WorldWideScience

Sample records for neural interface design

  1. Hafnium transistor process design for neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2009-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses 1-D process simulations of Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) structures to design the threshold voltage of hafnium oxide based transistors used for neural recording. The methodology is comprised of 1-D analytical equations for threshold voltage specification, and doping profiles, and 1-D MIS Technical Computer Aided Design (TCAD) to design a process to implement a specific threshold voltage, which minimized simulation time. The process was then verified with a 2-D process/electrical TCAD simulation. Hafnium oxide films (HfO) were grown and characterized for dielectric constant and fixed oxide charge for various annealing temperatures, two important design variables in threshold voltage design.

  2. Hafnium transistor design for neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, David W; Basham, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    A design methodology is presented that uses the EKV model and the g(m)/I(D) biasing technique to design hafnium oxide field effect transistors that are suitable for neural recording circuitry. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is correlated to the structural properties of a Field Effect Transistor (FET) and a Metal Insulator Semiconductor (MIS) capacitor. This approach allows a transistor designer to use a design flow that starts with simple and intuitive 1-D equations for gain that can be verified in 1-D MIS capacitor TCAD simulations, before final TCAD process verification of transistor properties. The DC gain of a common source amplifier is optimized by using fast 1-D simulations and using slower, complex 2-D simulations only for verification. The 1-D equations are used to show that the increased dielectric constant of hafnium oxide allows a higher DC gain for a given oxide thickness. An additional benefit is that the MIS capacitor can be employed to test additional performance parameters important to an open gate transistor such as dielectric stability and ionic penetration.

  3. Design and manufacturing challenges of optogenetic neural interfaces: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, S. B.; Ribeiro, J. F.; Silva, A. F.; Costa, R. M.; Correia, J. H.

    2017-08-01

    Optogenetics is a relatively new technology to achieve cell-type specific neuromodulation with millisecond-scale temporal precision. Optogenetic tools are being developed to address neuroscience challenges, and to improve the knowledge about brain networks, with the ultimate aim of catalyzing new treatments for brain disorders and diseases. To reach this ambitious goal the implementation of mature and reliable engineered tools is required. The success of optogenetics relies on optical tools that can deliver light into the neural tissue. Objective/Approach: Here, the design and manufacturing approaches available to the scientific community are reviewed, and current challenges to accomplish appropriate scalable, multimodal and wireless optical devices are discussed. Significance: Overall, this review aims at presenting a helpful guidance to the engineering and design of optical microsystems for optogenetic applications.

  4. Graphene in the Design and Engineering of Next-Generation Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostarelos, Kostas; Vincent, Melissa; Hebert, Clement; Garrido, Jose A

    2017-11-01

    Neural interfaces are becoming a powerful toolkit for clinical interventions requiring stimulation and/or recording of the electrical activity of the nervous system. Active implantable devices offer a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases affecting the central or peripheral nervous systems by electrically stimulating different neuronal structures. All currently used neural interface devices are designed to perform a single function: either record activity or electrically stimulate tissue. Because of their electrical and electrochemical performance and their suitability for integration into flexible devices, graphene-based materials constitute a versatile platform that could help address many of the current challenges in neural interface design. Here, how graphene and other 2D materials possess an array of properties that can enable enhanced functional capabilities for neural interfaces is illustrated. It is emphasized that the technological challenges are similar for all alternative types of materials used in the engineering of neural interface devices, each offering a unique set of advantages and limitations. Graphene and 2D materials can indeed play a commanding role in the efforts toward wider clinical adoption of bioelectronics and electroceuticals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Combining decoder design and neural adaptation in brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Krishna V; Carmena, Jose M

    2014-11-19

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to help people with paralysis by decoding movement-related neural signals into control signals for guiding computer cursors, prosthetic arms, and other assistive devices. Despite compelling laboratory experiments and ongoing FDA pilot clinical trials, system performance, robustness, and generalization remain challenges. We provide a perspective on how two complementary lines of investigation, that have focused on decoder design and neural adaptation largely separately, could be brought together to advance BMIs. This BMI paradigm should also yield new scientific insights into the function and dysfunction of the nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Designing Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2010-01-01

    Despite all of the UI toolkits available today, it's still not easy to design good application interfaces. This bestselling book is one of the few reliable sources to help you navigate through the maze of design options. By capturing UI best practices and reusable ideas as design patterns, Designing Interfaces provides solutions to common design problems that you can tailor to the situation at hand. This updated edition includes patterns for mobile apps and social media, as well as web applications and desktop software. Each pattern contains full-color examples and practical design advice th

  7. Ultra low-power integrated circuit design for wireless neural interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Holleman, Jeremy; Otis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Presenting results from real prototype systems, this volume provides an overview of ultra low-power integrated circuits and systems for neural signal processing and wireless communication. Topics include analog, radio, and signal processing theory and design for ultra low-power circuits.

  8. In vitro verification of a 3-D regenerative neural interface design: examination of neurite growth and electrical properties within a bifurcating microchannel structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, P.A.; Wiertz, Remy; de Weerd, Eddy L; Rutten, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Toward the development of neuroprosthesis, we propose a 3-D regenerative neural interface design for connecting with the peripheral nervous system. This approach relies on bifurcating microstructures to achieve defasciculated ingrowth patterns and, consequently, high selectivity. In vitro studies

  9. Neural prostheses for vision: designing a functional interface with retinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetling, John R; Baig-Silva, Monica S

    2004-01-01

    A number of prevalent eye diseases exist which may lead to partial or total blindness, and for which there are currently no cures or means by which to restore lost sight. Based on recent progress, it has become apparent that artificial prosthetic devices, which would use electrical stimulation of neurons in the visual pathway to elicit visual percepts, are likely to some day become a viable treatment for patients blinded by these diseases. A number of recent scientific reviews have summarized general functional electrical stimulation (FES) approaches related to the visual system, and many of the technical considerations regarding fabrication, biocompatibility, stimulation thresholds and electrotoxicity. This review will address a principal outstanding question in retinal prosthesis development: the design and implementation of a functional interface with the retina. A functional interface between electrodes and retinal neurons will be stable, biocompatible, and will convey useful information to the visual system. Several parameters related to both the artificial and biological aspects of the interface must be considered; this paper will emphasize electrode design. Additional issues central to the development of prosthesis interface design, including retinal physiology, eye diseases, and existing animal models of retinal degeneration, are also summarized.

  10. Design of a Closed-Loop, Bidirectional Brain Machine Interface System With Energy Efficient Neural Feature Extraction and PID Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a bidirectional brain machine interface (BMI) microsystem designed for closed-loop neuroscience research, especially experiments in freely behaving animals. The system-on-chip (SoC) consists of 16-channel neural recording front-ends, neural feature extraction units, 16-channel programmable neural stimulator back-ends, in-channel programmable closed-loop controllers, global analog-digital converters (ADC), and peripheral circuits. The proposed neural feature extraction units includes 1) an ultra low-power neural energy extraction unit enabling a 64-step natural logarithmic domain frequency tuning, and 2) a current-mode action potential (AP) detection unit with time-amplitude window discriminator. A programmable proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller has been integrated in each channel enabling a various of closed-loop operations. The implemented ADCs include a 10-bit voltage-mode successive approximation register (SAR) ADC for the digitization of the neural feature outputs and/or local field potential (LFP) outputs, and an 8-bit current-mode SAR ADC for the digitization of the action potential outputs. The multi-mode stimulator can be programmed to perform monopolar or bipolar, symmetrical or asymmetrical charge balanced stimulation with a maximum current of 4 mA in an arbitrary channel configuration. The chip has been fabricated in 0.18 μ m CMOS technology, occupying a silicon area of 3.7 mm 2 . The chip dissipates 56 μW/ch on average. General purpose low-power microcontroller with Bluetooth module are integrated in the system to provide wireless link and SoC configuration. Methods, circuit techniques and system topology proposed in this work can be used in a wide range of relevant neurophysiology research, especially closed-loop BMI experiments.

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    they can fail to record reliably neural signals for long periods of time. McConnell et al show that by measuring the impedance of the tissue, one can evaluate the extent of the tissue response to the presence of the electrode. Another problem with the neural interface is the mismatch of the mechanical properties between electrode and tissue. Basinger et al use finite element modeling to analyze this mismatch in retinal prostheses and guide the design of new implantable devices. Electrical stimulation has been the method of choice to activate externally the nervous system. However, Zhang et al show that a novel dual hybrid device integrating electrical and optical stimulation can provide an effective interface for simultaneous recording and stimulation. By interfacing an EMG recording system and a movement detection system, Johnson and Fuglevand develop a model capable of predicting muscle activity during movement that could be important for the development of motor prostheses. Sensory restoration is another unsolved problem in neural prostheses. By developing a novel interface between the dorsal root ganglia and electrodes arrays, Gaunt et al show that it is possible to recruit afferent fibers for sensory substitution. Finally, by interfacing directly with muscles, Jung and colleagues show that stimulation of muscles involved in locomotion following spinal cord damage in rats can provide an effective treatment modality for incomplete spinal cord injury. This series of articles clearly shows that the interface is indeed one of the keys to successful therapeutic neural devices. The next Neural Interfaces Conference will take place in Los Angeles, CA in June 2010 and one can expect to see new developments in neural engineering obtained by focusing on the neural interface.

  12. Implications of the Dependence of Neuronal Activity on Neural Network States for the Design of Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzeri, Stefano; Safaai, Houman; De Feo, Vito; Vato, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state) that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brain. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  13. Implications of the dependence of neuronal activity on neural network states for the design of brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ePanzeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs can improve the quality of life of patients with sensory and motor disabilities by both decoding motor intentions expressed by neural activity, and by encoding artificially sensed information into patterns of neural activity elicited by causal interventions on the neural tissue. Yet, current BMIs can exchange relatively small amounts of information with the brain. This problem has proved difficult to overcome by simply increasing the number of recording or stimulating electrodes, because trial-to-trial variability of neural activity partly arises from intrinsic factors (collectively known as the network state that include ongoing spontaneous activity and neuromodulation, and so is shared among neurons. Here we review recent progress in characterizing the state dependence of neural responses, and in particular of how neural responses depend on endogenous slow fluctuations of network excitability. We then elaborate on how this knowledge may be used to increase the amount of information that BMIs exchange with brains. Knowledge of network state can be used to fine-tune the stimulation pattern that should reliably elicit a target neural response used to encode information in the brain, and to discount part of the trial-by-trial variability of neural responses, so that they can be decoded more accurately.

  14. Micro- and Nanotechnologies for Optical Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Ferruccio; Sileo, Leonardo; De Vittorio, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    In last decade, the possibility to optically interface with the mammalian brain in vivo has allowed unprecedented investigation of functional connectivity of neural circuitry. Together with new genetic and molecular techniques to optically trigger and monitor neural activity, a new generation of optical neural interfaces is being developed, mainly thanks to the exploitation of both bottom-up and top-down nanofabrication approaches. This review highlights the role of nanotechnologies for optical neural interfaces, with particular emphasis on new devices and methodologies for optogenetic control of neural activity and unconventional methods for detection and triggering of action potentials using optically-active colloidal nanoparticles. PMID:27013939

  15. Flexible and Organic Neural Interfaces: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Lago

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Neural interfaces are a fundamental tool to interact with neurons and to study neural networks by transducing cellular signals into electronics signals and vice versa. State-of-the-art technologies allow both in vivo and in vitro recording of neural activity. However, they are mainly made of stiff inorganic materials that can limit the long-term stability of the implant due to infection and/or glial scars formation. In the last decade, organic electronics is digging its way in the field of bioelectronics and researchers started to develop neural interfaces based on organic semiconductors, creating more flexible and conformable neural interfaces that can be intrinsically biocompatible. In this manuscript, we are going to review the latest achievements in flexible and organic neural interfaces for the recording of neuronal activity.

  16. Designing the Instructional Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, L. L.

    2000-01-01

    Designing the instructional interface is a challenging endeavor requiring knowledge and skills in instructional and visual design, psychology, human-factors, ergonomic research, computer science, and editorial design. This paper describes the instructional interface, the challenges of its development, and an instructional systems approach to its…

  17. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  18. Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex human-machine systems is proposed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), is based on the skills, rules, knowledge taxonomy of cognitive control. The basic goal of EID is twofold: first, not to force processing...... of other approaches to interface design indicates that EID has a unique and significant contribution to make. Third, the results of an initial empirical evaluation also provide some preliminary support for the EID framework. Some issues for future research are outlined....

  19. User interface design considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Simon Engedal; Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.

    1999-01-01

    When designing a user interface for a simulation model there are several important issues to consider: Who is the target user group, and which a priori information can be expected. What questions do the users want answers to and what questions are answered using a specific model?When developing...... and output variables. This feature requires special attention when designing the user interface and a special approach for controlling the user selection of input and output variables are developed. To obtain a consistent system description the different input variables are grouped corresponding...... the consequence that the user does not have to specify any start guesses, etc.The design approach developed have resulted in a number of simulation tools which allow users with limited theoretical knowledge about refrigeration systems, mathematical models and simulation to use them while the expert users still...

  20. Electronic dura mater for long-term multimodal neural interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minev, Ivan R.; Musienko, Pavel; Hirsch, Arthur; Barraud, Quentin; Wenger, Nikolaus; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Gandar, Jérôme; Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Asboth, Léonie; Torres, Rafael Fajardo; Vachicouras, Nicolas; Liu, Qihan; Pavlova, Natalia; Duis, Simone; Larmagnac, Alexandre; Vörös, Janos; Micera, Silvestro; Suo, Zhigang; Courtine, Grégoire; Lacour, Stéphanie P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical mismatch between soft neural tissues and stiff neural implants hinders the long-term performance of implantable neuroprostheses. Here, we designed and fabricated soft neural implants with the shape and elasticity of dura mater, the protective membrane of the brain and spinal cord. The electronic dura mater, which we call e-dura, embeds interconnects, electrodes, and chemotrodes that sustain millions of mechanical stretch cycles, electrical stimulation pulses, and chemical injections. These integrated modalities enable multiple neuroprosthetic applications. The soft implants extracted cortical states in freely behaving animals for brain-machine interface and delivered electrochemical spinal neuromodulation that restored locomotion after paralyzing spinal cord injury.

  1. Metaphors for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    00 00 METAPHORS FOR INTERFACE DESIGN Edwin Hutchins April 1987 ICS Report 8703 COGNITIVE SCIENCE IZET INTTT FOR CONTV SCINC UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...systems. Schneiderman (1982, 1983) coined the term " direct manipulation" to refer to these sys- tems. The technology on which these s)stems are based has...Weitsma., IA press) a reidr nlavigtiom tralnlng yam and a ’ direct manmpulatlon statistical analysis tuftt (Owam 1966) Until ncmady. bewevr we have

  2. Flexible neural interfaces with integrated stiffening shank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooker, Angela C.; Felix, Sarah H.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Shah, Kedar G.; Sheth, Heeral; Tolosa, Vanessa

    2017-10-17

    A neural interface includes a first dielectric material having at least one first opening for a first electrical conducting material, a first electrical conducting material in the first opening, and at least one first interconnection trace electrical conducting material connected to the first electrical conducting material. A stiffening shank material is located adjacent the first dielectric material, the first electrical conducting material, and the first interconnection trace electrical conducting material.

  3. Early interfaced neural activity from chronic amputated nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija Garde

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Direct interfacing of transected peripheral nerves with advanced robotic prosthetic devices has been proposed as a strategy for achieving natural motor control and sensory perception of such bionic substitutes, thus fully functionally replacing missing limbs in amputees. Multi-electrode arrays placed in the brain and peripheral nerves have been used successfully to convey neural control of prosthetic devices to the user. However, reactive gliosis, micro hemorrhages, axonopathy and excessive inflammation, currently limit their long-term use. Here we demonstrate that enticement of peripheral nerve regeneration through a non-obstructive multi-electrode array, after either acute or chronic nerve amputation, offers a viable alternative to obtain early neural recordings and to enhance long-term interfacing of nerve activity. Non restrictive electrode arrays placed in the path of regenerating nerve fibers allowed the recording of action potentials as early as 8 days post-implantation with high signal-to-noise ratio, as long as 3 months in some animals, and with minimal inflammation at the nerve tissue-metal electrode interface. Our findings suggest that regenerative on-dependent multi-electrode arrays of open design allow the early and stable interfacing of neural activity from amputated peripheral nerves and might contribute towards conveying full neural control and sensory feedback to users of robotic prosthetic devices. .

  4. Neural growth into a microchannel network: towards a regenerative neural interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, P.A.; Wiertz, Remy; le Feber, Jakob; Rutten, Wim

    2009-01-01

    We propose and validated a design for a highly selective 'endcap' regenerative neural interface towards a neuroprosthesis. In vitro studies using rat cortical neurons determine if a branching microchannel structure can counter fasciculated growth and cause neurites to separte from one another,

  5. Time to address the problems at the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Krames, Elliot

    2014-04-01

    Neural engineers have made significant, if not remarkable, progress in interfacing with the nervous system in the last ten years. In particular, neuromodulation of the brain has generated significant therapeutic benefits [1-5]. EEG electrodes can be used to communicate with patients with locked-in syndrome [6]. In the central nervous system (CNS), electrode arrays placed directly over or within the cortex can record neural signals related to the intent of the subject or patient [7, 8]. A similar technology has allowed paralyzed patients to control an otherwise normal skeletal system with brain signals [9, 10]. This technology has significant potential to restore function in these and other patients with neural disorders such as stroke [11]. Although there are several multichannel arrays described in the literature, the workhorse for these cortical interfaces has been the Utah array [12]. This 100-channel electrode array has been used in most studies on animals and humans since the 1990s and is commercially available. This array and other similar microelectrode arrays can record neural signals with high quality (high signal-to-noise ratio), but these signals fade and disappear after a few months and therefore the current technology is not reliable for extended periods of time. Therefore, despite these major advances in communicating with the brain, clinical translation cannot be implemented. The reasons for this failure are not known but clearly involve the interface between the electrode and the neural tissue. The Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA) as well as other federal funding agencies such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institutes of Health have provided significant financial support to investigate this problem without much success. A recent funding program from DARPA was designed to establish the failure modes in order to generate a reliable neural interface technology and again was unsuccessful at producing a robust

  6. Decoding Local Field Potentials for Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Hall, Thomas M

    2017-10-01

    The stability and frequency content of local field potentials (LFPs) offer key advantages for long-term, low-power neural interfaces. However, interpreting LFPs may require new signal processing techniques which should be informed by a scientific understanding of how these recordings arise from the coordinated activity of underlying neuronal populations. We review current approaches to decoding LFPs for brain-machine interface (BMI) applications, and suggest several directions for future research. To facilitate an improved understanding of the relationship between LFPs and spike activity, we share a dataset of multielectrode recordings from monkey motor cortex, and describe two unsupervised analysis methods we have explored for extracting a low-dimensional feature space that is amenable to biomimetic decoding and biofeedback training.

  7. Development of bioactive conducting polymers for neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Warren, Laura; Lovell, Nigel; Baek, Sungchul; Green, Rylie

    2010-01-01

    Bioelectrodes for neural recording and neurostimulation are an integral component of a number of neuroprosthetic devices, including the commercially available cochlear implant, and developmental devices, such as the bionic eye and brain-machine interfaces. Current electrode designs limit the application of such devices owing to suboptimal material properties that lead to minimal interaction with the target neural tissue and the formation of fibrotic capsules. In designing an ideal bioelectrode, a number of design criteria must be considered with respect to physical, mechanical, electrical and biological properties. Conducting polymers have the potential to address the synergistic interaction of these properties and show promise as superior coatings for next-generation electrodes in implant devices.

  8. Designing end-user interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Heaton, N

    1988-01-01

    Designing End-User Interfaces: State of the Art Report focuses on the field of human/computer interaction (HCI) that reviews the design of end-user interfaces.This compilation is divided into two parts. Part I examines specific aspects of the problem in HCI that range from basic definitions of the problem, evaluation of how to look at the problem domain, and fundamental work aimed at introducing human factors into all aspects of the design cycle. Part II consists of six main topics-definition of the problem, psychological and social factors, principles of interface design, computer intelligenc

  9. Practical speech user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, James R

    2010-01-01

    Although speech is the most natural form of communication between humans, most people find using speech to communicate with machines anything but natural. Drawing from psychology, human-computer interaction, linguistics, and communication theory, Practical Speech User Interface Design provides a comprehensive yet concise survey of practical speech user interface (SUI) design. It offers practice-based and research-based guidance on how to design effective, efficient, and pleasant speech applications that people can really use. Focusing on the design of speech user interfaces for IVR application

  10. A Survey of Neural Front End Amplifiers and Their Requirements toward Practical Neural Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bharucha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available When designing an analog front-end for neural interfacing, it is hard to evaluate the interplay of priority features that one must upkeep. Given the competing nature of design requirements for such systems a good understanding of these trade-offs is necessary. Low power, chip size, noise control, gain, temporal resolution and safety are the salient ones. There is a need to expose theses critical features for high performance neural amplifiers as the density and performance needs of these systems increases. This review revisits the basic science behind the engineering problem of extracting neural signal from living tissue. A summary of architectures and topologies is then presented and illustrated through a rich set of examples based on the literature. A survey of existing systems is presented for comparison based on prevailing performance metrics.

  11. Search-User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Max

    2011-01-01

    Search User Interfaces (SUIs) represent the gateway between people who have a task to complete, and the repositories of information and data stored around the world. Not surprisingly, therefore, there are many communities who have a vested interest in the way SUIs are designed. There are people who study how humans search for information, and people who study how humans use computers. There are people who study good user interface design, and people who design aesthetically pleasing user interfaces. There are also people who curate and manage valuable information resources, and people who desi

  12. Designing interfaces patterns for effective interaction design

    CERN Document Server

    Tidwell, Jenifer

    2005-01-01

    This convenient resource offers advice on creating user-friendly interface designs--whether they're delivered on the Web, a CD, or a smart" devices like a cell phone. Solutions to common UI design problems are expressed as a collection of patterns--each one containing concrete examples, recommendations, and warnings. Intended for designers with basic UI design knowledge

  13. Braided Multi-Electrode Probes (BMEPs) for Neural Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Gyo

    Although clinical use of invasive neural interfaces is very limited, due to safety and reliability concerns, the potential benefits of their use in brain machine interfaces (BMIs) seem promising and so they have been widely used in the research field. Microelectrodes as invasive neural interfaces are the core tool to record neural activities and their failure is a critical issue for BMI systems. Possible sources of this failure are neural tissue motions and their interactions with stiff electrode arrays or probes fixed to the skull. To overcome these tissue motion problems, we have developed novel braided multi-electrode probes (BMEPs). By interweaving ultra-fine wires into a tubular braid structure, we obtained a highly flexible multi-electrode probe. In this thesis we described BMEP designs and how to fabricate BMEPs, and explore experiments to show the advantages of BMEPs through a mechanical compliance comparison and a chronic immunohistological comparison with single 50microm nichrome wires used as a reference electrode type. Results from the mechanical compliance test showed that the bodies of BMEPs have 4 to 21 times higher compliance than the single 50microm wire and the tethers of BMEPs were 6 to 96 times higher compliance, depending on combinations of the wire size (9.6microm or 12.7microm), the wire numbers (12 or 24), and the length of tether (3, 5 or 10 mm). Results from the immunohistological comparison showed that both BMEPs and 50microm wires anchored to the skull caused stronger tissue reactions than unanchored BMEPs and 50microm wires, and 50microm wires caused stronger tissue reactions than BMEPs. In in-vivo tests with BMEPs, we succeeded in chronic recordings from the spinal cord of freely jumping frogs and in acute recordings from the spinal cord of decerebrate rats during air stepping which was evoked by mesencephalic locomotor region (MLR) stimulation. This technology may provide a stable and reliable neural interface to spinal cord

  14. Convolutional neural network architecture and input volume matrix design for ERP classifications in a tactile P300-based Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Takumi; Makino, Shoji

    2017-07-01

    In the presented study we conduct the off-line ERP classification using the convolutional neural network (CNN) classifier for somatosensory ERP intervals acquired in the full- body tactile P300-based Brain-Computer Interface paradigm (fbBCI). The main objective of the study is to enhance fbBCI stimulus pattern classification accuracies by applying the CNN classifier. A 60 × 60 squared input volume transformed by one-dimensional somatosensory ERP intervals in each electrode channel is input to the convolutional architecture for a filter training. The flattened activation maps are evaluated by a multilayer perceptron with one-hidden-layer in order to calculate classification accuracy results. The proposed method reveals that the CNN classifier model can achieve a non-personal- training ERP classification with the fbBCI paradigm, scoring 100 % classification accuracy results for all the participated ten users.

  15. Interface design for digital courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabbers, H.; Kester, L.; Hummel, H.; Nadolski, R.; Jochems, W.; Merriënboer, J.; Koper, R.

    2003-01-01

    An important question in web-based education is how to deal with the design of the interface. What will the actual screen look like? Two main issues that are especially relevant for educational purposes are discussed, both from a Human-Computer Interaction and an Educational Psychology perspective.

  16. NeuralWISP: A Wirelessly Powered Neural Interface With 1-m Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, D J; Holleman, J; Prasad, R; Smith, J R; Otis, B P

    2009-12-01

    We present the NeuralWISP, a wireless neural interface operating from far-field radio-frequency RF energy. The NeuralWISP is compatible with commercial RF identification readers and operates at a range up to 1 m. It includes a custom low-noise, low-power amplifier integrated circuit for processing the neural signal and an analog spike detection circuit for reducing digital computational requirements and communications bandwidth. Our system monitors the neural signal and periodically transmits the spike density in a user-programmable time window. The entire system draws an average 20 muA from the harvested 1.8-V supply.

  17. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borton, David A; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have the potential for wider diagnosis of

  18. The Pursuit of Chronically Reliable Neural Interfaces: A Materials Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces represent one of the most astonishing technologies in our era. However, the grand challenge of chronic instability and limited throughput of the electrode-tissue interface has significantly hindered the further development and ultimate deployment of such exciting technologies. A multidisciplinary research workforce has been called upon to respond to this engineering need. In this paper, I briefly review this multidisciplinary pursuit of chronically reliable neural interfaces from a materials perspective by analyzing the problem, abstracting the engineering principles, and summarizing the corresponding engineering strategies. I further draw my future perspectives by extending the proposed engineering principles.

  19. Shaping the dynamics of a bidirectional neural interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Vato

    Full Text Available Progress in decoding neural signals has enabled the development of interfaces that translate cortical brain activities into commands for operating robotic arms and other devices. The electrical stimulation of sensory areas provides a means to create artificial sensory information about the state of a device. Taken together, neural activity recording and microstimulation techniques allow us to embed a portion of the central nervous system within a closed-loop system, whose behavior emerges from the combined dynamical properties of its neural and artificial components. In this study we asked if it is possible to concurrently regulate this bidirectional brain-machine interaction so as to shape a desired dynamical behavior of the combined system. To this end, we followed a well-known biological pathway. In vertebrates, the communications between brain and limb mechanics are mediated by the spinal cord, which combines brain instructions with sensory information and organizes coordinated patterns of muscle forces driving the limbs along dynamically stable trajectories. We report the creation and testing of the first neural interface that emulates this sensory-motor interaction. The interface organizes a bidirectional communication between sensory and motor areas of the brain of anaesthetized rats and an external dynamical object with programmable properties. The system includes (a a motor interface decoding signals from a motor cortical area, and (b a sensory interface encoding the state of the external object into electrical stimuli to a somatosensory area. The interactions between brain activities and the state of the external object generate a family of trajectories converging upon a selected equilibrium point from arbitrary starting locations. Thus, the bidirectional interface establishes the possibility to specify not only a particular movement trajectory but an entire family of motions, which includes the prescribed reactions to unexpected

  20. Shaping the Dynamics of a Bidirectional Neural Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vato, Alessandro; Semprini, Marianna; Maggiolini, Emma; Szymanski, Francois D.; Fadiga, Luciano; Panzeri, Stefano; Mussa-Ivaldi, Ferdinando A.

    2012-01-01

    Progress in decoding neural signals has enabled the development of interfaces that translate cortical brain activities into commands for operating robotic arms and other devices. The electrical stimulation of sensory areas provides a means to create artificial sensory information about the state of a device. Taken together, neural activity recording and microstimulation techniques allow us to embed a portion of the central nervous system within a closed-loop system, whose behavior emerges from the combined dynamical properties of its neural and artificial components. In this study we asked if it is possible to concurrently regulate this bidirectional brain-machine interaction so as to shape a desired dynamical behavior of the combined system. To this end, we followed a well-known biological pathway. In vertebrates, the communications between brain and limb mechanics are mediated by the spinal cord, which combines brain instructions with sensory information and organizes coordinated patterns of muscle forces driving the limbs along dynamically stable trajectories. We report the creation and testing of the first neural interface that emulates this sensory-motor interaction. The interface organizes a bidirectional communication between sensory and motor areas of the brain of anaesthetized rats and an external dynamical object with programmable properties. The system includes (a) a motor interface decoding signals from a motor cortical area, and (b) a sensory interface encoding the state of the external object into electrical stimuli to a somatosensory area. The interactions between brain activities and the state of the external object generate a family of trajectories converging upon a selected equilibrium point from arbitrary starting locations. Thus, the bidirectional interface establishes the possibility to specify not only a particular movement trajectory but an entire family of motions, which includes the prescribed reactions to unexpected perturbations. PMID

  1. Studies in RF power communication, SAR, and temperature elevation in wireless implantable neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements.

  2. High Integrity Can Design Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaber, E.L.

    1998-08-01

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is chartered with facilitating the disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel to allow disposal at a geologic repository. This is done through coordination with the repository program and by assisting DOE Site owners of SNF with needed information, standardized requirements, packaging approaches, etc. The High Integrity Can (HIC) will be manufactured to provide a substitute or barrier enhancement for normal fuel geometry and cladding. The can would be nested inside the DOE standardized canister which is designed to interface with the repository waste package. The HIC approach may provide the following benefits over typical canning approaches for DOE SNF. (a) It allows ready calculation and management of criticality issues for miscellaneous. (b) It segments and further isolates damaged or otherwise problem materials from normal SNF in the repository package. (c) It provides a very long term corrosion barrier. (d) It provides an extra internal pressure barrier for particulates, gaseous fission products, hydrogen, and water vapor. (e) It delays any potential release of fission products to the repository environment. (f) It maintains an additional level of fuel geometry control during design basis accidents, rock-fall, and seismic events. (g) When seal welded, it could provide the additional containment required for shipments involving plutonium content in excess of 20 Ci. (10 CFR 71.63.b) if integrated with an appropriate cask design. Long term corrosion protection is central to the HIC concept. The material selected for the HIC (Hastelloy C-22) has undergone extensive testing for repository service. The most severe theoretical interactions between iron, repository water containing chlorides and other repository construction materials have been tested. These expected chemical species have not been shown capable of corroding the selected HIC material. Therefore, the HIC should provide a significant barrier to DOE SNF dispersal

  3. Targeted muscle reinnervation a neural interface for artificial limbs

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiken, Todd A; Barlow, Ann K

    2013-01-01

    Implement TMR with Your Patients and Improve Their Quality of Life Developed by Dr. Todd A. Kuiken and Dr. Gregory A. Dumanian, targeted muscle reinnervation (TMR) is a new approach to accessing motor control signals from peripheral nerves after amputation and providing sensory feedback to prosthesis users. This practical approach has many advantages over other neural-machine interfaces for the improved control of artificial limbs. Targeted Muscle Reinnervation: A Neural Interface for Artificial Limbs provides a template for the clinical implementation of TMR and a resource for further research in this new area of science. After describing the basic scientific concepts and key principles underlying TMR, the book presents surgical approaches to transhumeral and shoulder disarticulation amputations. It explores the possible role of TMR in the prevention and treatment of end-neuromas and details the principles of rehabilitation, prosthetic fitting, and occupational therapy for TMR patients. The book also describ...

  4. Neuromorphic neural interfaces: from neurophysiological inspiration to biohybrid coupling with nervous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broccard, Frédéric D.; Joshi, Siddharth; Wang, Jun; Cauwenberghs, Gert

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Computation in nervous systems operates with different computational primitives, and on different hardware, than traditional digital computation and is thus subjected to different constraints from its digital counterpart regarding the use of physical resources such as time, space and energy. In an effort to better understand neural computation on a physical medium with similar spatiotemporal and energetic constraints, the field of neuromorphic engineering aims to design and implement electronic systems that emulate in very large-scale integration (VLSI) hardware the organization and functions of neural systems at multiple levels of biological organization, from individual neurons up to large circuits and networks. Mixed analog/digital neuromorphic VLSI systems are compact, consume little power and operate in real time independently of the size and complexity of the model. Approach. This article highlights the current efforts to interface neuromorphic systems with neural systems at multiple levels of biological organization, from the synaptic to the system level, and discusses the prospects for future biohybrid systems with neuromorphic circuits of greater complexity. Main results. Single silicon neurons have been interfaced successfully with invertebrate and vertebrate neural networks. This approach allowed the investigation of neural properties that are inaccessible with traditional techniques while providing a realistic biological context not achievable with traditional numerical modeling methods. At the network level, populations of neurons are envisioned to communicate bidirectionally with neuromorphic processors of hundreds or thousands of silicon neurons. Recent work on brain-machine interfaces suggests that this is feasible with current neuromorphic technology. Significance. Biohybrid interfaces between biological neurons and VLSI neuromorphic systems of varying complexity have started to emerge in the literature. Primarily intended as a

  5. Design and Realization of Universal Data Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Woo; Seo, Suk-Bae; Kim, Kyung-Tae

    2005-03-01

    KARI studied data interface of Space Applications for developing Space Experimental Instrument in International Space Station, designed, and manufactured the UDIS (International Sapce Station Universal Data Interface simulator) according to requirements of the data interface. This paper explains the design and implementation of UDIS for space application. UDIS is the instrument which simulate to interface the data from ISS to experiment module, payload and habitation module and use the development of a experiment system in the space. This simulator will be used to the GSE (Ground Support Equipment) for test of experiment system. By realization of the simulator, we ensure data interface skills for a manned-space data communication system.

  6. EDITORIAL: Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference Special issue containing contributions from the 39th Neural Interfaces Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, James D.

    2011-07-01

    strategy that can potentially optimize dosing, reduce side effects and extend implant battery life. The article by Liang et al investigates methods for closed loop control of epilepsy, using neural recording to detect imminent seizures and stimulation to halt the aberrant neural activity leading to seizure. Liu et al report on a model of basal ganglia function that could lead to optimized, closed-loop stimulation to reduce symptoms of Parkinson's disease while avoiding side effects. Our laboratory, as described in Ray et al, is investigating the interface between stimulating microelectrodes and the retina, to inform the design of a high-resolution retinal prosthesis. Three contributions address the issue of long-term stability of cortical recording, which remains a major hurdle to implementation of neural recording systems. The Utah group reports on the in vitro testing of a completely implantable, wireless neural recording system, demonstrating almost one year of reliable performance under simulated implant conditions. Shenoy's laboratory at Stanford demonstrates that useful signals can be recorded from research animals for over 2.5 years. Lempka et al describe a modeling approach to analyzing intracortical microelectrode recordings. These findings represent real and significant progress towards overcoming the final barriers to implementation of a reliable cortical interface. Planning is well underway for the 40th Neural Interfaces Conference, which will be held in Salt Lake City, Utah, in June 2012. The conference promises to continue the NIC tradition of showcasing the latest results from clinical trials of neural interface therapies while providing ample time for dynamic exchange amongst the interdisciplinary audience of engineers, scientists and clinicians.

  7. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber as nano-neuron interface for monitoring neural function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; McKnight, Timothy E [ORNL; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich [ORNL; Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Morrison, Barclay [ORNL; Yu, Zhe [Columbia University

    2012-01-01

    Neural chips, which are capable of simultaneous, multi-site neural recording and stimulation, have been used to detect and modulate neural activity for almost 30 years. As a neural interface, neural chips provide dynamic functional information for neural decoding and neural control. By improving sensitivity and spatial resolution, nano-scale electrodes may revolutionize neural detection and modulation at cellular and molecular levels as nano-neuron interfaces. We developed a carbon-nanofiber neural chip with lithographically defined arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanofiber electrodes and demonstrated its capability of both stimulating and monitoring electrophysiological signals from brain tissues in vitro and monitoring dynamic information of neuroplasticity. This novel nano-neuron interface can potentially serve as a precise, informative, biocompatible, and dual-mode neural interface for monitoring of both neuroelectrical and neurochemical activity at the single cell level and even inside the cell.

  8. A Theoretical Framework for Ecological Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vicente, Kim J.; Rasmussen, Jens

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical framework for designing interfaces for complex systems is de-scribed. The framework, called ecological interface design (EID), suggests a set of principles for designing interfaces in a way that supports the funda-mental properties of human cognition. The basis of EID is the skills...... of the task require. The EID approach extends the concept of direct manipulation inter-faces by taking into account the added complications introduced by complex systems. In this paper, we describe the development of the framework, its theoretical foundations, and examples of its application to various work...

  9. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Hughes, Stephen [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); Soares, Paulo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Polytechnic School, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR 80215-901 (Brazil); Popat, Ketul C., E-mail: ketul.popat@colostate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States); School of Biomedical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. - Highlights: • Titania nanotube arrays can be fabricated with to have loosely or densely packed morphologies. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation. • Titania nanotube arrays support higher C17.2 neural stem cell differentiation towards neuronal lineage.

  10. Hypertext Interface Design and Structural Knowledge Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneman, Philip A.; Jonassen, David H.

    Hypertext is well-suited for educational applications where open learning and knowledge exploration is desired. In such applications, principles of good hypertext interface design should be employed to avoid navigational problems so as to maximize learning. Interface design, however, may also directly enhance acquisition of a particular knowledge…

  11. An Architectural Experience for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Susan P.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of human-computer interface design was brought to the foreground with the emergence of the personal computer, the increasing complexity of electronic systems, and the need to accommodate the human operator in these systems. With each new technological generation discovering the interface design problems of its own technologies, initial…

  12. Implantable neurotechnologies: bidirectional neural interfaces--applications and VLSI circuit implementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Elliot; Masters, Matthew R; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    A bidirectional neural interface is a device that transfers information into and out of the nervous system. This class of devices has potential to improve treatment and therapy in several patient populations. Progress in very large-scale integration has advanced the design of complex integrated circuits. System-on-chip devices are capable of recording neural electrical activity and altering natural activity with electrical stimulation. Often, these devices include wireless powering and telemetry functions. This review presents the state of the art of bidirectional circuits as applied to neuroprosthetic, neurorepair, and neurotherapeutic systems.

  13. PinBus Interface Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins’ functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  14. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  15. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-12-16

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  16. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Okabe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna. In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT, the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  17. User Interface Design for Dynamic Geometry Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Ulrich; Dohrmann, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In this article we describe long-standing user interface issues with Dynamic Geometry Software and common approaches to address them. We describe first prototypes of multi-touch-capable DGS. We also give some hints on the educational benefits of proper user interface design.

  18. Visually Designing the Computer-Learner Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Leslie

    1991-01-01

    Discusses elements involved in the visual design of the computer-learner interface. Topics discussed include the need for consistency in screen layout; information representation, including accuracy in images and visual cuing strategies; and menu selection interfaces, or command representations, including their placement on the screen. (11…

  19. ORGANIC ELECTRODE COATINGS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NEURAL INTERFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises A Aregueta-Robles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Traditional neuronal interfaces utilize metallic electrodes which in recent years have reached a plateau in terms of the ability to provide safe stimulation at high resolution or rather with high densities of microelectrodes with improved spatial selectivity. To achieve higher resolution it has become clear that reducing the size of electrodes is required to enable higher electrode counts from the implant device. The limitations of interfacing electrodes including low charge injection limits, mechanical mismatch and foreign body response can be addressed through the use of organic electrode coatings which typically provide a softer, more roughened surface to enable both improved charge transfer and lower mechanical mismatch with neural tissue. Coating electrodes with conductive polymers or carbon nanotubes offers a substantial increase in charge transfer area compared to conventional platinum electrodes. These organic conductors provide safe electrical stimulation of tissue while avoiding undesirable chemical reactions and cell damage. However, the mechanical properties of conductive polymers are not ideal, as they are quite brittle. Hydrogel polymers present a versatile coating option for electrodes as they can be chemically modified to provide a soft and conductive scaffold. However, the in vivo chronic inflammatory response of these conductive hydrogels remains unknown. A more recent approach proposes tissue engineering the electrode interface through the use of encapsulated neurons within hydrogel coatings. This approach may provide a method for activating tissue at the cellular scale, however several technological challenges must be addressed to demonstrate feasibility of this innovative idea. The review focuses on the various organic coatings which have been investigated to improve neural interface electrodes.

  20. Designing Gestural Interfaces Touchscreens and Interactive Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Saffer, Dan

    2008-01-01

    If you want to get started in new era of interaction design, this is the reference you need. Packed with informative illustrations and photos, Designing Gestural Interfaces provides you with essential information about kinesiology, sensors, ergonomics, physical computing, touchscreen technology, and new interface patterns -- information you need to augment your existing skills in traditional" websites, software, or product development. This book will help you enter this new world of possibilities."

  1. Drug release from porous silicon for stable neural interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Tao, E-mail: taosun@hotmail.com.hk [Institute of Microelectronics, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR) (Singapore); Tsang, Wei Mong [Institute of Microelectronics, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR) (Singapore); Park, Woo-Tae [Institute of Microelectronics, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR) (Singapore); Department of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    70 μm-thick porous Si (PSi) layer with the pore size of 11.1 ± 7.6 nm was formed on an 8-in. Si wafer via an anodization process for the microfabrication of a microelectrode to record neural signals. To reduce host tissue responses to the microelectrode and achieve a stable neural interface, water-soluble dexamethesone (Dex) was loaded into the PSi via incubation with the drug solution overnight. After the drug loading process, the pore size of PSi reduced to 4.7 ± 2.6 nm on the basis of scanning electron microscopic (SEM) images, while its wettability was remarkably enhanced. Fluorescence images demonstrated that Dex was loaded into the porous structure of the PSi. Degradation rate of the PSi was investigated by incubation in distilled water for 21 days. Moreover, the drug release profile of the Dex-loaded PSi was a combination of an initial burst release and subsequent sustained release. To evaluate cellular responses to the drug release from the PSi, primary astrocytes were seeded on the surface of samples. After 2 days of culture, the Dex-loaded PSi could not only moderately prevent astrocyte adhesion in comparison with Si, but also more effectively suppress the activation of primary astrocytes than unloaded PSi due to the drug release. Therefore, it might be an effective method to reduce host tissue responses and stabilize the quality of the recorded neural signal by means of loading drugs into the PSi component of the microelectrode.

