real nervous systems. In this model, each individual artificial neuron is an autonomous unit whose behavior is determined only by the genetic information it harbors and local concentrations of substrates modeled by a simple artificial chemistry. Gene expression is manifested as axon and dendrite growth, cell division and differentiation, substrate production and cell stimulation. We demonstrate the model's power with a hand-written genome that leads to the growth of a simple network which performs classical conditioning. To evolve more complex structures, we implemented a platform-independent, asynchronous, distributed Genetic Algorithm (GA) that allows users to participate in evolutionary experiments via the World Wide Web.

  4. Acquiring neural signals for developing a perception and cognition model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Li, Yunyi; Chen, Genshe; Shen, Dan; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh; Lynch, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The understanding of how humans process information, determine salience, and combine seemingly unrelated information is essential to automated processing of large amounts of information that is partially relevant, or of unknown relevance. Recent neurological science research in human perception, and in information science regarding contextbased modeling, provides us with a theoretical basis for using a bottom-up approach for automating the management of large amounts of information in ways directly useful for human operators. However, integration of human intelligence into a game theoretic framework for dynamic and adaptive decision support needs a perception and cognition model. For the purpose of cognitive modeling, we present a brain-computer-interface (BCI) based humanoid robot system to acquire brainwaves during human mental activities of imagining a humanoid robot-walking behavior. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model. The BCI system consists of a data acquisition unit with an electroencephalograph (EEG), a humanoid robot, and a charge couple CCD camera. An EEG electrode cup acquires brainwaves from the skin surface on scalp. The humanoid robot has 20 degrees of freedom (DOFs); 12 DOFs located on hips, knees, and ankles for humanoid robot walking, 6 DOFs on shoulders and arms for arms motion, and 2 DOFs for head yaw and pitch motion. The CCD camera takes video clips of the human subject's hand postures to identify mental activities that are correlated to the robot-walking behaviors. We use the neural signals to investigate relationships between complex humanoid robot behaviors and human mental activities for developing the perception and cognition model.

  5. Development of ink transfer monitoring system for roll-to-plate gravure offset printing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Taik-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kim, Byoung Jae; Lee, Seungwoo

    2010-11-01

    The gravure offset printing process is very cost-effective for printed electronics, such as printed solar cell, printed battery, printed TFT, printed RFID tag and so on. In gravure offset printing, there are two kinds of ink transfer processes -- off and set processes. At the off process, an elastic blanket cylinder picks up the ink from patterned plate or patterned cylinder. At the set process, ink on the elastic blanket cylinder is transferred onto the target substrate. These two ink transfer processes determine printing quality, therefore understanding of ink transfer mechanism during off and set processes are very important to control printing quality. In this study, we developed ink transfer monitoring system for roll-to-plate gravure printing. We visualized ink transfer from pattern plate to rolling blanket cylinder (off process) and from rolling blanket cylinder to plate substrate (set process) by using high-speed camera and long range microscope. We investigated the effects of pattern size, printing speed, rotational effect of blanket cylinder, contact angle and rheological property of ink to understanding gravure offset printing mechanism.

  6. Development of an imaging plate as a heavy-nuclide detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanase, G.; Sakurai, H.; Noma, M.; Gunji, S.; Yasuda, N.; Kobayashi, T.

    1999-12-01

    It is very important for the study of nucleo-synthesis in supernova explosion to be able to measure the abundance of heavy nuclides in cosmic rays. Though a large-area detector is necessary for measurements of the abundance, it takes very long time to analyze the data for large-area detectors such as emulsion chamber. To address this need, we are developing a new type of heavy nuclide detector using an imaging plate which is manufactured by Fuji Film Co. Ltd. This film has a position resolution of 25 /spl mu/m and a sensitivity 1000 times higher than X-ray film. Moreover it is easy to enlarge since the area of one plate can be 20/spl times/25 cm/sup 2/, and the accumulated cosmic-ray-interaction information can be read out in about 10 minutes. To measure the characteristics of the imaging plate for heavy nuclides, we irradiated it with several kinds of nuclides using an accelerator in the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. These tests demonstrated that using an imaging plate, carbon, silicon, and argon nuclides can be distinguished.

  7. Cortical bone development under the growth plate is regulated by mechanical load transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanck, E; Hannink, G; Ruimerman, R; Buma, P; Burger, E H; Huiskes, R

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones takes place at the growth plates. The growth plate produces new bone trabeculae, which are later resorbed or merged into the cortical shell. This process implies transition of trabecular metaphyseal sections into diaphyseal sections. We hypothesize that the development of cortical bone is governed by mechanical stimuli. We also hypothesize that trabecular and cortical bone share the same regulatory mechanisms for adaptation to mechanical loads. To test these hypotheses, we monitored the development of the tibial cortex in growing pigs, using micro-computer tomography and histology. We then tested the concept that regulatory mechanisms for trabecular bone adaptation can also explain cortical bone development using our mechanical stimulation theory, which could explain trabecular bone (re)modelling. The main results showed that, from the growth plate towards the diaphysis, the pores of the trabecular structure were gradually filled in with bone, which resulted in increased density and cortical bone. The computer model largely predicted this morphological development. We conclude that merging of metaphyseal trabeculae into cortex is likely to be governed by mechanical stimuli. Furthermore, cortex development of growing long bones can be explained as a form of trabecular bone adaptation, without the need for different regulatory mechanisms for cortical and trabecular bone. PMID:16420380

  8. Analysis of the developing neural system using an in vitro model by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kosuke; Kudoh, Suguru N; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2015-04-07

    We developed an in vitro model of early neural cell development. The maturation of a normal neural cell was studied in vitro using Raman spectroscopy for 120 days. The Raman spectra datasets were analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) to investigate the relationship between maturation stages and molecular composition changes in neural cells. According to the PCA, the Raman spectra datasets can be classified into four larger groups. Previous electrophysiological studies have suggested that a normal neural cell goes through three maturation states. The groups we observed by Raman analysis showed good agreement with the electrophysiological results, except with the addition of a fourth state. The results demonstrated that Raman analysis was powerful to investigate the daily changes in molecular composition of the growing neural cell. This in vitro model system may be useful for future studies of the effects of endocrine disrupters in the developing early neural system.

  9. Development of modularity in the neural activity of children's brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man; Deem, Michael W

    2015-01-26

    We study how modularity of the human brain changes as children develop into adults. Theory suggests that modularity can enhance the response function of a networked system subject to changing external stimuli. Thus, greater cognitive performance might be achieved for more modular neural activity, and modularity might likely increase as children develop. The value of modularity calculated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is observed to increase during childhood development and peak in young adulthood. Head motion is deconvolved from the fMRI data, and it is shown that the dependence of modularity on age is independent of the magnitude of head motion. A model is presented to illustrate how modularity can provide greater cognitive performance at short times, i.e. task switching. A fitness function is extracted from the model. Quasispecies theory is used to predict how the average modularity evolves with age, illustrating the increase of modularity during development from children to adults that arises from selection for rapid cognitive function in young adults. Experiments exploring the effect of modularity on cognitive performance are suggested. Modularity may be a potential biomarker for injury, rehabilitation, or disease.

  10. Prototype to product—developing a commercially viable neural prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The Cochlear implant or 'Bionic ear' is a device that enables people who do not get sufficient benefit from a hearing aid to communicate with the hearing world. The Cochlear implant is not an amplifier, but a device that electrically stimulates the auditory nerve in a way that crudely mimics normal hearing, thus providing a hearing percept. Many recipients are able to understand running speech without the help of lipreading. Cochlear implants have reached a stage of maturity where there are now 170 000 recipients implanted worldwide. The commercial development of these devices has occurred over the last 30 years. This development has been multidisciplinary, including audiologists, engineers, both mechanical and electrical, histologists, materials scientists, physiologists, surgeons and speech pathologists. This paper will trace the development of the device we have today, from the engineering perspective. The special challenges of designing an active device that will work in the human body for a lifetime will be outlined. These challenges include biocompatibility, extreme reliability, safety, patient fitting and surgical issues. It is emphasized that the successful development of a neural prosthesis requires the partnership of academia and industry.

  11. Prototype to product-developing a commercially viable neural prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The Cochlear implant or 'Bionic ear' is a device that enables people who do not get sufficient benefit from a hearing aid to communicate with the hearing world. The Cochlear implant is not an amplifier, but a device that electrically stimulates the auditory nerve in a way that crudely mimics normal hearing, thus providing a hearing percept. Many recipients are able to understand running speech without the help of lipreading. Cochlear implants have reached a stage of maturity where there are now 170 000 recipients implanted worldwide. The commercial development of these devices has occurred over the last 30 years. This development has been multidisciplinary, including audiologists, engineers, both mechanical and electrical, histologists, materials scientists, physiologists, surgeons and speech pathologists. This paper will trace the development of the device we have today, from the engineering perspective. The special challenges of designing an active device that will work in the human body for a lifetime will be outlined. These challenges include biocompatibility, extreme reliability, safety, patient fitting and surgical issues. It is emphasized that the successful development of a neural prosthesis requires the partnership of academia and industry.

  12. The Development of Animal Behavior: From Lorenz to Neural Nets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Johan J.

    In the study of behavioral development both causal and functional approaches have been used, and they often overlap. The concept of ontogenetic adaptations suggests that each developmental phase involves unique adaptations to the environment of the developing animal. The functional concept of optimal outbreeding has led to further experimental evidence and theoretical models concerning the role of sexual imprinting in the evolutionary process of sexual selection. From a causal perspective it has been proposed that behavioral ontogeny involves the development of various kinds of perceptual, motor, and central mechanisms and the formation of connections among them. This framework has been tested for a number of complex behavior systems such as hunger and dustbathing. Imprinting is often seen as a model system for behavioral development in general. Recent advances in imprinting research have been the result of an interdisciplinary effort involving ethology, neuroscience, and experimental psychology, with a continual interplay between these approaches. The imprinting results are consistent with Lorenz' early intuitive suggestions and are also reflected in the architecture of recent neural net models.

  13. Development of flat-plate solar collectors for the heating and cooling of buildings: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    An efficient, low cost, flat-plate solar collector was developed. Computer aided mathematical models of the heat process in the collector were used in defining absorber panel configuration; determining insulation thickness; and in selecting the number, spacing, and material of the covers. Prototypes were built and performance tested. Data from simulated operation of the collector are compared with predicted loads from a number of locations to determine the degree of solar utilization.

  14. Recent experimental results and developments on the resistive plate chambers for the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Altieri, S; Bruno, G; Guida, R; Merlo, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vitulo, P; Abbrescia, M; Colaleo, A; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Loddo, F; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Pugliese, G; Ranieri, A; Romano, F

    2001-01-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) have been chosen as dedicated trigger detectors for the CMS experiment at the LHC. The expected severe operating conditions have required an intense research and development activity on these detectors over the past years. Experimental results on overall performance of large chambers, rate capability, ageing and photon sensitivity are reviewed. In all of these tests the detector has proven to achieve good enough performance for successful use at the LHC. (6 refs).

  15. Clean Plate Movement and Empowerment of Civil Leadership for Developing Sustainable Life Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kwang Soo; Kim, Seung Woo; Jung, Sin Yeong; Choi, Byeong Dae; Mun, Sung Joo; Lee, Dong Ho

    This paper describes the backgrounds, process, outcomes, and characteristics of "Clean plate" movement carried out in Korea. That was aimed at the reduction of food waste production as well as developing and disseminating a sustainable life style. Excessive foods are wasted every year in Korea and it reaches to 270 g/day/capita. Clean plate movement was started 2004 and over 1.5 million peoples, which is 3% of the population, did pledge for 15 months. Over one million students participated in the pledge campaign and they became conscious about the importance of food and get sustainable eating habit in which they don't leave any food behind. While the campaign carried out successfully, civil volunteers of a Buddhist NGO EcoBuddha, who were the housewives mainly, were in charge of the whole processes and were trained as civil leaders for sustainable development. They awakened to the interrelationship between human being and the nature, based on a series of Buddhist lectures and self practicing asceticism. Clean plate movement as an educational program for sustainable development has various factors in three pillars of environmental, economical and socio-cultural aspects for EfSD.

  16. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life.

  17. Development of a neural net paradigm that predicts simulator sickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allgood, G.O.

    1993-03-01

    A disease exists that affects pilots and aircrew members who use Navy Operational Flight Training Systems. This malady, commonly referred to as simulator sickness and whose symptomatology closely aligns with that of motion sickness, can compromise the use of these systems because of a reduced utilization factor, negative transfer of training, and reduction in combat readiness. A report is submitted that develops an artificial neural network (ANN) and behavioral model that predicts the onset and level of simulator sickness in the pilots and aircrews who sue these systems. It is proposed that the paradigm could be implemented in real time as a biofeedback monitor to reduce the risk to users of these systems. The model captures the neurophysiological impact of use (human-machine interaction) by developing a structure that maps the associative and nonassociative behavioral patterns (learned expectations) and vestibular (otolith and semicircular canals of the inner ear) and tactile interaction, derived from system acceleration profiles, onto an abstract space that predicts simulator sickness for a given training flight.

  18. The epigenetic switches for neural development and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jingwen; Xin, Yongjuan; Zhou, Wenhao; Qiu, Zilong

    2013-07-20

    The most remarkable feature of the nervous system is that the development and functions of the brain are largely reshaped by postnatal experiences, in joint with genetic landscapes. The nature vs. nurture argument reminds us that both genetic and epigenetic information is indispensable for the normal function of the brain. The epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the central nervous system have been revealed over last a decade. Moreover, the mutations of epigenetic modulator genes have been shown to be implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. The epigenetic study has initiated in the neuroscience field for a relative short period of time. In this review, we will summarize recent discoveries about epigenetic regulation on neural development, synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, as well as neuropsychiatric disorders. Although the comprehensive view of how epigenetic regulation contributes to the function of the brain is still not completed, the notion that brain, the most complicated organ of organisms, is profoundly shaped by epigenetic switches is widely accepted. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Dual-bath Plating of Composition Modulated Alloys (CMA) based on a newly developed Computer Controlled Plating System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Peter Torben; Leisner, Peter; Møller, Per

    1994-01-01

    of a computer controlled plating system for producing large scale CMA-coatings. Employing a dual-bath technique, multilayered materials with more than 1000 alternating layers have been manufactured and investigated. The thickness of each layer ranges from 25 nm to several microns. The characterisation results......Composition Modulated Alloys (CMA) are attracting ever increasing interests, as new and fascinating appli-cations are reported. Until recently, producing these multilayered coatings have been difficult, particularly for larger samples. This presentation will explain the design, use and purpose...

  20. Research development of buckling and ultimate strength of hull plate and stiffened panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Yanting

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Buckling and ultimate strength of hull plate and stiffened panel are important contents in the de-sign of ship structures,have achieved plenteous results in recent years. The research development of buck-ling and ultimate strength of steel hull plate and stiffened panel in the past decade at home and abroad is re-viewed for the convenience of carrying out studies and researches. The case of static loading is emphatical-ly described,the cyclic loading and dynamic loading are also introduced. A systematical overview is pre-sented for intact structures and damaged structures under single load or combined loads,in accordance with four kinds of research methods,which are experiment,numerical computation method,analytical method and comprehensive approach. The superiority and inferiority of each research method are assessed. Significant achievements are summarized,and six further problems are identified for the future study.

  1. Students' mental model development during historically contextualized inquiry: how the `Tectonic Plate' metaphor impeded the process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolphin, Glenn; Benoit, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    At present, quality earth science education in grade school is rare, increasing the importance of post-secondary courses. Observations of post-secondary geoscience indicate students often maintain errant ideas about the earth, even after direct instruction. This qualitative case study documents model-building activities of students as they experienced classroom instruction that braids history, inquiry, and model-based-learning within the context of earth dynamics. Transcripts of students' conversations, and their written work indicate students primarily employed model accretion to enhance their mental models. Instances of accretion were descriptive, pertaining to what their model consisted of, as opposed to how it explained the target phenomenon. Participants also conflated "continent" with "tectonic plate" and had difficulty attributing elastic properties - the mechanism for earthquakes - to rocks or "plates". We assert that the documented learning difficulties resulted from use of the metaphor "tectonic plate", reinforced by other everyday experiences and meanings. We suggest students need time with new models or concepts to develop strong descriptions before developing explanations. They need concrete experiences and explicit discussions concerning mapping those experiences to concepts. Lastly, because students often apply common meanings to scientific terms, we should not ask if they understand, but ask how they understand the concept.

  2. NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

  3. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Zhe [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Chuai, Manli [College of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Wang, Li-jing [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Geng, Jian-guo, E-mail: jgeng@umich.edu [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  4. Neural correlates of gesture processing across human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Elizabeth M; James, Thomas W; James, Karin H

    2013-01-01

    Co-speech gesture facilitates learning to a greater degree in children than in adults, suggesting that the mechanisms underlying the processing of co-speech gesture differ as a function of development. We suggest that this may be partially due to children's lack of experience producing gesture, leading to differences in the recruitment of sensorimotor networks when comparing adults to children. Here, we investigated the neural substrates of gesture processing in a cross-sectional sample of 5-, 7.5-, and 10-year-old children and adults and focused on relative recruitment of a sensorimotor system that included the precentral gyrus (PCG) and the posterior middle temporal gyrus (pMTG). Children and adults were presented with videos in which communication occurred through different combinations of speech and gesture during a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session. Results demonstrated that the PCG and pMTG were recruited to different extents in the two populations. We interpret these novel findings as supporting the idea that gesture perception (pMTG) is affected by a history of gesture production (PCG), revealing the importance of considering gesture processing as a sensorimotor process.

  5. The development of small-scale convection below evolving oceanic plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coltice, N.; Garnero, E.

    2015-12-01

    Seafloor of older ages shows a constancy of heat flow, and bathymetry that is different from what is expected for a half-space cooling model. These observations led to consideration of the existence of small-scale convection below the lithosphere (Parsons and McKenzie, 1978). Previous studies have characterized the detailed physics of such processes (Davaille and Jaupart, 1994; Choblet and Sotin, 2000; Solomatov and Moresi, 2000; Korenaga and Jordan, 2003 among others). However, questions remain for applications to the Earth: what is the shape of developed small-scale convection, what length-scales are involved, how does associated small-scale convection depend on the plate layout and its time-dependence. Using 3D spherical models of mantle convection with plate-like behaviour (Tackley, 2008), we will present a study of developed small-scale convection in a context of self-organization of plates and mantle flow. Small-scale convection depends on the resistance of the lithosphere, and its development beneath large plates produce network shapes with specific length-scales and orientations (see figure). We will show the impact of the size of plates and the evolution of subduction on the small-scale convection, and characterize how the age-heat flow relationship can change with time. The potential for seismic detection of the spatiotemporal patterns of temperature heterogeneity will also be discussed. ReferencesChoblet, G., and C. Sotin, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 119, 321-336 (2000). Davaille, A., and C. Jaupart, J. Geophys. Res. 99, 19,853-19,866 (1994). Korenaga, J., and T. H. Jordan, J. Geophys. Res. 108, 2333, (2003). Parsons, B., and D. McKenzie, J. Geophys. Res. 83, 4485-4496 (1978). Solomatov, V. S., and L. N. Moresi, J. Geophys. Res. 105, 21,795-21,817 (2000). Tackley, P. J., Phys. Earth Planet. Inter. 171, 7-18 (2008). Figure: Age of the seafloor in Myrs and white countour of a cold temperature isotherm showing the network of small-scale convection.

  6. Development of FEMAG. Calculation code of magnetic field generated by ferritic plates in the tokamak devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    In design of the future fusion devises in which low activation ferritic steel is planned to use as the plasma facing material and/or the inserts for ripple reduction, the appreciation of the error field effect against the plasma as well as the optimization of ferritic plate arrangement to reduce the toroidal field ripple require calculation of magnetic field generated by ferritic steel. However iterative calculations concerning the non-linearity in B-H curve of ferritic steel disturbs high-speed calculation required as the design tool. In the strong toroidal magnetic field that is characteristic in the tokamak fusion devices, fully magnetic saturation of ferritic steel occurs. Hence a distribution of magnetic charges as magnetic field source is determined straightforward and any iteration calculation are unnecessary. Additionally objective ferritic steel geometry is limited to the thin plate and ferritic plates are installed along the toroidal magnetic field. Taking these special conditions into account, high-speed calculation code ''FEMAG'' has been developed. In this report, the formalization of 'FEMAG' code, how to use 'FEMAG', and the validity check of 'FEMAG' in comparison with a 3D FEM code, with the measurements of the magnetic field in JFT-2M are described. The presented examples are numerical results of design studies for JT-60 modification. (author)

  7. Niche-dependent development of functional neuronal networks from embryonic stem cell-derived neural populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siebler Mario

    2009-08-01

    vGlut2 expression within presynaptic vesicles. Also those NPCs that had migrated away from adherent neural aggregates maintained their ability to generate a synchronously oscillating neuronal network, even if they were separated from adherent aggregates, dissociated and re-plated. Conclusion These findings suggest that the complex environment within niches and aggregates of heterogeneous neural cell populations support the generation of fully mature neurons and functional neuronal networks from ES cell-derived neural cells. In contrast, homogeneous ES cell-derived NPCs within monolayer cultures exhibited an impaired functional neuronal maturation.

  8. Remodeling of the postsynaptic plasma membrane during neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulodziecka, Karolina; Diaz-Rohrer, Barbara B; Farley, Madeline M; Chan, Robin B; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Levental, Kandice R; Waxham, M Neal; Levental, Ilya

    2016-11-07

    Neuronal synapses are the fundamental units of neural signal transduction and must maintain exquisite signal fidelity while also accommodating the plasticity that underlies learning and development. To achieve these goals, the molecular composition and spatial organization of synaptic terminals must be tightly regulated; however, little is known about the regulation of lipid composition and organization in synaptic membranes. Here we quantify the comprehensive lipidome of rat synaptic membranes during postnatal development and observe dramatic developmental lipidomic remodeling during the first 60 postnatal days, including progressive accumulation of cholesterol, plasmalogens, and sphingolipids. Further analysis of membranes associated with isolated postsynaptic densities (PSDs) suggests the PSD-associated postsynaptic plasma membrane (PSD-PM) as one specific location of synaptic remodeling. We analyze the biophysical consequences of developmental remodeling in reconstituted synaptic membranes and observe remarkably stable microdomains, with the stability of domains increasing with developmental age. We rationalize the developmental accumulation of microdomain-forming lipids in synapses by proposing a mechanism by which palmitoylation of the immobilized scaffold protein PSD-95 nucleates domains at the postsynaptic plasma membrane. These results reveal developmental changes in lipid composition and palmitoylation that facilitate the formation of postsynaptic membrane microdomains, which may serve key roles in the function of the neuronal synapse. © 2016 Tulodziecka et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Expression of neural cell adhesion molecule in human liver development and in congenital and acquired liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbrecht, L; Cassiman, D; Desmet, V; Roskams, T

    2001-09-01

    In the liver, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a marker of immature cells committed to the biliary lineage and is expressed by reactive bile ductules in human liver diseases. We investigated the possible role of NCAM in the development of intrahepatic bile ducts and aimed at determining whether immature biliary cells can contribute to the repair of damaged bile ducts in chronic liver diseases. Therefore, we performed immunohistochemistry for NCAM and bile duct cell markers cytokeratin 7 and cytokeratin 19 on frozen sections of 85 liver specimens taken from 14 fetuses, 10 donor livers, 18 patients with congenital liver diseases characterized by ductal plate malformations (DPMs), and 43 cirrhotic explant livers. Duplicated ductal plates and incorporating bile ducts during development showed a patchy immunoreactivity for NCAM, while DPMs were continuously positive for NCAM. Bile ducts showing complete or patchy immunoreactivity for NCAM were found in cirrhotic livers, with higher frequency in biliary than in posthepatitic cirrhosis. Our results suggest that NCAM may have a function in the development of the intrahepatic bile ducts and that NCAM-positive immature biliary cells can contribute to the repair of damaged bile ducts in chronic liver diseases.

  10. Development of Ensemble Neural Network Convection Parameterizations for Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, M. S.; Krasnopolsky, V. M.

    2012-05-02

    The novel neural network (NN) approach has been formulated and used for development of a NN ensemble stochastic convection parametrization for climate models. This fast parametrization is built based on data from Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations initialized with and forced by TOGA-COARE data. The SAM (System for Atmospheric Modeling), developed by D. Randall, M. Khairoutdinov, and their collaborators, has been used for CRM simulations. The observational data are also used for validation of model simulations. The SAM-simulated data have been averaged and projected onto the GCM space of atmospheric states to implicitly define a stochastic convection parametrization. This parametrization is emulated using an ensemble of NNs. An ensemble of NNs with different NN parameters has been trained and tested. The inherent uncertainty of the stochastic convection parametrization derived in such a way is estimated. Due to these inherent uncertainties, NN ensemble is used to constitute a stochastic NN convection parametrization. The developed NN convection parametrization have been validated in a diagnostic CAM (CAM-NN) run vs. the control CAM run. Actually, CAM inputs have been used, at every time step of the control/original CAM integration, for parallel calculations of the NN convection parametrization (CAM-NN) to produce its outputs as a diagnostic byproduct. Total precipitation (P) and cloudiness (CLD) time series, diurnal cycles, and P and CLD distributions for the large Tropical Pacific Ocean for the parallel CAM-NN and CAM runs show similarity and consistency with the NCEP reanalysis. The P and CLD distributions for the tropical area for the parallel runs have been analyzed first for the TOGA-COARE boreal winter season (November 1992 through February 1993) and then for the winter seasons of the follow-up parallel decadal simulations. The obtained results are encouraging and practically meaningful. They show the validity of the NN approach. This constitutes an

  11. Neural plasticity and the development of attention: Intrinsic and extrinsic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingler, Margaret M; Perry, Nicole B; Calkins, Susan D

    2015-05-01

    The development of attention has been strongly linked to the regulation of emotion and behavior and has therefore been of particular interest to researchers aiming to better understand precursors to behavioral maladjustment. In the current paper, we utilize a developmental psychopathology and neural plasticity framework to highlight the importance of both intrinsic (i.e., infant neural functioning) and extrinsic (i.e., caregiver behavior) factors for the development of attentional control across the first year. We begin by highlighting the importance of attention for children's emotion regulation abilities and mental health. We then review the development of attention behavior and underscore the importance of neural development and caregiver behavior for shaping attentional control. Finally, we posit that neural activation associated with the development of the executive attention network may be one mechanism through which maternal caregiving behavior influences the development of infants' attentional control and subsequent emotion regulation abilities known to be influential to childhood psychopathology.

  12. INTEGRATING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DEVELOPING TELEMEDICINE SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela GHEORGHE

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence is assuming an increasing important role in the telemedicine field, especially neural networks with their ability to achieve meaning from large sets of data characterized by lacking exactness and accuracy. These can be used for assisting physicians or other clinical staff in the process of taking decisions under uncertainty. Thus, machine learning methods which are specific to this technology are offering an approach for prediction based on pattern classification. This paper aims to present the importance of neural networks in detecting trends and extracting patterns which can be used within telemedicine domains, particularly for taking medical diagnosis decisions.

  13. Development of Eulerian numerical procedure for free surface toward plate-mantle simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, M.; Kameyama, M.; Kageyama, A.

    2008-12-01

    In the geophysical simulation study, one of the great challenges is to reproduce a realistic plate tectonics with mantle convection simulation. We develop an Eulerian numerical scheme for the steady Stokes flow to solve the deformation of rigid material (plate tectonics) induced by thermal convection of soft fluid (mantle convection). Our simulation scheme combines (i) the multigrid method together with a fast and robust smoother algorithm named ACuTE by Kameyama et~al. (2005), and (ii) an low diffusive semi-Lagrangian advection algorithm named CIP-CSLR-CS by Furuichi et~al. (2008). Since it is easy to optimize in vectorization/parallelization, our method is suitable for large scale simulation. According to our recent study, in which we carry out the validity test of our simulation scheme for a large deformation problem by using the fluid rope coiling event, the current approach in the grid resolution of our large scale simulation successfully reproduces not only qualitative but also quantitative behavior of a deformation of curved rigid plate. This indicates that by introducing a proper treatment of a free surface, our scheme may solve the whole system of solid earth on the mechanical model including the surface deformations without serious quantitative errors. In this study, we are trying to simulate self-gravitationg motion of the Stokes flow as the free surface problem. It means that the spherical shape like the real earth is simulated in the Cartesian grid. We would like to show the development of our numerical treatment toward free surface problems.

  14. Role of neural network models for developing speech systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These prosody models are further examined for applications such as text to speech synthesis, speech recognition, speaker recognition and language identification. Neural network models in voice conversion system are explored for capturing the mapping functions between source and target speakers at source, system and ...

  15. Transcriptomic profile analysis of mouse neural tube development by RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Juan; Mu, Jianbing; Guo, Qian; Yang, Lihong; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Zhizhen; Yu, Baofeng; Zhang, Ting; Xie, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The neural tube is the primordium of the central nervous system (CNS) in which its development is not entirely clear. Understanding the cellular and molecular basis of neural tube development could, therefore, provide vital clues to the mechanism of neural tube defects (NTDs). Here, we investigated the gene expression profiles of three different time points (embryonic day (E) 8.5, 9.5 and 10.5) of mouse neural tube by using RNA-seq approach. About 391 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened during mouse neural tube development, including 45 DEGs involved in CNS development, among which Bmp2, Ascl1, Olig2, Lhx1, Wnt7b and Eomes might play the important roles. Of 45 DEGs, Foxp2, Eomes, Hoxb3, Gpr56, Hap1, Nkx2-1, Sez6l2, Wnt7b, Tbx20, Nfib, Cntn1 and Dcx had different isoforms, and the opposite expression pattern of different isoforms was observed for Gpr56, Nkx2-1 and Sez6l2. In addition, alternative splicing, such as mutually exclusive exon, retained intron, skipped exon and alternative 3' splice site was identified in 10 neural related differentially splicing genes, including Ngrn, Ddr1, Dctn1, Dnmt3b, Ect2, Map2, Mbnl1, Meis2, Vcan and App. Moreover, seven neural splicing factors, such as Nova1/2, nSR100/Srrm4, Elavl3/4, Celf3 and Rbfox1 were differentially expressed during mouse neural tube development. Interestingly, nine DEGs identified above were dysregulated in retinoic acid-induced NTDs model, indicating the possible important role of these genes in NTDs. Taken together, our study provides more comprehensive information on mouse neural tube development, which might provide new insights on NTDs occurrence. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(9):706-719, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Human Embryonic Stem Cells: A Model for the Study of Neural Development and Neurological Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piya Prajumwongs

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the mechanism of neurogenesis has been well documented in other organisms, there might be fundamental differences between human and those species referring to species-specific context. Based on principles learned from other systems, it is found that the signaling pathways required for neural induction and specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs recapitulated those in the early embryo development in vivo at certain degree. This underscores the usefulness of hESCs in understanding early human neural development and reinforces the need to integrate the principles of developmental biology and hESC biology for an efficient neural differentiation.

  17. Sensitization and development of allergic contact dermatitis caused by a single contact with an electrosurgical grounding plate containing acrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borelli, S; Nestlé, F O

    1998-01-01

    Acrylates are known as potent sensitizers which can cause sensitization even during patch testing. A single exposure to concentrated acrylates can induce primary sensitization and contact dermatitis. Here we describe a 50-year-old man who developed contact dermatitis at the site of an electrosurgical grounding plate 2 weeks after orthopedic surgery. Patch testing revealed positive reactions to the electrosurgical plate and its components hydroxyethyl acrylate and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. As the patient has never had contact with acrylate-containing materials before, there is a high probability of primary sensitization by a single contact with the grounding plate during surgery.

  18. A New Animal Model for Developing a Somatosensory Neural Interface for Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-12

    interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh 1 10/15/2007 Scientific progress and accomplishments. We...information to the brain. A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D...A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh

  19. Development of bioactive conducting polymers for neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Warren, Laura; Lovell, Nigel; Baek, Sungchul; Green, Rylie

    2010-01-01

    Bioelectrodes for neural recording and neurostimulation are an integral component of a number of neuroprosthetic devices, including the commercially available cochlear implant, and developmental devices, such as the bionic eye and brain-machine interfaces. Current electrode designs limit the application of such devices owing to suboptimal material properties that lead to minimal interaction with the target neural tissue and the formation of fibrotic capsules. In designing an ideal bioelectrode, a number of design criteria must be considered with respect to physical, mechanical, electrical and biological properties. Conducting polymers have the potential to address the synergistic interaction of these properties and show promise as superior coatings for next-generation electrodes in implant devices.

  20. The mych gene is required for neural crest survival during zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Kook Hong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among Myc family genes, c-Myc is known to have a role in neural crest specification in Xenopus and in craniofacial development in the mouse. There is no information on the function of other Myc genes in neural crest development, or about any developmental role of zebrafish Myc genes.We isolated the zebrafish mych (myc homologue gene. Knockdown of mych leads to severe defects in craniofacial development and in certain other tissues including the eye. These phenotypes appear to be caused by cell death in the neural crest and in the eye field in the anterior brain.Mych is a novel factor required for neural crest cell survival in zebrafish.

  1. Utilising reinforcement learning to develop strategies for driving auditory neural implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Geoffrey W.; Zambetta, Fabio; Li, Xiaodong; Paolini, Antonio G.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. In this paper we propose a novel application of reinforcement learning to the area of auditory neural stimulation. We aim to develop a simulation environment which is based off real neurological responses to auditory and electrical stimulation in the cochlear nucleus (CN) and inferior colliculus (IC) of an animal model. Using this simulator we implement closed loop reinforcement learning algorithms to determine which methods are most effective at learning effective acoustic neural stimulation strategies. Approach. By recording a comprehensive set of acoustic frequency presentations and neural responses from a set of animals we created a large database of neural responses to acoustic stimulation. Extensive electrical stimulation in the CN and the recording of neural responses in the IC provides a mapping of how the auditory system responds to electrical stimuli. The combined dataset is used as the foundation for the simulator, which is used to implement and test learning algorithms. Main results. Reinforcement learning, utilising a modified n-Armed Bandit solution, is implemented to demonstrate the model’s function. We show the ability to effectively learn stimulation patterns which mimic the cochlea’s ability to covert acoustic frequencies to neural activity. Time taken to learn effective replication using neural stimulation takes less than 20 min under continuous testing. Significance. These results show the utility of reinforcement learning in the field of neural stimulation. These results can be coupled with existing sound processing technologies to develop new auditory prosthetics that are adaptable to the recipients current auditory pathway. The same process can theoretically be abstracted to other sensory and motor systems to develop similar electrical replication of neural signals.

  2. Development and performance of a microwell-plate-based polymerase chain reaction assay for Mycoplasma genitalium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutro, Susan M; Hebb, Jennifer K; Garin, Cresley A; Hughes, James P; Kenny, George E; Totten, Patricia A

    2003-10-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is associated with, and could be the cause of, idiopathic cases of urethritis, endometritis, and cervicitis. Further epidemiologic studies on this organism are needed, but currently used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are labor-intensive and culture is insensitive. The goal was to develop and evaluate a microwell-plate-based PCR assay for M. genitalium. We adapted an M. genitalium PCR assay targeting the MgPa gene to a 96-microwell plate format with colorimetric detection of PCR products and incorporation of an internal inhibition control to determine the limit of detection of this assay (termed MgPa-IMW) for M. genitalium DNA and evaluate its performance on cervical and male urine specimens. The MgPa-IMW PCR assay detected 1 and 17 genome copies of M. genitalium (with 27% and 95% confidence) and was able to detect specimens inhibited for amplification. This assay was 100% concordant (50 positive and 50 negative) with the Southern-blot-based PCR assay with cervical specimens. Similarly, this test was 89% concordant with the Southern-blot-based assay for 64 male urine specimens (25 positive, 32 negative, 7 discordant), 97% concordant after correcting for specimens no longer positive by the Southern blot-based assay after freezer storage. The MgPa-IMW assay is sensitive and specific for the detection of M. genitalium in patient specimens and should facilitate large-scale screening for this organism.

  3. A Development of Technical Specification of a Research Reactor with Plate Fuels Cooled by Upward Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sujin; Kim, Jeongeun; Kim, Hyeonil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The contents of the TS(Technical Specifications) are definitions, safety limits, limiting safety system settings, limiting conditions for operation, surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls. TS for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) have been developed since many years until now. On the other hands, there are no applicable modernized references of TS for research reactors with many differences from NPPs in purpose and characteristics. Fuel temperature and Departure from Nuclear Boiling Ratio (DNBR) are being used as references from the thermal-hydraulic analysis point of view for determining whether the design of research reactors satisfies acceptance criteria for the nuclear safety or not. Especially for research reactors using plate-type fuels, fuel temperature and critical heat flux, however, are very difficult to measure during the reactor operation. This paper described the outline of main contents of a TS for open-pool research reactor with plate-type fuels using core cooling through passive systems, where acceptance criteria for nuclear safety such as CHF and fuel temperature cannot be directly measured, different from circumstances in NPPs. Thus, three independent variables instead of non-measurable acceptance criteria: fuel temperature and CHF are considered as safety limits, i.e., power, flow, and flow temperature.

  4. Development of electromagnetic welding facility of flat plates for nuclear industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Sahoo, Subhanarayan; Sarkar, Biswanath; Shyam, Anurag

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic pulse welding (EMPW) process, one of high speed welding process uses electromagnetic force from discharged current through working coil, which develops a repulsive force between the induced current flowing parallel and in opposite direction. For achieving the successful weldment using this process the design of working coil is the most important factor due to high magnetic field on surface of work piece. In case of high quality flat plate welding factors such as impact velocity, angle of impact standoff distance, thickness of flyer and overlap length have to be chosen carefully. EMPW has wide applications in nuclear industry, automotive industry, aerospace, electrical industries. However formability and weldability still remain major issues. Due to ease in controlling the magnetic field enveloped inside tubes, the EMPW has been widely used for tube welding. In case of flat components control of magnetic field is difficult. Hence the application of EMPW gets restricted. The present work attempts to make a novel contribution by investigating the effect of process parameters on welding quality of flat plates. The work emphasizes the approaches and engineering calculations required to effectively use of actuator in EMPW of flat components.

  5. PC-based car license plate reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chung-Mu; Shu, Shyh-Yeong; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yie-Wern; Wen, Kuang-Pu

    1992-11-01

    A car license plate reader (CLPR) using fuzzy inference and neural network algorithm has been developed in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and installed in highway toll stations to identify stolen cars. It takes an average of 0.7 seconds to recognize a car license plate by using a PC with 80486-50 CPU. The recognition rate of the system is about 97%. The techniques of CLPR include vehicle sensing, image grab control, optic pre- processing, lighting, and optic character recognition (OCR). The CLPR can be used in vehicle flow statistics, the checking of stolen vehicles, automatic charging systems in parking lots or garage management, and so on.

  6. Regional differences in the expression of laminin isoforms during mouse neural tube development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copp, Andrew J.; Carvalho, Rita; Wallace, Adam; Sorokin, Lydia; Sasaki, Takako; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Ybot-Gonzalez, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Many significant human birth defects originate around the time of neural tube closure or early during post-closure nervous system development. For example, failure of the neural tube to close generates anencephaly and spina bifida, faulty cell cycle progression is implicated in primary microcephaly, while defective migration of neuroblasts can lead to neuronal migration disorders such as lissencephaly. At the stage of neural tube closure, basement membranes are becoming organised around the neuroepithelium, and beneath the adjacent non-neural surface ectoderm. While there is circumstantial evidence to implicate basement membrane dynamics in neural tube and surface ectodermal development, we have an incomplete understanding of the molecular composition of basement membranes at this stage. In the present study, we examined the developing basement membranes of the mouse embryo at mid-gestation (embryonic day 9.5), with particular reference to laminin composition. We performed in situ hybridization to detect the mRNAs of all eleven individual laminin chains, and immunohistochemistry to identify which laminin chains are present in the basement membranes. From this information, we inferred the likely laminin variants and their tissues of origin: that is, whether a given basement membrane laminin is contributed by epithelium, mesenchyme, or both. Our findings reveal major differences in basement composition along the body axis, with the rostral neural tube (at mandibular arch and heart levels) exhibiting many distinct laminin variants, while the lumbar level where the neural tube is just closing shows a much simpler laminin profile. Moreover, there appears to be a marked difference in the extent to which the mesenchyme contributes laminin variants to the basement membrane, with potential contribution of several laminins rostrally, but no contribution caudally. This information paves the way towards a mechanistic analysis of basement membrane laminin function during early

  7. Development of a compact E × B microchannel plate detector for beam imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, B. B.; Singh, Varinderjit; Vadas, J.; Huston, J.; Steinbach, T. K.; Hudan, S.; deSouza, R. T.

    2017-09-01

    A beam imaging detector was developed by coupling a multi-strip anode with delay line readout to an E × B microchannel plate (MCP) detector. This detector is capable of measuring the incident position of the beam particles in one-dimension. To assess the spatial resolution, the detector was illuminated by an α-source with an intervening mask that consists of a series of precisely-machined slits. The measured spatial resolution was 520 μm FWHM, which was improved to 413 μm FWHM by performing an FFT of the signals, rejecting spurious signals on the delay line, and requiring a minimum signal amplitude. This measured spatial resolution of 413 μm FWHM corresponds to an intrinsic resolution of 334 μm FWHM when the effect of the finite slit width is de-convoluted. To understand the measured resolution, the performance of the detector is simulated with the ion-trajectory code SIMION.

  8. Development of an Inductively Coupled Thermometer for a Cryogenic Half-Wave Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurowicz, Alexander; Kusaka, Akito

    2017-01-01

    The current state of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) research has focused much attention on the measurement of polarization. In an effort to modulate the CMB polarization while also minimizing photon noise due to thermal emission, we are developing a sapphire half-wave plate (HWP) cooled to 50 K rotating at 2 Hz on a superconducting magnetic levitating bearing. In order to measure the temperature of the rotor without making physical contact, we designed an inductively coupled cryogenic thermometer. The complex impedance of the circuit has a resonant peak when driven around 1 MHz. The width of this resonance is dependent on the value of the resistor, which varies with temperature and functions as a thermometer once calibrated. In this talk, we will present results from stationary measurements of this impedance and discuss the temperature accuracy of this thermometer, as well as a preliminary circuit design to measure this impedance during the HWP rotation.

  9. Development of a robust microtiter plate-based assay method for assessment of bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J T; O'Cleirigh, C; Walsh, P K; O'Shea, D G

    2004-09-01

    A microtiter plate-based assay was developed for the quantitative monitoring of bioactive compound production in Streptomyces hygroscopicus fermentation samples. The method reported demonstrates the successful application of the theories of disk diffusion based methods of bioactivity assessment, to a microtiter assay for high throughput analysis. The assay method facilitates the generation of the dose-response curve of test organisms (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a bioactive compound. Using this dose-response curve, the method facilitates definition of three distinct Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values for use in the characterisation of the bioactive attributes of a sample. The assay uses established standard procedures to facilitate adaptation of the assay for use with a wider range of test microorganisms. Errors due to the assumption of a linear relationship between turbidity and biomass concentration are also reduced, due to incorporation of a step to convert turbidity to biomass concentration, for use in the calculation of bioactivity.

  10. Development and modeling of a flat plate serpentine reactor for photocatalytic degradation of 17-ethinylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Li, Yi; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Qing; Wang, Peifang; Wang, Chao

    2013-04-01

    A flat plate serpentine reactor modified from ultraviolet disinfection pool in municipal wastewater treatment plants was developed for the removal of 17-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for the first time. The photocatalytic degradation performance of EE2 was investigated in this serpentine reactor under different conditions such as inlet concentrations, loaded catalyst concentrations, incident radiations fluxes, and flow velocities. More than 98% of EE2 was removed under certain conditions within 120 min. An integrated model including a six-flux adsorption-scattering model and a modified flow diffusion model was established to investigate the effect of radiation field and flow velocities, respectively. A satisfactory agreement was observed between the model simulation and experimental results, showing a potential for design and scale-up of photocatalytic reactor for wastewater treatment.

  11. Development of a flyer design to perform plate impact shock-release-shock experiments on explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnegan, Simon; Ferguson, James; Millett, Jeremy; Goff, Michael

    2017-06-01

    A flyer design to generate a shock-release-shock loading history within a gas gun target was developed before being used to study the response of an HMX based explosive. The flyer consisted of two flyer plates separated by a vacuum gap. This created a rear free surface that, with correct material choice, allowed the target to release to close to ambient pressure between the initial shock and subsequent re-shock. The design was validated by impacting piezoelectric pin arrays to record the front flyer deformation. Shots were performed on PCTFE targets to record the shock states generated in an inert material prior to subjecting an HMX based explosive to the same loading. The response of the explosive to this loading history was recorded using magnetic particle velocity (PV) gauges embedded within the targets. The behavior during the run to detonation is compared with the response to sustained shocks at similar input pressures.

  12. Effects of the popular food additive sodium benzoate on neural tube development in the chicken embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emon, Selin Tural; Orakdogen, Metin; Uslu, Serap; Somay, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Many more additives have been introduced with the development of processed foods. Neural tube defects are congenital malformations of the central nervous system. More than 300 000 children are born with neural tube defects every year and surviving children remain disabled for life. Sodium benzoate is used intensively in our daily lives. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effects of sodium benzoate on neural tube defects in chicken embryos. Fertile, specific pathogen-free eggs were used. The study was conducted on five groups. After 30 hours of incubation, the eggs were opened under 4x optical magnification. The embryonic disc was identified and sodium benzoate solution was injected. Eggs were closed with sterile adhesive strips and incubation was continued till the end of the 72nd hour. All eggs were then reopened and embryos were dissected from embryonic membranes and evaluated histopathologically. We found that the development of all embryos was consistent with the stage. We detected neural tube obstruction in one embryo. Neural tube defects were not detected in any embryos. This study showed that sodium benzoate as one of the widely used food preservatives has no effect to neural tube defect development in chicken embryos even at high doses.

  13. Design and development of artificial neural networks for depositing powders in coating treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ming-Der; Liu, Chyuan-Du; Wang, Jen-Ting

    2005-05-01

    We propose the application of an artificial neural network to a Taguchi orthogonal experiment to develop a robust and efficient method of depositing alloys with a favorable surface morphology by a specific microwelding hardfacing process. An artificial neural network model performs self-learning by updating weightings and repeated learning epochs. The artificial neural network construct can be developed based on data obtained from experiments. The root of mean squares (RMS) error can be minimized by applying results obtained from training and testing samples, such that the predicted and experimental values exhibit a good linear relationship. An analysis of variance indicates that the significant factors explain approximately 70% of the total variance. Consequently, the Taguchi-based neural network model is experimentally confirmed to estimate accurately the hardfacing roughness performance. The experimental results reveal the hardfacing roughness performance of the product of PTA coating is greatly improved by optimizing the coating conditions and is accurately predicted by the artificial neural network model. The combination of the neural network model with Taguchi-based experiments is demonstrated as an effective and intelligent method for developing a robust, efficient, high-quality coating process.