  2. Titania nanotube arrays as interfaces for neural prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Jonathan A; Hughes, Stephen; Soares, Paulo; Popat, Ketul C

    2015-04-01

    Neural prostheses have become ever more acceptable treatments for many different types of neurological damage and disease. Here we investigate the use of two different morphologies of titania nanotube arrays as interfaces to advance the longevity and effectiveness of these prostheses. The nanotube arrays were characterized for their nanotopography, crystallinity, conductivity, wettability, surface mechanical properties and adsorption of key proteins: fibrinogen, albumin and laminin. The loosely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using a diethylene glycol based electrolyte, contained a higher presence of the anatase crystal phase and were subsequently more conductive. These arrays yielded surfaces with higher wettability and lower modulus than the densely packed nanotube arrays fabricated using water based electrolyte. Further the adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of the C17.2 neural stem cell line was investigated on the nanotube arrays. The proliferation ratio of the cells as well as the level of neuronal differentiation was seen to increase on the loosely packed arrays. The results indicate that loosely packed nanotube arrays similar to the ones produced here with a DEG based electrolyte, may provide a favorable template for growth and maintenance of C17.2 neural stem cell line. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Systems Interface Design Methods Using Ecological Interface Design Principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seung Kweon; Park, Jung Chul; Kim, Sun Su; Sim, Kwang Pyo; Yuk, Seung Yul; Choi, Jae Hyeon; Yoon, Seung Hyun [Chungju National University, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    The results of this study categorized into two parts. The first part is the guidelines for EID designs. The procedure to observe for EID design is composed of 6 steps; 1) to define a target system, 2) to make an abstraction hierarchy model, 3) to check the link structure among each components included in the layers of abstraction hierarchy model, 4) to transform information requirements to variables, 5) to make the graphs related to each variables, 6) to check the graphs by visual display design principles and heuristic rules. The second part is an EID design alternative for nuclear power plant. The EID for high level function represents the energy balance and energy flow in each loop of nuclear power plant. The EID for middle level function represents the performance indicators of each equipment involved in the all processes of changing from coolants to steam. The EID for low level function represents the values measured in each equipment such as temperature, pressure, water level and so on.

  4. At the interface: convergence of neural regeneration and neural prostheses for restoration of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, W M; McDonald, J W; Peckham, P H; Heetderks, W; Kocsis, J; Weinrich, M

    2001-01-01

    The rapid pace of recent advances in development and application of electrical stimulation of the nervous system and in neural regeneration has created opportunities to combine these two approaches to restoration of function. This paper relates the discussion on this topic from a workshop at the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society. The goals of this workshop were to discuss the current state of interaction between the fields of neural regeneration and neural prostheses and to identify potential areas of future research that would have the greatest impact on achieving the common goal of restoring function after neurological damage. Identified areas include enhancement of axonal regeneration with applied electric fields, development of hybrid neural interfaces combining synthetic silicon and biologically derived elements, and investigation of the role of patterned neural activity in regulating various neuronal processes and neurorehabilitation. Increased communication and cooperation between the two communities and recognition by each field that the other has something to contribute to their efforts are needed to take advantage of these opportunities. In addition, creative grants combining the two approaches and more flexible funding mechanisms to support the convergence of their perspectives are necessary to achieve common objectives.

  5. User interface design of electronic appliances

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Konrad

    2002-01-01

    Foreword by Brenda Laurel. Part One: Introduction 1. Background, Bruce Thomas 2. Introduction, Konrad Baumann 3. The Interaction Design Process, Georg Rakers Part Two: User Interface Design 4. Creativity Techniques, Irene Mavrommati 5. Design Principals, Irene Mavrommati and Adrian Martel 6. Design of On-Screen Interfaces, Irene Mavrommati Part Three: Input Devices 7. Controls, Konrad Baumann 8. Keyboards, Konrad Baumann 9. Advanced Interaction Techniques, Christopher Baber and Konrad Baumann 10. Speech Control, Christopher Baber and Jan Noyes 11. Wearable Computers, Christopher Baber Part Fou

  6. AVID: Automatic Visualization Interface Designer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chuah, Mei

    2000-01-01

    .... Automatic generation offers great flexibility in performing data and information analysis tasks, because new designs are generated on a case by case basis to suit current and changing future needs...

  7. Defining Interactions and Interfaces in Engineering Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parslov, Jakob Filippson

    that they have different conceptual viewpoints on the product and use different ‘technical languages’ to communicate. Some terms like an interface, is used frequently in engineering however with no commonly declared meaning and is thus subject to much interpretation across engineering disciplines. It is well....... The case example showed that interfaces that reside at the boundary between engineering disciplines are vulnerable to misinterpretation and rework. Based on this understanding, this thesis presents a first principles, physics-­based Interaction and Interface Framework, which provides a ‘common language......’ across any engineering discipline for describing and communicating about interactions and interfaces in engineering design. The framework contains classifications of three key terms; interaction, interaction mechanism, and interface. Due to the first principles, physics-­based approach to deriving...

  8. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders.Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space.This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  9. Neural network topology design for nonlinear control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haecker, Jens; Rudolph, Stephan

    2001-03-01

    Neural networks, especially in nonlinear system identification and control applications, are typically considered to be black-boxes which are difficult to analyze and understand mathematically. Due to this reason, an in- depth mathematical analysis offering insight into the different neural network transformation layers based on a theoretical transformation scheme is desired, but up to now neither available nor known. In previous works it has been shown how proven engineering methods such as dimensional analysis and the Laplace transform may be used to construct a neural controller topology for time-invariant systems. Using the knowledge of neural correspondences of these two classical methods, the internal nodes of the network could also be successfully interpreted after training. As further extension to these works, the paper describes the latest of a theoretical interpretation framework describing the neural network transformation sequences in nonlinear system identification and control. This can be achieved By incorporation of the method of exact input-output linearization in the above mentioned two transform sequences of dimensional analysis and the Laplace transformation. Based on these three theoretical considerations neural network topologies may be designed in special situations by pure translation in the sense of a structural compilation of the known classical solutions into their correspondent neural topology. Based on known exemplary results, the paper synthesizes the proposed approach into the visionary goals of a structural compiler for neural networks. This structural compiler for neural networks is intended to automatically convert classical control formulations into their equivalent neural network structure based on the principles of equivalence between formula and operator, and operator and structure which are discussed in detail in this work.

  10. Conducting polymers with immobilised fibrillar collagen for enhanced neural interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Yue, Zhilian; Higgins, Michael J; Wallace, Gordon G

    2011-10-01

    Conducting polymers with pendant functionality are advantageous in various bionic and organic bioelectronic applications, as they allow facile incorporation of bio-regulative cues to provide bio-mimicry and conductive environments for cell growth, differentiation and function. In this work, polypyrrole substrates doped with chondroitin sulfate (CS), an extracellular matrix molecule bearing carboxylic acid moieties, were electrochemically synthesized and conjugated with type I collagen. During the coupling process, the conjugated collagen formed a 3-dimensional fibrillar matrix in situ at the conducting polymer interface, as evidenced by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy under aqueous physiological conditions. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and impedance measurement confirmed no significant reduction in the electroactivity of the fibrillar collagen-modified conducting polymer substrates. Rat pheochromocytoma (nerve) cells showed increased differentiation and neurite outgrowth on the fibrillar collagen, which was further enhanced through electrical stimulation of the underlying conducting polymer substrate. Our study demonstrates that the direct coupling of ECM components such as collagen, followed by their further self-assembly into 3-dimensional matrices, has the potential to improve the neural-electrode interface of implant electrodes by encouraging nerve cell attachment and differentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Designing the user interface for Wizard Wars

    OpenAIRE

    Yli-Kiikka, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to design a high-quality, functioning and implementation-ready user interface (UI) for the tablet strategy game Wizard Wars. UI design is traditionally a discipline where visuals take a backseat in favor of usability and functionality. In games, however, visual impressiveness is valued highly, and it is the only medium where it is deemed acceptable to sacrifice some amount of usability to create a more elaborate design to support the theme and atmosphere. Therefore...

  12. Development and Evaluation of Micro-Electrocorticography Arrays for Neural Interfacing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Amelia Ann

    Neural interfaces have great promise for both electrophysiological research and therapeutic applications. Whether for the study of neural circuitry or for neural prosthetic or other therapeutic applications, micro-electrocorticography (micro-ECoG) arrays have proven extremely useful as neural interfacing devices. These devices strike a balance between invasiveness and signal resolution, an important step towards eventual human application. The objective of this research was to make design improvements to micro-ECoG devices to enhance both biocompatibility and device functionality. To best evaluate the effectiveness of these improvements, a cranial window imaging method for in vivo monitoring of the longitudinal tissue response post device implant was developed. Employment of this method provided valuable insight into the way tissue grows around micro-ECoG arrays after epidural implantation, spurring a study of the effects of substrate geometry on the meningeal tissue response. The results of the substrate footprint comparison suggest that a more open substrate geometry provides an easy path for the tissue to grow around to the top side of the device, whereas a solid device substrate encourages the tissue to thicken beneath the device, between the electrode sites and the brain. The formation of thick scar tissue between the recording electrode sites and the neural tissue is disadvantageous for long-term recorded signal quality, and thus future micro-ECoG device designs should incorporate open-architecture substrates for enhanced longitudinal in vivo function. In addition to investigating improvements for long-term device reliability, it was also desired to enhance the functionality of micro-ECoG devices for neural electrophysiology research applications. To achieve this goal, a completely transparent graphene-based device was fabricated for use with the cranial window imaging method and optogenetic techniques. The use of graphene as the conductive material provided

  13. Modality-specific axonal regeneration: toward selective regenerative neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D "Y"-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a "Y"-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  14. A New Animal Model for Developing a Somatosensory Neural Interface for Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-12

    interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh 1 10/15/2007 Scientific progress and accomplishments. We...information to the brain. A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D...A new animal model for developing a somatosensory neural interface for neuroprosthetic limbs. PI: Douglas J. Weber, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh

  15. Design of Robust Neural Network Classifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Andersen, Lars Nonboe; Hintz-Madsen, Mads

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses a new framework for designing robust neural network classifiers. The network is optimized using the maximum a posteriori technique, i.e., the cost function is the sum of the log-likelihood and a regularization term (prior). In order to perform robust classification, we present...... a modified likelihood function which incorporates the potential risk of outliers in the data. This leads to the introduction of a new parameter, the outlier probability. Designing the neural classifier involves optimization of network weights as well as outlier probability and regularization parameters. We...

  16. Interface design in the process industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaverstock, M. C.; Stassen, H. G.; Williamson, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Every operator runs his plant in accord with his own mental model of the process. In this sense, one characteristic of an ideal man-machine interface is that it be in harmony with that model. With this theme in mind, the paper first reviews the functions of the process operator and compares them with human operators involved in control situations previously studied outside the industrial environment (pilots, air traffic controllers, helmsmen, etc.). A brief history of the operator interface in the process industry and the traditional methodology employed in its design is then presented. Finally, a much more fundamental approach utilizing a model definition of the human operator's behavior is presented.

  17. Functional recordings from awake, behaving rodents through a microchannel based regenerative neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Russell K.; Choi, Yoonsu; Bellamkonda, Ravi; English, Arthur

    2015-02-01

    Objective. Neural interface technologies could provide controlling connections between the nervous system and external technologies, such as limb prosthetics. The recording of efferent, motor potentials is a critical requirement for a peripheral neural interface, as these signals represent the user-generated neural output intended to drive external devices. Our objective was to evaluate structural and functional neural regeneration through a microchannel neural interface and to characterize potentials recorded from electrodes placed within the microchannels in awake and behaving animals. Approach. Female rats were implanted with muscle EMG electrodes and, following unilateral sciatic nerve transection, the cut nerve was repaired either across a microchannel neural interface or with end-to-end surgical repair. During a 13 week recovery period, direct muscle responses to nerve stimulation proximal to the transection were monitored weekly. In two rats repaired with the neural interface, four wire electrodes were embedded in the microchannels and recordings were obtained within microchannels during proximal stimulation experiments and treadmill locomotion. Main results. In these proof-of-principle experiments, we found that axons from cut nerves were capable of functional reinnervation of distal muscle targets, whether regenerating through a microchannel device or after direct end-to-end repair. Discrete stimulation-evoked and volitional potentials were recorded within interface microchannels in a small group of awake and behaving animals and their firing patterns correlated directly with intramuscular recordings during locomotion. Of 38 potentials extracted, 19 were identified as motor axons reinnervating tibialis anterior or soleus muscles using spike triggered averaging. Significance. These results are evidence for motor axon regeneration through microchannels and are the first report of in vivo recordings from regenerated motor axons within microchannels in a small

  18. Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Design and Construction of Strain Gauge Interface Pressure Transducer for Measurement of Static and Dynamic Interface Pressure Applied by Pressure Garments and its Relationship to Deep Vein Thrombosis.

  19. A microsystem integration platform dedicated to build multi-chip-neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoub, Amer E; Gosselin, Benoit; Sawan, Mohamad

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an electrical discharge machining (EDM) technique associated with electrochemical steps to construct an appropriate biological interface to neural tissues. The presented microprobe design permits to short the time of production compared to available techniques, while improving the integrity of the electrodes. In addition, we are using a 3D approach to create compact and independent microsystem integration platefrom incorporating array of electrodes and signal processing chips. System-in-package and die-stacking are used to connect the integrated circuits and the array of electrodes on the platform. This approach enables to build a device that will fit in a volume smaller than 1.7 x 1.7 x 3.0 mm(3). This demonstrates the possibility of creating small devices that are suitable to fit in restricted areas for interfacing the brain.

  20. NEVESIM: event-driven neural simulation framework with a Python interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecevski, Dejan; Kappel, David; Jonke, Zeno

    2014-01-01

    NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes) between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies.

  1. NEVESIM: Event-Driven Neural Simulation Framework with a Python Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan ePecevski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available NEVESIM is a software package for event-driven simulation of networks of spiking neurons with a fast simulation core in C++, and a scripting user interface in the Python programming language. It supports simulation of heterogeneous networks with different types of neurons and synapses, and can be easily extended by the user with new neuron and synapse types. To enable heterogeneous networks and extensibility, NEVESIM is designed to decouple the simulation logic of communicating events (spikes between the neurons at a network level from the implementation of the internal dynamics of individual neurons. In this paper we will present the simulation framework of NEVESIM, its concepts and features, as well as some aspects of the object-oriented design approaches and simulation strategies that were utilized to efficiently implement the concepts and functionalities of the framework. We will also give an overview of the Python user interface, its basic commands and constructs, and also discuss the benefits of integrating NEVESIM with Python. One of the valuable capabilities of the simulator is to simulate exactly and efficiently networks of stochastic spiking neurons from the recently developed theoretical framework of neural sampling. This functionality was implemented as an extension on top of the basic NEVESIM framework. Altogether, the intended purpose of the NEVESIM framework is to provide a basis for further extensions that support simulation of various neural network models incorporating different neuron and synapse types that can potentially also use different simulation strategies.

  2. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  3. Neural bases of syntax-semantics interface processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evguenia; Newman, Sharlene

    2015-06-01

    The binding problem-question of how information between the modules of the linguistic system is integrated during language processing-is as yet unresolved. The remarkable speed of language processing and comprehension (Pulvermüller et al. 2009) suggests that at least coarse semantic information (e.g. noun animacy) and syntactically-relevant information (e.g. verbal template) are integrated rapidly to allow for coarse comprehension. This EEG study investigated syntax-semantics interface processing during word-by-word sentence reading. As alpha-band neural activity serves as an inhibition mechanism for local networks, we used topographical distribution of alpha power to help identify the timecourse of the binding process. We manipulated the syntactic parameter of verbal event structure, and semantic parameter of noun animacy in reduced relative clauses (RRCs, e.g. "The witness/mansion seized/protected by the agent was in danger"), to investigate the neural bases of interaction between syntactic and semantic networks during sentence processing. The word-by-word stimulus presentation method in the present experiment required manipulation of both syntactic structure and semantic features in the working memory. The results demonstrated a gradient distribution of early components (biphasic posterior P1-N2 and anterior N1-P2) over function words "by" and "the", and the verb, corresponding to facilitation or conflict resulting from the syntactic (telicity) and semantic (animacy) cues in the preceding portion of the sentence. This was followed by assimilation of power distribution in the α band at the second noun. The flattened distribution of α power during the mental manipulation with high demand on working memory-thematic role re-assignment-demonstrates a state of α equilibrium with strong functional coupling between posterior and anterior regions. These results demonstrate that the processing of semantic and syntactic features during sentence comprehension proceeds

  4. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Polanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes.

  5. A 2.1 μW/channel current-mode integrated neural recording interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zjajo, A.; van Leuken, T.G.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a neural recording interface circuit for biomedical implantable devices, which includes low-noise signal amplification, band-pass filtering, and current-mode successive approximation A/D signal conversion. The integrated interface circuit is realized in a 65 nm CMOS

  6. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Saito

    Full Text Available Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET. We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song, sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics, and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody. The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  7. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1990-07-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and noncontrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of muting and classification types of optimization problems. Neural Networks are constructed from neurons, which in electronics or software attempt to model but are not constrained by the real thing, i.e., neurons in our gray matter. Neurons are simple processing units connected to many other neurons over pathways which modify the incoming signals. A single synthetic neuron typically sums its weighted inputs, runs this sum through a non-linear function, and produces an output. In the brain, neurons are connected in a complex topology: in hardware/software the topology is typically much simpler, with neurons lying side by side, forming layers of neurons which connect to the layer of neurons which receive their outputs. This simplistic model is much easier to construct than the real thing, and yet can solve real problems. The information in a network, or its "memory", is completely contained in the weights on the connections from one neuron to another. Establishing these weights is called "training" the network. Some networks are trained by design -- once constructed no further learning takes place. Other types of networks require iterative training once wired up, but are not trainable once taught Still other types of networks can continue to learn after initial construction. The main benefit to using Neural Networks is their ability to work with conflicting or incomplete ("fuzzy") data sets. This ability and its usefulness will become evident in the following

  8. Ecological Interface Design for Anaesthesia Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Watson

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available The operating theatre is a noisy place with many uninformative and redundant alarms. Using data from a recent observational study, we demonstrate that anaesthetists actively respond to only 3.4% of all audible alarms. We outline a range of possible solutions to the alarm problem. Ecological Interface Design (EID helps to outline the requirements for an information environment for anaesthetists and to indicate the possible benefits of continuous auditory signals. Our observational data are then "reworked" to give an indication of possible benefits of a continuous auditory display. Finally we indicate steps we are taking to test these ideas empirically

  9. Design Patterns for User Interfaces on Mobile Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik G.

    The objective of this tutorial is to enhance the participants’ skills in designing user interfaces for mobile equipment, including adaptive and context sensitive user interfaces and multimodal interaction. Through a combination of lectures and practical exercises, a collection of patterns addressing issues regarding designing user interfaces on mobile devices is presented. The patterns address typical challenges and opportunities when designing user interfaces that are to run on PDAs and SmartPhones - both challenges connected to characteristics of the equipment and connected to tasks to which designing suitable user interfaces is challenging. The tutorial is intended for user interface designer, systems developers, and project leaders that work with or plan to work on development of applications on mobile devices. The tutorial requires basic knowledge of user interface design in general, and basic understanding of challenges connected to designing user interfaces on mobile devices.

  10. Methodology of Neural Design: Applications in Microwave Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Raida; P. Pomenka

    2006-01-01

    In the paper, an original methodology for the automatic creation of neural models of microwave structures is proposed and verified. Following the methodology, neural models of the prescribed accuracy are built within the minimum CPU time. Validity of the proposed methodology is verified by developing neural models of selected microwave structures. Functionality of neural models is verified in a design - a neural model is joined with a genetic algorithm to find a global minimum of a formulat...

  11. Enhancing Hohlraum Design with Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Humbird, K. D.; Brandon, S. T.; Field, J. E.; Langer, S. H.; Nora, R. C.; Spears, B. K.

    2017-10-01

    A primary goal of hohlraum design is to efficiently convert available laser power and energy to capsule drive, compression and ultimately fusion neutron yield. However, a major challenge of this multi-dimensional optimization problem is the relative computational expense of hohlraum simulations. In this work, we explore overcoming this obstacle with the use of artificial neural networks built off ensembles of hohlraum simulations. These machine learning systems emulate the behavior of full simulations in a fraction of the time, thereby enabling the rapid exploration of design parameters. We will demonstrate this technology with a search for modifications to existing high-yield designs that can maximize neutron production within NIF's current laser power and energy constraints. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-734401.

  12. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality and Aesthe......This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality...... and Aesthetics in the conference. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows to bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors...... investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to do with a digital interactive system that responds on the movement of the hands; at a certain distance the user’s hands appear on a monitor screen...

  13. User Interface Design for E-Learning System

    OpenAIRE

    Suteja, Bernard Renaldy; Harjoko, Agus

    2008-01-01

    With the demand for e-Learning steadily growing and the ongoing struggle to convince the skeptics of thepotential of e-Learning and online virtual classrooms, quality design is the foundation for a successful DEprogram. The design of the instruction and the design of the user interface are critical elements in providingquality education with a virtual, e-Learning model. This White Paper will focus on the design of the e-Learninguser interface (UI). This paper provide examples of user interfac...

  14. Toward User Interfaces and Data Visualization Criteria for Learning Design of Digital Textbooks

    OpenAIRE

    Elena RAILEAN

    2014-01-01

    User interface and data visualisation criteria are central issues in digital textbooks design. However, when applying mathematical modelling of learning process to the analysis of the possible solutions, it could be observed that results differ. Mathematical learning views cognition in on the base on statistics and probability theory, graph theory, game theory, cellular automata, neural networks etc. Instead of this, research methodologies in learning design are diversified in behaviourism, c...

  15. Brain-Computer Interface for Control of Wheelchair Using Fuzzy Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahib H. Abiyev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of brain-computer interface for the wheelchair for physically disabled people is presented. The design of the proposed system is based on receiving, processing, and classification of the electroencephalographic (EEG signals and then performing the control of the wheelchair. The number of experimental measurements of brain activity has been done using human control commands of the wheelchair. Based on the mental activity of the user and the control commands of the wheelchair, the design of classification system based on fuzzy neural networks (FNN is considered. The design of FNN based algorithm is used for brain-actuated control. The training data is used to design the system and then test data is applied to measure the performance of the control system. The control of the wheelchair is performed under real conditions using direction and speed control commands of the wheelchair. The approach used in the paper allows reducing the probability of misclassification and improving the control accuracy of the wheelchair.

  16. An operator interface design for a telerobotic inspection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won S.; Tso, Kam S.; Hayati, Samad

    1993-01-01

    The operator interface has recently emerged as an important element for efficient and safe interactions between human operators and telerobotics. Advances in graphical user interface and graphics technologies enable us to produce very efficient operator interface designs. This paper describes an efficient graphical operator interface design newly developed for remote surface inspection at NASA-JPL. The interface, designed so that remote surface inspection can be performed by a single operator with an integrated robot control and image inspection capability, supports three inspection strategies of teleoperated human visual inspection, human visual inspection with automated scanning, and machine-vision-based automated inspection.

  17. iSpike: a spiking neural interface for the iCub robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, D; Fidjeland, A K; Lazdins, E

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents iSpike: a C++ library that interfaces between spiking neural network simulators and the iCub humanoid robot. It uses a biologically inspired approach to convert the robot's sensory information into spikes that are passed to the neural network simulator, and it decodes output spikes from the network into motor signals that are sent to control the robot. Applications of iSpike range from embodied models of the brain to the development of intelligent robots using biologically inspired spiking neural networks. iSpike is an open source library that is available for free download under the terms of the GPL.

  18. Design of efficient and safe neural stimulators a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    van Dongen, Marijn

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the design of neural stimulator systems which are used for the treatment of a wide variety of brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, depression and tinnitus. Whereas many existing books treating neural stimulation focus on one particular design aspect, such as the electrical design of the stimulator, this book uses a multidisciplinary approach: by combining the fields of neuroscience, electrophysiology and electrical engineering a thorough understanding of the complete neural stimulation chain is created (from the stimulation IC down to the neural cell). This multidisciplinary approach enables readers to gain new insights into stimulator design, while context is provided by presenting innovative design examples. Provides a single-source, multidisciplinary reference to the field of neural stimulation, bridging an important knowledge gap among the fields of bioelectricity, neuroscience, neuroengineering and microelectronics;Uses a top-down approach to understanding the neural activation proc...

  19. Towards Essential Visual Variables in User Interface Design

    OpenAIRE

    Silvennoinen, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on visual variables in user interface design from the user perspective. Visual design of user interfaces is essential to users interacting with different software. The study is conducted with 3E-templates for users to express their impressions by writing and drawing regarding visual website design. The data is analyzed with qualitative content analysis through interpretation framework. The results of this study provide new insights into user-centered visual user interface d...

  20. Spacecraft Neural Network Control System Design using FPGA

    OpenAIRE

    Hanaa T. El-Madany; Faten H. Fahmy; Ninet M. A. El-Rahman; Hassen T. Dorrah

    2011-01-01

    Designing and implementing intelligent systems has become a crucial factor for the innovation and development of better products of space technologies. A neural network is a parallel system, capable of resolving paradigms that linear computing cannot. Field programmable gate array (FPGA) is a digital device that owns reprogrammable properties and robust flexibility. For the neural network based instrument prototype in real time application, conventional specific VLSI neural chip design suffer...

  1. Vacuum-actuated percutaneous insertion/implantation tool for flexible neural probes and interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Heeral; Bennett, William J.; Pannu, Satinderpall S.; Tooker, Angela C.

    2017-03-07

    A flexible device insertion tool including an elongated stiffener with one or more suction ports, and a vacuum connector for interfacing the stiffener to a vacuum source, for attaching the flexible device such as a flexible neural probe to the stiffener during insertion by a suction force exerted through the suction ports to, and to release the flexible device by removing the suction force.

  2. Virtual Software to Design and Interface peripherals with different Microprocessors

    OpenAIRE

    N. Suresh Kumar,; D.V. Rama Koti Reddy; s. Amarnadh,; S. Praveen KUMAR; M.S.S. Praveen

    2010-01-01

    The software allows the user to design the interfacing circuit by giving simple input to the system. Here the software develops a graphical interface with different processors line 8085, 86, 186, 286, 386, 486, Pentium pro. This work includes the framework of graphics programming. It is a method to construct computer graphics programs. This software allows the user to construct the interface blocks by selecting required units from the selected menus. A usercan easily assemble his/her design w...

  3. Neural network optimization, components, and design selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Scott W.

    1991-01-01

    Neural Networks are part of a revived technology which has received a lot of hype in recent years. As is apt to happen in any hyped technology, jargon and predictions make its assimilation and application difficult. Nevertheless, Neural Networks have found use in a number of areas, working on non-trivial and non-contrived problems. For example, one net has been trained to "read", translating English text into phoneme sequences. Other applications of Neural Networks include data base manipulation and the solving of routing and classification types of optimization problems. It was their use in optimization that got me involved with Neural Networks. As it turned out, "optimization" used in this context was somewhat misleading, because while some network configurations could indeed solve certain kinds of optimization problems, the configuring or "training" of a Neural Network itself is an optimization problem, and most of the literature which talked about Neural Nets and optimization in the same breath did not speak to my goal of using Neural Nets to help solve lens optimization problems. I did eventually apply Neural Network to lens optimization, and I will touch on those results. The application of Neural Nets to the problem of lens selection was much more successful, and those results will dominate this paper.

  4. Cognitive Awareness Prototype Development on User Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, D'oria Islamiah

    2015-01-01

    Human error is a crucial problem in manufacturing industries. Due to the misinterpretation of information on interface system design, accidents or death may occur at workplace. Lack of human cognition criteria in interface system design is also one of the contributions to the failure in using the system effectively. Therefore, this paper describes…

  5. Ecological Interface Design of a Tactical Airborne Separation Assistance Tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, S.; Mulder, M.; Van Paassen, M.M.

    2008-01-01

    In a free-flight airspace environment, pilots have more freedom to choose user-preferred trajectories. An onboard pilot support system is needed that exploits travel freedom while maintaining spatial separation with other traffic. Ecological interface design is used to design an interface tool that

  6. Neural Operant Conditioning as a Core Mechanism of Brain-Machine Interface Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Sakurai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The process of changing the neuronal activity of the brain to acquire rewards in a broad sense is essential for utilizing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs, which is essentially operant conditioning of neuronal activity. Currently, this is also known as neural biofeedback, and it is often referred to as neurofeedback when human brain activity is targeted. In this review, we first illustrate biofeedback and operant conditioning, which are methodological background elements in neural operant conditioning. Then, we introduce research models of neural operant conditioning in animal experiments and demonstrate that it is possible to change the firing frequency and synchronous firing of local neuronal populations in a short time period. We also debate the possibility of the application of neural operant conditioning and its contribution to BMIs.

  7. Understanding and Design of Polymer Device Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahn, Antoine [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2015-10-26

    The research performed under grant DE-FG02-04ER46165 between May 2008 and April 2011 focused on the understanding and control of interfaces of organic semiconductors in general, and polymer interfaces more specifically. This work was a joined effort by three experimentalists and a theoretician. Emphasis was placed on the determination of the electronic structure of these interfaces, i.e. the relative energy position of molecular levels across these interfaces. From these electronic structures depend the injection, extraction and transport of charge carriers into, from and across, respectively, all (opto)electronic devices made of these semiconductors. A significant fraction of our work focused on ways to modify and optimize interfaces, for example via chemical doping of the semiconductors to reduce interface energy barriers or via deposition of ultra-thin work function-reducing polymer or self-assembled monolayers of dipolar molecules. Another significant fraction of our work was devoted to exploring alternate and unconventional interface formation methods, in particular the soft-contact lamination of both metal contacts and polymer overlayers on top of polymer films. These methods allowed us to better understand the impact of hot metal atom evaporation on a soft organic surface, as well as the key mechanisms that control the energetics of polymer/polymer heterojunctions. Finally, a significant fraction of the research was directed to understanding the electronic structure of buried polymer heterojunctions, in particular within donor/acceptor blends of interest in organic photovoltaic applications. The work supported by this grant resulted in 17 publications in some of the best peer-reviewed journals of the field, as well as numerous presentations at US and international conferences.

  8. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Ruiz-Amaya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz–7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models.

  9. A Low Noise Amplifier for Neural Spike Recording Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Amaya, Jesus; Rodriguez-Perez, Alberto; Delgado-Restituto, Manuel

    2015-09-30

    This paper presents a Low Noise Amplifier (LNA) for neural spike recording applications. The proposed topology, based on a capacitive feedback network using a two-stage OTA, efficiently solves the triple trade-off between power, area and noise. Additionally, this work introduces a novel transistor-level synthesis methodology for LNAs tailored for the minimization of their noise efficiency factor under area and noise constraints. The proposed LNA has been implemented in a 130 nm CMOS technology and occupies 0.053 mm-sq. Experimental results show that the LNA offers a noise efficiency factor of 2.16 and an input referred noise of 3.8 μVrms for 1.2 V power supply. It provides a gain of 46 dB over a nominal bandwidth of 192 Hz-7.4 kHz and consumes 1.92 μW. The performance of the proposed LNA has been validated through in vivo experiments with animal models.

  10. Optimizing the performance of neural interface devices with hybrid poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene) (PEDOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chin-chen

    This thesis describes methods for improving the performance of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as a direct neural interfacing material. The chronic foreign body response is always a challenge for implanted bionic devices. After long-term implantation (typically 2-4 weeks), insulating glial scars form around the devices, inhibiting signal transmission, which ultimately leads to device failure. The mechanical mismatch at the device-tissue interface is one of the issues that has been associated with chronic foreign body response. Another challenge for using PEDOT as a neural interface material is its mechanical failure after implantation. We observed cracking and delamination of PEDOT coatings on devices after extended implantations. In the first part of this thesis, we present a novel method for directly measuring the mechanical properties of a PEDOT thin film. Before investigating methods to improve the mechanical behavior of PEDOT, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanical properties of PEDOT thin film is required. A PEDOT thin film was machined into a dog-bone shape specimen with a dual beam FIB-SEM. With an OmniProbe, this PEDOT specimen could be attached onto a force sensor, while the other side was attached to OmniProbe. By moving the OmniProbe, the specimen could be deformed in tension, and a force sensor recorded the applied load on the sample simultaneously. Mechanical tensile tests were conducted in the FIB-SEM chamber along with in situ observation. With precise force measurement from the force sensor and the corresponding high resolution SEM images, we were able to convert the data to a stress-strain curve for further analysis. By analyzing these stress-strain curves, we were able to obtain information about PEDOT including the Young's modulus, strength of failure, strain to failure, and toughness (energy to failure). This information should be useful for future material selection and molecular design for specific applications. The second

  11. Optimal feedback control successfully explains changes in neural modulations during experiments with brain-machine interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam eZacksenhouse

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent experiments with brain-machine-interfaces (BMIs indicate that the extent of neural modulations increased abruptly upon starting to operate the interface, and especially after the monkey stopped moving its hand. In contrast, neural modulations that are correlated with the kinematics of the movement remained relatively unchanged. Here we demonstrate that similar changes are produced by simulated neurons that encode the relevant signals generated by an optimal feedback controller during simulated BMI experiments. The optimal feedback controller relies on state estimation that integrates both visual and proprioceptive feedback with prior estimations from an internal model. The processing required for optimal state estimation and control were conducted in the state-space, and neural recording was simulated by modeling two populations of neurons that encode either only the estimated state or also the control signal. Spike counts were generated as realizations of doubly stochastic Poisson processes with linear tuning curves. The model successfully reconstructs the main features of the kinematics and neural activity during regular reaching movements. Most importantly, the activity of the simulated neurons successfully reproduces the observed changes in neural modulations upon switching to brain control. Further theoretical analysis and simulations indicate that increasing the process noise during normal reaching movement results in similar changes in neural modulations. Thus we conclude that the observed changes in neural modulations during BMI experiments can be attributed to increasing process noise associated with the imperfect BMI filter, and, more directly, to the resulting increase in the variance of the encoded signals associated with state estimation and the required control signal.

  12. Interpenetrating Conducting Hydrogel Materials for Neural Interfacing Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goding, Josef; Gilmour, Aaron; Martens, Penny; Poole-Warren, Laura; Green, Rylie

    2017-05-01

    Conducting hydrogels (CHs) are an emerging technology in the field of medical electrodes and brain-machine interfaces. The greatest challenge to the fabrication of CH electrodes is the hybridization of dissimilar polymers (conductive polymer and hydrogel) to ensure the formation of interpenetrating polymer networks (IPN) required to achieve both soft and electroactive materials. A new hydrogel system is developed that enables tailored placement of covalently immobilized dopant groups within the hydrogel matrix. The role of immobilized dopant in the formation of CH is investigated through covalent linking of sulfonate doping groups to poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) macromers. These groups control the electrochemical growth of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and subsequent material properties. The effect of dopant density and interdopant spacing on the physical, electrochemical, and mechanical properties of the resultant CHs is examined. Cytocompatible PVA hydrogels with PEDOT penetration throughout the depth of the electrode are produced. Interdopant spacing is found to be the key factor in the formation of IPNs, with smaller interdopant spacing producing CH electrodes with greater charge storage capacity and lower impedance due to increased PEDOT growth throughout the network. This approach facilitates tailorable, high-performance CH electrodes for next generation, low impedance neuroprosthetic devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A Hardware-Efficient Scalable Spike Sorting Neural Signal Processor Module for Implantable High-Channel-Count Brain Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuning; Boling, Sam; Mason, Andrew J

    2017-08-01

    Next-generation brain machine interfaces demand a high-channel-count neural recording system to wirelessly monitor activities of thousands of neurons. A hardware efficient neural signal processor (NSP) is greatly desirable to ease the data bandwidth bottleneck for a fully implantable wireless neural recording system. This paper demonstrates a complete multichannel spike sorting NSP module that incorporates all of the necessary spike detector, feature extractor, and spike classifier blocks. To meet high-channel-count and implantability demands, each block was designed to be highly hardware efficient and scalable while sharing resources efficiently among multiple channels. To process multiple channels in parallel, scalability analysis was performed, and the utilization of each block was optimized according to its input data statistics and the power, area and/or speed of each block. Based on this analysis, a prototype 32-channel spike sorting NSP scalable module was designed and tested on an FPGA using synthesized datasets over a wide range of signal to noise ratios. The design was mapped to 130 nm CMOS to achieve 0.75 μW power and 0.023 mm2 area consumptions per channel based on post synthesis simulation results, which permits scalability of digital processing to 690 channels on a 4×4 mm2 electrode array.

  14. Implantable Graphene-based Neural Electrode Interfaces for Electrophysiology and Neurochemistry in In Vivo Hyperacute Stroke Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ta-Chung; Chuang, Min-Chieh; Chu, Chao-Yi; Huang, Wei-Chen; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Wang, Chao-Ting; Chu, Wei-Lin; Chen, San-Yuan; Chen, You-Yin

    2016-01-13

    Implantable microelectrode arrays have attracted considerable interest due to their high temporal and spatial resolution recording of neuronal activity in tissues. We herein presented an implantable multichannel neural probe with multiple real-time monitoring of neural-chemical and neural-electrical signals by a nonenzymatic neural-chemical interface, which was designed by creating the newly developed reduced graphene oxide-gold oxide (rGO/Au2O3) nanocomposite electrode. The modified electrode on the neural probe was prepared by a facile one-step cyclic voltammetry (CV) electrochemical method with simultaneous occurrence of gold oxidation and GOs reduction to induce the intimate attachment by electrostatic interaction using chloride ions (Cl(-)). The rGO/Au2O3-modified electrode at a low deposition scan rate of 10 mVs(-1) displayed significantly improved electrocatalytic activity due to large active areas and well-dispersive attached rGO sheets. The in vitro amperometric response to H2O2 demonstrated a fast response of less than 5 s and a very low detection limit of 0.63 μM. In in vivo hyperacute stroke model, the concentration of H2O2 was measured as 100.48 ± 4.52 μM for rGO/Au2O3 electrode within 1 h photothrombotic stroke, which was much higher than that (71.92 μM ± 2.52 μM) for noncoated electrode via in vitro calibration. Simultaneously, the somatosensory-evoked potentials (SSEPs) test provided reliable and precise validation for detecting functional changes of neuronal activities. This newly developed implantable probe with localized rGO/Au2O3 nanocomposite electrode can serve as a rapid and reliable sensing platform for practical H2O2 detection in the brain or for other neural-chemical molecules in vivo.

  15. Methodology of Neural Design: Applications in Microwave Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, an original methodology for the automatic creation of neural models of microwave structures is proposed and verified. Following the methodology, neural models of the prescribed accuracy are built within the minimum CPU time. Validity of the proposed methodology is verified by developing neural models of selected microwave structures. Functionality of neural models is verified in a design - a neural model is joined with a genetic algorithm to find a global minimum of a formulated objective function. The objective function is minimized using different versions of genetic algorithms, and their mutual combinations. The verified methodology of the automated creation of accurate neural models of microwave structures, and their association with global optimization routines are the most important original features of the paper.

  16. Design of Cognitive Interfaces for Personal Informatics Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Camilla Birgitte Falk

    to personal informatics systems, and propose an approach to design cognitive interfaces, which considers both users’ motivations, needs, and goals. In this thesis I propose a new personal informatics framework, the feedback loop, which incorporates lean agile design principles. Including hierarchical modeling...... of goals, activities, and tasks to create minimal viable products. While considering how micro-interactions based on an understanding of data, couples with user needs and the context they appear in, can contribute to creating cognitive interfaces. Designing cognitive interfaces requires a focus...

  17. Uniform and Non-uniform Perturbations in Brain-Machine Interface Task Elicit Similar Neural Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta Salas, Michelle; Helms Tillery, Stephen I

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that take place during learning and adaptation can be directly probed with brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). We developed a BMI controlled paradigm that enabled us to enforce learning by introducing perturbations which changed the relationship between neural activity and the BMI's output. We introduced a uniform perturbation to the system, through a visuomotor rotation (VMR), and a non-uniform perturbation, through a decorrelation task. The controller in the VMR was essentially unchanged, but produced an output rotated at 30° from the neurally specified output. The controller in the decorrelation trials decoupled the activity of neurons that were highly correlated in the BMI task by selectively forcing the preferred directions of these cell pairs to be orthogonal. We report that movement errors were larger in the decorrelation task, and subjects needed more trials to restore performance back to baseline. During learning, we measured decreasing trends in preferred direction changes and cross-correlation coefficients regardless of task type. Conversely, final adaptations in neural tunings were dependent on the type controller used (VMR or decorrelation). These results hint to the similar process the neural population might engage while adapting to new tasks, and how, through a global process, the neural system can arrive to individual solutions.