  14. Children with Down Syndrome: oral development and morphology after use of palatal plates between 6 and 18 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, B; Grevér-Sjölander, A-C; Holm, A-K; Johansson, I

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe oral development and morphology in 18-month-old children with Down syndrome (DS) treated with palatal plates in combination with structured communication and speech training. The aim is further to describe the design of the palatal plates, compliance in their use and to give a brief report of their effect on oral motor function and speech. Forty-two children with DS were followed from evaluation, the children in the project were compared with two control groups of children matched for age; one group of children with DS who had not been treated with palatal plates, and one group of children with normal development. Compared to the children with normal development, both groups of children with DS had fewer teeth erupted and a lower prevalence of sucking habits. Deviant morphology of the tongue in the form of diastase, lingua plicata or a sulcus in the anterior third of the tongue was only seen in children with DS. All children with normal development had positive values for overjet compared to 53% of the children with DS. The palatal plates were used 2-3 times daily for a total mean time of 15 min. Compliance in use of the plates decreased with age, mainly due to eruption of teeth and subsequent loss of retention. Evaluation of oral motor function and speech show that the children with DS in the project had better motor prerequisites for articulation than the control children with DS. Palatal plate therapy did not affect oral parameters, i.e., eruption of teeth, types and prevalence of sucking habits, tongue morphology and symptoms of hypotonia. In combination with oral motor and sensory stimulation, palatal plate therapy had a positive effect on oral motor performance and prerequisites for articulation.

  15. The Development and Microstructure Analysis of High Strength Steel Plate NVE36 for Large Heat Input Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhang; Liangfa, Xie; Ming, Wei; Jianli, Li

    In the shipbuilding industry, the welding efficiency of the ship plate not only has a great effect on the construction cost of the ship, but also affects the construction speed and determines the delivery cycle. The steel plate used for large heat input welding was developed sufficiently. In this paper, the composition of the steel with a small amount of Nb, Ti and large amount of Mn had been designed in micro-alloyed route. The content of C and the carbon equivalent were also designed to a low level. The technology of oxide metallurgy was used during the smelting process of the steel. The rolling technology of TMCP was controlled at a low rolling temperature and ultra-fast cooling technology was used, for the purpose of controlling the transformation of the microstructure. The microstructure of the steel plate was controlled to be the mixed microstructure of low carbon bainite and ferrite. Large amount of oxide particles dispersed in the microstructure of steel, which had a positive effects on the mechanical property and welding performance of the steel. The mechanical property of the steel plate was excellent and the value of longitudinal Akv at -60 °C is more than 200 J. The toughness of WM and HAZ were excellent after the steel plate was welded with a large heat input of 100-250 kJ/cm. The steel plate processed by mentioned above can meet the requirement of large heat input welding.

  16. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bridging Plate Development for Treatment of Segmental Bone Defects of the Canine Mandible: Mechanical Tests and Finite Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Elisângela Perez; Rahal, Sheila Canevese; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; da Silva, Jorge Vicente Lopes; Noritomi, Pedro Yoshito; El-Warrak, Alexander Oliveira; Melchert, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    With regard to the canine mandible, a mistaken concept of application is to assume that systemic plate-bone resistance is provided by the implant so that biomechanical position could be ignored. Because the alveolar border of the mandible is a tensile zone, the plate would ideally be positioned near this area while avoiding important structures. The aim of this study was to develop 2 bridging plates for the treatment of a segmental bone defect of the canine mandible using monocortical screws to avoid damage to the tooth roots and remaining neurovascular structures. Computed tomography images of the heads of 4 dogs (rottweiler, Doberman, boxer, and miniature poodle breeds) were used as models to develop the project. The images were reconstructed in 3-dimensional (3D) format. For each dog breed, 6 mandible prototypes were produced, each with a segmental bone defect in the right mandible. The mandibular reconstruction was performed with pure titanium bridging plate and locking screws. One plate model was developed for medium- and large-breed dogs and another for small-breed dogs. Mechanical testing showed the platemandible system resists the bite forces in all dog breeds. All safety factors were greater than I in the platemandible system for medium- and large-breed dogs and greater than 10 in the plate-mandible system for small-breed dogs. Thus, bridging plates designed with differentiated geometry and monocortical locking screws showed mechanical resistance to support simulated induced bone model defects and were able to support at least 5 times the value of bite force for each evaluated dog.

  18. Hybrid Neural-Network: Genetic Algorithm Technique for Aircraft Engine Performance Diagnostics Developed and Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takahisa; Simon, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    As part of the NASA Aviation Safety Program, a unique model-based diagnostics method that employs neural networks and genetic algorithms for aircraft engine performance diagnostics has been developed and demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center against a nonlinear gas turbine engine model. Neural networks are applied to estimate the internal health condition of the engine, and genetic algorithms are used for sensor fault detection, isolation, and quantification. This hybrid architecture combines the excellent nonlinear estimation capabilities of neural networks with the capability to rank the likelihood of various faults given a specific sensor suite signature. The method requires a significantly smaller data training set than a neural network approach alone does, and it performs the combined engine health monitoring objectives of performance diagnostics and sensor fault detection and isolation in the presence of nominal and degraded engine health conditions.

  19. Associations among Pubertal Development, Empathic Ability, and Neural Responses While Witnessing Peer Rejection in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masten, Carrie L.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.; Pfeifer, Jennifer H.; Colich, Natalie L.; Dapretto, Mirella

    2013-01-01

    Links among concurrent and longitudinal changes in pubertal development and empathic ability from ages 10 to 13 and neural responses while witnessing peer rejection at age 13 were examined in 16 participants. More advanced pubertal development at age 13, and greater longitudinal increases in pubertal development, related to increased activity in…

  20. Cortical bone development under the growth plate is regulated by mechanical load transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanck, E.J.M.; Hannink, G.J.; Ruimerman, R.; Buma, P.; Burger, E.H.; Huiskes, R.

    2006-01-01

    Longitudinal growth of long bones takes place at the growth plates. The growth plate produces new bone trabeculae, which are later resorbed or merged into the cortical shell. This process implies transition of trabecular metaphyseal sections into diaphyseal sections. We hypothesize that the

  1. Meninges harbor cells expressing neural precursor markers during development and adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifari, Francesco; Berton, Valeria; Pino, Annachiara; Kusalo, Marijana; Malpeli, Giorgio; Di Chio, Marzia; Bersan, Emanuela; Amato, Eliana; Scarpa, Aldo; Krampera, Mauro; Fumagalli, Guido; Decimo, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Brain and skull developments are tightly synchronized, allowing the cranial bones to dynamically adapt to the brain shape. At the brain-skull interface, meninges produce the trophic signals necessary for normal corticogenesis and bone development. Meninges harbor different cell populations, including cells forming the endosteum of the cranial vault. Recently, we and other groups have described the presence in meninges of a cell population endowed with neural differentiation potential in vitro and, after transplantation, in vivo. However, whether meninges may be a niche for neural progenitor cells during embryonic development and in adulthood remains to be determined. In this work we provide the first description of the distribution of neural precursor markers in rat meninges during development up to adulthood. We conclude that meninges share common properties with the classical neural stem cell niche, as they: (i) are a highly proliferating tissue; (ii) host cells expressing neural precursor markers such as nestin, vimentin, Sox2 and doublecortin; and (iii) are enriched in extracellular matrix components (e.g., fractones) known to bind and concentrate growth factors. This study underlines the importance of meninges as a potential niche for endogenous precursor cells during development and in adulthood. PMID:26483637

  2. Laminar thermally developing flow in rectangular channels and parallel plates: uniform heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew N.; Nochetto, Horacio

    2014-05-01

    Numerical simulations were conducted for thermally developing laminar flow in rectangular channels with aspect ratios ranging from 1 to 100, and for parallel plates. The simulations were for laminar, thermally developing flow with H1 boundary conditions: uniform heat flux along the length of the channel and constant temperature around the perimeter. In the limit as the non-dimensional length, x* = x/(D h RePr), goes to zero, the Nusselt number is dependent on x* to the negative exponent m. As the non-dimensional length goes to infinity the Nusselt number approaches fully developed values that are independent of x*. General correlations for the local and mean heat transfer coefficients are presented that use an asymptotic blending function to transition between these limiting cases. The discrepancy between the correlation and the numerical results is less than 2.5 % for all aspect ratios. The correlations presented are applicable to all aspect ratios and all non-dimensional lengths, and decrease the discrepancy relative to existing correlations.

  3. The Future Vocation of Neural Stem Cells: Lineage Commitment in Brain Development and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Tadashi; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-24

    Understanding the fate commitment of neural stem cells is critical to identify the regulatory mechanisms in developing brains. Genetic lineage-tracing has provided a powerful strategy to unveil the heterogeneous nature of stem cells and their descendants. However, recent studies have reported controversial data regarding the heterogeneity of neural stem cells in the developing mouse neocortex, which prevents a decisive conclusion on this issue. Here, we review the progress that has been made using lineage-tracing analyses of the developing neocortex and discuss stem cell heterogeneity from the viewpoint of comparative and evolutionary biology.

  4. The construction of airfoil pressure models by the plate method: Achievements, current research, technology development and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawing, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    A method of constructing airfoils by inscribing pressure channels on the face of opposing plates, bonding them together to form one plate with integral channels, and contour machining this plate to form an airfoil model is described. The research and development program to develop the bonding technology is described as well as the construction and testing of an airfoil model. Sample aerodynamic data sets are presented and discussed. Also, work currently under way to produce thin airfoils with camber is presented. Samples of the aft section of a 6 percent airfoil with complete pressure instrumentation including the trailing edge are pictured and described. This technique is particularly useful in fabricating models for transonic cryogenic testing, but it should find application in a wide ange of model construction projects, as well as the fabrication of fuel injectors, space hardware, and other applications requiring advanced bonding technology and intricate fluid passages.

  5. Crucial Role of Elovl6 in Chondrocyte Growth and Differentiation during Growth Plate Development in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manami Kikuchi

    Full Text Available ELOVL family member 6, elongation of very long chain fatty acids (Elovl6 is a microsomal enzyme, which regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 has been shown to be associated with various pathophysiologies including insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. To investigate a potential role of Elovl6 during bone development, we here examined a skeletal phenotype of Elovl6 knockout (Elovl6-/- mice. The Elovl6-/- skeleton was smaller than that of controls, but exhibited no obvious patterning defects. Histological analysis revealed a reduced length of proliferating and an elongated length of hypertrophic chondrocyte layer, and decreased trabecular bone in Elovl6-/- mice compared with controls. These results were presumably due to a modest decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and accelerated differentiation of cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Consistent with the increased length of the hypertrophic chondrocyte layer in Elovl6-/- mice, Collagen10α1 was identified as one of the most affected genes by ablation of Elovl6 in chondrocytes. Furthermore, this elevated expression of Collagen10α1 of Elovl6-null chondrocytes was likely associated with increased levels of Foxa2/a3 and Mef2c mRNA expression. Relative increases in protein levels of nuclear Foxa2 and cytoplasmic histone deacethylase 4/5/7 were also observed in Elovl6 knockdown cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Collectively, our data suggest that Elovl6 plays a critical role for proper development of embryonic growth plate.

  6. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sethuraman Swaminathan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  7. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves. PMID:19939265

  8. Development of biomaterial scaffold for nerve tissue engineering: Biomaterial mediated neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Anuradha; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2009-11-25

    Neural tissue repair and regeneration strategies have received a great deal of attention because it directly affects the quality of the patient's life. There are many scientific challenges to regenerate nerve while using conventional autologous nerve grafts and from the newly developed therapeutic strategies for the reconstruction of damaged nerves. Recent advancements in nerve regeneration have involved the application of tissue engineering principles and this has evolved a new perspective to neural therapy. The success of neural tissue engineering is mainly based on the regulation of cell behavior and tissue progression through the development of a synthetic scaffold that is analogous to the natural extracellular matrix and can support three-dimensional cell cultures. As the natural extracellular matrix provides an ideal environment for topographical, electrical and chemical cues to the adhesion and proliferation of neural cells, there exists a need to develop a synthetic scaffold that would be biocompatible, immunologically inert, conducting, biodegradable, and infection-resistant biomaterial to support neurite outgrowth. This review outlines the rationale for effective neural tissue engineering through the use of suitable biomaterials and scaffolding techniques for fabrication of a construct that would allow the neurons to adhere, proliferate and eventually form nerves.

  9. A development of the method of the control signal formation for the hot plate mill automation systems to improve the flatness of the finish plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronin Stanislav S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes how to control of the hot plate mill automation system to improve the quality metrics if the final strip. Based on the data of the modern hot rolling mills the classification of the cage equipment was designed. Depending on the degree of influence on the magnitude of reduction, the equipment was divided into categories. The functioning of every system including the main and the vertical cages was described. The conditions of electrical and hydraulic mechanisms was marked. The developed algorithm allows to improve defects based on the finite number of the thickness measurements given by special non-contact sensors. The example of regulators signals calculating was shown. The result of the algorithm operating was illustrated.

  10. Development of grooved flat-bar steels for the reaction plates of linear motor cars. Linear motor car yo reaction plate ''mizotsuki tokushu hirako'' no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, T.; Yamanaka, E.; Aso, K.; Ehiro, T.; Shiga, K.; Hayashi, H. (Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-09-01

    In order to manufacture the reaction plates for linear motor cars, an anchor-bonding method which permit jointing of aluminum plates and steel plates was developed by the Kawasaki Steel jointly with the Kawasaki Heavy Industries. Though a hot forming of overhang grooves, with their opening narrower than their beds, on the steel plate surface has been considered virtually impossible, the new method called anchor-bonding was found out based on the investigation using a Plasticine model and hot-rolled steel models. By applying the method to commercial-scale mills, the flat bars having an overhang beyond 2.0mm were successfully obtained. With using a technology also established to control cross-sectional areas of both overhang groove and aluminum projection within a proper range, the resultant uniform filling of aluminum within the overhang grooves assured the manufacture of reaction plates with higher bonding. 6 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Presenilins are required for maintenance of neural stem cells in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Woo-Young

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The early embryonic lethality of mutant mice bearing germ-line deletions of both presenilin genes precluded the study of their functions in neural development. We therefore employed the Cre-loxP technology to generate presenilin conditional double knockout (PS cDKO mice, in which expression of both presenilins is inactivated in neural progenitor cells (NPC or neural stem cells and their derivative neurons and glia beginning at embryonic day 11 (E11. In PS cDKO mice, dividing NPCs labeled by BrdU are decreased in number beginning at E13.5. By E15.5, fewer than 20% of NPCs remain in PS cDKO mice. The depletion of NPCs is accompanied by severe morphological defects and hemorrhages in the PS cDKO embryonic brain. Interkinetic nuclear migration of NPCs is also disrupted in PS cDKO embryos, as evidenced by displacement of S-phase and M-phase nuclei in the ventricular zone of the telencephalon. Furthermore, the depletion of neural progenitor cells in PS cDKO embryos is due to NPCs exiting cell cycle and differentiating into neurons rather than reentering cell cycle between E13.5 and E14.5 following PS inactivation in most NPCs. The length of cell cycle, however, is unchanged in PS cDKO embryos. Expression of Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hes5, is significantly decreased in PS cDKO brains, whereas Dll1 expression is up-regulated, indicating that Notch signaling is effectively blocked by PS inactivation. These findings demonstrate that presenilins are essential for neural progenitor cells to re-enter cell cycle and thus ensure proper expansion of neural progenitor pool during embryonic neural development.

  12. Development of heavy steel plate for Mayflower Resolution, special purpose vessel for erection of offshore wind towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, W.; Schroeter, F.

    2005-05-15

    Special problems necessitate special solutions. Installation vessels for the erection of offshore wind towers are subject to extremely demanding design and structural specifications. Such projects are made possible only by the use of high strength, fine grained structural steels possessing good toughness properties even at extremely low temperatures; in addition, such steels must also offer good workability. Such steel plate material exhibits mechanical properties greatly superior to those possessed by conventional shipbuilding plate. This article focuses on the material for such an installation vessel and the underlying steel development work performed at AG der Dillinger Huettenwerke. (author)

  13. Misexpression of BRE gene in the developing chick neural tube affects neurulation and somitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Chuai, Manli; Yeuk-Hon Chan, John; Lei, Jian; Münsterberg, Andrea; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-03-01

    The brain and reproductive expression (BRE) gene is expressed in numerous adult tissues and especially in the nervous and reproductive systems. However, little is known about BRE expression in the developing embryo or about its role in embryonic development. In this study, we used in situ hybridization to reveal the spatiotemporal expression pattern for BRE in chick embryo during development. To determine the importance of BRE in neurogenesis, we overexpressed BRE and also silenced BRE expression specifically in the neural tube. We established that overexpressing BRE in the neural tube indirectly accelerated Pax7(+) somite development and directly increased HNK-1(+) neural crest cell (NCC) migration and TuJ-1(+) neurite outgrowth. These altered morphogenetic processes were associated with changes in the cell cycle of NCCs and neural tube cells. The inverse effect was obtained when BRE expression was silenced in the neural tube. We also determined that BMP4 and Shh expression in the neural tube was affected by misexpression of BRE. This provides a possible mechanism for how altering BRE expression was able to affect somitogenesis, neurogenesis, and NCC migration. In summary, our results demonstrate that BRE plays an important role in regulating neurogenesis and indirectly somite differentiation during early chick embryo development. © 2015 Wang, Li, Wang, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Development of the anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit for air breathing PEMFC stack using silicone adhesive bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkook; Lee, Dai Gil

    2016-05-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) exhibit a wide power range, low operating temperature, high energy density and long life time. These advantages favor PEMFC for applications such as vehicle power sources, portable power, and backup power applications. With the push towards the commercialization of PEMFC, especially for portable power applications, the overall balance of plants (BOPs) of the systems should be minimized. To reduce the mass and complexity of the systems, air-breathing PEMFC stack design with open cathode channel configuration is being developed. However, the open cathode channel configuration incurs hydrogen leakage problem. In this study, the bonding strength of a silicon adhesive between the Nafion membrane and the carbon fiber/epoxy composite bipolar plate was measured. Then, an anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit which was bonded with the silicone adhesive was developed to solve the hydrogen leakage problem. The reliability of the anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit was estimated under the internal pressure of hydrogen by the FE analysis. Additionally, the gas sealability of the developed air breathing PEMFC unit cell was experimentally measured. Finally, unit cell performance of the developed anode bipolar plate/membrane assembly unit was tested and verified under operating conditions without humidity and temperature control.

  15. Development of new bi-polar plates based on electrically conductive filled polymers for PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jousse, F.; Salas, J.F.; Giroud, F. [C.E.A., Le Ripault, Monts (France); Icard, B.; Laurent, J.Y.; Serre Combe, P.

    2000-07-01

    In polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell technology, the bi-polar plates are dedicated to: the current collection, the separation and distribution of gas (hydrogen and oxygen) at the cathode and the anode. To achieve these functions, bi-polar plate materials must satisfy the following properties: high conductivity (higher than 10 S/cm), high chemical resistance to acid and water, very low permeability to hydrogen (permeability < Pe{sup H2}{sub Nafion} (20 C) = 7.10{sup -17} m{sup 2}/Pa/s). Traditionally bi-polar plates have been designed with stainless steel or graphite. However, the cost of these plates are incompatible to transport applications, principally because of the gas channel machining step. Recently, we have noticed the work of T.M. Besmann [1] on the manufacturing of bi-polar plates based on carbon fibres and phenolic resin, processed by pyrolisis and densification on surface by a chemical vapour infiltration process. However, this kind of process seems too expensive and complex for the needs of the road electric transportation industry. Organic composites based on conductive chemical resistant fillers and processed by molding could be an alternative solution. Bi-polar plates requirements can be achieved by controlling and optimising experimental parameters such as the nature and morphology of fillers, the resin characteristics, and the process conditions. To avoid corrosion of the composite material, and then, the contamination of the cell, we have selected non metallic fillers, based on graphite or carbon black. (orig.)

  16. Strategies influence neural activity for feedback learning across child and adolescent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sabine; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Crone, Eveline A; Van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Raijmakers, Maartje E J

    2014-09-01

    Learning from feedback is an important aspect of executive functioning that shows profound improvements during childhood and adolescence. This is accompanied by neural changes in the feedback-learning network, which includes pre-supplementary motor area (pre- SMA)/anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), superior parietal cortex (SPC), and the basal ganglia. However, there can be considerable differences within age ranges in performance that are ascribed to differences in strategy use. This is problematic for traditional approaches of analyzing developmental data, in which age groups are assumed to be homogenous in strategy use. In this study, we used latent variable models to investigate if underlying strategy groups could be detected for a feedback-learning task and whether there were differences in neural activation patterns between strategies. In a sample of 268 participants between ages 8 to 25 years, we observed four underlying strategy groups, which were cut across age groups and varied in the optimality of executive functioning. These strategy groups also differed in neural activity during learning; especially the most optimal performing group showed more activity in DLPFC, SPC and pre-SMA/ACC compared to the other groups. However, age differences remained an important contributor to neural activation, even when correcting for strategy. These findings contribute to the debate of age versus performance predictors of neural development, and highlight the importance of studying individual differences in strategy use when studying development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Oil Fraction Neural Sensor Developed Using Electrical Capacitance Tomography Sensor Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursiah Zainal-Mokhtar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents novel research on the development of a generic intelligent oil fraction sensor based on Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT data. An artificial Neural Network (ANN has been employed as the intelligent system to sense and estimate oil fractions from the cross-sections of two-component flows comprising oil and gas in a pipeline. Previous works only focused on estimating the oil fraction in the pipeline based on fixed ECT sensor parameters. With fixed ECT design sensors, an oil fraction neural sensor can be trained to deal with ECT data based on the particular sensor parameters, hence the neural sensor is not generic. This work focuses on development of a generic neural oil fraction sensor based on training a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP ANN with various ECT sensor parameters. On average, the proposed oil fraction neural sensor has shown to be able to give a mean absolute error of 3.05% for various ECT sensor sizes.

  18. Development and function of human cerebral cortex neural networks from pluripotent stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Peter; Turner-Bridger, Benita; Peter, Manuel; Momoh, Ayiba; Arambepola, Devika; Robinson, Hugh P C; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-09-15

    A key aspect of nervous system development, including that of the cerebral cortex, is the formation of higher-order neural networks. Developing neural networks undergo several phases with distinct activity patterns in vivo, which are thought to prune and fine-tune network connectivity. We report here that human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cerebral cortex neurons form large-scale networks that reflect those found in the developing cerebral cortex in vivo. Synchronised oscillatory networks develop in a highly stereotyped pattern over several weeks in culture. An initial phase of increasing frequency of oscillations is followed by a phase of decreasing frequency, before giving rise to non-synchronous, ordered activity patterns. hPSC-derived cortical neural networks are excitatory, driven by activation of AMPA- and NMDA-type glutamate receptors, and can undergo NMDA-receptor-mediated plasticity. Investigating single neuron connectivity within PSC-derived cultures, using rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing, we found two broad classes of neuronal connectivity: most neurons have small numbers (40). These data demonstrate that the formation of hPSC-derived cortical networks mimics in vivo cortical network development and function, demonstrating the utility of in vitro systems for mechanistic studies of human forebrain neural network biology. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Modeling anterior development in mice: diet as modulator of risk for neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappen, Claudia

    2013-11-01

    Head morphogenesis is a complex process that is controlled by multiple signaling centers. The most common defects of cranial development are craniofacial defects, such as cleft lip and cleft palate, and neural tube defects, such as anencephaly and encephalocoele in humans. More than 400 genes that contribute to proper neural tube closure have been identified in experimental animals, but only very few causative gene mutations have been identified in humans, supporting the notion that environmental influences are critical. The intrauterine environment is influenced by maternal nutrition, and hence, maternal diet can modulate the risk for cranial and neural tube defects. This article reviews recent progress toward a better understanding of nutrients during pregnancy, with particular focus on mouse models for defective neural tube closure. At least four major patterns of nutrient responses are apparent, suggesting that multiple pathways are involved in the response, and likely in the underlying pathogenesis of the defects. Folic acid has been the most widely studied nutrient, and the diverse responses of the mouse models to folic acid supplementation indicate that folic acid is not universally beneficial, but that the effect is dependent on genetic configuration. If this is the case for other nutrients as well, efforts to prevent neural tube defects with nutritional supplementation may need to become more specifically targeted than previously appreciated. Mouse models are indispensable for a better understanding of nutrient-gene interactions in normal pregnancies, as well as in those affected by metabolic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A cross-disciplinary approach to understanding neural stem cells in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique, Domingos; Bally-Cuif, Laure

    2010-06-01

    The Company of Biologists recently launched a new series of workshops aimed at bringing together scientists with different backgrounds to discuss cutting edge research in emerging and cross-disciplinary areas of biology. The first workshop was held at Wilton Park, Sussex, UK, and the chosen theme was 'Neural Stem Cells in Development and Disease', which is indeed a hot topic, not only because of the potential use of neural stem cells in cell replacement therapies to treat neurodegenerative diseases, but also because alterations in their behaviour can, in certain cases, lie at the origin of brain tumours and other diseases.

  1. Development of a neural network for early detection of renal osteodystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shirley N.; Chan, Heang-Ping; Adler, Ronald; Niklason, Loren T.; Chang, Chair-Li

    1991-07-01

    Bone erosion presenting as subperiosteal resorption on the phalanges of the hand is an early manifestation of hyperparathyroidism associated with chronic renal failure. At present, the diagnosis is made by trained radiologists through visual inspection of hand radiographs. In this study, a neural network is being developed to assess the feasibility of computer-aided detection of these changes. A two-pass approach is adopted. The digitized image is first compressed by a Laplacian pyramid compact code. The first neural network locates the region of interest using vertical projections along the phalanges and then the horizontal projections across the phalanges. A second neural network is used to classify texture variations of trabecular patterns in the region using a concurrence matrix as the input to a two-dimensional sensor layer to detect the degree of associated osteopenia. Preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this approach.

  2. Neural development and regeneration: it's all in your spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Catherina G; Diez Del Corral, Ruth

    2015-03-01

    The spinal cord constitutes an excellent model system for studying development and regeneration of a functional nervous system, from specification of its precursors to circuit formation. The latest advances in the field of spinal cord development and its regeneration following damage were discussed at a recent EMBO workshop 'Spinal cord development and regeneration' in Sitges, Spain (October, 2014), highlighting the use of direct visualization of cellular processes, genome-wide molecular techniques and the development of methods for directed stem cell differentiation and regeneration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Music and Cognitive Development: From Notes to Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rebecca Ann

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates research on early childhood development and on both listening to music and participation in music activities by young children. Research is reviewed that explores possible relationships between various music-related experiences and cognitive development, from the "Mozart Effect" studies to participation in piano lessons…

  4. Neural Correlates of Socioeconomic Status in the Developing Human Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Kimberly G.; Houston, Suzanne M.; Kan, Eric; Sowell, Elizabeth R.

    2012-01-01

    Socioeconomic disparities in childhood are associated with remarkable differences in cognitive and socio-emotional development during a time when dramatic changes are occurring in the brain. Yet, the neurobiological pathways through which socioeconomic status (SES) shapes development remain poorly understood. Behavioral evidence suggests that…

  5. Neural Correlates of Reward Processing in Typical and Atypical Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma G. Duerden PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypically developing children including those born preterm or who have autism spectrum disorder can display difficulties with evaluating rewarding stimuli, which may result from impaired maturation of reward and cognitive control brain regions. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, 58 typically and atypically developing children (6-12 years participated in a set-shifting task that included the presentation of monetary reward stimuli. In typically developing children, reward stimuli were associated with age-related increases in activation in cognitive control centers, with weaker changes in reward regions. In atypically developing children, no age-related changes were evident. Maturational disturbances in the frontostriatal regions during atypical development may underlie task-based differences in activation.

  6. Stretching morphogenesis of the roof plate and formation of the central canal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kondrychyn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurulation is driven by apical constriction of actomyosin cytoskeleton resulting in conversion of the primitive lumen into the central canal in a mechanism driven by F-actin constriction, cell overcrowding and buildup of axonal tracts. The roof plate of the neural tube acts as the dorsal morphogenetic center and boundary preventing midline crossing by neural cells and axons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The roof plate zebrafish transgenics expressing cytosolic GFP were used to study and describe development of this structure in vivo for a first time ever. The conversion of the primitive lumen into the central canal causes significant morphogenetic changes of neuroepithelial cells in the dorsal neural tube. We demonstrated that the roof plate cells stretch along the D-V axis in parallel with conversion of the primitive lumen into central canal and its ventral displacement. Importantly, the stretching of the roof plate is well-coordinated along the whole spinal cord and the roof plate cells extend 3× in length to cover 2/3 of the neural tube diameter. This process involves the visco-elastic extension of the roof place cytoskeleton and depends on activity of Zic6 and the Rho-associated kinase (Rock. In contrast, stretching of the floor plate is much less extensive. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The extension of the roof plate requires its attachment to the apical complex of proteins at the surface of the central canal, which depends on activity of Zic6 and Rock. The D-V extension of the roof plate may change a range and distribution of morphogens it produces. The resistance of the roof plate cytoskeleton attenuates ventral displacement of the central canal in illustration of the novel mechanical role of the roof plate during development of the body axis.

  7. Development of a selective agar plate for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jin-Hee; Choi, Na-Young; Bae, Young-Min; Lee, Jung-Su; Lee, Sun-Young

    2014-10-17

    This study was conducted to develop a selective medium for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Campylobacter spp. (n=4), non-Campylobacter (showing positive results on Campylobacter selective agar) strains (n=49) isolated from fresh produce, indicator bacteria (n=13), and spoilage bacteria isolated from fresh produce (n=15) were plated on four Campylobacter selective media. Bolton agar and modified charcoal cefoperazone deoxycholate agar (mCCDA) exhibited higher sensitivity for Campylobacter spp. than did Preston agar and Hunt agar, although certain non-Campylobacter strains isolated from fresh produce by using a selective agar isolation method, were still able to grow on Bolton agar and mCCDA. To inhibit the growth of non-Campylobacter strains, Bolton agar and mCCDA were supplemented with 5 antibiotics (rifampicin, polymyxin B, sodium metabisulfite, sodium pyruvate, ferrous sulfate) and the growth of Campylobacter spp. (n=7) and non-Campylobacter strains (n=44) was evaluated. Although Bolton agar supplemented with rifampicin (BR agar) exhibited a higher selectivity for Campylobacter spp. than did mCCDA supplemented with antibiotics, certain non-Campylobacter strains were still able to grow on BR agar (18.8%). When BR agar with various concentrations of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were tested with Campylobacter spp. (n=8) and non-Campylobacter (n=7), sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim was inhibitory against 3 of 7 non-Campylobacter strains. Finally, we validated the use of BR agar containing 50mg/L sulfamethoxazole (BRS agar) or 0.5mg/L ciprofloxacin (BRCS agar) and other selective agars for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in chicken and fresh produce. All chicken samples were positive for Campylobacter spp. when tested on mCCDA, BR agar, and BRS agar. In fresh produce samples, BRS agar exhibited the highest selectivity for Campylobacter spp., demonstrating its suitability for the detection of Campylobacter spp. in fresh produce. Copyright

  8. Ablation of Arg-tRNA-protein transferases results in defective neural tube development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Kim, Seonmu; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kwon, Yong Tae; Lee, Min Jae

    2016-08-01

    The arginylation branch of the N-end rule pathway is a ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic system in which post-translational conjugation of Arg by ATE1-encoded Arg-tRNA-protein transferase to N-terminal Asp, Glu, or oxidized Cys residues generates essential degradation signals. Here, we characterized the ATE1-/- mice and identified the essential role of N-terminal arginylation in neural tube development. ATE1-null mice showed severe intracerebral hemorrhages and cystic space near the neural tubes. Expression of ATE1 was prominent in the developing brain and spinal cord, and this pattern overlapped with the migration path of neural stem cells. The ATE1-/- brain showed defective G-protein signaling. Finally, we observed reduced mitosis in ATE1-/- neuroepithelium and a significantly higher nitric oxide concentration in the ATE1-/- brain. Our results strongly suggest that the crucial role of ATE1 in neural tube development is directly related to proper turn-over of the RGS4 protein, which participate in the oxygen-sensing mechanism in the cells. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 443-448].

  9. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  10. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic–neural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and

  11. Genetically induced abnormal cranial development in human trisomy 18 with holoprosencephaly: comparisons with the normal tempo of osteogenic-neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Shaina N; Ziermann, Janine M; Gondré-Lewis, Marjorie C

    2015-07-01

    Craniofacial malformations are common congenital defects caused by failed midline inductive signals. These midline defects are associated with exposure of the fetus to exogenous teratogens and with inborn genetic errors such as those found in Down, Patau, Edwards' and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndromes. Yet, there are no studies that analyze contributions of synchronous neurocranial and neural development in these disorders. Here we present the first in-depth analysis of malformations of the basicranium of a holoprosencephalic (HPE) trisomy 18 (T18; Edwards' syndrome) fetus with synophthalmic cyclopia and alobar HPE. With a combination of traditional gross dissection and state-of-the-art computed tomography, we demonstrate the deleterious effects of T18 caused by a translocation at 18p11.31. Bony features included a single developmentally unseparated frontal bone, and complete dual absence of the anterior cranial fossa and ethmoid bone. From a superior view with the calvarium plates removed, there was direct visual access to the orbital foramen and hard palate. Both the eyes and the pituitary gland, normally protected by bony structures, were exposed in the cranial cavity and in direct contact with the brain. The middle cranial fossa was shifted anteriorly, and foramina were either missing or displaced to an abnormal location due to the absence or misplacement of its respective cranial nerve (CN). When CN development was conserved in its induction and placement, the respective foramen developed in its normal location albeit with abnormal gross anatomical features, as seen in the facial nerve (CNVII) and the internal acoustic meatus. More anteriorly localized CNs and their foramina were absent or heavily disrupted compared with posterior ones. The severe malformations exhibited in the cranial fossae, orbital region, pituitary gland and sella turcica highlight the crucial involvement of transcription factors such as TGIF, which is located on chromosome 18 and contributes

  12. Development of Stokes flow solver against a large contrast in viscosity: toward plate-mantle simulation with free surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuichi, M.

    2009-12-01

    We are interested in solving a large-scale plate-mantle simulation enables capture of the large and complex deformation of a subducting plate. In our earlier study (Furuichi, et al 2008), we developed a numerical method toward plate-mantle simulation especially for the highly parallel vector supercomputer system (e.g. Earth Simulator). Our scheme is based on the finite volume method combines (i) the multigrid technique together with ACuTE smoother algorithm (Kameyama et al., 2005), and (ii) the low diffusive CIP-CSLR advection. The validity test of our simulation code by using a fluid rope coiling event (Furuichi, et al 2009) showed that our method enable us to reproduce large non-linear deformation problems of a rigid plate surrounded by soft material without serious quantitative errors. Then as a next step, I am trying to create a Stokes flow solver scalable against a large jump in a viscosity profile, for moving surface (geometrically free boundary) problems. It is for solving the Stokes flow motion under the same condition as real earth. In this presentation, I propose to apply BFBt preconditioner and AMG techniques for the problems of large viscosity contrast and moving free surface boundary condition respectively. I would like to show some numerical experiments for a self-gravitating motion of the layered Stokes flow.

  13. Development an efficient calibrated nonlocal plate model for nonlinear axial instability of zirconia nanosheets using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, S; Fattahi, A M

    2017-08-01

    New ceramic materials containing nanoscaled crystalline phases create a main object of scientific interest due to their attractive advantages such as biocompatibility. Zirconia as a transparent glass ceramic is one of the most useful binary oxides in a wide range of applications. In the present study, a new size-dependent plate model is constructed to predict the nonlinear axial instability characteristics of zirconia nanosheets under axial compressive load. To accomplish this end, the nonlocal continuum elasticity of Eringen is incorporated to a refined exponential shear deformation plate theory. A perturbation-based solving process is put to use to derive explicit expressions for nonlocal equilibrium paths of axial-loaded nanosheets. After that, some molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed for axial instability response of square zirconia nanosheets with different side lengths, the results of which are matched with those of the developed nonlocal plate model to capture the proper value of nonlocal parameter. It is demonstrated that the calibrated nonlocal plate model with nonlocal parameter equal to 0.37nm has a very good capability to predict the axial instability characteristics of zirconia nanosheets, the accuracy of which is comparable with that of MD simulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Distinct regulatory mechanisms act to establish and maintain Pax3 expression in the developing neural tube.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Moore

    Full Text Available Pattern formation in developing tissues is driven by the interaction of extrinsic signals with intrinsic transcriptional networks that together establish spatially and temporally restricted profiles of gene expression. How this process is orchestrated at the molecular level by genomic cis-regulatory modules is one of the central questions in developmental biology. Here we have addressed this by analysing the regulation of Pax3 expression in the context of the developing spinal cord. Pax3 is induced early during neural development in progenitors of the dorsal spinal cord and is maintained as pattern is subsequently elaborated, resulting in the segregation of the tissue into dorsal and ventral subdivisions. We used a combination of comparative genomics and transgenic assays to define and dissect several functional cis-regulatory modules associated with the Pax3 locus. We provide evidence that the coordinated activity of two modules establishes and refines Pax3 expression during neural tube development. Mutational analyses of the initiating element revealed that in addition to Wnt signaling, Nkx family homeodomain repressors restrict Pax3 transcription to the presumptive dorsal neural tube. Subsequently, a second module mediates direct positive autoregulation and feedback to maintain Pax3 expression. Together, these data indicate a mechanism by which transient external signals are converted into a sustained expression domain by the activities of distinct regulatory elements. This transcriptional logic differs from the cross-repression that is responsible for the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression in the ventral neural tube, suggesting that a variety of circuits are deployed within the neural tube regulatory network to establish and elaborate pattern formation.

  15. Development of Integrally Molded Bipolar Plates for All-Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hsun Chang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRBs are potential energy storage systems for renewable power sources because of their flexible design, deep discharge capacity, quick response time, and long cycle life. To minimize the energy loss due to the shunt current, in a traditional design, a flow field is machined on two electrically insulated frames with a graphite plate in between. A traditional bipolar plate (BP of a VRB consists of many components, and thus, the assembly process is time consuming. In this study, an integrally molded BP is designed and fabricated to minimize the manufacturing cost. First, the effects of the mold design and injection parameters on frame formability were analyzed by simulation. Second, a new graphite plate design for integral molding was proposed, and finally, two integrally molded BPs were fabricated and compared. Results show that gate position significantly affects air traps and the maximum volume shrinkage occurs at the corners of a BP. The volume shrinkage can be reduced using a large graphite plate embedded within the frame.

  16. Role of tubularization of urethral plate in development of urethrocutaneous fistula post hypospadias repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basim S Alsaywid

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Incision of the urethral plate did not affect the fistula rate. In comparison to international literature, the incidence of fistula was significantly higher which could be explained by the fact that one-third of those patients had a previous hypospadias repair.

  17. Development of a Titanium Plate for Mandibular Angle Fractures with a Bone Defect in the Lower Border: Finite Element Analysis and Mechanical Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Rangel Goulart

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the present study was to develop a plate to treat mandibular angle fractures using the finite element method and mechanical testing. Material and Methods: A three-dimensional model of a fractured mandible was generated using Rhinoceros 4.0 software. The models were exported to ANSYS®, in which a static application of displacement (3 mm was performed in the first molar region. Three groups were assessed according to the method of internal fixation (2 mm system: two non-locking plates; two locking plates and a new design locking plate. The computational model was transferred to an in vitro experiment with polyurethane mandibles. Each group contained five samples and was subjected to a linear loading test in a universal testing machine. Results: A balanced distribution of stress was associated with the new plate design. This plate modified the mechanical behavior of the fractured region, with less displacement between the fractured segments. In the mechanical test, the group with two locking plates exhibited greater resistance to the 3 mm displacement, with a statistically significant difference when compared with the new plate group (ANOVA, P = 0.016. Conclusions: The new plate exhibited a more balanced distribution of stress. However, the group with two locking plates exhibited greater mechanical resistance.

  18. Development of roughness updating based on artificial neural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on dynamic wave theory using an implicit finite-difference method is developed with river roughness ... to provide early warning message in support of emer- ..... the river system. During a typhoon, when the computed river depths differ from the depths observed at gauge stations, the differences in water depths can be.

  19. Meis2 is essential for cranial and cardiac neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machon, Ondrej; Masek, Jan; Machonova, Olga; Krauss, Stefan; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2015-11-06

    TALE-class homeodomain transcription factors Meis and Pbx play important roles in formation of the embryonic brain, eye, heart, cartilage or hematopoiesis. Loss-of-function studies of Pbx1, 2 and 3 and Meis1 documented specific functions in embryogenesis, however, functional studies of Meis2 in mouse are still missing. We have generated a conditional allele of Meis2 in mice and shown that systemic inactivation of the Meis2 gene results in lethality by the embryonic day 14 that is accompanied with hemorrhaging. We show that neural crest cells express Meis2 and Meis2-defficient embryos display defects in tissues that are derived from the neural crest, such as an abnormal heart outflow tract with the persistent truncus arteriosus and abnormal cranial nerves. The importance of Meis2 for neural crest cells is further confirmed by means of conditional inactivation of Meis2 using crest-specific AP2α-IRES-Cre mouse. Conditional mutants display perturbed development of the craniofacial skeleton with severe anomalies in cranial bones and cartilages, heart and cranial nerve abnormalities. Meis2-null mice are embryonic lethal. Our results reveal a critical role of Meis2 during cranial and cardiac neural crest cells development in mouse.

  20. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development.

  1. Histone deacetylase-4 is required during early cranial neural crest development for generation of the zebrafish palatal skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeLaurier April

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase-4 (Hdac4 is a class II histone deacetylase that inhibits the activity of transcription factors. In humans, HDAC4 deficiency is associated with non-syndromic oral clefts and brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR with craniofacial abnormalities. Results We identify hdac4 in zebrafish and characterize its function in craniofacial morphogenesis. The gene is present as a single copy, and the deduced Hdac4 protein sequence shares all known functional domains with human HDAC4. The zebrafish hdac4 transcript is widely present in migratory cranial neural crest (CNC cells of the embryo, including populations migrating around the eye, which previously have been shown to contribute to the formation of the palatal skeleton of the early larva. Embryos injected with hdac4 morpholinos (MO have reduced or absent CNC populations that normally migrate medial to the eye. CNC-derived palatal precursor cells do not recover at the post-migratory stage, and subsequently we found that defects in the developing cartilaginous palatal skeleton correlate with reduction or absence of early CNC cells. Palatal skeletal defects prominently include a shortened, clefted, or missing ethmoid plate, and are associated with a shortening of the face of young larvae. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Hdac4 is a regulator of CNC-derived palatal skeletal precursors during early embryogenesis. Cleft palate resulting from HDAC4 mutations in human patients may result from defects in a homologous CNC progenitor cell population.

  2. Music training relates to the development of neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention

    OpenAIRE

    Dana L. Strait; Jessica Slater; Samantha O’Connell; Nina Kraus

    2015-01-01

    Selective attention decreases trial-to-trial variability in cortical auditory-evoked activity. This effect increases over the course of maturation, potentially reflecting the gradual development of selective attention and inhibitory control. Work in adults indicates that music training may alter the development of this neural response characteristic, especially over brain regions associated with executive control: in adult musicians, attention decreases variability in auditory-evoked response...

  3. Embryonic requirements for ErbB signaling in neural crest development and adult pigment pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Erine H.; Patterson, Larissa B.; Parichy, David M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells are derived from neural crest cells and are a useful system for studying neural crest-derived traits during post-embryonic development. In zebrafish, neural crest-derived melanophores differentiate during embryogenesis to produce stripes in the early larva. Dramatic changes to the pigment pattern occur subsequently during the larva-to-adult transformation, or metamorphosis. At this time, embryonic melanophores are replaced by newly differentiating metamorphic melanophores that form the adult stripes. Mutants with normal embryonic/early larval pigment patterns but defective adult patterns identify factors required uniquely to establish, maintain, or recruit the latent precursors to metamorphic melanophores. We show that one such mutant, picasso, lacks most metamorphic melanophores and results from mutations in the ErbB gene erbb3b, encoding an EGFR-like receptor tyrosine kinase. To identify critical periods for ErbB activities, we treated fish with pharmacological ErbB inhibitors and also knocked-down erbb3b by morpholino injection. These analyses reveal an embryonic critical period for ErbB signaling in promoting later pigment pattern metamorphosis, despite the normal patterning of embryonic/early larval melanophores. We further demonstrate a peak requirement during neural crest migration that correlates with early defects in neural crest pathfinding and peripheral ganglion formation. Finally, we show that erbb3b activities are both autonomous and non-autonomous to the metamorphic melanophore lineage. These data identify a very early, embryonic, requirement for erbb3b in the development of much later metamorphic melanophores, and suggest complex modes by which ErbB signals promote adult pigment pattern development. PMID:18508863

  4. Development and Evaluation of Micro-Electrocorticography Arrays for Neural Interfacing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Amelia Ann

    Neural interfaces have great promise for both electrophysiological research and therapeutic applications. Whether for the study of neural circuitry or for neural prosthetic or other therapeutic applications, micro-electrocorticography (micro-ECoG) arrays have proven extremely useful as neural interfacing devices. These devices strike a balance between invasiveness and signal resolution, an important step towards eventual human application. The objective of this research was to make design improvements to micro-ECoG devices to enhance both biocompatibility and device functionality. To best evaluate the effectiveness of these improvements, a cranial window imaging method for in vivo monitoring of the longitudinal tissue response post device implant was developed. Employment of this method provided valuable insight into the way tissue grows around micro-ECoG arrays after epidural implantation, spurring a study of the effects of substrate geometry on the meningeal tissue response. The results of the substrate footprint comparison suggest that a more open substrate geometry provides an easy path for the tissue to grow around to the top side of the device, whereas a solid device substrate encourages the tissue to thicken beneath the device, between the electrode sites and the brain. The formation of thick scar tissue between the recording electrode sites and the neural tissue is disadvantageous for long-term recorded signal quality, and thus future micro-ECoG device designs should incorporate open-architecture substrates for enhanced longitudinal in vivo function. In addition to investigating improvements for long-term device reliability, it was also desired to enhance the functionality of micro-ECoG devices for neural electrophysiology research applications. To achieve this goal, a completely transparent graphene-based device was fabricated for use with the cranial window imaging method and optogenetic techniques. The use of graphene as the conductive material provided

  5. Making sense of zebrafish neural development in the Minervois

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dambly-Chaudière Christine

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The meeting 'From sensory perception to motor output: genetic bases of behavior in the zebrafish embryo' was held at Minerve (South of France on March 16–18, 2007. The meeting site was beautifully situated in the heart of the Minervois wine country, and its remoteness promoted conversations and interaction over the course of the program. The meeting covered neurogenesis and eye development on day 1, ear and lateral line development on day 2, and brain connectivity and behavior on day 3. Underlying all sessions, however, ran the growing importance of live imaging, an approach that takes full advantage of the transparency of fish embryos and early larvae, as illustrated by several movies and links in this report.

  6. Development of eddy current testing probe for thick-walled metal plate and quantitative evaluation of cracks

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, K; Uchimoto, T; Takagi, T

    2003-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the crack detection of thick-walled non-magnetic metal plates by eddy current testing, which is difficult because of Kelvin skin effect generally. The purpose of this research is the development of an new eddy current testing probe for cracks in thick-walled plates and crack shapes quantitative evaluation. The probe was designed, based on the numerical computation using 3D fast eddy current code. The advantages of this new probe are strong eddy current on the back of specimens and gentle decrement of eddy current in the thickness direction. Through experiments, we confirmed that this probe can detect the back artificial defect with 0.5 mm thickness on IN-CONEL 718 specimen with 7.0 mm thickness. Reconstruction of crack shapes was performed based on the experimental results with the inverse problem code developed by authors. The length and depth of reconstructed defects approximately agree with those of real crack. (author)

  7. Development of a technique to evaluate the performance of cooling headers and its applications in POSCO plate mills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Jong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hundreds of thousands of liquid jet nozzles are widely used in controling cooling equipment to accelerate the cooling of hot plates. The holes of these nozzles become clogged or the hole size becomes smaller as foreign substances like grease, scrap, and mud containing cooling water are flushed through. In this case, cooling water sprays abnormally through the partially clogged or restricted nozzle. This causes inhomogeneous cooling of hot plates. The objective of this study is to develop an evaluation system of cooling headers including nozzles. This paper presents the method to evaluate the conditions of spraying nozzles. The sensor developed in this research measures the liquid column of spraying nozzles using differential pressure between the inside sensor block and ambient air. In addition, the results of a field test in a real, large factory are introduced in this paper.

  8. Development of a novel bead-based 96-well filtration plate competitive immunoassay for the detection of Gentamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tien Yu Jessica; Chan, Chia-Chung; Chan, KinGho; Wang, Yu Chieh; Lin, Jing-Tang; Chang, Cheng-Ming; Chen, Chien-Sheng

    2013-11-15

    We developed a sensitive, simple, inexpensive and rapid bead-based immunoassay platform, composed of liposomal nanovesicle amplification system, Gentamycin sulfate beads and 96-well filtration plates. In the beginning of the assay, Gentamycin sulfate beads, Gentamycin sulfate and Gentamycin specific antibody were incubated in a bottom-sealed 96-well filtration plate. After incubation, washing was done by running washing buffer through the unsealed filtration plate with only gravity and the antibody-Gentamycin bead complexes were retained in the plate. Fluorescent dye-loaded protein G-liposomal nanovesicles were then added to specifically bind to antibodies on the retained beads. After washing unbound nanovesicles, millions of fluorescent dye molecules were released by adding a detergent solution to lyse liposomal nanovesicles. The limit of detection (LOD) of this novel detection platform in TBS and in skim milk were 52.65 ng/mL and 14.16 ng/mL, which are both sufficient for detecting the 200 ng/mL Codex maximum residual level (MRL). The dynamic ranges were both from each of their LODs to 100 μg/mL. The 50% inhibition concentrations (IC50) in TBS and skim milk were 199.66 ng/mL and 360.81 ng/mL, respectively. We also demonstrated the good specificity of this platform by comparing detection results between pure Gentamycin solution and a mixture solution of 6 different antibiotics including Gentamycin in skim milk. The entire assay with 60 samples was conducted within 2h. In sum, this novel biosensing platform not only fulfilled most benefits of magnetic bead-based assays, but also was inexpensive and convenient by replacing the magnetic separation with filtration plate separation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multi-scale finite element model of growth plate damage during the development of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzaneh, S; Paseta, O; Gómez-Benito, M J

    2015-04-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is one of the most common disorders of adolescent hips. A number of works have related the development of SCFE to mechanical factors. Due to the difficulty of diagnosing SCFE in its early stages, the disorder often progresses over time, resulting in serious side effects. Therefore, the development of a tool to predict the initiation of damage in the growth plate is needed. Because the growth plate is a heterogeneous structure, to develop a precise and reliable model, it is necessary to consider this structure from both macro- and microscale perspectives. Thus, the main objective of this work is to develop a numerical multi-scale model that links damage occurring at the microscale to damage occurring at the macroscale. The use of this model enables us to predict which regions of the growth plate are at high risk of damage. First, we have independently analyzed the microscale to simulate the microstructure under shear and tensile tests to calibrate the damage model. Second, we have employed the model to simulate damage occurring in standardized healthy and affected femurs during the heel-strike stage of stair climbing. Our results indicate that on the macroscale, damage is concentrated in the medial region of the growth plate in both healthy and affected femurs. Furthermore, damage to the affected femur is greater than damage to the healthy femur from both the micro- and macrostandpoints. Maximal damage is observed in territorial matrices. Furthermore, simulations illustrate that little damage occurs in the reserve zone. These findings are consistent with previous findings reported in well-known experimental works.

  10. Proteases at work: Cues for understanding neural development and degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eSaftig

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytical processing of membrane bound molecules is a fundamental mechanism for the degradation of these proteins as well as for controlling cell-to-cell communication, which is at the basis of tissue development and homeostasis. Members of families of metalloproteinases and intra-membrane proteases are major effectors of these events. A recent workshop in Baeza, Spain, was devoted to discuss how this mechanism coordinates brain development and how its dysfunction leads to brain pathologies. Herein we summarize the findings presented during this workshop, which illuminate the role of metalloproteinases, including MMPs, ADAM-proteases and intra-membrane proteases, in the regulation of neurogenesis, axon guidance and synaptogenesis as well as in neurodegeneration. Indeed, there is increasing evidence that proteolysis at the membrane is directly linked to neuropathologies such as Alzheimer Disease and autism spectrum or prion disorders. These proteolytic events are tightly regulated and we are just at the beginning of understanding how these processes could be exploited to design therapeutic treatments aimed at alleviating psychiatric and neurodegenerative pathologies.

  11. Neural development of networks for audiovisual speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Anthony Steven; Solodkin, Ana; Small, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Everyday conversation is both an auditory and a visual phenomenon. While visual speech information enhances comprehension for the listener, evidence suggests that the ability to benefit from this information improves with development. A number of brain regions have been implicated in audiovisual speech comprehension, but the extent to which the neurobiological substrate in the child compares to the adult is unknown. In particular, developmental differences in the network for audiovisual speech comprehension could manifest through the incorporation of additional brain regions, or through different patterns of effective connectivity. In the present study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and structural equation modeling (SEM) to characterize the developmental changes in network interactions for audiovisual speech comprehension. The brain response was recorded while children 8- to 11-years-old and adults passively listened to stories under audiovisual (AV) and auditory-only (A) conditions. Results showed that in children and adults, AV comprehension activated the same fronto-temporo-parietal network of regions known for their contribution to speech production and perception. However, the SEM network analysis revealed age-related differences in the functional interactions among these regions. In particular, the influence of the posterior inferior frontal gyrus/ventral premotor cortex on supramarginal gyrus differed across age groups during AV, but not A speech. This functional pathway might be important for relating motor and sensory information used by the listener to identify speech sounds. Further, its development might reflect changes in the mechanisms that relate visual speech information to articulatory speech representations through experience producing and perceiving speech. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPUTER SYSTEM FOR IDENTITY AUTHENTICATION USING ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Kartbayev

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to increase the effectiveness of automated face recognition to authenticate identity, considering features of change of the face parameters over time. The improvement of the recognition accuracy, as well as consideration of the features of temporal changes in a human face can be based on the methodology of artificial neural networks. Hybrid neural networks, combining the advantages of classical neural networks and fuzzy logic systems, allow using the network learnability along with the explanation of the findings. The structural scheme of intelligent system for identification based on artificial neural networks is proposed in this work. It realizes the principles of digital information processing and identity recognition taking into account the forecast of key characteristics’ changes over time (e.g., due to aging. The structural scheme has a three-tier architecture and implements preliminary processing, recognition and identification of images obtained as a result of monitoring. On the basis of expert knowledge, the fuzzy base of products is designed. It allows assessing possible changes in key characteristics, used to authenticate identity based on the image. To take this possibility into consideration, a neuro-fuzzy network of ANFIS type was used, which implements the algorithm of Tagaki-Sugeno. The conducted experiments showed high efficiency of the developed neural network and a low value of learning errors, which allows recommending this approach for practical implementation. Application of the developed system of fuzzy production rules that allow predicting changes in individuals over time, will improve the recognition accuracy, reduce the number of authentication failures and improve the efficiency of information processing and decision-making in applications, such as authentication of bank customers, users of mobile applications, or in video monitoring systems of sensitive sites.

  13. Differentiation-Dependent Motility-Responses of Developing Neural Progenitors to Optogenetic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tímea Köhidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During neural tissue genesis, neural stem/progenitor cells are exposed to bioelectric stimuli well before synaptogenesis and neural circuit formation. Fluctuations in the electrochemical potential in the vicinity of developing cells influence the genesis, migration and maturation of neuronal precursors. The complexity of the in vivo environment and the coexistence of various progenitor populations hinder the understanding of the significance of ionic/bioelectric stimuli in the early phases of neuronal differentiation. Using optogenetic stimulation, we investigated the in vitro motility responses of radial glia-like neural stem/progenitor populations to ionic stimuli. Radial glia-like neural stem cells were isolated from CAGloxpStoploxpChR2(H134-eYFP transgenic mouse embryos. After transfection with Cre-recombinase, ChR2(channelrhodopsin-2-expressing and non-expressing cells were separated by eYFP fluorescence. Expression of light-gated ion channels were checked by patch clamp and fluorescence intensity assays. Neurogenesis by ChR2-expressing and non-expressing cells was induced by withdrawal of EGF from the medium. Cells in different (stem cell, migrating progenitor and maturing precursor stages of development were illuminated with laser light (λ = 488 nm; 1.3 mW/mm2; 300 ms in every 5 min for 12 h. The displacement of the cells was analyzed on images taken at the end of each light pulse. Results demonstrated that the migratory activity decreased with the advancement of neuronal differentiation regardless of stimulation. Light-sensitive cells, however, responded on a differentiation-dependent way. In non-differentiated ChR2-expressing stem cell populations, the motility did not change significantly in response to light-stimulation. The displacement activity of migrating progenitors was enhanced, while the motility of differentiating neuronal precursors was markedly reduced by illumination.

  14. Developing and using expert systems and neural networks in medicine: a review on benefits and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhtaheri, Abbas; Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra

    2014-09-01

    Complicacy of clinical decisions justifies utilization of information systems such as artificial intelligence (e.g. expert systems and neural networks) to achieve better decisions, however, application of these systems in the medical domain faces some challenges. We aimed at to review the applications of these systems in the medical domain and discuss about such challenges. Following a brief introduction of expert systems and neural networks by representing few examples, the challenges of these systems in the medical domain are discussed. We found that the applications of expert systems and artificial neural networks have been increased in the medical domain. These systems have shown many advantages such as utilization of experts' knowledge, gaining rare knowledge, more time for assessment of the decision, more consistent decisions, and shorter decision-making process. In spite of all these advantages, there are challenges ahead of developing and using such systems including maintenance, required experts, inputting patients' data into the system, problems for knowledge acquisition, problems in modeling medical knowledge, evaluation and validation of system performance, wrong recommendations and responsibility, limited domains of such systems and necessity of integrating such systems into the routine work flows. We concluded that expert systems and neural networks can be successfully used in medicine; however, there are many concerns and questions to be answered through future studies and discussions.

  15. Programmed cell death during early development of the nervous system, modelled by pruning in a neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, JE; vanHeijst, JJ; Greuters, S; Silva, FL; Principe, JC; Almeida, LB

    1997-01-01

    An artificial neural network model is presented in which the development is simulated of a baby's ability to control movement of his forearm around the elbow, until he is capable of goal-directed reaching. The neural network implementation provides the facility to change the number of nodes (or

  16. Cold plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marroquin, Christopher M.; O' Connell, Kevin M.; Schultz, Mark D.; Tian, Shurong

    2018-02-13

    A cold plate, an electronic assembly including a cold plate, and a method for forming a cold plate are provided. The cold plate includes an interface plate and an opposing plate that form a plenum. The cold plate includes a plurality of active areas arranged for alignment over respective heat generating portions of an electronic assembly, and non-active areas between the active areas. A cooling fluid flows through the plenum. The plenum, at the non-active areas, has a reduced width and/or reduced height relative to the plenum at the active areas. The reduced width and/or height of the plenum, and exterior dimensions of cold plate, at the non-active areas allow the non-active areas to flex to accommodate surface variations of the electronics assembly. The reduced width and/or height non-active areas can be specifically shaped to fit between physical features of the electronics assembly.

  17. Complement System in Neural Synapse Elimination in Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presumey, Jessy; Bialas, Allison R; Carroll, Michael C

    2017-01-01

    Recent discoveries implicate the classical complement cascade in normal brain development and in disease. Complement proteins C1q, C3, and C4 participate in synapse elimination, tagging inappropriate synaptic connections between neurons for removal by phagocytic microglia that exist in a special, highly phagocytic state during the synaptic pruning period. Several neurodevelopmental disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism, are thought to be caused by an imbalance in synaptic pruning, and recent studies suggest that dysregulation of complement could promote this synaptic pruning imbalance. Moreover, in the mature brain, complement can be aberrantly activated in early stages of neurodegenerative diseases to stimulate synapse loss. Similar pathways can also be activated in response to inflammation, as in West Nile Virus infection or in lupus, where peripheral inflammation can promote microglia-mediated synapse loss. Whether synapse loss in disease is a true reactivation of developmental synaptic pruning programs remains unclear; nonetheless, complement proteins represent potential therapeutic targets for both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Maternal Diabetes Alters Expression of MicroRNAs that Regulate Genes Critical for Neural Tube Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, Seshadri; Shyamasundar, Sukanya; Bay, Boon Huat; Dheen, S Thameem

    2017-01-01

    Maternal diabetes is known to cause neural tube defects (NTDs) in embryos and neuropsychological deficits in infants. Several metabolic pathways and a plethora of genes have been identified to be deregulated in developing brain of embryos by maternal diabetes, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. Recently, miRNAs have been shown to regulate genes involved in brain development and maturation. Therefore, we hypothesized that maternal diabetes alters the expression of miRNAs that regulate genes involved in biological pathways critical for neural tube development and closure during embryogenesis. To address this, high throughput miRNA expression profiling in neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from the forebrain of embryos from normal or streptozotocin-induced diabetic pregnancy was carried out. It is known that maternal diabetes results in fetal hypoglycemia/hyperglycemia or hypoxia. Hence, NSCs from embryos of control pregnant mice were exposed to low or high glucose or hypoxia in vitro. miRNA pathway analysis revealed distinct deregulation of several biological pathways, including axon guidance pathway, which are critical for brain development in NSCs exposed to different treatments. Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, the miRNA-30 family members which are predicted to target genes involved in brain development was upregulated in NSCs from embryos of diabetic pregnancy when compared to control. miRNA-30b was found to be upregulated while its target gene Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1), as revealed by luciferase assay, was down regulated in NSCs from embryos of diabetic pregnancy. Further, overexpression of miRNA-30b in NSCs, resulted in decreased expression of Sirt1 protein, and altered the neuron/glia ratio. On the other hand, siRNA mediated knockdown of Sirt1 in NSCs promoted astrogenesis, indicating that miRNA-30b alters lineage specification via Sirt1. Overall, these results suggest that maternal diabetes alters the genes involved in neural tube formation via

  19. Signaling and transcriptional regulation in neural crest specification and migration: lessons from xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a population of highly migratory and multipotent cells, which arises from the border of the neural plate in vertebrate embryos. In the last few years, the molecular actors of neural crest early development have been intensively studied, notably by using the frog embryo, as a prime model for the analysis of the earliest embryonic inductions. In addition, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular and cellular basis of Xenopus cranial neural crest migration, by combining in vitro and in vivo analysis. In this review, we examine how the action of previously known neural crest-inducing signals [bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), wingless-int (Wnt), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)] is controlled by newly discovered modulators during early neural plate border patterning and neural crest specification. This regulation controls the induction of key transcription factors that cooperate to pattern the premigratory neural crest progenitors. These data are discussed in the perspective of the gene regulatory network that controls neural and neural crest patterning. We then address recent findings on noncanonical Wnt signaling regulation, cell polarization, and collective cell migration which highlight how cranial neural crest cells populate their target tissue, the branchial arches, in vivo. More than ever, the neural crest stands as a powerful and attractive model to decipher complex vertebrate regulatory circuits in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The association of peroxisomes with the developing cell plate in dividing onion root cells depends on actin microfilaments and myosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, David A; Harper, John D I; Vaughn, Kevin C

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated changes in the distribution of peroxisomes through the cell cycle in onion ( Allium cepa L.) root meristem cells with immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, and in leek ( Allium porrum L.) epidermal cells with immunofluorescence and peroxisomal-targeted green fluorescent protein. During interphase and mitosis, peroxisomes distribute randomly throughout the cytoplasm, but beginning late in anaphase, they accumulate at the division plane. Initially, peroxisomes occur within the microtubule phragmoplast in two zones on either side of the developing cell plate. However, as the phragmoplast expands outwards to form an annulus, peroxisomes redistribute into a ring immediately inside the location of the microtubules. Peroxisome aggregation depends on actin microfilaments and myosin. Peroxisomes first accumulate in the division plane prior to the formation of the microtubule phragmoplast, and throughout cytokinesis, always co-localise with microfilaments. Microfilament-disrupting drugs (cytochalasin and latrunculin), and a putative inhibitor of myosin (2,3-butanedione monoxime), inhibit aggregation. We propose that aggregated peroxisomes function in the formation of the cell plate, either by regulating hydrogen peroxide production within the developing cell plate, or by their involvement in recycling of excess membranes from secretory vesicles via the beta-oxidation pathway. Differences in aggregation, a phenomenon which occurs in onion, some other monocots and to a lesser extent in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells, but which is not obvious in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., may reflect differences within the primary cell walls of these plants.

  1. Neural network-based survey analysis of risk management practices in new product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampianakis, Andreas N.; Oehmen, Josef

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the applicability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) to analyse survey data on the effectiveness of risk management practices in product development (PD) projects, and its ability to forecast project outcomes. Moreover, this study presents the relations between risk...... Neural Networks. Dataset used is a filtered survey of 291 product development programs. Answers of this survey are used as training input and target output, in pattern recognition two-layer feed forward networks, using various transfer functions. Using this method, relations among 6 project practices...... and 13 outcome metrics were revealed. Results of this analysis are compared with existent results made through statistical analysis in prior work of one of the authors. Future investigation is needed in order to tackle the lack of data and create an easy to use platform for industrial use....

  2. Differential development of neuronal physiological responsiveness in two human neural stem cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Patel Sara; Pollock Kenneth; Aouabdi Sihem; Hines Susan J; Miljan Erik A; Donato Roberta; Edwards Frances A; Sinden John D

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to neurodegenerative disease. Overexpression of the myc family transcription factors in human primary cells from developing cortex and mesencephalon has produced two stable multipotential NSC lines (ReNcell VM and CX) that can be continuously expanded in monolayer culture. Results In the undifferentiated state, both ReNcell VM and CX are nestin positive and have resting memb...

  3. A Malaysian Vehicle License Plate Localization and Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganapathy Velappa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological intelligence is a highly sought after commodity even in traffic-based systems. These intelligent systems do not only help in traffic monitoring but also in commuter safety, law enforcement and commercial applications. In this paper, a license plate localization and recognition system for vehicles in Malaysia is proposed. This system is developed based on digital images and can be easily applied to commercial car park systems for the use of documenting access of parking services, secure usage of parking houses and also to prevent car theft issues. The proposed license plate localization algorithm is based on a combination of morphological processes with a modified Hough Transform approach and the recognition of the license plates is achieved by the implementation of the feed-forward backpropagation artificial neural network. Experimental results show an average of 95% successful license plate localization and recognition in a total of 589 images captured from a complex outdoor environment.

  4. Dynamics of modularity of neural activity in the brain during development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deem, Michael; Chen, Man

    2014-03-01

    Theory suggests that more modular systems can have better response functions at short times. This theory suggests that greater cognitive performance may be achieved for more modular neural activity, and that modularity of neural activity may, therefore, likely increase with development in children. We study the relationship between age and modularity of brain neural activity in developing children. The value of modularity calculated from fMRI data is observed to increase during childhood development and peak in young adulthood. We interpret these results as evidence of selection for plasticity in the cognitive function of the human brain. We present a model to illustrate how modularity can provide greater cognitive performance at short times and enhance fast, low-level, automatic cognitive processes. Conversely, high-level, effortful, conscious cognitive processes may not benefit from modularity. We use quasispecies theory to predict how the average modularity evolves with age, given a fitness function extracted from the model. We suggest further experiments exploring the effect of modularity on cognitive performance and suggest that modularity may be a potential biomarker for injury, rehabilitation, or disease.

  5. hmmr mediates anterior neural tube closure and morphogenesis in the frog Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, Angela; Hagenlocher, Cathrin; Ott, Tim; Schambony, Alexandra; Feistel, Kerstin

    2017-10-01

    Development of the central nervous system requires orchestration of morphogenetic processes which drive elevation and apposition of the neural folds and their fusion into a neural tube. The newly formed tube gives rise to the brain in anterior regions and continues to develop into the spinal cord posteriorly. Conspicuous differences between the anterior and posterior neural tube become visible already during neural tube closure (NTC). Planar cell polarity (PCP)-mediated convergent extension (CE) movements are restricted to the posterior neural plate, i.e. hindbrain and spinal cord, where they propagate neural fold apposition. The lack of CE in the anterior neural plate correlates with a much slower mode of neural fold apposition anteriorly. The morphogenetic processes driving anterior NTC have not been addressed in detail. Here, we report a novel role for the breast cancer susceptibility gene and microtubule (MT) binding protein Hmmr (Hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, RHAMM) in anterior neurulation and forebrain development in Xenopus laevis. Loss of hmmr function resulted in a lack of telencephalic hemisphere separation, arising from defective roof plate formation, which in turn was caused by impaired neural tissue narrowing. hmmr regulated polarization of neural cells, a function which was dependent on the MT binding domains. hmmr cooperated with the core PCP component vangl2 in regulating cell polarity and neural morphogenesis. Disrupted cell polarization and elongation in hmmr and vangl2 morphants prevented radial intercalation (RI), a cell behavior essential for neural morphogenesis. Our results pinpoint a novel role of hmmr in anterior neural development and support the notion that RI is a major driving force for anterior neurulation and forebrain morphogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. dNTP deficiency induced by HU via inhibiting ribonucleotide reductase affects neural tube development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhen; Wang, Xiuwei; Dong, Yanting; Xu, Lin; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jianhua; Zhang, Ting; Niu, Bo

    2015-02-03

    Exposure to environmental toxic chemicals in utero during the neural tube development period can cause developmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neural tube development programming, the murine neural tube defects (NTDs) model was induced by interrupting folate metabolism using methotrexate in our previous study. The present study aimed to examine the effects of dNTP deficiency induced by hydroxyurea (HU), a specific ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor, during murine neural tube development. Pregnant C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with various doses of HU on gestation day (GD) 7.5, and the embryos were checked on GD 11.5. RNR activity and deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) levels were measured in the optimal dose. Additionally, DNA damage was examined by comet analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay. Cellular behaviors in NTDs embryos were evaluated with phosphorylation of histone H3 (PH-3) and caspase-3 using immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. The results showed that NTDs were observed mostly with HU treatment at an optimal dose of 225 mg/kg b/w. RNR activity was inhibited and dNTP levels were decreased in HU-treated embryos with NTDs. Additionally, increased DNA damage, decreased proliferation, and increased caspase-3 were significant in NTDs embryos compared to the controls. Results indicated that HU induced murine NTDs model by disturbing dNTP metabolism and further led to the abnormal cell balance between proliferation and apoptosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Hot Isostatic Press Manufacturing Process Development for Fabrication of RERTR Monolithic Fuel Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapps, Justin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clarke, Kester D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Katz, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexander, David J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aikin, Beverly [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vargas, Victor D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montalvo, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dombrowski, David E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mihaila, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-06

    We use experimentation and finite element modeling to study a Hot Isostatic Press (HIP) manufacturing process for U-10Mo Monolithic Fuel Plates. Finite element simulations are used to identify the material properties affecting the process and improve the process geometry. Accounting for the high temperature material properties and plasticity is important to obtain qualitative agreement between model and experimental results. The model allows us to improve the process geometry and provide guidance on selection of material and finish conditions for the process strongbacks. We conclude that the HIP can must be fully filled to provide uniform normal stress across the bonding interface.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of mobile phones on the neural tube development of chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Ahmet Sukru; Yaldiz, Can; Bursali, Adem; Umur, Nurcan; Kara, Burcu; Barutcuoglu, Mustafa; Vatansever, Seda; Selcuki, Deniz; Selcuki, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effects of radiation of mobile phones on developing neural tissue of chick embryos. There were 4 study groups. All Groups were placed in equal distance, from the mobile phones. Serial sections were taken from each Group to study the neural tube segments. The TUNEL results were statistically significant (p negative in the 48 and 72 hours in the Control Group, had moderate activity in the third Group 3, weak activity in the 48 hour, and was negative in the 72 hour in other groups. Caspase-9 immunoreactivity was weak in Group 1, 2 and 3 at 30 hours and was negative in Group 1 and 4 at 48 and 72 hours. Caspase-9 activity in the third Group was weak in all three stages. Electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phones caused developmental delay in chick embryos in early period. This finding suggests that the use of mobile phones by pregnant women may pose risks.

  9. Application of artificial neural networks for response surface modelling in HPLC method development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Korany

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the usefulness of artificial neural networks (ANNs for response surface modelling in HPLC method development. In this study, the combined effect of pH and mobile phase composition on the reversed-phase liquid chromatographic behaviour of a mixture of salbutamol (SAL and guaiphenesin (GUA, combination I, and a mixture of ascorbic acid (ASC, paracetamol (PAR and guaiphenesin (GUA, combination II, was investigated. The results were compared with those produced using multiple regression (REG analysis. To examine the respective predictive power of the regression model and the neural network model, experimental and predicted response factor values, mean of squares error (MSE, average error percentage (Er%, and coefficients of correlation (r were compared. It was clear that the best networks were able to predict the experimental responses more accurately than the multiple regression analysis.

  10. Growing adaptive machines combining development and learning in artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Bredeche, Nicolas; Doursat, René

    2014-01-01

    The pursuit of artificial intelligence has been a highly active domain of research for decades, yielding exciting scientific insights and productive new technologies. In terms of generating intelligence, however, this pursuit has yielded only limited success. This book explores the hypothesis that adaptive growth is a means of moving forward. By emulating the biological process of development, we can incorporate desirable characteristics of natural neural systems into engineered designs, and thus move closer towards the creation of brain-like systems. The particular focus is on how to design artificial neural networks for engineering tasks. The book consists of contributions from 18 researchers, ranging from detailed reviews of recent domains by senior scientists, to exciting new contributions representing the state of the art in machine learning research. The book begins with broad overviews of artificial neurogenesis and bio-inspired machine learning, suitable both as an introduction to the domains and as a...

  11. Early Divergence of Central and Peripheral Neural Retina Precursors During Vertebrate Eye Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Sara J.; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    During development of the vertebrate eye, optic tissue is progressively compartmentalized into functionally distinct tissues. From the central to the peripheral optic cup, the original optic neuroepithelial tissue compartmentalizes, forming retina, ciliary body and iris. The retina can be further sub-divided into peripheral and central compartments, where the central domain is specialized for higher visual acuity, having a higher ratio and density of cone photoreceptors in most species. Classically, models depict a segregation of the early optic cup into only two domains, neural and non-neural. Recent studies, however, uncovered discrete precursors for central and peripheral retina in the optic vesicle, indicating that the neural retina cannot be considered as a single unit with homogeneous specification and development. Instead, central and peripheral retina may be subject to distinct developmental pathways that underlie their specialization. This review focuses on lineage relationships in the retina and revisits the historical context for segregation of central and peripheral retina precursors before overt eye morphogenesis. PMID:25329498

  12. Neural correlates of deception in social contexts in normally developing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eYokota

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deception is related to the ability to inhibit prepotent responses and to engage in mental tasks such as anticipating responses and inferring what another person knows, especially in social contexts. However, the neural correlates of deception processing, which requires mentalizing, remain unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we examined the neural correlates of deception, including mentalization, in social contexts in normally developing children. Healthy right-handed children (aged 8–9 years were scanned while performing interactive games involving deception. The games varied along two dimensions: the type of reply (deception and truth and the type of context (social and less social. Participants were instructed to deceive a witch and to tell the truth to a girl. Under the social-context conditions, participants were asked to consider what they inferred about protagonists’ preferences from their facial expressions when responding to questions. Under the less-social-context conditions, participants did not need to consider others’ preferences. We found a significantly greater response in the right precuneus under the social-context than under less-social-context conditions. Additionally, we found substantially greater activation in the right inferior parietal lobule (IPL under the deception than under the truth condition. These results suggest that deception in a social context requires not only inhibition of prepotent responses but also engagement in mentalizing processes. This study provides the first evidence of the neural correlates of the mentalizing processes involved in deception in normally developing children.

  13. Neural network development in late adolescents during observation of risk-taking action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Tamura

    Full Text Available Emotional maturity and social awareness are important for adolescents, particularly college students beginning to face the challenges and risks of the adult world. However, there has been relatively little research into personality maturation and psychological development during late adolescence and the neural changes underlying this development. We investigated the correlation between psychological properties (neuroticism, extraversion, anxiety, and depression and age among late adolescents (n = 25, from 18 years and 1 month to 22 years and 8 months. The results revealed that late adolescents became less neurotic, less anxious, less depressive and more extraverted as they aged. Participants then observed video clips depicting hand movements with and without a risk of harm (risk-taking or safe actions during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The results revealed that risk-taking actions elicited significantly stronger activation in the bilateral inferior parietal lobule, temporal visual regions (superior/middle temporal areas, and parieto-occipital visual areas (cuneus, middle occipital gyri, precuneus. We found positive correlations of age and extraversion with neural activation in the insula, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and precuneus. We also found a negative correlation of age and anxiety with activation in the angular gyrus, precentral gyrus, and red nucleus/substantia nigra. Moreover, we found that insula activation mediated the relationship between age and extraversion. Overall, our results indicate that late adolescents become less anxious and more extraverted with age, a process involving functional neural changes in brain networks related to social cognition and emotional processing. The possible neural mechanisms of psychological and social maturation during late adolescence are discussed.

  14. Development and Training of a Neural Controller for Hind Leg Walking in a Dog Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alexander; Szczecinski, Nicholas; Quinn, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Animals dynamically adapt to varying terrain and small perturbations with remarkable ease. These adaptations arise from complex interactions between the environment and biomechanical and neural components of the animal's body and nervous system. Research into mammalian locomotion has resulted in several neural and neuro-mechanical models, some of which have been tested in simulation, but few “synthetic nervous systems” have been implemented in physical hardware models of animal systems. One reason is that the implementation into a physical system is not straightforward. For example, it is difficult to make robotic actuators and sensors that model those in the animal. Therefore, even if the sensorimotor circuits were known in great detail, those parameters would not be applicable and new parameter values must be found for the network in the robotic model of the animal. This manuscript demonstrates an automatic method for setting parameter values in a synthetic nervous system composed of non-spiking leaky integrator neuron models. This method works by first using a model of the system to determine required motor neuron activations to produce stable walking. Parameters in the neural system are then tuned systematically such that it produces similar activations to the desired pattern determined using expected sensory feedback. We demonstrate that the developed method successfully produces adaptive locomotion in the rear legs of a dog-like robot actuated by artificial muscles. Furthermore, the results support the validity of current models of mammalian locomotion. This research will serve as a basis for testing more complex locomotion controllers and for testing specific sensory pathways and biomechanical designs. Additionally, the developed method can be used to automatically adapt the neural controller for different mechanical designs such that it could be used to control different robotic systems. PMID:28420977

  15. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangho Shin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE and low density polyethylene (LDPE and polypropylene (PP resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  16. Development of Metal Plate with Internal Structure Utilizing the Metal Injection Molding (MIM) Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kwangho; Heo, Youngmoo; Park, Hyungpil; Chang, Sungho; Rhee, Byungohk

    2013-12-12

    In this study, we focus on making a double-sided metal plate with an internal structure, such as honeycomb. The stainless steel powder was used in the metal injection molding (MIM) process. The preliminary studies were carried out for the measurement of the viscosity of the stainless steel feedstock and for the prediction of the filling behavior through Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) simulation. PE (high density polyethylene (HDPE) and low density polyethylene (LDPE)) and polypropylene (PP) resins were used to make the sacrificed insert with a honeycomb structure using a plastic injection molding process. Additionally, these sacrificed insert parts were inserted in the metal injection mold, and the metal injection molding process was carried out to build a green part with rectangular shape. Subsequently, debinding and sintering processes were adopted to remove the sacrificed polymer insert. The insert had a suitable rigidity that was able to endure the filling pressure. The core shift analysis was conducted to predict the deformation of the insert part. The 17-4PH feedstock with a low melting temperature was applied. The glass transition temperature of the sacrificed polymer insert would be of a high grade, and this insert should be maintained during the MIM process. Through these processes, a square metal plate with a honeycomb structure was made.

  17. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  18. Punctuated Neogene tectonics and stratigraphy of the African-Iberian plate-boundary zone: concurrent development of Betic-Rif basins (southern Spain, northern Morocco)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sissingh, W.

    2008-01-01

    This paper integrates the sequence stratigraphic and tectonic data related to the Neogene geodynamic and palaeogeographic development of the African-Iberian plate boundary zone between Spain and Morocco. Though the dating of individual tectonostratigraphic sequences and their delimiting sequence

  19. Use of uniform designs in combination with neural networks for viral infection process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenno, Laís Hara; Rocha, José Celso; Leme, Jaci; Caricati, Celso Pereira; Tonso, Aldo; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to compare the predictive capacity of empirical models, based on the uniform design utilization combined to artificial neural networks with respect to classical factorial designs in bioprocess, using as example the rabies virus replication in BHK-21 cells. The viral infection process parameters under study were temperature (34°C, 37°C), multiplicity of infection (0.04, 0.07, 0.1), times of infection, and harvest (24, 48, 72 hours) and the monitored output parameter was viral production. A multilevel factorial experimental design was performed for the study of this system. Fractions of this experimental approach (18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 runs), defined according uniform designs, were used as alternative for modelling through artificial neural network and thereafter an output variable optimization was carried out by means of genetic algorithm methodology. Model prediction capacities for all uniform design approaches under study were better than that found for classical factorial design approach. It was demonstrated that uniform design in combination with artificial neural network could be an efficient experimental approach for modelling complex bioprocess like viral production. For the present study case, 67% of experimental resources were saved when compared to a classical factorial design approach. In the near future, this strategy could replace the established factorial designs used in the bioprocess development activities performed within biopharmaceutical organizations because of the improvements gained in the economics of experimentation that do not sacrifice the quality of decisions. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  20. PV Reliability Development Lessons from JPL's Flat Plate Solar Array Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Key reliability and engineering lessons learned from the 20-year history of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Flat-Plate Solar Array Project and thin film module reliability research activities are presented and analyzed. Particular emphasis is placed on lessons applicable to evolving new module technologies and the organizations involved with these technologies. The user-specific demand for reliability is a strong function of the application, its location, and its expected duration. Lessons relative to effective means of specifying reliability are described, and commonly used test requirements are assessed from the standpoint of which are the most troublesome to pass, and which correlate best with field experience. Module design lessons are also summarized, including the significance of the most frequently encountered failure mechanisms and the role of encapsulate and cell reliability in determining module reliability. Lessons pertaining to research, design, and test approaches include the historical role and usefulness of qualification tests and field tests.

  1. Development of flat-plate solar collectors for the heating and cooling of buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, J. W.; Borzoni, J. T.; Holland, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relevant design parameters in the fabrication of a solar collector for heating liquids were examined. The objective was to design, fabricate, and test a low-cost, flat-plate solar collector with high collection efficiency, high durability, and requiring little maintenance. Computer-aided math models of the heat transfer processes in the collector assisted in the design. The preferred physical design parameters were determined from a heat transfer standpoint and the absorber panel configuration, the surface treatment of the absorber panel, the type and thickness of insulation, and the number, spacing and material of the covers were defined. Variations of this configuration were identified, prototypes built, and performance tests performed using a solar simulator. Simulated operation of the baseline collector configuration was combined with insolation data for a number of locations and compared with a predicted load to determine the degree of solar utilization.

  2. Development of Analytical Method for Predicting Residual Mechanical Properties of Corroded Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. R. S. Appuhamy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bridge infrastructure maintenance and assurance of adequate safety is of paramount importance in transportation engineering and maintenance management industry. Corrosion causes strength deterioration, leading to impairment of its operation and progressive weakening of the structure. Since the actual corroded surfaces are different from each other, only experimental approach is not enough to estimate the remaining strength of corroded members. However, in modern practices, numerical simulation is being used to replace the time-consuming and expensive experimental work and to comprehend on the lack of knowledge on mechanical behavior, stress distribution, ultimate behavior, and so on. This paper presents the nonlinear FEM analyses results of many corroded steel plates and compares them with their respective tensile coupon tests. Further, the feasibility of establishing an accurate analytical methodology to predict the residual strength capacities of a corroded steel member with lesser number of measuring points is also discussed.

  3. Development and testing of a multiwell plates absorbance reader for clinical analysis using inexpensive webcam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jimmy; Gutierrez, Hector; Vitta, Yosmery; Martinez, Mauro; Fernandez, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Biochemical analysis and clinical tests like glucose, hemoglobin, cholesterol, iron, etc. are crucial for early illness diagnosis like diabetes, anemia and coronary deceases. These tests usually are done in state of the art instruments in well equipped laboratories in health centers. In some cases, these instruments are not portable, so they are not recommended for clinical field studies in remote areas. The present work shows a portable low-cost prototype of multi-well plates reader designed for clinical analysis. A Light Emission Diodes (LEDs) array is used as excitation source and an inexpensive webcam as detector. The light source illuminates the 96 well plates and the webcam take the image with 640x480 pixels. The data is acquired and processed by using a portable computer. 96 samples can be read including blanks and calibration standards simultaneously. Light absorption data are processed using a MatLab software designed in our laboratory to obtain calibration curves, standards lectures and samples concentration. The system was evaluated using different analytes series solutions: Neutral Red, Cooper (II) Ammonia Complex and Methyl Orange. The results shows that it is possible to measure few micro liters of solutions with adequate exactitude and precision of less than 3%. As possible analytical clinical application, iron determination was performed using Fe(III) Thiocyanate complex. This method is usually applied in serum samples analysis. The sensibility achieved with the proposed instrumentation configurations allows the analysis of iron in serum samples in the references values normal range (0.75 - 1.5 mg/L) in human.

  4. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshik Choe

    Full Text Available Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis.

  5. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-15

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Anthropogenic changes in sodium affect neural and muscle development in butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell-Rood, Emilie C; Espeset, Anne; Boser, Christopher J; White, William A; Smykalski, Rhea

    2014-07-15

    The development of organisms is changing drastically because of anthropogenic changes in once-limited nutrients. Although the importance of changing macronutrients, such as nitrogen and phosphorus, is well-established, it is less clear how anthropogenic changes in micronutrients will affect organismal development, potentially changing dynamics of selection. We use butterflies as a study system to test whether changes in sodium availability due to road salt runoff have significant effects on the development of sodium-limited traits, such as neural and muscle tissue. We first document how road salt runoff can elevate sodium concentrations in the tissue of some plant groups by 1.5-30 times. Using monarch butterflies reared on roadside- and prairie-collected milkweed, we then show that road salt runoff can result in increased muscle mass (in males) and neural investment (in females). Finally, we use an artificial diet manipulation in cabbage white butterflies to show that variation in sodium chloride per se positively affects male flight muscle and female brain size. Variation in sodium not only has different effects depending on sex, but also can have opposing effects on the same tissue: across both species, males increase investment in flight muscle with increasing sodium, whereas females show the opposite pattern. Taken together, our results show that anthropogenic changes in sodium availability can affect the development of traits in roadside-feeding herbivores. This research suggests that changing micronutrient availability could alter selection on foraging behavior for some roadside-developing invertebrates.

  7. The neural coding of feedback learning across child and adolescent development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sabine; Braams, Barbara R; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Koolschijn, P Cédric M P; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-08-01

    The ability to learn from environmental cues is an important contributor to successful performance in a variety of settings, including school. Despite the progress in unraveling the neural correlates of cognitive control in childhood and adolescence, relatively little is known about how these brain regions contribute to learning. In this study, 268 participants aged 8-25 years performed a rule-learning task with performance feedback in a 3T MRI scanner. We examined the development of the frontoparietal network during feedback learning by exploring contributions of age and pubertal development. The pFC showed more activation following negative compared with positive feedback with increasing age. In contrast, our data suggested that the parietal cortex demonstrated a shift from sensitivity to positive feedback in young children to negative feedback in adolescents and adults. These findings were interpreted in terms of separable contributions of the frontoparietal network in childhood to more integrated functions in adulthood. Puberty (testosterone, estradiol, and self-report) did not explain additional variance in neural activation patterns above age, suggesting that development of the frontoparietal network occurs relatively independently from hormonal development. This study presents novel insights into the development of learning, moving beyond a simple frontoparietal immaturity hypothesis.

  8. Making Headway: The Roles of Hox Genes and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Trainor

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  9. Development of objective flow regime identification method using self-organizing neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Nam Seok; Kwak, Nam Yee [Handong Global Univ., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Two-phase flow shows various flow patterns according to the amount of the void and its relative velocity to the liquid flow. This variation directly affect the interfacial transfer which is the key factor for the design or analysis of the phase change systems. Especially the safety analysis of the nuclear power plant has been performed based on the numerical code furnished with the proper constitutive relations depending highly upon the flow regimes. Heavy efforts have been focused to identify the flow regime and at this moment we stand on relative very stable engineering background compare to the other research field. However, the issues related to objectiveness and transient flow regime are still open to study. Lee et al. and Ishii developed the method for the objective and instantaneous flow regime identification based on the neural network and new index of probability distribution of the flow regime which allows just one second observation for the flow regime identification. In the present paper, we developed the self-organized neural network for more objective approach to this problem. Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map (SOM) has been used for clustering, visualization, and abstraction. The SOM is trained through unsupervised competitive learning using a 'winner takes it all' policy. Therefore, its unsupervised training character delete the possible interference of the regime developer to the neural network training. After developing the computer code, we evaluate the performance of the code with the vertically upward two-phase flow in the pipes of 25.4 and 50.4 cmm I.D. Also, the sensitivity of the number of the clusters to the flow regime identification was made.

  10. Novel roles for immune molecules in neural development: Implications for neurodevelopmental disoders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A Garay

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the brain has classically been considered "immune-privileged," current research suggests extensive communication between the nervous and the immune systems in both health and disease. Recent studies demonstrate that immune molecules are present at the right place and time to modulate the development and function of the healthy and diseased CNS. Indeed, immune molecules play integral roles in the CNS throughout neural development, including affecting neurogenesis, neuronal migration, axon guidance, synapse formation, activity-dependent refinement of circuits, and synaptic plasticity. Moreover, the roles of individual immune molecules in the nervous system may change over development. This review focuses on the effects of immune molecules on neuronal connections in the mammalian central nervous system—specifically the roles for MHCI and its receptors, complement, and cytokines on the function, refinement, and plasticity of cortical and hippocampal synapses and their relationship to neurodevelopmental disorders. These functions for immune molecules during neural development suggest that they could also mediate pathological responses to chronic elevations of cytokines in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorders (ASD and schizophrenia.

  11. Development of artificial neural network models for supercritical fluid solvency in presence of co-solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokir, Eissa Mohamed El-Moghawry; El-Midany, Ayman Abdel-Hamid [Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Al-Homadhi, Emad Souliman; Al-Mahdy, Osama [King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    This paper presents the application of artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop new models of liquid solvent dissolution of supercritical fluids with solutes in the presence of cosolvents. The neural network model of the liquid solvent dissolution of CO{sub 2} was built as a function of pressure, temperature, and concentrations of the solutes and cosolvents. Different experimental measurements of liquid solvent dissolution of supercritical fluids (CO{sub 2}) with solutes in the presence of cosolvents were collected. The collected data are divided into two parts. The first part was used in building the models, and the second part was used to test and validate the developed models against the Peng- Robinson equation of state. The developed ANN models showed high accuracy, within the studied variables range, in predicting the solubility of the 2-naphthol, anthracene, and aspirin in the supercritical fluid in the presence and absence of co-solvents compared to (EoS). Therefore, the developed ANN models could be considered as a good tool in predicting the solubility of tested solutes in supercritical fluid.

  12. Progress in the KIT approach for development of the HCPB TBM stiffening plate feasibility mock up fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuberger, Heiko, E-mail: heiko.neuberger@kit.edu [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR) (Germany); Rey, Jörg [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik (INR) (Germany); Materna-Morris, Edeltraud; Bolich, Daniel [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Institut für Angewandte Materialien (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Handl, Thomas [WBHS Wärmebehandlungsservice, Am Hof 5/14, 1010 Wien (Austria); Milker, Torsten [TRUMPF Laser- und Systemtechnik GmbH, Johann-Maus-Straße 2, 71254 Ditzingen (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Sub-component manufacturing and assembly concepts for the fabrication of the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed Test Blanket Module have been developed since more than one decade in the KIT. In the present design the structure of the HCPB TBM can be sub-divided into three key components: (i) TBM box, (ii) stiffening plates and (iii) the breeder zone. The present fabrication and assembly routines is based on the assumption that each of the aforementioned sub-components can be assembled in parallel and independently before assembling the TBM. Therefore the procedures to fabricate these sub-components can be addressed in independent tasks. This paper shows the results of the KIT/industry collaboration with the final goal to develop a set of preliminary welding procedure specifications (pWPS) for the assembly of the HCPB TBM stiffening plate. Recently a promising set of draft pWPS could be identified in medium scale fabrication experiments. This paper recalls the results of qualification routines according to ISO 15614-11 (RCC-MR Edition 2007, RS 3570) in order to verify the parameters.

  13. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  14. Development of output signal-to-noise ratio tester for microchannel plate and fluorescent screen component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xinglin; Qiu, Yafeng; Zhou, Jin; Qian, Yunsheng

    The core components of Image intensifier is microchannel plate (MCP) and fluorescent screen component. The present paper deeply studies output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characteristics of MCP and fluorescent screen component. A tester system using to the evaluation of characteristics of the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component, consists of a vacuum system, a surface electron source, mechanical mechanism components ,a high-voltage power supply system, a signal processing system, communication interfaces, a data acquisition and control system, computer system, and testing software. a hot cathode used as an electron source, generates a surface electron flow to provide the input signal. A photomultiplier tube is used to detection faceplate output brightness of the light spot. Then, the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is processed with a combination of methods of the hardware filter and digital filtering software. The output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is measured under different conditions, and the results are analyzed. This test system Provide a technical to promote the image intensifier research, and experience to testing other parameters or in other areas of research.

  15. Microstructural developments and mechanical properties of friction stir welding of AZ91D magnesium alloy plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagabhushan Kumar Kadigithala

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Friction stir welding (FSW is an efficient technique which can be used particularly for magnesium and aluminum alloys that are difficult to fusion weld. In this work AZ91D Mg alloy plates 3mm thick were friction stir welded at different process variables such as rotational speed and welding speed. The range of rotational speeds varied from 1025 to 1525 rpm, and the welding speed varied from 25 to 75 mm/min. Good quality welds were obtained under 1025 rpm of rotational speed with the welding speeds range from 25 to 75 mm/min. The microstructure of the AZ91D alloy consists of primary α-phase, eutectic α-phase and eutectic β (Mg17Al12 phase in the received condition (gravity die cast. The original dendrite grain structure completely disappeared and was transformed to fine equiaxed grains in stir zone (SZ. It was observed that there was a slight increase in hardness in SZ, because of fine recrystallized grain structure. The transverse tensile test results of weld specimens indicated constant strength irrespective of traveling speed. Fractrographic analysis of the friction stir welded specimens showed the brittle failure.