  18. Facet‐Engineered Surface and Interface Design of Photocatalytic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Li, Zhengquan

    2016-01-01

    The facet‐engineered surface and interface design for photocatalytic materials has been proven as a versatile approach to enhance their photocatalytic performance. This review article encompasses some recent advances in the facet engineering that has been performed to control the surface of mono‐component semiconductor systems and to design the surface and interface structures of multi‐component heterostructures toward photocatalytic applications. The review begins with some key points which should receive attention in the facet engineering on photocatalytic materials. We then discuss the synthetic approaches to achieve the facet control associated with the surface and interface design. In the following section, the facet‐engineered surface design on mono‐component photocatalytic materials is introduced, which forms a basis for the discussion on more complex systems. Subsequently, we elucidate the facet‐engineered surface and interface design of multi‐component photocatalytic materials. Finally, the existing challenges and future prospects are discussed. PMID:28105398

  19. How to design software user interfaces to prevent musculoskeletal symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lingen P. van

    2006-01-01

    Static postures, repetitive movements and precision demands are causes for musculoskeletal disorders. Features in the design of user interfaces of software contribute to these risks. The user interface can increase risks of musculoskeletal disorders by forcing the user to repeat movements, to

  20. Direct manipulation and the design of user interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desain, P.

    1988-01-01

    An approach to user interfaces is made from a cognitive engineering viewpoint. A model of task representations within the user is given, together with complexity measures of the translations between the representations. Two approaches to interface design are compared: the conversational method and

  1. Interface Matters : Postphenomenological Perspectives on Service Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Secomandi, F.

    2012-01-01

    One of the fundamental questions facing the emerging discipline of service design concerns the definition of its object. In this thesis, I posit that the practice of service design, as a recent development within the tradition of industrial design, may be approached primarily as the design of

  2. Designing a flexible user interface for both users and programmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, S; Feingold, E

    1989-01-01

    The design of a user interface for computers is examined from both the end user's and the programmer's point of view. Different methods of menu selection and user feedback are discussed. A graphics interface using pull down menus and dialog boxes is ideal for simplifying user interaction and program organization. This style of interface also provides for a modular program development environment, reduced program development time, program portability, and reduced maintenance. Software tools for programming the user interface are explored and pseudo-code examples are given.

  3. Polymer neural interface with dual-sided electrodes for neural stimulation and recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooker, Angela; Tolosa, Vanessa; Shah, Kedar G; Sheth, Heeral; Felix, Sarah; Delima, Terri; Pannu, Satinderpall

    2012-01-01

    We present here a demonstration of a dual-sided, 4-layer metal, polyimide-based electrode array suitable for neural stimulation and recording. The fabrication process outlined here utilizes simple polymer and metal deposition and etching steps, with no potentially harmful backside etches or long exposures to extremely toxic chemicals. These polyimide-based electrode arrays have been tested to ensure they are fully biocompatible and suitable for long-term implantation; their flexibility minimizes the injury and glial scarring that can occur at the implantation site. The creation of dual-side electrode arrays with more than two layers of trace metal enables the fabrication of neural probes with more electrodes without a significant increase in probe size. This allows for more stimulation/recording sites without inducing additional injury and glial scarring.

  4. Neural interface methods and apparatus to provide artificial sensory capabilities to a subject

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stephen P.; Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Novick, David K.; Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.

    2017-01-24

    Embodiments of neural interfaces according to the present invention comprise sensor modules for sensing environmental attributes beyond the natural sensory capability of a subject, and communicating the attributes wirelessly to an external (ex-vivo) portable module attached to the subject. The ex-vivo module encodes and communicates the attributes via a transcutaneous inductively coupled link to an internal (in-vivo) module implanted within the subject. The in-vivo module converts the attribute information into electrical neural stimuli that are delivered to a peripheral nerve bundle within the subject, via an implanted electrode. Methods and apparatus according to the invention incorporate implantable batteries to power the in-vivo module allowing for transcutaneous bidirectional communication of low voltage (e.g. on the order of 5 volts) encoded signals as stimuli commands and neural responses, in a robust, low-error rate, communication channel with minimal effects to the subjects' skin.

  5. Neural interface methods and apparatus to provide artificial sensory capabilities to a subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerger, Stephen P.; Olsson, III, Roy H.; Wojciechowski, Kenneth E.; Novick, David K.; Kholwadwala, Deepesh K.

    2017-01-24

    Embodiments of neural interfaces according to the present invention comprise sensor modules for sensing environmental attributes beyond the natural sensory capability of a subject, and communicating the attributes wirelessly to an external (ex-vivo) portable module attached to the subject. The ex-vivo module encodes and communicates the attributes via a transcutaneous inductively coupled link to an internal (in-vivo) module implanted within the subject. The in-vivo module converts the attribute information into electrical neural stimuli that are delivered to a peripheral nerve bundle within the subject, via an implanted electrode. Methods and apparatus according to the invention incorporate implantable batteries to power the in-vivo module allowing for transcutaneous bidirectional communication of low voltage (e.g. on the order of 5 volts) encoded signals as stimuli commands and neural responses, in a robust, low-error rate, communication channel with minimal effects to the subjects' skin.

  6. Point-and-Click Cursor Control With an Intracortical Neural Interface System by Humans With Tetraplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Donoghue, John P.; Friehs, Gerhard M.; Black, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain–computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer. PMID:21278024

  7. Polymer Composite with Carbon Nanofibers Aligned during Thermal Drawing as a Microelectrode for Chronic Neural Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Shan; Grena, Benjamin J B; Kimbrough, Ian F; Thompson, Emily G; Fink, Yoel; Sontheimer, Harald; Yoshinobu, Tatsuo; Jia, Xiaoting

    2017-07-25

    Microelectrodes provide a direct pathway to investigate brain activities electrically from the external world, which has advanced our fundamental understanding of brain functions and has been utilized for rehabilitative applications as brain-machine interfaces. However, minimizing the tissue response and prolonging the functional durations of these devices remain challenging. Therefore, the development of next-generation microelectrodes as neural interfaces is actively progressing from traditional inorganic materials toward biocompatible and functional organic materials with a miniature footprint, good flexibility, and reasonable robustness. In this study, we developed a miniaturized all polymer-based neural probe with carbon nanofiber (CNF) composites as recording electrodes via the scalable thermal drawing process. We demonstrated that in situ CNF unidirectional alignment can be achieved during the thermal drawing, which contributes to a drastic improvement of electrical conductivity by 2 orders of magnitude compared to a conventional polymer electrode, while still maintaining the mechanical compliance with brain tissues. The resulting neural probe has a miniature footprint, including a recording site with a reduced size comparable to a single neuron and maintained impedance that was able to capture neural activities. Its stable functionality as a chronic implant has been demonstrated with the long-term reliable electrophysiological recording with single-spike resolution and the minimal tissue response over the extended period of implantation in wild-type mice. Technology developed here can be applied to basic chronic electrophysiological studies as well as clinical implementation for neuro-rehabilitative applications.

  8. Designing new interfaces for ROOT data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Vuorinen, Kalle Elmer

    2016-01-01

    ROOT is a C++ framework for data analysis provided with a Python interface (PyRoot). ROOT is used in every Large Hadron Collider experiment. This project presents a way of reading ROOT TTree by using a new class called DataFrame, which allows the usage of cache and functional chains. Reading TTrees in Python has been quite slow compared to the C++ way of doing it and for this reason we also bring the possibility to read them with just-in-time (JIT) compiled C++ code, using another new Python class called TreeReader.

  9. Enhanced project brief: Structured approach to client-designer interface

    OpenAIRE

    Khosrowshahi, F

    2015-01-01

    © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. Purpose - The focus of this work is on the client-designer interface where decisions have significant impact over the lifecycle of the project. Therefore, the briefing stage is examined in the context of clients needs which is divided into project-based strategy and broader clients strategy. The purpose of this paper is to address the pitfalls in the briefing process which has been attributed to the shortcomings in the client-designer communication interfac...

  10. Designing a Tablet Touch-Screen Interface for Older Adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdezoto, Nervo; Grönvall, Erik

    Sustaining daily, unsupervised healthcare activities in a private home setting can challenge, among others, older adults. In this paper, we discuss experiences from designing a tablet mobile application, MediFrame, to support older adults’ medication management at home. In relation to Medi......Frame’s touch interface design, we discuss existing guidelines that can be adopted for touch interfaces and we use MediFrame to illustrate an implementation of such guidelines....

  11. SSVEP and ANN based optimal speller design for Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Ahmad Ansari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work put forwards an optimal BCI (Brain Computer Interface speller design based on Steady State Visual Evoked Potentials (SSVEP and Artificial Neural Network (ANN in order to help the people with severe motor impairments. This work is carried out to enhance the accuracy and communication rate of  BCI system. To optimize the BCI system, the work has been divided into two steps: First, designing of an encoding technique to choose characters from the speller interface and the second is the development and implementation of feature extraction algorithm to acquire optimal features, which is used to train the BCI system for classification using neural network. Optimization of speller interface is focused on representation of character matrix and its designing parameters. Then again, a lot of deliberations made in order to optimize selection of features and user’s time window. Optimized system works nearly the same with the new user and gives character per minute (CPM of 13 ± 2 with an average accuracy of 94.5% by choosing first two harmonics of power spectral density as the feature vectors and using the 2 second time window for each selection. Optimized BCI performs better with experienced users with an average accuracy of 95.1%. Such a good accuracy has not been reported before in account of fair enough CPM.DOI: 10.15181/csat.v2i2.1059

  12. Parietal neural prosthetic control of a computer cursor in a graphical-user-interface task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revechkis, Boris; Aflalo, Tyson NS; Kellis, Spencer; Pouratian, Nader; Andersen, Richard A.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. To date, the majority of Brain-Machine Interfaces have been used to perform simple tasks with sequences of individual targets in otherwise blank environments. In this study we developed a more practical and clinically relevant task that approximated modern computers and graphical user interfaces (GUIs). This task could be problematic given the known sensitivity of areas typically used for BMIs to visual stimuli, eye movements, decision-making, and attentional control. Consequently, we sought to assess the effect of a complex, GUI-like task on the quality of neural decoding. Approach. A male rhesus macaque monkey was implanted with two 96-channel electrode arrays in area 5d of the superior parietal lobule. The animal was trained to perform a GUI-like ‘Face in a Crowd’ task on a computer screen that required selecting one cued, icon-like, face image from a group of alternatives (the ‘Crowd’) using a neurally controlled cursor. We assessed whether the crowd affected decodes of intended cursor movements by comparing it to a ‘Crowd Off’ condition in which only the matching target appeared without alternatives. We also examined if training a neural decoder with the Crowd On rather than Off had any effect on subsequent decode quality. Main results. Despite the additional demands of working with the Crowd On, the animal was able to robustly perform the task under Brain Control. The presence of the crowd did not itself affect decode quality. Training the decoder with the Crowd On relative to Off had no negative influence on subsequent decoding performance. Additionally, the subject was able to gaze around freely without influencing cursor position. Significance. Our results demonstrate that area 5d recordings can be used for decoding in a complex, GUI-like task with free gaze. Thus, this area is a promising source of signals for neural prosthetics that utilize computing devices with GUI interfaces, e.g. personal computers, mobile devices, and tablet

  13. Aerospace product/process design interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present volume discusses the electron beam welding of launch-vehicle structures, an integrated aluminum forging-stock producer for aerospace structures, the definition of design processes in decision-based concurrent engineering, and the theory and application of the development of a comprehensive/concurrent engineering method. Also discussed are managing constraints in integrated and cooperative product development, an automatic FEM mesh-generation for the automation of parametric conceptual design, and computer-aided life-cycle design. (For individual items see A93-21746 to A93-21750)

  14. Poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene (PEDOT as a micro-neural interface material for electrostimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth J Wilks

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic microstimulation-based devices are being investigated to treat conditions such as blindness, deafness, pain, paralysis and epilepsy. Small area electrodes are desired to achieve high selectivity. However, a major trade-off with electrode miniaturization is an increase in impedance and charge density requirements. Thus, the development of novel materials with lower interfacial impedance and enhanced charge storage capacity is essential for the development of micro-neural interface-based neuroprostheses. In this report, we study the use of conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene (PEDOT as a neural interface material for microstimulation of small area iridium electrodes on silicon-substrate arrays. Characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrodeposition of PEDOT results in lower interfacial impedance at physiologically-relevant frequencies, with the 1kHz impedance magnitude being 23.3 ± 0.7 kΩ compared to 113.6 ± 3.5 kΩ for iridium oxide (IrOx on 177μm2 sites. Further, PEDOT exhibits enhanced charge storage capacity at 75.6 ± 5.4 mC/cm2 compared to 28.8 ± 0.3 mC/cm2 for IrOx, characterized by cyclic voltammetry (50 mV/s. These improvements at the electrode interface were corroborated by observation of the voltage excursions that result from constant current pulsing. The PEDOT coatings provide both a lower amplitude voltage and a more ohmic representation of the applied current compared to IrOx. During repetitive pulsing, PEDOT-coated electrodes show stable performance and little change in electrical properties, even at relatively high current densities which cause IrOx instability. These findings support the potential of PEDOT coatings as a micro-neural interface material for electrostimulation.

  15. Web Interface Design Principles for Adults’ Self-Directed Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet FIRAT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important features which e-learning tools and environments must possess within the scope of lifelong learning is self-directed learning, which can be considered as a form of self-learning. The aim of this study was to determine, based on the views and recommendations of experts, interface design principles for the development of educational web interfaces that will support the self-directed learning of adults. This descriptive study was conducted with the contribution of 12 academicians specializing in interface design and self-directed learning. Within the scope of the study, new interfaces features were identified based on an evaluation of the literature on interface designs for self-directed learning, and the views of subject experts. Based on the study results, it was determined that interface designs supporting self-directed learning must possess five basic features, which include being user-directed, ensuring variety, being supported by learning analytics, being motivational, and being sharing-oriented.

  16. User Interface Design in Medical Distributed Web Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Alexandru; Crisan-Vida, Mihaela; Mada, Leonard; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lacramioara

    2016-01-01

    User interfaces are important to facilitate easy learning and operating with an IT application especially in the medical world. An easy to use interface has to be simple and to customize the user needs and mode of operation. The technology in the background is an important tool to accomplish this. The present work aims to creating a web interface using specific technology (HTML table design combined with CSS3) to provide an optimized responsive interface for a complex web application. In the first phase, the current icMED web medical application layout is analyzed, and its structure is designed using specific tools, on source files. In the second phase, a new graphic adaptable interface to different mobile terminals is proposed, (using HTML table design (TD) and CSS3 method) that uses no source files, just lines of code for layout design, improving the interaction in terms of speed and simplicity. For a complex medical software application a new prototype layout was designed and developed using HTML tables. The method uses a CSS code with only CSS classes applied to one or multiple HTML table elements, instead of CSS styles that can be applied to just one DIV tag at once. The technique has the advantage of a simplified CSS code, and a better adaptability to different media resolutions compared to DIV-CSS style method. The presented work is a proof that adaptive web interfaces can be developed just using and combining different types of design methods and technologies, using HTML table design, resulting in a simpler to learn and use interface, suitable for healthcare services.

  17. BioCMOS Interfaces and Co-Design

    CERN Document Server

    Carrara, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    The application of CMOS circuits and ASIC VLSI systems to problems in medicine and system biology has led to the emergence of Bio/CMOS Interfaces and Co-Design as an exciting and rapidly growing area of research. The mutual inter-relationships between VLSI-CMOS design and the biophysics of molecules interfacing with silicon and/or onto metals has led to the emergence of the interdisciplinary engineering approach to Bio/CMOS interfaces. This new approach, facilitated by 3D circuit design and nanotechnology, has resulted in new concepts and applications for VLSI systems in the bio-world. This book offers an invaluable reference to the state-of-the-art in Bio/CMOS interfaces. It describes leading-edge research in the field of CMOS design and VLSI development for applications requiring integration of biological molecules onto the chip. It provides multidisciplinary content ranging from biochemistry to CMOS design in order to address Bio/CMOS interface co-design in bio-sensing applications.

  18. Bed occupancy monitoring: data processing and clinician user interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Melanie; Joshi, Vilas; Goubran, Rafik; Knoefel, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Unobtrusive and continuous monitoring of patients, especially at their place of residence, is becoming a significant part of the healthcare model. A variety of sensors are being used to monitor different patient conditions. Bed occupancy monitoring provides clinicians a quantitative measure of bed entry/exit patterns and may provide information relating to sleep quality. This paper presents a bed occupancy monitoring system using a bed pressure mat sensor. A clinical trial was performed involving 8 patients to collect bed occupancy data. The trial period for each patient ranged from 5-10 weeks. This data was analyzed using a participatory design methodology incorporating clinician feedback to obtain bed occupancy parameters. The parameters extracted include the number of bed exits per night, the bed exit weekly average (including minimum and maximum), the time of day of a particular exit, and the amount of uninterrupted bed occupancy per night. The design of a clinical user interface plays a significant role in the acceptance of such patient monitoring systems by clinicians. The clinician user interface proposed in this paper was designed to be intuitive, easy to navigate and not cause information overload. An iterative design methodology was used for the interface design. The interface design is extendible to incorporate data from multiple sensors. This allows the interface to be part of a comprehensive remote patient monitoring system.

  19. Effective affective user interface design in games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel; Wiles, Janet

    It is proposed that games, which are designed to generate positive affect, are most successful when they facilitate flow (Csikszentmihalyi 1992). Flow is a state of concentration, deep enjoyment, and total absorption in an activity. The study of games, and a resulting understanding of flow in games can inform the design of non-leisure software for positive affect. The paper considers the ways in which computer games contravene Nielsen's guidelines for heuristic evaluation (Nielsen and Molich 1990) and how these contraventions impact on flow. The paper also explores the implications for research that stem from the differences between games played on a personal computer and games played on a dedicated console. This research takes important initial steps towards defining how flow in computer games can inform affective design.

  20. Sharepoint 2013 branding and user interface design

    CERN Document Server

    Drisgill, Randy; Stubbs, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Plan, design, and launch a brand in SharePoint If you are planning, designing, and launching your brand using SharePoint, this book and author trio will walk you through everything you need to know in an understandable and approachable way. From specific technologies such as master pages, page layouts, and CSS to offering best-practices and real-world experience for creating successful branding projects through SharePoint 2013, you will learn how to approach your branding project in effective new ways. This visual book provides step-by-step instructions in a simple and striking format that f

  1. A lysinated thiophene-based semiconductor as a multifunctional neural bioorganic interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Simone; Pistone, Assunta; Brucale, Marco; Karges, Saskia; Favaretto, Laura; Zambianchi, Massimo; Posati, Tamara; Sagnella, Anna; Caprini, Marco; Toffanin, Stefano; Zamboni, Roberto; Camaioni, Nadia; Muccini, Michele; Melucci, Manuela; Benfenati, Valentina

    2015-06-03

    Lysinated molecular organic semiconductors are introduced as valuable multifunctional platforms for neural cells growth and interfacing. Cast films of quaterthiophene (T4) semiconductor covalently modified with lysine-end moieties (T4Lys) are fabricated and their stability, morphology, optical/electrical, and biocompatibility properties are characterized. T4Lys films exhibit fluorescence and electronic transport as generally observed for unsubstituted oligothiophenes combined to humidity-activated ionic conduction promoted by the charged lysine-end moieties. The Lys insertion in T4 enables adhesion of primary culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG), which is not achievable by plating cells on T4. Notably, on T4Lys, the number on adhering neurons/area is higher and displays a twofold longer neurite length than neurons plated on glass coated with poly-l-lysine. Finally, by whole-cell patch-clamp, it is shown that the biofunctionality of neurons cultured on T4Lys is preserved. The present study introduces an innovative concept for organic material neural interface that combines optical and iono-electronic functionalities with improved biocompatibility and neuron affinity promoted by Lys linkage and the softness of organic semiconductors. Lysinated organic semiconductors could set the scene for the fabrication of simplified bioorganic devices geometry for cells bidirectional communication or optoelectronic control of neural cells biofunctionality. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Persuasive interface: Designing for the WWW

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dormann, Claire

    1997-01-01

    The design of Web documents is approached from the perspective of visual rhetoric and important aspects of persuasive discourses (e.g. the role of emotion) are presented in connection with the World Wide Web (WWW). The origin of the rhetorical figures is first briefly outlined. Then, a few rhetor...

  3. Augmented reality as a design tool for mobile interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Olav Wedege; Nielsen, Christina

    2000-01-01

    applications derived from the classification of augmented reality interfaces. The focus on physical interaction with objects of work and with the mobile device provides us with a range of interaction styles, based on e.g. gestures and manipulation of objects. Furthermore, issues of transparency and directness......This paper challenges user interface paradigms for mobile devices, by using the technical classification of augmented reality interfaces as a thinking tool to develop ideas for interaction with mobile devices. The paper presents future work scenarios from a wastewater treatment plant embodying PDA...... are addressed. The future scenarios indicate that the concepts of augmented reality support solving context problems in mobile design....

  4. Knowledge-Based User-Computer Interface Design, Prototyping and Evaluation - the Design Pro Advisory System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andriole, Stephen

    1998-01-01

    ...) design, prototyping and evaluation. DesignPro permits designers of user computer interfaces to represent requirements, to build prototypes, and to evaluate their impact -- all via a "workbench" of user accessible functions...

  5. Integrated Human Factors Design Guidelines for Sound Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Woo Chang [Kumoh National Univ. of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-15

    Digital MMI, such as CRT, LCD etc., has been used increasingly in the design of main control room of the Korean standard nuclear power plants following the YGN units 3 and 4. The utilization of digital MMI may introduce various kind of sound interface into the control room design. In this project, for five top-level guideline items, including Sound Formats, Alarms, Sound Controls, Communications, and Environments, a total of 147 detail guidelines were developed and a database system for these guidelines was developed. The integrated human factors design guidelines for sound interface and the database system developed in this project will be useful for the design of sound interface of digital MMI in Korean NPPs.

  6. Designing Emotion Awareness Interface for Group Recommender Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Chen; Pearl Pu

    2014-01-01

    Group recommender systems help users to find items of interest collaboratively. Support for such collaboration has been mainly provided by interfaces that visualize membership awareness preference awareness and decision awareness. In this paper we are interested in investigating the roles of emotion awareness interfaces and how they may enable positive group influence. We first describe the design process behind an emotion annotation tool which we call CoFeel. We then show that it allows user...

  7. Context-Centric Design of Automotive Human-Machine Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Mercep, Ljubo

    2014-01-01

    Automotive human-machine interfaces are increasingly relying on situation awareness and context processing in order to improve the safety and user experience. This work suggests a context-centric approach to designing a human-machine interface, which places the focus on the context modelling and context usage. In the first step, a unified human-machine interaction strategy is defined. In the second step, the resulting requirements are analyzed and the appropriate solutions are implemented. ...

  8. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Pohlmeyer

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interface (BMI systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings. These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  9. Using reinforcement learning to provide stable brain-machine interface control despite neural input reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmeyer, Eric A; Mahmoudi, Babak; Geng, Shijia; Prins, Noeline W; Sanchez, Justin C

    2014-01-01

    Brain-machine interface (BMI) systems give users direct neural control of robotic, communication, or functional electrical stimulation systems. As BMI systems begin transitioning from laboratory settings into activities of daily living, an important goal is to develop neural decoding algorithms that can be calibrated with a minimal burden on the user, provide stable control for long periods of time, and can be responsive to fluctuations in the decoder's neural input space (e.g. neurons appearing or being lost amongst electrode recordings). These are significant challenges for static neural decoding algorithms that assume stationary input/output relationships. Here we use an actor-critic reinforcement learning architecture to provide an adaptive BMI controller that can successfully adapt to dramatic neural reorganizations, can maintain its performance over long time periods, and which does not require the user to produce specific kinetic or kinematic activities to calibrate the BMI. Two marmoset monkeys used the Reinforcement Learning BMI (RLBMI) to successfully control a robotic arm during a two-target reaching task. The RLBMI was initialized using random initial conditions, and it quickly learned to control the robot from brain states using only a binary evaluative feedback regarding whether previously chosen robot actions were good or bad. The RLBMI was able to maintain control over the system throughout sessions spanning multiple weeks. Furthermore, the RLBMI was able to quickly adapt and maintain control of the robot despite dramatic perturbations to the neural inputs, including a series of tests in which the neuron input space was deliberately halved or doubled.

  10. Ecological interface design for a power plant feedwater subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinadis, N.; Vicente, K. J.

    1996-02-01

    Virtually every major vendor of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is currently working on the design of advanced control rooms for their next generation of plants. Ecological interface design (EID) is a theoretical framework that has been developed to provide guidance in the design of these advanced control rooms. Previous research has applied and evaluated EID in the context of a small-scale, but representative, thermal-hydraulic process simulation. The purpose of this research was to apply the principles of EID to a larger-scale system that is more representative of the complexity of a NPP. A power plant feedwater subsystem was selected as the focus of the study. This paper briefly discusses the principles of EID, describes the design of an EID interface for a power plant feedwater subsystem, and identifies some lessons learned. The main findings of this study are: (1) a proof of concept showing that the principles of EID can be meaningfully applied to a larger-scale design problem representative of those found in the nuclear industry, (2) EID needs to be supplemented by more specific interface design principles, and (3) it is possible to effectively integrate EID with these other design principles. Therefore, EID seems to be a viable candidate for the design of advanced computer interfaces for NPPs.

  11. Designing a Facebook Interface for Senior Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of social networks by older adults has increased in recent years. However, many still cannot make use of social networks as these are simply not adapted to them. Through a series of direct observations, interviews, and focus groups, we identified recommendations for the design of social networks targeting seniors. Based on these, we developed a prototype for tablet devices, supporting sharing and viewing Facebook content. We then conducted a user study comparing our prototype with Facebook's native mobile application. We have found that Facebook's native application does not meet senior users concerns, like privacy and family focus, while our prototype, designed in accordance with the collected recommendations, supported relevant use cases in a usable and accessible manner.

  12. Auto-deleting brain machine interface: Error detection using spiking neural activity in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Chen, Nir; Stavisky, Sergey D; Kao, Jonathan C; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V

    2015-01-01

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) aim to assist people with paralysis by increasing their independence and ability to communicate, e.g., by using a cursor-based virtual keyboard. Current BMI clinical trials are hampered by modest performance that causes selection of wrong characters (errors) and thus reduces achieved typing rate. If it were possible to detect these errors without explicit knowledge of the task goal, this could be used to automatically "undo" wrong selections or even prevent upcoming wrong selections. We decoded imminent or recent errors during closed-loop BMI control from intracortical spiking neural activity. In our experiment, a non-human primate controlled a neurally-driven BMI cursor to acquire targets on a grid, which simulates a virtual keyboard. In offline analyses of this closed-loop BMI control data, we identified motor cortical neural signals indicative of task error occurrence. We were able to detect task outcomes (97% accuracy) and even predict upcoming task outcomes (86% accuracy) using neural activity alone. This novel strategy may help increase the performance and clinical viability of BMIs.

  13. Designing Interfaces for Astronaut Autonomy in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenius, Steve

    2015-01-01

    As we move towards human deep space missions, astronauts will no longer be able to say, Houston, we have a problem. The restricted contact with mission control because of the incredible distance from Earth will require astronauts to make autonomous decisions. How will astronauts take on the roles of mission control? This is an area of active research that has far reaching implications for the future of distant spaceflight. Come to this talk to hear how we are using design and user research to come up with innovative solutions for astronauts to effectively explore the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

  14. Designers' models of the human-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, Douglas J.; Breedin, Sarah D.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding design models of the human-computer interface (HCI) may produce two types of benefits. First, interface development often requires input from two different types of experts: human factors specialists and software developers. Given the differences in their backgrounds and roles, human factors specialists and software developers may have different cognitive models of the HCI. Yet, they have to communicate about the interface as part of the design process. If they have different models, their interactions are likely to involve a certain amount of miscommunication. Second, the design process in general is likely to be guided by designers' cognitive models of the HCI, as well as by their knowledge of the user, tasks, and system. Designers do not start with a blank slate; rather they begin with a general model of the object they are designing. The author's approach to a design model of the HCI was to have three groups make judgments of categorical similarity about the components of an interface: human factors specialists with HCI design experience, software developers with HCI design experience, and a baseline group of computer users with no experience in HCI design. The components of the user interface included both display components such as windows, text, and graphics, and user interaction concepts, such as command language, editing, and help. The judgments of the three groups were analyzed using hierarchical cluster analysis and Pathfinder. These methods indicated, respectively, how the groups categorized the concepts, and network representations of the concepts for each group. The Pathfinder analysis provides greater information about local, pairwise relations among concepts, whereas the cluster analysis shows global, categorical relations to a greater extent.

  15. Recasting brain-machine interface design from a physical control system perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yin; Chase, Steven M

    2015-10-01

    With the goal of improving the quality of life for people suffering from various motor control disorders, brain-machine interfaces provide direct neural control of prosthetic devices by translating neural signals into control signals. These systems act by reading motor intent signals directly from the brain and using them to control, for example, the movement of a cursor on a computer screen. Over the past two decades, much attention has been devoted to the decoding problem: how should recorded neural activity be translated into the movement of the cursor? Most approaches have focused on this problem from an estimation standpoint, i.e., decoders are designed to return the best estimate of motor intent possible, under various sets of assumptions about how the recorded neural signals represent motor intent. Here we recast the decoder design problem from a physical control system perspective, and investigate how various classes of decoders lead to different types of physical systems for the subject to control. This framework leads to new interpretations of why certain types of decoders have been shown to perform better than others. These results have implications for understanding how motor neurons are recruited to perform various tasks, and may lend insight into the brain's ability to conceptualize artificial systems.

  16. Application of design of experiments and artificial neural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. This paper discusses the use of Distance based optimal designs in the design of experiments (DOE) and artificial neural networks (ANN) in optimizing the stacking sequence for simply supported laminated composite plate under uniformly distributed load (UDL) for minimizing the deflections and stresses. A number ...

  17. Application of design of experiments and artificial neural networks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the use of Distance based optimal designs in the design of experiments (DOE) and artificial neural networks (ANN) in optimizing the stacking sequence for simply supported laminated composite plate under uniformly distributed load (UDL) for minimizing the deflections and stresses. A number of finite ...

  18. An interpenetrating, microstructurable and covalently attached conducting polymer hydrogel for neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, Carolin; Bruns, Michael; Lienkamp, Karen; Rühe, Jürgen; Asplund, Maria

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a new conducting polymer hydrogel (CPH) system, consisting of the synthetic hydrogel P(DMAA-co-5%MABP-co-2,5%SSNa) and the conducting polymer (CP) poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), intended as coating material for neural interfaces. The composite material can be covalently attached to the surface electrode, can be patterned by a photolithographic process to influence selected electrode sites only and forms an interpenetrating network. The hybrid material was characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV), impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which confirmed a homogeneous distribution of PEDOT throughout all CPH layers. The CPH exhibited a 2,5 times higher charge storage capacity (CSC) and a reduced impedance when compared to the bare hydrogel. Electrochemical stability was proven over at least 1000 redox cycles. Non-toxicity was confirmed using an elution toxicity test together with a neuroblastoma cell-line. The described material shows great promise for surface modification of neural probes making it possible to combine the beneficial properties of the hydrogel with the excellent electronic properties necessary for high quality neural microelectrodes. Conductive polymer hydrogels have emerged as a promising new class of materials to functionalize electrode surfaces for enhanced neural interfaces and drug delivery. Common weaknesses of such systems are delamination from the connection surface, and the lack of suitable patterning methods for confining the gel to the selected electrode site. Various studies have reported on conductive polymer hydrogels addressing one of these challenges. In this study we present a new composite material which offers, for the first time, the unique combination of properties: it can be covalently attached to the substrate, forms an interpenetrating network, shows excellent electrical properties and can be patterned via UV-irradiation through a structured mask. Copyright

  19. Point-and-click cursor control with an intracortical neural interface system by humans with tetraplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Phil; Simeral, John D; Hochberg, Leigh R; Donoghue, John P; Friehs, Gerhard M; Black, Michael J

    2011-04-01

    We present a point-and-click intracortical neural interface system (NIS) that enables humans with tetraplegia to volitionally move a 2-D computer cursor in any desired direction on a computer screen, hold it still, and click on the area of interest. This direct brain-computer interface extracts both discrete (click) and continuous (cursor velocity) signals from a single small population of neurons in human motor cortex. A key component of this system is a multi-state probabilistic decoding algorithm that simultaneously decodes neural spiking activity of a small population of neurons and outputs either a click signal or the velocity of the cursor. The algorithm combines a linear classifier, which determines whether the user is intending to click or move the cursor, with a Kalman filter that translates the neural population activity into cursor velocity. We present a paradigm for training the multi-state decoding algorithm using neural activity observed during imagined actions. Two human participants with tetraplegia (paralysis of the four limbs) performed a closed-loop radial target acquisition task using the point-and-click NIS over multiple sessions. We quantified point-and-click performance using various human-computer interaction measurements for pointing devices. We found that participants could control the cursor motion and click on specified targets with a small error rate (one participant). This study suggests that signals from a small ensemble of motor cortical neurons (∼40) can be used for natural point-and-click 2-D cursor control of a personal computer.

  20. Asynchronous BCI and local neural classifiers: an overview of the Adaptive Brain Interface project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, José del R; Mouriño, Josep

    2003-06-01

    In this communication, we give an overview of our work on an asynchronous brain-computer interface (where the subject makes self-paced decisions on when to switch from one mental task to the next) that responds every 0.5 s. A local neural classifier tries to recognize three different mental tasks; it may also respond "unknown" for uncertain samples as the classifier has incorporated statistical rejection criteria. We report our experience with 15 subjects. We also briefly describe two brain-actuated applications we have developed: a virtual keyboard and a mobile robot (emulating a motorized wheelchair).

  1. Feedback from Usability Evaluation to User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports from an exploratory study of means for providing feedback from a usability evaluation to the user interface designers. In this study, we conducted a usability evaluation of a mobile system that is used by craftsmen to register use of time and materials. The results of this eval......This paper reports from an exploratory study of means for providing feedback from a usability evaluation to the user interface designers. In this study, we conducted a usability evaluation of a mobile system that is used by craftsmen to register use of time and materials. The results...

  2. A wireless transmission neural interface system for unconstrained non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Leon, Jose A.; Parajuli, Arun; Franklin, Robert; Sorenson, Michael; Felleman, Daniel J.; Hansen, Bryan J.; Hu, Ming; Dragoi, Valentin

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Studying the brain in large animal models in a restrained laboratory rig severely limits our capacity to examine brain circuits in experimental and clinical applications. Approach. To overcome these limitations, we developed a high-fidelity 96-channel wireless system to record extracellular spikes and local field potentials from the neocortex. A removable, external case of the wireless device is attached to a titanium pedestal placed in the animal skull. Broadband neural signals are amplified, multiplexed, and continuously transmitted as TCP/IP data at a sustained rate of 24 Mbps. A Xilinx Spartan 6 FPGA assembles the digital signals into serial data frames for transmission at 20 kHz though an 802.11n wireless data link on a frequency-shift key-modulated signal at 5.7-5.8 GHz to a receiver up to 10 m away. The system is powered by two CR123A, 3 V batteries for 2 h of operation. Main results. We implanted a multi-electrode array in visual area V4 of one anesthetized monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) of a freely moving monkey (Macaca mulatta). The implanted recording arrays were electrically stable and delivered broadband neural data over a year of testing. For the first time, we compared dlPFC neuronal responses to the same set of stimuli (food reward) in restrained and freely moving conditions. Although we did not find differences in neuronal responses as a function of reward type in the restrained and unrestrained conditions, there were significant differences in correlated activity. This demonstrates that measuring neural responses in freely moving animals can capture phenomena that are absent in the traditional head-fixed paradigm. Significance. We implemented a wireless neural interface for multi-electrode recordings in freely moving non-human primates, which can potentially move systems neuroscience to a new direction by allowing one to record neural signals while animals interact with their environment.

  3. Neural Correlates of Phrase Quadrature Perception in Harmonic Rhythm: An EEG Study (Using a Brain-Computer Interface).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Martínez-Rodrigo, Arturo; Moncho-Bogani, José; Latorre, José Miguel; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio

    2017-11-13

    For the sake of establishing the neural correlates of phrase quadrature perception in harmonic rhythm, a musical experiment has been designed to induce music-evoked stimuli related to one important aspect of harmonic rhythm, namely the phrase quadrature. Brain activity is translated to action through electroencephalography (EEG) by using a brain-computer interface. The power spectral value of each EEG channel is estimated to obtain how power variance distributes as a function of frequency. The results of processing the acquired signals are in line with previous studies that use different musical parameters to induce emotions. Indeed, our experiment shows statistical differences in theta and alpha bands between the fulfillment and break of phrase quadrature, an important cue of harmonic rhythm, in two classical sonatas.

  4. Quantum neural network-based EEG filtering for a brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Vaibhav; Prasad, Girijesh; Coyle, Damien; Behera, Laxmidhar; McGinnity, Thomas Martin

    2014-02-01

    A novel neural information processing architecture inspired by quantum mechanics and incorporating the well-known Schrodinger wave equation is proposed in this paper. The proposed architecture referred to as recurrent quantum neural network (RQNN) can characterize a nonstationary stochastic signal as time-varying wave packets. A robust unsupervised learning algorithm enables the RQNN to effectively capture the statistical behavior of the input signal and facilitates the estimation of signal embedded in noise with unknown characteristics. The results from a number of benchmark tests show that simple signals such as dc, staircase dc, and sinusoidal signals embedded within high noise can be accurately filtered and particle swarm optimization can be employed to select model parameters. The RQNN filtering procedure is applied in a two-class motor imagery-based brain-computer interface where the objective was to filter electroencephalogram (EEG) signals before feature extraction and classification to increase signal separability. A two-step inner-outer fivefold cross-validation approach is utilized to select the algorithm parameters subject-specifically for nine subjects. It is shown that the subject-specific RQNN EEG filtering significantly improves brain-computer interface performance compared to using only the raw EEG or Savitzky-Golay filtered EEG across multiple sessions.

  5. Microfabrication, characterization and in vivo MRI compatibility of diamond microelectrodes array for neural interfacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hébert, Clément, E-mail: clement.hebert@cea.fr [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Warnking, Jan; Depaulis, Antoine [INSERM, U836, Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Garçon, Laurie Amandine [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); CEA/INAC/SPrAM/CREAB, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mermoux, Michel [Université Grenoble Alpes, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, LEPMI, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Eon, David [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Mailley, Pascal [CEA-LETI-DTBS Minatec, 17 rue des Martyres, 38054 Grenoble (France); Omnès, Franck [Institut Néel, CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing still requires highly stable and biocompatible materials, in particular for in vivo applications. Indeed, most of the currently used materials are degraded and/or encapsulated by the proximal tissue leading to a loss of efficiency. Here, we considered boron doped diamond microelectrodes to address this issue and we evaluated the performances of a diamond microelectrode array. We described the microfabrication process of the device and discuss its functionalities. We characterized its electrochemical performances by cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy in saline buffer and observed the typical diamond electrode electrochemical properties, wide potential window and low background current, allowing efficient electrochemical detection. The charge storage capacitance and the modulus of the electrochemical impedance were found to remain in the same range as platinum electrodes used for standard commercial devices. Finally we observed a reduced Magnetic Resonance Imaging artifact when the device was implanted on a rat cortex, suggesting that boron doped-diamond is a very promising electrode material allowing functional imaging. - Highlights: • Microfabrication of all-diamond microelectrode array • Evaluation of as-grown nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond for electrical neural interfacing • MRI compatibility of nanocrystalline boron-doped diamond.

  6. A 128-Channel Extreme Learning Machine-Based Neural Decoder for Brain Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi; Yao, Enyi; Basu, Arindam

    2016-06-01

    Currently, state-of-the-art motor intention decoding algorithms in brain-machine interfaces are mostly implemented on a PC and consume significant amount of power. A machine learning coprocessor in 0.35- μm CMOS for the motor intention decoding in the brain-machine interfaces is presented in this paper. Using Extreme Learning Machine algorithm and low-power analog processing, it achieves an energy efficiency of 3.45 pJ/MAC at a classification rate of 50 Hz. The learning in second stage and corresponding digitally stored coefficients are used to increase robustness of the core analog processor. The chip is verified with neural data recorded in monkey finger movements experiment, achieving a decoding accuracy of 99.3% for movement type. The same coprocessor is also used to decode time of movement from asynchronous neural spikes. With time-delayed feature dimension enhancement, the classification accuracy can be increased by 5% with limited number of input channels. Further, a sparsity promoting training scheme enables reduction of number of programmable weights by ≈ 2X.

  7. Ultra-low-power and robust digital-signal-processing hardware for implantable neural interface microsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, S; Chiel, H J; Bhunia, S

    2011-04-01

    Implantable microsystems for monitoring or manipulating brain activity typically require on-chip real-time processing of multichannel neural data using ultra low-power, miniaturized electronics. In this paper, we propose an integrated-circuit/architecture-level hardware design framework for neural signal processing that exploits the nature of the signal-processing algorithm. First, we consider different power reduction techniques and compare the energy efficiency between the ultra-low frequency subthreshold and conventional superthreshold design. We show that the superthreshold design operating at a much higher frequency can achieve comparable energy dissipation by taking advantage of extensive power gating. It also provides significantly higher robustness of operation and yield under large process variations. Next, we propose an architecture level preferential design approach for further energy reduction by isolating the critical computation blocks (with respect to the quality of the output signal) and assigning them higher delay margins compared to the noncritical ones. Possible delay failures under parameter variations are confined to the noncritical components, allowing graceful degradation in quality under voltage scaling. Simulation results using prerecorded neural data from the sea-slug (Aplysia californica) show that the application of the proposed design approach can lead to significant improvement in total energy, without compromising the output signal quality under process variations, compared to conventional design approaches.

  8. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genson, Kirsten Larson [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  9. Web Interface Design Principles for Adults' Self-Directed Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firat, Mehmet; Sakar, A. Nurhan; Kabakci Yurdakul, Isil

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important features which e-learning tools and environments must possess within the scope of lifelong learning is self-directed learning, which can be considered as a form of self-learning. The aim of this study was to determine, based on the views and recommendations of experts, interface design principles for the development of…

  10. Easier Said than Done: Practical Considerations in User Interface Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Raymond W., Jr.; Starbird, Robert F.