  16. A Robust Single Primate Neuroepithelial Cell Clonal Expansion System for Neural Tube Development and Disease Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a model of primate neural tube (NT development is important to promote many NT disorder studies in model organisms. Here, we report a robust and stable system to allow for clonal expansion of single monkey neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs to develop into miniature NT-like structures. Single NESCs can produce functional neurons in vitro, survive, and extensively regenerate neuron axons in monkey brain. NT formation and NESC maintenance depend on high metabolism activity and Wnt signaling. NESCs are regionally restricted to a telencephalic fate. Moreover, single NESCs can turn into radial glial progenitors (RGPCs. The transition is accurately regulated by Wnt signaling through regulation of Notch signaling and adhesion molecules. Finally, using the “NESC-TO-NTs” system, we model the functions of folic acid (FA on NT closure and demonstrate that FA can regulate multiple mechanisms to prevent NT defects. Our system is ideal for studying NT development and diseases.

  17. The Sustainable Development Assessment of Reservoir Resettlement Based on a BP Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Huang, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2018-01-18

    Resettlement affects not only the resettlers' production activities and life but also, directly or indirectly, the normal operation of power stations, the sustainable development of the resettlers, and regional social stability. Therefore, a scientific evaluation index system for the sustainable development of reservoir resettlement must be established that fits Chinese national conditions and not only promotes reservoir resettlement research but also improves resettlement practice. This essay builds an evaluation index system for resettlers' sustainable development based on a back-propagation (BP) neural network, which can be adopted in China, taking the resettlement necessitated by step hydropower stations along the Wujiang River cascade as an example. The assessment results show that the resettlement caused by step power stations along the Wujiang River is sustainable, and this evaluation supports the conclusion that national policies and regulations, which are undergoing constant improvement, and resettlement has increasingly improved. The results provide a reference for hydropower reservoir resettlement in developing countries.

  18. The Sustainable Development Assessment of Reservoir Resettlement Based on a BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Huang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resettlement affects not only the resettlers’ production activities and life but also, directly or indirectly, the normal operation of power stations, the sustainable development of the resettlers, and regional social stability. Therefore, a scientific evaluation index system for the sustainable development of reservoir resettlement must be established that fits Chinese national conditions and not only promotes reservoir resettlement research but also improves resettlement practice. This essay builds an evaluation index system for resettlers’ sustainable development based on a back-propagation (BP neural network, which can be adopted in China, taking the resettlement necessitated by step hydropower stations along the Wujiang River cascade as an example. The assessment results show that the resettlement caused by step power stations along the Wujiang River is sustainable, and this evaluation supports the conclusion that national policies and regulations, which are undergoing constant improvement, and resettlement has increasingly improved. The results provide a reference for hydropower reservoir resettlement in developing countries.

  19. Software Development Cost and Time Forecasting Using a High Performance Artificial Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarzadeh, Iman; Ow, Siew Hock

    Nowadays, mature software companies are more interested to have a precise estimation of software metrics such as project time, cost, quality, and risk at the early stages of software development process. The ability to precisely estimate project time and costs by project managers is one of the essential tasks in software development activities, and it named software effort estimation. The estimated effort at the early stage of project development process is uncertain, vague, and often the least accurate. It is because that very little information is available at the beginning stage of project. Therefore, a reliable and precise effort estimation model is an ongoing challenge for project managers and software engineers. This research work proposes a novel soft computing model incorporating Constructive Cost Model (COCOMO) to improve the precision of software time and cost estimation. The proposed artificial neural network model has good generalisation, adaption capability, and it can be interpreted and validated by software engineers. The experimental results show that applying the desirable features of artificial neural networks on the algorithmic estimation model improves the accuracy of time and cost estimation and estimated effort can be very close to the actual effort.

  20. Epigenetic Regulation of the Neural Transcriptome and Alcohol Interference During Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol eResendiz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol intoxicated cells broadly alter their metabolites–– among them methyl and acetic acid can alter the DNA and histone epigenetic codes. Together with the promiscuous effect of alcohol on enzyme activities (including DNA methyltransferases and the downstream effect on microRNA and transposable elements, alcohol is well placed to affect intrinsic transcriptional programs of developing cells. Considering that the developmental consequences of early alcohol exposure so profoundly affect neural systems, it is not unfounded to reason that alcohol exploits transcriptional regulators to challenge canonical gene expression and in effect, intrinsic developmental pathways to achieve widespread damage in the developing nervous system. To fully evaluate the role of epigenetic regulation in alcohol-related developmental disease, it is important to first gather the targets of epigenetic players in neurodevelopmental models. Here, we attempt to review the cellular and genomic windows of opportunity for alcohol to act on intrinsic neurodevelopmental programs. We also discuss some established targets of fetal alcohol exposure and propose pathways for future study. Overall, this review hopes to illustrate the known epigenetic program and its alterations in normal neural stem cell development and further, aims to depict how alcohol, through neuroepigenetics, may lead to neurodevelopmental deficits observed in fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

  1. Dynamic network communication as a unifying neural basis for cognition, development, aging, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, Bradley; Knight, Robert T

    2015-06-15

    Perception, cognition, and social interaction depend upon coordinated neural activity. This coordination operates within noisy, overlapping, and distributed neural networks operating at multiple timescales. These networks are built upon a structural scaffolding with intrinsic neuroplasticity that changes with development, aging, disease, and personal experience. In this article, we begin from the perspective that successful interregional communication relies upon the transient synchronization between distinct low-frequency (communication via phase-coordinated local neuronal spiking. From this, we construct a theoretical framework for dynamic network communication, arguing that these networks reflect a balance between oscillatory coupling and local population spiking activity and that these two levels of activity interact. We theorize that when oscillatory coupling is too strong, spike timing within the local neuronal population becomes too synchronous; when oscillatory coupling is too weak, spike timing is too disorganized. Each results in specific disruptions to neural communication. These alterations in communication dynamics may underlie cognitive changes associated with healthy development and aging, in addition to neurological and psychiatric disorders. A number of neurological and psychiatric disorders-including Parkinson's disease, autism, depression, schizophrenia, and anxiety-are associated with abnormalities in oscillatory activity. Although aging, psychiatric and neurological disease, and experience differ in the biological changes to structural gray or white matter, neurotransmission, and gene expression, our framework suggests that any resultant cognitive and behavioral changes in normal or disordered states or their treatment are a product of how these physical processes affect dynamic network communication. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Brief Report: Robo1 Regulates the Migration of Human Subventricular Zone Neural Progenitor Cells During Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Lavell, Emily; Chen, Linda; Schiapparelli, Paula; Lara-Velazquez, Montserrat; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; Clements, Anna Christina; Drummond, Gabrielle; Noiman, Liron; Thaler, Katrina; Burke, Anne; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2017-07-01

    Human neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration within the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ganglionic eminence is an active process throughout early brain development. The migration of human NPCs from the SVZ to the olfactory bulb during fetal stages resembles what occurs in adult rodents. As the human brain develops during infancy, this migratory stream is drastically reduced in cell number and becomes barely evident in adults. The mechanisms regulating human NPC migration are unknown. The Slit-Robo signaling pathway has been defined as a chemorepulsive cue involved in axon guidance and neuroblast migration in rodents. Slit and Robo proteins expressed in the rodent brain help guide neuroblast migration from the SVZ through the rostral migratory stream to the olfactory bulb. Here, we present the first study on the role that Slit and Robo proteins play in human-derived fetal neural progenitor cell migration (hfNPC). We describe that Robo1 and Robo2 isoforms are expressed in the human fetal SVZ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Slit2 is able to induce a chemorepellent effect on the migration of hfNPCs derived from the human fetal SVZ. In addition, when Robo1 expression is inhibited, hfNPCs are unable to migrate to the olfactory bulb of mice when injected in the anterior SVZ. Our findings indicate that the migration of human NPCs from the SVZ is partially regulated by the Slit-Robo axis. This pathway could be regulated to direct the migration of NPCs in human endogenous neural cell therapy. Stem Cells 2017;35:1860-1865. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Melanoblast development coincides with the late emerging cells from the dorsal neural tube in turtle Trachemys scripta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ritva; Cebra-Thomas, Judith; Haugas, Maarja; Partanen, Juha; Rice, David P C; Gilbert, Scott F

    2017-09-21

    Ectothermal reptiles have internal pigmentation, which is not seen in endothermal birds and mammals. Here we show that the development of the dorsal neural tube-derived melanoblasts in turtle Trachemys scripta is regulated by similar mechanisms as in other amniotes, but significantly later in development, during the second phase of turtle trunk neural crest emigration. The development of melanoblasts coincided with a morphological change in the dorsal neural tube between stages mature G15 and G16. The melanoblasts delaminated and gathered in the carapacial staging area above the neural tube at G16, and differentiated into pigment-forming melanocytes during in vitro culture. The Mitf-positive melanoblasts were not restricted to the dorsolateral pathway as in birds and mammals but were also present medially through the somites similarly to ectothermal anamniotes. This matched a lack of environmental barrier dorsal and lateral to neural tube and the somites that is normally formed by PNA-binding proteins that block entry to medial pathways. PNA-binding proteins may also participate in the patterning of the carapacial pigmentation as both the migratory neural crest cells and pigment localized only to PNA-free areas.

  4. Development of the Technology of Large Bodies Manufacturing Based on Combined Process of Plate Rolling and Stamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesin, Alexander; Drigun, Ernst; Pustovoitov, Denis; Pesin, Ilya

    2017-12-01

    An experimental study of the developed new technologies for obtaining large-sized parts with an elliptical surface has been carried out. The advantages and disadvantages are established, as well as the boundaries of effective applicability of new combined process. Verification of the results of computer simulation based on testing the technology in the conditions of a laboratory rolling mill was performed. Optimal geometric shapes of matrices and punches to produce spherical and elliptical bottoms of various thicknesses and diameters are obtained on a thick plate rolling mill. The methods of correction of the technology for obtaining large-sized parts with an elliptical surface have been developed and tested in laboratory conditions to eliminate the identified shortcomings.

  5. Structural and mechanical properties of the proliferative zone of the developing murine growth plate cartilage assessed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prein, Carina; Warmbold, Niklas; Farkas, Zsuzsanna; Schieker, Matthias; Aszodi, Attila; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke

    2016-03-01

    The growth plate (GP) is a dynamic tissue driving bone elongation through chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy and matrix production. The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the major determinant of GP biomechanical properties and assumed to play a pivotal role for chondrocyte geometry and arrangement, thereby guiding proper growth plate morphogenesis and bone elongation. To elucidate the relationship between morphology and biomechanics during cartilage morphogenesis, we have investigated age-dependent structural and elastic properties of the proliferative zone of the murine GP by atomic force microscopy (AFM) from the embryonic stage to adulthood. We observed a progressive cell flattening and arrangement into columns from embryonic day 13.5 until postnatal week 2, correlating with an increasing collagen density and ECM stiffness, followed by a nearly constant cell shape, collagen density and ECM stiffness from week 2 to 4 months. At all ages, we found marked differences in the density and organization of the collagen network between the intracolumnar matrix, and the intercolumnar matrix, associated with a roughly two-fold higher stiffness of the intracolumnar matrix compared to the intercolumnar matrix. This difference in local ECM stiffness may force the cells to arrange in a columnar structure upon cell division and drive bone elongation during embryonic and juvenile development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of micromachined preconcentrators and gas chromatographic separation columns by an electroless gold plating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, C.-Y.; Chen, P.-S.; Chen, H.-T.; Lu, C.-J.; Tian, W.-C.

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a simple process for fabricating a novel micromachined preconcentrator (μPCT) and a gas chromatographic separation column (μSC) for use in a micro gas chromatograph (μGC) using one photomask is described. By electroless gold plating, a high-surface-area gold layer was deposited on the surface of channels inside the μPCT and μSC. For this process, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS) was used as a promoter for attaching gold nanoparticles on a silicon substrate to create a seed layer. For this purpose, a gold sodium sulfite solution was used as reagent for depositing gold to form heating structures. The microchannels of the μPCT and μSC were coated with the adsorbent and stationary phase, Tenax-TA and polydimethylsiloxane (DB-1), respectively. μPCTs were heated at temperatures greater than 280 °C under an applied electrical power of 24 W and a heating rate of 75 °C s-1. Repeatable thermal heating responses for μPCTs were achieved; good linearity (R 2  >  0.9997) was attained at three heating rates for the temperature programme for the μSC (0.2, 0.5 and 1 °C s-1). The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) toluene and m-xylene were concentrated over the μPCT by rapid thermal desorption (peak width of half height (PWHH)  7900. The VOCs acetone, benzene, toluene, m-xylene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene were also separated on the μSC as evidenced by their different retention times (47-184 s).

  7. Development of Multiwell-Plate Methods Using Pure Cultures of Methanogens To Identify New Inhibitors for Suppressing Ruminant Methane Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, M. R.; Cheung, J.; Dey, D.; McSweeney, C.; Morrison, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Whitman, W. B.; Carbone, V.; Schofield, L. R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hydrogenotrophic methanogens typically require strictly anaerobic culturing conditions in glass tubes with overpressures of H2 and CO2 that are both time-consuming and costly. To increase the throughput for screening chemical compound libraries, 96-well microtiter plate methods for the growth of a marine (environmental) methanogen Methanococcus maripaludis strain S2 and the rumen methanogen Methanobrevibacter species AbM4 were developed. A number of key parameters (inoculum size, reducing agents for medium preparation, assay duration, inhibitor solvents, and culture volume) were optimized to achieve robust and reproducible growth in a high-throughput microtiter plate format. The method was validated using published methanogen inhibitors and statistically assessed for sensitivity and reproducibility. The Sigma-Aldrich LOPAC library containing 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds and an in-house natural product library (120 compounds) were screened against M. maripaludis as a proof of utility. This screen identified a number of bioactive compounds, and MIC values were confirmed for some of them against M. maripaludis and M. AbM4. The developed method provides a significant increase in throughput for screening compound libraries and can now be used to screen larger compound libraries to discover novel methanogen-specific inhibitors for the mitigation of ruminant methane emissions. IMPORTANCE Methane emissions from ruminants are a significant contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions, and new technologies are required to control emissions in the agriculture technology (agritech) sector. The discovery of small-molecule inhibitors of methanogens using high-throughput phenotypic (growth) screening against compound libraries (synthetic and natural products) is an attractive avenue. However, phenotypic inhibitor screening is currently hindered by our inability to grow methanogens in a high-throughput format. We have developed, optimized, and validated a

  8. Effect of abacus training on executive function development and underlying neural correlates in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjie; Weng, Jian; Yao, Yuan; Dong, Shanshan; Liu, Yuqiu; Chen, Feiyan

    2017-10-01

    Executive function (EF) refers to a set of cognitive abilities involved in self-regulated behavior. Given the critical role of EF in cognition, strategies for improving EF have attracted intensive attention in recent years. Previous studies have explored the effects of abacus-based mental calculation (AMC) training on several cognitive abilities. However, it remains unclear whether AMC training affects EF and its neural correlates. In this study, participants were randomly assigned to AMC or control groups upon starting primary school. The AMC group received 2 h AMC training every week, while the control group did not have any abacus experience. Neural activity during an EF task was examined using functional MRI for both groups in their 4th and 6th grades. Our results showed that the AMC group performed better and faster than the control group in both grades. They also had lower activation in the frontoparietal reigons than the control group in the 6th grade. From the 4th to the 6th grade, the AMC group showed activation decreases in the frontoparietal regions, while the control group exhibited an opposite pattern. Furthermore, voxel-wise regression analyses revealed that better performance was associated with lower task-relevant brain activity in the AMC group but associated with greater task-relevant brain activity in the control group. These results suggest that long-term AMC training, with calculation ability as its original target, may improve EF and enhance neural efficiency of the frontoparietal regions during development. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5234-5249, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Microtubules, polarity and vertebrate neural tube morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cearns, Michael D; Escuin, Sarah; Alexandre, Paula; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are key cellular components, long known to participate in morphogenetic events that shape the developing embryo. However, the links between the cellular functions of MTs, their effects on cell shape and polarity, and their role in large-scale morphogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, these relationships were examined with respect to two strategies for generating the vertebrate neural tube: bending and closure of the mammalian neural plate; and cavitation of the teleost neural rod. The latter process has been compared with 'secondary' neurulation that generates the caudal spinal cord in mammals. MTs align along the apico-basal axis of the mammalian neuroepithelium early in neural tube closure, participating functionally in interkinetic nuclear migration, which indirectly impacts on cell shape. Whether MTs play other functional roles in mammalian neurulation remains unclear. In the zebrafish, MTs are important for defining the neural rod midline prior to its cavitation, both by localizing apical proteins at the tissue midline and by orienting cell division through a mirror-symmetric MT apparatus that helps to further define the medial localization of apical polarity proteins. Par proteins have been implicated in centrosome positioning in neuroepithelia as well as in the control of polarized morphogenetic movements in the neural rod. Understanding of MT functions during early nervous system development has so far been limited, partly by techniques that fail to distinguish 'cause' from 'effect'. Future developments will likely rely on novel ways to selectively impair MT function in order to investigate the roles they play. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  10. Plate tectonics

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chaubey, A.K.

    Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 209 Plate Tectonics A. K. Chaubey National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 004. chaubey@nio.org Introduction The theory of continental drift, which paved the way for discovery... of plate tectonics, was put forward by Alfred Lother Wegener - a meteorologist from Germany - in 1912. The theory states that continents are not fixed, but have been slowly wandering during the course of Earth’s geological history. Although Wegener...

  11. Owenia fusiformis - a basally branching annelid suitable for studying ancestral features of annelid neural development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Conrad; Vöcking, Oliver; Kourtesis, Ioannis; Hausen, Harald

    2016-06-16

    Comparative investigations on bilaterian neurogenesis shed light on conserved developmental mechanisms across taxa. With respect to annelids, most studies focus on taxa deeply nested within the annelid tree, while investigations on early branching groups are almost lacking. According to recent phylogenomic data on annelid evolution Oweniidae represent one of the basally branching annelid clades. Oweniids are thought to exhibit several plesiomorphic characters, but are scarcely studied - a fact that might be caused by the unique morphology and unusual metamorphosis of the mitraria larva, which seems to be hardly comparable to other annelid larva. In our study, we compare the development of oweniid neuroarchitecture with that of other annelids aimed to figure out whether oweniids may represent suitable study subjects to unravel ancestral patterns of annelid neural development. Our study provides the first data on nervous system development in basally branching annelids. Based on histology, electron microscopy and immunohistochemical investigations we show that development and metamorphosis of the mitraria larva has many parallels to other annelids irrespective of the drastic changes in body shape during metamorphosis. Such significant changes ensuing metamorphosis are mainly from diminution of a huge larval blastocoel and not from major restructuring of body organization. The larval nervous system features a prominent apical organ formed by flask-shaped perikarya and circumesophageal connectives that interconnect the apical and trunk nervous systems, in addition to serially arranged clusters of perikarya showing 5-HT-LIR in the ventral nerve cord, and lateral nerves. Both 5-HT-LIR and FMRFamide-LIR are present in a distinct nerve ring underlying the equatorial ciliary band. The connections arising from these cells innervate the circumesophageal connectives as well as the larval brain via dorsal and ventral neurites. Notably, no distinct somata with 5-HT -LIR in the

  12. Rules of engagement: factors that regulate activity-dependent synaptic plasticity during neural network development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Emily T; Sanders, Erin M; Sanyal, Mohima; Dumas, Theodore C

    2010-10-01

    Overproduction and pruning during development is a phenomenon that can be observed in the number of organisms in a population, the number of cells in many tissue types, and even the number of synapses on individual neurons. The sculpting of synaptic connections in the brain of a developing organism is guided by its personal experience, which on a neural level translates to specific patterns of activity. Activity-dependent plasticity at glutamatergic synapses is an integral part of neuronal network formation and maturation in developing vertebrate and invertebrate brains. As development of the rodent forebrain transitions away from an over-proliferative state, synaptic plasticity undergoes modification. Late developmental changes in synaptic plasticity signal the establishment of a more stable network and relate to pronounced perceptual and cognitive abilities. In large part, activation of glutamate-sensitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors regulates synaptic stabilization during development and is a necessary step in memory formation processes that occur in the forebrain. A developmental change in the subunits that compose NMDA receptors coincides with developmental modifications in synaptic plasticity and cognition, and thus much research in this area focuses on NMDA receptor composition. We propose that there are additional, equally important developmental processes that influence synaptic plasticity, including mechanisms that are upstream (factors that influence NMDA receptors) and downstream (intracellular processes regulated by NMDA receptors) from NMDA receptor activation. The goal of this review is to summarize what is known and what is not well understood about developmental changes in functional plasticity at glutamatergic synapses, and in the end, attempt to relate these changes to maturation of neural networks.

  13. Development of Streamwise Counter-Rotating Vortices in Flat Plate Boundary Layer Pre-set by Leading Edge Patterns

    KAUST Repository

    Hasheminejad, S.M.

    2017-04-03

    Development of streamwise counter-rotating vortices induced by leading edge patterns with different pattern shape is investigated using hot-wire anemometry in the boundary layer of a flat plate. A triangular, sinusoidal and notched patterns with the same pattern wavelength λ of 15mm and the same pattern amplitude A of 7.5mm were examined for free-stream velocity of 3m/s. The results show a good agreement with earlier studies. The inflection point on the velocity profile downstream of the trough of the patterns at the beginning of the vortex formation indicates that the vortices non-linearly propagate downstream. An additional vortex structure was also observed between the troughs of the notched pattern.

  14. Development of social skills in children: neural and behavioral evidence for the elaboration of cognitive models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Icaza, Patricia; Aboitiz, Francisco; Billeke, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Social skills refer to a wide group of abilities that allow us to interact and communicate with others. Children learn how to solve social situations by predicting and understanding other's behaviors. The way in which humans learn to interact successfully with others encompasses a complex interaction between neural, behavioral, and environmental elements. These have a role in the accomplishment of positive developmental outcomes, including peer acceptance, academic achievement, and mental health. All these social abilities depend on widespread brain networks that are recently being studied by neuroscience. In this paper, we will first review the studies on this topic, aiming to clarify the behavioral and neural mechanisms related to the acquisition of social skills during infancy and their appearance in time. Second, we will briefly describe how developmental diseases like Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) can inform about the neurobiological mechanisms of social skills. We finally sketch a general framework for the elaboration of cognitive models in order to facilitate the comprehension of human social development.

  15. Endocrine Pancreas Development and Regeneration: Noncanonical Ideas From Neural Stem Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjkur, Jimmy; Poser, Steven W; Nikolakopoulou, Polyxeni; Chrousos, George; McKay, Ronald D; Bornstein, Stefan R; Jones, Peter M; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Loss of insulin-producing pancreatic islet β-cells is a hallmark of type 1 diabetes. Several experimental paradigms demonstrate that these cells can, in principle, be regenerated from multiple endogenous sources using signaling pathways that are also used during pancreas development. A thorough understanding of these pathways will provide improved opportunities for therapeutic intervention. It is now appreciated that signaling pathways should not be seen as "on" or "off" but that the degree of activity may result in wildly different cellular outcomes. In addition to the degree of operation of a signaling pathway, noncanonical branches also play important roles. Thus, a pathway, once considered as "off" or "low" may actually be highly operational but may be using noncanonical branches. Such branches are only now revealing themselves as new tools to assay them are being generated. A formidable source of noncanonical signal transduction concepts is neural stem cells because these cells appear to have acquired unusual signaling interpretations to allow them to maintain their unique dual properties (self-renewal and multipotency). We discuss how such findings from the neural field can provide a blueprint for the identification of new molecular mechanisms regulating pancreatic biology, with a focus on Notch, Hes/Hey, and hedgehog pathways. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  16. Development of social skills in children: neural and behavioral evidence for the elaboration of cognitive models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eSoto-Icaza

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Social skills refer to a wide group of abilities that allow us to interact and communicate with others. Children learn how to solve social situations by predicting and understanding other’s behaviors. The way in which humans learn to interact successfully with others encompasses a complex interaction between neural, behavioral and environmental elements. These have a role in the accomplishment of positive developmental outcomes, including peer acceptance, academic achievement, and mental health. All these social abilities depend on widespread brain networks that are only recently being studied by neuroscience. In this paper we will first review the studies on this topic, aiming to clarify the behavioral and neural mechanisms related to the acquisition of social skills during infancy and their appearance in time. Second, we will briefly describe how developmental diseases like Autism Spectrum Disorders can inform about the neurobiological mechanisms of social skills. We finally sketch a general framework for the elaboration of cognitive models in order to facilitate the comprehension of human social development.

  17. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  18. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  19. Exponential distance distribution of connected neurons in simulations of two-dimensional in vitro neural network development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Zhi-Song; Zhu, Chen-Ping; Nie, Pei; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Hui-Jie; Wang, Yan-Jun; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2017-06-01

    The distribution of the geometric distances of connected neurons is a practical factor underlying neural networks in the brain. It can affect the brain's dynamic properties at the ground level. Karbowski derived a power-law decay distribution that has not yet been verified by experiment. In this work, we check its validity using simulations with a phenomenological model. Based on the in vitro two-dimensional development of neural networks in culture vessels by Ito, we match the synapse number saturation time to obtain suitable parameters for the development process, then determine the distribution of distances between connected neurons under such conditions. Our simulations obtain a clear exponential distribution instead of a power-law one, which indicates that Karbowski's conclusion is invalid, at least for the case of in vitro neural network development in two-dimensional culture vessels.

  20. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  1. Predictions on the Development Dimensions of Provincial Tourism Discipline Based on the Artificial Neural Network BP Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Hu, Jun; Lv, Yingchun; Zhang, Mu

    2013-01-01

    As the tourism industry has gradually become the strategic mainstay industry of the national economy, the scope of the tourism discipline has developed rigorously. This paper makes a predictive study on the development of the scope of Guangdong provincial tourism discipline based on the artificial neural network BP model in order to find out how…

  2. Longitudinal change in the neural bases of adolescent social self-evaluations: Effects of age and pubertal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeifer, J. H.; Kahn, L. E.; Merchant, J. S.; Peake, S. A.; Veroude, K.; Masten, C. L.; Lieberman, M. D.; Mazziotta, J. C.; Dapretto, M.

    2013-01-01

    Self-evaluations undergo significant transformation during early adolescence, developing in parallel with the heightened complexity of teenagers' social worlds. Intuitive theories of adolescent development, based in part on animal work, suggest that puberty is associated with neural-level changes

  3. The development of the neural substrates of cognitive control in adolescents with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Marjorie; Yoon, Jong H; Ragland, J Daniel; Niendam, Tara A; Lesh, Tyler A; Fairbrother, Wonja; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) involve impairments in cognitive control. In typical development (TYP), neural systems underlying cognitive control undergo substantial maturation during adolescence. Development is delayed in adolescents with ASD. Little is known about the neural substrates of this delay. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and a cognitive control task involving overcoming a prepotent response tendency to examine the development of cognitive control in young (ages 12-15; n = 13 with ASD and n = 13 with TYP) and older (ages 16-18; n = 14 with ASD and n = 14 with TYP) adolescents with whole-brain voxelwise univariate and task-related functional connectivity analyses. Older ASD and TYP showed reduced activation in sensory and premotor areas relative to younger ones. The older ASD group showed reduced left parietal activation relative to TYP. Functional connectivity analyses showed a significant age by group interaction with the older ASD group exhibiting increased functional connectivity strength between the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex, bilaterally. This functional connectivity strength was related to task performance in ASD, whereas that between dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex (Brodmann areas 9 and 40) was related to task performance in TYP. Adolescents with ASD rely more on reactive cognitive control, involving last-minute conflict detection and control implementation by the anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, versus proactive cognitive control requiring processing by dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and parietal cortex. Findings await replication in larger longitudinal studies that examine their functional consequences and amenability to intervention. © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry Published by Society of Biological Psychiatry All rights reserved.

  4. Application of 3D digital image correlation for development and validation of FEM model of self-supporting metal plates structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malowany, Krzysztof; Malesa, Marcin; Piekarczuk, Artur; Kujawińska, Małgorzata; Skrzypczak, Paweł; Wiech, Przemysław

    2016-04-01

    Many building structures due to complex geometry and nonlinear material properties are difficult to be analyzed with FEM methods. A good example is a self-supporting metal plates structure. Considering uncommon geometry and material characteristic of a metal plate (due to plastic deformations, cross section of a trough, a goffer pattern), the local loss of stability can occur in unexpected regions. Therefore, the hybrid experimental-numerical methodology of analysis and optimization of metal plates structures has been developed. The methodology is based on three steps of development and validation of a numerical model with utilization of Digital Image Correlation measurements. In each step, the measurements are performed in different environments, with different accuracies and different scales. In this paper, the results of analysis performed with Digital Image Correlation, that enabled development and validation of FEM model are presented. The performed modification of a measurement setup is also described.

  5. Development of a Highly Portable Plate Loading Device and In Situ Modulus Measurements in Weak Rock Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallu, Raj R.; Keffeler, Evan R.; Watters, Robert J.; Warren, Sean N.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, underground mines in Nevada are increasingly exploiting in weak mineralized zones at greater depths that are intensely fractured and highly altered. The mechanical behavior of these rock masses ranges between weak rock and very stiff soil. A common limitation for design of underground mining excavations in these types of rock masses is absence of in situ geotechnical data. This limitation is generally overcome by estimating in situ mechanical behavior from empirical relationships so that the continuum-based numerical methods can be used to evaluate ground support designs. Because of the cost, time, and specialized equipment involved, historically in situ tests have not been performed in these underground mines. Predictive rock mass modulus relationships that are currently available in the literature are derived from field testing of predominantly good-quality rock masses. Consequently, there is limited confidence in using these models for rock masses with Rock Mass Ratings less than 45. In order to overcome some of these limitations, a portable plate loading device (PPLD) was designed and fabricated. The PPLD allows one to perform low cost and relatively quick in situ deformability tests to be performed on weak rock masses in underground mines. Test procedures and data reduction methods were developed to limit potential sources of error associated with the PPLD test. A total of fourteen plate loading tests were performed in weak rock masses at two different active underground mines in Nevada, USA. The resulting the test data were compared to eight published empirical rock mass modulus relationships to determine which, if any, of these relationships are sufficiently accurate for estimating modulus in similar geotechnical conditions. Only two of these relationships were found to be sufficient for first-order estimations of in situ modulus.

  6. Development of a miniaturized bioreactor for neural culture and axon stretch growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Chen, Fang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiao; He, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a miniaturized bioreactor for accelerating nerve growth is developed to investigate potentially bi-directional peripheral neural interface based on tissue engineering. The bioreactor consisting of two parallel chambers that are extended to conduct controlled trials for optimized neuronal culture. The chamber is used to improve the micro-environment of in vitro nerve regeneration in a CO2 incubator, whereas the process of axon stretch growth is performed by a computer controlled micro-motion system comprised of a linear motion table and a micro-stepper motor. This apparatus produces axon stretch growth by taking l μm step every 1 minute over 1000 iterations for 1mm elongation growth per day. Results show that axons from neonatal DRG explants are grown with unidirectional polarity with a robust regeneration over 5 days in the culture chamber, whereas micro-displacement measurement indicates a satisfactory accuracy and repeatability for the implementation of computer-controlled ASG.

  7. Expression of developing neural transcription factors in diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Antonio García; Zarco, Enrique Rodríguez; Arjona, Juan Carlos Girón; Moreno, María José Ríos; Rodríguez, Katherine Gallardo; Benítez, Ana Vallejo; Cámpora, Ricardo González

    2016-09-01

    DIPNECH is characterized by neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia, tumorlets, and eventually carcinoid tumors. Although it is regarded by some authors as a preneoplastic condition, this issue is controversial. New pathologic criteria have recently been proposed for the diagnosis of DIPNECH, and a subgroup of carcinoid tumors expressing developing neural transcription factors (DNTFs), with clinicopathologic features similar to those of DIPNECH, has been recognized. This paper reports on the clinical and pathological findings in three cases of DIPNECH and investigates the expression of three DNTFs (TTF1, ASCL1, and POU3F2). All patients were female, with a mean age of 63 years, and all lesions were located in the periphery of the lung. In two cases, typical carcinoids were associated with a spindle-cell component. All neuroendocrine proliferations were DNTF positive. The morphologic (spindle-cell component), phenotypic (DNTF expression), and clinicopathologic (peripheral tumors, female predominance) similarities suggest that DIPNECH may be a preneoplastic lesion for peripheral carcinoids.

  8. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijvenvoorde, Anna C K; Zanolie, Kiki; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Raijmakers, Maartje E J; Crone, Eveline A

    2008-09-17

    How children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to feedback-based learning when performing a rule search and application task. Behavioral results from three age groups (8-9, 11-13, and 18-25 years of age) demonstrated that, compared with adults, 8- to 9-year-old children performed disproportionally more inaccurately after receiving negative feedback relative to positive feedback. Additionally, imaging data pointed toward a qualitative difference in how children and adults use performance feedback. That is, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and superior parietal cortex were more active after negative feedback for adults, but after positive feedback for children (8-9 years of age). For 11- to 13-year-olds, these regions did not show differential feedback sensitivity, suggesting that the transition occurs around this age. Pre-supplementary motor area/anterior cingulate cortex, in contrast, was more active after negative feedback in both 11- to 13-year-olds and adults, but not 8- to 9-year-olds. Together, the current data show that cognitive control areas are differentially engaged during feedback-based learning across development. Adults engage these regions after signals of response adjustment (i.e., negative feedback). Young children engage these regions after signals of response continuation (i.e., positive feedback). The neural activation patterns found in 11- to 13-year-olds indicate a transition around this age toward an increased influence of negative feedback on performance adjustment. This is the first developmental fMRI study to compare qualitative changes in brain activation during feedback learning across distinct stages of development.

  9. Development of Artificial Neural-Network-Based Models for the Simulation of Spring Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohan Raju

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the application of artificial neural networks (ANNs in predicting the weekly spring discharge. The study was based on the weekly spring discharge from a spring located near Ranichauri in Tehri Garhwal district of Uttarakhand, India. Five models were developed for predicting the spring discharge based on a weekly interval using rainfall, evaporation, temperature with a specified lag time. All models were developed both with one and two hidden layers. Each model was developed with many trials by selecting different network architectures and different number of hidden neurons; finally a best predicting model presented against each developed model. The models were trained with three different algorithms, that is, quick-propagation algorithm, batch backpropagation algorithm, and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm using weekly data from 1999 to 2005. A best model for the simulation was selected from the three presented algorithms using the statistical criteria such as correlation coefficient (, determination coefficient, or Nash Sutcliff's efficiency (DC. Finally, optimized number of neurons were considered for the best model. Training and testing results revealed that the models were predicting the weekly spring discharge satisfactorily. Based on these criteria, ANN-based model results in better agreement for the computation of spring discharge. LMR models were also developed in the study, and they also gave good results, but, when compared with the ANN methodology, ANN resulted in better optimized values.

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH OF ULTRASONIC OSCILLATORY SYSTEM FOR HARDENING OF SPRING PLATE BILLETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tomilo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various schemes of ultrasonic oscillatory system are developed: with a «force nonsensitive» support, with a «force sensitive» support, with the deforming steel balls in bulk. Results of the ultrasonic treatment showed that hardening of a surface of the samples took place when the vibration amplitude of a radiator exceeds a certain level. The level of hardening increases with increase in amplitude of fluctuations of a radiator. Higher level of hardening is registered when the surface is treated by steel balls.

  11. Development of new finite element by source method. 2nd Report. Plate bending element; Source wo mochiita atarashii yugen yoso no kaihatsu. 2. Itamage yoso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neki, I.; Tada, T. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports a method to develop a new finite element by source (FES) for a two-dimensional plane problem and a three-dimensional solid problem as a method to analyze ship body structures. The paper describes development of a plate bending element by using a similar method, and the fundamental principle thereof. The present method can prepare a finite element of an arbitrary shape by simply providing a contact point only on a boundary. It can also derive good calculation accuracy with less number of contact points and elements. These facts are shown by examples of analyses on a square plate, a triangle plate and a semi-circular plate. Particularly, since a plate bending problem has a large order of differential calculus in a governing equation, this method being a semi-analytical method derives a result with very good accuracy even with less number of contact points. A hypothetical boundary method or a hypothetical electric charge method presents not a very high accuracy even if a large number of contact points are provided. This is because the method hypothesizes only a bending moment vertical to the boundary, but does not consider a source of the moment relative to the boundary. In contrast, the present method hypothesizes both of bending and twisting as the sources, hence its accuracy is better than with the above two methods. 5 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Development and life cycle analysis of double slope active solar still with flat plate collector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Sethi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Potable water is an essential ingredient of socio-economic development and economic growth. Often water sources are brackish (i.e. contain dissolved salts and/or contain harmful bacteria and therefore cannot be used for drinking. In addition, there are many coastal locations where seawater is abundant but potable water is not available. This study is focused on a development of solar still with flat plat collector for water desalination considered for small scale applications at remote locations where only saline water is available. In this paper the cost of distilled water per kg has been calculated by using the concept of life cycle cost analysis. The pay back periods for different conditions of the distribution of distilled water, namely at the cost it is produced and at the selling price on market rate have been evaluated. The cost of water per kg is minimum Rs. 0.59, when the interest rate and the lifetime of solar still are taken as 4% and 50 years respectively. The lowest payback time 1.23 years is obtained when the selling price of water Rs. 10 per kg.

  13. Neural signal registration and analysis of axons grown in microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigareva, Y.; Malishev, E.; Gladkov, A.; Kolpakov, V.; Bukatin, A.; Mukhina, I.; Kazantsev, V.; Pimashkin, A.

    2016-08-01

    Registration of neuronal bioelectrical signals remains one of the main physical tools to study fundamental mechanisms of signal processing in the brain. Neurons generate spiking patterns which propagate through complex map of neural network connectivity. Extracellular recording of isolated axons grown in microchannels provides amplification of the signal for detailed study of spike propagation. In this study we used neuronal hippocampal cultures grown in microfluidic devices combined with microelectrode arrays to investigate a changes of electrical activity during neural network development. We found that after 5 days in vitro after culture plating the spiking activity appears first in microchannels and on the next 2-3 days appears on the electrodes of overall neural network. We conclude that such approach provides a convenient method to study neural signal processing and functional structure development on a single cell and network level of the neuronal culture.

  14. Experience Shapes the Development of Neural Substrates of Face Processing in Human Ventral Temporal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golarai, Golijeh; Liberman, Alina; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-02-01

    In adult humans, the ventral temporal cortex (VTC) represents faces in a reproducible topology. However, it is unknown what role visual experience plays in the development of this topology. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults, we found a sequential development, in which the topology of face-selective activations across the VTC was matured by age 7, but the spatial extent and degree of face selectivity continued to develop past age 7 into adulthood. Importantly, own- and other-age faces were differentially represented, both in the distributed multivoxel patterns across the VTC, and also in the magnitude of responses of face-selective regions. These results provide strong evidence that experience shapes cortical representations of faces during development from childhood to adulthood. Our findings have important implications for the role of experience and age in shaping the neural substrates of face processing in the human VTC. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Development of modularity in the neural activity of children’s brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    We study how modularity of the human brain changes as children develop into adults. Theory suggests that modularity can enhance the response function of a networked system subject to changing external stimuli. Thus, greater cognitive performance might be achieved for more modular neural activity, and modularity might likely increase as children develop. The value of modularity calculated from fMRI data is observed to increase during childhood development and peak in young adulthood. Head motion is deconvolved from the fMRI data, and it is shown that the dependence of modularity on age is independent of the magnitude of head motion. A model is presented to illustrate how modularity can provide greater cognitive performance at short times, i.e. task switching. A fitness function is extracted from the model. Quasispecies theory is used to predict how the average modularity evolves with age, illustrating the increase of modularity during development from children to adults that arises from selection for rapid cognitive function in young adults. Experiments exploring the effect of modularity on cognitive performance are suggested. Modularity may be a potential biomarker for injury, rehabilitation, or disease. PMID:25619207

  16. Early warning of illegal development for protected areas by integrating cellular automata with neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Lao, Chunhua; Liu, Yilun; Liu, Xiaoping; Chen, Yimin; Li, Shaoying; Ai, Bing; He, Zijian

    2013-11-30

    Ecological security has become a major issue under fast urbanization in China. As the first two cities in this country, Shenzhen and Dongguan issued the ordinance of Eco-designated Line of Control (ELC) to "wire" ecologically important areas for strict protection in 2005 and 2009 respectively. Early warning systems (EWS) are a useful tool for assisting the implementation ELC. In this study, a multi-model approach is proposed for the early warning of illegal development by integrating cellular automata (CA) and artificial neural networks (ANN). The objective is to prevent the ecological risks or catastrophe caused by such development at an early stage. The integrated model is calibrated by using the empirical information from both remote sensing and handheld GPS (global positioning systems). The MAR indicator which is the ratio of missing alarms to all the warnings is proposed for better assessment of the model performance. It is found that the fast urban development has caused significant threats to natural-area protection in the study area. The integration of CA, ANN and GPS provides a powerful tool for describing and predicting illegal development which is in highly non-linear and fragmented forms. The comparison shows that this multi-model approach has much better performances than the single-model approach for the early warning. Compared with the single models of CA and ANN, this integrated multi-model can improve the value of MAR by 65.48% and 5.17% respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of modularity in the neural activity of childrenʼs brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Man; Deem, Michael W.

    2015-02-01

    We study how modularity of the human brain changes as children develop into adults. Theory suggests that modularity can enhance the response function of a networked system subject to changing external stimuli. Thus, greater cognitive performance might be achieved for more modular neural activity, and modularity might likely increase as children develop. The value of modularity calculated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data is observed to increase during childhood development and peak in young adulthood. Head motion is deconvolved from the fMRI data, and it is shown that the dependence of modularity on age is independent of the magnitude of head motion. A model is presented to illustrate how modularity can provide greater cognitive performance at short times, i.e. task switching. A fitness function is extracted from the model. Quasispecies theory is used to predict how the average modularity evolves with age, illustrating the increase of modularity during development from children to adults that arises from selection for rapid cognitive function in young adults. Experiments exploring the effect of modularity on cognitive performance are suggested. Modularity may be a potential biomarker for injury, rehabilitation, or disease.

  18. Artificial Neural Network Test Support Development for the Space Shuttle PRCS Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    A significant anomaly, Fuel Valve Pilot Seal Extrusion, is affecting the Shuttle Primary Reaction Control System (PRCS) Thrusters, and has caused 79 to fail. To help address this problem, a Shuttle PRCS Thruster Process Evaluation Team (TPET) was formed. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) and Boeing members of the TPET have identified many discrete valve current trace characteristics that are predictive of the problem. However, these are difficult and time consuming to identify and trend by manual analysis. Based on this exhaustive analysis over months, 22 thrusters previously delivered by the Depot were identified as high risk for flight failures. Although these had only recently been installed, they had to be removed from Shuttles OV103 and OV104 for reprocessing, by directive of the Shuttle Project Office. The resulting impact of the thruster removal, replacement, and valve replacement was significant (months of work and hundreds of thousands of dollars). Much of this could have been saved had the proposed Neural Network (NN) tool described in this paper been in place. In addition to the significant benefits to the Shuttle indicated above, the development and implementation of this type of testing will be the genesis for potential Quality improvements across many areas of WSTF test data analysis and will be shared with other NASA centers. Future tests can be designed to incorporate engineering experience via Artificial Neural Nets (ANN) into depot level acceptance of hardware. Additionally, results were shared with a NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Super Problem Response Team (SPRT). There was extensive interest voiced among many different personnel from several centers. There are potential spin-offs of this effort that can be directly applied to other data acquisition systems as well as vehicle health management for current and future flight vehicles.

  19. Multipotent neural stem cells generate glial cells of the central complex through transit amplifying intermediate progenitors in Drosophila brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorin, Gudrun; Riebli, Nadia; Popkova, Anna; Giangrande, Angela; Reichert, Heinrich

    2011-08-15

    The neural stem cells that give rise to the neural lineages of the brain can generate their progeny directly or through transit amplifying intermediate neural progenitor cells (INPs). The INP-producing neural stem cells in Drosophila are called type II neuroblasts, and their neural progeny innervate the central complex, a prominent integrative brain center. Here we use genetic lineage tracing and clonal analysis to show that the INPs of these type II neuroblast lineages give rise to glial cells as well as neurons during postembryonic brain development. Our data indicate that two main types of INP lineages are generated, namely mixed neuronal/glial lineages and neuronal lineages. Genetic loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments show that the gcm gene is necessary and sufficient for gliogenesis in these lineages. The INP-derived glial cells, like the INP-derived neuronal cells, make major contributions to the central complex. In postembryonic development, these INP-derived glial cells surround the entire developing central complex neuropile, and once the major compartments of the central complex are formed, they also delimit each of these compartments. During this process, the number of these glial cells in the central complex is increased markedly through local proliferation based on glial cell mitosis. Taken together, these findings uncover a novel and complex form of neurogliogenesis in Drosophila involving transit amplifying intermediate progenitors. Moreover, they indicate that type II neuroblasts are remarkably multipotent neural stem cells that can generate both the neuronal and the glial progeny that make major contributions to one and the same complex brain structure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. COMPUTER-SIMULATED NEURAL NETWORKS - AN APPROPRIATE MODEL FOR MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VOS, JE; SCHEEPSTRA, KA

    The idea of an artificial neural network is introduced in a historical context, and the essential aspect of it, viz., the modifiable synapse, is compared to the aspect of plasticity in the natural nervous system. Based on such an artificial neural network, a model is presented for the way in which

  1. Neural development in the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini based on anti-acetylated α-tubulin immunolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Vladimir; Mayer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    The tardigrades (water bears) are a cosmopolitan group of microscopic ecdysozoans found in a variety of aquatic and temporarily wet environments. They are members of the Panarthropoda (Tardigrada + Onychophora + Arthropoda), although their exact position within this group remains contested. Studies of embryonic development in tardigrades have been scarce and have yielded contradictory data. Therefore, we investigated the development of the nervous system in embryos of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini using immunohistochemical techniques in conjunction with confocal laser scanning microscopy in an effort to gain insight into the evolution of the nervous system in panarthropods. An antiserum against acetylated α-tubulin was used to visualize the axonal processes and general neuroanatomy in whole-mount embryos of the eutardigrade H. dujardini. Our data reveal that the tardigrade nervous system develops in an anterior-to-posterior gradient, beginning with the neural structures of the head. The brain develops as a dorsal, bilaterally symmetric structure and contains a single developing central neuropil. The stomodeal nervous system develops separately and includes at least four separate, ring-like commissures. A circumbuccal nerve ring arises late in development and innervates the circumoral sensory field. The segmental trunk ganglia likewise arise from anterior to posterior and establish links with each other via individual pioneering axons. Each hemiganglion is associated with a number of peripheral nerves, including a pair of leg nerves and a branched, dorsolateral nerve. The revealed pattern of brain development supports a single-segmented brain in tardigrades and challenges previous assignments of homology between tardigrade brain lobes and arthropod brain segments. Likewise, the tardigrade circumbuccal nerve ring cannot be homologized with the arthropod 'circumoral' nerve ring, suggesting that this structure is unique to tardigrades. Finally, we propose

  2. Involvement of Atm and Trp53 in neural cell loss due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jusik; Choi, Inseo; Lee, Youngsoo

    2017-11-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity is one of the critical features for proper neurodevelopment and inhibition of neurological diseases. The signals from both ATM and ATR to TP53 are well-known mechanisms to remove neural cells with DNA damage during neurogenesis. Here we examined the involvement of Atm and Atr in genomic instability due to Terf2 inactivation during mouse brain development. Selective inactivation of Terf2 in neural progenitors induced apoptosis, resulting in a complete loss of the brain structure. This neural loss was rescued partially in both Atm and Trp53 deficiency, but not in an Atr-deficient background in the mouse. Atm inactivation resulted in incomplete brain structures, whereas p53 deficiency led to the formation of multinucleated giant neural cells and the disruption of the brain structure. These giant neural cells disappeared in Lig4 deficiency. These data demonstrate ATM and TP53 are important for the maintenance of telomere homeostasis and the surveillance of telomere dysfunction during neurogenesis.