    1992-01-01

    Describes the redesign of a CD-ROM database interface by the Congressional Information Service (CIS) that addressed the needs of novice, casual, and expert searchers in academic libraries. Topics discussed include the user profile, the task profile, redesign goals, interaction style, menu design and implementation, system structure and the search…

  11. Design of a user interface for intuitive colonoscope control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuperij, Nicole; Reilink, Rob; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak; Broeders, Ivo Adriaan Maria Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to improve the efficiency and efficacy of the standard colonoscopy procedure. This is done by addressing the intuitiveness of colonoscope control. For this purpose an interface in the form of a grip was designed that allows the user to intuitively steer and drive the

  12. Circumventing Graphical User Interfaces in Chemical Engineering Plant Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romey, Noel; Schwartz, Rachel M.; Behrend, Douglas; Miao, Peter; Cheung, H. Michael; Beitle, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) are pervasive elements of most modern technical software and represent a convenient tool for student instruction. For example, GUIs are used for [chemical] process design software (e.g., CHEMCAD, PRO/II and ASPEN) typically encountered in the senior capstone course. Drag and drop aspects of GUIs are challenging for…

  13. A Chronically Implantable Bidirectional Neural Interface for Non-human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Komatsu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Optogenetics has potential applications in the study of epilepsy and neuroprostheses, and for studies on neural circuit dynamics. However, to achieve translation to clinical usage, optogenetic interfaces that are capable of chronic stimulation and monitoring with minimal brain trauma are required. We aimed to develop a chronically implantable device for photostimulation of the brain of non-human primates. We used a micro-light-emitting diode (LED array with a flexible polyimide film. The array was combined with a whole-cortex electrocorticographic (ECoG electrode array for simultaneous photostimulation and recording. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 was virally transduced into the cerebral cortex of common marmosets, and then the device was epidurally implanted into their brains. We recorded the neural activity during photostimulation of the awake monkeys for 4 months. The neural responses gradually increased after the virus injection for ~8 weeks and remained constant for another 8 weeks. The micro-LED and ECoG arrays allowed semi-invasive simultaneous stimulation and recording during long-term implantation in the brains of non-human primates. The development of this device represents substantial progress in the field of optogenetic applications.

  14. Fabrication and Microassembly of a mm-Sized Floating Probe for a Distributed Wireless Neural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pyungwoo Yeon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A new class of wireless neural interfaces is under development in the form of tens to hundreds of mm-sized untethered implants, distributed across the target brain region(s. Unlike traditional interfaces that are tethered to a centralized control unit and suffer from micromotions that may damage the surrounding neural tissue, the new free-floating wireless implantable neural recording (FF-WINeR probes will be stand-alone, directly communicating with an external interrogator. Towards development of the FF-WINeR, in this paper we describe the micromachining, microassembly, and hermetic packaging of 1-mm3 passive probes, each of which consists of a thinned micromachined silicon die with a centered Ø(diameter 130 μm through-hole, an Ø81 μm sharpened tungsten electrode, a 7-turn gold wire-wound coil wrapped around the die, two 0201 surface mount capacitors on the die, and parylene-C/Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS coating. The fabricated passive probe is tested under a 3-coil inductive link to evaluate power transfer efficiency (PTE and power delivered to a load (PDL for feasibility assessment. The minimum PTE/PDL at 137 MHz were 0.76%/240 μW and 0.6%/191 μW in the air and lamb head medium, respectively, with coil separation of 2.8 cm and 9 kΩ receiver (Rx loading. Six hermetically sealed probes went through wireless hermeticity testing, using a 2-coil inductive link under accelerated lifetime testing condition of 85 °C, 1 atm, and 100%RH. The mean-time-to-failure (MTTF of the probes at 37 °C is extrapolated to be 28.7 years, which is over their lifetime.

  15. Usability of JACO Arm Interfaces Designed with a User-Centred Design Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauzin, Damien; Vigouroux, Nadine; Vella, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Utility, usability and acceptability of robotic arm for helping motor impairment people (quadriplegic, muscular dystrophy, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis) must be improved. The robotic arm JACO of company ©Kinova is controlled by a joystick, sometimes unusable by patients. The IRIT laboratory has designed three types of virtual interfaces: one based on virtual keyboards and two others on Pie Menu concepts. These interfaces were designed by mean of a user centred design approach (UCDA) including brain storming, focus group, iterative prototyping and trials. Then an experiment is described with two patients (Spinal Muscular Atrophy and cerebral palsy). This experiment shows that the three interfaces designed by a UCDA are usable by them.

  16. Minimally-Invasive Neural Interface for Distributed Wireless Electrocorticogram Recording Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Il Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a minimally-invasive neural interface for distributed wireless electrocorticogram (ECoG recording systems. The proposed interface equips all necessary components for ECoG recording, such as the high performance front-end integrated circuits, a fabricated flexible microelectrode array, and wireless communication inside a miniaturized custom-made platform. The multiple units of the interface systems can be deployed to cover a broad range of the target brain region and transmit signals via a built-in intra-skin communication (ISCOM module. The core integrated circuit (IC consists of 16-channel, low-power push-pull double-gated preamplifiers, in-channel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADC with a single-clocked bootstrapping switch and a time-delayed control unit, an ISCOM module for wireless data transfer through the skin instead of a power-hungry RF wireless transmitter, and a monolithic voltage/current reference generator to support the aforementioned analog and mixed-signal circuit blocks. The IC was fabricated using 250 nm CMOS processes in an area of 3.2 × 0.9 mm2 and achieved the low-power operation of 2.5 µW per channel. Input-referred noise was measured as 5.62 µVrms for 10 Hz to 10 kHz and ENOB of 7.21 at 31.25 kS/s. The implemented system successfully recorded multi-channel neural activities in vivo from a primate and demonstrated modular expandability using the ISCOM with power consumption of 160 µW.

  17. Minimally-Invasive Neural Interface for Distributed Wireless Electrocorticogram Recording Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sun-Il; Park, Sung-Yun; Yoon, Euisik

    2018-01-17

    This paper presents a minimally-invasive neural interface for distributed wireless electrocorticogram (ECoG) recording systems. The proposed interface equips all necessary components for ECoG recording, such as the high performance front-end integrated circuits, a fabricated flexible microelectrode array, and wireless communication inside a miniaturized custom-made platform. The multiple units of the interface systems can be deployed to cover a broad range of the target brain region and transmit signals via a built-in intra-skin communication (ISCOM) module. The core integrated circuit (IC) consists of 16-channel, low-power push-pull double-gated preamplifiers, in-channel successive approximation register analog-to-digital converters (SAR ADC) with a single-clocked bootstrapping switch and a time-delayed control unit, an ISCOM module for wireless data transfer through the skin instead of a power-hungry RF wireless transmitter, and a monolithic voltage/current reference generator to support the aforementioned analog and mixed-signal circuit blocks. The IC was fabricated using 250 nm CMOS processes in an area of 3.2 × 0.9 mm² and achieved the low-power operation of 2.5 µW per channel. Input-referred noise was measured as 5.62 µVrms for 10 Hz to 10 kHz and ENOB of 7.21 at 31.25 kS/s. The implemented system successfully recorded multi-channel neural activities in vivo from a primate and demonstrated modular expandability using the ISCOM with power consumption of 160 µW.

  18. Automatic Data Collection Design for Neural Networks Detection of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in Nigeria, collecting fraudulent data is relatively difficult and the human labour involved is expensive and risky. This paper examines some formal procedures for data collection and proposes designing an automatic data collection system for detection of occupational frauds using artificial neural networks.

  19. Design of Fault Tolerant Network Interfaces for NoCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiorin, Leandro; Micconi, Laura; Sami, Mariagiovanna

    2011-01-01

    Networks-on-Chip (NoCs) appeared as a strategy to deal with the communication requirements of complex IP-based System-on-Chips. As the complexity of designs increases and the technology scales down into the deep-submicron domain, the probability of malfunctions and failures in the NoC components...... increases. This paper focuses on the study and evaluation of techniques for increasing reliability and resilience of Network Interfaces (NIs). NIs act as interfaces between IP cores and the communication infrastructure; a faulty behavior in them could affect therefore the overall system. In this work, we...

  20. Design of Jetty Piles Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjei Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the complication of jetty pile design process, artificial neural networks (ANN are adopted. To generate the training samples for training ANN, finite element (FE analysis was performed 50 times for 50 different design cases. The trained ANN was verified with another FE analysis case and then used as a structural analyzer. The multilayer neural network (MBPNN with two hidden layers was used for ANN. The framework of MBPNN was defined as the input with the lateral forces on the jetty structure and the type of piles and the output with the stress ratio of the piles. The results from the MBPNN agree well with those from FE analysis. Particularly for more complex modes with hundreds of different design cases, the MBPNN would possibly substitute parametric studies with FE analysis saving design time and cost.

  1. Interface Circuit Design for Frequency-Time Domain MEMS Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yurish, Sergey Y [Information Systems and Networks, National University Lviv Polytechnic, Bandera str., 12 Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine); Kirianaki, Nikolay V [International Frequency Sensor Association (IFSA), Bandera str., 12 Lviv, 79013 (Ukraine)

    2006-04-01

    The focus of this paper is to describe emerging techniques and methods for interface circuit design for frequency, period, duty-cycle or PWM output MEMS sensors. The designed module is intended for frequency-time parameters - to - digital conversion and communication functions and can be embedded into a SoC. The developed interface circuit provides technologies that both reduce the cost and time of SoC development and improve sensor system performance. Its revolutionary suite of technical products facilitates, for the first time, low-cost, time-efficient production of MEMS sensor applications. On the other hand the proposed design approach reduces the development time, risk and cost of sensor applications by to ten times.

  2. Interface design of VSOP'94 computer code for safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsir, Khairina; Yazid, Putranto Ilham; Andiwijayakusuma, D.; Wahanani, Nursinta Adi

    2014-09-01

    Today, most software applications, also in the nuclear field, come with a graphical user interface. VSOP'94 (Very Superior Old Program), was designed to simplify the process of performing reactor simulation. VSOP is a integrated code system to simulate the life history of a nuclear reactor that is devoted in education and research. One advantage of VSOP program is its ability to calculate the neutron spectrum estimation, fuel cycle, 2-D diffusion, resonance integral, estimation of reactors fuel costs, and integrated thermal hydraulics. VSOP also can be used to comparative studies and simulation of reactor safety. However, existing VSOP is a conventional program, which was developed using Fortran 65 and have several problems in using it, for example, it is only operated on Dec Alpha mainframe platforms and provide text-based output, difficult to use, especially in data preparation and interpretation of results. We develop a GUI-VSOP, which is an interface program to facilitate the preparation of data, run the VSOP code and read the results in a more user friendly way and useable on the Personal 'Computer (PC). Modifications include the development of interfaces on preprocessing, processing and postprocessing. GUI-based interface for preprocessing aims to provide a convenience way in preparing data. Processing interface is intended to provide convenience in configuring input files and libraries and do compiling VSOP code. Postprocessing interface designed to visualized the VSOP output in table and graphic forms. GUI-VSOP expected to be useful to simplify and speed up the process and analysis of safety aspects.

  3. A Digital Interface for the Part Designers and the Fixture Designers for a Reconfigurable Assembly System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishwa V. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a web-based framework for interfacing product designers and fixture designers to fetch the benefits of early supplier involvement (ESI to a reconfigurable assembly system (RAS. The interfacing of the two members requires four steps, namely, collaboration chain, fixture supplier selection, knowledge share, and accommodation of service facilities so as to produce multiple products on a single assembly line. The interfacing not only provokes concurrency in the activities of product and fixture designer but also enables the assembly systems to tackle the spatial and generational variety. Among the four stages of interfacing, two steps are characterized by optimization issues, one from the product customer side and the other from the fixture designer side. To impart promptness in the optimization and hence the interaction, computationally economic tools are also presented in the paper for both of the supplier selection and fixture design optimization.

  4. Surgeon Design Interface for Patient-Specific Concentric Tube Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tania K; Greer, Joseph D; Hsieh, Michael H; Okamura, Allison M

    2016-06-01

    Concentric tube robots have potential for use in a wide variety of surgical procedures due to their small size, dexterity, and ability to move in highly curved paths. Unlike most existing clinical robots, the design of these robots can be developed and manufactured on a patient- and procedure-specific basis. The design of concentric tube robots typically requires significant computation and optimization, and it remains unclear how the surgeon should be involved. We propose to use a virtual reality-based design environment for surgeons to easily and intuitively visualize and design a set of concentric tube robots for a specific patient and procedure. In this paper, we describe a novel patient-specific design process in the context of the virtual reality interface. We also show a resulting concentric tube robot design, created by a pediatric urologist to access a kidney stone in a pediatric patient.

  5. Intra-day signal instabilities affect decoding performance in an intracortical neural interface system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perge, János A.; Homer, Mark L.; Malik, Wasim Q.; Cash, Sydney; Eskandar, Emad; Friehs, Gerhard; Donoghue, John P.; Hochberg, Leigh R.

    2013-06-01

    Objective. Motor neural interface systems (NIS) aim to convert neural signals into motor prosthetic or assistive device control, allowing people with paralysis to regain movement or control over their immediate environment. Effector or prosthetic control can degrade if the relationship between recorded neural signals and intended motor behavior changes. Therefore, characterizing both biological and technological sources of signal variability is important for a reliable NIS. Approach. To address the frequency and causes of neural signal variability in a spike-based NIS, we analyzed within-day fluctuations in spiking activity and action potential amplitude recorded with silicon microelectrode arrays implanted in the motor cortex of three people with tetraplegia (BrainGate pilot clinical trial, IDE). Main results. 84% of the recorded units showed a statistically significant change in apparent firing rate (3.8 ± 8.71 Hz or 49% of the mean rate) across several-minute epochs of tasks performed on a single session, and 74% of the units showed a significant change in spike amplitude (3.7 ± 6.5 µV or 5.5% of mean spike amplitude). 40% of the recording sessions showed a significant correlation in the occurrence of amplitude changes across electrodes, suggesting array micro-movement. Despite the relatively frequent amplitude changes, only 15% of the observed within-day rate changes originated from recording artifacts such as spike amplitude change or electrical noise, while 85% of the rate changes most likely emerged from physiological mechanisms. Computer simulations confirmed that systematic rate changes of individual neurons could produce a directional ‘bias’ in the decoded neural cursor movements. Instability in apparent neuronal spike rates indeed yielded a directional bias in 56% of all performance assessments in participant cursor control (n = 2 participants, 108 and 20 assessments over two years), resulting in suboptimal performance in these sessions

  6. Connecting Neurons to a Mobile Robot: An In Vitro Bidirectional Neural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novellino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key properties of intelligent behaviors is the capability to learn and adapt to changing environmental conditions. These features are the result of the continuous and intense interaction of the brain with the external world, mediated by the body. For this reason x201C;embodiment” represents an innovative and very suitable experimental paradigm when studying the neural processes underlying learning new behaviors and adapting to unpredicted situations. To this purpose, we developed a novel bidirectional neural interface. We interconnected in vitro neurons, extracted from rat embryos and plated on a microelectrode array (MEA, to external devices, thus allowing real-time closed-loop interaction. The novelty of this experimental approach entails the necessity to explore different computational schemes and experimental hypotheses. In this paper, we present an open, scalable architecture, which allows fast prototyping of different modules and where coding and decoding schemes and different experimental configurations can be tested. This hybrid system can be used for studying the computational properties and information coding in biological neuronal networks with far-reaching implications for the future development of advanced neuroprostheses.

  7. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain–machine interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Bullard, A. J.; Tat, D. M.; Nu, C. S.; Vaskov, A.; Nason, S. R.; Thompson, D. E.; Bentley, J. N.; Patil, P. G.; Chestek, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Intracortical brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. Approach. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Main results. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys’ ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s‑1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. Significance. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We

  8. Neural control of finger movement via intracortical brain-machine interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z T; Schroeder, K E; Vu, P P; Bullard, A J; Tat, D M; Nu, C S; Vaskov, A; Nason, S R; Thompson, D E; Bentley, J N; Patil, P G; Chestek, C A

    2017-12-01

    Intracortical brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) are a promising source of prosthesis control signals for individuals with severe motor disabilities. Previous BMI studies have primarily focused on predicting and controlling whole-arm movements; precise control of hand kinematics, however, has not been fully demonstrated. Here, we investigate the continuous decoding of precise finger movements in rhesus macaques. In order to elicit precise and repeatable finger movements, we have developed a novel behavioral task paradigm which requires the subject to acquire virtual fingertip position targets. In the physical control condition, four rhesus macaques performed this task by moving all four fingers together in order to acquire a single target. This movement was equivalent to controlling the aperture of a power grasp. During this task performance, we recorded neural spikes from intracortical electrode arrays in primary motor cortex. Using a standard Kalman filter, we could reconstruct continuous finger movement offline with an average correlation of ρ  =  0.78 between actual and predicted position across four rhesus macaques. For two of the monkeys, this movement prediction was performed in real-time to enable direct brain control of the virtual hand. Compared to physical control, neural control performance was slightly degraded; however, the monkeys were still able to successfully perform the task with an average target acquisition rate of 83.1%. The monkeys' ability to arbitrarily specify fingertip position was also quantified using an information throughput metric. During brain control task performance, the monkeys achieved an average 1.01 bits s -1 throughput, similar to that achieved in previous studies which decoded upper-arm movements to control computer cursors using a standard Kalman filter. This is, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of brain control of finger-level fine motor skills. We believe that these results represent an important step

  9. Convolutional neural networks for P300 detection with application to brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecotti, Hubert; Gräser, Axel

    2011-03-01

    A Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a specific type of human-computer interface that enables the direct communication between human and computers by analyzing brain measurements. Oddball paradigms are used in BCI to generate event-related potentials (ERPs), like the P300 wave, on targets selected by the user. A P300 speller is based on this principle, where the detection of P300 waves allows the user to write characters. The P300 speller is composed of two classification problems. The first classification is to detect the presence of a P300 in the electroencephalogram (EEG). The second one corresponds to the combination of different P300 responses for determining the right character to spell. A new method for the detection of P300 waves is presented. This model is based on a convolutional neural network (CNN). The topology of the network is adapted to the detection of P300 waves in the time domain. Seven classifiers based on the CNN are proposed: four single classifiers with different features set and three multiclassifiers. These models are tested and compared on the Data set II of the third BCI competition. The best result is obtained with a multiclassifier solution with a recognition rate of 95.5 percent, without channel selection before the classification. The proposed approach provides also a new way for analyzing brain activities due to the receptive field of the CNN models.

  10. An investigation on effects of amputee's physiological parameters on maximum pressure developed at the prosthetic socket interface using artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Chitresh; Singh, Amit; Chaudhary, Himanshu; Unune, Deepak Rajendra

    2017-10-23

    Technological advances in prosthetics have attracted the curiosity of researchers in monitoring design and developments of the sockets to sustain maximum pressure without any soft tissue damage, skin breakdown, and painful sores. Numerous studies have been reported in the area of pressure measurement at the limb/socket interface, though, the relation between amputee's physiological parameters and the pressure developed at the limb/socket interface is still not studied. Therefore, the purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of patient-specific physiological parameters viz. height, weight, and stump length on the pressure development at the transtibial prosthetic limb/socket interface. Initially, the pressure values at the limb/socket interface were clinically measured during stance and walking conditions for different patients using strain gauges placed at critical locations of the stump. The measured maximum pressure data related to patient's physiological parameters was used to develop an artificial neural network (ANN) model. The effects of physiological parameters on the pressure development at the limb/socket interface were examined using the ANN model. The analyzed results indicated that the weight and stump length significantly affects the maximum pressure values. The outcomes of this work could be an important platform for the design and development of patient-specific prosthetic socket which can endure the maximum pressure conditions at stance and ambulation conditions.

  11. Design and Evaluation of Human System Interfaces (HSIs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In the safe operation of nuclear power plants and other complex process industries the performance of the control room crews plays an important role. In this respect a well-functioning and well-designed Human-System Interface (HSI) is crucial for safe and efficient operation of the plant. It is therefore essential that the design, development and evaluation of both control rooms and HSI-solutions are conducted in a well-structured way, applying sound human factors principles and guidelines in all phases of the HSI development process. Many nuclear power plants around the world are currently facing major modernisation of their control rooms. In this process computerised, screen-based HSIs replace old conventional operator interfaces. In new control rooms, both in the nuclear field and in other process industries, fully digital, screen-based control rooms are becoming the standard. It is therefore of particular importance to address the design and evaluation of screen-based HSIs in a systematic and consistent way in order to arrive at solutions which take proper advantage of the possibilities for improving operator support through the use of digital, screen-based HSIs, at the same time avoiding pitfalls and problems in the use of this technology. The Halden Reactor Project, in cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, organised an International Summer School on ''Design and Evaluation of Human-System Interfaces (HSIs)'' in Halden, Norway in the period August 25th - 29th, 2003. The Summer School addressed the different steps in design, development and evaluation of HSIs, and the human factors principles, standards and guidelines which should be followed in this process. The lectures comprised both theoretical background, as well as examples of good and bad HSI design, thereby providing practical advice in design and evaluation of operator interfaces and control room solutions to the participants in the Summer School. This CD contains the

  12. Design de interface do ambiente virtual HyperCAL online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaire Passos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A presente pesquisa objetiva propor uma metodologia que oriente o projeto de interface de ambiente virtual centrado no usuário que seja sistematizada como processo de produto com princípios de design de interação, considerando aspectos de usabilidade e ergonomia, de modo a favorecer o trabalho do usuário, permitindo a apropriação do conteúdo e a execução das tarefas através das funcionalidades do sistema. Para consecução do trabalho foram investigados: os elementos da experiência do usuário; as ferramentas de planejamento de produto; as técnicas engenharia de software; e os conceitos do design de interação. A validação da metodologia foi feita através do projeto de interface do módulo do desenvolvedor (professor/instrutor do HyperCalGD online. A interface projetada apresentou melhores condições para o desenvolvimento de materiais educacionais.

  13. Energy efficient neural stimulation: coupling circuit design and membrane biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutz, Thomas J; Ackermann, D Michael; Kilgore, Kevin L; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic levels of electrical current to neural tissue is a well-established treatment for numerous indications such as Parkinson's disease and chronic pain. While the neuromodulation medical device industry has experienced steady clinical growth over the last two decades, much of the core technology underlying implanted pulse generators remain unchanged. In this study we propose some new methods for achieving increased energy-efficiency during neural stimulation. The first method exploits the biophysical features of excitable tissue through the use of a centered-triangular stimulation waveform. Neural activation with this waveform is achieved with a statistically significant reduction in energy compared to traditional rectangular waveforms. The second method demonstrates energy savings that could be achieved by advanced circuitry design. We show that the traditional practice of using a fixed compliance voltage for constant-current stimulation results in substantial energy loss. A portion of this energy can be recuperated by adjusting the compliance voltage to real-time requirements. Lastly, we demonstrate the potential impact of axon fiber diameter on defining the energy-optimal pulse-width for stimulation. When designing implantable pulse generators for energy efficiency, we propose that the future combination of a variable compliance system, a centered-triangular stimulus waveform, and an axon diameter specific stimulation pulse-width has great potential to reduce energy consumption and prolong battery life in neuromodulation devices.

  14. Neural network design for J function approximation in dynamic programming

    CERN Document Server

    Pang, X

    1998-01-01

    This paper shows that a new type of artificial neural network (ANN) -- the Simultaneous Recurrent Network (SRN) -- can, if properly trained, solve a difficult function approximation problem which conventional ANNs -- either feedforward or Hebbian -- cannot. This problem, the problem of generalized maze navigation, is typical of problems which arise in building true intelligent control systems using neural networks. (Such systems are discussed in the chapter by Werbos in K.Pribram, Brain and Values, Erlbaum 1998.) The paper provides a general review of other types of recurrent networks and alternative training techniques, including a flowchart of the Error Critic training design, arguable the only plausible approach to explain how the brain adapts time-lagged recurrent systems in real-time. The C code of the test is appended. As in the first tests of backprop, the training here was slow, but there are ways to do better after more experience using this type of network.

  15. On the design of script languages for neural simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    In neural network simulators, models are specified according to a language, either specific or based on a general programming language (e.g. Python). There are also ongoing efforts to develop standardized languages, for example NeuroML. When designing these languages, efforts are often focused on expressivity, that is, on maximizing the number of model types than can be described and simulated. I argue that a complementary goal should be to minimize the cognitive effort required on the part of the user to use the language. I try to formalize this notion with the concept of "language entropy", and I propose a few practical guidelines to minimize the entropy of languages for neural simulation.

  16. An architecture for designing fuzzy logic controllers using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1991-01-01

    Described here is an architecture for designing fuzzy controllers through a hierarchical process of control rule acquisition and by using special classes of neural network learning techniques. A new method for learning to refine a fuzzy logic controller is introduced. A reinforcement learning technique is used in conjunction with a multi-layer neural network model of a fuzzy controller. The model learns by updating its prediction of the plant's behavior and is related to the Sutton's Temporal Difference (TD) method. The method proposed here has the advantage of using the control knowledge of an experienced operator and fine-tuning it through the process of learning. The approach is applied to a cart-pole balancing system.

  17. Volunteers Oriented Interface Design for the Remote Navigation of Rescue Robots at Large-Scale Disaster Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixiao; Ito, Kazuyuki; Saijo, Kazuhiko; Hirotsune, Kazuyuki; Gofuku, Akio; Matsuno, Fumitoshi

    This paper aims at constructing an efficient interface being similar to those widely used in human daily life, to fulfill the need of many volunteer rescuers operating rescue robots at large-scale disaster sites. The developed system includes a force feedback steering wheel interface and an artificial neural network (ANN) based mouse-screen interface. The former consists of a force feedback steering control and a six monitors’ wall. It provides a manual operation like driving cars to navigate a rescue robot. The latter consists of a mouse and a camera’s view displayed in a monitor. It provides a semi-autonomous operation by mouse clicking to navigate a rescue robot. Results of experiments show that a novice volunteer can skillfully navigate a tank rescue robot through both interfaces after 20 to 30 minutes of learning their operation respectively. The steering wheel interface has high navigating speed in open areas, without restriction of terrains and surface conditions of a disaster site. The mouse-screen interface is good at exact navigation in complex structures, while bringing little tension to operators. The two interfaces are designed to switch into each other at any time to provide a combined efficient navigation method.

  18. Design Through Manufacturing: The Solid Model - Finite Element Analysis Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Carol

    2003-01-01

    State-of-the-art computer aided design (CAD) presently affords engineers the opportunity to create solid models of machine parts which reflect every detail of the finished product. Ideally, these models should fulfill two very important functions: (1) they must provide numerical control information for automated manufacturing of precision parts, and (2) they must enable analysts to easily evaluate the stress levels (using finite element analysis - FEA) for all structurally significant parts used in space missions. Today's state-of-the-art CAD programs perform function (1) very well, providing an excellent model for precision manufacturing. But they do not provide a straightforward and simple means of automating the translation from CAD to FEA models, especially for aircraft-type structures. The research performed during the fellowship period investigated the transition process from the solid CAD model to the FEA stress analysis model with the final goal of creating an automatic interface between the two. During the period of the fellowship a detailed multi-year program for the development of such an interface was created. The ultimate goal of this program will be the development of a fully parameterized automatic ProE/FEA translator for parts and assemblies, with the incorporation of data base management into the solution, and ultimately including computational fluid dynamics and thermal modeling in the interface.

  19. Radial basis function (RBF) neural network control for mechanical systems design, analysis and Matlab simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jinkun

    2013-01-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) Neural Network Control for Mechanical Systems is motivated by the need for systematic design approaches to stable adaptive control system design using neural network approximation-based techniques. The main objectives of the book are to introduce the concrete design methods and MATLAB simulation of stable adaptive RBF neural control strategies. In this book, a broad range of implementable neural network control design methods for mechanical systems are presented, such as robot manipulators, inverted pendulums, single link flexible joint robots, motors, etc. Advanced neural network controller design methods and their stability analysis are explored. The book provides readers with the fundamentals of neural network control system design.   This book is intended for the researchers in the fields of neural adaptive control, mechanical systems, Matlab simulation, engineering design, robotics and automation. Jinkun Liu is a professor at Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronauti...

  20. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hennessy, John L

    1994-01-01

    Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface presents the interaction between hardware and software at a variety of levels, which offers a framework for understanding the fundamentals of computing. This book focuses on the concepts that are the basis for computers.Organized into nine chapters, this book begins with an overview of the computer revolution. This text then explains the concepts and algorithms used in modern computer arithmetic. Other chapters consider the abstractions and concepts in memory hierarchies by starting with the simplest possible cache. This book di

  1. The Copyright/Design Interface in Denmark (and Scandinavia)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schovsbo, Jens Hemmingsen; Rosenmeier, Morten

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the interface in copyright and design law in Denmark and with accounts also for Norway and Sweden. It is pointed out how Scandinavian courts have historically employed several strategies to limit copyright protection of works of applied art including 1) “raising the bar......” to keep works with “clear functional intentions” out of copyright (as seen in Norway and until recently also in Sweden) and 2) narrowing the scope of protection (seen in all three nations). It is finally pointed out how, presently, it is doubtful to what extent the de-velopment in EU law will allow...

  2. Improving the Interplay between Usability Evaluation and User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbæk, K.; Stage, Jan

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of a full-day workshop that was held on October 23 2004 in connection with the Third Nordic Conference on Human Computer Interaction (Nordichi 2004). The proceedings from the workshop are available from http://www.cs.aau.dk/~jans/events.html. The ideas and theme...... of the workshop are motivated and an outline of the contents of the papers that were presented in the workshop is given. In addition we summarize some challenges to the interplay between usability evaluation and user interface design agreed upon at the workshop, as well as some solutions that were debated....

  3. Impact of mental representational systems on design interface.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown-VanHoozer, S. A.

    1998-02-25

    The purpose of the studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory is to understand the impact mental representational systems have in identifying how user comfort parameters influence how information is to best be presented. By understanding how each individual perceives information based on the three representational systems (visual, auditory and kinesthetic modalities), it has been found that a different approach must be taken in the design of interfaces resulting in an outcome that is much more effective and representative of the users mental model. This paper will present current findings and future theories to be explored.

  4. Ensemble of Neural Network Conditional Random Fields for Self-Paced Brain Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bashashati

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Classification of EEG signals in self-paced Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI is an extremely challenging task. The main difficulty stems from the fact that start time of a control task is not defined. Therefore it is imperative to exploit the characteristics of the EEG data to the extent possible. In sensory motor self-paced BCIs, while performing the mental task, the user’s brain goes through several well-defined internal state changes. Applying appropriate classifiers that can capture these state changes and exploit the temporal correlation in EEG data can enhance the performance of the BCI. In this paper, we propose an ensemble learning approach for self-paced BCIs. We use Bayesian optimization to train several different classifiers on different parts of the BCI hyper- parameter space. We call each of these classifiers Neural Network Conditional Random Field (NNCRF. NNCRF is a combination of a neural network and conditional random field (CRF. As in the standard CRF, NNCRF is able to model the correlation between adjacent EEG samples. However, NNCRF can also model the nonlinear dependencies between the input and the output, which makes it more powerful than the standard CRF. We compare the performance of our algorithm to those of three popular sequence labeling algorithms (Hidden Markov Models, Hidden Markov Support Vector Machines and CRF, and to two classical classifiers (Logistic Regression and Support Vector Machines. The classifiers are compared for the two cases: when the ensemble learning approach is not used and when it is. The data used in our studies are those from the BCI competition IV and the SM2 dataset. We show that our algorithm is considerably superior to the other approaches in terms of the Area Under the Curve (AUC of the BCI system.

  5. DataHigh: Graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Butler, Zachary S.; Churchland, Mark M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Yu, Byron M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Analyzing and interpreting the activity of a heterogeneous population of neurons can be challenging, especially as the number of neurons, experimental trials, and experimental conditions increases. One approach is to extract a set of latent variables that succinctly captures the prominent co-fluctuation patterns across the neural population. A key problem is that the number of latent variables needed to adequately describe the population activity is often greater than three, thereby preventing direct visualization of the latent space. By visualizing a small number of 2-d projections of the latent space or each latent variable individually, it is easy to miss salient features of the population activity. Approach To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (called DataHigh) that allows the user to quickly and smoothly navigate through a continuum of different 2-d projections of the latent space. We also implemented a suite of additional visualization tools (including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses) and an optional tool for performing dimensionality reduction. Main results To demonstrate the utility and versatility of DataHigh, we used it to analyze single-trial spike count and single-trial timecourse population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded using single electrodes. Significance DataHigh was developed to fulfill a need for visualization in exploratory neural data analysis, which can provide intuition that is critical for building scientific hypotheses and models of population activity. PMID:24216250

  6. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A Wenzel

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG. Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI, because it would allow software to adapt to the user's interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli.Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions.Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG.The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI.

  7. Coping with human errors through system design: Implications for ecological interface design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Vicente, Kim J.

    1989-01-01

    Research during recent years has revealed that human errors are not stochastic events which can be removed through improved training programs or optimal interface design. Rather, errors tend to reflect either systematic interference between various models, rules, and schemata, or the effects of t...... on both the interferences causing error and on the opportunity for error recovery left to the operator.......Research during recent years has revealed that human errors are not stochastic events which can be removed through improved training programs or optimal interface design. Rather, errors tend to reflect either systematic interference between various models, rules, and schemata, or the effects...... of the adaptive mechanisms involved in learning. In terms of design implications, these findings suggest that reliable human-system interaction will be achieved by designing interfaces which tend to minimize the potential for control interference and support recovery from errors. In other words, the focus should...

  8. Inclusive Smartphone Interface Design in Context: Co(Re)designing the PIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Paul; Ward, Gillian; Moody, Louise; Roebuck, Annette

    2017-01-01

    User-context optimises smartphone interface-design. Neglect of user-context during development, delays or prevents marginalised-consumer benefit. Working with People with Learning Disability (PWLD) to develop interfaces refined by communication-need will improve User-Experience (UX). In research, a Participant Information Sheet (PIS) discloses planned study-activity. This paper explains co-creation of a PIS based on communication-need of PWLD.

  9. Hybrid neural network model for the design of beam subjected to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper demonstrates the applicability of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Genetic Algorithms (GA) for the design of beams subjected to moment and shear. A hybrid neural network model which combines the features of feed forward neural networks and genetic algorithms has been developed for the design of beam ...

  10. Rating User Interface and Universal Instructional Design in MOOC Course Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Meyer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how college students rate Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs in terms of User Interface Design and Universal Instructional Design. The research participants were 115 undergraduate students from a public midwestern university in the United States. Each participant evaluated three randomly chosen MOOCs, all of which were developed on the Coursera platform, using rubrics for User Interface Design and Universal Instructional Design. The results indicated that students had an overall positive impression of each MOOC’s course design. This study concludes that overall course design strategies are not associated with the massive dropout rates currently documented in MOOC learning environments. The authors suggest the use of appropriate instructional design principles be further explored

  11. SAGE III on ISS Lessons Learned on Thermal Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) instrument - the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring vertical distribution of aerosols, ozone, and other trace gases in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere - is currently scheduled for delivery to the International Space Station (ISS) via the SpaceX Dragon vehicle in 2016. The Instrument Adapter Module (IAM), one of many SAGE III subsystems, continuously dissipates a considerable amount of thermal energy during mission operations. Although a portion of this energy is transferred via its large radiator surface area, the majority must be conductively transferred to the ExPRESS Payload Adapter (ExPA) to satisfy thermal mitigation requirements. The baseline IAM-ExPA mechanical interface did not afford the thermal conductance necessary to prevent the IAM from overheating in hot on-orbit cases, and high interfacial conductance was difficult to achieve given the large span between mechanical fasteners, less than stringent flatness specifications, and material usage constraints due to strict contamination requirements. This paper will examine the evolution of the IAM-ExPA thermal interface over the course of three design iterations and will include discussion on design challenges, material selection, testing successes and failures, and lessons learned.

  12. A WEARABLE NEURAL INTERFACE FOR REAL TIME TRANSLATION OF SPANISH DEAF SIGN LANGUAGE TO VOICE AND WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hidalgo-Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a work related to the design and implementation of a communication tool for persons withspeech and hearing disabilities. This tool provides to the user a Human-Computer interface capable of the captureand recognition of gestures belonging to the Mexican Spanish Sign Alphabet. To capture the manual expressions, adata-glove constructed to sense the position of fifteen articulations of one of the user’s hand is described. Alocation system that detects the position and movements of the hand with respect to the user’s body is alsoconstructed. The data-glove and location system signals are processed by a pair of programmable automatons. Theautomaton’s outputs are sent to a personal computer that realizes the gesture recognition and interpretation tasks.Artificial neural network techniques are utilized to implement the mappings of the space of information generatedby the instruments to the interpretation space, where the representation of the gestures are found. Once a gestureis captured and interpreted, it is presented in written form through a screen mounted in the clothes of the user,and in verbal form by a speaker.

  13. Studying the glial cell response to biomaterials and surface topography for improving the neural electrode interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ereifej, Evon S.

    Neural electrode devices hold great promise to help people with the restoration of lost functions, however, research is lacking in the biomaterial design of a stable, long-term device. Current devices lack long term functionality, most have been found unable to record neural activity within weeks after implantation due to the development of glial scar tissue (Polikov et al., 2006; Zhong and Bellamkonda, 2008). The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar made up of reactive astrocytes and the matrix proteins they generate (Polikov et al., 2005; Seil and Webster, 2008). Scarring is initiated when a device is inserted into brain tissue and is associated with an inflammatory response. Activated astrocytes are hypertrophic, hyperplastic, have an upregulation of intermediate filaments GFAP and vimentin expression, and filament formation (Buffo et al., 2010; Gervasi et al., 2008). Current approaches towards inhibiting the initiation of glial scarring range from altering the geometry, roughness, size, shape and materials of the device (Grill et al., 2009; Kotov et al., 2009; Kotzar et al., 2002; Szarowski et al., 2003). Literature has shown that surface topography modifications can alter cell alignment, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and gene expression (Agnew et al., 1983; Cogan et al., 2005; Cogan et al., 2006; Merrill et al., 2005). Thus, the goals of the presented work are to study the cellular response to biomaterials used in neural electrode fabrication and assess surface topography effects on minimizing astrogliosis. Initially, to examine astrocyte response to various materials used in neural electrode fabrication, astrocytes were cultured on platinum, silicon, PMMA, and SU-8 surfaces, with polystyrene as the control surface. Cell proliferation, viability, morphology and gene expression was measured for seven days in vitro. Results determined the cellular characteristics, reactions and growth rates of astrocytes

  14. Organizing engineering / industrial design interface for innovation : Lessons from the Renault "Design Fundamentals" process

    OpenAIRE

    Hirt, Olivier

    2003-01-01

    This text relates an innovative process carried out jointly by Renault both engineering and industrial design departments, which has showed the possibility of a new form of cooperation, and drawn the outlines of a new model for the design / engineering interface organization. While being a form of rationalization of the design / engineering relationship within new logics of the car development process, this model also constitutes a framework for managing the development of innovative concepts...

  15. Exploring Interaction Space as Abstraction Mechanism for Task-Based User Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C. M.; Overgaard, M.; Pedersen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    Designing a user interface is often a complex undertaking. Model-based user interface design is an approach where models and mappings between them form the basis for creating and specifying the design of a user interface. Such models usually include descriptions of the tasks of the prospective user......, but there is considerable variation in the other models that are employed. This paper explores the extent to which the notion of interaction space is useful as an abstraction mechanism to reduce the complexity of creating and specifying a user interface design. We present how we designed a specific user interface through...... mechanism that can help user interface designers exploit object-oriented analysis results and reduce the complexity of designing a user interface....

  16. The design of Jemboss: a graphical user interface to EMBOSS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Tim; Bleasby, Alan

    2003-09-22

    Jemboss is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the European Molecular Biology Open Software Suite (EMBOSS). It is being developed at the MRC UK HGMP-RC as part of the EMBOSS project. This paper explains the technical aspects of the Jemboss client-server design. The client-server model optionally allows that a Jemboss user have an account on the remote server. The Jemboss client is written in Java and is downloaded automatically to a user's workstation via Java Web Start using the HTML protocol. The client then communicates with the remote server using SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol). A Tomcat server listens on the remote machine and communicates the SOAP requests to a Jemboss server, again written in Java. This Java server interprets the client requests and executes them through Java Native Interface (JNI) code written in the C language. Another C program having setuid privilege, jembossctl, is called by the JNI code to perform the client requests under the user's account on the server. The commands include execution of EMBOSS applications, file management and project management tasks. Jemboss allows the use of JSSE for encryption of communication between the client and server. The GUI parses the EMBOSS Ajax Command Definition language for form generation and maximum input flexibility. Jemboss interacts directly with the EMBOSS libraries to allow dynamic generation of application default settings. This interface is part of the EMBOSS distribution and has attracted much interest. It has been set up at many other sites globally as well as being used at the HGMP-RC for registered users. The software, EMBOSS and Jemboss, is freely available to academics and commercial users under the GPL licence. It can be downloaded from the EMBOSS ftp server: http://www.uk.embnet.org/Software/EMBOSS/, ftp://ftp.uk.embnet.org/pub/EMBOSS/. Registered HGMP-RC users can access an installed server from: http://www.uk.embnet.org/Software/EMBOSS/Jemboss/

  17. Controlling selective stimulations below a spinal cord hemisection using brain recordings with a neural interface system approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetsos, Fivos; Sanchez-Jimenez, Abel; Torets, Carlos; Largo, Carla; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-08-01

    In this work we address the use of realtime cortical recordings for the generation of coherent, reliable and robust motor activity in spinal-lesioned animals through selective intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS). The spinal cord of adult rats was hemisectioned and groups of multielectrodes were implanted in both the central nervous system (CNS) and the spinal cord below the lesion level to establish a neural system interface (NSI). To test the reliability of this new NSI connection, highly repeatable neural responses recorded from the CNS were used as a pattern generator of an open-loop control strategy for selective ISMS of the spinal motoneurons. Our experimental procedure avoided the spontaneous non-controlled and non-repeatable neural activity that could have generated spurious ISMS and the consequent undesired muscle contractions. Combinations of complex CNS patterns generated precisely coordinated, reliable and robust motor actions.

  18. In vivo electrical conductivity across critical nerve gaps using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-coated neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Brent M; Urbanchek, Melanie G; Peramo, Antonio; Richardson-Burns, Sarah M; Martin, David C; Kipke, Daryl R; Kuzon, William M; Cederna, Paul S

    2010-12-01

    Bionic limbs require sensitive, durable, and physiologically relevant bidirectional control interfaces. Modern central nervous system interfacing is high risk, low fidelity, and failure prone. Peripheral nervous system interfaces will mitigate this risk and increase fidelity by greatly simplifying signal interpretation and delivery. This study evaluates in vivo relevance of a hybrid peripheral nervous system interface consisting of biological acellular muscle scaffolds made electrically conductive using poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene). Peripheral nervous system interfaces were tested in vivo using the rat hind-limb conduction-gap model for motor (peroneal) and sensory (sural) nerves. Experimental groups included acellular muscle, iron(III) chloride-treated acellular muscle, and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polymerized on acellular muscle, each compared with intact nerve, autogenous nerve graft, and empty (nonreconstructed) nerve gap controls (n=5 for each). Interface lengths tested included 0, 5, 10, and 20 mm. Immediately following implantation, the interface underwent electrophysiologic characterization in vivo using nerve conduction studies, compound muscle action potentials, and antidromic sensory nerve action potentials. Both efferent and afferent electrophysiology demonstrates acellular muscle-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) interfaces conduct physiologic action potentials across nerve conduction gaps of at least 20 mm with amplitude and latency not differing from intact nerve or nerve grafts, with the exception of increased velocity in the acellular muscle-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) interfaces. Nonmetallic, biosynthetic acellular muscle-poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) peripheral nervous system interfaces both sense and stimulate physiologically relevant efferent and afferent action potentials in vivo. This demonstrates their relevance not only as a nerve-electronic coupling device capable of reaching the long-sought goal of closed-loop neural

  19. Designer interface peptide grafts target estrogen receptor alpha dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, S. [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Asare, B.K. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States); Biswas, P.K., E-mail: pbiswas@tougaloo.edu [Laboratory of Computational Biophysics & Bioengineering, Department of Physics, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Rajnarayanan, R.V., E-mail: rajendra@buffalo.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214 (United States)

    2016-09-09

    The nuclear transcription factor estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), triggered by its cognate ligand estrogen, regulates a variety of cellular signaling events. ERα is expressed in 70% of breast cancers and is a widely validated target for anti-breast cancer drug discovery. Administration of anti-estrogen to block estrogen receptor activation is still a viable anti-breast cancer treatment option but anti-estrogen resistance has been a significant bottle-neck. Dimerization of estrogen receptor is required for ER activation. Blocking ERα dimerization is therefore a complementary and alternative strategy to combat anti-estrogen resistance. Dimer interface peptide “I-box” derived from ER residues 503–518 specifically blocks ER dimerization. Recently using a comprehensive molecular simulation we studied the interaction dynamics of ERα LBDs in a homo-dimer. Based on this study, we identified three interface recognition peptide motifs LDKITDT (ERα residues 479–485), LQQQHQRLAQ (residues 497–506), and LSHIRHMSNK (residues 511–520) and reported the suitability of using LQQQHQRLAQ (ER 497–506) as a template to design inhibitors of ERα dimerization. Stability and self-aggregation of peptide based therapeutics poses a significant bottle-neck to proceed further. In this study utilizing peptide grafted to preserve their pharmacophoric recognition motif and assessed their stability and potential to block ERα mediated activity in silico and in vitro. The Grafted peptides blocked ERα mediated cell proliferation and viability of breast cancer cells but did not alter their apoptotic fate. We believe the structural clues identified in this study can be used to identify novel peptidometics and small molecules that specifically target ER dimer interface generating a new breed of anti-cancer agents. - Highlights: • Designer peptide grafts retain core molecular recognition motif during MD simulations. • Designer peptide grafts with Poly-ALA helix form stable

  20. Operator interface design for a PACS primary diagnosis workstation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Rick H.; Neubecker, Cynthia S.; Keller, Scott A.; Steinke, James E.

    1990-08-01

    One of the challenges to the PACS workstation designer is to cost effectively fulfill the range of requirements from those of the entry-level system to those of the fully digital hospital. The workstation must therefore support many of the functions of film-based image storage and image information systems. A primary diagnosis workstation must support rapid selection and viewing of patient examination folders. The user must easily and rapidly sequence through a stack of examinations. Activities such as printing films, archiving images, and retrieving older examinations must be initiated easily, without interfering with the diagnostic use of the workstation. Some of these functions are executed by the workstation itself while others are performed by service nodes on the PACS network. The workstation's user interface must make the architecture of the system transparent, providing access to the services while concealing the complexity of their accomplishment. This paper discusses the approach taken to the user interface of a commercial PACS primary diagnosis workstation. This workstation may be configured as an entry-level PACS or as a single workstation in a very complex system. Local image storage, retrieval, archiving and display functions will be described. Networking with modalities, image storage systems and image management systems will also be discussed.

  1. Design and implementation of a random neural network routing engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, T; Seeber, J; Terzioglu, H

    2003-01-01

    Random neural network (RNN) is an analytically tractable spiked neural network model that has been implemented in software for a wide range of applications for over a decade. This paper presents the hardware implementation of the RNN model. Recently, cognitive packet networks (CPN) is proposed as an alternative packet network architecture where there is no routing table, instead the RNN based reinforcement learning is used to route packets. Particularly, we describe implementation details for the RNN based routing engine of a CPN network processor chip: the smart packet processor (SPP). The SPP is a dual port device that stores, modifies, and interprets the defining characteristics of multiple RNN models. In addition to hardware design improvements over the software implementation such as the dual access memory, output calculation step, and reduced output calculation module, this paper introduces a major modification to the reinforcement learning algorithm used in the original CPN specification such that the number of weight terms are reduced from 2n/sup 2/ to 2n. This not only yields significant memory savings, but it also simplifies the calculations for the steady state probabilities (neuron outputs in RNN). Simulations have been conducted to confirm the proper functionality for the isolated SPP design as well as for the multiple SPP's in a networked environment.

  2. Designing with the mind in mind simple guide to understanding user interface design guidelines

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    In this completely updated and revised edition of Designing with the Mind in Mind, Jeff Johnson provides you with just enough background in perceptual and cognitive psychology that user interface (UI) design guidelines make intuitive sense rather than being just a list or rules to follow. Early UI practitioners were trained in cognitive psychology, and developed UI design rules based on it. But as the field has evolved since the first edition of this book, designers enter the field from many disciplines. Practitioners today have enough experience in UI design that they have been exposed to

  3. Neural architecture design based on extreme learning machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno-Crespo, Andrés; García-Laencina, Pedro J; Sancho-Gómez, José-Luis

    2013-12-01

    Selection of the optimal neural architecture to solve a pattern classification problem entails to choose the relevant input units, the number of hidden neurons and its corresponding interconnection weights. This problem has been widely studied in many research works but their solutions usually involve excessive computational cost in most of the problems and they do not provide a unique solution. This paper proposes a new technique to efficiently design the MultiLayer Perceptron (MLP) architecture for classification using the Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) algorithm. The proposed method provides a high generalization capability and a unique solution for the architecture design. Moreover, the selected final network only retains those input connections that are relevant for the classification task. Experimental results show these advantages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A design of an interface board between a MRC thermistor probe and a personal computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The main purpose of this project was to design and build a prototype of an interface board between an MRC temperature probe : (thermistor array) and a personal laptop computer. This interface board replaces and significantly improve the capabilities ...

  5. Interface Heuristics and Style Guide Design: An Air Battle Management Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, W. T; Bolia, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a human-machine interface style guide designed to promote a common look and feel among operator interfaces employed by air battle managers in the United States...

  6. Brain-computer interface design using alpha wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-bin; Wang, Hong; Liu, Chong; Li, Chun-sheng

    2010-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) is a novel communication system that translates brain activity into commands for a computer or other electronic devices. BCI system based on non-invasive scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) has become a hot research area in recent years. BCI technology can help improve the quality of life and restore function for people with severe motor disabilities. In this study, we design a real-time asynchronous BCI system using Alpha wave. The basic theory of this BCI system is alpha wave-block phenomenon. Alpha wave is the most prominent wave in the whole realm of brain activity. This system includes data acquisition, feature selection and classification. The subject can use this system easily and freely choose anyone of four commands with only short-time training. The results of the experiment show that this BCI system has high classification accuracy, and has potential application for clinical engineering and is valuable for further research.

  7. Top ten list of user-hostile interface design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.P.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes ten of the most frequent ergonomic problems found in human-computer interfaces (HCIs) associated with complex industrial machines. In contrast with being thought of as ``user friendly,`` many of these machines are seen as exhibiting ``user-hostile`` attributes by the author. The historical lack of consistent application of ergonomic principles in the HCIs has led to a breed of very sophisticated, complex manufacturing equipment that few people can operate without extensive orientation, training, or experience. This design oversight has produced the need for extensive training programs and help documentation, unnecessary machine downtime, and reduced productivity resulting from operator stress and confusion. Ergonomic considerations affect industrial machines in at least three important areas: (1) the physical package including CRT and keyboard, maintenance access areas, and dedicated hardware selection, layout, and labeling; (2) the software by which the user interacts with the computer that controls the equipment; and (3) the supporting documentation.

  8. Designing Guiding Systems for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmyna, Nataliya; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2017-01-01

    Brain–Computer Interface (BCI) community has focused the majority of its research efforts on signal processing and machine learning, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. Guiding users on how to use a BCI is crucial in order to teach them to produce stable brain patterns. In this work, we explore the instructions and feedback for BCIs in order to provide a systematic taxonomy to describe the BCI guiding systems. The purpose of our work is to give necessary clues to the researchers and designers in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI) in making the fusion between BCIs and HCI more fruitful but also to better understand the possibilities BCIs can provide to them. PMID:28824400

  9. Designing Guiding Systems for Brain-Computer Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Kosmyna

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Brain–Computer Interface (BCI community has focused the majority of its research efforts on signal processing and machine learning, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. Guiding users on how to use a BCI is crucial in order to teach them to produce stable brain patterns. In this work, we explore the instructions and feedback for BCIs in order to provide a systematic taxonomy to describe the BCI guiding systems. The purpose of our work is to give necessary clues to the researchers and designers in Human–Computer Interaction (HCI in making the fusion between BCIs and HCI more fruitful but also to better understand the possibilities BCIs can provide to them.

  10. Neural Network Assisted Experimental Designs for Food Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Ramaswamy

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of artificial neural networks (ANN in predicting full factorial data from the fractional data corresponding to some of the commonly used experimental designs is explored in this paper. Factorial and fractional factorial designs such as L8, L9, L18, and Box and Behnken schemes were considered both in their original form and with some variations (L8+6, L15 and L9+1. Full factorial (3 factors x 5 levels and fractional data were generated employing sixteen different mathematical equations (four in each category: linear, with and without interactions, and non-linear, with and without interactions. Different ANN models were trained and the best model was chosen for each equation based on their ability to predict the fractional data. The best experimental design was then chosen based on their ability to simulate the full- factorial data for each equation. In several cases, the mean relative errors with the L18 design (which had more input data than other models were even higher than with other smaller fractional design. In general, the ANN assisted Lm, Box and Behnken, L15 and L18 designs were found to predict the full factorial data reasonably well with errors less than 5 %. The L8+6 model performed well with several experimental datasets reported in the literature.

  11. User interface inspection methods a user-centered design method

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Chauncey

    2014-01-01

    User Interface Inspection Methods succinctly covers five inspection methods: heuristic evaluation, perspective-based user interface inspection, cognitive walkthrough, pluralistic walkthrough, and formal usability inspections. Heuristic evaluation is perhaps the best-known inspection method, requiring a group of evaluators to review a product against a set of general principles. The perspective-based user interface inspection is based on the principle that different perspectives will find different problems in a user interface. In the related persona-based inspection, colleagues assume the

  12. Physics and Its Interfaces with Medicinal Chemistry and Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ricardo N.; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2013-08-01

    Medicinal chemistry is a multidisciplinary subject that integrates knowledge from a variety of fields of science, including, but not limited to, chemistry, biology, and physics. The area of drug design involves the cooperative work of scientists with a diverse range of backgrounds and technical skills, trying to tackle complex problems using an integration of approaches and methods. One important contribution to this field comes from physics through studies that attempt to identify and quantify the molecular interactions between small molecules (drugs) and biological targets (receptors), such as the forces that govern the interactions, the thermodynamics of the drug-receptor interactions, and so on. In this context, the interfaces of physics, medicinal chemistry, and drug design are of vital importance for the development of drugs that not only have the right chemistry but also the right intermolecular properties to interact at the macromolecular level, providing useful information about the principles and molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of drugs. This article highlights some of the most important connections between physics and medicinal chemistry in the design of new drugs.

  13. A Function-Behavior-State Approach to Designing Human Machine Interface for Nuclear Power Plant Operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Zhang, W. J.

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents an approach to human-machine interface design for control room operators of nuclear power plants. The first step in designing an interface for a particular application is to determine information content that needs to be displayed. The design methodology for this step is called the interface design framework (called framework ). Several frameworks have been proposed for applications at varying levels, including process plants. However, none is based on the design and manufacture of a plant system for which the interface is designed. This paper presents an interface design framework which originates from design theory and methodology for general technical systems. Specifically, the framework is based on a set of core concepts of a function-behavior-state model originally proposed by the artificial intelligence research community and widely applied in the design research community. Benefits of this new framework include the provision of a model-based fault diagnosis facility, and the seamless integration of the design (manufacture, maintenance) of plants and the design of human-machine interfaces. The missing linkage between design and operation of a plant was one of the causes of the Three Mile Island nuclear reactor incident. A simulated plant system is presented to explain how to apply this framework in designing an interface. The resulting human-machine interface is discussed; specifically, several fault diagnosis examples are elaborated to demonstrate how this interface could support operators' fault diagnosis in an unanticipated situation.

  14. Neural Control of a Tracking Task via Attention-Gated Reinforcement Learning for Brain-Machine Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Fang; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Zhang, Shaomin; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2015-05-01

    Reinforcement learning (RL)-based brain machine interfaces (BMIs) enable the user to learn from the environment through interactions to complete the task without desired signals, which is promising for clinical applications. Previous studies exploited Q-learning techniques to discriminate neural states into simple directional actions providing the trial initial timing. However, the movements in BMI applications can be quite complicated, and the action timing explicitly shows the intention when to move. The rich actions and the corresponding neural states form a large state-action space, imposing generalization difficulty on Q-learning. In this paper, we propose to adopt attention-gated reinforcement learning (AGREL) as a new learning scheme for BMIs to adaptively decode high-dimensional neural activities into seven distinct movements (directional moves, holdings and resting) due to the efficient weight-updating. We apply AGREL on neural data recorded from M1 of a monkey to directly predict a seven-action set in a time sequence to reconstruct the trajectory of a center-out task. Compared to Q-learning techniques, AGREL could improve the target acquisition rate to 90.16% in average with faster convergence and more stability to follow neural activity over multiple days, indicating the potential to achieve better online decoding performance for more complicated BMI tasks.

  15. Augmenting intracortical brain-machine interface with neurally driven error detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Chen, Nir; Stavisky, Sergey D.; Kao, Jonathan C.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Making mistakes is inevitable, but identifying them allows us to correct or adapt our behavior to improve future performance. Current brain–machine interfaces (BMIs) make errors that need to be explicitly corrected by the user, thereby consuming time and thus hindering performance. We hypothesized that neural correlates of the user perceiving the mistake could be used by the BMI to automatically correct errors. However, it was unknown whether intracortical outcome error signals were present in the premotor and primary motor cortices, brain regions successfully used for intracortical BMIs. Approach. We report here for the first time a putative outcome error signal in spiking activity within these cortices when rhesus macaques performed an intracortical BMI computer cursor task. Main results. We decoded BMI trial outcomes shortly after and even before a trial ended with 96% and 84% accuracy, respectively. This led us to develop and implement in real-time a first-of-its-kind intracortical BMI error ‘detect-and-act’ system that attempts to automatically ‘undo’ or ‘prevent’ mistakes. The detect-and-act system works independently and in parallel to a kinematic BMI decoder. In a challenging task that resulted in substantial errors, this approach improved the performance of a BMI employing two variants of the ubiquitous Kalman velocity filter, including a state-of-the-art decoder (ReFIT-KF). Significance. Detecting errors in real-time from the same brain regions that are commonly used to control BMIs should improve the clinical viability of BMIs aimed at restoring motor function to people with paralysis.

  16. DataHigh: graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R; Kaufman, Matthew T; Churchland, Mark M; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V; Yu, Byron M

    2012-01-01

    The activity of tens to hundreds of neurons can be succinctly summarized by a smaller number of latent variables extracted using dimensionality reduction methods. These latent variables define a reduced-dimensional space in which we can study how population activity varies over time, across trials, and across experimental conditions. Ideally, we would like to visualize the population activity directly in the reduced-dimensional space, whose optimal dimensionality (as determined from the data) is typically greater than 3. However, direct plotting can only provide a 2D or 3D view. To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (GUI) that allows the user to quickly navigate through a continuum of different 2D projections of the reduced-dimensional space. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of this GUI, we applied it to visualize population activity recorded in premotor and motor cortices during reaching tasks. Examples include single-trial population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded sequentially using single electrodes. Because any single 2D projection may provide a misleading impression of the data, being able to see a large number of 2D projections is critical for intuition-and hypothesis-building during exploratory data analysis. The GUI includes a suite of additional interactive tools, including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses. The use of visualization tools like the GUI developed here, in tandem with dimensionality reduction methods, has the potential to further our understanding of neural population activity.

  17. Designing Artificial Neural Networks Using Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garro, Beatriz A; Vázquez, Roberto A

    2015-01-01

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) design is a complex task because its performance depends on the architecture, the selected transfer function, and the learning algorithm used to train the set of synaptic weights. In this paper we present a methodology that automatically designs an ANN using particle swarm optimization algorithms such as Basic Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), Second Generation of Particle Swarm Optimization (SGPSO), and a New Model of PSO called NMPSO. The aim of these algorithms is to evolve, at the same time, the three principal components of an ANN: the set of synaptic weights, the connections or architecture, and the transfer functions for each neuron. Eight different fitness functions were proposed to evaluate the fitness of each solution and find the best design. These functions are based on the mean square error (MSE) and the classification error (CER) and implement a strategy to avoid overtraining and to reduce the number of connections in the ANN. In addition, the ANN designed with the proposed methodology is compared with those designed manually using the well-known Back-Propagation and Levenberg-Marquardt Learning Algorithms. Finally, the accuracy of the method is tested with different nonlinear pattern classification problems.

  18. Design and Fabrication of Nanodevice for Cell Interfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnappan, Prema

    The goal of this thesis is to (a) design and fabricate a nanodevice that interface with cells and (b) optimize neuronal cell culturing protocol. The long term objective of this thesis is to perform intracellular electrical signal recording and stimulation of neuronal cells. To achieve this objective, a nanodevice with "Fin" shaped electrodes was designed that increases the electrode area and conductance so that it reduces the signal loss as shown in the case of traditional circular Nanopillar design. The overarching goal of neuroscience is to target and discover the relationships between the functional connectivity-map of neuronal circuits and their physiological or pathological functions. For recording large number of neurons, technologies such as gold mushroom-shaped microelectrodes (Hai et al.), vertical nanowire electrode arrays (VNEAs) (Robinson et al.) and nanoFET technology (Tian et al.) are currently under development. The gold mushroom-shaped electrodes in order of microns are invasive for smaller cells with no successful recording for long durations. The VNEAs show high electrode impedance which causes large signal loss. The nanoFET shows higher noise levels and the manipulation of a single nanotube to penetrate a single cell is very challenging. This thesis presents the design and fabrication of a "Fin" shaped nanoelectrode which seeks to overcome the restrictions between electrode impedance and electrode size. Compared to the 3x3 array of 200nm diameter nanowire electrodes, the "Fin" electrodes reduces the interfacial impedance. The fabrication was done in Silicon on insulator wafer with conducting lines and contact pads completely insulated by Silicon dioxide layer and gold coated nanofins. Nanofins of width 200 nm were fabricated using Focused Ion Beam (FIB) milling. Both high density and low density nanofins were optimized and cells were cultured over them. The optimization of cell culture, adherence and differentiation protocols were done to grow

  19. Neural correlates of learning in an electrocorticographic motor-imagery brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Tim M.; Miller, Kai J.; Rao, Rajesh P. N.; Ojemann, Jeffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    Human subjects can learn to control a one-dimensional electrocorticographic (ECoG) brain-computer interface (BCI) using modulation of primary motor (M1) high-gamma activity (signal power in the 75–200 Hz range). However, the stability and dynamics of the signals over the course of new BCI skill acquisition have not been investigated. In this study, we report 3 characteristic periods in evolution of the high-gamma control signal during BCI training: initial, low task accuracy with corresponding low power modulation in the gamma spectrum, followed by a second period of improved task accuracy with increasing average power separation between activity and rest, and a final period of high task accuracy with stable (or decreasing) power separation and decreasing trial-to-trial variance. These findings may have implications in the design and implementation of BCI control algorithms. PMID:25599079

  20. A framework of interface improvements for designing new user interfaces for the MANUS robot arm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsma, H.A.; Liefhebber, F.; Herder, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Users of the MANUS robot arm experience a high cognitive and physical load when performing activities of daily living with the arm. These high loads originate from user interface problems and limitations. To reduce these high loads the user interface of the MANUS needs to be improved. Because large

  1. Spatial issues in user interface design from a graphic design perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    The user interface of a computer system is a visual display that provides information about the status of operations on data within the computer and control options to the user that enable adjustments to these operations. From the very beginning of computer technology the user interface was a spatial display, although its spatial features were not necessarily complex or explicitly recognized by the users. All text and nonverbal signs appeared in a virtual space generally thought of as a single flat plane of symbols. Current technology of high performance workstations permits any element of the display to appear as dynamic, multicolor, 3-D signs in a virtual 3-D space. The complexity of appearance and the user's interaction with the display provide significant challenges to the graphic designer of current and future user interfaces. In particular, spatial depiction provides many opportunities for effective communication of objects, structures, processes, navigation, selection, and manipulation. Issues are presented that are relevant to the graphic designer seeking to optimize the user interface's spatial attributes for effective visual communication.

  2. Websites for children: search strategies and interface design. Three studies on children's search performance and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochmann-Mannak, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Children experience all kinds of problems using search interfaces for adults such as Google. The research reported in this dissertation is about the design of informational interfaces for children between 8 and 12 years old. The goal of the research was to learn more about interfaces that ‘work’ for

  3. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sagar; Lo, Meng-Chen; Damodaran, Vinod B.; Kaplan, Hilton M.; Kohn, Joachim; Zahn, Jeffrey D.; Shreiber, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM) to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (probe length were the most important features in influencing insertion potential. The model also revealed the effects of manufacturing flaws on insertion potential. PMID:26959021

  4. DESIGN OF A VISUAL INTERFACE FOR ANN BASED SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan BAYINDIR

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence application methods have been used for control of many systems with parallel of technological development besides conventional control techniques. Increasing of artificial intelligence applications have required to education in this area. In this paper, computer based an artificial neural network (ANN software has been presented to learning and understanding of artificial neural networks. By means of the developed software, the training of the artificial neural network according to the inputs provided and a test action can be performed by changing the components such as iteration number, momentum factor, learning ratio, and efficiency function of the artificial neural networks. As a result of the study a visual education set has been obtained that can easily be adapted to the real time application.

  5. Grid Interface Design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC)

    CERN Document Server

    Jankovic, Maria; Clare, Jon; Wheeler, Pat; Aguglia, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the grid interface challenges for CERN’s proposed Compact Linear Colliders’ (CLIC) klystron modulators, including a 280 MW power system optimisation. The modular multilevel converter is evaluated as a candidate topology for a Medium Voltage grid interface along with a control method for reducing the impact of klystron modulators on the electrical network.

  6. A 128-Channel FPGA-Based Real-Time Spike-Sorting Bidirectional Closed-Loop Neural Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongkil; Kim, Gookhwa; Jung, Sang-Don

    2017-12-01

    A multichannel neural interface system is an important tool for various types of neuroscientific studies. For the electrical interface with a biological system, high-precision high-speed data recording and various types of stimulation capability are required. In addition, real-time signal processing is an important feature in the implementation of a real-time closed-loop system without unwanted substantial delay for feedback stimulation. Online spike sorting, the process of assigning neural spikes to an identified group of neurons or clusters, is a necessary step to make a closed-loop path in real time, but massive memory-space requirements commonly limit hardware implementations. Here, we present a 128-channel field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based real-time closed-loop bidirectional neural interface system. The system supports 128 channels for simultaneous signal recording and eight selectable channels for stimulation. A modular 64-channel analog front-end (AFE) provides scalability and a parameterized specification of the AFE supports the recording of various electrophysiological signal types with 1.59 ± 0.76 root-mean-square noise. The stimulator supports both voltage-controlled and current-controlled arbitrarily shaped waveforms with the programmable amplitude and duration of pulse. An empirical algorithm for online real-time spike sorting is implemented in an FPGA. The spike-sorting is performed by template matching, and templates are created by an online real-time unsupervised learning process. A memory saving technique, called dynamic cache organizing, is proposed to reduce the memory requirement down to 6 kbit per channel and modular implementation improves the scalability for further extensions.

  7. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  8. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intan Af'idah, Dwi; Didik Widianto, Eko; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  9. A Framework for Effective User Interface Design for Web-Based Electronic Commerce Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Burns

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficient delivery of relevant product information is increasingly becoming the central basis of competition between firms. The interface design represents the central component for successful information delivery to consumers. However, interface design for web-based information systems is probably more an art than a science at this point in time. Much research is needed to understand properties of an effective interface for electronic commerce. This paper develops a framework identifying the relationship between user factors, the role of the user interface and overall system success for web-based electronic commerce. The paper argues that web-based systems for electronic commerce have some similar properties to decision support systems (DSS and adapts an established DSS framework to the electronic commerce domain. Based on a limited amount of research studying web browser interface design, the framework identifies areas of research needed and outlines possible relationships between consumer characteristics, interface design attributes and measures of overall system success.

  10. Conceptualization and application of an approach for designing healthcare software interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajit; Maskara, Reena; Maskara, Sanjeev; Chiang, I-Jen

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study is to conceptualize a novel approach, which facilitates us to design prototype interfaces for healthcare software. Concepts and techniques from various disciplines were used to conceptualize an interface design approach named MORTARS (Map Original Rhetorical To Adapted Rhetorical Situation). The concepts and techniques included in this approach are (1) rhetorical situation - a concept of philosophy provided by Bitzer (1968); (2) move analysis - an applied linguistic technique provided by Swales (1990) and Bhatia (1993); (3) interface design guidelines - a cognitive and computer science concept provided by Johnson (2010); (4) usability evaluation instrument - an interface evaluation questionnaire provided by Lund (2001); (5) user modeling via stereotyping - a cognitive and computer science concept provided by Rich (1979). A prototype interface for outpatient clinic software was designed to introduce the underlying concepts of MORTARS. The prototype interface was evaluated by thirty-two medical informaticians. The medical informaticians found the designed prototype interface to be useful (73.3%), easy to use (71.9%), easy to learn (93.1%), and satisfactory (53.2%). MORTARS approach was found to be effective in designing the prototype user interface for the outpatient clinic software. This approach might be further used to design interfaces for various software pertaining to healthcare and other domains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport and metabolism at blood-brain interfaces and in neural cells: relevance to bilirubin-induced encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia eGazzin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bilirubin, the end-product of heme catabolism, circulates in non pathological plasma mostly as a protein-bound species. When bilirubin concentration builds up, the free fraction of the molecule increases. Unbound bilirubin then diffuses across blood-brain interfaces into the brain, where it accumulates and exerts neurotoxic effects. In this classical view of bilirubin neurotoxicity, blood-brain interfaces act merely as structural barriers impeding the penetration of the pigment-bound carrier protein, and neural cells are considered as passive targets of its toxicity. Yet, the role of blood-brain interfaces in the occurrence of bilirubin encephalopathy appears more complex than being simple barriers to the diffusion of bilirubin, and neural cells such as astrocytes and neurons can play an active role in controlling the balance between the neuroprotective and neurotoxic effects of bilirubin. This article reviews the emerging in vivo and in vitro data showing that transport and metabolic detoxification mechanisms at the blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers may modulate bilirubin flux across both cellular interfaces, and that these protective functions can be affected in chronic hyperbilirubinemia. Then the in vivo and in vitro arguments in favor of the physiological antioxidant function of intracerebral bilirubin are presented, as well as with the potential role of transporters such as ABCC-1 and metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P-450 in setting the cerebral cell- and structure-specific toxicity of bilirubin following hyperbilirubinemia. The relevance of these data to the pathophysiology of bilirubin-induced neurological diseases is discussed.

  12. Does this interface make my sensor look bad? Basic principles for designing usable, useful interfaces for sensor technology operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Laura A.; Berg, Leif; Butler, Karin; Klein, Laura

    2017-05-01

    Even as remote sensing technology has advanced in leaps and bounds over the past decade, the remote sensing community lacks interfaces and interaction models that facilitate effective human operation of our sensor platforms. Interfaces that make great sense to electrical engineers and flight test crews can be anxiety-inducing to operational users who lack professional experience in the design and testing of sophisticated remote sensing platforms. In this paper, we reflect on an 18-month collaboration which our Sandia National Laboratory research team partnered with an industry software team to identify and fix critical issues in a widely-used sensor interface. Drawing on basic principles from cognitive and perceptual psychology and interaction design, we provide simple, easily learned guidance for minimizing common barriers to system learnability, memorability, and user engagement.

  13. A Framework for Effective User Interface Design for Web-Based Electronic Commerce Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Justyna Burns; Madey, Gregory R.

    2001-01-01

    Efficient delivery of relevant product information is increasingly becoming the central basis of competition between firms. The interface design represents the central component for successful information delivery to consumers. However, interface design for web-based information systems is probably more an art than a science at this point in time. Much research is needed to understand properties of an effective interface for electronic commerce. This paper develops a framework identifying the...

  14. Two-dimensional neural field simulator with parameter interface and 3D visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Eric; Hutt, Axel

    2014-01-01

    International audience; A simulator calculating two-dimensional dynamic neural fields with multiple order derivatives is presented in this work. The simulated neural fields are of the type ... where I, L and S are respectively a field's input, spatial delay kernel with axonal transmission speed c and nonlinear firing rate function S = S0 / (1 + exp(-α(V-Θ)). A Fast Fourier Transform in space is used to accelerate the integral calculation. The stochastic differential equation is useful for stu...

  15. A Fully Integrated Wireless Compressed Sensing Neural Signal Acquisition System for Chronic Recording and Brain Machine Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Xiong, Tao; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Chin, Peter S; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Tran, Trac D; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2016-07-18

    Reliable, multi-channel neural recording is critical to the neuroscience research and clinical treatment. However, most hardware development of fully integrated, multi-channel wireless neural recorders to-date, is still in the proof-of-concept stage. To be ready for practical use, the trade-offs between performance, power consumption, device size, robustness, and compatibility need to be carefully taken into account. This paper presents an optimized wireless compressed sensing neural signal recording system. The system takes advantages of both custom integrated circuits and universal compatible wireless solutions. The proposed system includes an implantable wireless system-on-chip (SoC) and an external wireless relay. The SoC integrates 16-channel low-noise neural amplifiers, programmable filters and gain stages, a SAR ADC, a real-time compressed sensing module, and a near field wireless power and data transmission link. The external relay integrates a 32 bit low-power microcontroller with Bluetooth 4.0 wireless module, a programming interface, and an inductive charging unit. The SoC achieves high signal recording quality with minimized power consumption, while reducing the risk of infection from through-skin connectors. The external relay maximizes the compatibility and programmability. The proposed compressed sensing module is highly configurable, featuring a SNDR of 9.78 dB with a compression ratio of 8×. The SoC has been fabricated in a 180 nm standard CMOS technology, occupying 2.1 mm × 0.6 mm silicon area. A pre-implantable system has been assembled to demonstrate the proposed paradigm. The developed system has been successfully used for long-term wireless neural recording in freely behaving rhesus monkey.

  16. Design and development of interface design principles for complex documentation using PDAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Polun; Hsu, Chiao-Ling; Liou, Yiing Mei; Kuo, Yu-Yin; Lan, Chung-Fu

    2011-03-01

    The screen interface has been believed to be the major barrier for the adoption of PDAs in healthcare. The study objectives were to design a set of screen interface design principles for complex documentation using PDAs and to examine nurses' perception of the ease of use and usefulness of the application. A 21-page Chinese version of the interRAI MDS-HC home-care assessment tool composed of more than 250 assessment questions was used for the application. A WiFi Palm-based PDA was used. A convenience sample of 60 subjects, primarily nurses newly trained to use the MDS-HC assessment tool, were invited to evaluate the PDA system in terms of Davis' Technology Acceptance Model. The final information structure of the PDA application consisted of 18 categories composed of 262 questions over 63 screens. Subjects could move to any assessment question in less than two taps without a memory burden and finish the question in one tap. Respectively, close to 95% and 93% of the subjects agreed that, overall, the system was easy to use and useful for their work. We conclude the screen interface challenge for complex documentation using PDAs can be improved and managed to achieve to a very high usability.

  17. From Fulcher to PLEVALEX: Issues in Interface Design, Validity and Reliability in Internet Based Language Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Laborda, Jesus

    2007-01-01

    Interface design and ergonomics, while already studied in much of educational theory, have not until recently been considered in language testing (Fulcher, 2003). In this paper, we revise the design principles of PLEVALEX, a fully operational prototype Internet based language testing platform. Our focus here is to show PLEVALEX's interfaces and…

  18. Guideline for the Graphic Design of Web Application for Children’s Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Tengku Siti Meriam Tengku Wook; Siti Salwah Salim

    2013-01-01

    There have been numerous studies done on the guidelines of user interface, but only a number of them have considered specific guidelines for the design of children’s interface. This paper is about a research on the specific guidelines for children, focusing on the criteria of graphic design. The objective of this research is to study on the guidelines of user interface design and to develop specific guidelines on children’s graphic design. The criteria of graphic design are the priority of th...

  19. Interface diagram: Design tool for supporting the development of modularity in complex product systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Hans Peter Lomholt; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Harlou, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    . This article presents a visual design tool –the Interface diagram– which aims to support the engineering process of developing modularity in complex product systems. The tool is a model of a product system representing the arrangement of its elements and their interfaces. The tool has similar characteristics...... the activity of decomposing a product system into modules consisting of components developed by different engineering teams. The usefulness of the Interface diagram has been tested in an industrial development project showing positive results of shortening the lead time and minimising rework. Moreover......, the Interface diagram has been used in interplay with a broader Product Lifecycle Management system. This allows the product structures from the Interface diagram to be enriched with detailed product documentation like computer-aided design, requirements, view models, design specifications and interface...

  20. Design and evaluation of neural classifiers application to skin lesion classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hintz-Madsen, Mads; Hansen, Lars Kai; Larsen, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Addresses design and evaluation of neural classifiers for the problem of skin lesion classification. By using Gauss Newton optimization for the entropic cost function in conjunction with pruning by Optimal Brain Damage and a new test error estimate, the authors show that this scheme is capable...... of optimizing the architecture of neural classifiers. Furthermore, error-reject tradeoff theory indicates, that the resulting neural classifiers for the skin lesion classification problem are near-optimal...

  1. An optical neural interface: in vivo control of rodent motor cortex with integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravanis, Alexander M.; Wang, Li-Ping; Zhang, Feng; Meltzer, Leslie A.; Mogri, Murtaza Z.; Schneider, M. Bret; Deisseroth, Karl

    2007-09-01

    Neural interface technology has made enormous strides in recent years but stimulating electrodes remain incapable of reliably targeting specific cell types (e.g. excitatory or inhibitory neurons) within neural tissue. This obstacle has major scientific and clinical implications. For example, there is intense debate among physicians, neuroengineers and neuroscientists regarding the relevant cell types recruited during deep brain stimulation (DBS); moreover, many debilitating side effects of DBS likely result from lack of cell-type specificity. We describe here a novel optical neural interface technology that will allow neuroengineers to optically address specific cell types in vivo with millisecond temporal precision. Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), an algal light-activated ion channel we developed for use in mammals, can give rise to safe, light-driven stimulation of CNS neurons on a timescale of milliseconds. Because ChR2 is genetically targetable, specific populations of neurons even sparsely embedded within intact circuitry can be stimulated with high temporal precision. Here we report the first in vivo behavioral demonstration of a functional optical neural interface (ONI) in intact animals, involving integrated fiberoptic and optogenetic technology. We developed a solid-state laser diode system that can be pulsed with millisecond precision, outputs 20 mW of power at 473 nm, and is coupled to a lightweight, flexible multimode optical fiber, ~200 µm in diameter. To capitalize on the unique advantages of this system, we specifically targeted ChR2 to excitatory cells in vivo with the CaMKIIα promoter. Under these conditions, the intensity of light exiting the fiber (~380 mW mm-2) was sufficient to drive excitatory neurons in vivo and control motor cortex function with behavioral output in intact rodents. No exogenous chemical cofactor was needed at any point, a crucial finding for in vivo work in large mammals. Achieving modulation of behavior with optical control of

  2. Radar stimulator interface protocol, preliminary interface design and Doppler Beam Sharpening implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrich, C.H. [Mission Research Corp., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    1993-06-30

    This is the final report for a subcontract to supply a Doppler Beam Sharpening model to interface with the radar stimulation package running on the Cray supercomputers. The article describes the beam sharpening model, and the way beam sharpening is implemented by the model. Changes from previous work are emphasized in this report.

  3. Neutron spectrometry and dosimetry by means of Bonner spheres system and artificial neural networks applying robust design of artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez B, M.R.; Ortiz R, J.M.; Vega C, H.R. [UAZ, Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde No. 801, 98000 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    An Artificial Neural Network has been designed, trained and tested to unfold neutron spectra and simultaneously to calculate equivalent doses. A set of 187 neutron spectra compiled by the International Atomic Energy Agency and 13 equivalent doses were used in the artificial neural network designed, trained and tested. In order to design the neural network was used the robust design of artificial neural networks methodology, which assures that the quality of the neural networks takes into account from the design stage. Unless previous works, here, for first time a group of neural networks were designed and trained to unfold 187 neutron spectra and at the same time to calculate 13 equivalent doses, starting from the count rates coming from the Bonner spheres system by using a systematic and experimental strategy. (Author)

  4. Designing laboratory wind simulations using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Križan, Josip; Gašparac, Goran; Kozmar, Hrvoje; Antonić, Oleg; Grisogono, Branko

    2015-05-01

    While experiments in boundary layer wind tunnels remain to be a major research tool in wind engineering and environmental aerodynamics, designing the modeling hardware required for a proper atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) simulation can be costly and time consuming. Hence, possibilities are sought to speed-up this process and make it more time-efficient. In this study, two artificial neural networks (ANNs) are developed to determine an optimal design of the Counihan hardware, i.e., castellated barrier wall, vortex generators, and surface roughness, in order to simulate the ABL flow developing above urban, suburban, and rural terrains, as previous ANN models were created for one terrain type only. A standard procedure is used in developing those two ANNs in order to further enhance best-practice possibilities rather than to improve existing ANN designing methodology. In total, experimental results obtained using 23 different hardware setups are used when creating ANNs. In those tests, basic barrier height, barrier castellation height, spacing density, and height of surface roughness elements are the parameters that were varied to create satisfactory ABL simulations. The first ANN was used for the estimation of mean wind velocity, turbulent Reynolds stress, turbulence intensity, and length scales, while the second one was used for the estimation of the power spectral density of velocity fluctuations. This extensive set of studied flow and turbulence parameters is unmatched in comparison to the previous relevant studies, as it includes here turbulence intensity and power spectral density of velocity fluctuations in all three directions, as well as the Reynolds stress profiles and turbulence length scales. Modeling results agree well with experiments for all terrain types, particularly in the lower ABL within the height range of the most engineering structures, while exhibiting sensitivity to abrupt changes and data scattering in profiles of wind-tunnel results. The

  5. Characterizing Design Process Interfaces as Organization Networks: Insights for Engineering Systems Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz, Pedro Parraguez; Eppinger, Steven; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The engineering design literature has provided guidance on how to identify and analyze design activities and their information dependencies. However, a systematic characterization of process interfaces between engineering design activities is missing, and the impact of structural and compositional...... and interpret the effect of those characteristics on interface problems. As a result, we show how structural and compositional aspects of the organization networks between information-dependent activities provide valuable insights to better manage complex engineering design processes. The proposed approach...... and organization architectures, the systematic identification of key performance metrics associated with interface problems, and improved support for engineering managers by means of a better overview of information flows between activities....

  6. Three Principles of Perception for Instructional Interface Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Linda L.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses graphical user interfaces used for instructional purposes in educational environments, which promote learning goals, and in support environments, which promote performance goals. Explains three key principles of perception and gives guidelines for their use, including the figure/ground principle, the hierarchy principle, and the gestalt…

  7. Using Cluster Analysis to Improve the Design of Component Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adnan, R.; Graaf, B.; Van Deursen, A.; Zonneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    A short (4-page) version of this paper is published in: ASE 2008 - 23rd IEEE/ACM International Conference on Automated Software Engineering, 15-19 September 2008; doi:10.1109/ASE.2008.54 For large software systems, interface structure has an important impact on their maintainability and build

  8. Interface-induced multiferroism by design in complex oxide superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hangwen [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Wang, Zhen [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Shuai [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment; Ghosh, Saurabh [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Saghayezhian, Mohammad [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Chen, Lina [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Weng, Yakui [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). School of Energy and Environment; Herklotz, Andreas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ward, Thomas Z. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jin, Rongying [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Pantelides, Sokrates T. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhang, Jiandi [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Plummer, E. W. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    2017-05-19

    Interfaces between materials present unique opportunities for the discovery of intriguing quantum phenomena. Here, we explore the possibility that, in the case of superlattices, if one of the layers is made ultrathin, unexpected properties can be induced between the two bracketing interfaces. We pursue this objective by combining advanced growth and characterization techniques with theoretical calculations. Using prototype La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 (LSMO)/BaTiO3 (BTO) superlattices, we observe a structural evolution in the LSMO layers as a function of thickness. Atomic-resolution EM and spectroscopy reveal an unusual polar structure phase in ultrathin LSMO at a critical thickness caused by interfacing with the adjacent BTO layers, which is confirmed by first principles calculations. Most important is the fact that this polar phase is accompanied by reemergent ferromagnetism, making this system a potential candidate for ultrathin ferroelectrics with ferromagnetic ordering. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate the important role of spin–lattice coupling in LSMO. These results open up a conceptually intriguing recipe for developing functional ultrathin materials via interface-induced spin–lattice coupling.