  3. Development of a computational model on the neural activity patterns of a visual working memory in a hierarchical feedforward Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Soyoung; Choi, Woochul; Paik, Se-Bum

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism of information processing in the human brain remains a unique challenge because the nonlinear interactions between the neurons in the network are extremely complex and because controlling every relevant parameter during an experiment is difficult. Therefore, a simulation using simplified computational models may be an effective approach. In the present study, we developed a general model of neural networks that can simulate nonlinear activity patterns in the hierarchical structure of a neural network system. To test our model, we first examined whether our simulation could match the previously-observed nonlinear features of neural activity patterns. Next, we performed a psychophysics experiment for a simple visual working memory task to evaluate whether the model could predict the performance of human subjects. Our studies show that the model is capable of reproducing the relationship between memory load and performance and may contribute, in part, to our understanding of how the structure of neural circuits can determine the nonlinear neural activity patterns in the human brain.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF NEURAL NETWORKS FOR FORECASTING OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES’ MIGRATION IN SOIL AND ALGORITHMS OF THEIR TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Kundas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the existing models and methods for forecasting chemical substances' migration in soil is contained in the paper. The paper shows that the most effective decision for solving ecological tasks in this field is an application of artificial neural networks using training «with a tutor» on the basis of an inverse error propagation algorithm. Corresponding structures of  neural networks for solution of the given problem have been developed in the paper.A new method for artificial neural network training based on the modification of an inverse error propagation algorithm while using an additional signal is proposed in the paper. The given method allows to achieve 100% convergence in the forecasting problems pertaining to chemical substances' migration in soil. 

  5. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali

    2012-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is essential for synaptic maturation and plasticity. Although its synaptic regulation has been widely studied, the control of PSD-95 cellular expression is not understood. We found that Psd-95 was controlled post-transcriptionally during neural development...

  6. Implications of a neural network model of early sensori-motor development for the field of developmental neurology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, JJ; Touwen, BCL; Vos, JE

    This paper reports on a neural network model for early sensori-motor development and on the possible implications of this research for our understanding and, eventually, treatment of motor disorders like cerebral palsy. We recapitulate the results we published in detail in a series of papers [1-4].

  7. [Development of static three dimensional screw-plate system and the biomechanic features thereof, a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie-Yu; Li, Kang-Hua; Liao, Qian-De; Zhu, Yong; Hu, Yi-He; Lei, Guang-Hua

    2009-01-06

    To develop a new internal fixation device and the matching tools for subtrochanteric fracture, investigate the biomechanical features thereof, and compare its effects with those of other instruments. A new internal fixation device, static three dimensional screw-plate system: (STDSP) was developed based on the anatomical parameters and the biomechanical characteristics of proximal femur and combined with the biomechanical advantages of the model of three-dimensional plate and multiple-screws plate fixation. Sixteen paired cadaveric adult femurs were randomly divided into 2 equal groups: fracture healing group undergoing insertion of implant and then taking out thereof with a nail left, and fracture group with a trapezoid defect to mimic subtrochanteric fracture 4 of which were fixed with dynamic hip screw (DHS) and STDSP or Gamma nail and STDSP. All the specimens underwent A-P position four point bending test, axial compression test, torsion test, and destroyable test. (1) In the fracture group, A-P position four point bending test showed that the stretch displacement of STDSP group was (0.221 +/- 0.089) mm, significantly smaller than that of the Gamma nails group [(0.506 +/- 0.086) mm, t = 38.278 P = 0.000]; Axial compression test showed that the inferior displacement of the STDSP group was (2.804 +/- 0.585) mm, significantly larger than that of the Gamma nail group [(1.874 +/- 0.549) mm, t = -5.454, P = 0.012]; Torsion test showed that the torque values at 50 and 100 of the STDSP group were (3.78 +/- 0.84) J and (2.3 +/- 1.08) J, both significantly larger than those of the Gamma nail groups [(2.3 +/- 1.08) J and (4.35 +/- 1.81) J, t = -4.729 P = 0.018, and t = -3.227 P = 0.048] and those of the DHS group [(7.3 +/- 1.273) J and (4.325 +/- 0.88) J respectively, t = -3.242 P = 0.048]; and torsion destroyable test showed that the torque values at 200 of the STDSP group was (21.88 +/- 2.51) J, significantly larger than those of the Gamma nail and DHS groups, [(14

  8. Combined application of mixture experimental design and artificial neural networks in the solid dispersion development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medarević, Djordje P; Kleinebudde, Peter; Djuriš, Jelena; Djurić, Zorica; Ibrić, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    This study for the first time demonstrates combined application of mixture experimental design and artificial neural networks (ANNs) in the solid dispersions (SDs) development. Ternary carbamazepine-Soluplus®-poloxamer 188 SDs were prepared by solvent casting method to improve carbamazepine dissolution rate. The influence of the composition of prepared SDs on carbamazepine dissolution rate was evaluated using d-optimal mixture experimental design and multilayer perceptron ANNs. Physicochemical characterization proved the presence of the most stable carbamazepine polymorph III within the SD matrix. Ternary carbamazepine-Soluplus®-poloxamer 188 SDs significantly improved carbamazepine dissolution rate compared to pure drug. Models developed by ANNs and mixture experimental design well described the relationship between proportions of SD components and percentage of carbamazepine released after 10 (Q10) and 20 (Q20) min, wherein ANN model exhibit better predictability on test data set. Proportions of carbamazepine and poloxamer 188 exhibited the highest influence on carbamazepine release rate. The highest carbamazepine release rate was observed for SDs with the lowest proportions of carbamazepine and the highest proportions of poloxamer 188. ANNs and mixture experimental design can be used as powerful data modeling tools in the systematic development of SDs. Taking into account advantages and disadvantages of both techniques, their combined application should be encouraged.

  9. Sox2 acts as a rheostat of epithelial to mesenchymal transition during neural crest development

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    Nikolaos eMandalos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of self-renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells into the cranial neural crest (CNC pool ensures proper head development, guided by signaling pathways such as BMPs, FGFs, Shh and Notch. Here, we show that murine Sox2 plays an essential role in controlling progenitor cell behavior during craniofacial development. A Conditional by Inversion Sox2 allele (Sox2COIN has been employed to generate an epiblast ablation of Sox2 function (Sox2EpINV. Sox2EpINV/+(H haploinsufficient and conditional (Sox2EpINV/mosaic mutant embryos proceed beyond gastrulation and die around E11. These mutant embryos exhibit severe anterior malformations, with hydrocephaly and frontonasal truncations, which could be attributed to the deregulation of CNC progenitor cells during their epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This irregularity results in an exacerbated and aberrant migration of Sox10+ NCC in the branchial arches and frontonasal process of the Sox2 mutant embryos. These results suggest a novel role for Sox2 as a regulator of the epithelial to mesenchymal transitions that are important for the cell flow in the developing head.

  10. Development of compositional and contextual communicable congruence in robots by using dynamic neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gibeom; Tani, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The current study presents neurorobotics experiments on acquisition of skills for "communicable congruence" with human via learning. A dynamic neural network model which is characterized by its multiple timescale dynamics property was utilized as a neuromorphic model for controlling a humanoid robot. In the experimental task, the humanoid robot was trained to generate specific sequential movement patterns as responding to various sequences of imperative gesture patterns demonstrated by the human subjects by following predefined compositional semantic rules. The experimental results showed that (1) the adopted MTRNN can achieve generalization by learning in the lower feature perception level by using a limited set of tutoring patterns, (2) the MTRNN can learn to extract compositional semantic rules with generalization in its higher level characterized by slow timescale dynamics, (3) the MTRNN can develop another type of cognitive capability for controlling the internal contextual processes as situated to on-going task sequences without being provided with cues for explicitly indicating task segmentation points. The analysis on the dynamic property developed in the MTRNN via learning indicated that the aforementioned cognitive mechanisms were achieved by self-organization of adequate functional hierarchy by utilizing the constraint of the multiple timescale property and the topological connectivity imposed on the network configuration. These results of the current research could contribute to developments of socially intelligent robots endowed with cognitive communicative competency similar to that of human. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Music training relates to the development of neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention

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    Dana L. Strait

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Selective attention decreases trial-to-trial variability in cortical auditory-evoked activity. This effect increases over the course of maturation, potentially reflecting the gradual development of selective attention and inhibitory control. Work in adults indicates that music training may alter the development of this neural response characteristic, especially over brain regions associated with executive control: in adult musicians, attention decreases variability in auditory-evoked responses recorded over prefrontal cortex to a greater extent than in nonmusicians. We aimed to determine whether this musician-associated effect emerges during childhood, when selective attention and inhibitory control are under development. We compared cortical auditory-evoked variability to attended and ignored speech streams in musicians and nonmusicians across three age groups: preschoolers, school-aged children and young adults. Results reveal that childhood music training is associated with reduced auditory-evoked response variability recorded over prefrontal cortex during selective auditory attention in school-aged child and adult musicians. Preschoolers, on the other hand, demonstrate no impact of selective attention on cortical response variability and no musician distinctions. This finding is consistent with the gradual emergence of attention during this period and may suggest no pre-existing differences in this attention-related cortical metric between children who undergo music training and those who do not.

  12. Music training relates to the development of neural mechanisms of selective auditory attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strait, Dana L; Slater, Jessica; O'Connell, Samantha; Kraus, Nina

    2015-04-01

    Selective attention decreases trial-to-trial variability in cortical auditory-evoked activity. This effect increases over the course of maturation, potentially reflecting the gradual development of selective attention and inhibitory control. Work in adults indicates that music training may alter the development of this neural response characteristic, especially over brain regions associated with executive control: in adult musicians, attention decreases variability in auditory-evoked responses recorded over prefrontal cortex to a greater extent than in nonmusicians. We aimed to determine whether this musician-associated effect emerges during childhood, when selective attention and inhibitory control are under development. We compared cortical auditory-evoked variability to attended and ignored speech streams in musicians and nonmusicians across three age groups: preschoolers, school-aged children and young adults. Results reveal that childhood music training is associated with reduced auditory-evoked response variability recorded over prefrontal cortex during selective auditory attention in school-aged child and adult musicians. Preschoolers, on the other hand, demonstrate no impact of selective attention on cortical response variability and no musician distinctions. This finding is consistent with the gradual emergence of attention during this period and may suggest no pre-existing differences in this attention-related cortical metric between children who undergo music training and those who do not. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Distinct intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics regulate apical constriction and differentially contribute to neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Sato, Masanao; Koyama, Hiroshi; Hara, Yusuke; Hayashi, Kentaro; Yasue, Naoko; Imamura, Hiromi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Nagai, Takeharu; Campbell, Robert E; Ueno, Naoto

    2017-04-01

    Early in the development of the central nervous system, progenitor cells undergo a shape change, called apical constriction, that triggers the neural plate to form a tubular structure. How apical constriction in the neural plate is controlled and how it contributes to tissue morphogenesis are not fully understood. In this study, we show that intracellular calcium ions (Ca(2+)) are required for Xenopus neural tube formation and that there are two types of Ca(2+)-concentration changes, a single-cell and a multicellular wave-like fluctuation, in the developing neural plate. Quantitative imaging analyses revealed that transient increases in Ca(2+) concentration induced cortical F-actin remodeling, apical constriction and accelerations of the closing movement of the neural plate. We also show that extracellular ATP and N-cadherin (cdh2) participate in the Ca(2+)-induced apical constriction. Furthermore, our mathematical model suggests that the effect of Ca(2+) fluctuations on tissue morphogenesis is independent of fluctuation frequency and that fluctuations affecting individual cells are more efficient than those at the multicellular level. We propose that distinct Ca(2+) signaling patterns differentially modulate apical constriction for efficient epithelial folding and that this mechanism has a broad range of physiological outcomes. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Characterization of Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Polypropylene-Based Composites for Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates and Development of Educational Tools in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Gaxiola, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this project we developed conductive thermoplastic resins by adding varying amounts of three different carbon fillers: carbon black (CB), synthetic graphite (SG) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) to a polypropylene matrix for application as fuel cell bipolar plates. This component of fuel cells provides mechanical support to the stack,…

  15. 40LoVe and Samba are involved in Xenopus neural development and functionally distinct from hnRNP AB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andreou

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs comprise a large group of modular RNA-binding proteins classified according to their conserved domains. This modular nature, coupled with a large choice of alternative splice variants generates functional diversity. Here, we investigate the biological differences between 40LoVe, its splice variant Samba and its pseudoallele hnRNP AB in neural development. Loss of function experiments lead to defects in neural development with reduction of eye size, which stem primarily from increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in neural tissues. Despite very high homology between 40LoVe/Samba and hnRNP AB, these proteins display major differences in localization, which appear to be in part responsible for functional differences. Specifically, we show that the 40Love/Samba carboxy-terminal domain (GRD enables nucleocytoplasmic shuttling behavior. This domain is slightly different in hnRNP AB, leading to nuclear-restricted localization. Finally, we show that shuttling is required for 40LoVe/Samba function in neural development.

  16. Development of a Plate-Based Screening Assay to Investigate the Substrate Specificity of the PRMT Family of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hao C; Wang, Min; Salsburg, Andrew; Knuckley, Bryan

    2015-09-14

    There are nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs 1-9) expressed in humans that vary in both subcellular localization and substrate specificity. The variation in substrate specificity between isozymes leads to competing effects that result in either activation or repression of tumor suppressor genes. Current methods used to study substrate specificity for these enzymes utilize radioisotopic labeling of substrates, mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples, or coupled assays that monitor cofactor degradation. Herein, we report the development of a rapid, nonradioactive, and sensitive method for screening multiple peptides in parallel to gain insight into the substrate specificity of PRMT enzymes. Our assay provides a major advantage over other high-throughput screening assays (e.g., ELISA, AlphaScreen chemiluminescence) by eliminating the need for purification of individual peptides and provides a timesaving, cost-effective alternative to the traditional PRMT assays. A one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide library was synthesized and subsequently screened against PRMT1 in a 96-well plate. This screen resulted in identification of a novel PRMT1 substrate with kinetic parameters similar to histone H4-21 (e.g., the best-known PRMT1 peptide substrate).

  17. A Simulation Tool for Geometrical Analysis and Optimization of Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Development, Validation and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Pino

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar plates (BPs are one of the most important components in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC due to the numerous functions they perform. The objective of the research work described in this paper was to develop a simplified and validated method based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD, aimed at the analysis and study of the influence of geometrical parameters of BPs on the operation of a cell. A complete sensibility analysis of the influence of dimensions and shape of the BP can be obtained through a simplified CFD model without including the complexity of other components of the PEMFC. This model is compared with the PEM Fuel Cell Module of the FLUENT software, which includes the physical and chemical phenomena relevant in PEMFCs. Results with both models regarding the flow field inside the channels and local current densities are obtained and compared. The results show that it is possible to use the simple model as a standard tool for geometrical analysis of BPs, and results of a sensitivity analysis using the simplified model are presented and discussed.

  18. Development of a single-photon-counting camera with use of a triple-stacked micro-channel plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Naruomi; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    At the quantum-mechanical level, all substances (not merely electromagnetic waves such as light and X-rays) exhibit wave–particle duality. Whereas students of radiation science can easily understand the wave nature of electromagnetic waves, the particle (photon) nature may elude them. Therefore, to assist students in understanding the wave–particle duality of electromagnetic waves, we have developed a photon-counting camera that captures single photons in two-dimensional images. As an image intensifier, this camera has a triple-stacked micro-channel plate (MCP) with an amplification factor of 10(6). The ultra-low light of a single photon entering the camera is first converted to an electron through the photoelectric effect on the photocathode. The electron is intensified by the triple-stacked MCP and then converted to a visible light distribution, which is measured by a high-sensitivity complementary metal oxide semiconductor image sensor. Because it detects individual photons, the photon-counting camera is expected to provide students with a complete understanding of the particle nature of electromagnetic waves. Moreover, it measures ultra-weak light that cannot be detected by ordinary low-sensitivity cameras. Therefore, it is suitable for experimental research on scintillator luminescence, biophoton detection, and similar topics.

  19. Recent Advances in the Development and Application of Power Plate Transducers in Dense Gas Extraction and Aerosol Agglomeration Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera, E.; Cardoni, A.; Gallego-Juárez, J. A.; Acosta, V. M.; Blanco, A.; Rodríguez, G.; Blasco, M.; Herranz, L. E.

    Power ultrasound (PU) is an emerging, innovative, energy saving and environmental friendly technology that is generating a great interest in sectors such as food and pharmaceutical industries, green chemistry, environmental pollution, and other processes, where sustainable and energy efficient methods are required to improve and/or produce specific effects. Two typical effects of PU are the enhancement of mass transfer in gases and liquids, and the induction of particle agglomeration in aerosols. These effects are activated by a variety of mechanisms associated to the nonlinear propagation of high amplitude ultrasonic waves such as diffusion, agitation, entrainment, turbulence, etc. During the last years a great effort has been jointly made by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the company Pusonics towards introducing novel processes into the market based on airborne ultrasonic plate transducers. This technology was specifically developed for the treatment of gas and multiphasic media characterized by low specific acoustic impedance and high acoustic absorption. Different strategies have been developed to mitigate the effects of the nonlinear dynamic behavior of such ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers in order to enhance and stabilize their response at operational power conditions. This work deals with the latter advances in the mitigation of nonlinear problems found in power transducers; besides it describes two applications assisted by ultrasound developed at semi-industrial and laboratory scales and consisting in extraction via dense gases and particle agglomeration. Dense Gas Extraction (DGE) assisted by PU is a new process with a potential to enhance the extraction kinetics with supercritical CO2. Acoustic agglomeration of fine aerosol particles has a great potential for the treatment of air pollution problems generated by particulate materials. Experimental and numerical results in both processes will be shown and discussed.

  20. Development of a stimuli-responsive polymer nanocomposite toward biologically optimized, MEMS-based neural probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A. E.; Capadona, J. R.; Shanmuganathan, K.; Hsu, L.; Rowan, S. J.; Weder, C.; Tyler, D. J.; Zorman, C. A.

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports the development of micromachining processes and mechanical evaluation of a stimuli-responsive, mechanically dynamic polymer nanocomposite for biomedical microsystems. This nanocomposite consists of a cellulose nanofiber network encased in a polyvinyl acetate matrix. Micromachined tensile testing structures fabricated from the nanocomposite displayed a reversible and switchable stiffness comparable to bulk samples, with a Young's modulus of 3420 MPa when dry, reducing to ~20 MPa when wet, and a stiff-to-flexible transition time of ~300 s. This mechanically dynamic behavior is particularly attractive for the development of adaptive intracortical probes that are sufficiently stiff to insert into the brain without buckling, but become highly compliant upon insertion. Along these lines, a micromachined neural probe incorporating parylene insulating/moisture barrier layers and Ti/Au electrodes was fabricated from the nanocomposite using a fabrication process designed specifically for this chemical- and temperature-sensitive material. It was found that the parylene layers only slightly increased the stiffness of the probe in the wet state in spite of its much higher Young's modulus. Furthermore, the Ti/Au electrodes exhibited impedance comparable to Au electrodes on conventional substrates. Swelling of the nanocomposite was highly anisotropic favoring the thickness dimension by a factor of 8 to 12, leading to excellent adhesion between the nanocomposite and parylene layers and no discernable deformation of the probes when deployed in deionized water.

  1. CTCF Is Required for Neural Development and Stochastic Expression of Clustered Pcdh Genes in Neurons

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    Teruyoshi Hirayama

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF is a key molecule for chromatin conformational changes that promote cellular diversity, but nothing is known about its role in neurons. Here, we produced mice with a conditional knockout (cKO of CTCF in postmitotic projection neurons, mostly in the dorsal telencephalon. The CTCF-cKO mice exhibited postnatal growth retardation and abnormal behavior and had defects in functional somatosensory mapping in the brain. In terms of gene expression, 390 transcripts were expressed at significantly different levels between CTCF-deficient and control cortex and hippocampus. In particular, the levels of 53 isoforms of the clustered protocadherin (Pcdh genes, which are stochastically expressed in each neuron, declined markedly. Each CTCF-deficient neuron showed defects in dendritic arborization and spine density during brain development. Their excitatory postsynaptic currents showed normal amplitude but occurred with low frequency. Our results indicate that CTCF regulates functional neural development and neuronal diversity by controlling clustered Pcdh expression.

  2. Excessive Sensory Stimulation during Development Alters Neural Plasticity and Vulnerability to Cocaine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder, Shilpa; Donckels, Elizabeth A; Ramirez, Julian S B; Christakis, Dimitri A; Ramirez, Jan-Marino; Ferguson, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Early life experiences affect the formation of neuronal networks, which can have a profound impact on brain function and behavior later in life. Previous work has shown that mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation during development are hyperactive and novelty seeking, and display impaired cognition compared with controls. In this study, we addressed the issue of whether excessive sensory stimulation during development could alter behaviors related to addiction and underlying circuitry in CD-1 mice. We found that the reinforcing properties of cocaine were significantly enhanced in mice exposed to excessive sensory stimulation. Moreover, although these mice displayed hyperactivity that became more pronounced over time, they showed impaired persistence of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. These behavioral effects were associated with alterations in glutamatergic transmission in the nucleus accumbens and amygdala. Together, these findings suggest that excessive sensory stimulation in early life significantly alters drug reward and the neural circuits that regulate addiction and attention deficit hyperactivity. These observations highlight the consequences of early life experiences and may have important implications for children growing up in today's complex technological environment.

  3. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

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    Linya You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1 is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  4. The Netrin-related domain of Sfrp1 interacts with Wnt ligands and antagonizes their activity in the anterior neural plate

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    Esteve Pilar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs are multifunctional modulators of Wnt and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein signalling necessary for the development of most organs and the homeostasis of different adult tissues. SFRPs fold in two independent domains: the cysteine rich domain (SfrpCRD related to the extracellular portion of Frizzled (Fz, Wnt receptors and the Netrin module (SfrpNTR defined by homologies with molecules such as Netrin-1, inhibitors of metalloproteinases and complement proteins. Due to its structural relationship with Fz, it is believed that SfrpCRD interferes with Wnt signalling by binding and sequestering the ligand. In contrast, the functional relevance of the SfrpNTR has been barely addressed. Results Here, we combine biochemical studies, mutational analysis and functional assays in cell culture and medaka-fish embryos to show that the Sfrp1NTR mimics the function of the entire molecule, binds to Wnt8 and antagonizes Wnt canonical signalling. This activity requires intact tertiary structure and is shared by the distantly related Netrin-1NTR. In contrast, the Sfrp1CRD cannot mirror the function of the entire molecule in vivo but interacts with Fz receptors and antagonizes Wnt8-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion On the basis of these results, we propose that SFRP modulation of Wnt signalling may involve multiple and differential interactions among Wnt, Fz and SFRPs.

  5. Methylmercury exposure during early Xenopus laevis development affects cell proliferation and death but not neural progenitor specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyck, Ryan W; Nagarkar, Maitreyi; Olsen, Nina; Clamons, Samuel E; Saha, Margaret S

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widespread environmental toxin that preferentially and adversely affects developing organisms. To investigate the impact of MeHg toxicity on the formation of the vertebrate nervous system at physiologically relevant concentrations, we designed a graded phenotype scale for evaluating Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to MeHg in solution. Embryos displayed a range of abnormalities in response to MeHg, particularly in brain development, which is influenced by both MeHg concentration and the number of embryos per ml of exposure solution. A TC50 of ~50μg/l and LC50 of ~100μg/l were found when maintaining embryos at a density of one per ml, and both increased with increasing embryo density. In situ hybridization and microarray analysis showed no significant change in expression of early neural patterning genes including sox2, en2, or delta; however a noticeable decrease was observed in the terminal neural differentiation genes GAD and xGAT, but not xVGlut. PCNA, a marker for proliferating cells, was negatively correlated with MeHg dose, with a significant reduction in cell number in the forebrain and spinal cord of exposed embryos by tadpole stages. Conversely, the number of apoptotic cells in neural regions detected by a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay was significantly increased. These results provide evidence that disruption of embryonic neural development by MeHg may not be directly due to a loss of neural progenitor specification and gene transcription, but to a more general decrease in cell proliferation and increase in cell death throughout the developing nervous system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Comparing the neural bases of self-referential processing in typically developing and 22q11.2 adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Lagioia, Annalaura; Salomon, Roy; D’Argembeau, Arnaud; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The investigation of self-reflective processing during adolescence is relevant, as this period is characterized by deep reorganization of the self-concept. It may be the case that an atypical development of brain regions underlying self-reflective processing increases the risk for psychological disorders and impaired social functioning. In this study, we investigated the neural bases of self- and other-related processing in typically developing adolescents and youths with 22q11.2 deletion syn...

  7. Behavioral and neural correlates of emotional development: typically developing infants and infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Porto, Juliana; L Nunes, Magda; Nelson, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    To describe the main findings of studies of behavioral and neural correlates regarding the development of facial emotion processing during the first year of life in typically developing infants and infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers. Comprehensive, non-systematic review of the literature on studies about individual differences in facial emotion processing by newborns and infants over the first year of life. Maternal stress related to depression and anxiety has been associated to atypical emotional processing and attentional behaviors in the offspring. Recent neurophysiological studies using electroencephalogram and event-related potentials have begun to shed light on the possible mechanisms underlying such behaviors. Infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers have increased risk for several adverse outcomes across the lifespan. Further neurobehavioral investigations and the promotion of clinical and developmental research integration might eventually contribute to refining screening tools, improving treatment, and enabling primary prevention interventions for children at risk. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Behavioral and neural correlates of emotional development: typically developing infants and infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana A. Porto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To describe the main findings of studies of behavioral and neural correlates regarding the development of facial emotion processing during the first year of life in typically developing infants and infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers. Sources: Comprehensive, non-systematic review of the literature on studies about individual differences in facial emotion processing by newborns and infants over the first year of life. Summary of the findings: Maternal stress related to depression and anxiety has been associated to atypical emotional processing and attentional behaviors in the offspring. Recent neurophysiological studies using electroencephalogram and event-related potentials have begun to shed light on the possible mechanisms underlying such behaviors. Conclusions: Infants of depressed and/or anxious mothers have increased risk for several adverse outcomes across the lifespan. Further neurobehavioral investigations and the promotion of clinical and developmental research integration might eventually contribute to refining screening tools, improving treatment, and enabling primary prevention interventions for children at risk.

  9. Recent developments in wireless recording from the nervous system with ultrasonic neural dust (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2017-05-01

    The emerging field of bioelectronic medicine seeks methods for deciphering and modulating electrophysiological activity in the body to attain therapeutic effects at target organs. Current approaches to interfacing with peripheral nerves and muscles rely heavily on wires, creating problems for chronic use, while emerging wireless approaches lack the size scalability necessary to interrogate small-diameter nerves. Furthermore, conventional electrode-based technologies lack the capability to record from nerves with high spatial resolution or to record independently from many discrete sites within a nerve bundle. We recently demonstrated (Seo et al., arXiV, 2013; Seo et al., Neuron, 2016) "neural dust," a wireless and scalable ultrasonic backscatter system for powering and communicating with implanted bioelectronics. There, we showed that ultrasound is effective at delivering power to mm-scale devices in tissue; likewise, passive, battery-less communication using backscatter enabled high-fidelity transmission of electromyogram (EMG) and electroneurogram (ENG) signals from anesthetized rats. In this talk, I will review recent developments from my group and collaborators in this area.

  10. Development and application of Artificial Neural Networks in forecasting the maximum daily precipitation at Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastos, P. T.; Paliatsos, A. G.; Larissi, I. K.; Moustris, K. P.

    2012-04-01

    Extreme daily precipitation events are involved in significant environmental damages, even in life loss, because of causing adverse impacts, such as flash floods, in urban and sometimes in rural areas. Thus, long-term forecast of such events is of great importance, in order to be prepared the local authorities to confront and mitigate the adverse consequences. The objective of this study is to estimate the possibility of forecasting the maximum daily precipitation for the next coming year. For this reason, appropriate prognostic models, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) were developed and applied. The data used for the analysis concern daily precipitation totals, which have been recorded at National Observatory of Athens (NOA), during the period 1891-2009. To evaluate the potential of daily extreme precipitation prognosis by the applied ANNs, a different period was considered than the one used for the ANNs training. Thus, the datasets of the period 1891-1980 were used as training datasets, while the datasets of the period 1981-2009 as validation datasets. Appropriate statistical indices, such as the Coefficient of Determination (R2), the Index of Agreement (IA), the Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), and the Mean Bias Error (MBE) were applied to test the reliability of the models. The findings of the analysis showed that, a quite satisfactory relationship at the statistically significant level of p<0.01 appears between the forecasted maximum daily precipitation totals for the next coming year and the respective observed ones.

  11. Neural development of mentalizing in moral judgment from adolescence to adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harenski, Carla L.; Harenski, Keith A.; Shane, Matthew S.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2011-01-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying moral judgment have been extensively studied in healthy adults. How these mechanisms evolve from adolescence to adulthood has received less attention. Brain regions that have been consistently implicated in moral judgment in adults, including the superior temporal cortex and prefrontal cortex, undergo extensive developmental changes from adolescence to adulthood. Thus, their role in moral judgment may also change over time. In the present study, 51 healthy male participants age 13–53 were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they viewed pictures that did or did not depict situations considered by most individuals to represent moral violations, and rated their degree of moral violation severity. Consistent with predictions, a regression analysis revealed a positive correlation between age and hemodynamic activity in the temporo-parietal junction when participants made decisions regarding moral severity. This region is known to contribute to mentalizing processes during moral judgment in adults and suggests that adolescents use these types of inferences less during moral judgment than do adults. A positive correlation with age was also present in the posterior cingulate. Overall, the results suggest that the brain regions utilized in moral judgment change over development. PMID:22267967

  12. Alcohol exposure induces chick craniofacial bone defects by negatively affecting cranial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guang; Lin, Zhuangling; Wu, Yushi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Meng; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Chuai, Manli; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-11-05

    Excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy could lead to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). However, the molecular mechanism leading to craniofacial abnormality, a feature of FAS, is still poorly understood. The cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) contribute to the formation of the craniofacial bones. Therefore, NCCs exposed to ethanol was investigated - using chick embryos and in vitro explant culture as experimental models. We demonstrated that exposure to 2% ethanol induced craniofacial defects, which includes parietal defect, in the developing chick fetus. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that ethanol treatment downregulated Ap-2ɑ, Pax7 and HNK-1 expressions by cranial NCCs. Using double-immunofluorescent stainings for Ap-2ɑ/pHIS3 and Ap-2ɑ/c-Caspase3, we showed that ethanol treatment inhibited cranial NCC proliferation and increased NCC apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, ethanol treatment of the dorsal neuroepithelium increased Laminin, N-Cadherin and Cadherin 6B expressions while Cadherin 7 expression was repressed. In situ hybridization also revealed that ethanol treatment up-regulated Cadherin 6B expression but down-regulated slug, Msx1, FoxD3 and BMP4 expressions. In summary, our experimental results demonstrated that ethanol treatment interferes with the production of cranial NCCs by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of these cells. In addition, ethanol affected the delamination, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration of cranial NCCs, which may have contributed to the etiology of the craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Deep biomarkers of human aging: Application of deep neural networks to biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putin, Evgeny; Mamoshina, Polina; Aliper, Alexander; Korzinkin, Mikhail; Moskalev, Alexey; Kolosov, Alexey; Ostrovskiy, Alexander; Cantor, Charles; Vijg, Jan; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2016-05-01

    One of the major impediments in human aging research is the absence of a comprehensive and actionable set of biomarkers that may be targeted and measured to track the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. In this study, we designed a modular ensemble of 21 deep neural networks (DNNs) of varying depth, structure and optimization to predict human chronological age using a basic blood test. To train the DNNs, we used over 60,000 samples from common blood biochemistry and cell count tests from routine health exams performed by a single laboratory and linked to chronological age and sex. The best performing DNN in the ensemble demonstrated 81.5 % epsilon-accuracy r = 0.90 with R(2) = 0.80 and MAE = 6.07 years in predicting chronological age within a 10 year frame, while the entire ensemble achieved 83.5% epsilon-accuracy r = 0.91 with R(2) = 0.82 and MAE = 5.55 years. The ensemble also identified the 5 most important markers for predicting human chronological age: albumin, glucose, alkaline phosphatase, urea and erythrocytes. To allow for public testing and evaluate real-life performance of the predictor, we developed an online system available at http://www.aging.ai. The ensemble approach may facilitate integration of multi-modal data linked to chronological age and sex that may lead to simple, minimally invasive, and affordable methods of tracking integrated biomarkers of aging in humans and performing cross-species feature importance analysis.

  14. Development of a highly accurate OCR system by neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Joe C. H.; Man, Gary M. T.; Hung, Yan C.

    1993-04-01

    We have developed an application software system for font and size invariant optical character recognition (OCR). A preliminary front-end process, which handles gray scale normalization, noise elimination, line finding, and character block segmentation, has been included in our system. But the main characteristic of our system is that we adopt a Fourier descriptors (FDs) based feature extraction approach and a multicategory back-propagation neural network classifier for the recognition. Instead of using one set of FDs to represent the image object as in conventional FDs approach, we use three sets of FDs to represent different portions of the object. We find this approach can solve the intrinsic problem of FDs caused by their rotational and reflectional invariance properties. Thus, our existing method can correctly classify ambiguous characters like 5, 2, p, q, etc. Our system will become a primitive building block for later more complex OCR systems. In general, the back propagation provides a gradient descent optimization in training. Without prior knowledge of the mathematical relation between the input and output, the network is highly efficient to map a large variety set of input patterns to an arbitrary set of output patterns after successful training. Thus, the system is not only capable of understanding printed English text and isolated cursive scripts, but also can be extended to read other symbols at the expense of additional training time. At present, a 99.8 percent rate of recognition accuracy has already been achieved for trained English samples in our experiment.

  15. Increased sleep depth in developing neural networks: new insights from sleep restriction in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salome Kurth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain networks respond to sleep deprivation or restriction with increased sleep depth, which is quantified as slow-wave activity (SWA in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG. When adults are sleep deprived, this homeostatic response is most pronounced over prefrontal brain regions. However, it is unknown how children’s developing brain networks respond to acute sleep restriction, and whether this response is linked to myelination, an ongoing process in childhood that is critical for brain development and cortical integration. We implemented a bedtime delay protocol in 5- to 12-year-old children to obtain partial sleep restriction (1-night; 50% of their habitual sleep. High-density sleep EEG was assessed during habitual and restricted sleep and brain myelin content was obtained using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging. The effect of sleep restriction was analyzed using statistical non-parametric mapping with supra-threshold cluster analysis. We observed a localized homeostatic SWA response following sleep restriction in a specific parieto-occipital region. The restricted/habitual SWA ratio was negatively associated with myelin water fraction (MWF in the optic radiation, a developing fiber bundle. This relationship occurred bilaterally over parieto-temporal areas and was adjacent to, but did not overlap with the parieto-occipital region showing the most pronounced homeostatic SWA response. These results provide evidence for increased sleep need in posterior neural networks in children. Sleep need in parieto-temporal areas is related to myelin content, yet it remains speculative whether age-related myelin growth drives the fading of the posterior homeostatic SWA response during the transition to adulthood. Whether chronic insufficient sleep in the sensitive period of early life alters the anatomical generators of deep sleep slow-waves is an important unanswered question.

  16. Increased Sleep Depth in Developing Neural Networks: New Insights from Sleep Restriction in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Salome; Dean, Douglas C.; Achermann, Peter; O’Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Huber, Reto; Deoni, Sean C. L.; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2016-01-01

    Brain networks respond to sleep deprivation or restriction with increased sleep depth, which is quantified as slow-wave activity (SWA) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). When adults are sleep deprived, this homeostatic response is most pronounced over prefrontal brain regions. However, it is unknown how children’s developing brain networks respond to acute sleep restriction, and whether this response is linked to myelination, an ongoing process in childhood that is critical for brain development and cortical integration. We implemented a bedtime delay protocol in 5- to 12-year-old children to obtain partial sleep restriction (1-night; 50% of their habitual sleep). High-density sleep EEG was assessed during habitual and restricted sleep and brain myelin content was obtained using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging. The effect of sleep restriction was analyzed using statistical non-parametric mapping with supra-threshold cluster analysis. We observed a localized homeostatic SWA response following sleep restriction in a specific parieto-occipital region. The restricted/habitual SWA ratio was negatively associated with myelin water fraction in the optic radiation, a developing fiber bundle. This relationship occurred bilaterally over parieto-temporal areas and was adjacent to, but did not overlap with the parieto-occipital region showing the most pronounced homeostatic SWA response. These results provide evidence for increased sleep need in posterior neural networks in children. Sleep need in parieto-temporal areas is related to myelin content, yet it remains speculative whether age-related myelin growth drives the fading of the posterior homeostatic SWA response during the transition to adulthood. Whether chronic insufficient sleep in the sensitive period of early life alters the anatomical generators of deep sleep slow-waves is an important unanswered question. PMID:27708567

  17. Increased Sleep Depth in Developing Neural Networks: New Insights from Sleep Restriction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Salome; Dean, Douglas C; Achermann, Peter; O'Muircheartaigh, Jonathan; Huber, Reto; Deoni, Sean C L; LeBourgeois, Monique K

    2016-01-01

    Brain networks respond to sleep deprivation or restriction with increased sleep depth, which is quantified as slow-wave activity (SWA) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). When adults are sleep deprived, this homeostatic response is most pronounced over prefrontal brain regions. However, it is unknown how children's developing brain networks respond to acute sleep restriction, and whether this response is linked to myelination, an ongoing process in childhood that is critical for brain development and cortical integration. We implemented a bedtime delay protocol in 5- to 12-year-old children to obtain partial sleep restriction (1-night; 50% of their habitual sleep). High-density sleep EEG was assessed during habitual and restricted sleep and brain myelin content was obtained using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging. The effect of sleep restriction was analyzed using statistical non-parametric mapping with supra-threshold cluster analysis. We observed a localized homeostatic SWA response following sleep restriction in a specific parieto-occipital region. The restricted/habitual SWA ratio was negatively associated with myelin water fraction in the optic radiation, a developing fiber bundle. This relationship occurred bilaterally over parieto-temporal areas and was adjacent to, but did not overlap with the parieto-occipital region showing the most pronounced homeostatic SWA response. These results provide evidence for increased sleep need in posterior neural networks in children. Sleep need in parieto-temporal areas is related to myelin content, yet it remains speculative whether age-related myelin growth drives the fading of the posterior homeostatic SWA response during the transition to adulthood. Whether chronic insufficient sleep in the sensitive period of early life alters the anatomical generators of deep sleep slow-waves is an important unanswered question.

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective ... and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add ...

  19. Decoding neural events from fMRI BOLD signal: A comparison of existing approaches and development of a new algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Keith; Cisler, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Neuroimaging methodology predominantly relies on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal. While the BOLD signal is a valid measure of neuronal activity, variance in fluctuations of the BOLD signal are not only due to fluctuations in neural activity. Thus, a remaining problem in neuroimaging analyses is developing methods that ensure specific inferences about neural activity that are not confounded by unrelated sources of noise in the BOLD signal. Here, we develop and test a new algorithm for performing semi-blind (i.e., no knowledge of stimulus timings) deconvolution of the BOLD signal that treats the neural event as an observable, but intermediate, probabilistic representation of the system’s state. We test and compare this new algorithm against three other recent deconvolution algorithms under varied levels of autocorrelated and Gaussian noise, hemodynamic response function (HRF) misspecification, and observation sampling rate (i.e., TR). Further, we compare the algorithms’ performance using two models to simulate BOLD data: a convolution of neural events with a known (or misspecified) HRF versus a biophysically accurate balloon model of hemodynamics. We also examine the algorithms’ performance on real task data. The results demonstrated good performance of all algorithms, though the new algorithm generally outperformed the others (3.0% improvement) under simulated resting state experimental conditions exhibiting multiple, realistic confounding factors (as well as 10.3% improvement on a real Stroop task). The simulations also demonstrate that the greatest negative influence on deconvolution accuracy is observation sampling rate. Practical and theoretical implications of these results for improving inferences about neural activity from fMRI BOLD signal are discussed. PMID:23602664

  20. Neural tube defects in Costa Rica, 1987-2012: origins and development of birth defect surveillance and folic acid fortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza-Argüello, María de la Paz; Umaña-Solís, Lila M; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-03-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica-through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas-CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987-2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992-1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987-1991; 1996-1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999-2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003-2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1-10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3-5.3) for the post-fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P Costa Rica. Costa Rica's experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs.

  1. Neural Tube Defects in Costa Rica, 1987–2012: Origins and Development of Birth Defect Surveillance and Folic Acid Fortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Paz Barboza-Argüello, María; Umaña-Solís, Lila M.; Azofeifa, Alejandro; Valencia, Diana; Flores, Alina L.; Rodríguez-Aguilar, Sara; Alfaro-Calvo, Thelma; Mulinare, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to provide a descriptive overview of how the birth defects surveillance and folic acid fortification programs were implemented in Costa Rica—through the establishment of the Registry Center for Congenital Anomalies (Centro de Registro de Enfermedades Congénitas—CREC), and fortification legislation mandates. We estimated the overall prevalence of neural tube defects (i.e., spina bifida, anencephaly and encephalocele) before and after fortification captured by CREC. Prevalence was calculated by dividing the total number of infants born with neural tube defects by the total number of live births in the country (1987–2012).A total of 1,170 newborns with neural tube defects were identified from 1987 to 2012 (1992–1995 data excluded); 628 were identified during the baseline pre-fortification period (1987–1991; 1996–1998); 191 during the fortification period (1999–2002); and 351 during the post-fortification time period (2003–2012). The overall prevalence of neural tube defects decreased from 9.8 per 10,000 live-births (95 % CI 9.1–10.5) for the pre-fortification period to 4.8 per 10,000 live births (95 % CI 4.3–5.3) for the post–fortification period. Results indicate a statistically significant (P Costa Rica. Costa Rica’s experience can serve as an example for other countries seeking to develop and strengthen both their birth defects surveillance and fortification programs. PMID:24952876

  2. The development of 8 inch roll-to-plate nanoimprint lithography (8-R2P-NIL) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lai Seng; Mohamed, Khairudin; Ooi, Su Guan

    2017-07-01

    Growth in semiconductor and integrated circuit industry was observed in the past decennium of years for industrial technology which followed Moore's law. The line width of nanostructure to be exposed was influenced by the essential technology of photolithography. Thus, it is crucial to have a low cost and high throughput manufacturing process for nanostructures. Nanoimprint Lithography technique invented by Stephen Y. Chou was considered as major nanolithography process to be used in future integrated circuit and integrated optics. The drawbacks of high imprint pressure, high imprint temperature, air bubbles formation, resist sticking to mold and low throughput of thermal nanoimprint lithography on silicon wafer have yet to be solved. Thus, the objectives of this work is to develop a high throughput, low imprint force, room temperature UV assisted 8 inch roll to plate nanoimprint lithography system capable of imprinting nanostructures on 200 mm silicon wafer using roller imprint with flexible mold. A piece of resist spin coated silicon wafer was placed onto vacuum chuck drives forward by a stepper motor. A quartz roller wrapped with a piece of transparent flexible mold was used as imprint roller. The imprinted nanostructures were cured by 10 W, 365 nm UV LED which situated inside the quartz roller. Heat generated by UV LED was dissipated by micro heat pipe. The flexible mold detaches from imprinted nanostructures in a 'line peeling' pattern and imprint pressure was measured by ultra-thin force sensors. This system has imprinting speed capability ranging from 0.19 mm/s to 5.65 mm/s, equivalent to imprinting capability of 3 to 20 pieces of 8 inch wafers per hour. Speed synchronization between imprint roller and vacuum chuck was achieved by controlling pulse rate supplied to stepper motor which drive the vacuum chuck. The speed different ranging from 2 nm/s to 98 nm/s is achievable. Vacuum chuck height was controlled by stepper motor with displacement of 5 nm/step.