  9. Research of Digital Interface Layout Design based on Eye-tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to improve the low service efficiency and unsmooth human-computer interaction caused by currently irrational layouts of digital interfaces for complex systems. Also, three common layout structures for digital interfaces are to be presented and five layout types appropriate for multilevel digital interfaces are to be summarized. Based on the eye tracking technology, an assessment was conducted in advantages and disadvantages of different layout types through subjects’ search efficiency. Based on data and results, this study constructed a matching model which is appropriate for multilevel digital interface layout and verified the fact that the task element is a significant and important aspect of layout design. A scientific experimental model of research on digital interfaces for complex systems is provided. Both data and conclusions of the eye movement experiment provide a reference for layout designs of interfaces for complex systems with different task characteristics.

  10. Design of efficient and simple interface testing equipment for opto-electric tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiong; Deng, Chao; Tian, Jing; Mao, Yao

    2016-10-01

    Interface testing for opto-electric tracking system is one important work to assure system running performance, aiming to verify the design result of every electronic interface matching the communication protocols or not, by different levels. Opto-electric tracking system nowadays is more complicated, composed of many functional units. Usually, interface testing is executed between units manufactured completely, highly depending on unit design and manufacture progress as well as relative people. As a result, it always takes days or weeks, inefficiently. To solve the problem, this paper promotes an efficient and simple interface testing equipment for opto-electric tracking system, consisting of optional interface circuit card, processor and test program. The hardware cards provide matched hardware interface(s), easily offered from hardware engineer. Automatic code generation technique is imported, providing adaption to new communication protocols. Automatic acquiring items, automatic constructing code architecture and automatic encoding are used to form a new program quickly with adaption. After simple steps, a standard customized new interface testing equipment with matching test program and interface(s) is ready for a waiting-test system in minutes. The efficient and simple interface testing equipment for opto-electric tracking system has worked for many opto-electric tracking system to test entire or part interfaces, reducing test time from days to hours, greatly improving test efficiency, with high software quality and stability, without manual coding. Used as a common tool, the efficient and simple interface testing equipment for opto-electric tracking system promoted by this paper has changed traditional interface testing method and created much higher efficiency.

  11. Designing an information search interface for younger and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Richard; Price, Margaux M

    2008-08-01

    The present study examined Web-based information retrieval as a function of age for two information organization schemes: hierarchical organization and one organized around tags or keywords. Older adults' performance in information retrieval tasks has traditionally been lower compared with younger adults'. The current study examined the degree to which information organization moderated age-related performance differences on an information retrieval task. The theory of fluid and crystallized intelligence may provide insight into different kinds of information architectures that may reduce age-related differences in computer-based information retrieval performance. Fifty younger (18-23 years of age) and 50 older (55-76 years of age) participants browsed a Web site for answers to specific questions. Half of the participants browsed the hierarchically organized system (taxonomy), which maintained a one-to-one relationship between menu link and page, whereas the other half browsed the tag-based interface, with a many-to-one relationship between menu and page. This difference was expected to interact with age-related differences in fluid and crystallized intelligence. Age-related differences in information retrieval performance persisted; however, a tag-based retrieval interface reduced age-related differences, as compared with a taxonomical interface. Cognitive aging theory can lead to interface interventions that reduce age-related differences in performance with technology. In an information retrieval paradigm, older adults may be able to leverage their increased crystallized intelligence to offset fluid intelligence declines in a computer-based information search task. More research is necessary, but the results suggest that information retrieval interfaces organized around keywords may reduce age-related differences in performance.

  12. Interface design and cognitive style in learning an instructional computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effken, J A; Doyle, M

    2001-01-01

    An experimental design was used to investigate how cognitive style interacts with interface design to affect users' abilities to learn to use a computer simulation. Eighteen nursing students were assigned to two groups, based on their cognitive style, and asked to solve 3 physiologic problems using 3 interface designs: a strip-chart display, an integrated balloon display, and an etiologic display. Students were given up to 2 minutes to solve each problem by administering 6 different hypothetical drugs targeted at different aspects of the simulated hemodynamic system. A mixed-design analysis of variance was used to determine the effects of interface design and cognitive style on number of problems solved, time to initiate treatment, percentage of time system maintained within normal parameters, and number of drugs used. We found that the effects of cognitive style on performance were mediated by interface design and tended to decrease with practice.

  13. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-04-15

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients' brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies.

  14. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted displays and joystick allow interaction and immersion in unreal environments created from computer software. Virtual environments are highly interactive, generating great activation of visual, vestibular and proprioceptive systems during the execution of a video game. In addition, they are entertaining and safe for the user. Recently, incorporating therapeutic purposes in virtual reality interface devices has allowed them to be used for the rehabilitation of neurological patients, e.g., balance training in older adults and dynamic stability in healthy participants. The improvements observed in neurological diseases (chronic stroke and cerebral palsy) have been shown by changes in the reorganization of neural networks in patients’ brain, along with better hand function and other skills, contributing to their quality of life. The data generated by such studies could substantially contribute to physical rehabilitation strategies. PMID:25206907

  15. Improving aircraft conceptual design - A PHIGS interactive graphics interface for ACSYNT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampler, S. G.; Myklebust, A.; Jayaram, S.; Gelhausen, P.

    1988-01-01

    A CAD interface has been created for the 'ACSYNT' aircraft conceptual design code that permits the execution and control of the design process via interactive graphics menus. This CAD interface was coded entirely with the new three-dimensional graphics standard, the Programmer's Hierarchical Interactive Graphics System. The CAD/ACSYNT system is designed for use by state-of-the-art high-speed imaging work stations. Attention is given to the approaches employed in modeling, data storage, and rendering.

  16. User interface design principles for the SSM/PMAD automated power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakstas, Laura M.; Myers, Chris J.

    1991-01-01

    Martin Marietta has developed a user interface for the space station module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) automated power system testbed which provides human access to the functionality of the power system, as well as exemplifying current techniques in user interface design. The testbed user interface was designed to enable an engineer to operate the system easily without having significant knowledge of computer systems, as well as provide an environment in which the engineer can monitor and interact with the SSM/PMAD system hardware. The design of the interface supports a global view of the most important data from the various hardware and software components, as well as enabling the user to obtain additional or more detailed data when needed. The components and representations of the SSM/PMAD testbed user interface are examined. An engineer's interactions with the system are also described.

  17. A CLIPS-based tool for aircraft pilot-vehicle interface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Thomas D.; Rogers, Steven P.

    1991-01-01

    The Pilot-Vehicle Interface of modern aircraft is the cognitive, sensory, and psychomotor link between the pilot, the avionics modules, and all other systems on board the aircraft. To assist pilot-vehicle interface designers, a C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) based tool was developed that allows design information to be stored in a table that can be modified by rules representing design knowledge. Developed for the Apple Macintosh, the tool allows users without any CLIPS programming experience to form simple rules using a point and click interface.

  18. Use of Design Patterns According to Hand Dominance in a Mobile User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samarraie, Hosam; Ahmad, Yusof

    2016-01-01

    User interface (UI) design patterns for mobile applications provide a solution to design problems and can improve the usage experience for users. However, there is a lack of research categorizing the uses of design patterns according to users' hand dominance in a learning-based mobile UI. We classified the main design patterns for mobile…

  19. Rethinking Design Process: Using 3D Digital Models as an Interface in Collaborative Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Suining

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study for an alternative design process by integrating a designer-user collaborative session with digital models. The collaborative session took place in a 3D AutoCAD class for a real world project. The 3D models served as an interface for designer-user collaboration during the design process. Students not only learned…

  20. Navigating the Interface between Design Education and Fashion Business Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Colleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to address the interface between design education and business start-up in the designer fashion industry (DFI) and provide a new framework for reflecting on ways to improve design education and graduates' business start-up preparedness. Design/methodology/approach: This interpretive study employed…

  1. Design of natural user interface of indoor surveillance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lili; Liu, Dan; Jiang, Mu-Jin; Cao, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Conventional optical video surveillance systems usually just record what they view, but they can't make sense of what they are viewing. With lots of useless video information stored and transmitted, waste of memory space and increasing the bandwidth are produced every day. In order to reduce the overall cost of the system, and improve the application value of the monitoring system, we use the Kinect sensor with CMOS infrared sensor, as a supplement to the traditional video surveillance system, to establish the natural user interface system for indoor surveillance. In this paper, the architecture of the natural user interface system, complex background monitoring object separation, user behavior analysis algorithms are discussed. By the analysis of the monitoring object, instead of the command language grammar, when the monitored object need instant help, the system with the natural user interface sends help information. We introduce the method of combining the new system and traditional monitoring system. In conclusion, theoretical analysis and experimental results in this paper show that the proposed system is reasonable and efficient. It can satisfy the system requirements of non-contact, online, real time, higher precision and rapid speed to control the state of affairs at the scene.

  2. Design considerations to improve cognitive ergonomic issues of unmanned vehicle interfaces utilizing video game controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppold, P; Rupp, M; Mouloua, M; Hancock, P A; Martin, J

    2012-01-01

    Unmanned (UAVs, UCAVs, and UGVs) systems still have major human factors and ergonomic challenges related to the effective design of their control interface systems, crucial to their efficient operation, maintenance, and safety. Unmanned system interfaces with a human centered approach promote intuitive interfaces that are easier to learn, and reduce human errors and other cognitive ergonomic issues with interface design. Automation has shifted workload from physical to cognitive, thus control interfaces for unmanned systems need to reduce mental workload on the operators and facilitate the interaction between vehicle and operator. Two-handed video game controllers provide wide usability within the overall population, prior exposure for new operators, and a variety of interface complexity levels to match the complexity level of the task and reduce cognitive load. This paper categorizes and provides taxonomy for 121 haptic interfaces from the entertainment industry that can be utilized as control interfaces for unmanned systems. Five categories of controllers were based on the complexity of the buttons, control pads, joysticks, and switches on the controller. This allows the selection of the level of complexity needed for a specific task without creating an entirely new design or utilizing an overly complex design.

  3. Designing a Framework to Develop WEB Graphical Interfaces for ORACLE Databases - Web Dialog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiana-Petruţa Fîntîneanu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to describe a project consisting in designing a framework of applications used to create graphical interfaces with an Oracle distributed database. The development of the project supposed the use of the latest technologies: database Oracle server, Tomcat web server, JDBC (Java library used for accessing a database, JSP and Tag Library (for the development of graphical interfaces.

  4. Design of the Face/Core Interface for Improved Fracture Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard-Larsen, Christian; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the face/core fracture behavior of sandwich specimens with different designs. The traditional interface with a quadraxial mat directly adhered to the foam core is compared to interfaces where an additional mat with randomly oriented fibers is inserted between core and face...

  5. Neural computing architectures: The design of brain-like machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksander, I.

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical and applications aspects of neural-network (NN) computers are discussed in chapters contributed by European experts. Topics addressed include speech recognition based on topology-preserving neural maps, neural-map applications, backpropagation in nonfeedforward NNs, a parallel-distributed-processing learning approach to natural language, the learning capabilities of Boolean NNs, the logic of connectionist systems, and a probabilistic-logic NN for associative learning. Consideration is given to N-tuple sampling and genetic algorithms for speech recognition; the dynamic behavior of Boolean NNs; statistical mechanics and NNs; digital NNs, matched filters, and optical implementations; heteroassociative NNs using cabling vs link-disabling local modification rules; and the generation of movement trajectories in primates and robots. Also provided is an overview of parallel distributed processing.

  6. A generalizable adaptive brain-machine interface design for control of anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuxiao Yang; Shanechi, Maryam M

    2015-08-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) for closed-loop control of anesthesia have the potential to automatically monitor and control brain states under anesthesia. Since a variety of anesthetic states are needed in different clinical scenarios, designing a generalizable BMI architecture that can control a wide range of anesthetic states is essential. In addition, drug dynamics are non-stationary over time and could change with the depth of anesthesia. Hence for precise control, a BMI needs to track these non-stationarities online. Here we design a BMI architecture that generalizes to control of various anesthetic states and their associated neural signatures, and is adaptive to time-varying drug dynamics. We provide a systematic approach to build general parametric models that quantify the anesthetic state and describe the drug dynamics. Based on these models, we develop an adaptive closed-loop controller within the framework of stochastic optimal feedback control. This controller tracks the non-stationarities in drug dynamics, achieves tight control in a time-varying environment, and removes the need for an offline system identification session. For robustness, the BMI also ensures small drug infusion rate variations at steady state. We test the BMI architecture for control of two common anesthetic states, i.e., burst suppression in medically-induced coma and unconsciousness in general anesthesia. Using numerical experiments, we find that the BMI generalizes to control of both these anesthetic states; in a time-varying environment, even without initial knowledge of model parameters, the BMI accurately controls these two different anesthetic states, reducing bias and error more than 70 times and 9 times, respectively, compared with a non-adaptive system.

  7. Structuring a multi-nodal neural network in vitro within a novel design microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Wijdeven, Rosanne; Ramstad, Ola Huse; Bauer, Ulrich Stefan; Halaas, Øyvind; Sandvig, Axel; Sandvig, Ioanna

    2018-01-02

    Neural network formation is a complex process involving axon outgrowth and guidance. Axon guidance is facilitated by structural and molecular cues from the surrounding microenvironment. Micro-fabrication techniques can be employed to produce microfluidic chips with a highly controlled microenvironment for neural cells enabling longitudinal studies of complex processes associated with network formation. In this work, we demonstrate a novel open microfluidic chip design that encompasses a freely variable number of nodes interconnected by axon-permissible tunnels, enabling structuring of multi-nodal neural networks in vitro. The chip employs a partially open design to allow high level of control and reproducibility of cell seeding, while reducing shear stress on the cells. We show that by culturing dorsal root ganglion cells (DRGs) in our microfluidic chip, we were able to structure a neural network in vitro. These neurons were compartmentalized within six nodes interconnected through axon growth tunnels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the additional benefit of open top design by establishing a 3D neural culture in matrigel and a neuronal aggregate 3D culture within the chips. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a novel microfluidic chip design applicable to structuring complex neural networks in vitro, thus providing a versatile, highly relevant platform for the study of neural network dynamics applicable to developmental and regenerative neuroscience.

  8. Research on architecture of intelligent design platform for artificial neural network expert system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Honghong

    2017-09-01

    Based on the review of the development and current situation of CAD technology, the necessity of combination of artificial neural network and expert system, and then present an intelligent design system based on artificial neural network. Moreover, it discussed the feasibility of realization of a design-oriented expert system development tools on the basis of above combination. In addition, knowledge representation strategy and method and the solving process are given in this paper.

  9. The role of simulation in the design of a neural network chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Utpal; Roppel, Thaddeus A.; Padgett, Mary L.

    1993-01-01

    An iterative, simulation-based design procedure for a neural network chip is introduced. For this design procedure, the goal is to produce a chip layout for a neural network in which the weights are determined by transistor gate width-to-length ratios. In a given iteration, the current layout is simulated using the circuit simulator SPICE, and layout adjustments are made based on conventional gradient-decent methods. After the iteration converges, the chip is fabricated. Monte Carlo analysis is used to predict the effect of statistical fabrication process variations on the overall performance of the neural network chip.

  10. Investigation of amorphous silicon carbide:hydrogen and Parylene-C thin films as encapsulation materials for neural interface devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Mei

    Neural interface devices have been developed for neuroscience and neuroprosthetics applications to record and stimulate nerve signals. Chronic use of these devices is prevented by their lack of long-term stability due to device failure or immune system responses. Fully integrated, wireless, silicon-based neural interface (INI) devices are being developed to address the main failure modes by eliminating the wired connections. Furthermore, chronic stable, conformal, hermetic, biocompatible, and electrically insulating coating materials that sustain chronic implantation and guarantee stable recording or stimulation are needed. Even though a large selection of materials has been proposed and tested for this purpose, to date, no encapsulation material or coating process presented in scientific literature has been thoroughly characterized or qualified as long-term hermetic encapsulation for silicon micro-electrode arrays. In this work, hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiCx:H) and Parylene-C films were investigated as encapsulation materials. The deposition parameters and corresponding film properties were explored and correlated with the encapsulation characteristics. The bond configuration of the deposited a-SiCx:H films was analyzed by FT-IR in order to develop films with strong chemical structure and low defect density. Film properties were optimized based on the bond configuration and process temperature requirements ( 12 months). Oxygen plasma etching processes necessary for deinsulation of the electrode tips and the etching performance on the Parylene-C were investigated, and the relationship between tip exposure and electrode impedance was studied. Excellent encapsulation properties of Parylene-C were demonstrated. The correlation between process parameters and Parylene-C properties was investigated, including surface topography, adhesion, and crystallinity.

  11. Design of efficient and safe neural stimulators : A multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dongen, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Neural stimulation is an established treatment methodology for an increasing number of diseases. Electrical Stimulation injects a stimulation signal through electrodes that are implanted in the target area of the central or peripheral nervous system in order to evoke a specific neuronal response

  12. automatic data collection design for neural networks detection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    data collection system for detection of occupational frauds using artificial neural networks. .... an issue). Limitations. (i) Little flexibility for people to raise their own issues (ii) Little opportunity for people to respond in their own words (iii) Little opportunity to go into depth on any issue (iv) ..... Lecture notes in Artificial Intelligence.

  13. Bayesian and neural networks for preliminary ship design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, H. B.; Lützen, Marie; Friis-Hansen, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    000 ships is acquired and various methods for derivation of empirical relations are employed. A regression analysis is carried out to fit functions to the data. Further, the data are used to learn Bayesian and neural networks to encode the relations between the characteristics. On the basis...

  14. A Formal Approach to User Interface Design using Hybrid System Theory Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optimal Synthesis Inc.(OSI) proposes to develop an aiding tool for user interface design that is based on mathematical formalism of hybrid system theory. The...

  15. Graphic User Interface Design for Mapping, Information, Display, and Analysis Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lowell, James

    2000-01-01

    This thesis evaluates both the interface design process and the map-based mission planning tools of the Loosely Coupled Components Research Group, Naval Postgraduate School, for human factors usability...

  16. Design of video interface conversion system based on FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wang, Xiang-jun

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a FPGA based video interface conversion system that enables the inter-conversion between digital and analog video. Cyclone IV series EP4CE22F17C chip from Altera Corporation is used as the main video processing chip, and single-chip is used as the information interaction control unit between FPGA and PC. The system is able to encode/decode messages from the PC. Technologies including video decoding/encoding circuits, bus communication protocol, data stream de-interleaving and de-interlacing, color space conversion and the Camera Link timing generator module of FPGA are introduced. The system converts Composite Video Broadcast Signal (CVBS) from the CCD camera into Low Voltage Differential Signaling (LVDS), which will be collected by the video processing unit with Camera Link interface. The processed video signals will then be inputted to system output board and displayed on the monitor.The current experiment shows that it can achieve high-quality video conversion with minimum board size.

  17. The use of graphics in the design of the human-telerobot interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Mark A.; Smith, Randy L.

    1989-01-01

    The Man-Systems Telerobotics Laboratory (MSTL) of NASA's Johnson Space Center employs computer graphics tools in their design and evaluation of the Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) human/telerobot interface on the Shuttle and on the Space Station. It has been determined by the MSTL that the use of computer graphics can promote more expedient and less costly design endeavors. Several specific examples of computer graphics applied to the FTS user interface by the MSTL are described.

  18. Improvement of design of a surgical interface using an eye tracking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol Barkana, Duygun; Açık, Alper; Duru, Dilek Goksel; Duru, Adil Deniz

    2014-05-07

    Surgical interfaces are used for helping surgeons in interpretation and quantification of the patient information, and for the presentation of an integrated workflow where all available data are combined to enable optimal treatments. Human factors research provides a systematic approach to design user interfaces with safety, accuracy, satisfaction and comfort. One of the human factors research called user-centered design approach is used to develop a surgical interface for kidney tumor cryoablation. An eye tracking device is used to obtain the best configuration of the developed surgical interface. Surgical interface for kidney tumor cryoablation has been developed considering the four phases of user-centered design approach, which are analysis, design, implementation and deployment. Possible configurations of the surgical interface, which comprise various combinations of menu-based command controls, visual display of multi-modal medical images, 2D and 3D models of the surgical environment, graphical or tabulated information, visual alerts, etc., has been developed. Experiments of a simulated cryoablation of a tumor task have been performed with surgeons to evaluate the proposed surgical interface. Fixation durations and number of fixations at informative regions of the surgical interface have been analyzed, and these data are used to modify the surgical interface. Eye movement data has shown that participants concentrated their attention on informative regions more when the number of displayed Computer Tomography (CT) images has been reduced. Additionally, the time required to complete the kidney tumor cryoablation task by the participants had been decreased with the reduced number of CT images. Furthermore, the fixation durations obtained after the revision of the surgical interface are very close to what is observed in visual search and natural scene perception studies suggesting more efficient and comfortable interaction with the surgical interface. The

  19. Re-evaluation of the AASHTO-flexible pavement design equation with neural network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiğdemir, Mesut

    2014-01-01

    Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies) test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance.

  20. Re-evaluation of the AASHTO-flexible pavement design equation with neural network modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesut Tiğdemir

    Full Text Available Here we establish that equivalent single-axle loads values can be estimated using artificial neural networks without the complex design equality of American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO. More importantly, we find that the neural network model gives the coefficients to be able to obtain the actual load values using the AASHTO design values. Thus, those design traffic values that might result in deterioration can be better calculated using the neural networks model than with the AASHTO design equation. The artificial neural network method is used for this purpose. The existing AASHTO flexible pavement design equation does not currently predict the pavement performance of the strategic highway research program (Long Term Pavement Performance studies test sections very accurately, and typically over-estimates the number of equivalent single axle loads needed to cause a measured loss of the present serviceability index. Here we aimed to demonstrate that the proposed neural network model can more accurately represent the loads values data, compared against the performance of the AASHTO formula. It is concluded that the neural network may be an appropriate tool for the development of databased-nonparametric models of pavement performance.

  1. Modeling the Insertion Mechanics of Flexible Neural Probes Coated with Sacrificial Polymers for Optimizing Probe Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Singh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Single-unit recording neural probes have significant advantages towards improving signal-to-noise ratio and specificity for signal acquisition in brain-to-computer interface devices. Long-term effectiveness is unfortunately limited by the chronic injury response, which has been linked to the mechanical mismatch between rigid probes and compliant brain tissue. Small, flexible microelectrodes may overcome this limitation, but insertion of these probes without buckling requires supporting elements such as a stiff coating with a biodegradable polymer. For these coated probes, there is a design trade-off between the potential for successful insertion into brain tissue and the degree of trauma generated by the insertion. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a finite element model (FEM to simulate insertion of coated neural probes of varying dimensions and material properties into brain tissue. Simulations were performed to predict the buckling and insertion forces during insertion of coated probes into a tissue phantom with material properties of brain. The simulations were validated with parallel experimental studies where probes were inserted into agarose tissue phantom, ex vivo chick embryonic brain tissue, and ex vivo rat brain tissue. Experiments were performed with uncoated copper wire and both uncoated and coated SU-8 photoresist and Parylene C probes. Model predictions were found to strongly agree with experimental results (<10% error. The ratio of the predicted buckling force-to-predicted insertion force, where a value greater than one would ideally be expected to result in successful insertion, was plotted against the actual success rate from experiments. A sigmoidal relationship was observed, with a ratio of 1.35 corresponding to equal probability of insertion and failure, and a ratio of 3.5 corresponding to a 100% success rate. This ratio was dubbed the “safety factor”, as it indicated the degree to which the coating

  2. Interface Design Concepts in the Development of ELSA, an Intelligent Electronic Library Search Assistant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Rebecca; Smith, Philip J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes issues and advances in the design of appropriate inference engines and knowledge structures needed by commercially feasible intelligent intermediary systems for information retrieval. Issues associated with the design of interfaces to such functions are discussed in detail. Design principles for guiding implementation of these interfaces…

  3. Four Principles for User Interface Design of Computerised Clinical Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract.  The paper presents results from design of a user interface for a Computerised Clinical Decision Support System (CSSS). The ambition has been to design Human-Computer Interaction that can minimise medication errors. Through an iterative design process a digital prototype for prescription...... emphasises a focus on how users interact with the system, a focus on how information is provided by the system, and four principles of interaction. The four principles for design of user interfaces for CDSS are summarised as four A’s: All in one, At a glance, At hand and Attention. It is recommended that all...... four interaction principles are integrated in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors....

  4. A Command Language Processor for Flexible Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    33 Service Description 34 Introduction to Multiple Langauge Forms Service Functional Module Specification Contexts 35 34 35 v...framework for expressing the syntactic and semantic structure of a computer language. The CLP’s dialogue grammar has as its domain an entire terminal...collection of commands. The domain of the command language designer includes only the design of individual commands. The language designer has no

  5. Materials Design on the Origin of Gap States in a High-κ/GaAs Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weichao Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the demand for constantly scaling microelectronic devices to ever smaller dimensions, a SiO2 gate dielectric was substituted with a higher dielectric-constant material, Hf(ZrO2, in order to minimize current leakage through dielectric thin film. However, upon interfacing with high dielectric constant (high-κ dielectrics, the electron mobility in the conventional Si channel degrades due to Coulomb scattering, surface-roughness scattering, remote-phonon scattering, and dielectric-charge trapping. III-V and Ge are two promising candidates with superior mobility over Si. Nevertheless, Hf(ZrO2/III-V(Ge has much more complicated interface bonding than Si-based interfaces. Successful fabrication of a high-quality device critically depends on understanding and engineering the bonding configurations at Hf(ZrO2/III-V(Ge interfaces for the optimal design of device interfaces. Thus, an accurate atomic insight into the interface bonding and mechanism of interface gap states formation becomes essential. Here, we utilize first-principle calculations to investigate the interface between HfO2 and GaAs. Our study shows that As−As dimer bonding, Ga partial oxidation (between 3+ and 1+ and Ga− dangling bonds constitute the major contributions to gap states. These findings provide insightful guidance for optimum interface passivation.

  6. Evolving RBF neural networks for adaptive soft-sensor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, Alex

    2013-12-01

    This work presents an adaptive framework for building soft-sensors based on radial basis function (RBF) neural network models. The adaptive fuzzy means algorithm is utilized in order to evolve an RBF network, which approximates the unknown system based on input-output data from it. The methodology gradually builds the RBF network model, based on two separate levels of adaptation: On the first level, the structure of the hidden layer is modified by adding or deleting RBF centers, while on the second level, the synaptic weights are adjusted with the recursive least squares with exponential forgetting algorithm. The proposed approach is tested on two different systems, namely a simulated nonlinear DC Motor and a real industrial reactor. The results show that the produced soft-sensors can be successfully applied to model the two nonlinear systems. A comparison with two different adaptive modeling techniques, namely a dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS) and neural networks trained with online backpropagation, highlights the advantages of the proposed methodology.

  7. Brave NUI World Designing Natural User Interfaces for Touch and Gesture

    CERN Document Server

    Wigdor, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Touch and gestural devices have been hailed as next evolutionary step in human-computer interaction. As software companies struggle to catch up with one another in terms of developing the next great touch-based interface, designers are charged with the daunting task of keeping up with the advances in new technology and this new aspect to user experience design. Product and interaction designers, developers and managers are already well versed in UI design, but touch-based interfaces have added a new level of complexity.

  8. Approach to design neural cryptography: a generalized architecture and a heuristic rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nankun; Liao, Xiaofeng; Huang, Tingwen

    2013-06-01

    Neural cryptography, a type of public key exchange protocol, is widely considered as an effective method for sharing a common secret key between two neural networks on public channels. How to design neural cryptography remains a great challenge. In this paper, in order to provide an approach to solve this challenge, a generalized network architecture and a significant heuristic rule are designed. The proposed generic framework is named as tree state classification machine (TSCM), which extends and unifies the existing structures, i.e., tree parity machine (TPM) and tree committee machine (TCM). Furthermore, we carefully study and find that the heuristic rule can improve the security of TSCM-based neural cryptography. Therefore, TSCM and the heuristic rule can guide us to designing a great deal of effective neural cryptography candidates, in which it is possible to achieve the more secure instances. Significantly, in the light of TSCM and the heuristic rule, we further expound that our designed neural cryptography outperforms TPM (the most secure model at present) on security. Finally, a series of numerical simulation experiments are provided to verify validity and applicability of our results.

  9. A spatially augmented reality sketching interface for architectural daylighting design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Yu; Yapo, Theodore C; Young, Christopher; Cutler, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    We present an application of interactive global illumination and spatially augmented reality to architectural daylight modeling that allows designers to explore alternative designs and new technologies for improving the sustainability of their buildings. Images of a model in the real world, captured by a camera above the scene, are processed to construct a virtual 3D model. To achieve interactive rendering rates, we use a hybrid rendering technique, leveraging radiosity to simulate the interreflectance between diffuse patches and shadow volumes to generate per-pixel direct illumination. The rendered images are then projected on the real model by four calibrated projectors to help users study the daylighting illumination. The virtual heliodon is a physical design environment in which multiple designers, a designer and a client, or a teacher and students can gather to experience animated visualizations of the natural illumination within a proposed design by controlling the time of day, season, and climate. Furthermore, participants may interactively redesign the geometry and materials of the space by manipulating physical design elements and see the updated lighting simulation. © 2011 IEEE Published by the IEEE Computer Society

  10. Atlas chamber, power flow channel, and diagnostic interface design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurden, G.A.; Davis, H.A.; Taylor, A.; Bowman, D.; Ballard, E.; Ney, S.; Scudder, D.; Trainor, J.

    1997-09-01

    The Atlas pulsed-power machine, presently being designed at Los Alamos, will deliver a pulse of {approximately} 45 MA, in 4--5 {micro}sec, with energies of up to 6 MJ (from a bank of 36 MJ maximum) to a load assembly, located in vacuum. Design considerations for the vacuum vessel, power flow channel from the vessel inward, are presented. In contrast to Sandia`s PBFA II-Z, where 20 MA currents and 2--2.5 MJ of energy are delivered to ({approximately} 15 mg) loads in {approximately} 100 nsec, the Atlas structures will have to be designed for longer timescales and higher energies to drive heavy lines ({approximately} 70 g). Design issues for the chamber include materials stresses, formation of (and protection from) debris and molten jets, impulse loading, and survivability and ease of replacement of internal structures. For the power flow channel designs, issues are minimizing inductance, preventing movement of conductors during and after firing, damage mitigation, reducing the cost of materials and installation, and electrical insulation. A key issue for damage mitigation is the radius within which total destruction of material objects occurs. Choices of vessel size, insulator materials, cost and ease of manufacturing, and mechanical stability issues are presently in the conceptual design phase. Typical access requirements for diagnostics (including radial and axial X-ray backlighting, flux loops, spectroscopy, interferometry, bolometry, etc.) are provided for in the design.

  11. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2009-01-01

    The classic textbook for computer systems analysis and design, Computer Organization and Design, has been thoroughly updated to provide a new focus on the revolutionary change taking place in industry today: the switch from uniprocessor to multicore microprocessors. This new emphasis on parallelism is supported by updates reflecting the newest technologies with examples highlighting the latest processor designs, benchmarking standards, languages and tools. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to present the fundamentals of hardware technologies, assembly language, compu

  12. The neuroergonomic evaluation of human machine interface design in air traffic control using behavioral and EGG/ERP measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraudet, L; Imbert, J-P; Bérenger, M; Tremblay, S; Causse, M

    2015-11-01

    The Air Traffic Control (ATC) environment is complex and safety-critical. Whilst exchanging information with pilots, controllers must also be alert to visual notifications displayed on the radar screen (e.g., warning which indicates a loss of minimum separation between aircraft). Under the assumption that attentional resources are shared between vision and hearing, the visual interface design may also impact the ability to process these auditory stimuli. Using a simulated ATC task, we compared the behavioral and neural responses to two different visual notification designs--the operational alarm that involves blinking colored "ALRT" displayed around the label of the notified plane ("Color-Blink"), and the more salient alarm involving the same blinking text plus four moving yellow chevrons ("Box-Animation"). Participants performed a concurrent auditory task with the requirement to react to rare pitch tones. P300 from the occurrence of the tones was taken as an indicator of remaining attentional resources. Participants who were presented with the more salient visual design showed better accuracy than the group with the suboptimal operational design. On a physiological level, auditory P300 amplitude in the former group was greater than that observed in the latter group. One potential explanation is that the enhanced visual design freed up attentional resources which, in turn, improved the cerebral processing of the auditory stimuli. These results suggest that P300 amplitude can be used as a valid estimation of the efficiency of interface designs, and of cognitive load more generally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Multiple IMU system hardware interface design, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landey, M.; Brown, D.

    1975-01-01

    The design of each system component is described. Emphasis is placed on functional requirements unique in this system, including data bus communication, data bus transmitters and receivers, and ternary-to-binary torquing decision logic. Mechanization drawings are presented.

  14. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics_Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede; Tamke, Martin; Evers, Henrik Leander

    2015-01-01

    . In this research materiality through digital technology is considered in an extended way, as being the result of firstly the interaction of a designer with responding matter; here clay, - and secondly the process; here interventions by the designer, 3d printing, firing and glazing. The project used design......The dawn of digital fabrication technologies questions the relationship between crafting materiality and its now digital representation. This paper presents a way how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies...... as a method of inquiry, reflecting on action and through action. Through experiments research question, concept, digital technology and ceramic material have been tested, evaluated and iteratively refined. Through the experiment a computational interactive system for designing wall like composition made up...

  15. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Williams, Ziv M; Wornell, Gregory W; Hu, Rollin C; Powers, Marissa; Brown, Emery N

    2013-01-01

    Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI) have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  16. A real-time brain-machine interface combining motor target and trajectory intent using an optimal feedback control design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Shanechi

    Full Text Available Real-time brain-machine interfaces (BMI have focused on either estimating the continuous movement trajectory or target intent. However, natural movement often incorporates both. Additionally, BMIs can be modeled as a feedback control system in which the subject modulates the neural activity to move the prosthetic device towards a desired target while receiving real-time sensory feedback of the state of the movement. We develop a novel real-time BMI using an optimal feedback control design that jointly estimates the movement target and trajectory of monkeys in two stages. First, the target is decoded from neural spiking activity before movement initiation. Second, the trajectory is decoded by combining the decoded target with the peri-movement spiking activity using an optimal feedback control design. This design exploits a recursive Bayesian decoder that uses an optimal feedback control model of the sensorimotor system to take into account the intended target location and the sensory feedback in its trajectory estimation from spiking activity. The real-time BMI processes the spiking activity directly using point process modeling. We implement the BMI in experiments consisting of an instructed-delay center-out task in which monkeys are presented with a target location on the screen during a delay period and then have to move a cursor to it without touching the incorrect targets. We show that the two-stage BMI performs more accurately than either stage alone. Correct target prediction can compensate for inaccurate trajectory estimation and vice versa. The optimal feedback control design also results in trajectories that are smoother and have lower estimation error. The two-stage decoder also performs better than linear regression approaches in offline cross-validation analyses. Our results demonstrate the advantage of a BMI design that jointly estimates the target and trajectory of movement and more closely mimics the sensorimotor control system.

  17. Design of FPGA Based Neural Network Controller for Earth Station Power System

    OpenAIRE

    Hassen T. Dorrah; Ninet M. A. El-Rahman; Faten H. Fahmy; Hanaa T. El-Madany

    2012-01-01

    Automation of generating hardware description language code from neural networks models can highly decrease time of implementation those networks into a digital devices, thus significant money savings. To implement the neural network into hardware designer, it is required to translate generated model into device structure. VHDL language is used to describe those networks into hardware. VHDL code has been proposed to implement ANNs as well as to present simulation results with floating point a...

  18. Transformation of Neural State Space Models into LFT Models for Robust Control Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Trangbæk, Klaus

    2000-01-01

    This paper considers the extraction of linear state space models and uncertainty models from neural networks trained as state estimators with direct application to robust control. A new method for writing a neural state space model in a linear fractional transformation form in a non-conservative ......-conservative way is proposed, and it is demonstrated how a standard robust control law can be designed for a system described by means of a multi layer perceptron....

  19. Man-machine interface analysis of the flight design system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, H. R.; Atwood, M. E.; Willoughby, J. K.

    1978-01-01

    The objective of the current effort was to perform a broad analysis of the human factors issues involved in the design of the Flight Design System (FDS). The analysis was intended to include characteristics of the system itself, such as: (1) basic structure and functional capabilities of FDS; (2) user backgrounds, capabilities, and possible modes of use; (3) FDS interactive dialogue, problem solving aids; (4) system data management capabilities; and to include, as well, such system related matters as: (1) flight design team structure; (2) roles of technicians; (3) user training; and (4) methods of evaluating system performance. Wherever possible, specific recommendations are made. In other cases, the issues which seem most important are identified. In some cases, additional analyses or experiments which might provide resolution are suggested.

  20. The use of analytical models in human-computer interface design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugerty, Leo

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a large number of human-computer interface (HCI) researchers have investigated building analytical models of the user, which are often implemented as computer models. These models simulate the cognitive processes and task knowledge of the user in ways that allow a researcher or designer to estimate various aspects of an interface's usability, such as when user errors are likely to occur. This information can lead to design improvements. Analytical models can supplement design guidelines by providing designers rigorous ways of analyzing the information-processing requirements of specific tasks (i.e., task analysis). These models offer the potential of improving early designs and replacing some of the early phases of usability testing, thus reducing the cost of interface design. This paper describes some of the many analytical models that are currently being developed and evaluates the usefulness of analytical models for human-computer interface design. This paper will focus on computational, analytical models, such as the GOMS model, rather than less formal, verbal models, because the more exact predictions and task descriptions of computational models may be useful to designers. The paper also discusses some of the practical requirements for using analytical models in complex design organizations such as NASA.

  1. Design of a neurally plausible model of fear learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin B. Krasne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A neurally oriented conceptual and computational model of fear conditioning ("Fraidy Rat" or FRAT has been constructed that accounts for many aspects of delay and context conditioning. Conditioning and extinction are the result of neuromodulation-controlled LTP at synapses of thalamic, cortical, and hippocampal afferents on principal cells and inhibitory interneurons of lateral and basal amygdala. The phenomena accounted for by the model (and simulated by the computational version include conditioning, secondary reinforcement, blocking, the immediate shock deficit, extinction, renewal, and a range of empirically valid effects of pre- and post-training ablation or inactivation of hippocampus or amygdala nuclei.

  2. Designing for User Engagment Aesthetic and Attractive User Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sutcliffe, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    This book explores the design process for user experience and engagement, which expands the traditional concept of usability and utility in design to include aesthetics, fun and excitement. User experience has evolved as a new area of Human Computer Interaction research, motivated by non-work oriented applications such as games, education and emerging interactive Web 2.0. The chapter starts by examining the phenomena of user engagement and experience and setting them in the perspective of cognitive psychology, in particular motivation, emotion and mood. The perspective of aesthetics is expande

  3. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2011-01-01

    This Fourth Revised Edition of Computer Organization and Design includes a complete set of updated and new exercises, along with improvements and changes suggested by instructors and students. Focusing on the revolutionary change taking place in industry today--the switch from uniprocessor to multicore microprocessors--this classic textbook has a modern and up-to-date focus on parallelism in all its forms. Examples highlighting multicore and GPU processor designs are supported with performance and benchmarking data. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to pres

  4. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A USER-ORIENTED SPEECH RECOGNITION INTERFACE - THE SYNERGY OF TECHNOLOGY AND HUMAN-FACTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLOOSTERMAN, SH

    The design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface are described. The interface enables the use of speech recognition in so-called interactive voice response systems which can be accessed via a telephone connection. In the design of the interface a synergy of technology

  5. Design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface: the synergy of technology and human factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Sietse H.

    1994-01-01

    The design and implementation of a user-oriented speech recognition interface are described. The interface enables the use of speech recognition in so-called interactive voice response systems which can be accessed via a telephone connection. In the design of the interface a synergy of technology

  6. Design of an Adaptive-Neural Network Attitude Controller of a Satellite using Reaction Wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ajorkar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite using four reaction wheels in a tetrahedron configuration. Then, an attitude control based on feedback linearization control has been designed and uncertainties in the moment of inertia matrix and disturbances torque have been considered. In order to eliminate the effect of these uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with back-propagation law is designed. In this structure, the parameters of the moment of inertia matrix and external disturbances are estimated and used in feedback linearization control law. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by several simulations.

  7. Towards the formal verification of the requirements and design of a processor interface unit: HOL listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, David A.; Windley, Phillip J.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    This technical report contains the Higher-Order Logic (HOL) listings of the partial verification of the requirements and design for a commercially developed processor interface unit (PIU). The PIU is an interface chip performing memory interface, bus interface, and additional support services for a commercial microprocessor within a fault tolerant computer system. This system, the Fault Tolerant Embedded Processor (FTEP), is targeted towards applications in avionics and space requiring extremely high levels of mission reliability, extended maintenance-free operation, or both. This report contains the actual HOL listings of the PIU verification as it currently exists. Section two of this report contains general-purpose HOL theories and definitions that support the PIU verification. These include arithmetic theories dealing with inequalities and associativity, and a collection of tactics used in the PIU proofs. Section three contains the HOL listings for the completed PIU design verification. Section 4 contains the HOL listings for the partial requirements verification of the P-Port.

  8. User productivity as a function of AutoCAD interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitta, D A; Flores, P L

    1995-12-01

    Increased operator productivity is a desired outcome of user-CAD interaction scenarios. Two objectives of this research were to (1) define a measure of operator productivity and (2) empirically investigate the potential effects of CAD interface design on operator productivity, where productivity is defined as the percentage of a drawing session correctly completed per unit time. Here, AutoCAD provides the CAD environment of interest. Productivity with respect to two AutoCAD interface designs (menu, template) and three task types (draw, dimension, display) was investigated. Analysis of user productivity data revealed significantly higher productivity under the menu interface condition than under the template interface condition. A significant effect of task type was also discovered, where user productivity under display tasks was higher than productivity under the draw and dimension tasks. Implications of these results are presented.

  9. The design and evaluation of an activity monitoring user interface for people with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil; Bierwirth, Rebekah; Fulk, George; Sazonov, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Usability is an important topic in the field of telerehabilitation research. Older users with disabilities in particular, present age-related and disability-related challenges that should be accommodated for in the design of a user interface for a telerehabilitation system. This paper describes the design, implementation, and assessment of a telerehabilitation system user interface that tries to maximize usability for an elderly user who has experienced a stroke. An Internet-connected Nintendo(®) Wii™ gaming system is selected as a hardware platform, and a server and website are implemented to process and display the feedback information. The usability of the interface is assessed with a trial consisting of 18 subjects: 10 healthy Doctor of Physical Therapy students and 8 people with a stroke. Results show similar levels of usability and high satisfaction with the gaming system interface from both groups of subjects.

  10. Novel conjugates of peptides and conjugated polymers for optoelectronics and neural interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Nandita

    Peptide-polymer conjugates are a novel class of hybrid materials that take advantage of each individual component giving the opportunity to generate materials with unique physical, chemical, mechanical, optical, and electronic properties. In this dissertation peptide-polymer conjugates for two different applications are discussed. The first set of peptide-polymer conjugates were developed as templates to study the intermolecular interactions between electroactive molecules by manipulating the intermolecular distances at nano-scale level. A PEGylated, alpha-helical peptide template was employed to effectively display an array of organic chromophores (oxadiazole containing phenylenevinylene oligomers, Oxa-PPV). Three Oxa-PPV chromophores were strategically positioned on each template, at distances ranging from 6 to 17 A from each other, as dictated by the chemical and structural properties of the peptide. The Oxa-PPV modified PEGylated helical peptides (produced via Heck coupling strategies) were characterized by a variety of spectroscopic methods. Electronic contributions from multiple pairs of chromophores on a scaffold were detectable; the number and relative positioning of the chromophores dictated the absorbance and emission maxima, thus confirming the utility of these polymer--peptide templates for complex presentation of organic chromophores. The rest of the thesis is focused on using poly(3,4-alkylenedioxythiophene) based conjugated polymers as coatings for neural electrodes. This thiophene derivative is of considerable current interest for functionalizing the surfaces of a wide variety of devices including implantable biomedical electronics, specifically neural bio-electrodes. Toward these ends, copolymer films of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT) with a carboxylic acid functional EDOT (EDOTacid) were electrochemically deposited and characterized as a systematic function of the EDOTacid content (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100%). The chemical surface characterization

  11. Designing a Knowledge Representation Interface for Cognitive Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagosi, T.; Greeff, J. de; Hindriks, K.V.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The design of cognitive agents involves a knowledge representation (KR) to formally represent and manipulate information relevant for that agent. In practice, agent programming frameworks are dedicated to a specific KR, limiting the use of other possible ones. In this paper we address the issue of

  12. Ecological Design of Cooperative Human-Machine Interfaces for Safety of Intelligent Transport Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orekhov Aleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes research results in the domain of cooperative intelligent transport systems. The requirements for human-machine interface considering safety issue of for intelligent transport systems (ITSare analyzed. Profiling of the requirements to cooperative human-machine interface (CHMI for such systems including requirements to usability and safety is based on a set of standards for ITSs. An approach and design technique of cooperative human-machine interface for ITSs are suggested. The architecture of cloud-based CHMI for intelligent transport systems has been developed. The prototype of software system CHMI4ITSis described.

  13. Design of electronic medical record user interfaces: a matrix-based method for improving usability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuqi, Kushtrim; Eveleigh, Tim; Holzer, Thomas; Sarkani, Shahryar; Levin, James E; Crowley, Rebecca S

    2013-01-01

    This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM) modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians' time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  14. Design of Electronic Medical Record User Interfaces: A Matrix-Based Method for Improving Usability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Kuqi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines a new approach of using the Design Structure Matrix (DSM modeling technique to improve the design of Electronic Medical Record (EMR user interfaces. The usability of an EMR medication dosage calculator used for placing orders in an academic hospital setting was investigated. The proposed method captures and analyzes the interactions between user interface elements of the EMR system and groups elements based on information exchange, spatial adjacency, and similarity to improve screen density and time-on-task. Medication dose adjustment task time was recorded for the existing and new designs using a cognitive simulation model that predicts user performance. We estimate that the design improvement could reduce time-on-task by saving an average of 21 hours of hospital physicians’ time over the course of a month. The study suggests that the application of DSM can improve the usability of an EMR user interface.

  15. Blood-neural barrier: intercellular communication at glio-vascular interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Park, Joeng Ae; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Woo Jean; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2006-07-31

    The blood-neural barrier (BNB), including blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-retinal barrier (BRB), is an endothelial barrier constructed by an extensive network of endothelial cells, astrocytes and neurons to form functional "neurovascular units", which has an important role in maintaining a precisely regulated microenvironment for reliable neuronal activity. Although failure of the BNB may be a precipitating event or a consequence, the breakdown of BNB is closely related with the development and progression of CNS diseases. Therefore, BNB is most essential in the regulation of microenvironment of the CNS. The BNB is a selective diffusion barrier characterized by tight junctions between endothelial cells, lack of fenestrations, and specific BNB transporters. The BNB have been shown to be astrocyte dependent, for it is formed by the CNS capillary endothelial cells, surrounded by astrocytic end-foot processes. Given the anatomical associations with endothelial cells, it could be supposed that astrocytes play a role in the development, maintenance, and breakdown of the BNB. Therefore, astrocytes-endothelial cells interaction influences the BNB in both physiological and pathological conditions. If we better understand mutual interactions between astrocytes and endothelial cells, in the near future, we could provide a critical solution to the BNB problems and create new opportunities for future success of treating CNS diseases. Here, we focused astrocyte-endothelial cell interaction in the formation and function of the BNB.

  16. A computer aid for choosing HMOs: design of a new interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, F; Alemi, M

    1989-08-01

    This paper reports on a new interface design. The presentation is similar to a newspaper style, allowing a familiar format and advertisement. In addition, the design includes steps to ease data collection, features to help users influence others in the organization, and a dynamic allocation of menu lists that reflect user's knowledge and previous interest.

  17. A Comparison of Parallelism in Interface Designs for Computer-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Rik; Yu, Tao; Spenkelink, Gerd; Vos, Hans

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an experiment that was carried out with a prototype, designed in conformity with the concept of parallelism and the Parallel Instruction theory (the PI theory). We designed this prototype with five different interfaces, and ran an empirical study in which 18 participants completed an abstract task. The five basic designs…

  18. Construction management research at the interface of design and explanatory science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voordijk, Johannes T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this study is to characterize construction management research at the interface of explanatory science and design science. Design/methodology/approach – The dual nature of construction management research is analyzed by relating this field of research to natural science,

  19. How Interface Design and Search Strategy Influence Children’s Search Performance and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochmann-Mannak, Hanna; Lentz, Leo; Huibers, Theo W.C.; Sanders, Ted

    This chapter presents an experiment with 158 children, aged 10 to 12, in which search performance and attitudes towards an informational Website are investigated. The same Website was designed in 3 different types of interface design varying in playfulness of navigation structure and in playfulness

  20. Utilising cognitive work analysis for the design and evaluation of command and control user interfaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gous, E

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and evaluation of distributed net-centric command and control user interfaces for future air defence operations. The design was based on the Cognitive Work Analysis framework to identify the required capabilities...

  1. Interfacing Media: User-Centered Design for Media-Rich Web Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Sarah

    2000-01-01

    Discusses multimedia Web site design that may include images, animations, audio, and video. Highlights include interfaces that stress user-centered design; using only relevant media; placing high-demand content on secondary pages and keeping the home page simpler; providing information about the media; considering users with disabilities; and user…

  2. An approach to design interface topologies across interdependent urban infrastructure systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang Min, E-mail: min.ouyang@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-318, TX 77005 (United States); Duenas-Osorio, Leonardo, E-mail: leonardo.duenas-osorio@rice.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, MS-318, TX 77005 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    This paper proposes an approach to design or retrofit interface topologies to minimize cascading failures across urban infrastructure systems. Four types of interface design strategies are formulated based on maximum network component degree, maximum component betweenness, minimum Euclidean distance across components and component reliability rankings. To compute and compare strategy effectiveness under multiple hazard types, this paper introduces a global annual cascading failure effect (GACFE) metric as well as a GACFE-based cost improvement (GACI) metric. The GACI metric quantifies the improvement of the strategy effectiveness per kilometer increment of interdependent link length (ILL) relative to a reference strategy with minimum ILL. Taking as examples the power and gas transmission systems in Harris County, Texas, USA, optimum interface designs under random and hurricane hazards are discussed. Findings include that the strategy based on reliability rankings minimizes the GACFE metric, and decreases the GACI value relative to a reference practical strategy by 10-15% under different power grid safety margins. Such metrics will contribute to coupled utility system design or retrofit given that current guidelines or recommended practices in the utility industry mostly rely on minimum Euclidean distances and are yet to include interdependent effects in their provisions. - Highlights: > This paper offers interface topology design methods to reduce cascading failures. > Design strategies are judged by performance and cost metrics under multiple hazards. > Reliability-based interfaces globally outperform topological and distance designs. > Only low levels of extra link density and distance are needed for desired designs. > Interface distance relaxation is more effective at yielding maximum performance.

  3. Advanced Operator Workstation Display Design for a User Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Hoan-Sung; Choi, Young-San; Kim, Young-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-15

    The HANARO operator workstation in the main control room that continuously controls and monitors the overall reactor condition is being upgraded in various directions to catch up with the demand from operators. But the original design of OWS has some difficulties in the implementation of a more sophisticated system due to the poor software configuration that has a limitation in its hardware performance. Such hardware restrictions as the resolution problem, system performance, and a utility which is behind the times result in retarding development of the OWS display design. But with hardware progress a more comprehensive control system can be realized and it satisfies more requirements with a high specification. It is demonstrated in this paper that the applied functions are shown through a remarkable example of a display.

  4. Interface design for an audio based information retrieval system

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, James Robert

    1992-01-01

    This project involves a telephone-based information retrieval system. Users interact with the computer by pressing buttons on a telephone keypad and listening to the computer respond by way of a speech synthesizer. The purpose of this project is to redesign and revise an existing information retrieval system. The goals of this project include simplifying the job of the menu designer and providing a way so experience can aid users to perform a given task faster than previously possible. Key...

  5. A Revised Interface for the ARL Topodef Mobility Design Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Application Design with MVC [Technical article]. (2010). Retrieved from Oracle Corporation, website: http://java.sun.com/ developer /technicalArticles...time consuming, or difficult to coordinate. A key to developing valuable MANET emulation experiments is defining a realistic mobility scenario...Researchers need a tool for developing mobility scenarios based on typical troop movement patterns. Researchers use the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL

  6. The Attentional Capture of Colour in Visual Interface Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Emil; Maier, Anja

    2017-01-01

    associated with specific mood tones. However, it has thus far not been investigated whether these two factors, which we refer to as the perception-primacy and emotion-conveyance, are associated with attentional capture in a congruent manner. To investigate this, we conducted a visual search task study...... at a sufficiently early level of processing to influence attention. We end by discussing implications of our results for design practice and research in psychology....

  7. Design of intelligent systems based on fuzzy logic, neural networks and nature-inspired optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Oscar; Kacprzyk, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent advances on the design of intelligent systems based on fuzzy logic, neural networks and nature-inspired optimization and their application in areas such as, intelligent control and robotics, pattern recognition, time series prediction and optimization of complex problems. The book is organized in eight main parts, which contain a group of papers around a similar subject. The first part consists of papers with the main theme of theoretical aspects of fuzzy logic, which basically consists of papers that propose new concepts and algorithms based on fuzzy systems. The second part contains papers with the main theme of neural networks theory, which are basically papers dealing with new concepts and algorithms in neural networks. The third part contains papers describing applications of neural networks in diverse areas, such as time series prediction and pattern recognition. The fourth part contains papers describing new nature-inspired optimization algorithms. The fifth part presents div...

  8. Professional SharePoint 2010 Branding and User Interface Design

    CERN Document Server

    Drisgill, Randy; Sanford, Jacob J; Stubbs, Paul; Riemann, Larry

    2010-01-01

    A must have guide for creating engaging and usable SharePoint 2010 brandingWith SharePoint 2010, Microsoft has provided a more robust environment for creating collaboration and content management sites that rival any of the popular websites on the internet. Creating a branded SharePoint site involves understanding both traditional web design techniques as well as topics that are typically reserved for developers. This book bridges that gap by not only providing expert guidance for creating beautiful public facing and internal intranet sites but it also addresses the needs of those readers that

  9. A case study on better iconographic design in electronic medical records' user interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasa, Umut Burcu; Ozcan, Oguzhan; Yantac, Asim Evren; Unluer, Ayca

    2008-06-01

    It is a known fact that there is a conflict between what users expect and what user interface designers create in the field of medical informatics along with other fields of interface design. The objective of the study is to suggest, from the 'design art' perspective, a method for improving the usability of an electronic medical record (EMR) interface. The suggestion is based on the hypothesis that the user interface of an EMR should be iconographic. The proposed three-step method consists of a questionnaire survey on how hospital users perceive concepts/terms that are going to be used in the EMR user interface. Then icons associated with the terms are designed by a designer, following a guideline which is prepared according to the results of the first questionnaire. Finally the icons are asked back to the target group for proof. A case study was conducted with 64 medical staff and 30 professional designers for the first questionnaire, and with 30 medical staff for the second. In the second questionnaire 7.53 icons out of 10 were matched correctly with a standard deviation of 0.98. Also, all icons except three were matched correctly in at least 83.3% of the forms. The proposed new method differs from the majority of previous studies which are based on user requirements by leaning on user experiments instead. The study demonstrated that the user interface of EMRs should be designed according to a guideline that results from a survey on users' experiences on metaphoric perception of the terms.

  10. Decoding of grasping information from neural signals recorded using peripheral intrafascicular interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriani Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The restoration of complex hand functions by creating a novel bidirectional link between the nervous system and a dexterous hand prosthesis is currently pursued by several research groups. This connection must be fast, intuitive, with a high success rate and quite natural to allow an effective bidirectional flow of information between the user's nervous system and the smart artificial device. This goal can be achieved with several approaches and among them, the use of implantable interfaces connected with the peripheral nervous system, namely intrafascicular electrodes, is considered particularly interesting. Methods Thin-film longitudinal intra-fascicular electrodes were implanted in the median and ulnar nerves of an amputee's stump during a four-week trial. The possibility of decoding motor commands suitable to control a dexterous hand prosthesis was investigated for the first time in this research field by implementing a spike sorting and classification algorithm. Results The results showed that motor information (e.g., grip types and single finger movements could be extracted with classification accuracy around 85% (for three classes plus rest and that the user could improve his ability to govern motor commands over time as shown by the improved discrimination ability of our classification algorithm. Conclusions These results open up new and promising possibilities for the development of a neuro-controlled hand prosthesis.

  11. Computer organization and design the hardware/software interface

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, David A

    2013-01-01

    The 5th edition of Computer Organization and Design moves forward into the post-PC era with new examples, exercises, and material highlighting the emergence of mobile computing and the cloud. This generational change is emphasized and explored with updated content featuring tablet computers, cloud infrastructure, and the ARM (mobile computing devices) and x86 (cloud computing) architectures. Because an understanding of modern hardware is essential to achieving good performance and energy efficiency, this edition adds a new concrete example, "Going Faster," used throughout the text to demonstrate extremely effective optimization techniques. Also new to this edition is discussion of the "Eight Great Ideas" of computer architecture. As with previous editions, a MIPS processor is the core used to present the fundamentals of hardware technologies, assembly language, computer arithmetic, pipelining, memory hierarchies and I/O. Optimization techniques featured throughout the text. It covers parallelism in depth with...

  12. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A; Schroeder, Karen E; Patel, Paras R; Irwin, Zachary T; Thompson, David E; Nicole Bentley, J; Lempka, Scott F; Chestek, Cynthia A; Patil, Parag G

    2016-02-01

    We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the recording site-tissue interface rather than

  13. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A.; Schroeder, Karen E.; Patel, Paras R.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Thompson, David E.; Bentley, J. Nicole; Lempka, Scott F.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Patil, Parag G.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. Approach. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. Main results. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. Significance. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the

  14. Interface design and human factors considerations for model-based tight glycemic control in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan; Steel, James; Le Compte, Aaron; Evans, Alicia; Tan, Chia-Siong; Penning, Sophie; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Tight glycemic control (TGC) has shown benefits but has been difficult to implement. Model-based methods and computerized protocols offer the opportunity to improve TGC quality and compliance. This research presents an interface design to maximize compliance, minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and minimize error based on simple human factors and end user input. The graphical user interface (GUI) design is presented by construction based on a series of simple, short design criteria based on fundamental human factors engineering and includes the use of user feedback and focus groups comprising nursing staff at Christchurch Hospital. The overall design maximizes ease of use and minimizes (unnecessary) interaction and use. It is coupled to a protocol that allows nurse staff to select measurement intervals and thus self-manage workload. The overall GUI design is presented and requires only one data entry point per intervention cycle. The design and main interface are heavily focused on the nurse end users who are the predominant users, while additional detailed and longitudinal data, which are of interest to doctors guiding overall patient care, are available via tabs. This dichotomy of needs and interests based on the end user's immediate focus and goals shows how interfaces must adapt to offer different information to multiple types of users. The interface is designed to minimize real and perceived clinical effort, and ongoing pilot trials have reported high levels of acceptance. The overall design principles, approach, and testing methods are based on fundamental human factors principles designed to reduce user effort and error and are readily generalizable. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  15. Virtual workstations and telepresence interfaces: Design accommodations and prototypes for Space Station Freedom evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1990-01-01

    An advanced human-system interface is being developed for evolutionary Space Station Freedom as part of the NASA Office of Space Station (OSS) Advanced Development Program. The human-system interface is based on body-pointed display and control devices. The project will identify and document the design accommodations ('hooks and scars') required to support virtual workstations and telepresence interfaces, and prototype interface systems will be built, evaluated, and refined. The project is a joint enterprise of Marquette University, Astronautics Corporation of America (ACA), and NASA's ARC. The project team is working with NASA's JSC and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (the Work Package contractor) to ensure that the project is consistent with space station user requirements and program constraints. Documentation describing design accommodations and tradeoffs will be provided to OSS, JSC, and McDonnell Douglas, and prototype interface devices will be delivered to ARC and JSC. ACA intends to commercialize derivatives of the interface for use with computer systems developed for scientific visualization and system simulation.

  16. A study of usability principles and interface design for mobile e-books.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Ming; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2015-01-01

    This study examined usability principles and interface designs in order to understand the relationship between the intentions of mobile e-book interface designs and users' perceptions. First, this study summarised 4 usability principles and 16 interface attributes, in order to conduct usability testing and questionnaire survey by referring to Nielsen (1993), Norman (2002), and Yeh (2010), who proposed the usability principles. Second, this study used the interviews to explore the perceptions and behaviours of user operations through senior users of multi-touch prototype devices. The results of this study are as follows: (1) users' behaviour of operating an interactive interface is related to user prior experience; (2) users' rating of the visibility principle is related to users' subjective perception but not related to user prior experience; however, users' ratings of the ease, efficiency, and enjoyment principles are related to user prior experience; (3) the interview survey reveals that the key attributes affecting users' behaviour of operating an interface include aesthetics, achievement, and friendliness. This study conducts experiments to explore the effects of users’ prior multi-touch experience on users’ behaviour of operating a mobile e-book interface and users’ rating of usability principles. Both qualitative and quantitative data analyses were performed. By applying protocol analysis, key attributes affecting users’ behaviour of operation were determined.

  17. Neural correlates of user-initiated motor success and failure - A brain-computer interface perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazmir, Boris; Reiner, Miriam

    2016-11-02

    Any motor action is, by nature, potentially accompanied by human errors. In order to facilitate development of error-tailored Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) correction systems, we focused on internal, human-initiated errors, and investigated EEG correlates of user outcome successes and errors during a continuous 3D virtual tennis game against a computer player. We used a multisensory, 3D, highly immersive environment. Missing and repelling the tennis ball were considered, as 'error' (miss) and 'success' (repel). Unlike most previous studies, where the environment "encouraged" the participant to perform a mistake, here errors happened naturally, resulting from motor-perceptual-cognitive processes of incorrect estimation of the ball kinematics, and can be regarded as user internal, self-initiated errors. Results show distinct and well-defined Event-Related Potentials (ERPs), embedded in the ongoing EEG, that differ across conditions by waveforms, scalp signal distribution maps, source estimation results (sLORETA) and time-frequency patterns, establishing a series of typical features that allow valid discrimination between user internal outcome success and error. The significant delay in latency between positive peaks of error- and success-related ERPs, suggests a cross-talk between top-down and bottom-up processing, represented by an outcome recognition process, in the context of the game world. Success-related ERPs had a central scalp distribution, while error-related ERPs were centro-parietal. The unique characteristics and sharp differences between EEG correlates of error/success provide the crucial components for an improved BCI system. The features of the EEG waveform can be used to detect user action outcome, to be fed into the BCI correction system. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using artificial neural networks in the design of orthotropic bridge decks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shamel Fahmy

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For orthotropic bridge decks a lot of progress has been made in the development of codes to aid in the design process, in addition to software tools for numerical analysis and design. However, professional software tools will not aid the designer in choosing a preliminary economic layout at the conceptual design stage. Designers would go through iterative, lengthy and expensive procedures to reach the best configuration. The present research provides a methodology to investigate the contingency of using artificial neural networks for conceptual design of orthotropic steel-deck bridge. A neural network model was trained with different combinations of dimensions, and eight types of safety checks were performed on all of them. The resulting network can predict whether the deck is safe or not. It is found that this approach for the selection of orthotropic deck dimensions is a better and cost-effective option compared with international codes or expert opinion.

  19. Some trends in man-machine interface design for industrial process plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1980-01-01

    The demands for an efficient and reliable man-machine inter-face in industrial process plant are increasing due to the steadily growing size and complexity of installations. At the same time, computerized technology offers the possibility of powerful and effective solutions to designers. In the p......The demands for an efficient and reliable man-machine inter-face in industrial process plant are increasing due to the steadily growing size and complexity of installations. At the same time, computerized technology offers the possibility of powerful and effective solutions to designers...

  20. Fast Numerical Methods for the Design of Layered Photonic Structures with Rough Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarevskiy, Nikolay; Braginsky, Leonid; Shklover, Valery; Hafner, Christian; Lawson, John

    2011-01-01

    Modified boundary conditions (MBC) and a multilayer approach (MA) are proposed as fast and efficient numerical methods for the design of 1D photonic structures with rough interfaces. These methods are applicable for the structures, composed of materials with arbitrary permittivity tensor. MBC and MA are numerically validated on different types of interface roughness and permittivities of the constituent materials. The proposed methods can be combined with the 4x4 scattering matrix method as a field solver and an evolutionary strategy as an optimizer. The resulted optimization procedure is fast, accurate, numerically stable and can be used to design structures for various applications.

  1. Designing a neural network for closed thermosyphon with nanofluid using a genetic algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Salehi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer of a silver/water nanofluid in a two-phase closed thermosyphon that is thermally enhanced by magnetic field has been predicted by an optimized artificial Neural Network. Artificial neural network is a technique with flexible mathematical structure that is capable of identifying complex non-linear relationships between input and output data. A multi-layer perception neural network was used to estimate the thermal efficiency and resistance of a thermosyphon during application of a magnetic field and using nanoparticles in the water as the working fluid. The magnetic field strength, volume fraction of nanofluid in water and inlet power were used as input parameters and the thermal efficiency and thermal resistance were used as output parameters. The results were compared with experimental data and it was found that the thermal efficiency and resistance estimated by the multi-layer perception neural network are accurate. The GA-ANN (Genetic Algorithm-Artificial Neural network predicts the thermosyphon behavior correctly within the given range of the training data. In this study, a new approach for the auto-design of neural networks, based on a genetic algorithm, has been used to predict collection output of a closed thermosyphon.

  2. Use of uniform designs in combination with neural networks for viral infection process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenno, Laís Hara; Rocha, José Celso; Leme, Jaci; Caricati, Celso Pereira; Tonso, Aldo; Fernández Núñez, Eutimio Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    This work aimed to compare the predictive capacity of empirical models, based on the uniform design utilization combined to artificial neural networks with respect to classical factorial designs in bioprocess, using as example the rabies virus replication in BHK-21 cells. The viral infection process parameters under study were temperature (34°C, 37°C), multiplicity of infection (0.04, 0.07, 0.1), times of infection, and harvest (24, 48, 72 hours) and the monitored output parameter was viral production. A multilevel factorial experimental design was performed for the study of this system. Fractions of this experimental approach (18, 24, 30, 36 and 42 runs), defined according uniform designs, were used as alternative for modelling through artificial neural network and thereafter an output variable optimization was carried out by means of genetic algorithm methodology. Model prediction capacities for all uniform design approaches under study were better than that found for classical factorial design approach. It was demonstrated that uniform design in combination with artificial neural network could be an efficient experimental approach for modelling complex bioprocess like viral production. For the present study case, 67% of experimental resources were saved when compared to a classical factorial design approach. In the near future, this strategy could replace the established factorial designs used in the bioprocess development activities performed within biopharmaceutical organizations because of the improvements gained in the economics of experimentation that do not sacrifice the quality of decisions. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  3. Novel user interface design for medication reconciliation: an evaluation of Twinlist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisant, Catherine; Wu, Johnny; Hettinger, A Zach; Powsner, Seth; Shneiderman, Ben

    2015-03-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate time, number of interface actions, and accuracy on medication reconciliation tasks using a novel user interface (Twinlist, which lays out the medications in five columns based on similarity and uses animation to introduce the grouping - www.cs.umd.edu/hcil/sharp/twinlist) compared to a Control interface (where medications are presented side by side in two columns). A secondary objective was to assess participant agreement with statements regarding clarity and utility and to elicit comparisons. A 1 × 2 within-subjects experimental design was used with interface (Twinlist or Control) as an independent variable; time, number of clicks, scrolls, and errors were used as dependent variables. Participants were practicing medical providers with experience performing medication reconciliation but no experience with Twinlist. They reconciled two cases in each interface (in a counterbalanced order), then provided feedback on the design of the interface. Twenty medical providers participated in the study for a total of 80 trials. The trials using Twinlist were statistically significantly faster (18%), with fewer clicks (40%) and scrolls (60%). Serious errors were noted 12 and 31 times in Twinlist and Control trials, respectively. Trials using Twinlist were faster and more accurate. Subjectively, participants rated Twinlist more favorably than Control. They valued the novel layout of the drugs, but indicated that the included animation would be valuable for novices, but not necessarily for advanced users. Additional feedback from participants provides guidance for further development and clinical implementations. Cognitive support of medication reconciliation through interface design can significantly improve performance and safety. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Evolvable Block-Based Neural Network Design for Applications in Dynamic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumil G. Merchant

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedicated hardware implementations of artificial neural networks promise to provide faster, lower-power operation when compared to software implementations executing on microprocessors, but rarely do these implementations have the flexibility to adapt and train online under dynamic conditions. A typical design process for artificial neural networks involves offline training using software simulations and synthesis and hardware implementation of the obtained network offline. This paper presents a design of block-based neural networks (BbNNs on FPGAs capable of dynamic adaptation and online training. Specifically the network structure and the internal parameters, the two pieces of the multiparametric evolution of the BbNNs, can be adapted intrinsically, in-field under the control of the training algorithm. This ability enables deployment of the platform in dynamic environments, thereby significantly expanding the range of target applications, deployment lifetimes, and system reliability. The potential and functionality of the platform are demonstrated using several case studies.

  5. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam M Shanechi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA. However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was

  6. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanechi, Maryam M; Orsborn, Amy L; Carmena, Jose M

    2016-04-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain's behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user's motor intention during CLDA-a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to parameter

  7. (Covert attention and visual speller design in an ERP-based brain-computer interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treder Matthias S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a visual oddball paradigm, attention to an event usually modulates the event-related potential (ERP. An ERP-based brain-computer interface (BCI exploits this neural mechanism for communication. Hitherto, it was unclear to what extent the accuracy of such a BCI requires eye movements (overt attention or whether it is also feasible for targets in the visual periphery (covert attention. Also unclear was how the visual design of the BCI can be improved to meet peculiarities of peripheral vision such as low spatial acuity and crowding. Method Healthy participants (N = 13 performed a copy-spelling task wherein they had to count target intensifications. EEG and eye movements were recorded concurrently. First, (covert attention was investigated by way of a target fixation condition and a central fixation condition. In the latter, participants had to fixate a dot in the center of the screen and allocate their attention to a target in the visual periphery. Second, the effect of visual speller layout was investigated by comparing the symbol Matrix to an ERP-based Hex-o-Spell, a two-levels speller consisting of six discs arranged on an invisible hexagon. Results We assessed counting errors, ERP amplitudes, and offline classification performance. There is an advantage (i.e., less errors, larger ERP amplitude modulation, better classification of overt attention over covert attention, and there is also an advantage of the Hex-o-Spell over the Matrix. Using overt attention, P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 components are enhanced by attention. Using covert attention, only N2 and P3 are enhanced for both spellers, and N1 and P2 are modulated when using the Hex-o-Spell but not when using the Matrix. Consequently, classifiers rely mainly on early evoked potentials in overt attention and on later cognitive components in covert attention. Conclusions Both overt and covert attention can be used to drive an ERP-based BCI, but performance is markedly lower

  8. Robust Brain-Machine Interface Design Using Optimal Feedback Control Modeling and Adaptive Point Process Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmena, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Much progress has been made in brain-machine interfaces (BMI) using decoders such as Kalman filters and finding their parameters with closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA). However, current decoders do not model the spikes directly, and hence may limit the processing time-scale of BMI control and adaptation. Moreover, while specialized CLDA techniques for intention estimation and assisted training exist, a unified and systematic CLDA framework that generalizes across different setups is lacking. Here we develop a novel closed-loop BMI training architecture that allows for processing, control, and adaptation using spike events, enables robust control and extends to various tasks. Moreover, we develop a unified control-theoretic CLDA framework within which intention estimation, assisted training, and adaptation are performed. The architecture incorporates an infinite-horizon optimal feedback-control (OFC) model of the brain’s behavior in closed-loop BMI control, and a point process model of spikes. The OFC model infers the user’s motor intention during CLDA—a process termed intention estimation. OFC is also used to design an autonomous and dynamic assisted training technique. The point process model allows for neural processing, control and decoder adaptation with every spike event and at a faster time-scale than current decoders; it also enables dynamic spike-event-based parameter adaptation unlike current CLDA methods that use batch-based adaptation on much slower adaptation time-scales. We conducted closed-loop experiments in a non-human primate over tens of days to dissociate the effects of these novel CLDA components. The OFC intention estimation improved BMI performance compared with current intention estimation techniques. OFC assisted training allowed the subject to consistently achieve proficient control. Spike-event-based adaptation resulted in faster and more consistent performance convergence compared with batch-based methods, and was robust to

  9. Towards the formal verification of the requirements and design of a processor interface unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, David A.; Windley, Phillip J.; Cohen, Gerald C.

    1993-01-01

    The formal verification of the design and partial requirements for a Processor Interface Unit (PIU) using the Higher Order Logic (HOL) theorem-proving system is described. The processor interface unit is a single-chip subsystem within a fault-tolerant embedded system under development within the Boeing Defense and Space Group. It provides the opportunity to investigate the specification and verification of a real-world subsystem within a commercially-developed fault-tolerant computer. An overview of the PIU verification effort is given. The actual HOL listing from the verification effort are documented in a companion NASA contractor report entitled 'Towards the Formal Verification of the Requirements and Design of a Processor Interface Unit - HOL Listings' including the general-purpose HOL theories and definitions that support the PIU verification as well as tactics used in the proofs.

  10. Design Concept of Human Interface System for Risk Monitoring for Proactive Trouble Prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidekazu, Yoshikawa; Ming, Yang; Zhijian, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A new concept is first proposed of distributed human interface system to integrate both operation and maintenance of nuclear power plant. Then, a method of constructing human interface system is introduced by integrating the plant knowledge database system based on Multilevel Flow Model (MFM......) with the risk monitor to watch Defense-in Depth plant safety functions. The proposed concept is applied for a liquid metal fast reactor Monju and necessary R&D subjects are reviewed to realize human interface system for the maintenance work in Monju plant. Because of using high temperature liquid sodium...... as reactor coolant in Monju plant, the maintenance for Monju should utilize more automated equipments of remote control and robotics than that of light water reactor. It is necessary to design optimum task allocation between human and automated machine as the requisites for good communication design of human...

  11. Optimizing the morphological design of discrete-time cellular neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    terBrugge, MH; Spaanenburg, L; Jansen, WJ; Nijhuis, JAG

    1996-01-01

    The morphological design of Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks (DTCNNs) has been presented in a companion paper [1]. DTCNN templates have been given for the elemental morphological operators. One way to obtain realizations for more complex operators is cascading the DTCNN equivalences of the

  12. Four principles for user interface design of computerised clinical decision support systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Christiansen, Marion Berg; Nøhr, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents results from a design research project of a user interface (UI) for a Computerised Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS). The ambition has been to design Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) that can minimise medication errors. Through an iterative design process a digital prototype for prescription of medicine has been developed. This paper presents results from the formative evaluation of the prototype conducted in a simulation laboratory with ten participating physicians. Data from the simulation is analysed by use of theory on how users perceive information. The conclusion is a model, which sum up four principles of interaction for design of CDSS. The four principles for design of user interfaces for CDSS are summarised as four A's: All in one, At a glance, At hand and Attention. The model emphasises integration of all four interaction principles in the design of user interfaces for CDSS, i.e. the model is an integrated model which we suggest as a guide for interaction design when working with preventing medication errors.

  13. User-centered design with illiterate persons : The case of the ATM user interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, A.H.M.; Jong, J.G.M. de; Balken, J.S. van

    2008-01-01

    One of the major challenges in current user interface research and development is the accommodation of diversity in users and contexts of use in order to improve the self-efficacy of citizens. A common banking service, which should be designed for diversity, is the Automated Teller Machine (ATM).

  14. Designing the marketing-sales interface in B2B firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemans, W.G.; Makovec Brencic, M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose - This paper explores the marketing-sales interface in Dutch and Slovenian B2B firms. Design/methodology/approach - The study included 11 Dutch firms and ten Slovenian firms, with both samples as closely matched as possible. The firms were all manufacturers of physical products that operate

  15. Designing personal attentive user interfaces in the mobile public safety domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Streefkerk, J.W.; Esch van-Bussemakers, M.P.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the mobile computing environment, there is a need to adapt the information and service provision to the momentary attentive state of the user, operational requirements and usage context. This paper proposes to design personal attentive user interfaces (PAUI) for which the content and style of

  16. Toward User Interfaces and Data Visualization Criteria for Learning Design of Digital Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Railean, Elena

    2014-01-01

    User interface and data visualisation criteria are central issues in digital textbooks design. However, when applying mathematical modelling of learning process to the analysis of the possible solutions, it could be observed that results differ. Mathematical learning views cognition in on the base on statistics and probability theory, graph…

  17. The Attitudes of Field Dependence Learners for Learner Interface Design (LID) in e-Learning Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sözcü, Ömer Faruk; Ipek, Ismail; Kinay, Hüseyin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore relationships between learners' cognitive styles of field dependence and learner variables in the preference of learner Interface design, attitudes in e-Learning instruction and experience with e-Learning in distance education. Cognitive style has historically referred to a psychological dimension…

  18. Within the Interface: Visual Rhetoric, Pedagogy, and Writing Center Website Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myatt, Alice J.

    2010-01-01

    My dissertation examines the theory and praxis of taking an expanded concept of the human-computer interface (HCI) and working with the resulting concept to foster a more conversational approach for online tutoring sessions and the design of the writing center websites that facilitate online tutoring. For the purposes of my research, I describe…

  19. A Cross-Layer Routing Design for Multi-Interface Wireless Mesh Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Chieh Tsai

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs technologies have received significant attentions. WMNs not only accede to the advantages of ad hoc networks but also provide hierarchical multi-interface architecture. Transmission power control and routing path selections are critical issues in the past researches of multihop networks. Variable transmission power levels lead to different network connectivity and interference. Further, routing path selections among different radio interfaces will also produce different intra-/interflow interference. These features tightly affect the network performance. Most of the related works on the routing protocol design do not consider transmission power control and multi-interface environment simultaneously. In this paper, we proposed a cross-layer routing protocol called M2iRi2 which coordinates transmission power control and intra-/interflow interference considerations as routing metrics. Each radio interface calculates the potential tolerable-added transmission interference in the physical layer. When the route discovery starts, the M2iRi2 will adopt the appropriate power level to evaluate each interface quality along paths. The simulation results demonstrate that our design can enhance both network throughput and end-to-end delay.

  20. Nyquist AD Converters, Sensor Interfaces, and Robustness Advances in Analog Circuit Design, 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Baschirotto, Andrea; Steyaert, Michiel

    2013-01-01

    This book is based on the presentations during the 21st workshop on Advances in Analog Circuit Design.  Expert designers provide readers with information about a variety of topics at the frontier of analog circuit design, including Nyquist analog-to-digital converters, capacitive sensor interfaces, reliability, variability, and connectivity.  This book serves as a valuable reference to the state-of-the-art, for anyone involved in analog circuit research and development.  Provides a state-of-the-art reference in analog circuit design, written by experts from industry and academia; Presents material in a tutorial-based format; Includes coverage of Nyquist A/D converters, capacitive sensor interfaces, reliability, variability, and connectivity.

  1. Intuitive engineering, human factors, and the design of future interfaces (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, James B.

    2005-05-01

    Human factors engineering (HFE) professionals complain that they are often called in after-the-fact to help correct human interface problems. They believe many design flaws can be avoided if design teams involve them early on. However, in the case of innovative technology, such post hoc human factors may not be avoidable unless the inventor is also a human factors engineer or the prospective user. In rare cases an inventor of a new technology has an intuitive understanding of human engineering principles and knows well the capabilities and limitations of operators. This paper outlines the importance of focusing on the user-system interface and encouraging engineers to develop their own intuitive sense of users through mental imagery. If design engineers start with a clear mental picture of a specific user and task rather than generalities of use, fewer interface problems are likely to be encountered later in development. Successful technology innovators often use a visual thinking approach in the development of new concepts. Examples are presented to illustrate the successful application of intuitive design. An approach is offered on how designers can improve their non-verbal thinking skills. The author shares the view that the mission of HFE should not be to make system developers dependent on the small community of HF experts but rather to help them learn the value of applying user-centered design techniques.

  2. Designing Social Interfaces Principles, Patterns, and Practices for Improving the User Experience

    CERN Document Server

    Crumlish, Christian

    2009-01-01

    From the creators of Yahoo!'s Design Pattern Library, Designing Social Interfaces provides you with more than 100 patterns, principles, and best practices, along with salient advice for many of the common challenges you'll face when starting a social website. Designing sites that foster user interaction and community-building is a valuable skill for web developers and designers today, but it's not that easy to understand the nuances of the social web. Now you have help. Christian Crumlish and Erin Malone share hard-won insights into what works, what doesn't, and why. You'll learn how to bala

  3. A tunable waveguide-coupled cavity design for scalable interfaces to solid-state quantum emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Mouradian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Photonic nanocavities in diamond have emerged as useful structures for interfacing photons and embedded atomic color centers, such as the nitrogen vacancy center. Here, we present a hybrid nanocavity design that enables (i a loaded quality factor exceeding 50 000 (unloaded Q>106 with 75% of the enhanced emission collected into an underlying waveguide circuit, (ii MEMS-based cavity spectral tuning without straining the diamond, and (iii the use of a diamond waveguide with straight sidewalls to minimize surface defects and charge traps. This system addresses the need for scalable on-chip photonic interfaces to solid-state quantum emitters.

  4. Gas Turbine Engine Control Design Using Fuzzy Logic and Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bazazzadeh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a successful approach in designing a Fuzzy Logic Controller (FLC for a specific Jet Engine. At first, a suitable mathematical model for the jet engine is presented by the aid of SIMULINK. Then by applying different reasonable fuel flow functions via the engine model, some important engine-transient operation parameters (such as thrust, compressor surge margin, turbine inlet temperature, etc. are obtained. These parameters provide a precious database, which train a neural network. At the second step, by designing and training a feedforward multilayer perceptron neural network according to this available database; a number of different reasonable fuel flow functions for various engine acceleration operations are determined. These functions are used to define the desired fuzzy fuel functions. Indeed, the neural networks are used as an effective method to define the optimum fuzzy fuel functions. At the next step, we propose a FLC by using the engine simulation model and the neural network results. The proposed control scheme is proved by computer simulation using the designed engine model. The simulation results of engine model with FLC illustrate that the proposed controller achieves the desired performance and stability.

  5. Design and Implementation of Behavior Recognition System Based on Convolutional Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Bo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We build a set of human behavior recognition system based on the convolution neural network constructed for the specific human behavior in public places. Firstly, video of human behavior data set will be segmented into images, then we process the images by the method of background subtraction to extract moving foreground characters of body. Secondly, the training data sets are trained into the designed convolution neural network, and the depth learning network is constructed by stochastic gradient descent. Finally, the various behaviors of samples are classified and identified with the obtained network model, and the recognition results are compared with the current mainstream methods. The result show that the convolution neural network can study human behavior model automatically and identify human’s behaviors without any manually annotated trainings.