  3. Neural Progenitor Cells Rptor Ablation Impairs Development but Benefits to Seizure-Induced Behavioral Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Lin; Wu, Mei-Ling; Zhu, Feng; Kai, Jie-Jing; Dong, Jing-Yin; Wu, Xi-Mei; Zeng, Ling-Hui

    2016-12-01

    Previous study suggests that mTOR signaling pathway may play an important role in epileptogenesis. The present work was designed to explore the contribution of raptor protein to the development of epilepsy and comorbidities. Mice with conditional knockout of raptor protein were generated by cross-bred Rptor flox/flox mice with nestin-CRE mice. The expression of raptor protein was analyzed by Western blotting in brain tissue samples. Neuronal death and mossy fiber sprouting were detected by FJB staining and Timm staining, respectively. Spontaneous seizures were recorded by EEG-video system. Morris water maze, open field test, and excitability test were used to study the behaviors of Rptor CKO mice. As the consequence of deleting Rptor, downstream proteins of raptor in mTORC1 signaling were partly blocked. Rptor CKO mice exhibited decrease in body and brain weight under 7 weeks old and accordingly, cortical layer thickness. After kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus, overactivation of mTORC1 signaling was markedly reversed in Rptor CKO mice. Although low frequency of spontaneous seizure and seldom neuronal cell death were observed in both Rptor CKO and control littermates, KA seizure-induced mossy fiber spouting were attenuated in Rptor CKO mice. Additionally, cognitive-deficit and anxiety-like behavior after KA-induced seizures were partly reversed in Rptor CKO mice. Loss of the Rptor gene in mice neural progenitor cells affects normal development in young age and may contribute to alleviate KA seizure-induced behavioral abnormalities, suggesting that raptor protein plays an important role in seizure comorbidities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Music perception and cognition: development, neural basis, and rehabilitative use of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkämö, Teppo; Tervaniemi, Mari; Huotilainen, Minna

    2013-07-01

    Music is a highly versatile form of art and communication that has been an essential part of human society since its early days. Neuroimaging studies indicate that music is a powerful stimulus also for the human brain, engaging not just the auditory cortex but also a vast, bilateral network of temporal, frontal, parietal, cerebellar, and limbic brain areas that govern auditory perception, syntactic and semantic processing, attention and memory, emotion and mood control, and motor skills. Studies of amusia, a severe form of musical impairment, highlight the right temporal and frontal cortices as the core neural substrates for adequate perception and production of music. Many of the basic auditory and musical skills, such as pitch and timbre perception, start developing already in utero, and babies are born with a natural preference for music and singing. Music has many important roles and functions throughout life, ranging from emotional self-regulation, mood enhancement, and identity formation to promoting the development of verbal, motor, cognitive, and social skills and maintaining their healthy functioning in old age. Music is also used clinically as a part of treatment in many illnesses, which involve affective, attention, memory, communication, or motor deficits. Although more research is still needed, current evidence suggests that music-based rehabilitation can be effective in many developmental, psychiatric, and neurological disorders, such as autism, depression, schizophrenia, and stroke, as well as in many chronic somatic illnesses that cause pain and anxiety. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:441-451. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1237 The authors have declared no conflicts of interest for this article. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Development of a neural network for prediction of glucose concentration in type 1 diabetes patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappada, Scott M; Cameron, Brent D; Rosman, Paul M

    2008-09-01

    A major difficulty in the management of diabetes is the optimization of insulin therapies to avoid occurrences of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Many factors impact glucose fluctuations in diabetes patients, such as insulin dosage, nutritional intake, daily activities and lifestyle (e.g., sleep-wake cycles and exercise), and emotional states (e.g., stress). The overall effect of these factors has not been fully quantified to determine the impact on subsequent glycemic trends. Recent advances in diabetes technology such as continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides significant sources of data, such that quantification may be possible. Depending on the CGM technology utilized, the sampling frequency ranges from 1-5 min. In this study, an intensive electronic diary documenting the factors previously described was created. This diary was utilized by 18 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in conjunction with CGM. Utilizing this dataset, various neural network models were constructed to predict glucose in these diabetes patients while varying the predictive window from 50-180 min. The predictive capability of each neural network within the fully trained dataset was analyzed as well as the predictive capabilities of the neural networks on unseen data. Neural network models were created using NeuroSolutions software with variable predictive windows of 50, 75, 100, 120, 150, and 180 min. Neural network models were trained using patient datasets ranging from 11-17 patients and evaluated on patient data not included in the neural network formulation. Performance analysis was completed for the neural network models using MATLAB. Performance measures include the calculation of the mean absolute difference percent overall and at hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic extremes, and the percentage of hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic occurrences were predicted. Overall, the neural network models perform adequately at predicting at normal (>70 and or =180 mg/dl); however

  6. ACAM, a novel member of the neural IgCAM family, mediates anterior neural tube closure in a primitive chordate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Diaz, Heidi; Mejares, Emil; Newman-Smith, Erin; Smith, William C

    2016-01-01

    The neural IgCAM family of cell adhesion molecules, which includes NCAM and related molecules, has evolved via gene duplication and alternative splicing to allow for a wide range of isoforms with distinct functions and homophilic binding properties. A search for neural IgCAMs in ascidians (Ciona intestinalis, Ciona savignyi, and Phallusia mammillata) has identified a novel set of truncated family members that, unlike the known members, lack fibronectin III domains and consist of only repeated Ig domains. Within the tunicates this form appears to be unique to the ascidians, and it was designated ACAM, for Ascidian Cell Adhesion Molecule. In C. intestinalis ACAM is expressed in the developing neural plate and neural tube, with strongest expression in the anterior sensory vesicle precursor. Unlike the two other conventional neural IgCAMs in C. intestinalis, which are expressed maternally and throughout the morula and blastula stages, ACAM expression initiates at the gastrula stage. Moreover, C. intestinalis ACAM is a target of the homeodomain transcription factor OTX, which plays an essential role in the development of the anterior central nervous system. Morpholino (MO) knockdown shows that ACAM is required for neural tube closure. In MO-injected embryos neural tube closure was normal caudally, but the anterior neuropore remained open. A similar phenotype was seen with overexpression of a secreted version of ACAM. The presence of ACAM in ascidians highlights the diversity of this gene family in morphogenesis and neurodevelopment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. miR-430 regulates oriented cell division during neural tube development in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, Carter M; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression. Originally shown to regulate developmental timing, microRNAs have since been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including cell identity, migration and signaling. miRNA-430, the earliest expressed microRNA during zebrafish embryogenesis, is required to undergo morphogenesis and has previously been shown to regulate maternal mRNA clearance, Nodal signaling, and germ cell migration. The functions of miR-430 in brain morphogenesis, however, remain unclear. Herein we find that miR-430 instructs oriented cell divisions in the neural rod required for neural midline formation. Loss of miR-430 function results in mitotic spindle misorientation in the neural rod, failed neuroepithelial integration after cell division, and ectopic cell accumulation in the dorsal neural tube. We propose that miR-430, independently of canonical apicobasal and planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways, coordinates the stereotypical cell divisions that instruct neural tube morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Differential development of neuronal physiological responsiveness in two human neural stem cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Roberta; Miljan, Erik A; Hines, Susan J; Aouabdi, Sihem; Pollock, Kenneth; Patel, Sara; Edwards, Frances A; Sinden, John D

    2007-05-25

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to neurodegenerative disease. Overexpression of the myc family transcription factors in human primary cells from developing cortex and mesencephalon has produced two stable multipotential NSC lines (ReNcell VM and CX) that can be continuously expanded in monolayer culture. In the undifferentiated state, both ReNcell VM and CX are nestin positive and have resting membrane potentials of around -60 mV but do not display any voltage-activated conductances. As initially hypothesized, using standard methods (stdD) for differentiation, both cell lines can form neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes according to immunohistological characteristics. However it became clear that this was not true for electrophysiological features which designate neurons, such as the firing of action potentials. We have thus developed a new differentiation protocol, designated 'pre-aggregation differentiation' (preD) which appears to favor development of electrophysiologically functional neurons and to lead to an increase in dopaminergic neurons in the ReNcell VM line. In contrast, the protocol used had little effect on the differentiation of ReNcell CX in which dopaminergic differentiation was not observed. Moreover, after a week of differentiation with the preD protocol, 100% of ReNcell VM featured TTX-sensitive Na+-channels and fired action potentials, compared to 25% after stdD. Currents via other voltage-gated channels did not appear to depend on the differentiation protocol. ReNcell CX did not display the same electrophysiological properties as the VM line, generating voltage-dependant K+ currents but no Na+ currents or action potentials under either stdD or preD differentiation. These data demonstrate that overexpression of myc in NSCs can be used to generate electrophysiologically active neurons in culture. Development of a functional neuronal phenotype may be dependent on parameters

  9. Differential development of neuronal physiological responsiveness in two human neural stem cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Sara

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural stem cells (NSCs are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to neurodegenerative disease. Overexpression of the myc family transcription factors in human primary cells from developing cortex and mesencephalon has produced two stable multipotential NSC lines (ReNcell VM and CX that can be continuously expanded in monolayer culture. Results In the undifferentiated state, both ReNcell VM and CX are nestin positive and have resting membrane potentials of around -60 mV but do not display any voltage-activated conductances. As initially hypothesized, using standard methods (stdD for differentiation, both cell lines can form neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes according to immunohistological characteristics. However it became clear that this was not true for electrophysiological features which designate neurons, such as the firing of action potentials. We have thus developed a new differentiation protocol, designated 'pre-aggregation differentiation' (preD which appears to favor development of electrophysiologically functional neurons and to lead to an increase in dopaminergic neurons in the ReNcell VM line. In contrast, the protocol used had little effect on the differentiation of ReNcell CX in which dopaminergic differentiation was not observed. Moreover, after a week of differentiation with the preD protocol, 100% of ReNcell VM featured TTX-sensitive Na+-channels and fired action potentials, compared to 25% after stdD. Currents via other voltage-gated channels did not appear to depend on the differentiation protocol. ReNcell CX did not display the same electrophysiological properties as the VM line, generating voltage-dependant K+ currents but no Na+ currents or action potentials under either stdD or preD differentiation. Conclusion These data demonstrate that overexpression of myc in NSCs can be used to generate electrophysiologically active neurons in culture. Development of a

  10. A study of neural-related microRNAs in the developing amphioxus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candiani Simona

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs regulating expression of protein coding genes at post-transcriptional level and controlling several biological processes. At present microRNAs have been identified in various metazoans and seem also to be involved in brain development, neuronal differentiation and subtypes specification. An approach to better understand the role of microRNAs in animal gene expression is to determine temporal and tissue-specific expression patterns of microRNAs in different model organisms. Therefore, we have investigated the expression of six neural related microRNAs in amphioxus, an organism having an important phylogenetic position in terms of understanding the origin and evolution of chordates. Results In amphioxus, all the microRNAs we examined are expressed in specific regions of the CNS, and some of them are correlated with specific cell types. In addition, miR-7, miR-137 and miR-184 are also expressed in endodermal and mesodermal tissues. Several potential targets expressed in the nervous system of amphioxus have been identified by computational prediction and some of them are coexpressed with one or more miRNAs. Conclusion We identified six miRNAs that are expressed in the nervous system of amphioxus in a variety of patterns. miR-124 is found in both differentiating and mature neurons, miR-9 in differentiated neurons, miR-7, miR-137 and miR-184 in restricted CNS regions, and miR-183 in cells of sensory organs. Therefore, such amphioxus miRNAs may play important roles in regional patterning and/or specification of neuronal cell types.

  11. Left-Right Asymmetry of Maturation Rates in Human Embryonic Neural Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kovel, Carolien G F; Lisgo, Steven; Karlebach, Guy; Ju, Jia; Cheng, Gang; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2017-08-01

    Left-right asymmetry is a fundamental organizing feature of the human brain, and neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia sometimes involve alterations of brain asymmetry. As early as 8 weeks postconception, the majority of human fetuses move their right arms more than their left arms, but because nerve fiber tracts are still descending from the forebrain at this stage, spinal-muscular asymmetries are likely to play an important developmental role. We used RNA sequencing to measure gene expression levels in the left and right spinal cords, and the left and right hindbrains, of 18 postmortem human embryos aged 4 to 8 weeks postconception. Genes showing embryonic lateralization were tested for an enrichment of signals in genome-wide association data for schizophrenia. The left side of the embryonic spinal cord was found to mature faster than the right side. Both sides transitioned from transcriptional profiles associated with cell division and proliferation at earlier stages to neuronal differentiation and function at later stages, but the two sides were not in synchrony (p = 2.2 E-161). The hindbrain showed a left-right mirrored pattern compared with the spinal cord, consistent with the well-known crossing over of function between these two structures. Genes that showed lateralization in the embryonic spinal cord were enriched for association signals with schizophrenia (p = 4.3 E-05). These are the earliest stage left-right differences of human neural development ever reported. Disruption of the lateralized developmental program may play a role in the genetic susceptibility to schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural network controller development and implementation for spark ignition engines with high EGR levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Jonathan Blake; Singh, Atmika; Kaul, Brian C; Jagannathan, Sarangapani; Drallmeier, James A

    2007-07-01

    Past research has shown substantial reductions in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) concentrations by using 10%-25% exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in spark ignition (SI) engines (see Dudek and Sain, 1989). However, under high EGR levels, the engine exhibits strong cyclic dispersion in heat release which may lead to instability and unsatisfactory performance preventing commercial engines to operate with high EGR levels. A neural network (NN)-based output feedback controller is developed to reduce cyclic variation in the heat release under high levels of EGR even when the engine dynamics are unknown by using fuel as the control input. A separate control loop was designed for controlling EGR levels. The stability analysis of the closed-loop system is given and the boundedness of the control input is demonstrated by relaxing separation principle, persistency of excitation condition, certainty equivalence principle, and linear in the unknown parameter assumptions. Online training is used for the adaptive NN and no offline training phase is needed. This online learning feature and model-free approach is used to demonstrate the applicability of the controller on a different engine with minimal effort. Simulation results demonstrate that the cyclic dispersion is reduced significantly using the proposed controller when implemented on an engine model that has been validated experimentally. For a single cylinder research engine fitted with a modern four-valve head (Ricardo engine), experimental results at 15% EGR indicate that cyclic dispersion was reduced 33% by the controller, an improvement of fuel efficiency by 2%, and a 90% drop in NOx from stoichiometric operation without EGR was observed. Moreover, unburned hydrocarbons (uHC) drop by 6% due to NN control as compared to the uncontrolled scenario due to the drop in cyclic dispersion. Similar performance was observed with the controller on a different engine.

  13. In search for the neural mechanisms of individual development: behavior-driven differential Hebbian learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf eDer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When Donald Hebb published his 1949 book ``The Organization of Behavior'' he opened a new way of thinking in theoretical neuroscience which, in retrospective, is very close to contemporary ideas in self-organization. His metaphor of ``wiring'' together what ``fires together'' matches very closely the commonparadigm that global organization can derive from simple local rules. While ingenious at his time and inspiring the research over decades, the results still fall short of the expectations. For instance,unsupervised as they are, such neural mechanisms should be able to explain and realize the self-organizedacquisition of sensorimotor competencies. This paper proposes a new synaptic law which replaces Hebb's original metaphor by that of ``chaining together'' what ``changes together''. Starting from differential Hebbian learning,the new rule grounds the behavior of the agent directly in the internal synaptic dynamics.Therefore, one may call this a behavior-driven synaptic plasticity.Neurorobotics is an ideal testing ground for this new, unsupervised learning rule. This paper focuses on the close coupling between body, control, and environmentin challenging physical settings. The examples demonstrate how the new synaptic mechanism induces a self-determined ``search and converge'' strategy in behavior space, generating spontaneously a variety of sensorimotor competencies. The emerging behavior patterns are qualified by involving body and environment inan irreducible conjunction with the internal mechanism.The results may not only be of immediate interest for the further development of embodied intelligence.They also offer a new view on the role of self-learning processes in natural evolutionand in the brain.Videos and further details may be found under url{http://robot.informatik.uni-leipzig.de/research/supplementary/NeuroAutonomy/}.

  14. Development of an artificial neural network to predict critical heat flux based on the look up tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terng, Nilton; Carajilescov, Pedro, E-mail: Nil.terng@gmail.com, E-mail: pedro.carajilescov@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais

    2015-07-01

    The critical heat flux (CHF) is one of the principal thermal hydraulic limits of PWR type nuclear reactors. The present work consists in the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) to estimate the CHF, based on Look Up Table CHF data, published by Groeneveld (2006). Three parameters were considered in the development of the ANN: the pressure in the range of 1 to 21 MPa, the mass flux in the range of 50 to 8000 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and the thermodynamic quality in the range of - 0.5 to 0.9. The ANN model considered was a multi feed forward net, which have two feedforward ANN. The first one, called main neural network, is used to calculate the result of CHF, and the second, denominated spacenet, is responsible to modify the main neural network according to the input. Comparing the ANN predictions with the data of the Look Up Table, it was observed an average of the ratio of 0.993 and a root mean square error of 13.3%. With the developed ANN, a parametric study of CHF was performed to observe the influence of each parameter in the CHF. It was possible to note that the CHF decreases with the increase of pressure and thermodynamic quality, while CHF increases with the mass flow rate, as expected. However, some erratic trends were also observed which can be attributed to either unknown aspect of the CHF phenomenon or uncertainties in the data. (author)

  15. Development of Novel Gas Brand Anti-Piracy System based on BP Neural Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L [School of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Y Y [Chinese-German School of Postgraduate Studies, Tongji University (China); Ding, L [Chinese-German School of Postgraduate Studies, Tongji University (China)

    2006-10-15

    The Wireless-net Close-loop gas brand anti-piracy system introduced in this paper is a new type of brand piracy technical product based on BP neural network. It is composed by gas brand piracy label possessing gas exhalation resource, ARM embedded gas-detector, GPRS wireless module and data base of merchandise information. First, the system obtains the information on the special label through gas sensor array ,then the attained signals are transferred into ARM Embedded board and identified by artificial neural network, and finally turns back the outcome of data collection and identification to the manufactures with the help of GPRS module.

  16. Development of Novel Gas Brand Anti-Piracy System based on BP Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Ding, L.

    2006-10-01

    The Wireless-net Close-loop gas brand anti-piracy system introduced in this paper is a new type of brand piracy technical product based on BP neural network. It is composed by gas brand piracy label possessing gas exhalation resource, ARM embedded gas-detector, GPRS wireless module and data base of merchandise information. First, the system obtains the information on the special label through gas sensor array ,then the attained signals are transferred into ARM Embedded board and identified by artificial neural network, and finally turns back the outcome of data collection and identification to the manufactures with the help of GPRS module.

  17. Delayed development of neural language organization in very preterm born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mürner-Lavanchy, Ines; Steinlin, Maja; Kiefer, Claus; Weisstanner, Christian; Ritter, Barbara Catherine; Perrig, Walter; Everts, Regula

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates neural language organization in very preterm born children compared to control children and examines the relationship between language organization, age, and language performance. Fifty-six preterms and 38 controls (7-12 y) completed a functional magnetic resonance imaging language task. Lateralization and signal change were computed for language-relevant brain regions. Younger preterms showed a bilateral language network whereas older preterms revealed left-sided language organization. No age-related differences in language organization were observed in controls. Results indicate that preterms maintain atypical bilateral language organization longer than term born controls. This might reflect a delay of neural language organization due to very premature birth.

  18. Characterization of Early Cortical Neural Network ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examined the development of neural network activity using microelectrode array (MEA) recordings made in multi-well MEA plates (mwMEAs) over the first 12 days in vitro (DIV). In primary cortical cultures made from postnatal rats, action potential spiking activity was essentially absent on DIV 2 and developed rapidly between DIV 5 and 12. Spiking activity was primarily sporadic and unorganized at early DIV, and became progressively more organized with time in culture, with bursting parameters, synchrony and network bursting increasing between DIV 5 and 12. We selected 12 features to describe network activity and principal components analysis using these features demonstrated a general segregation of data by age at both the well and plate levels. Using a combination of random forest classifiers and Support Vector Machines, we demonstrated that 4 features (CV of within burst ISI, CV of IBI, network spike rate and burst rate) were sufficient to predict the age (either DIV 5, 7, 9 or 12) of each well recording with >65% accuracy. When restricting the classification problem to a binary decision, we found that classification improved dramatically, e.g. 95% accuracy for discriminating DIV 5 vs DIV 12 wells. Further, we present a novel resampling approach to determine the number of wells that might be needed for conducting comparisons of different treatments using mwMEA plates. Overall, these results demonstrate that network development on mwMEA plates is similar to

  19. Unjoined primary and secondary neural tubes: junctional neural tube defect, a new form of spinal dysraphism caused by disturbance of junctional neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibach, Sebastian; Moes, Greg; Hou, Yong Jin; Zovickian, John; Pang, Dachling

    2016-10-29

    Primary and secondary neurulation are the two known processes that form the central neuraxis of vertebrates. Human phenotypes of neural tube defects (NTDs) mostly fall into two corresponding categories consistent with the two types of developmental sequence: primary NTD features an open skin defect, an exposed, unclosed neural plate (hence an open neural tube defect, or ONTD), and an unformed or poorly formed secondary neural tube, and secondary NTD with no skin abnormality (hence a closed NTD) and a malformed conus caudal to a well-developed primary neural tube. We encountered three cases of a previously unrecorded form of spinal dysraphism in which the primary and secondary neural tubes are individually formed but are physically separated far apart and functionally disconnected from each other. One patient was operated on, in whom both the lumbosacral spinal cord from primary neurulation and the conus from secondary neurulation are each anatomically complete and endowed with functioning segmental motor roots tested by intraoperative triggered electromyography and direct spinal cord stimulation. The remarkable feature is that the two neural tubes are unjoined except by a functionally inert, probably non-neural band. The developmental error of this peculiar malformation probably occurs during the critical transition between the end of primary and the beginning of secondary neurulation, in a stage aptly called junctional neurulation. We describe the current knowledge concerning junctional neurulation and speculate on the embryogenesis of this new class of spinal dysraphism, which we call junctional neural tube defect.

  20. Use of a murine embryonic stem cell line that is sensitive to high glucose environment to model neural tube development in diabetic pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kaitlyn; Jung, Jin Hyuk; Loeken, Mary R

    2014-08-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are significantly increased by maternal diabetes. Embryonic stem cells (ESC) that can differentiate into neuroepithelium and can sense supraphysiological glucose concentrations would be very valuable to simulate the effects of maternal diabetes on molecular and cellular processes during neural tube formation. LG-ESC, a recently established ESC line that expresses the glucose transporter, Scl2a2, and is sensitive to elevated glucose concentrations, were grown for up to 8 days in a three-dimensional culture to form neural cysts. We tested whether high glucose media inhibits expression of Pax3, a gene that is required for neural tube closure and whose expression is inhibited in embryos of diabetic mice, and inhibits formation of neural cysts. Pax3 expression was detected after 4 days of culture and increased with time. Pax3 expression was inhibited by high glucose media, but not if cells had been cultured in low glucose media for the first 4 days of culture. Pax7, which is also expressed in dorsal neural tube, was not detected. Pax6, which is expressed in the ventral neural tube, was detected only after 8 days of culture, but was not inhibited by high glucose. High glucose media did not inhibit formation of neural cysts. LG-ESC can be used as a model of embryonic exposure to a diabetic environment during neural tube development. While high glucose exposure inhibits expression of a gene required for neural tube closure, it may not inhibit all of the processes involved in formation of a neural tube-like structure. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The neural coding of feedback learning across child and adolescent development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, S.; Braams, B.R.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Koolschijn, P.C.M.P.; Crone, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to learn from environmental cues is an important contributor to successful performance in a variety of settings, including school. Despite the progress in unraveling the neural correlates of cognitive control in childhood and adolescence, relatively little is known about how these brain

  2. The neural code in developing cultured networks: experiments and advanced simulation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Wim; Gritsun, T.; Stoyanova, Irina; le Feber, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the neural code of cultured neuronal networks may help to forward our understanding of human brain processes.The most striking property of spontaneously firing cultures is their regular bursting activity, a burst being defined as synchronized firing of groups of neurons spread

  3. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijvenvoorde, A.C.K.; Zanolie, K.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Crone, E.A.

    2008-01-01

    Howchildren learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes related to

  4. Evaluating the negative or valuing the positive? Neural mechanisms supporting feedback-based learning across development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.K. van Duijvenvoorde (Anna C.); K. Zanolie (Kiki); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge); M.E.J. Raijmakers (Maartje E.); E.A. Crone (Eveline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHow children learn from positive and negative performance feedback lies at the foundation of successful learning and is therefore of great importance for educational practice. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine the neural developmental changes

  5. Jarid1b targets genes regulating development and is involved in neural differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Sandra U; Albert, Mareike; Malatesta, Martina

    2011-01-01

    -renewal and differentiation is just starting to emerge. Here, we show that the H3K4me2/3 histone demethylase Jarid1b (Kdm5b/Plu1) is dispensable for ESC self-renewal, but essential for ESC differentiation along the neural lineage. By genome-wide location analysis, we demonstrate that Jarid1b localizes predominantly...

  6. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Brault

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV, can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4. We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  7. Development of the micro-channel plate photomultiplier for the Belle II time-of-propagation counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Shigeki [Department of Physics, Nagoya University (Japan); Iijima, Toru [Department of Physics, Nagoya University (Japan); KMI, Nagoya University (Japan); Inami, Kenji; Furumura, Daiki [Department of Physics, Nagoya University (Japan); Hayakawa, Tomokatsu; Kato, Yuji; Matsuoka, Kodai [KMI, Nagoya University (Japan); Mizuno, Ryo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University (Japan); Sato, Yutaro [KMI, Nagoya University (Japan); Suzuki, Kazuhito; Yonekura, Takuya [Department of Physics, Nagoya University (Japan)

    2015-07-01

    The time-of-propagation counter for the Belle II experiment is a new particle identification device using ring imaging Cherenkov technique. In order to detect each Cherenkov photon with a timing precision of 30–40 ps in a 1.5 T magnetic field, a micro-channel plate photomultiplier tube is a suitable device for the TOP counter. By introducing an atomic layer deposition technique on the micro-channel plate surface, the tube lifetime was improved by a factor of 3–10 relative to more conventional devices. A total of 530 tubes have been produced. To ensure appropriate tube performance, the quantum efficiency, gain and transit time spread have been measured for all units. The results from each measurement are discussed. Results from a beamtest with a 2 GeV/c positron beam are also reported and demonstrate the good tube performance.

  8. Development of steel plate - cast iron hybrid casting process for recycling of low level radioactive metal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H.; Hirabayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Akimoto, J.; Takahashi, K.; Shindo, H.; Sakurai, D. [Mitsubishi Materials Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Almansour, A.; Okane, T.; Umeda, T. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of recycling low-level radioactive waste arising from dismantling of nuclear reactors, applicability of steel plate - cast iron hybrid casting process has been investigated as a measure for producing a waste container using radioactive metal waste. This investigation consists of casting tests and analyses on the solidification and distortion of castings. This paper describes the concept of the casting process, casting test results, and understandings obtained from the analyses. (orig.)

  9. [Retinoic acid signal pathway regulation of zebra fish tooth development through manipulation of the differentiation of neural crest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Xing; Xu, Zhiyun; Yang, Deqin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism of retinoic acid (RA) signal in dental evolution, RA is used to explore the influence of the mechanism on neural crest's migration during the early stage of zebra fish embryos. We divided embryos of wild type and transgenic line zebra fish into three groups. 1 x 10(-7) to 6 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1) RA and 1 x 10(-7) mo x L(-1) 4-diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) were added into egg water at 24 hpf for 9 h. Dimethyl sulfoxid (DMSO) with the concentration was used as control group. Then, antisense probes of dlx2a, dlx2b, and barxl were formulated to perform whole-mount in situ hybridization to check the expressions of the genes in 48 hpf to 72 hpf embryos. We observed fluorescence of transgenic line in 4 dpf embryos. We obtained three mRNA probes successfully. Compared with DMSO control group, a low concentration (1 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1)) of RA could up-regulate the expression of mRNA (barx1, dlx2a) in neural crest. Obvious migration trend was observed toward the pharyngeal arch in which teeth adhered. Transgenic fish had spreading fluorescence tendency in pharyngeal arch. However, a high concentration (4 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1)) of RA malformed the embryos and killed them after treatment. One third of the embryos of middle concentration (3 x 10(-7) mo x L(-1)) exhibited delayed development. DEAB resulted in neural crest dysplasia. The expression of barxl and dlx2a were suppressed, and the appearance of dlx2b in tooth was delayed. RA signal pathway can regulate the progenitors of tooth by controlling the growth of the neural crest and manipulating tooth development

  10. Development of carbon plasma-coated multiwell plates for high-throughput mass spectrometric analysis of highly lipophilic fermentation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinig, Uwe; Scholz, Susanne; Dahm, Pia; Grabowy, Udo; Jennewein, Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Classical approaches to strain improvement and metabolic engineering rely on rapid qualitative and quantitative analyses of the metabolites of interest. As an analytical tool, mass spectrometry (MS) has proven to be efficient and nearly universally applicable for timely screening of metabolites. Furthermore, gas chromatography (GC)/MS- and liquid chromatography (LC)/MS-based metabolite screens can often be adapted to high-throughput formats. We recently engineered a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to produce taxa-4(5),11(12)-diene, the first pathway-committing biosynthetic intermediate for the anticancer drug Taxol, through the heterologous and homologous expression of several genes related to isoprenoid biosynthesis. To date, GC/MS- and LC/MS-based high-throughput methods have been inherently difficult to adapt to the screening of isoprenoid-producing microbial strains due to the need for extensive sample preparation of these often highly lipophilic compounds. In the current work, we examined different approaches to the high-throughput analysis of taxa-4(5),11(12)-diene biosynthesizing yeast strains in a 96-deep-well format. Carbon plasma coating of standard 96-deep-well polypropylene plates allowed us to circumvent the inherent solvent instability of commonly used deep-well plates. In addition, efficient adsorption of the target isoprenoid product by the coated plates allowed rapid and simple qualitative and quantitative analyses of the individual cultures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of 70/30 Poly-L-DL-Lactic Acid Filaments for 3D Printers (Part 2): Mechanical and Surface Properties of Bioabsorbable Printed Plates for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Daniel J.; Vidal, Rafael; Assayag, Ariel; de Biasi, Ronaldo S.; Elias, Carlos N.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical, chemical, roughness and wettability properties of 70/30 poly (L,DL-lactide acid) three-dimensional (3D)-printed surgical plates made with extruded polymer filaments developed in the first part of this work were investigated. The plates were printed with horizontal (HRZ) and vertical (VRT) running layer orientations and evaluated by tensile, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), optical perfilometry and wettability tests before and after degradation in simulated body fluid (SBF) for 21 days. The results show that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of HRZ plates before immersion in SBF was higher (34.1 MPa) than that of VRT plates (31.8 MPa). The Young's modulus ( E) of HRZ plates and VRT plates are similar (4 GPa). After immersion in SBF, the UTS of HRZ plates dropped to 20.5 MPa and E decreased to 3.3 GPa. VRT were not tested after SBF immersion due to the large degradation. FTIR analysis showed no evidence of chemical change in the plates after immersion in SBF. The roughness parameter R3z of VRT surfaces (19.54 µm) was higher than that of the HRZ surfaces (12.80 µm). The roughness parameters increased after degradation in SBF ( p = 0.7048). The contact angles of HRZ surfaces before immersion in SBF (66.28°) were higher than after immersion in SBF (18.12°); the same behavior was also observed in VRT plates.

  12. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Omer; Zaritsky, Assaf; Yaffe, Yakey; Mutukula, Naresh; Edri, Reuven; Elkabetz, Yechiel

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture) and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM)--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII) reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  13. Comparison of multiple linear regression and artificial neural network in developing the objective functions of the orthopaedic screws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Chi; Lin, Jinn; Chao, Ching-Kong

    2011-12-01

    Optimizing the orthopaedic screws can greatly improve their biomechanical performances. However, a methodical design optimization approach requires a long time to search the best design. Thus, the surrogate objective functions of the orthopaedic screws should be accurately developed. To our knowledge, there is no study to evaluate the strengths and limitations of the surrogate methods in developing the objective functions of the orthopaedic screws. Three-dimensional finite element models for both the tibial locking screws and the spinal pedicle screws were constructed and analyzed. Then, the learning data were prepared according to the arrangement of the Taguchi orthogonal array, and the verification data were selected with use of a randomized selection. Finally, the surrogate objective functions were developed by using either the multiple linear regression or the artificial neural network. The applicability and accuracy of those surrogate methods were evaluated and discussed. The multiple linear regression method could successfully construct the objective function of the tibial locking screws, but it failed to develop the objective function of the spinal pedicle screws. The artificial neural network method showed a greater capacity of prediction in developing the objective functions for the tibial locking screws and the spinal pedicle screws than the multiple linear regression method. The artificial neural network method may be a useful option for developing the objective functions of the orthopaedic screws with a greater structural complexity. The surrogate objective functions of the orthopaedic screws could effectively decrease the time and effort required for the design optimization process. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative Live Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Neural Rosettes Reveals Structure-Function Dynamics Coupled to Cortical Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Ziv

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs are progenitor cells for brain development, where cellular spatial composition (cytoarchitecture and dynamics are hypothesized to be linked to critical NSC capabilities. However, understanding cytoarchitectural dynamics of this process has been limited by the difficulty to quantitatively image brain development in vivo. Here, we study NSC dynamics within Neural Rosettes--highly organized multicellular structures derived from human pluripotent stem cells. Neural rosettes contain NSCs with strong epithelial polarity and are expected to perform apical-basal interkinetic nuclear migration (INM--a hallmark of cortical radial glial cell development. We developed a quantitative live imaging framework to characterize INM dynamics within rosettes. We first show that the tendency of cells to follow the INM orientation--a phenomenon we referred to as radial organization, is associated with rosette size, presumably via mechanical constraints of the confining structure. Second, early forming rosettes, which are abundant with founder NSCs and correspond to the early proliferative developing cortex, show fast motions and enhanced radial organization. In contrast, later derived rosettes, which are characterized by reduced NSC capacity and elevated numbers of differentiated neurons, and thus correspond to neurogenesis mode in the developing cortex, exhibit slower motions and decreased radial organization. Third, later derived rosettes are characterized by temporal instability in INM measures, in agreement with progressive loss in rosette integrity at later developmental stages. Finally, molecular perturbations of INM by inhibition of actin or non-muscle myosin-II (NMII reduced INM measures. Our framework enables quantification of cytoarchitecture NSC dynamics and may have implications in functional molecular studies, drug screening, and iPS cell-based platforms for disease modeling.

  15. Parameter Estimation in Active Plate Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araujo, A. L.; Lopes, H. M. R.; Vaz, M. A. P.

    2006-01-01

    through gradient based optimization techniques, while the second is based on a metamodel of the inverse problem, using artificial neural networks. A numerical higher order finite element laminated plate model is used in both methods and results are compared and discussed through a simulated...

  16. Synchrotron radiation protein data collection system using the newly developed Weissenberg camera and imaging plate for crystal structure analysis (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakabe, N.; Nakagawa, A.; Sasaki, K.; Sakabe, K.; Watanabe, N.; Kondo, H.; Shimomura, M.

    1989-07-01

    It has been an earnest desire of protein crystallographers to collect fast, accurate, high resolution diffraction data from protein crystals, preferably with exposure time as short as possible. In order to meet this challenge, a new type of Weissenberg camera has been developed for the recording of diffraction intensity from protein crystals using synchrotron radiation. The BL6A2 line has a plane-bending mirror designed by Y. Sato. The optical bench with triangular tilt-cut Si crystal monochromator was designed by N. Kamiya and was installed in the BL6A2 hutch. The Weissenberg camera was set on the 2θ arm of the optical bench. This camera can be used with Fuji Imaging Plate (IP) as an x-ray detector, and the reading out of the image from the IP is carried out by using BA100. The characterization of this system was carried out using the native crystal of chicken gizzard G-actin DNase I complex and its Yb3+, PCMB, indium, and FMA derivatives. Since these crystals are very sensitive for x rays, the resolution limit of the diffraction was 5 Å with a 4-circle diffractometer on a rotating anode x-ray generator (N. Sakabe et al., J. Biochem. 95, 887. This complex was crystallized in space group P2,2,2, with a=42.0, b=225.3, and c=77.4 Å. The data were collected with this system with the 430-mm radius cassette when Photon Factory was operated at 2.5 GeV and 270 mA and the wavelength λ=1.004 Å was chosen. In order to avoid overlapping of diffraction spots, oscillation angle range and coupling constant (degree/mm) were settled on the basis of simulation patterns of diffraction spots up to the maximum resolution to be measured considering the direction of the crystal axes, wavelength, radius of the camera, and mosaicness of the crystal. When the oscillation axis was a axis, the oscillation angle range was selected at either 10° (1°/mm) or 5° (0.5°/mm) depending on the density of reciprocal lattice points along the incident beam, and typical exposure time in each IP

  17. Plate tectonics, damage and inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovici, David; Ricard, Yanick

    2014-04-24

    The initiation of plate tectonics on Earth is a critical event in our planet's history. The time lag between the first proto-subduction (about 4 billion years ago) and global tectonics (approximately 3 billion years ago) suggests that plates and plate boundaries became widespread over a period of 1 billion years. The reason for this time lag is unknown but fundamental to understanding the origin of plate tectonics. Here we suggest that when sufficient lithospheric damage (which promotes shear localization and long-lived weak zones) combines with transient mantle flow and migrating proto-subduction, it leads to the accumulation of weak plate boundaries and eventually to fully formed tectonic plates driven by subduction alone. We simulate this process using a grain evolution and damage mechanism with a composite rheology (which is compatible with field and laboratory observations of polycrystalline rocks), coupled to an idealized model of pressure-driven lithospheric flow in which a low-pressure zone is equivalent to the suction of convective downwellings. In the simplest case, for Earth-like conditions, a few successive rotations of the driving pressure field yield relic damaged weak zones that are inherited by the lithospheric flow to form a nearly perfect plate, with passive spreading and strike-slip margins that persist and localize further, even though flow is driven only by subduction. But for hotter surface conditions, such as those on Venus, accumulation and inheritance of damage is negligible; hence only subduction zones survive and plate tectonics does not spread, which corresponds to observations. After plates have developed, continued changes in driving forces, combined with inherited damage and weak zones, promote increased tectonic complexity, such as oblique subduction, strike-slip boundaries that are subparallel to plate motion, and spalling of minor plates.

  18. Artificial neural network surrogate development of equivalence models for nuclear data uncertainty propagation in scenario studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krivtchik Guillaume

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scenario studies simulate the whole fuel cycle over a period of time, from extraction of natural resources to geological storage. Through the comparison of different reactor fleet evolutions and fuel management options, they constitute a decision-making support. Consequently uncertainty propagation studies, which are necessary to assess the robustness of the studies, are strategic. Among numerous types of physical model in scenario computation that generate uncertainty, the equivalence models, built for calculating fresh fuel enrichment (for instance plutonium content in PWR MOX so as to be representative of nominal fuel behavior, are very important. The equivalence condition is generally formulated in terms of end-of-cycle mean core reactivity. As this results from a physical computation, it is therefore associated with an uncertainty. A state-of-the-art of equivalence models is exposed and discussed. It is shown that the existing equivalent models implemented in scenario codes, such as COSI6, are not suited to uncertainty propagation computation, for the following reasons: (i existing analytical models neglect irradiation, which has a strong impact on the result and its uncertainty; (ii current black-box models are not suited to cross-section perturbations management; and (iii models based on transport and depletion codes are too time-consuming for stochastic uncertainty propagation. A new type of equivalence model based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANN has been developed, constructed with data calculated with neutron transport and depletion codes. The model inputs are the fresh fuel isotopy, the irradiation parameters (burnup, core fractionation, etc., cross-sections perturbations and the equivalence criterion (for instance the core target reactivity in pcm at the end of the irradiation cycle. The model output is the fresh fuel content such that target reactivity is reached at the end of the irradiation cycle. Those models are built and

  19. The neural development of conditional reasoning in children: Different mechanisms for assessing the logical validity and likelihood of conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Flora; Epinat-Duclos, Justine; Léone, Jessica; Prado, Jérôme

    2017-09-19

    Scientific and mathematical thinking relies on the ability to evaluate whether conclusions drawn from conditional (if-then) arguments are logically valid. Yet, the neural development of this ability -- termed deductive reasoning -- is largely unknown. Here we aimed to identify the neural mechanisms that underlie the emergence of deductive reasoning with conditional rules in children. We further tested whether these mechanisms have their roots in the neural mechanisms involved in judging the likelihood of conclusions. In a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scanner, 8- to 13-year-olds were presented with causal conditional problems such as "If a baby is hungry then he will start crying; The baby is crying; Is the baby hungry?". In Validity trials, children were asked to indicate whether the conclusion followed out of necessity from the premises. In Likelihood trials, they indicated the degree of likelihood of the conclusion. We found that children who made accurate judgments of logical validity (as compared to those who did not) exhibited enhanced activity in left and medial frontal regions. In contrast, differences in likelihood ratings between children were related to differences of activity in right frontal and bilateral parietal regions. There was no overlap between the brain regions underlying validity and likelihood judgments. Therefore, our results suggest that the ability to evaluate the logical validity of conditional arguments emerges from brain mechanisms that qualitatively differ from those involved in evaluating the likelihood of these arguments in children. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Artificial Neural Network approach to develop unique Classification and Raga identification tools for Pattern Recognition in Carnatic Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimani, P. K.; Parimala, Y. G.

    2011-12-01

    A unique approach has been developed to study patterns in ragas of Carnatic Classical music based on artificial neural networks. Ragas in Carnatic music which have found their roots in the Vedic period, have grown on a Scientific foundation over thousands of years. However owing to its vastness and complexities it has always been a challenge for scientists and musicologists to give an all encompassing perspective both qualitatively and quantitatively. Cognition, comprehension and perception of ragas in Indian classical music have always been the subject of intensive research, highly intriguing and many facets of these are hitherto not unravelled. This paper is an attempt to view the melakartha ragas with a cognitive perspective using artificial neural network based approach which has given raise to very interesting results. The 72 ragas of the melakartha system were defined through the combination of frequencies occurring in each of them. The data sets were trained using several neural networks. 100% accurate pattern recognition and classification was obtained using linear regression, TLRN, MLP and RBF networks. Performance of the different network topologies, by varying various network parameters, were compared. Linear regression was found to be the best performing network.

  1. Scaling Pattern to Variations in Size during Development of the Vertebrate Neural Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygur, Aysu; Young, John; Huycke, Tyler R.; Koska, Mervenaz; Briscoe, James; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Anatomical proportions are robustly maintained in individuals that vary enormously in size, both within a species and between members of related taxa. However, the mechanisms underlying scaling are still poorly understood. We have examined this phenomenon in the context of the patterning of the ventral neural tube in response to a gradient of the morphogen Sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the chick and zebra finch, two species that differ in size during the time of neural tube patterning. We find that scaling is achieved, at least in part, by altering the sensitivity of the target cells to SHH and appears to be achieved by modulating the ratio of the repressive and activating transcriptional regulators, GLI2 and GLI3. This mechanism contrasts with previous experimental and theoretical analyses of morphogenic scaling that have focused on compensatory changes in the morphogen gradient itself. PMID:27093082

  2. Prediction Model for Object Oriented Software Development Effort Estimation Using One Hidden Layer Feed Forward Neural Network with Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Shekhar Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The budget computation for software development is affected by the prediction of software development effort and schedule. Software development effort and schedule can be predicted precisely on the basis of past software project data sets. In this paper, a model for object-oriented software development effort estimation using one hidden layer feed forward neural network (OHFNN has been developed. The model has been further optimized with the help of genetic algorithm by taking weight vector obtained from OHFNN as initial population for the genetic algorithm. Convergence has been obtained by minimizing the sum of squared errors of each input vector and optimal weight vector has been determined to predict the software development effort. The model has been empirically validated on the PROMISE software engineering repository dataset. Performance of the model is more accurate than the well-established constructive cost model (COCOMO.

  3. Neural substrates of child irritability in typically developing and psychiatric populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan B. Perlman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Irritability is an aspect of the negative affectivity domain of temperament, but in severe and dysregulated forms is a symptom of a range of psychopathologies. Better understanding of the neural underpinnings of irritability, outside the context of specific disorders, can help to understand normative variation but also characterize its clinical salience in psychopathology diagnosis. This study assessed brain activation during reward and frustration, domains of behavioral deficits in childhood irritability. Children (age 6–9 presenting in mental health clinics for extreme and impairing irritability (n = 26 were compared to healthy children (n = 28. Using developmentally sensitive methods, neural activation was measured via a negative mood induction paradigm during fMRI scanning. The clinical group displayed more activation of the anterior cingulate and middle frontal gyrus during reward, but less activation during frustration, than healthy comparison children. The opposite pattern was found in the posterior cingulate. Further, in clinical subjects, parent report of irritability was dimensionally related to decreased activation of the anterior cingulate and striatum during frustration. The results of this study indicate neural dysfunction within brain regions related to reward processing, error monitoring, and emotion regulation underlying clinically impairing irritability. Results are discussed in the context of a growing field of neuroimaging research investigating irritable children.

  4. PROPOSAL FOR NEURAL-LINGUISTIC PROGRAMMING (N.L.P. INTHE ADMINISTRATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF LEADERSHIP SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Samira

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neural-linguistic programming is an organised method to know the human self construction and dealing with it in fixed means and styles so as to decesisively affect the processes of perception, thinking, imaging, ideas,feeling and also in behavior, skills and the human body and mental performance (1 Neural-linguistic programming has a private nature because it is a group of mechanisms and practicaltechniques far from likeliness, so it enters in the circle of application and employment of the human abilities and possibilities. (9 Al Fiky (2001 points out that neural linguistic programming created the favourable environment to help individuals to get rid of their diseased fears and controlling in their negative reactions and thus improving communication with themselves and with others. He shows it took its way into the human life fields because itsways and strategies are used in the sectors of health, education, marketing and administration(2. The modern administration embarks on the human element that represents the most valuable elementsof administration and is the most effective on the productivity and with the increasing the effect of the human element in the efficacy of the administrative organizations, the need increased to consider the management of the human resources as an independent function of administrative functions that cancers the human element and onwhose efficiency, abilities, experience and zeal for work, the administration efficacy depends.

  5. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pacific Islanders American Indian/Alaska Native Programs Older Adults Family Link Diabetes EXPO Upcoming Diabetes EXPOs EXPO ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ...

  6. Growth Plate Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for ... also subject to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your food choices. Reset Plate Share Create Your ... your protein. See this list of protein foods . Add a serving of fruit , a serving of dairy ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and ... Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections below to add your ... down the middle of the plate. Then on one side, cut it again so you will have ...

  10. Expression of Phospho-MeCP2s in the Developing Rat Brain and Function of Postnatal MeCP2 in Cerebellar Neural Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Ni, Jing-Jing; Sun, Feng-Yan

    2017-02-01

    Abnormal expression and dysfunction of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) cause Rett syndrome (RTT). The diverse phosphorylation modifications modulate MeCP2 function in neural cells. Using western blot and immunohistochemistry, we examined the expression patterns of MeCP2 and three phospho-MeCP2s (pMeCP2s) in the developing rat brain. The expression of MeCP2 and phospho-S80 (pS80) MeCP2 increased while pS421 MeCP2 and pS292 MeCP2 decreased with brain maturation. In contrast to the nuclear localization of MeCP2 and pS80 MeCP2, pS421 MeCP2 and pS292 MeCP2 were mainly expressed in the cytoplasmic compartment. Apart from their distribution in neurons, they were also detected at a low level in astrocytes. Postnatally-initiated MeCP2 deficiency affected cerebellar neural cell development, as determined by the abnormal expression of GFAP, DCX, Tuj1, MAP-2, and calbindin-D28k. Together, these results demonstrate that MeCP2 and diverse pMeCP2s have distinct features of spatio-temporal expression in the rat brain, and that the precise levels of MeCP2 in the postnatal period are vital to cerebellar neural cell development.

  11. What Is Neural Plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bernhardi, Rommy; Bernhardi, Laura Eugenín-von; Eugenín, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    "Neural plasticity" refers to the capacity of the nervous system to modify itself, functionally and structurally, in response to experience and injury. As the various chapters in this volume show, plasticity is a key component of neural development and normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as a response to the changing environment, aging, or pathological insult. This chapter discusses how plasticity is necessary not only for neural networks to acquire new functional properties, but also for them to remain robust and stable. The article also reviews the seminal proposals developed over the years that have driven experiments and strongly influenced concepts of neural plasticity.

  12. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  13. Influence of the antifolate drug Methotrexate on the development of murine neural tube defects and genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Guan, Tao; Wang, Jianhua; Xiang, Qian; Wang, Mingsheng; Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Xie, Qiu; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Ting

    2013-09-01

    Impaired folate metabolism is considered a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the relationship between folate deficiency and the risk of NTDs remains unclear, because experimentally induced dietary folate deficiency is insufficient to cause NTDs in non-mutant mice. Methotrexate (MTX) is a specific folate antagonist that competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) activity. The objective of this study was to develop a folate dysmetabolism murine model, and study the development of NTDs and its mechanism. Pregnant mice were injected with different doses of MTX [0, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 mg kg(-1) body weight (b/w) intraperitoneally (i.p.)] on gestational day 7.5 and sacrificed on gestational day 11.5. DHFR activity in embryonic tissues was detected, and folate concentrations were analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Copy number variations (CNVs) in neural tube tissues were detected using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). A dose of MTX 4.5 mg kg(-1) b/w, resulted in the highest incidence of NTDs (31.4%) compared with the other groups, and DHFR activities, 5-MeTHF and 5-FoTHF concentrations in embryonic tissues decreased significantly after MTX injection. Furthermore, we found three high-confidence CNVs on chromosome X using aCGH, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and MassARRAY. These results indicate that MTX could cause a folate-associated dysmetabolism, which is similar to that of dietary folate deficiency in mice. The presence of CNVs in neural tube tissues was associated with the development of NTDs. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  15. Developing convolutional neural networks for measuring climate change opinions from social media data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Bhaduri, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding public opinions on climate change is important for policy making. Public opinion, however, is typically measured with national surveys, which are often too expensive and thus being updated at a low frequency. Twitter has become a major platform for people to express their opinions on social and political issues. Our work attempts to understand if Twitter data can provide complimentary insights about climate change perceptions. Since the nature of social media is real-time, this data source can especially help us understand how public opinion changes over time in response to climate events and hazards, which though is very difficult to be captured by manual surveys. We use the Twitter Streaming API to collect tweets that contain keywords, "climate change" or "#climatechange". Traditional machine-learning based opinion mining algorithms require a significant amount of labeled data. Data labeling is notoriously time consuming. To address this problem, we use hashtags (a significant feature used to mark topics of tweets) to annotate tweets automatically. For example, hashtags, #climatedenial and #climatescam, are negative opinion labels, while #actonclimate and #climateaction are positive. Following this method, we can obtain a large amount of training data without human labor. This labeled dataset is used to train a deep convolutional neural network that classifies tweets into positive (i.e. believe in climate change) and negative (i.e. do not believe). Based on the positive/negative tweets obtained, we will further analyze risk perceptions and opinions towards policy support. In addition, we analyze twitter user profiles to understand the demographics of proponents and opponents of climate change. Deep learning techniques, especially convolutional deep neural networks, have achieved much success in computer vision. In this work, we propose a convolutional neural network architecture for understanding opinions within text. This method is compared with

  16. Imaging and quantitative analysis of tritium-labelled cells in lymphocyte proliferation assays using microchannel plate detectors originally developed for X-ray astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, J E; Hales, J M

    2001-01-01

    Microchannel plate detectors have been used in many astronomical X-ray telescopes. Recently we have begun to use similar detectors to image electron emission from radiolabelled biological assays. Here we show how a microchannel plate (MCP) detector can be used to image tritium uptake in T lymphocyte proliferation assays. Quantitative analysis using the MCP detector has the same sensitivity and speed as conventional liquid scintillation counter (LSC) analysis whilst obviating the need for scintillation fluid. In addition the system permits the imaging of whole plate harvests from a range of plate sizes. Here we present data obtained with 96-well plates and Terasaki plates.

  17. Is this a brain which I see before me? Modeling human neural development with pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ikuo K; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre

    2015-09-15

    The human brain is arguably the most complex structure among living organisms. However, the specific mechanisms leading to this complexity remain incompletely understood, primarily because of the poor experimental accessibility of the human embryonic brain. Over recent years, technologies based on pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have been developed to generate neural cells of various types. While the translational potential of PSC technologies for disease modeling and/or cell replacement therapies is usually put forward as a rationale for their utility, they are also opening novel windows for direct observation and experimentation of the basic mechanisms of human brain development. PSC-based studies have revealed that a number of cardinal features of neural ontogenesis are remarkably conserved in human models, which can be studied in a reductionist fashion. They have also revealed species-specific features, which constitute attractive lines of investigation to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the human brain, and its link with evolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Development of a New Fast Shower Maximum Detector Based on Microchannel Plates Photomultipliers (MCP-PMT) as an Active Element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronzhin, A. [Fermilab; Los, S. [Fermilab; Ramberg, E. [Fermilab; Spiropulu, M. [Caltech; Apresyan, A. [Caltech; Xie, S. [Caltech; Kim, H. [Chicago U.; Zatserklyaniy, A. [UC, Santa Cruz

    2014-09-21

    One possibility to make a fast and radiation resistant shower maximum (SM) detector is to use a secondary emitter as an active element. We present below test beam results, obtained with different types of photodetectors based on microchannel plates (MCPs) as the secondary emitter. We performed the measurements at the Fermilab Test Beam Facility with 120GeV proton beam and 12GeV and 32GeV secondary beams. The goal of the measurement with 120GeV protons was to determine time resolution for minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). The SM time resolution we obtained for this new type of detector is at the level of 20-30ps. We estimate that a significant contribution to the detector response originates from secondary emission of the MCP. This work can be considered as the first step in building a new type of calorimeter based on this principle.

  19. Decosol Project : development of solar plate collectors of high efficiency and low cost for medium temperature application; Proyecto Decosol: Desarrollo de colectores solares planos de alta eficiencia ybajo coste para aplicaciones a mediana temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadafalch, J.; Oliva, A.; Lavandeira, J. C.; Maestre, F.; Martinez, J. C.; Martin, J. R.; Hermo, R.

    2004-07-01

    Work that is currently being carried out by the authors in the framework of the project DECOSOL (Development of high efficiency and low cost flat plate collectors for medium temperature applications) is described in this paper. The goal of DECOSOL is to consolidate the results of previous R AND D projects conducted by the authors on the development of stagnation proof transparently insulated flat plate solar collectors prototypes, in order to end up with commercial products. (Author)

  20. Developing an Intelligent System for Diagnosis of Asthma Based on Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Behrouz; Safdari, Reza; Zolnoori, Maryam; Bashiri, Azadeh

    2015-08-01

    Lack of proper diagnosis and inadequate treatment of asthma, leads to physical and financial complications. This study aimed to use data mining techniques and creating a neural network intelligent system for diagnosis of asthma. The study population is the patients who had visited one of the Lung Clinics in Tehran. Data were analyzed using the SPSS statistical tool and the chi-square Pearson's coefficient was the basis of decision making for data ranking. The considered neural network is trained using back propagation learning technique. According to the analysis performed by means of SPSS to select the top factors, 13 effective factors were selected, in different performances, data was mixed in various forms, so the different modes was made for training the data and testing networks and in all different modes, the network was able to predict correctly 100% of all cases. Using data mining methods before the design structure of system, aimed to reduce the data dimension and the optimum choice of the data, will lead to a more accurate system. So considering the data mining approaches due to the nature of medical data is necessary.

  1. Immunohistochemical study of the neural development transcription factors (TTF1, ASCL1 and BRN2) in neuroendocrine prostate tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Zarco, E; Vallejo-Benítez, A; Umbría-Jiménez, S; Pereira-Gallardo, S; Pabón-Carrasco, S; Azueta, A; González-Cámpora, R; Espinal, P S; García-Escudero, A

    2017-10-01

    Prostatic small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is an uncommon malignancy that constitutes 0.5-1% of all prostate malignancies. The median cancer-specific survival of patients with prostatic small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is 19 months, and 60.5% of the patients have metastatic disease. Neural development transcription factors are molecules involved in the organogenesis of the central nervous system and of neuroendocrine precursors of various tissues, including the suprarenal gland, thyroid glands, lungs and prostate. We present 3 cases of this uncommon condition, applying the new World Health Organisation criteria. We conducted studies through haematoxylin and eosin staining and analysed the expression of the neural development transcription factors achaete-scute homolog like 1, thyroid transcription factor 1 and the class III/IV POU transcription factors, as a new research line in the carcinogenesis of prostatic neuroendocrine tumours. In case 1, there was no TTF1 immunoexpression. Cases 2 and 3 had positive immunostaining for ASCL1, and Case 1 had negative immunostaining. BRN2 immunostaining was negative in case 1 and positive in cases 2 and 3. The World Health Organisation does not recognise any molecular or genetic marker with prognostic value. ASCL-1 is related to the NOTCH and WNT signalling pathways. ASCL-1, TTF1 and BRN2 could be used for early diagnosis and as prognostic factors and therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 AEU. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem cell property of postmigratory cranial neural crest cells and their utility in alveolar bone regeneration and tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Il-Hyuk; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Zhao, Hu; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Shi, Songtao; Chai, Yang

    2009-04-01

    The vertebrate neural crest is a multipotent cell population that gives rise to a variety of different cell types. We have discovered that postmigratory cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) maintain mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and show potential utility for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. We are able to induce the osteogenic differentiation of postmigratory CNCCs, and this differentiation is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways. After transplantation into a host animal, postmigratory CNCCs form bone matrix. CNCC-formed bones are distinct from bones regenerated by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, CNCCs support tooth germ survival via BMP signaling in our CNCC-tooth germ cotransplantation system. Thus, we conclude that postmigratory CNCCs preserve stem cell features, contribute to craniofacial bone formation, and play a fundamental role in supporting tooth organ development. These findings reveal a novel function for postmigratory CNCCs in organ development, and demonstrate the utility of these CNCCs in regenerating craniofacial structures.

  3. Sleep as a window into early neural development: Shifts in sleep-dependent learning effects across early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Rebecca L; Edgin, Jamie O

    2015-09-01

    Sleep is an important physiological state for the consolidation and generalization of new learning in children and adults. We review the literature on sleep-dependent memory consolidation and generalization in infants and preschool children and place the findings in the context of the development of the neural systems underlying memory (hippocampus and its connections to cortex). Based on the extended trajectory of hippocampal development, transitions in the nature of sleep-dependent learning are expected. The studies reviewed here show shifts in the nature of sleep-dependent learning across early childhood, with sleep facilitating generalization in infants but enhancing precise memory after 18-24 months of age. Future studies on sleep-dependent learning in infants and young children must take these transitions in early brain development into account.

  4. Current plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-05-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  5. Development of Filtered Bispectrum for EEG Signal Feature Extraction in Automatic Emotion Recognition Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prima Dewi Purnamasari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of automatic emotion detection systems has recently gained significant attention due to the growing possibility of their implementation in several applications, including affective computing and various fields within biomedical engineering. Use of the electroencephalograph (EEG signal is preferred over facial expression, as people cannot control the EEG signal generated by their brain; the EEG ensures a stronger reliability in the psychological signal. However, because of its uniqueness between individuals and its vulnerability to noise, use of EEG signals can be rather complicated. In this paper, we propose a methodology to conduct EEG-based emotion recognition by using a filtered bispectrum as the feature extraction subsystem and an artificial neural network (ANN as the classifier. The bispectrum is theoretically superior to the power spectrum because it can identify phase coupling between the nonlinear process components of the EEG signal. In the feature extraction process, to extract the information contained in the bispectrum matrices, a 3D pyramid filter is used for sampling and quantifying the bispectrum value. Experiment results show that the mean percentage of the bispectrum value from 5 × 5 non-overlapped 3D pyramid filters produces the highest recognition rate. We found that reducing the number of EEG channels down to only eight in the frontal area of the brain does not significantly affect the recognition rate, and the number of data samples used in the training process is then increased to improve the recognition rate of the system. We have also utilized a probabilistic neural network (PNN as another classifier and compared its recognition rate with that of the back-propagation neural network (BPNN, and the results show that the PNN produces a comparable recognition rate and lower computational costs. Our research shows that the extracted bispectrum values of an EEG signal using 3D filtering as a feature extraction

  6. Neural network-based sliding mode control for atmospheric-actuated spacecraft formation using switching strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ran; Wang, Jihe; Zhang, Dexin; Shao, Xiaowei

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an adaptive neural networks-based control method for spacecraft formation with coupled translational and rotational dynamics using only aerodynamic forces. It is assumed that each spacecraft is equipped with several large flat plates. A coupled orbit-attitude dynamic model is considered based on the specific configuration of atmospheric-based actuators. For this model, a neural network-based adaptive sliding mode controller is implemented, accounting for system uncertainties and external perturbations. To avoid invalidation of the neural networks destroying stability of the system, a switching control strategy is proposed which combines an adaptive neural networks controller dominating in its active region and an adaptive sliding mode controller outside the neural active region. An optimal process is developed to determine the control commands for the plates system. The stability of the closed-loop system is proved by a Lyapunov-based method. Comparative results through numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of executing attitude control while maintaining the relative motion, and higher control accuracy can be achieved by using the proposed neural-based switching control scheme than using only adaptive sliding mode controller.

  7. Development of a Bayesian neural network to perform obstacle avoidance for an intelligent wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Anh V; Nguyen, Lien B; Su, Steven; Nguyen, Hung T

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an extension of a real-time obstacle avoidance algorithm for our laser-based intelligent wheelchair, to provide independent mobility for people with physical, cognitive, and/or perceptual impairments. The laser range finder URG-04LX mounted on the front of the wheelchair collects immediate environment information, and then the raw laser data are directly used to control the wheelchair in real-time without any modification. The central control role is an obstacle avoidance algorithm which is a neural network trained under supervision of Bayesian framework, to optimize its structure and weight values. The experiment results demonstrated that this new approach provides safety, smoothness for autonomous tasks and significantly improves the performance of the system in difficult tasks such as door passing.

  8. Development of Artificial Neural Network Model of Crude Oil Distillation Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hussein Khalaf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network in MATLAB simulator is used to model Baiji crude oil distillation unit based on data generated from aspen-HYSYS simulator. Thirteen inputs, six outputs and over 1487 data set are used to model the actual unit. Nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARXand back propagation algorithm are used for training. Seventy percent of data are used for training the network while the remaining  thirty percent are used for testing  and validating the network to determine its prediction accuracy. One hidden layer and 34 hidden neurons are used for the proposed network with MSE of 0.25 is obtained. The number of neuron are selected based on less MSE for the network. The model founded to predict the optimal operating conditions for different objective functions within the training limit since ANN models are poor extrapolators. They are usually only reliable within the range of data that they had been trained for.

  9. Development of Artificial Neural Network Model of Crude Oil Distillation Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraid F. Ahmed

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network in MATLAB simulator is used to model Baiji crude oil distillation unit based on data generated from aspen-HYSYS simulator. Thirteen inputs, six outputs and over 1487 data set are used to model the actual unit. Nonlinear autoregressive network with exogenous inputs (NARX and back propagation algorithm are used for training. Seventy percent of data are used for training the network while the remaining thirty percent are used for testing and validating the network to determine its prediction accuracy. One hidden layer and 34 hidden neurons are used for the proposed network with MSE of 0.25 is obtained. The number of neuron are selected based on less MSE for the network. The model founded to predict the optimal operating conditions for different objective functions within the training limit since ANN models are poor extrapolators. They are usually only reliable within the range of data that they had been trained for.

  10. What the laboratory rat has taught us about social play behavior: role in behavioral development and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschuren, Louk J M J; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    Social play behavior is the most vigorous and characteristic form of social interaction displayed by developing mammals. The laboratory rat is an ideal species to study this behavior, since it shows ample social play that can be easily recognized and quantified. In this chapter, we will first briefly describe the structure of social play behavior in rats. Next, we will discuss studies that used social isolation rearing during the period in life when social play is most abundant to investigate the developmental functions of social play behavior in rats, focusing on the consequences of play deprivation on social, cognitive, emotional, and sensorimotor development. Last, we will discuss the neural substrates of social play behavior in rats, with emphasis on the limbic corticostriatal circuits that underlie emotions and their influence on behavior.

  11. Development of a New Aprepitant Liquisolid Formulation with the Aid of Artificial Neural Networks and Genetic Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmpalexis, Panagiotis; Grypioti, Agni; Eleftheriadis, Georgios K; Fatouros, Dimitris G

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, liquisolid formulations were developed for improving dissolution profile of aprepitant (APT) in a solid dosage form. Experimental studies were complemented with artificial neural networks and genetic programming. Specifically, the type and concentration of liquid vehicle was evaluated through saturation-solubility studies, while the effect of the amount of viscosity increasing agent (HPMC), the type of wetting (Soluplus® vs. PVP) and solubilizing (Poloxamer®407 vs. Kolliphor®ELP) agents, and the ratio of solid coating (microcrystalline cellulose) to carrier (colloidal silicon dioxide) were evaluated based on in vitro drug release studies. The optimum liquisolid formulation exhibited improved dissolution characteristics compared to the marketed product Emend®. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a novel method combining particle size analysis by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and HPLC, revealed that the increase in dissolution rate of APT in the optimum liquisolid formulation was due to the formation of stable APT nanocrystals. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) revealed the presence of intermolecular interactions between APT and liquisolid formulation excipients. Multilinear regression analysis (MLR), artificial neural networks (ANNs), and genetic programming (GP) were used to correlate several formulation variables with dissolution profile parameters (Y 15min and Y 30min) using a full factorial experimental design. Results showed increased correlation efficacy for ANNs and GP (RMSE of 0.151 and 0.273, respectively) compared to MLR (RMSE = 0.413).

  12. Boys vs. girls: Gender differences in the neural development of trust and reciprocity depend on social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmers-Jansen, Imke L J; Krabbendam, Lydia; Veltman, Dick J; Fett, Anne-Kathrin J

    2017-06-01

    Trust and cooperation increase from adolescence to adulthood, but studies on gender differences in this development are rare. We investigated gender and age-related differences in trust and reciprocity and associated neural mechanisms in 43 individuals (16-27 years, 22 male). Participants played two multi-round trust games with a cooperative and an unfair partner. Males showed more basic trust towards unknown others than females. Both genders increased trust during cooperative interactions, with no differences in average trust. Age was unrelated to trust during cooperation. During unfair interactions males decreased their trust more with age than females. ROI analysis showed age-related increases in activation in the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during cooperative investments, and increased age-related caudate activation during both cooperative and unfair repayments. Gender differences in brain activation were only observed during cooperative repayments, with males activating the TPJ more than females, and females activating the caudate more. The findings suggest relatively mature processes of trust and reciprocity in the investigated age range. Gender differences only occur in unfair contexts, becoming more pronounced with age. Largely similar neural activation in males and females and few age effects suggest that similar, mature cognitive strategies are employed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. The neural signature of self-concept development in adolescence: The role of domain and valence distinctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Cruijsen, R; Peters, S; van der Aar, L P E; Crone, E A

    2017-11-22

    Neuroimaging studies in adults showed that cortical midline regions including medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) are important in self-evaluations. The goals of this study were to investigate the contribution of these regions to self-evaluations in late childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood, and to examine whether these differed per domain (academic, physical and prosocial) and valence (positive versus negative). Also, we tested whether this activation changes across adolescence. For this purpose, participants between ages 11-21-years (N=150) evaluated themselves on trait sentences in an fMRI session. Behaviorally, adolescents rated their academic traits less positively than children and young adults. The neural analyses showed that evaluating self-traits versus a control condition was associated with increased activity in mPFC (domain-general effect), and positive traits were associated with increased activity in ventral mPFC (valence effect). Self-related mPFC activation increased linearly with age, but only for evaluating physical traits. Furthermore, an adolescent-specific decrease in striatum activation for positive self traits was found. Finally, we found domain-specific neural activity for evaluating traits in physical (dorsolateral PFC, dorsal mPFC) and academic (PPC) domains. Together, these results highlight the importance of domain distinctions when studying self-concept development in late childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance but not activation of Pitx2 expression in neural crest during eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Amanda L; Gage, Philip J

    2010-12-01

    Pitx2 is a paired-like homeodomain gene that acts as a key regulator of eye development. Despite its significance, upstream regulation of Pitx2 expression during eye development remains incompletely understood. We use neural crest-specific ablation of Ctnnb1 to demonstrate that canonical Wnt signaling is not required for initial activation of Pitx2 in neural crest. However, canonical Wnt signaling is subsequently required to maintain Pitx2 expression in the neural crest. Eye development in Ctnnb1-null mice appears grossly normal early but significant phenotypes emerge following loss of Pitx2 expression. LEF-1 and β-catenin bind Pitx2 promoter sequences in ocular neural crest, indicating a likely direct effect of canonical Wnt signaling on Pitx2 expression. Combining our data with previous reports, we propose a model wherein a sequential code of retinoic acid followed by canonical Wnt signaling are required for activation and maintenance of Pitx2 expression, respectively. Other key transcription factors in the neural crest, including Foxc1, do not require intact canonical Wnt signaling. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Neural bases of childhood speech disorders: lateralization and plasticity for speech functions during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liégeois, Frédérique J; Morgan, Angela T

    2012-01-01

    Current models of speech production in adults emphasize the crucial role played by the left perisylvian cortex, primary and pre-motor cortices, the basal ganglia, and the cerebellum for normal speech production. Whether similar brain-behaviour relationships and leftward cortical dominance are found in childhood remains unclear. Here we reviewed recent evidence linking motor speech disorders (apraxia of speech and dysarthria) and brain abnormalities in children and adolescents with developmental, progressive, or childhood-acquired conditions. We found no evidence that unilateral damage can result in apraxia of speech, or that left hemisphere lesions are more likely to result in dysarthria than lesion to the right. The few studies reporting on childhood apraxia of speech converged towards morphological, structural, metabolic or epileptic anomalies affecting the basal ganglia, perisylvian and rolandic cortices bilaterally. Persistent dysarthria, similarly, was commonly reported in individuals with syndromes and conditions affecting these same structures bilaterally. In conclusion, for the first time we provide evidence that longterm and severe childhood speech disorders result predominantly from bilateral disruption of the neural networks involved in speech production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  17. Signalling through the Type 1 Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor (IGF1R Interacts with Canonical Wnt Signalling to Promote Neural Proliferation in Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qichen Hu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Signalling through the IGF1R [type 1 IGF (insulin-like growth factor receptor] and canonical Wnt signalling are two signalling pathways that play critical roles in regulating neural cell generation and growth. To determine whether the signalling through the IGF1R can interact with the canonical Wnt signalling pathway in neural cells in vivo, we studied mutant mice with altered IGF signalling. We found that in mice with blunted IGF1R expression specifically in nestin-expressing neural cells (IGF1RNestin–KO mice the abundance of neural β-catenin was significantly reduced. Blunting IGF1R expression also markedly decreased: (i the activity of a LacZ (β-galactosidase reporter transgene that responds to Wnt nuclear signalling (LacZTCF reporter transgene and (ii the number of proliferating neural precursors. In contrast, overexpressing IGF-I (insulin-like growth factor I in brain markedly increased the activity of the LacZTCF reporter transgene. Consistently, IGF-I treatment also markedly increased the activity of the LacZTCF reporter transgene in embryonic neuron cultures that are derived from LacZTCF Tg (transgenic mice. Importantly, increasing the abundance of β-catenin in IGF1RNestin–KO embryonic brains by suppressing the activity of GSK3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β significantly alleviated the phenotypic changes induced by IGF1R deficiency. These phenotypic changes includes: (i retarded brain growth, (ii reduced precursor proliferation and (iii decreased neuronal number. Our current data, consistent with our previous study of cultured oligodendrocytes, strongly support the concept that IGF signalling interacts with canonical Wnt signalling in the developing brain to promote neural proliferation. The interaction of IGF and canonical Wnt signalling plays an important role in normal brain development by promoting neural precursor proliferation.

  18. Development of a remote sensing algorithm for cyanobacterial phycocyanin pigment in the Baltic Sea using neural network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riha, Stefan; Krawczyk, Harald

    2011-11-01

    Water quality monitoring in the Baltic Sea is of high ecological importance for all its neighbouring countries. They are highly interested in a regular monitoring of water quality parameters of their regional zones. A special attention is paid to the occurrence and dissemination of algae blooms. Among the appearing blooms the possibly toxicological or harmful cyanobacteria cultures are a special case of investigation, due to their specific optical properties and due to the negative influence on the ecological state of the aquatic system. Satellite remote sensing, with its high temporal and spatial resolution opportunities, allows the frequent observations of large areas of the Baltic Sea with special focus on its two seasonal algae blooms. For a better monitoring of the cyanobacteria dominated summer blooms, adapted algorithms are needed which take into account the special optical properties of blue-green algae. Chlorophyll-a standard algorithms typically fail in a correct recognition of these occurrences. To significantly improve the opportunities of observation and propagation of the cyanobacteria blooms, the Marine Remote Sensing group of DLR has started the development of a model based inversion algorithm that includes a four component bio-optical water model for Case2 waters, which extends the commonly calculated parameter set chlorophyll, Suspended Matter and CDOM with an additional parameter for the estimation of phycocyanin absorption. It was necessary to carry out detailed optical laboratory measurements with different cyanobacteria cultures, occurring in the Baltic Sea, for the generation of a specific bio-optical model. The inversion of satellite remote sensing data is based on an artificial Neural Network technique. This is a model based multivariate non-linear inversion approach. The specifically designed Neural Network is trained with a comprehensive dataset of simulated reflectance values taking into account the laboratory obtained specific optical

  19. The Wellcome Prize Lecture. A map of auditory space in the mammalian brain: neural computation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, A J

    1993-09-01

    The experiments described in this review have demonstrated that the SC contains a two-dimensional map of auditory space, which is synthesized within the brain using a combination of monaural and binaural localization cues. There is also an adaptive fusion of auditory and visual space in this midbrain nucleus, providing for a common access to the motor pathways that control orientation behaviour. This necessitates a highly plastic relationship between the visual and auditory systems, both during postnatal development and in adult life. Because of the independent mobility of difference sense organs, gating mechanisms are incorporated into the auditory representation to provide up-to-date information about the spatial orientation of the eyes and ears. The SC therefore provides a valuable model system for studying a number of important issues in brain function, including the neural coding of sound location, the co-ordination of spatial information between different sensory systems, and the integration of sensory signals with motor outputs.

  20. Development of Hybrid Model for Estimating Construction Waste for Multifamily Residential Buildings Using Artificial Neural Networks and Ant Colony Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongoun Lee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the increasing costs of construction waste disposal, an accurate estimation of the amount of construction waste is a key factor in a project’s success. Korea has been burdened by increasing construction waste as a consequence of the growing number of construction projects and a lack of construction waste management (CWM strategies. One of the problems associated with predicting the amount of waste is that there are no suitable estimation strategies currently available. Therefore, we developed a hybrid estimation model to predict the quantity and cost of waste in the early stage of construction. The proposed approach can be used to address cost overruns and improve CWM in the subsequent stages of construction. The proposed hybrid model uses artificial neural networks (ANNs and ant colony optimization (ACO. It is expected to provide an accurate waste estimate by applying historical data from multifamily residential buildings.

  1. Simple Algorithms for Distributed Leader Election in Anonymous Synchronous Rings and Complete Networks Inspired by Neural Development in Fruit Flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Jeavons, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Leader election in anonymous rings and complete networks is a very practical problem in distributed computing. Previous algorithms for this problem are generally designed for a classical message passing model where complex messages are exchanged. However, the need to send and receive complex messages makes such algorithms less practical for some real applications. We present some simple synchronous algorithms for distributed leader election in anonymous rings and complete networks that are inspired by the development of the neural system of the fruit fly. Our leader election algorithms all assume that only one-bit messages are broadcast by nodes in the network and processors are only able to distinguish between silence and the arrival of one or more messages. These restrictions allow implementations to use a simpler message-passing architecture. Even with these harsh restrictions our algorithms are shown to achieve good time and message complexity both analytically and experimentally.

  2. Developing Generic Image Search Strategies for Large Astronomical Data Sets and Archives using Convolutional Neural Networks and Transfer Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Joshua E. G.; Hargis, Jonathan R.; Jones, Craig R.

    2018-01-01

    Astronomical instruments produce petabytes of images every year, vastly more than can be inspected by a member of the astronomical community in search of a specific population of structures. Fortunately, the sky is mostly black and source extraction algorithms have been developed to provide searchable catalogs of unconfused sources like stars and galaxies. These tools often fail for studies of more diffuse structures like the interstellar medium and unresolved stellar structures in nearby galaxies, leaving astronomers interested in observations of photodissociation regions, stellar clusters, diffuse interstellar clouds without the crucial ability to search. In this work we present a new path forward for finding structures in large data sets similar to an input structure using convolutional neural networks, transfer learning, and machine learning clustering techniques. We show applications to archival data in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST).

  3. A novel hybrid classification model of genetic algorithms, modified k-Nearest Neighbor and developed backpropagation neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  4. A novel hybrid classification model of genetic algorithms, modified k-Nearest Neighbor and developed backpropagation neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nader Salari

    Full Text Available Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that

  5. A Novel Hybrid Classification Model of Genetic Algorithms, Modified k-Nearest Neighbor and Developed Backpropagation Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Nader; Shohaimi, Shamarina; Najafi, Farid; Nallappan, Meenakshii; Karishnarajah, Isthrinayagy

    2014-01-01

    Among numerous artificial intelligence approaches, k-Nearest Neighbor algorithms, genetic algorithms, and artificial neural networks are considered as the most common and effective methods in classification problems in numerous studies. In the present study, the results of the implementation of a novel hybrid feature selection-classification model using the above mentioned methods are presented. The purpose is benefitting from the synergies obtained from combining these technologies for the development of classification models. Such a combination creates an opportunity to invest in the strength of each algorithm, and is an approach to make up for their deficiencies. To develop proposed model, with the aim of obtaining the best array of features, first, feature ranking techniques such as the Fisher's discriminant ratio and class separability criteria were used to prioritize features. Second, the obtained results that included arrays of the top-ranked features were used as the initial population of a genetic algorithm to produce optimum arrays of features. Third, using a modified k-Nearest Neighbor method as well as an improved method of backpropagation neural networks, the classification process was advanced based on optimum arrays of the features selected by genetic algorithms. The performance of the proposed model was compared with thirteen well-known classification models based on seven datasets. Furthermore, the statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman test followed by post-hoc tests. The experimental findings indicated that the novel proposed hybrid model resulted in significantly better classification performance compared with all 13 classification methods. Finally, the performance results of the proposed model was benchmarked against the best ones reported as the state-of-the-art classifiers in terms of classification accuracy for the same data sets. The substantial findings of the comprehensive comparative study revealed that performance of the

  6. Growth Plate Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plate injuries includes: Falling down. Competitive sports (like football). Recreational activities. Sometimes growth plate injuries happen when ... knee. For More Info U.S. Food and Drug Administration Toll free: 888-INFO-FDA (888-463-6332) ...

  7. Create Your Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  8. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal ... Healthy Diet Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook ...

  9. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of Diabetes Research & Practice Home We Are Research Leaders World's Largest Diabetes Meeting Recent Advances Type 1 ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets ...

  10. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Plate It's simple and effective for both managing diabetes and losing weight. Creating your plate lets you still choose the foods you want, but changes the portion sizes so you are getting larger ...

  11. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... this interactive tool. The healthy meal combinations are endless! Ready to try it at home? Just follow ... non-starchy vegetables and that your options are endless. Create Your Plate! Click on the plate sections ...

  12. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Planning Meals Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook ... Create Your Plate Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Gluten Free Diets Holiday Meal Planning Cook with Heart- ...

  13. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatments for those living with diabetes. Other Ways to Give Become a Member Vehicle Donation Planned Giving ... Share Create Your Plate ! Share: Seven Simple Steps to Create Your Plate It's simple and effective for ...

  14. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  15. Development of flow and heat transfer in the vicinity of a vertical plate embedded in a porous medium with viscous dissipation effects

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of viscous dissipation on unsteady free convection from an isothermal vertical flat plate in a fluidsaturated porous medium are investigated. The Darcy-Brinkman model is employed to describe the flow field. A new model of viscous dissipation is used for the Darcy-Brinkman model of porous media. The simultaneous development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers is obtained by using a finite-difference method. Boundary layer and Boussinesq approximation have been incorporated. Numerical calculations are carried out for various parameters entering into the problem. Velocity and temperature profiles as well as the local friction factor and local Nusselt number are displayed graphically. It is found that as time approaches infinity, the values of the friction factor and heat transfer coefficient approach steady state. © 2012 by Begell House, Inc.

  16. Deep Classifiers-Based License Plate Detection, Localization and Recognition on GPU-Powered Mobile Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Tahir Hussain Rizvi; Denis Patti; Tomas Björklund; Gianpiero Cabodi; Gianluca Francini

    2017-01-01

    The realization of a deep neural architecture on a mobile platform is challenging, but can open up a number of possibilities for visual analysis applications. A neural network can be realized on a mobile platform by exploiting the computational power of the embedded GPU and simplifying the flow of a neural architecture trained on the desktop workstation or a GPU server. This paper presents an embedded platform-based Italian license plate detection and recognition system using deep neural clas...

  17. Neuregulin 3 Mediates Cortical Plate Invasion and Laminar Allocation of GABAergic Interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Bartolini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits in the cerebral cortex consist of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons. These two main classes of cortical neurons follow largely different genetic programs, yet they assemble into highly specialized circuits during development following a very precise choreography. Previous studies have shown that signals produced by pyramidal cells influence the migration of cortical interneurons, but the molecular nature of these factors has remained elusive. Here, we identified Neuregulin 3 (Nrg3 as a chemoattractive factor expressed by developing pyramidal cells that guides the allocation of cortical interneurons in the developing cortical plate. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches reveal that Nrg3 modulates the migration of interneurons into the cortical plate in a process that is dependent on the tyrosine kinase receptor ErbB4. Perturbation of Nrg3 signaling in conditional mutants leads to abnormal lamination of cortical interneurons. Nrg3 is therefore a critical mediator in the assembly of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  18. Create Your Plate

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Create Your Plate Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose levels and lose weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy veggies ...

  19. Development of the heated length to diameter correction factor on critical heat flux using the artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Ho; Baek, Won Pil; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Tae Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    With using artificial neural networks (ANNs), an analytical study related to the heated length effect on critical heat flux (CHF) has been carried out to make an improvement of the CHF prediction accuracy based on local condition correlations or table. It has been carried out to suggest a feasible criterion of the threshold length-to-diameter (L/D) value in which heated length could affect CHF. And within the criterion, a L/D correction factor has been developed through conventional regression. In order to validate the developed L/D correction factor, CHF experiments for various heated lengths have been carried out under low and intermediate pressure conditions. The developed threshold L/D correlation provides a new feasible criterion of L/D threshold value. The developed correction factor gives a reasonable accuracy for the original database, showing the error of -2.18% for average and 27.75% for RMS, and promising results for new experimental data. 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  20. Development of an in situ evaluation system for neural cells using extracellular matrix-modeled gel culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takayuki; Ikegami, Yasuhiro; Mizumachi, Hideyuki; Shirakigawa, Nana; Ijima, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional monolayer culture is the most popular cell culture method. However, the cells may not respond as they do in vivo because the culture conditions are different from in vivo conditions. However, hydrogel-embedding culture, which cultures cells in a biocompatible culture substrate, can produce in vivo-like cell responses, but in situ evaluation of cells in a gel is difficult. In this study, we realized an in vivo-like environment in vitro to produce cell responses similar to those in vivo and established an in situ evaluation system for hydrogel-embedded cell responses. The extracellular matrix (ECM)-modeled gel consisted of collagen and heparin (Hep-col) to mimic an in vivo-like environment. The Hep-col gel could immobilize growth factors, which is important for ECM functions. Neural stem/progenitor cells cultured in the Hep-col gel grew and differentiated more actively than in collagen, indicating an in vivo-like environment in the Hep-col gel. Second, a thin-layered gel culture system was developed to realize in situ evaluation of the gel-embedded cells. Cells in a 200-μm-thick gel could be evaluated clearly by a phase-contrast microscope and immunofluorescence staining through reduced optical and diffusional effects. Finally, we found that the neural cells cultured in this system had synaptic connections and neuronal action potentials by immunofluorescence staining and Ca2+ imaging. In conclusion, this culture method may be a valuable evaluation system for neurotoxicity testing. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 3. Testing of model plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irek P.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is the continuation of the previous ones entitled „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 1. Material factors“ and „Material factors in relation to development time in liquid-penetrant inspection. Part 2. Investigation programme and preliminary tests“ in which material factors influencing essentially the development time in penetrant testing as well as the range of their values have been specified. These factors are: material kind, surface roughness and imperfection width.

  2. Short communication: A comparison of biofilm development on stainless steel and modified-surface plate heat exchangers during a 17-h milk pasteurization run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Shivali; Anand, Sanjeev; Metzger, Lloyd; Amamcharla, Jayendra

    2018-02-02

    Flow of milk through the plate heat exchanger (PHE) results in denaturation of proteins, resulting in fouling. This also accelerates bacterial adhesion on the PHE surface, eventually leading to the development of biofilms. During prolonged processing, these biofilms result in shedding of bacteria and cross-contaminate the milk being processed, thereby limiting the duration of production runs. Altering the surface properties of PHE, such as surface energy and hydrophobicity, could be an effective approach to reduce biofouling. This study was conducted to compare the extent of biofouling on native stainless steel (SS) and modified-surface [Ni-P-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)] PHE during the pasteurization of raw milk for an uninterrupted processing run of 17 h. For microbial studies, raw and pasteurized milk samples were aseptically collected from inlets and outlets of both PHE at various time intervals to examine shedding of bacteria in the milk. At the end of the run, 3M quick swabs (3M, St. Paul, MN) and ATP swabs (Charm Sciences Inc., Lawrence, MA) were used to sample plates from different sections of the pasteurizers (regeneration, heating, and cooling) for biofilm screening and to estimate the efficiency of cleaning in place, respectively. The data were tested for ANOVA, and means were compared. Modified PHE experienced lower mesophilic and thermophilic bacterial attachment and biofilm formation (average log 1.0 and 0.99 cfu/cm 2 , respectively) in the regenerative section of the pasteurizer compared with SS PHE (average log 1.49 and 1.47, respectively). Similarly, higher relative light units were observed for SS PHE compared with the modified PHE, illustrating the presence of more organic matter on the surface of SS PHE at the end of the run. In addition, at h 17, milk collected from the outlet of SS PHE showed plate counts of 5.44 cfu/cm 2 , which were significantly higher than those for pasteurized milk collected from modified PHE (4.12 log cfu/cm 2 ). This

  3. From Point Defects to Plate Tectonic Faults

    OpenAIRE

    Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus; Hobbs, Bruce; Yuen, David; Ord, Alison; Zhang, Yanhua; Muhlhaus, Hans Bernd; Morra, Gabriele

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Understanding and explaining emergent constitutive laws in the multi-scale evolution from point defects, dislocations and two-dimensional defects to plate tectonic scales is an arduous challenge in condensed matter physics. The Earth appears to be the only planet known to have developed stable plate tectonics as a means to get rid of its heat. The emergence of plate tectonics out of mantle convection appears to rely intrinsically on the capacity to form extremely weak faul...

  4. Search for the Missing lncs: Gene Regulatory Networks in Neural Crest Development and Long Non-coding RNA Biomarkers of Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), a birth defect characterized by variable aganglionosis of the gut, affects about 1 in 5000 births, and is a consequence of abnormal development of neural crest cells, from which enteric ganglia derive. In the companion article in this issue (S...

  5. Search for the Missing lncs: Gene Regulatory Networks in Neural Crest Development and Long Non-coding RNA Biomarkers of Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), a birth defect characterized by variable aganglionosis of the gut, affects about 1 in 5000 births, and is a consequence of abnormal development of neural crest cells, from which enteric ganglia derive. In the companion article in this issue (Shen et...

  6. A neural cell adhesion molecule-derived fibroblast growth factor receptor agonist, the FGL-peptide, promotes early postnatal sensorimotor development and enhances social memory retention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Thomas; Novitskaia, V; Berezin, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) belongs to the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily and is composed extracellularly of five Ig-like and two fibronectin type III (F3) modules. It plays a pivotal role in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. NCAM signals via a direct interaction...

  7. Geologically current plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Argus, Donald F.

    2010-04-01

    We describe best-fitting angular velocities and MORVEL, a new closure-enforced set of angular velocities for the geologically current motions of 25 tectonic plates that collectively occupy 97 per cent of Earth's surface. Seafloor spreading rates and fault azimuths are used to determine the motions of 19 plates bordered by mid-ocean ridges, including all the major plates. Six smaller plates with little or no connection to the mid-ocean ridges are linked to MORVEL with GPS station velocities and azimuthal data. By design, almost no kinematic information is exchanged between the geologically determined and geodetically constrained subsets of the global circuit-MORVEL thus averages motion over geological intervals for all the major plates. Plate geometry changes relative to NUVEL-1A include the incorporation of Nubia, Lwandle and Somalia plates for the former Africa plate, Capricorn, Australia and Macquarie plates for the former Australia plate, and Sur and South America plates for the former South America plate. MORVEL also includes Amur, Philippine Sea, Sundaland and Yangtze plates, making it more useful than NUVEL-1A for studies of deformation in Asia and the western Pacific. Seafloor spreading rates are estimated over the past 0.78 Myr for intermediate and fast spreading centres and since 3.16 Ma for slow and ultraslow spreading centres. Rates are adjusted downward by 0.6-2.6mmyr-1 to compensate for the several kilometre width of magnetic reversal zones. Nearly all the NUVEL-1A angular velocities differ significantly from the MORVEL angular velocities. The many new data, revised plate geometries, and correction for outward displacement thus significantly modify our knowledge of geologically current plate motions. MORVEL indicates significantly slower 0.78-Myr-average motion across the Nazca-Antarctic and Nazca-Pacific boundaries than does NUVEL-1A, consistent with a progressive slowdown in the eastward component of Nazca plate motion since 3.16 Ma. It also

  8. Longitudinal change in the neural bases of adolescent social self-evaluations: effects of age and pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Jennifer H; Kahn, Lauren E; Merchant, Junaid S; Peake, Shannon J; Veroude, Kim; Masten, Carrie L; Lieberman, Matthew D; Mazziotta, John C; Dapretto, Mirella

    2013-04-24

    Self-evaluations undergo significant transformation during early adolescence, developing in parallel with the heightened complexity of teenagers' social worlds. Intuitive theories of adolescent development, based in part on animal work, suggest that puberty is associated with neural-level changes that facilitate a "social reorientation" (Nelson et al., 2005). However, direct tests of this hypothesis using neuroimaging are limited in humans. This longitudinal fMRI study examined neurodevelopmental trajectories associated with puberty, self-evaluations, and the presumed social reorientation during the transition from childhood to adolescence. Participants (N = 27, mean age = 10.1 and 13.1 years at time points one and two, respectively) engaged in trait evaluations of two targets (the self and a familiar fictional other), across two domains of competence (social and academic). Responses in ventromedial PFC increased with both age and pubertal development during self-evaluations in the social domain, but not in the academic domain. These results suggest that changes in social self-evaluations are intimately connected with biology, not just peer contexts, and provide important empirical support for the relationship between neurodevelopment, puberty, and social functioning.

  9. What changes in neural oscillations can reveal about developmental cognitive neuroscience: language development as a case in point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Mandy J; Abel, Alyson D

    2013-10-01

    EEG is a primary method for studying temporally precise neuronal processes across the lifespan. Most of this work focuses on event related potentials (ERPs); however, using time-locked time frequency analysis to decompose the EEG signal can identify and distinguish multiple changes in brain oscillations underlying cognition (Bastiaansen et al., 2010). Further this measure is thought to reflect changes in inter-neuronal communication more directly than ERPs (Nunez and Srinivasan, 2006). Although time frequency has elucidated cognitive processes in adults, applying it to cognitive development is still rare. Here, we review the basics of neuronal oscillations, some of what they reveal about adult cognitive function, and what little is known relating to children. We focus on language because it develops early and engages complex cortical networks. Additionally, because time frequency analysis of the EEG related to adult language comprehension has been incredibly informative, using similar methods with children will shed new light on current theories of language development and increase our understanding of how neural processes change over the lifespan. Our goal is to emphasize the power of this methodology and encourage its use throughout developmental cognitive neuroscience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Long-Term Effects of Chronic Oral Ritalin Administration on Cognitive and Neural Development in Adolescent Wistar Kyoto Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. Cornish

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD often results in chronic treatment with psychostimulants such as methylphenidate (MPH, Ritalin®. With increases in misdiagnosis of ADHD, children may be inappropriately exposed to chronic psychostimulant treatment during development. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chronic Ritalin treatment on cognitive and neural development in misdiagnosed “normal” (Wistar Kyoto, WKY rats and in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats (SHR, a model of ADHD. Adolescent male animals were treated for four weeks with oral Ritalin® (2 × 2 mg/kg/day or distilled water (dH2O. The effect of chronic treatment on delayed reinforcement tasks (DRT and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity (TH-ir in the prefrontal cortex was assessed. Two weeks following chronic treatment, WKY rats previously exposed to MPH chose the delayed reinforcer significantly less than the dH2O treated controls in both the DRT and extinction task. MPH treatment did not significantly alter cognitive performance in the SHR. TH-ir in the infralimbic cortex was significantly altered by age and behavioural experience in WKY and SHR, however this effect was not evident in WKY rats treated with MPH. These results suggest that chronic treatment with MPH throughout adolescence in “normal” WKY rats increased impulsive choice and altered catecholamine development when compared to vehicle controls.

  11. Comparing the neural bases of self-referential processing in typically developing and 22q11.2 adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Maude; Debbané, Martin; Lagioia, Annalaura; Salomon, Roy; d'Argembeau, Arnaud; Eliez, Stephan

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of self-reflective processing during adolescence is relevant, as this period is characterized by deep reorganization of the self-concept. It may be the case that an atypical development of brain regions underlying self-reflective processing increases the risk for psychological disorders and impaired social functioning. In this study, we investigated the neural bases of self- and other-related processing in typically developing adolescents and youths with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a rare neurogenetic condition associated with difficulties in social interactions and increased risk for schizophrenia. The fMRI paradigm consisted in judging if a series of adjectives applied to the participant himself/herself (self), to his/her best friend or to a fictional character (Harry Potter). In control adolescents, we observed that self- and other-related processing elicited strong activation in cortical midline structures (CMS) when contrasted with a semantic baseline condition. 22q11DS exhibited hypoactivation in the CMS and the striatum during the processing of self-related information when compared to the control group. Finally, the hypoactivation in the anterior cingulate cortex was associated with the severity of prodromal positive symptoms of schizophrenia. The findings are discussed in a developmental framework and in light of their implication for the development of schizophrenia in this at-risk population. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Program Specificity for Ptf1a in Pancreas versus Neural Tube Development Correlates with Distinct Collaborating Cofactors and Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, David M.; Borromeo, Mark D.; Deering, Tye G.; Casey, Bradford H.; Savage, Trisha K.; Mayer, Paul R.; Hoang, Chinh; Tung, Kuang-Chi; Kumar, Manonmani; Shen, Chengcheng; Swift, Galvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is a critical driver for development of both the pancreas and nervous system. How one transcription factor controls diverse programs of gene expression is a fundamental question in developmental biology. To uncover molecular strategies for the program-specific functions of Ptf1a, we identified bound genomic regions in vivo during development of both tissues. Most regions bound by Ptf1a are specific to each tissue, lie near genes needed for proper formation of each tissue, and coincide with regions of open chromatin. The specificity of Ptf1a binding is encoded in the DNA surrounding the Ptf1a-bound sites, because these regions are sufficient to direct tissue-restricted reporter expression in transgenic mice. Fox and Sox factors were identified as potential lineage-specific modifiers of Ptf1a binding, since binding motifs for these factors are enriched in Ptf1a-bound regions in pancreas and neural tube, respectively. Of the Fox factors expressed during pancreatic development, Foxa2 plays a major role. Indeed, Ptf1a and Foxa2 colocalize in embryonic pancreatic chromatin and can act synergistically in cell transfection assays. Together, these findings indicate that lineage-specific chromatin landscapes likely constrain the DNA binding of Ptf1a, and they identify Fox and Sox gene families as part of this process. PMID:23754747

  13. A novel three-dimensional system to study interactions between endothelial cells and neural cells of the developing central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milner Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS, endothelial cells (EC detach from blood vessels growing on the brain surface, and migrate into the expanding brain parenchyma. Brain angiogenesis is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins secreted by cells of the developing CNS. In addition, recent evidence suggests that EC play an important role in establishing the neural stem cell (NSC niche. Therefore, two-way communication between EC and neural cells is of fundamental importance in the developing CNS. To study the interactions between brain EC and neural cells of the developing CNS, a novel three-dimensional (3-D murine co-culture system was developed. Fluorescent-labelled brain EC were seeded onto neurospheres; floating cellular aggregates that contain NSC/neural precursor cells (NPC and smaller numbers of differentiated cells. Using this system, brain EC attachment, survival and migration into neurospheres was evaluated and the role of integrins in mediating the early adhesive events addressed. Results Brain EC attached, survived and migrated deep into neurospheres over a 5-day period. Neurospheres express the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin, and brain EC adhesion to neurospheres was inhibited by RGD peptides and antibodies specific for the β1, but not the α6 integrin subunit. Conclusion A novel 3-D co-culture system for analysing the interactions between EC and neural cells of the developing CNS is presented. This system could be used to investigate the reciprocal influence of EC and NSC/NPC; to examine how NSC/NPC influence cerebral angiogenesis, and conversely, to examine how EC regulate the maintenance and differentiation of NSC/NPC. Using this system it is demonstrated that EC attachment to neurospheres is mediated by the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin.

  14. Expression of the Drosophila homeobox gene, Distal-less, supports an ancestral role in neural development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Plavicki, Jessica S; Squirrell, Jayne M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Boekhoff-Falk, Grace

    2016-01-01

    .... Based on earlier observations in the limbless nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the primitive chordate amphioxus, it was proposed that Dll had an ancestral function in nervous system development...

  15. Plate tectonics and sedimentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yasuji

    1988-05-20

    The theory of continental drift which German meteorologist, Wegener had proposed was denied by the experts at that time and disappeared from the academy. However, scholars of UK measured palaeomagnetism at several parts of the world in 1950's and from this standpoint, the continental drift theory revived. Furthermore, the conditions of the ocean beds started to be discovered due to the development of oceanographic observations in 1950's and in the end of 1960's, the principle of plate tectonics was firmly established changing totally and dramatically then conventional solid earth science based upon the substantially immovable continents and ocean floors. Consequently, the geology up to that time was obliged to be reexamined in its entire fields. This article provides the general information on the above history up to the present time, states about where the sedimentary basins which formed strata do occupy its positions on the earth, and explains the concrete relationship between the geological facts which have been revealed and plate tectonics. (16 figs, 49 refs)

  16. A Neural Network Model of the Effects of Entrenchment and Memory Development on Grammatical Gender Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monner, Derek; Vatz, Karen; Morini, Giovanna; Hwang, So-One; DeKeyser, Robert

    2013-01-01

    To investigate potential causes of L2 performance deficits that correlate with age of onset, we use a computational model to explore the individual contributions of L1 entrenchment and aspects of memory development. Since development and L1 entrenchment almost invariably coincide, studying them independently is seldom possible in humans. To avoid…

  17. ANT Advanced Neural Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labrador, I.; Carrasco, R.; Martinez, L.

    1996-07-01

    This paper describes a practical introduction to the use of Artificial Neural Networks. Artificial Neural Nets are often used as an alternative to the traditional symbolic manipulation and first order logic used in Artificial Intelligence, due the high degree of difficulty to solve problems that can not be handled by programmers using algorithmic strategies. As a particular case of Neural Net a Multilayer Perception developed by programming in C language on OS9 real time operating system is presented. A detailed description about the program structure and practical use are included. Finally, several application examples that have been treated with the tool are presented, and some suggestions about hardware implementations. (Author) 15 refs.

  18. The DLK signalling pathway—a double‐edged sword in neural development and regeneration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tedeschi, Andrea; Bradke, Frank

    2013-01-01

    ... development, as well as neurodegeneration after various insults to the adult nervous system. Interestingly, recent studies have also highlighted a role of DLK in promoting axon regeneration in diverse model systems...

  19. Neural Mechanisms and Children's Intellectual Development: Multiple Impacts of Environmental Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-12-01

    Human psychometric intelligence can predict a number of important social and academic outcomes. Substantial parts of the variances of human intelligence and the brain volume supporting those abilities are explained by environmental factors, and during childhood, human brains have higher plasticity and also 60% of variance of intelligence that is explained by environmental factors. Here, we review the representative environmental factors known to affect human intellectual development during each developmental stage. We describe what is (and what is not) being investigated to determine how these factors affect human brain development through analyses of volumetrical and cortical structures. In conclusion, environmental factors that affect children's intellectual development lead to three patterns of brain structural change. The first is global change in the brain structure, observed more often in the earlier phase of development. The second is structural changes concentrated in the medial prefrontal and adjacent areas and medial temporal areas, which are likely to be induced by stress in many cases. The third is sporadic region-specific change, likely to be primarily caused by use-dependent plasticity of the areas that is often observed in the later phase of development. These changes may underlie the alterations in children's intellectual development that is induced by environmental factors. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Floor plate descendants in the ependyma of the adult mouse Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, Sophie; Paz, Yael; Hefetz, Amit; Gonzales, Ben J; Netser, Yaara; Mansour, Abed A; Ben-Arie, Nissim

    2017-01-01

    During embryonic development of the Central Nervous System (CNS), the expression of the bHLH transcription factor Nato3 (Ferd3l) is unique and restricted to the floor plate of the neural tube. In mice lacking Nato3 the floor plate cells of the spinal cord do not fully mature, whereas in the midbrain floor plate, progenitors lose some neurogenic activity, giving rise to a reduced population of dopaminergic neurons. Since the floor plate is considered to be disintegrated at the time of birth, Nato3 expression was never tested postnatally and in adult mice. Here, we utilized a Nato3 knockout mouse model in which a LacZ reporter precisely replaced the coding region under the endogenous regulatory elements, so that its expression recapitulates the spatiotemporal pattern of Nato3 expression. Nato3 was found to be expressed in the CNS throughout life in a highly restricted manner along the medial cavities: in subpopulations of cells in the III(rd) ventricle, the cerebral aqueduct, the IV(th) ventricle, the central canal of the spinal cord, and the subcommissural organ, a gland located in the midbrain. A few unifying themes are shared among all Nato3-positive cells: all are positioned in the midline, are of an ependymal type, and contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) similarly to the embryonic position of the floor plate bordering the lumen of the neural tube. Taken together, Nato3 defines an unrecognized subpopulation of medial cells positioned at only one side of circular ependymal structures, and it may affect their regulatory activities and neuronal stem cell function.

  1. Peak Torque and Rate of Torque Development Influence on Repeated Maximal Exercise Performance: Contractile and Neural Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Baptiste; Rouffet, David M.; Saboul, Damien; Rota, Samuel; Clémençon, Michel; Hautier, Christophe A.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid force production is critical to improve performance and prevent injuries. However, changes in rate of force/torque development caused by the repetition of maximal contractions have received little attention. The aim of this study was to determine the relative influence of rate of torque development (RTD) and peak torque (Tpeak) on the overall performance (i.e. mean torque, Tmean) decrease during repeated maximal contractions and to investigate the contribution of contractile and neural mechanisms to the alteration of the various mechanical variables. Eleven well-trained men performed 20 sets of 6-s isokinetic maximal knee extensions at 240°·s-1, beginning every 30 seconds. RTD, Tpeak and Tmean as well as the Rate of EMG Rise (RER), peak EMG (EMGpeak) and mean EMG (EMGmean) of the vastus lateralis were monitored for each contraction. A wavelet transform was also performed on raw EMG signal for instant mean frequency (ifmean) calculation. A neuromuscular testing procedure was carried out before and immediately after the fatiguing protocol including evoked RTD (eRTD) and maximal evoked torque (eTpeak) induced by high frequency doublet (100 Hz). Tmean decrease was correlated to RTD and Tpeak decrease (R²=0.62; pmuscle in the first milliseconds of the contraction. PMID:25901576

  2. Development of an Experimental Model for a Magnetorheological Damper Using Artificial Neural Networks (Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Raizada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the experimental study for design and control of vibrations in automotive vehicles. The objective of this paper is to develop a model for the highly nonlinear magnetorheological (MR damper to maximize passenger comfort in an automotive vehicle. The behavior of the MR damper is studied under different loading conditions and current values in the system. The input and output parameters of the system are used as a training data to develop a suitable model using Artificial Neural Networks. To generate the training data, a test rig similar to a quarter car model was fabricated to load the MR damper with a mechanical shaker to excite it externally. With the help of the test rig the input and output parameter data points are acquired by measuring the acceleration and force of the system at different points with the help of an impedance head and accelerometers. The model is validated by measuring the error for the testing and validation data points. The output of the model is the optimum current that is supplied to the MR damper, using a controller, to increase the passenger comfort by minimizing the amplitude of vibrations transmitted to the passenger. Besides using this model for cars, bikes, and other automotive vehicles it can also be modified by retraining the algorithm and used for civil structures to make them earthquake resistant.

  3. Neural measures of social attention across the first years of life: Characterizing typical development and markers of autism risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhiannon J. Luyster

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Few studies employing event-related potentials (ERPs to examine infant perception/cognition have systematically characterized age-related changes over the first few years of life. Establishing a ‘normative’ template of development is important in its own right, and doing so may also better highlight points of divergence for high-risk populations of infants, such as those at elevated genetic risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD. The present investigation explores the developmental progression of the P1, N290, P400 and Nc components for a large sample of young children between 6 and 36 months of age, addressing age-related changes in amplitude, sensitivity to familiar and unfamiliar stimuli and hemispheric lateralization. Two samples of infants are included: those at low- and high-risk for ASD. The four components of interest show differential patterns of change over time and hemispheric lateralization; however, infants at low- and high-risk for ASD do not show significant differences in patterns of neural response to faces. These results will provide a useful point of reference for future developmental cognitive neuroscience research targeting both typical development and vulnerable populations.

  4. The Dlx5-FGF10 signaling cascade controls cranial neural crest and myoblast interaction during oropharyngeal patterning and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugii, Hideki; Grimaldi, Alexandre; Li, Jingyuan; Parada, Carolina; Vu-Ho, Thach; Feng, Jifan; Jing, Junjun; Yuan, Yuan; Guo, Yuxing; Maeda, Hidefumi; Chai, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Craniofacial development depends on cell-cell interactions, coordinated cellular movement and differentiation under the control of regulatory gene networks, which include the distal-less (Dlx) gene family. However, the functional significance of Dlx5 in patterning the oropharyngeal region has remained unknown. Here, we show that loss of Dlx5 leads to a shortened soft palate and an absence of the levator veli palatini, palatopharyngeus and palatoglossus muscles that are derived from the 4th pharyngeal arch (PA); however, the tensor veli palatini, derived from the 1st PA, is unaffected. Dlx5-positive cranial neural crest (CNC) cells are in direct contact with myoblasts derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm, and Dlx5 disruption leads to altered proliferation and apoptosis of CNC and muscle progenitor cells. Moreover, the FGF10 pathway is downregulated in Dlx5-/- mice, and activation of FGF10 signaling rescues CNC cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation in these mutant mice. Collectively, our results indicate that Dlx5 plays crucial roles in the patterning of the oropharyngeal region and development of muscles derived from the 4th PA mesoderm in the soft palate, likely via interactions between CNC-derived and myogenic progenitor cells. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. One-Step Seeding of Neural Stem Cells with Vitronectin-Supplemented Medium for High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Sheng; Li, Rong; Long, Yan; Titus, Steve; Zhao, Jinghua; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Human neuronal cells differentiated from induced pluripotent cells have emerged as a new model system for the study of disease pathophysiology and evaluation of drug efficacy. Differentiated neuronal cells are more similar in genetics and biological content to human brain cells than other animal disease models. However, culture of neuronal cells in assay plates requires a labor-intensive procedure of plate precoating, hampering its applications in high-throughput screening (HTS). We developed a simplified method with one-step seeding of neural stem cells in assay plates by supplementing the medium with a recombinant human vitronectin (VTN), thus avoiding plate precoating. Robust results were obtained from cell viability, calcium response, and neurite outgrowth assays using this new method. Our data demonstrate that this approach greatly simplifies high-throughput assays using neuronal cells differentiated from human stem cells for translational research.

  6. Sex differences in behavior and neural development and their role in adolescent vulnerability to substance use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerslag, Lindsey R.; Gulley, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to risky behavior and to the emergence of psychological disorders like substance abuse, anxiety and depression. However, there is a sex (or gender) difference in this vulnerability, with females being more prone to developing internalizing disorders and males being more likely to engage in risky behavior and drug use. While several researchers have proposed that there is a relationship between corticolimbic circuit development and adolescent vulnerability, the current proposed models do not take sex differences into account. In this review, we explore recent findings from both human and rodent studies of sex differences during adolescence. In particular, we consider epidemiological studies on the factors that contribute to the development of substance abuse and internalizing disorders, laboratory studies on reward-related and decision-making behavior, and neuroanatomical studies on the development of several structures in the corticolimbic circuit (i.e., prefrontal cortex [PFC], amygdala and striatum). We then integrate these recent findings into models of adolescent vulnerability to substance use that have previously not addressed sex differences. Lastly, we discuss methodological considerations for the interpretation and design of studies on sex (or gender) differences during adolescence while highlighting some opportunities for future investigations. PMID:25882721

  7. Choosing not to act: neural bases of the development of intentional inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schel, M.A.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Crone, E.A.

    2014-01-01

    Choosing not to act, or the ability to intentionally inhibit your actions lies at the core of self-control. Even though most research has focused on externally primed inhibition, an important question concerns how intentional inhibition develops. Therefore, in the present study children (aged 10-12)

  8. The adolescent brain : unraveling the neural mechanisms of cognitive and affective development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is often characterized as a period of increased risk taking and impulsive behavior. Researchers have constructed brain-based models to explain the higher prevalence of risk taking during adolescence. It has been hypothesized that brain regions for cognitive control develop relatively

  9. The formation of synchronization cliques during the development of modular neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Einat; Ayali, Amir; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Boccaletti, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Modular organization is a special feature shared by many biological and social networks alike. It is a hallmark for systems exhibiting multitasking, in which individual tasks are performed by separated and yet coordinated functional groups. Understanding how networks of segregated modules develop to support coordinated multitasking functionalities is the main topic of the current study. Using simulations of biologically inspired neuronal networks during development, we study the formation of functional groups (cliques) and inter-neuronal synchronization. The results indicate that synchronization cliques first develop locally according to the explicit network topological organization. Later on, at intermediate connectivity levels, when networks have both local segregation and long-range integration, new synchronization cliques with distinctive properties are formed. In particular, by defining a new measure of synchronization centrality, we identify at these developmental stages dominant neurons whose functional centrality largely exceeds the topological one. These are generated mainly in a few dominant clusters that become the centers of the newly formed synchronization cliques. We show that by the local synchronization properties at the very early developmental stages, it is possible to predict with high accuracy which clusters will become dominant in later stages of network development.

  10. Sex differences in behavior and neural development and their role in adolescent vulnerability to substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerslag, Lindsey R; Gulley, Joshua M

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to risky behavior and to the emergence of psychological disorders like substance abuse, anxiety and depression. However, there is a sex (or gender) difference in this vulnerability, with females being more prone to developing internalizing disorders and males being more likely to engage in risky behavior and drug use. While several researchers have proposed that there is a relationship between corticolimbic circuit development and adolescent vulnerability, the current proposed models do not take sex differences into account. In this review, we explore recent findings from both human and rodent studies of sex differences during adolescence. In particular, we consider epidemiological studies on the factors that contribute to the development of substance abuse and internalizing disorders, laboratory studies on reward-related and decision-making behavior, and neuroanatomical studies on the development of several structures in the corticolimbic circuit (i.e., prefrontal cortex [PFC], amygdala and striatum). We then integrate these recent findings into models of adolescent vulnerability to substance use that have previously not addressed sex differences. Lastly, we discuss methodological considerations for the interpretation and design of studies on sex (or gender) differences during adolescence while highlighting some opportunities for future investigations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of Neural Systems for Processing Social Exclusion from Childhood to Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolling, Danielle Z.; Pitskel, Naomi B.; Deen, Ben; Crowley, Michael J.; Mayes, Linda C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is a period of development in which peer relationships become especially important. A computer-based game (Cyberball) has been used to explore the effects of social exclusion in adolescents and adults. The current functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study used Cyberball to extend prior work to the cross-sectional study of…

  12. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pdgfrα functions in endothelial-derived cells to regulate neural crest cells and the development of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanian, Haig; Cho, Young Kuk; Rizer, Nicholas W; Wang, Qiaohong; Li, Li; Degenhardt, Karl; Jain, Rajan

    2017-09-01

    Originating as a single vessel emerging from the embryonic heart, the truncus arteriosus must septate and remodel into the aorta and pulmonary artery to support postnatal life. Defective remodeling or septation leads to abnormalities collectively known as conotruncal defects, which are associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Multiple populations of cells must interact to coordinate outflow tract remodeling, and the cardiac neural crest has emerged as particularly important during this process. Abnormalities in the cardiac neural crest have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple conotruncal defects, including persistent truncus arteriosus, double outlet right ventricle and tetralogy of Fallot. However, the role of the neural crest in the pathogenesis of another conotruncal abnormality, transposition of the great arteries, is less well understood. In this report, we demonstrate an unexpected role of Pdgfra in endothelial cells and their derivatives during outflow tract development. Loss of Pdgfra in endothelium and endothelial-derived cells results in double outlet right ventricle and transposition of the great arteries. Our data suggest that loss of Pdgfra in endothelial-derived mesenchyme in the outflow tract endocardial cushions leads to a secondary defect in neural crest migration during development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Developing a 3-choice serial reaction time task for examining neural and cognitive function in an equine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kirsty; Hemmings, Andrew J; McBride, Sebastian D; Parker, Matthew O

    2017-12-01

    Large animal models of human neurological disorders are advantageous compared to rodent models due to their neuroanatomical complexity, longevity and their ability to be maintained in naturalised environments. Some large animal models spontaneously develop behaviours that closely resemble the symptoms of neural and psychiatric disorders. The horse is an example of this; the domestic form of this species consistently develops spontaneous stereotypic behaviours akin to the compulsive and impulsive behaviours observed in human neurological disorders such as Tourette's syndrome. The ability to non-invasively probe normal and abnormal equine brain function through cognitive testing may provide an extremely useful methodological tool to assess brain changes associated with certain human neurological and psychiatric conditions. An automated operant system with the ability to present visual and auditory stimuli as well as dispense salient food reward was developed. To validate the system, ten horses were trained and tested using a standard cognitive task (three choice serial reaction time task (3-CSRTT)). All animals achieved total learning criterion and performed six probe sessions. Learning criterion was met within 16.30±0.79 sessions over a three day period. During six probe sessions, level of performance was maintained at 80.67±0.57% (mean±SEM) accuracy. This is the first mobile fully automated system developed to examine cognitive function in the horse. A fully-automated operant system for mobile cognitive function of a large animal model has been designed and validated. Horses pose an interesting complementary model to rodents for the examination of human neurological dysfunction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Roll-forming tubes to header plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, K.

    1976-01-01

    Technique has been developed for attaching and sealing tubes to header plates using a unique roll-forming tool. Technique is useful for attaching small tubes which are difficult to roll into conventional grooves in header plate tube holes, and for attaching when welding, brazing, or soldering is not desirable.

  16. Novel Algorithms for Astronomical Plate Analyses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Powerful computers and dedicated software allow effective data mining and scientific analyses in astronomical plate archives. We give and discuss examples of newly developed algorithms for astronomical plate analyses, e.g., searches for optical transients, as well as for major spectral and brightness ...

  17. Artificial neural networks in forecasting tourists’ flow, an intelligent technique to help the economic development of tourism in Albania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezdemona Gjylapi

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the neural network usage in the tourists’ number forecasting and to determine the trends of the future tourist inflow, thus helping tourism management agencies in making scientific based financial decisions.

  18. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes

    OpenAIRE

    Galeazzi, Juan M.; Navajas, Joaquin; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw....

  19. Neural development of binaural tuning through Hebbian learning predicts frequency-dependent best delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Bertrand; Brette, Romain

    2011-08-10

    Birds use microsecond differences in the arrival times of the sounds at the two ears to infer the location of a sound source in the horizontal plane. These interaural time differences (ITDs) are encoded by binaural neurons which fire more when the ITD matches their "best delay." In the textbook model of sound localization, the best delays of binaural neurons reflect the differences in axonal delays of their monaural inputs, but recent observations have cast doubts on this classical view because best delays were found to depend on preferred frequency. Here, we show that these observations are in fact consistent with the notion that best delays are created by differences in axonal delays, provided ITD tuning is created during development through spike-timing-dependent plasticity: basilar membrane filtering results in correlations between inputs to binaural neurons, which impact the selection of synapses during development, leading to the observed distribution of best delays.

  20. An Engineered orco Mutation Produces Aberrant Social Behavior and Defective Neural Development in Ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hua; Opachaloemphan, Comzit; Mancini, Giacomo; Yang, Huan; Gallitto, Matthew; Mlejnek, Jakub; Leibholz, Alexandra; Haight, Kevin; Ghaninia, Majid; Huo, Lucy; Perry, Michael; Slone, Jesse; Zhou, Xiaofan; Traficante, Maria; Penick, Clint A; Dolezal, Kelly; Gokhale, Kaustubh; Stevens, Kelsey; Fetter-Pruneda, Ingrid; Bonasio, Roberto; Zwiebel, Laurence J; Berger, Shelley L; Liebig, Jürgen; Reinberg, Danny; Desplan, Claude

    2017-08-10

    Ants exhibit cooperative behaviors and advanced forms of sociality that depend on pheromone-mediated communication. Odorant receptor neurons (ORNs) express specific odorant receptors (ORs) encoded by a dramatically expanded gene family in ants. In most eusocial insects, only the queen can transmit genetic information, restricting genetic studies. In contrast, workers in Harpegnathos saltator ants can be converted into gamergates (pseudoqueens) that can found entire colonies. This feature facilitated CRISPR-Cas9 generation of germline mutations in orco, the gene that encodes the obligate co-receptor of all ORs. orco mutations should significantly impact olfaction. We demonstrate striking functions of Orco in odorant perception, reproductive physiology, and social behavior plasticity. Surprisingly, unlike in other insects, loss of OR functionality also dramatically impairs development of the antennal lobe to which ORNs project. Therefore, the development of genetics in Harpegnathos establishes this ant species as a model organism to study the complexity of eusociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Normative data on development of neural and behavioral mechanisms underlying attention orienting toward social-emotional stimuli: An exploratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstrom, Kara; Guyer, Amanda E; Mogg, Karin; Bradley, Brendan P.; Fox, Nathan A.; Ernst, Monique; Nelson, Eric E.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Britton, Jennifer C.; Monk, Christopher S.; Pine, Daniel S.; Bar-Haim, Yair

    2009-01-01

    The ability of positive and negative facial signals to influence attention orienting is crucial to social functioning. Given the dramatic developmental change in neural architecture supporting social function, positive and negative facial cues may influence attention orienting differently in relatively young or old individuals. However, virtually no research examines such age-related differences in the neural circuitry supporting attention orienting to emotional faces. We examined age-related...

  2. Temporal Loss of Tsc1: Neural Development and Brain Disease in Tuberous Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    brain development causes neurological disease in Tuberous Sclerosis". Honorary Lecturer at 8th Annual Pharmacology Graduate Students’ Symposium...Orthopedics and Surgery at Rhode Island Hospital and the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, RI 02903, USA *Correspondence...analysis, five thalamic regions from five medial-to-lateral brain sections were assessed. The measure function (Voloc- ity) was used to calculate the

  3. Spatio-temporal regulation of ADAR editing during development in porcine neural tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard; Bramsen, Jesper Bertram; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Editing by ADAR enzymes is essential for mammalian life. Still, knowledge of the spatio-temporal editing patterns in mammals is limited. By use of 454 amplicon sequencing we examined the editing status of 12 regionally extracted mRNAs from porcine developing brain encompassing a total of 64...... putative ADAR editing sites. In total 24 brain tissues, dissected from up to five regions from embryonic gestation day 23, 42, 60, 80, 100 and 115, were examined for editing....

  4. Development of Fuzzy Logic and Neural Network Control and Advanced Emissions Modeling for Parallel Hybrid Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, A.; Washington, G.; Rizzoni, G.; Guezennec, Y.

    2003-12-01

    This report describes the development of new control strategies and models for Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV) by the Ohio State University. The report indicates results from models created in NREL's ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR (ADVISOR 3.2), and results of a scalable IC Engine model, called in Willan's Line technique, implemented in ADVISOR 3.2.

  5. Development of an England-wide indoor overheating and air pollution model using artificial neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Symonds, P. H.; Taylor, J.; Chalabi, Z.; Mavrogianni, A.; Davies, M.; Hamilton, I.; Vardoulakis, S.; Heaviside, C.; Macintyre, H.

    2016-01-01

    With the UK climate projected to warm in future decades, there is an increased research focus on the risks of indoor overheating. Energy-efficient building adaptations may modify a buildings risk of overheating and the infiltration of air pollution from outdoor sources. This paper presents the development of a national model of indoor overheating and air pollution, capable of modelling the existing and future building stocks, along with changes to the climate, outdoor air pollution levels, an...

  6. Deep Classifiers-Based License Plate Detection, Localization and Recognition on GPU-Powered Mobile Platform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Syed Tahir Hussain Rizvi; Denis Patti; Tomas Björklund; Gianpiero Cabodi; Gianluca Francini

    2017-01-01

    .... In this work, trained parameters of a highly precise automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) system are imported and used to replicate the same neural classifiers on a Nvidia Shield K1 tablet...

  7. Solid dispersions in the development of a nimodipine floating tablet formulation and optimization by artificial neural networks and genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmpalexis, Panagiotis; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Georgarakis, Emanouil

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigates the use of nimodipine-polyethylene glycol solid dispersions for the development of effervescent controlled release floating tablet formulations. The physical state of the dispersed nimodipine in the polymer matrix was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy and polarized light microscopy, and the mixture proportions of polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl-pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), effervescent agents (EFF) and nimodipine were optimized in relation to drug release (% release at 60 min, and time at which the 90% of the drug was dissolved) and floating properties (tablet's floating strength and duration), employing a 25-run D-optimal mixture design combined with artificial neural networks (ANNs) and genetic programming (GP). It was found that nimodipine exists as mod I microcrystals in the solid dispersions and is stable for at least a three-month period. The tablets showed good floating properties and controlled release profiles, with drug release proceeding via the concomitant operation of swelling and erosion of the polymer matrix. ANNs and GP both proved to be efficient tools in the optimization of the tablet formulation, and the global optimum formulation suggested by the GP equations consisted of PEG=9%, PVP=30%, HPMC=36%, EFF=11%, nimodipine=14%. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Multiple levels of impaired neural plasticity and cellular resilience in bipolar disorder: developing treatments using an integrated translational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Soeiro-De-Souza, Marcio G; Richards, Erica M; Teixeira, Antonio L; Zarate, Carlos A

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews the neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD), particularly findings associated with impaired cellular resilience and plasticity. PubMed/Medline articles and book chapters published over the last 20 years were identified using the following keyword combinations: BD, calcium, cytokines, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), genetics, glucocorticoids, glutamate, imaging, ketamine, lithium, mania, mitochondria, neuroplasticity, neuroprotection, neurotrophic, oxidative stress, plasticity, resilience, and valproate. BD is associated with impaired cellular resilience and synaptic dysfunction at multiple levels, associated with impaired cellular resilience and plasticity. These findings were partially prevented or even reversed with the use of mood stabilizers, but longitudinal studies associated with clinical outcome remain scarce. Evidence consistently suggests that BD involves impaired neural plasticity and cellular resilience at multiple levels. This includes the genetic and intra- and intercellular signalling levels, their impact on brain structure and function, as well as the final translation into behaviour/cognitive changes. Future studies are expected to adopt integrated translational approaches using a variety of methods (e.g., microarray approaches, neuroimaging, genetics, electrophysiology, and the new generation of -omics techniques). These studies will likely focus on more precise diagnoses and a personalized medicine paradigm in order to develop better treatments for those who need them most.

  9. Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair neural development in rat hippocampus: involvement of doublecortin and NCAM-180

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Developmental iodine deficiency results in inadequate thyroid hormone (TH), which damages the hippocampus. Here, we explored the roles of hippocampal doublecortin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-180 in developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism. Methods Two developmental rat models were established with either an iodine-deficient diet, or propylthiouracil (PTU)-adulterated water (5 ppm or 15 ppm) to impair thyroid function, in pregnant rats from gestational day 6 until postnatal day (PN) 28. Silver-stained neurons and protein levels of doublecortin and NCAM-180 in several hippocampal subregions were assessed on PN14, PN21, PN28, and PN42. Results The results show that nerve fibers in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats were injured on PN28 and PN42. Downregulation of doublecortin and upregulation of NCAM-180 were observed in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats from PN14 on. These alterations were irreversible by the restoration of serum TH concentrations on PN42. Conclusion Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair the expression of doublecortin and NCAM-180, leading to nerve fiber malfunction and thus impairments in hippocampal development. PMID:20412599

  10. Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair neural development in rat hippocampus: involvement of doublecortin and NCAM-180

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Jiapeng

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental iodine deficiency results in inadequate thyroid hormone (TH, which damages the hippocampus. Here, we explored the roles of hippocampal doublecortin and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM-180 in developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism. Methods Two developmental rat models were established with either an iodine-deficient diet, or propylthiouracil (PTU-adulterated water (5 ppm or 15 ppm to impair thyroid function, in pregnant rats from gestational day 6 until postnatal day (PN 28. Silver-stained neurons and protein levels of doublecortin and NCAM-180 in several hippocampal subregions were assessed on PN14, PN21, PN28, and PN42. Results The results show that nerve fibers in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats were injured on PN28 and PN42. Downregulation of doublecortin and upregulation of NCAM-180 were observed in iodine-deficient and 15 ppm PTU-treated rats from PN14 on. These alterations were irreversible by the restoration of serum TH concentrations on PN42. Conclusion Developmental iodine deficiency and hypothyroidism impair the expression of doublecortin and NCAM-180, leading to nerve fiber malfunction and thus impairments in hippocampal development.

  11. Development and application of Artificial Neural Networks in the forecast of maximum daily precipitation at Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastos, P. T.; Paliatsos, A. G.; Larissi, I. K.; Moustris, K. P.

    2010-09-01

    Extreme daily precipitation events are involved in significant environmental damages, because of causing adverse impacts, such as flash floods, in urban and even in rural areas. Thus, long-term forecast of such events is of great importance, in order the local authorities be prepared to confront and mitigate the adverse consequences. The objective of this study is the possibility to forecast the maximum daily precipitation for the next coming year. For this reason, appropriate prognostic models, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) were developed and applied. The data used for the analysis concern daily precipitation totals, which have been recorded at National Observatory of Athens (NOA), during the period 1891-2009. To evaluate the potential of precipitation prediction by the trained ANNs, a different period was used than the one used for the training for each station. The datasets of the period 1891-1980 were used as training datasets, while the datasets of the period 1981-2009 were used as validation datasets. Appropriate statistical indexes, such as the coefficient of determination (R2), the index of agreement (IA) and the root mean square error (RMSE), were applied to test the reliability of the predictive models. The findings of the analysis showed that, the forecasted maximum daily precipitation totals for the next coming year compared to the respective original ones indicated a quite satisfactory relationship, at the statistically significant level p<0.01.

  12. Development and validation of a new PCR optimization method by combining experimental design and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Du, Xueling; Yuan, Qipeng; Lv, Xinhua

    2010-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is one of the most powerful techniques in a variety of clinical and biological research fields. In this paper, a chemometrics approach, combining experimental design (ED) and artificial neural network (ANN), was proposed for optimization of PCR amplification of lycopene cyclase gene carRA in Blakeslea Trispora. Five-level star design was carried out to obtain experimental information and provide data source for ANN modeling. Nine variables were used as inputs in ANN, including the added amount of template, primer, dNTP, polymerase and magnesium ion, the temperature of denaturating, annealing and extension, and the number of cycles. The output variable was the efficiency (yield) of the PCR. Based on the developed model, the effects of each parameter on PCR efficiency were predicted and the most suitable operation condition for present system was determined. At last, the validation experiment was performed under the optimized condition, and the expectant results were produced. The results obtained in this paper showed that the combination of ANN and ED provided a satisfactory optimization model with good descriptive and predictive abilities, indicating that the method of combining ANN and ED can be a useful tool in PCR optimization and other biological applications.

  13. STARBASE: Database software for the automated plate scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odewahn, S. C.; Humphreys, R. M.; Thurmes, P.

    1992-01-01

    The Automated Plate Scanner (APS) of the University of Minnesota, a unique high speed 'flying spot' laser scanner, is currently being used to scan and digitize the 936 O and E plate pairs of the first epoch Palomar Sky Survey. The resultant database will be used to produce a catalog of approximately a billion stars and several million galaxies. The authors describe the ongoing development of a dedicated APS database management system which will be made available to the astronomical community via INTERNET. A specialized DBMS called STARBASE has been written to provide fast access to the hundreds of millions of images collected by the APS. This system provides an initial reduction mode for parameterizing APS images and classifying image types using a novel set of neural network image classifiers. A second analysis mode, which will be that commonly used by the general user, provides for searches of the database which may be constrained by any combination of physical and positional parameters. Through the use of pointer hash trees, the system has been optimized for extremely fast positional searches using either right ascension and declination on the sky or linear X and Y positions on the POSS field. In addition to fast data retrieval, the system provides a graphical interface for displaying scatter plots or histograms of the collected data. In addition, a specialized image display system is being developed to allow the user to view densitometric data for all objects classified as extended by the neural network system. Finally, STARBASE has a flexible programmable interface which allows other programs to access information in the database. This allows users to write applications suited to their particular needs to process APS data.

  14. Software development for a orifice plate characterization used in the oil and gas industry; Desenvolvimento de um 'software' para caracterizacao de placas de orificio utilizadas na industria do petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreas, N. Andreas [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The petroleum industry is an economic area that has a strong impact, because this, the information precision is one of the most important facts and it is able to be defined with software simulation. The knowledge of the exactly quantify of petroleum is fundamental, and then the instrumentation is essential for this measurement. There are many mechanisms to measure the volume flow, and one of the most used is the Orifice Plates, which has been more common in the Natural Gas Industry. The software development goal is the characterization of these Orifice Plates, allowing that the constant, which characterizes certain Plate, to be determined without Labor instruments, for that the software has an actualized database. But, the software needs some variables, that are responsible for the environment characteristics and the used material, to calculate the constant of the Orifice Plate, for example, fluid viscosity, environment temperature and kind of the Orifice Plate. The utilized equations in this software are based on the Stolz II equations. This tool is able to facilitate the work in petroleum industry, besides it is done for mobile applications, allowing analyses in real time. (author)

  15. Neural control of steroid hormone biosynthesis during development in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Yuko S; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2014-01-01

    The insect steroid hormone ecdysteroid plays pivotal roles in the temporal coordination of development, represented by molting and metamorphosis. During the larval stages, ecdysteroid is biosynthesized from dietary cholesterol by several ecdysteroidogenic enzymes in the specialized endocrine organ called the prothoracic gland (PG). As ecdysteroid biosynthesis in the PG is affected by several environmental cues, such as photoperiod and nutrition, a fundamental question is how the ecdysteroid biosynthesis pathway is controlled in response to environmental cues. In this review, we briefly summarize recent topics on the regulatory mechanisms of ecdysteroid biosynthesis, especially the neuronal regulatory mechanism, in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The implications from studies with other insects are also discussed.

  16. Global gene expression shift during the transition from early neural development to late neuronal differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cantera

    Full Text Available Regulation of transcription is one of the mechanisms involved in animal development, directing changes in patterning and cell fate specification. Large temporal data series, based on microarrays across the life cycle of the fly Drosophila melanogaster, revealed the existence of groups of genes which expression increases or decreases temporally correlated during the life cycle. These groups of genes are enriched in different biological functions. Here, instead of searching for temporal coincidence in gene expression using the entire genome expression data, we searched for temporal coincidence in gene expression only within predefined catalogues of functionally related genes and investigated whether a catalogue's expression profile can be used to generate larger catalogues, enriched in genes necessary for the same function. We analyzed the expression profiles from genes already associated with early neurodevelopment and late neurodifferentiation, at embryonic stages 16 and 17 of Drosophila life cycle. We hypothesized that during this interval we would find global downregulation of genes important for early neuronal development together with global upregulation of genes necessary for the final differentiation of neurons. Our results were consistent with this hypothesis. We then investigated if the expression profile of gene catalogues representing particular processes of neural development matched the temporal sequence along which these processes occur. The profiles of genes involved in patterning, neurogenesis, axogenesis or synaptic transmission matched the prediction, with largest transcript values at the time when the corresponding biological process takes place in the embryo. Furthermore, we obtained catalogues enriched in genes involved in temporally matching functions by performing a genome-wide systematic search for genes with their highest expression levels at the corresponding embryonic intervals. These findings imply the use of gene

  17. Effects of Atrazine on the Development of Neural System of Zebrafish, Danio rerio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available By comparative analysis of histomorphology and AChE activity, the changes of physiological and biochemical parameters were determined in zebrafish embryos and larvae dealt with atrazine (ATR at different concentrations (0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1 mg/L. This study showed that the development of the sarcomere and the arrangement of white muscle myofibers were affected by ATR significantly and the length of sarcomere shortened. Further analysis of the results showed that the AChE activity in juvenile fish which was treated with ATR was downregulated, which can indicate that the innervation efficiency to the muscle was impaired. Conversely, the AChE activity in zebrafish embryos which was treated with ATR was upregulated. A parallel phenomenon showed that embryonic primary sensory neurons (Rohon-Beard cells, principally expressing AChE in embryos, survived the physiological apoptosis. These phenomena demonstrated that the motor integration ability of the zebrafish was damaged by ATR which can disturb the development of sensory neurons and sarcomere and the innervations of muscle.

  18. Development of neural mechanisms of conflict and error processing during childhood: Implications for self-regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación eCheca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of thoughts and behavior requires attention, particularly when there is conflict between alternative responses or when errors are to be prevented or corrected. Conflict monitoring and error processing are functions of the executive attention network, a neurocognitive system that greatly matures during childhood. In this study, we examined the development of brain mechanisms underlying conflict and error processing with event-related potentials (ERPs, and explored the relationship between brain function and individual differences in the ability to self-regulate behavior. Three groups of children aged 4 to 6, 7 to 9, and 10 to 13 years, and a group of adults performed a child-friendly version of the flanker task while ERPs were registered. Marked developmental changes were observed in both conflict processing and brain reactions to errors. After controlling by age, higher self-regulation skills are associated with smaller amplitude of the conflict effect but greater amplitude of the error-related negativity. Additionally, we found that electrophysiological measures of conflict and error monitoring predict individual differences in impulsivity and the capacity to delay gratification. These findings inform of brain mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive control and self-regulation.

  19. Development of neural mechanisms of conflict and error processing during childhood: implications for self-regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Purificación; Castellanos, M. C.; Abundis-Gutiérrez, Alicia; Rosario Rueda, M.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of thoughts and behavior requires attention, particularly when there is conflict between alternative responses or when errors are to be prevented or corrected. Conflict monitoring and error processing are functions of the executive attention network, a neurocognitive system that greatly matures during childhood. In this study, we examined the development of brain mechanisms underlying conflict and error processing with event-related potentials (ERPs), and explored the relationship between brain function and individual differences in the ability to self-regulate behavior. Three groups of children aged 4–6, 7–9, and 10–13 years, and a group of adults performed a child-friendly version of the flanker task while ERPs were registered. Marked developmental changes were observed in both conflict processing and brain reactions to errors. After controlling by age, higher self-regulation skills are associated with smaller amplitude of the conflict effect but greater amplitude of the error-related negativity. Additionally, we found that electrophysiological measures of conflict and error monitoring predict individual differences in impulsivity and the capacity to delay gratification. These findings inform of brain mechanisms underlying the development of cognitive control and self-regulation. PMID:24795676

  20. Deciphering detailed plate kinematics of the Indian Ocean and developing a unified model for East Gondwanaland reconstruction: An Indian-Australian-French initiative

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yatheesh, V.; Dyment, J.; Bhattacharya, G.C.; Muller, R.D.

    and their independent magnetic anomaly investigations provided better plate tectonic evolution models for different sectors of the Indian Ocean. Indian and French scientists, under two Indo-French collaborative projects, carried out detailed magnetic investigations...

  1. Neural Changes Developed during the Extinction of Cocaine Self-Administration Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria del Olmo

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The high rate of recidivism in cocaine addiction after prolonged periods of abstinence poses a significant problem for the effective treatment of this condition. Moreover, the neurobiological basis of this relapse phenomenon remains poorly understood. In this review, we will discuss the evidence currently available regarding the neurobiological changes during the extinction of cocaine self-administration. Specifically, we will focus on alterations in the dopaminergic, opioidergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic, serotoninergic and CRF systems described in self-administration experiments and extinction studies after chronic cocaine administration. We will also discuss the differences related to contingent versus non-contingent cocaine administration, which highlights the importance of environmental cues on drug effects and extinction. The findings discussed in this review may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to treat cocaine relapse.

  2. Neural Oscillators Programming Simplified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick McDowell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The neurological mechanism used for generating rhythmic patterns for functions such as swallowing, walking, and chewing has been modeled computationally by the neural oscillator. It has been widely studied by biologists to model various aspects of organisms and by computer scientists and robotics engineers as a method for controlling and coordinating the gaits of walking robots. Although there has been significant study in this area, it is difficult to find basic guidelines for programming neural oscillators. In this paper, the authors approach neural oscillators from a programmer’s point of view, providing background and examples for developing neural oscillators to generate rhythmic patterns that can be used in biological modeling and robotics applications.

  3. Development of a parallel plate ion chamber for radiation protection level; Desenvolvimento de uma camara de ionizacao de placas paralelas para protecao radiologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bottaro, Marcio; Landi, Mauricio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (STEEE/IEE/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Eletrotecnica e Energia. Secao Tecnica de Ensaios em Equipamentos Eletromedicos; Moralles, Mauricio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (CRPq/IPEN/CNEN-SP), SP (Brazil). Centro do Reator Nuclear de Pesquisas

    2011-07-01

    A new parallel plate vented ion chamber is proposed in this paper. The application of this chamber was primarily intended to the measurement of stray radiation in interventional procedures, but the energy response of about 2.6%, which was obtained in the first prototype, on the range from 40 to 150 kV using ISO 4037-1 narrow qualities, provided the possibility of a wide modality application on radiation protection. Primary studies with Maxwell 2D electromagnetic field simulator revealed an optimized model regarding effective volume and saturation voltage levels, which conferred to the ion chamber a dual entrance window feature. The development of this ion chamber has the main contribution of Monte Carlo calculations as a support tool to the establishment of the effective volume of the chamber and determination of the best materials for housing mounting and conductive elements, such as guard rings, electrode, and windows. Even the composition of the conductive layers, which would be neglected due to their very small thicknesses (about 35 {mu}m), had important influence on the results and could be better understood with Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System (MCNP) simulations. (author)

  4. Development of Plate Reader and On-Line Microfluidic Screening to Identify Ligands of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Binding Protein in Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka A. Otvos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which is expressed in the nervous system. Its antagonists are used clinically for treatment of postoperative- and radiotherapy-induced emesis and irritable bowel syndrome. In order to better understand the structure and function of the 5-HT3 receptor, and to allow for compound screening at this receptor, recently a serotonin binding protein (5HTBP was engineered with the Acetylcholine Binding Protein as template. In this study, a fluorescence enhancement assay for 5HTBP ligands was developed in plate-reader format and subsequently used in an on-line microfluidic format. Both assay types were validated using an existing radioligand binding assay. The on-line microfluidic assay was coupled to HPLC via a post-column split which allowed parallel coupling to a mass spectrometer to collect MS data. This high-resolution screening (HRS system is well suitable for compound mixture analysis. As a proof of principle, the venoms of Dendroapsis polylepis, Pseudonaja affinis and Pseudonaja inframacula snakes were screened and the accurate masses of the found bioactives were established. To demonstrate the subsequent workflow towards structural identification of bioactive proteins and peptides, the partial amino acid sequence of one of the bioactives from the Pseudonaja affinis venom was determined using a bottom-up proteomics approach.

  5. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Increased neural response to peer rejection associated with adolescent depression and pubertal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S; Siegle, Greg J; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Nelson, Eric E; Stroud, Laura R; Dahl, Ronald E

    2014-11-01

    Sensitivity to social evaluation has been proposed as a potential marker or risk factor for depression, and has also been theorized to increase with pubertal maturation. This study utilized an ecologically valid paradigm to test the hypothesis that adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD) would show altered reactivity to peer rejection and acceptance relative to healthy controls in a network of ventral brain regions implicated in affective processing of social information. A total of 48 adolescents (ages 11-17), including 21 with a current diagnosis of MDD and 27 age- and gender-matched controls, received rigged acceptance and rejection feedback from fictitious peers during a simulated online peer interaction during functional neuroimaging. MDD youth showed increased activation to rejection relative to controls in the bilateral amygdala, subgenual anterior cingulate, left anterior insula and left nucleus accumbens. MDD and healthy youth did not differ in response to acceptance. Youth more advanced in pubertal maturation also showed increased reactivity to rejection in the bilateral amygdala/parahippocampal gyrus and the caudate/subgenual anterior cingulate, and these effects remained significant when controlling for chronological age. Findings suggest that increased reactivity to peer rejection is a normative developmental process associated with pubertal development, but is particularly enhanced among youth with depression. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. MACMA: a Virtual Lab for Plate Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigne, C.; Combes, M.; Tisseau, C.

    2013-12-01

    MACMA (Multi-Agent Convective MAntle) is a tool developed to simulate evolutive plate tectonics and mantle convection in a 2-D cylindrical geometry (Combes et al., 2012). The model relies mainly on a force balance to compute the velocity of each plate, and on empirical rules to determine how plate boundaries move and evolve. It includes first-order features of plate tectonics: (a) all plates on Earth do not have the same size, (b) subduction zones are asymmetric, (c) plates driven by subducting slabs and upper plates do not exhibit the same velocities, and (d) plate boundaries are mobile, can collide, merge and disappear, and new plate boundaries can be created. The MACMA interface was designed to be user-friendly and a simple use of the simulator can be achieved without any prerequisite knowledge in fluid dynamics, mantle rheology, nor in numerical methods. As a