  6. Review of the Socket Design and Interface Pressure Measurement for Transtibial Prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Pirouzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Socket is an important part of every prosthetic limb as an interface between the residual limb and prosthetic components. Biomechanics of socket-residual limb interface, especially the pressure and force distribution, have effect on patient satisfaction and function. This paper aimed to review and evaluate studies conducted in the last decades on the design of socket, in-socket interface pressure measurement, and socket biomechanics. Literature was searched to find related keywords with transtibial amputation, socket-residual limb interface, socket measurement, socket design, modeling, computational modeling, and suspension system. In accordance with the selection criteria, 19 articles were selected for further analysis. It was revealed that pressure and stress have been studied in the last decaeds, but quantitative evaluations remain inapplicable in clinical settings. This study also illustrates prevailing systems, which may facilitate improvements in socket design for improved quality of life for individuals ambulating with transtibial prosthesis. It is hoped that the review will better facilitate the understanding and determine the clinical relevance of quantitative evaluations.

  7. Hypothetical Pattern Recognition Design Using Multi-Layer Perceptorn Neural Network For Supervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdullah-al-mamun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Humans are capable to identifying diverse shape in the different pattern in the real world as effortless fashion due to their intelligence is grow since born with facing several learning process. Same way we can prepared an machine using human like brain called Artificial Neural Network that can be recognize different pattern from the real world object. Although the various techniques is exists to implementation the pattern recognition but recently the artificial neural network approaches have been giving the significant attention. Because the approached of artificial neural network is like a human brain that is learn from different observation and give a decision the previously learning rule. Over the 50 years research now a days pattern recognition for machine learning using artificial neural network got a significant achievement. For this reason many real world problem can be solve by modeling the pattern recognition process. The objective of this paper is to present the theoretical concept for pattern recognition design using Multi-Layer Perceptorn neural networkin the algorithm of artificial Intelligence as the best possible way of utilizing available resources to make a decision that can be a human like performance.

  8. Brain-machine interface control of a manipulator using small-world neural network and shared control strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Hong, Jun; Zhang, Jinhua; Guo, Feng

    2014-03-15

    The improvement of the resolution of brain signal and the ability to control external device has been the most important goal in BMI research field. This paper describes a non-invasive brain-actuated manipulator experiment, which defined a paradigm for the motion control of a serial manipulator based on motor imagery and shared control. The techniques of component selection, spatial filtering and classification of motor imagery were involved. Small-world neural network (SWNN) was used to classify five brain states. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed classifier, we replace the SWNN classifier by a radial basis function (RBF) networks neural network, a standard multi-layered feed-forward backpropagation network (SMN) and a multi-SVM classifier, with the same features for the classification. The results also indicate that the proposed classifier achieves a 3.83% improvement over the best results of other classifiers. We proposed a shared control method consisting of two control patterns to expand the control of BMI from the software angle. The job of path building for reaching the 'end' point was designated as an assessment task. We recorded all paths contributed by subjects and picked up relevant parameters as evaluation coefficients. With the assistance of two control patterns and series of machine learning algorithms, the proposed BMI originally achieved the motion control of a manipulator in the whole workspace. According to experimental results, we confirmed the feasibility of the proposed BMI method for 3D motion control of a manipulator using EEG during motor imagery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Iterative User Interface Design for Automated Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score Calculator in Sepsis Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakre, Christopher Ansel; Kitson, Jaben E; Li, Man; Herasevich, Vitaly

    2017-05-18

    The new sepsis definition has increased the need for frequent sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score recalculation and the clerical burden of information retrieval makes this score ideal for automated calculation. The aim of this study was to (1) estimate the clerical workload of manual SOFA score calculation through a time-motion analysis and (2) describe a user-centered design process for an electronic medical record (EMR) integrated, automated SOFA score calculator with subsequent usability evaluation study. First, we performed a time-motion analysis by recording time-to-task-completion for the manual calculation of 35 baseline and 35 current SOFA scores by 14 internal medicine residents over a 2-month period. Next, we used an agile development process to create a user interface for a previously developed automated SOFA score calculator. The final user interface usability was evaluated by clinician end users with the Computer Systems Usability Questionnaire. The overall mean (standard deviation, SD) time-to-complete manual SOFA score calculation time was 61.6 s (33). Among the 24% (12/50) usability survey respondents, our user-centered user interface design process resulted in >75% favorability of survey items in the domains of system usability, information quality, and interface quality. Early stakeholder engagement in our agile design process resulted in a user interface for an automated SOFA score calculator that reduced clinician workload and met clinicians' needs at the point of care. Emerging interoperable platforms may facilitate dissemination of similarly useful clinical score calculators and decision support algorithms as "apps." A user-centered design process and usability evaluation should be considered during creation of these tools.

  10. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE DIGITAL HOME CONTROL INTERFACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Pastorino

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An inquiry of the National Statistics Institute of Spain shows that 74% of the Spanish population with disabilities suffers some kind of limitation performing Daily Basic Activities, while 1.39 million cannot perform them at all without the assistance of specialized personnel. Digital Home Systems could mitigate disabled people’s difficulties to carry out those activities, giving the opportunity to manage home appliances through a single control. Digital Home Systems have to provide specific and adapted control interfaces based on Augmentative and Alternative Communication languages in order to be an efficient solution to the problem and to allow most vulnerable groups of people with disabilities to reach the highest level of autonomy.  This paper describes a Digital Home Interface capable of adapting layouts, styles and contents to device capability, user preferences and appliances’ features; designed with a combination of web technologies, standard languages for abstract interface definition and AAC systems.

  11. Investigating Effects of Screen Layout Elements on Interface and Screen Design Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamed Altaboli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study suggested the use of the screen layout elements of balance, unity, and sequence as a part of a computational model of interface aesthetics. It is argued that these three elements are the most contributed terms in the model. In the current study, a controlled experiment was designed and conducted to systematically investigate effects of these three elements (balance, unity, and sequence on the perceived interface aesthetics. Results showed that the three elements have significant effects on the perceived interface aesthetics. Significant interactions were also found among the three elements. A regression model relating the perceived visual aesthetics to the three elements was constructed. When validating the model using standard questionnaire scores of real web pages, high correlations were found between the values computed by the model and scores of questionnaire items related to visual layout of the web pages, indicating that layout-based measures are good at assessing the classical dimension of website aesthetics.

  12. Design and Development of an Affective Interface for Supporting Energy-saving Activities and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kyoko; Tomita, Daisuke; Imaki, Tomotaka; Hongo, Taishiro; Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    Toward a sustainable society, energy and environmental issues are very important and controversial problems, and it is expected to support various human activities for the measures by using Information Technology. The purpose of this study is to develop an affective interface for supporting people's energy-saving activities. First, a model for supporting people's energy-saving activities involving affective elements has been constructed for supporting people's energy-saving activities, based on social psychological approaches. Based on the proposed model, the requirements on an affective interface for people's energy-saving activities have been considered. In this study, the affective interface presents suitable energy-saving activities and current electric energy consumption by a character agent with a graphical shape and synthesized voice. The character agent recommends people's energy-saving activities, tells the method of energy-saving activities and the effectiveness, and so on. The affective interface for supporting energy-saving activities has been designed in detail and developed. Then, the evaluation experiment of the developed interface has been conducted, and the results of the experiments were analyzed.

  13. Prediction of Optimal Design and Deflection of Space Structures Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Kamyab Moghadas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present work is to determine the optimal design and maximum deflection of double layer grids spending low computational cost using neural networks. The design variables of the optimization problem are cross-sectional area of the elements as well as the length of the span and height of the structures. In this paper, a number of double layer grids with various random values of length and height are selected and optimized by simultaneous perturbation stochastic approximation algorithm. Then, radial basis function (RBF and generalized regression (GR neural networks are trained to predict the optimal design and maximum deflection of the structures. The numerical results demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methodology.

  14. An improved genetic algorithm for designing optimal temporal patterns of neural stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Isaac R.; Titus, Nathan D.; Grill, Warren M.

    2017-12-01

    Objective. Electrical neuromodulation therapies typically apply constant frequency stimulation, but non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation may be more effective and more efficient. However, the design space for temporal patterns is exceedingly large, and model-based optimization is required for pattern design. We designed and implemented a modified genetic algorithm (GA) intended for design optimal temporal patterns of electrical neuromodulation. Approach. We tested and modified standard GA methods for application to designing temporal patterns of neural stimulation. We evaluated each modification individually and all modifications collectively by comparing performance to the standard GA across three test functions and two biophysically-based models of neural stimulation. Main results. The proposed modifications of the GA significantly improved performance across the test functions and performed best when all were used collectively. The standard GA found patterns that outperformed fixed-frequency, clinically-standard patterns in biophysically-based models of neural stimulation, but the modified GA, in many fewer iterations, consistently converged to higher-scoring, non-regular patterns of stimulation. Significance. The proposed improvements to standard GA methodology reduced the number of iterations required for convergence and identified superior solutions.

  15. An improved genetic algorithm for designing optimal temporal patterns of neural stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassar, Isaac R; Titus, Nathan D; Grill, Warren M

    2017-12-01

    Electrical neuromodulation therapies typically apply constant frequency stimulation, but non-regular temporal patterns of stimulation may be more effective and more efficient. However, the design space for temporal patterns is exceedingly large, and model-based optimization is required for pattern design. We designed and implemented a modified genetic algorithm (GA) intended for design optimal temporal patterns of electrical neuromodulation. We tested and modified standard GA methods for application to designing temporal patterns of neural stimulation. We evaluated each modification individually and all modifications collectively by comparing performance to the standard GA across three test functions and two biophysically-based models of neural stimulation. The proposed modifications of the GA significantly improved performance across the test functions and performed best when all were used collectively. The standard GA found patterns that outperformed fixed-frequency, clinically-standard patterns in biophysically-based models of neural stimulation, but the modified GA, in many fewer iterations, consistently converged to higher-scoring, non-regular patterns of stimulation. The proposed improvements to standard GA methodology reduced the number of iterations required for convergence and identified superior solutions.

  16. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  17. The Role of Perceived User-Interface Design in Continued Usage Intention of Self-Paced E-Learning Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Vincent; Cheng, T. C. Edwin; Lai, W. M. Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    While past studies on user-interface design focused on a particular system or application using the experimental approach, we propose a theoretical model to assess the impact of perceived user-interface design (PUID) on continued usage intention (CUI) of self-paced e-learning tools in general. We argue that the impact of PUID is mediated by two…

  18. Design of the torus interface for the neutral beam injectors of Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nocentini, R., E-mail: riccardo.nocentini@ipp.mpg.de; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Rust, N.; Orozco, G.

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Two NBI injectors are installed in W7-X, each capable of hosting four ion sources. • The NBI boxes and their NBI ports in W7-X are connected by NBI–torus interfaces. • Each NBI–torus interface includes a DN800 bellow, copper scrapers and diagnostics. • The design of the NBI–torus interface has been challenging due to the shape of W7-X. • The design includes the numerical shape optimization of one of the beam scrapers. - Abstract: A neutral beam injection (NBI) heating system for the stellarator project Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) is currently under construction at the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) Greifswald, Germany. The NBI at W7-X is based on the similar system in operation on the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade at IPP in Garching, Germany, and makes use of radio-frequency-driven positive ion sources. Two NBI injectors are going to be installed in W7-X, each being capable of hosting four ion sources. Initially each injector is being equipped with two ion sources of 1.8 (2.5) MW beam power each in H (D). Accelerated positive ions are going to be neutralized and transported inside an NBI-box, which also hosts a residual ion dump, titanium sublimation pumps and a calorimeter. The beams are focused at a point 6.5 m downstream of the ion sources and are injected into the plasma vessel of W7-X through two ports. The NBI boxes and their NBI ports are connected by NBI–torus interfaces, which are made of several components that minimize beam losses while protecting the port walls and bellows from energetic re-ionized particles and beam intersection. This paper describes the design of the NBI–torus interface, including the shape optimization of a beam scraper and the integration of beam diagnostics.

  19. Impact of Participatory Design for Drug-Drug Interaction Alerts. A Comparison Study Between Two Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Daniel; Otero, Carlos; Risk, Marcelo; Stanziola, Enrique; González Bernaldo de Quirós, Fernán

    2016-01-01

    Decision support systems for alert drug-drug interactions have been shown as valid strategy to reduce medical error. Even so the use of these systems has not been as expected, probably due to the lack of a suitable design. This study compares two interfaces, one of them developed using participatory design techniques (based on user centered design processes). This work showed that the use of these techniques improves satisfaction, effectiveness and efficiency in an alert system for drug-drug interactions, a fact that was evident in specific situations such as the decrease of errors to meet the specified task, the time, the workload optimization and users overall satisfaction with the system.

  20. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  1. An Integrated User Interface Style Guide for the ESF-CCS, RPS and CPCS display design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Kyu; Lee, Hyun Chul; Hwang, Seong Hwan; Jang, Tong Il; Kang, Suk Ho; Lee, Jung Woon; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    The human machine interface (HMI) design process is important to enhance the safety and reliability of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) operation. Various MMI activities are achieved with progress of MMI and environment of NPP. These activities are impossible to utilize when upgrade of environment because most of these activities emphasize hardware aspect. Also, the human factors guidelines mostly describe the human factors principles so the designer has to adapt them to apply them to his design. The design-specific guideline that is specially dedicated to a unique system and derived from the general guidelines is called style guide. The style guide provides easy to use templates to help the user interface design, and these templates help ensure a consistent look and behavior throughout the design products. However, it could be difficult for a designer to select the human factors guideline items related to a target system and to derive a style guide from the items. This paper describes human factors activities carried out to develop a style guide for the ESF-CCS, RPS and CPCS system.

  2. Design and Implementation of a Prototype with a Standardized Interface for Transducers in Ambient Assisted Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Dorronzoro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions in the field of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL do not generally use standards to implement a communication interface between sensors and actuators. This makes these applications isolated solutions because it is so difficult to integrate them into new or existing systems. The objective of this research was to design and implement a prototype with a standardized interface for sensors and actuators to facilitate the integration of different solutions in the field of AAL. Our work is based on the roadmap defined by AALIANCE, using motes with TinyOS telosb, 6LoWPAN, sensors, and the IEEE 21451 standard protocol. This prototype allows one to upgrade sensors to a smart status for easy integration with new applications and already existing ones. The prototype has been evaluated for autonomy and performance. As a use case, the prototype has been tested in a serious game previously designed for people with mobility problems, and its advantages and disadvantages have been analysed.

  3. Reducing wrong patient selection errors: exploring the design space of user interface techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopan, Awalin; Plaisant, Catherine; Powsner, Seth; Shneiderman, Ben

    2014-01-01

    Wrong patient selection errors are a major issue for patient safety; from ordering medication to performing surgery, the stakes are high. Widespread adoption of Electronic Health Record (EHR) and Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) systems makes patient selection using a computer screen a frequent task for clinicians. Careful design of the user interface can help mitigate the problem by helping providers recall their patients' identities, accurately select their names, and spot errors before orders are submitted. We propose a catalog of twenty seven distinct user interface techniques, organized according to a task analysis. An associated video demonstrates eighteen of those techniques. EHR designers who consider a wider range of human-computer interaction techniques could reduce selection errors, but verification of efficacy is still needed.

  4. Development of a multi-classification neural network model to determine the microbial growth/no growth interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Navarro, Francisco; Valero, Antonio; Hervás-Martínez, César; Gutiérrez, Pedro A; García-Gimeno, Rosa M; Zurera-Cosano, Gonzalo

    2010-07-15

    Boundary models have been recognized as useful tools to predict the ability of microorganisms to grow at limiting conditions. However, at these conditions, microbial behaviour can vary, being difficult to distinguish between growth or no growth. In this paper, the data from the study of Valero et al. [Valero, A., Pérez-Rodríguez, F., Carrasco, E., Fuentes-Alventosa, J.M., García-Gimeno, R.M., Zurera, G., 2009. Modelling the growth boundaries of Staphylococcus aureus: Effect of temperature, pH and water activity. International Journal of Food Microbiology 133 (1-2), 186-194] belonging to growth/no growth conditions of Staphylococcus aureus against temperature, pH and a(w) were divided into three categorical classes: growth (G), growth transition (GT) and no growth (NG). Subsequently, they were modelled by using a Radial Basis Function Neural Network (RBFNN) in order to create a multi-classification model that was able to predict the probability of belonging at one of the three mentioned classes. The model was developed through an over sampling procedure using a memetic algorithm (MA) in order to balance in part the size of the classes and to improve the accuracy of the classifier. The multi-classification model, named Smote Memetic Radial Basis Function (SMRBF) provided a quite good adjustment to data observed, being able to correctly classify the 86.30% of training data and the 82.26% of generalization data for the three observed classes in the best model. Besides, the high number of replicates per condition tested (n=30) produced a smooth transition between growth and no growth. At the most stringent conditions, the probability of belonging to class GT was higher, thus justifying the inclusion of the class in the new model. The SMRBF model presented in this study can be used to better define microbial growth/no growth interface and the variability associated to these conditions so as to apply this knowledge to a food safety in a decision-making process. 2010

  5. The design of a standard message passing interface for distributed memory concurrent computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of MPI, a proposed standard message passing interface for MIMD distributed memory concurrent computers. The design of MPI has been a collective effort involving researchers in the United States and Europe from many organizations and institutions. MPI includes point-to-point and collective communication routines, as well as support for process groups, communication contexts, and application topologies. While making use of new ideas where appropriate, the MPI standard is based largely on current practice.

  6. Teaching Task Analysis for User Interface Design: Lessons Learned from Three Pilot Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Marçal de Oliveira, Káthia; Girard, Patrick; Guidini Gonçalves, Taisa; Lepreux, Sophie; Kolski, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Task analysis is recognized by the Human-Computer Interaction community as good practice to improve the understanding of how a user may interact with software interfaces to reach a given goal. During more than one decade, we have taught task analysis in undergraduate and graduate HCI programs for the design of better interactive systems. In this paper, we describe three ways of teaching task analysis and the lessons learned from those practices. We consider this the fi...

  7. Materials and optimized designs for human-machine interfaces via epidermal electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Woong; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Akhtar, Aadeel; Norton, James J S; Kwack, Young-Jin; Li, Shuo; Jung, Sung-Young; Su, Yewang; Lee, Woosik; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Huang, Yonggang; Choi, Woon-Seop; Bretl, Timothy; Rogers, John A

    2013-12-17

    Thin, soft, and elastic electronics with physical properties well matched to the epidermis can be conformally and robustly integrated with the skin. Materials and optimized designs for such devices are presented for surface electromyography (sEMG). The findings enable sEMG from wide ranging areas of the body. The measurements have quality sufficient for advanced forms of human-machine interface. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A Novel Multiscale Design of Interfaces for Polymeric Composites and Bonded Joints using Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    Prabhakar UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO 500 UNIV ST ADMIN BLDG 209 EL PASO, TX 79968-0001 09/13/2016 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution...Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering The University of Texas at El Paso 500 West University Ave., A-114, El Paso, Texas 79968-0521 Tel: (915...Keck Center for 3D Innovation at the University of Texas at El Paso. The material used to create interface designs was ABS-M30, which will be

  9. An integrated approach for the design and evaluation of human-machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truszkowski, Walt F.

    1987-01-01

    An integrated environment for the design and evaluation (from a human factors point-of-view) of human-machine interfaces is proposed. Four major components of an experimental environment currently under study are identified and discussed. A scenario highlighting the relationships of these four components in an integrated operational environment is presented. Current status, issues to be addressed and future plans for this activity are discussed.

  10. Design of Artificial Neural Network-Based pH Estimator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shebel A. Alsabbah

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration the cost, size and drawbacks might be found with real hardware instrument for measuring pH values such that the complications of the wiring, installing, calibrating and troubleshooting the system, would make a person look for a cheaper, accurate, and alternative choice to perform the measuring operation, Where’s hereby, a feedforward artificial neural network-based pH estimator has to be proposed. The proposed estimator has been designed with multi- layer perceptrons. One input which is a measured base stream and two outputs represent pH values at strong base and strong/weak acids for a titration process. The created data base has been obtained with consideration of temperature variation. The final numerical results ensure the effectiveness and robustness of the design neural network-based pH estimator.

  11. Neural Network Control-Based Drive Design of Servomotor and Its Application to Automatic Guided Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Shyan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An automatic guided vehicle (AGV is extensively used for productions in a flexible manufacture system with high efficiency and high flexibility. A servomotor-based AGV is designed and implemented in this paper. In order to steer the AGV to go along a predefined path with corner or arc, the conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID control is used in the system. However, it is difficult to tune PID gains at various conditions. As a result, the neural network (NN control is considered to assist the PID control for gain tuning. The experimental results are first provided to verify the correctness of the neural network plus PID control for 400 W-motor control system. Secondly, the AGV includes two sets of the designed motor systems and CAN BUS transmission so that it can move along the straight line and curve paths shown in the taped videos.

  12. Observer design for switched recurrent neural networks: an average dwell time approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jie; Feng, Zhi; Shi, Peng

    2011-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of observer design for switched recurrent neural networks with time-varying delay. The attention is focused on designing the full-order observers that guarantee the global exponential stability of the error dynamic system. Based on the average dwell time approach and the free-weighting matrix technique, delay-dependent sufficient conditions are developed for the solvability of such problem and formulated as linear matrix inequalities. The error-state decay estimate is also given. Then, the stability analysis problem for the switched recurrent neural networks can be covered as a special case of our results. Finally, four illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and the superiority of the proposed methods. © 2011 IEEE

  13. Human Factors Guidance for Control Room and Digital Human-System Interface Design and Modification, Guidelines for Planning, Specification, Design, Licensing, Implementation, Training, Operation and Maintenance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Fink, D. Hill, J. O' Hara

    2004-11-30

    Nuclear plant operators face a significant challenge designing and modifying control rooms. This report provides guidance on planning, designing, implementing and operating modernized control rooms and digital human-system interfaces.

  14. Usability Studies on Mobile User Interface Design Patterns: A Systematic Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumpapun Punchoojit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile platforms have called for attention from HCI practitioners, and, ever since 2007, touchscreens have completely changed mobile user interface and interaction design. Some notable differences between mobile devices and desktops include the lack of tactile feedback, ubiquity, limited screen size, small virtual keys, and high demand of visual attention. These differences have caused unprecedented challenges to users. Most of the mobile user interface designs are based on desktop paradigm, but the desktop designs do not fully fit the mobile context. Although mobile devices are becoming an indispensable part of daily lives, true standards for mobile UI design patterns do not exist. This article provides a systematic literature review of the existing studies on mobile UI design patterns. The first objective is to give an overview of recent studies on the mobile designs. The second objective is to provide an analysis on what topics or areas have insufficient information and what factors are concentrated upon. This article will benefit the HCI community in seeing an overview of present works, to shape the future research directions.

  15. Artificial neural networks aided conceptual stage design of water harvesting structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Chandwani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents artificial neural networks (ANNs based methodology for ascertaining the structural parameters of water harvesting structures (WHS at the conceptual stage of design. The ANN is trained using exemplar patterns generated using an in-house MSExcel based design program, to draw a functional relationship between the five inputs design parameters namely, peak flood discharge, safe bearing capacity of strata, length of structure, height of structure and silt factor and four outputs namely, top width, bottom width, foundation depth and flood lift representing the structural parameters of WHS. The results of the study show that, the structural parameters of the WHS predicted using ANN model are in close agreement with the actual field parameters. The versatility of ANN to map complex or complex unknown relationships has been proven in the study. A parametric sensitivity study is also performed to assess the most significant design parameter. The study holistically presents a neural network based decision support tool that can be used to accurately estimate the major design parameters of the WHS at the conceptual stage of design in quick time, aiding the engineer-in-charge to conveniently forecast the budget requirements and minimize the labor involved during the subsequent phases of analysis and design.

  16. High-Lift Optimization Design Using Neural Networks on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Roxana M.; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag, and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural networks were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 83% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  17. Containment control of networked autonomous underwater vehicles: A predictor-based neural DSC design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhouhua; Wang, Dan; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lu

    2015-11-01

    This paper investigates the containment control problem of networked autonomous underwater vehicles in the presence of model uncertainty and unknown ocean disturbances. A predictor-based neural dynamic surface control design method is presented to develop the distributed adaptive containment controllers, under which the trajectories of follower vehicles nearly converge to the dynamic convex hull spanned by multiple reference trajectories over a directed network. Prediction errors, rather than tracking errors, are used to update the neural adaptation laws, which are independent of the tracking error dynamics, resulting in two time-scales to govern the entire system. The stability property of the closed-loop network is established via Lyapunov analysis, and transient property is quantified in terms of L2 norms of the derivatives of neural weights, which are shown to be smaller than the classical neural dynamic surface control approach. Comparative studies are given to show the substantial improvements of the proposed new method. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A Modified Dynamic Evolving Neural-Fuzzy Approach to Modeling Customer Satisfaction for Affective Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Kwong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1 the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2 the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort.

  19. A modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach to modeling customer satisfaction for affective design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, C K; Fung, K Y; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K Y; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort.

  20. Structural and mechanical design of tissue interfaces in the giant reed Arundo donax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo; Speck, Thomas

    2010-03-06

    The culms of the giant reed Arundo donax represent slender tube-like structures. Several nodes along the culm, a ring of sclerenchymatous fibres in the periphery of the culm wall and numerous isolated vascular bundles enclosed by fibre rings in the culm wall function as stiffening elements. The bundles are embedded in lignified parenchyma. Micromechanical analysis indicated differences in stiffness between the individual tissues of more than one order of magnitude. In case of abrupt transitions in stiffness at the interfaces, stress discontinuities arise under dynamic loads. This eventually leads to critical shear stresses at cell ends, and culm failure may be initiated at these points. Pronounced mechanical differences between individual tissues can be compromised by gradual transitions at their interfaces. Ultrastructural and spectroscopic investigations with high spatial resolution revealed a gradual transition of cell parameters (cell wall area fraction and cell length). However, cell wall parameters (cellulose microfibril angle and lignin content) showed abrupt transitions or remained almost constant across the interfaces between various tissues. The design principles found at the interfaces between tissues in the culm walls of A. donax are discussed as an adaptation strategy to mechanical loads at different levels of hierarchy.

  1. Intelligent Systems and Advanced User Interfaces for Design, Operation, and Maintenance of Command Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    Historically Command Management Systems (CMS) have been large, expensive, spacecraft-specific software systems that were costly to build, operate, and maintain. Current and emerging hardware, software, and user interface technologies may offer an opportunity to facilitate the initial formulation and design of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as a to develop a more generic or a set of core components for CMS systems. Current MOC (mission operations center) hardware and software include Unix workstations, the C/C++ and Java programming languages, and X and Java window interfaces representations. This configuration provides the power and flexibility to support sophisticated systems and intelligent user interfaces that exploit state-of-the-art technologies in human-machine systems engineering, decision making, artificial intelligence, and software engineering. One of the goals of this research is to explore the extent to which technologies developed in the research laboratory can be productively applied in a complex system such as spacecraft command management. Initial examination of some of the issues in CMS design and operation suggests that application of technologies such as intelligent planning, case-based reasoning, design and analysis tools from a human-machine systems engineering point of view (e.g., operator and designer models) and human-computer interaction tools, (e.g., graphics, visualization, and animation), may provide significant savings in the design, operation, and maintenance of a spacecraft-specific CMS as well as continuity for CMS design and development across spacecraft with varying needs. The savings in this case is in software reuse at all stages of the software engineering process.

  2. Design of a 32-Channel EEG System for Brain Control Interface Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Sung Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study integrates the hardware circuit design and the development support of the software interface to achieve a 32-channel EEG system for BCI applications. Since the EEG signals of human bodies are generally very weak, in addition to preventing noise interference, it also requires avoiding the waveform distortion as well as waveform offset and so on; therefore, the design of a preamplifier with high common-mode rejection ratio and high signal-to-noise ratio is very important. Moreover, the friction between the electrode pads and the skin as well as the design of dual power supply will generate DC bias which affects the measurement signals. For this reason, this study specially designs an improved single-power AC-coupled circuit, which effectively reduces the DC bias and improves the error caused by the effects of part errors. At the same time, the digital way is applied to design the adjustable amplification and filter function, which can design for different EEG frequency bands. For the analog circuit, a frequency band will be taken out through the filtering circuit and then the digital filtering design will be used to adjust the extracted frequency band for the target frequency band, combining with MATLAB to design man-machine interface for displaying brain wave. Finally the measured signals are compared to the traditional 32-channel EEG signals. In addition to meeting the IFCN standards, the system design also conducted measurement verification in the standard EEG isolation room in order to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of this system design.

  3. Design of a Lunar Quick-Attach Mechanism to Hummer Vehicle Mounting Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismore, David A.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents my work experiences while I was an intern with NASA (National Aeronautic and Space Administration) in the Spring of2010 at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) launch facility in Cape Canaveral, Florida as a member of the NASA USRP (Undergraduate Student Research Program) program. I worked in the Surface Systems (NE-S) group during the internship. Within NE-S, two ASRC (Arctic Slope Regional Corporation) contract engineers, A.J. Nick and Jason Schuler, had developed a "Quick-Attach" mechanism for the Chariot Rover, the next generation lunar rover. My project was to design, analyze, and possibly fabricate a mounting interface between their "Quick-Attach" and a Hummer vehicle. This interface was needed because it would increase their capabilities to test the Quick Attach and its various attachments, as they do not have access to a Chariot Rover at KSC. I utilized both Pro Engineer, a 3D CAD software package, and a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) known as a FAROarm to collect data and create my design. I relied on hand calculations and the Mechanica analysis tool within Pro Engineer to perform stress analysis on the design. After finishing the design, I began working on creating professional level CAD drawings and issuing them into the KSC design database known as DDMS before the end of the internship.

  4. Amphiphilic Four-Helix Bundle Peptides Designed for Light-Induced Electron Transfer Across a Soft Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye,S.; Discher, B.; Strzalka, J.; Xu, T.; Wu, S.; Noy, D.; Kuzmenko, I.; Gog, T.; Blasie, K.; et al.

    2005-01-01

    A family of four-helix bundle peptides were designed to be amphiphilic, possessing distinct hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains along the length of the bundle's exterior. This facilitates their vectorial insertion across a soft interface between polar and nonpolar media. Their design also now provides for selective incorporation of electron donor and acceptor cofactors within each domain. This allows translation of the designed intramolecular electron transfer along the bundle axis into a macroscopic charge separation across the interface.

  5. Design and implementation of interface units for high speed fiber optics local area networks and broadband integrated services digital networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobagi, Fouad A.; Dalgic, Ismail; Pang, Joseph

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of interface units for high speed Fiber Optic Local Area Networks and Broadband Integrated Services Digital Networks are discussed. During the last years, a number of network adapters that are designed to support high speed communications have emerged. This approach to the design of a high speed network interface unit was to implement package processing functions in hardware, using VLSI technology. The VLSI hardware implementation of a buffer management unit, which is required in such architectures, is described.

  6. Designing interfaces of hydrogenase-nanomaterial hybrids for efficient solar conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The direct conversion of sunlight into biofuels is an intriguing alternative to a continued reliance on fossil fuels. Natural photosynthesis has long been investigated both as a potential solution, and as a model for utilizing solar energy to drive a water-to-fuel cycle. The molecules and organizational structure provide a template to inspire the design of efficient molecular systems for photocatalysis. A clear design strategy is the coordination of molecular interactions that match kinetic rates and energetic levels to control the direction and flow of energy from light harvesting to catalysis. Energy transduction and electron-transfer reactions occur through interfaces formed between complexes of donor-acceptor molecules. Although the structures of several of the key biological complexes have been solved, detailed descriptions of many electron-transfer complexes are lacking, which presents a challenge to designing and engineering biomolecular systems for solar conversion. Alternatively, it is possible to couple the catalytic power of biological enzymes to light harvesting by semiconductor nanomaterials. In these molecules, surface chemistry and structure can be designed using ligands. The passivation effect of the ligand can also dramatically affect the photophysical properties of the semiconductor, and energetics of external charge-transfer. The length, degree of bond saturation (aromaticity), and solvent exposed functional groups of ligands can be manipulated to further tune the interface to control molecular assembly, and complex stability in photocatalytic hybrids. The results of this research show how ligand selection is critical to designing molecular interfaces that promote efficient self-assembly, charge-transfer and photocatalysis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Metals in Bioenergetics and Biomimetics Systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 8051 microcontroller to FPGA and ADC interface design for high speed parallel processing systems – Application in ultrasound scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jean Rossario Raj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Microcontrollers perform the hardware control in many instruments. Instruments requiring huge data throughput and parallel computing use FPGA’s for data processing. The microcontroller in turn configures the application hardware devices such as FPGA’s, ADC’s and Ethernet chips etc. The interfacing of these devices uses address/data bus interface, serial interface or serial peripheral interface. The choice of the interface depends upon the input/output pins available with different devices, programming ease and proprietary interfaces supported by devices such as ADC’s. The novelty of this paper is to describe the programming logic used for various types of interface scenarios from microcontroller to different programmable devices. The study presented describes the methods and logic flowcharts for different interfaces. The implementation of the interface logics were in prototype hardware for ultrasound scanner. The internal devices were controlled from the graphical user interface in a laptop and the scan results are taken. It is seen that the optimum solution of the hardware design can be achieved by using a common serial interface towards all the devices.

  8. Design guidelines for the use of audio cues in computer interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumikawa, D.A.; Blattner, M.M.; Joy, K.I.; Greenberg, R.M.

    1985-07-01

    A logical next step in the evolution of the computer-user interface is the incorporation of sound thereby using our senses of ''hearing'' in our communication with the computer. This allows our visual and auditory capacities to work in unison leading to a more effective and efficient interpretation of information received from the computer than by sight alone. In this paper we examine earcons, which are audio cues, used in the computer-user interface to provide information and feedback to the user about computer entities (these include messages and functions, as well as states and labels). The material in this paper is part of a larger study that recommends guidelines for the design and use of audio cues in the computer-user interface. The complete work examines the disciplines of music, psychology, communication theory, advertising, and psychoacoustics to discover how sound is utilized and analyzed in those areas. The resulting information is organized according to the theory of semiotics, the theory of signs, into the syntax, semantics, and pragmatics of communication by sound. Here we present design guidelines for the syntax of earcons. Earcons are constructed from motives, short sequences of notes with a specific rhythm and pitch, embellished by timbre, dynamics, and register. Compound earcons and family earcons are introduced. These are related motives that serve to identify a family of related cues. Examples of earcons are given.

  9. An FPGA hardware/software co-design towards evolvable spiking neural networks for robotics application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, S P; Prasad, G; Maguire, L; McGinnity, T M

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents an approach that permits the effective hardware realization of a novel Evolvable Spiking Neural Network (ESNN) paradigm on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). The ESNN possesses a hybrid learning algorithm that consists of a Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP) mechanism fused with a Genetic Algorithm (GA). The design and implementation direction utilizes the latest advancements in FPGA technology to provide a partitioned hardware/software co-design solution. The approach achieves the maximum FPGA flexibility obtainable for the ESNN paradigm. The algorithm was applied as an embedded intelligent system robotic controller to solve an autonomous navigation and obstacle avoidance problem.

  10. Design Program in Graphic User Interface Environment for Automobile ER Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Park, J. S.; Sohn, J. W.; Choi, S. B.

    This work presents a design and analysis program for vehicle devices utilizing an electrorheological (ER) fluid. The program is operated in graphic user interface (GUI) environment and the initial window is consisted of four subprogram modules which are related to ER shock absorber, ER seat damper, ER engine mount, and ER anti-lock brake system (ABS), respectively. In order to execute each module, both material properties and design parameters are to be chosen by the user. Then, the output display window shows the field-dependent performance characteristics to be considered as design criteria. In addition, control performances of the vehicle system equipped with ER devices are displayed in time and frequency domain. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed program, ER shock absorber and ER ABS are designed and manufactured and their performance characteristics are evaluated.

  11. Knowledge Analysis of Tasks as a Basis for Interface Design of Complex Developmental Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Colman

    1995-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex development systems are interactive software systems used for the manipulation, design or development in complex problem domains. This paper highlights some of the limitations of Johnson's Knowledge Analysis of Tasks (KAT (Johnson, 1989, 1992 and proposes a modified version of KAT where task knowledge can be analysed and grouped in a way that will make it useful in the derivation of interfaces in complex developmental systems. This modified form has been applied to the domain of intelligent distributed control systems in an attempt to develop interface concepts for the development, installation and documentation of such systems. The paper further shows how this extended version of KAT may prove a useful input to object oriented analysis.

  12. From Documents to User Interfaces Universal Design and the Emergence of Abstraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason White

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract representations of content which allow it to be automatically adapted to suit the delivery context, have emerged historically with the development of markup languages intended to facilitate the storage and processing of electronic documents. This technological tradition is reviewed in the first part of the paper, focusing predominantly on the nature and advantages of a ‘single authoring’ approach to the creation of content. Some of the lessons to be derived from the evolution and deployment of markup systems are also discussed, then applied, in the second part of the paper, to the question of how such abstractions can be extended to the design of user interfaces. Innovative work related to the generic specification of user interfaces is reviewed. It is argued that the advantages of an abstract approach depend for their realization on the development of more expressive style languages and more sophisticated adaptation mechanisms, as well as continued refinement of the semantics of markup languages themselves.

  13. The Design of Wireless Data Acquisition and Remote Transmission Interface in Micro-seismic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Huan BIAN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The micro-seismic signal acquisition and transmission is an important key part in geological prospecting. This paper describes a bran-new solution of micro-seismic signal acquisition and remote transmission using Zigbee technique and wireless data transmission technique. The hardware such as front-end data acquisition interface made up by Zigbee wireless networking technique, remote data transmission solution composed of general packet radio service (or GPRS for short technique and interface between Zigbee and GPRS is designed in detail. Meanwhile the corresponding software of the system is given out. The solution solves the numerous practical problems nagged by complex and terrible environment faced using micro-seismic prospecting. The experimental results demonstrate that the method using Zigbee wireless network communication technique GPRS wireless packet switching technique is efficient, reliable and flexible.

  14. Designing with the mind in mind simple guide to understanding user interface design rules

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    "Take fundamental principles of psychology. Illustrate. Combine with Fundamental Principles of Design. Stir gently until fully blended.  Read daily until finished. Caution: The mixture is addictive."-- Don Norman, Nielsen Norman group, Author of Design of Future Things."This book is a primer to understand the why of the larger human action principles at work-a sort of cognitive science for designers in a hurry. Above all, this is a book of profound insight into the human mind for practical people who want to get something done."-- Stuart Card, Senior Research Fellow and the manager of the

  15. Design of artificial neural networks using a genetic algorithm to predict collection efficiency in venturi scrubbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Mahboobeh; Mohebbi, Ali

    2008-08-30

    In this study, a new approach for the auto-design of neural networks, based on a genetic algorithm (GA), has been used to predict collection efficiency in venturi scrubbers. The experimental input data, including particle diameter, throat gas velocity, liquid to gas flow rate ratio, throat hydraulic diameter, pressure drop across the venturi scrubber and collection efficiency as an output, have been used to create a GA-artificial neural network (ANN) model. The testing results from the model are in good agreement with the experimental data. Comparison of the results of the GA optimized ANN model with the results from the trial-and-error calibrated ANN model indicates that the GA-ANN model is more efficient. Finally, the effects of operating parameters such as liquid to gas flow rate ratio, throat gas velocity, and particle diameter on collection efficiency were determined.

  16. An experimental study on nonlinear function computation for neural/fuzzy hardware design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basterretxea, Koldo; Tarela, José Manuel; del Campo, Inés; Bosque, Guillermo

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study on the influence of the computation of basic nodal nonlinear functions on the performance of (NFSs) is described in this paper. Systems' architecture size, their approximation capability, and the smoothness of provided mappings are used as performance indexes for this comparative paper. Two widely used kernel functions, the sigmoid-logistic function and the Gaussian function, are analyzed by their computation through an accuracy-controllable approximation algorithm designed for hardware implementation. Two artificial neural network (ANN) paradigms are selected for the analysis: backpropagation neural networks (BPNNs) with one hidden layer and radial basis function (RBF) networks. Extensive simulation of simple benchmark approximation problems is used in order to achieve generalizable conclusions. For the performance analysis of fuzzy systems, a functional equivalence theorem is used to extend obtained results to fuzzy inference systems (FISs). Finally, the adaptive neurofuzzy inference system (ANFIS) paradigm is used to observe the behavior of neurofuzzy systems with learning capabilities.

  17. Neural-Network-Biased Genetic Algorithms for Materials Design: Evolutionary Algorithms That Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Tarak K; Meenakshisundaram, Venkatesh; Hung, Jui-Hsiang; Simmons, David S

    2017-02-13

    Machine learning has the potential to dramatically accelerate high-throughput approaches to materials design, as demonstrated by successes in biomolecular design and hard materials design. However, in the search for new soft materials exhibiting properties and performance beyond those previously achieved, machine learning approaches are frequently limited by two shortcomings. First, because they are intrinsically interpolative, they are better suited to the optimization of properties within the known range of accessible behavior than to the discovery of new materials with extremal behavior. Second, they require large pre-existing data sets, which are frequently unavailable and prohibitively expensive to produce. Here we describe a new strategy, the neural-network-biased genetic algorithm (NBGA), for combining genetic algorithms, machine learning, and high-throughput computation or experiment to discover materials with extremal properties in the absence of pre-existing data. Within this strategy, predictions from a progressively constructed artificial neural network are employed to bias the evolution of a genetic algorithm, with fitness evaluations performed via direct simulation or experiment. In effect, this strategy gives the evolutionary algorithm the ability to "learn" and draw inferences from its experience to accelerate the evolutionary process. We test this algorithm against several standard optimization problems and polymer design problems and demonstrate that it matches and typically exceeds the efficiency and reproducibility of standard approaches including a direct-evaluation genetic algorithm and a neural-network-evaluated genetic algorithm. The success of this algorithm in a range of test problems indicates that the NBGA provides a robust strategy for employing informatics-accelerated high-throughput methods to accelerate materials design in the absence of pre-existing data.

  18. Human-system interface design review guideline -- Process and guidelines: Final report. Revision 1, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-06-01

    NUREG-0700, Revision 1, provides human factors engineering (HFE) guidance to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for its: (1) review of the human system interface (HSI) design submittals prepared by licensees or applications for a license or design certification of commercial nuclear power plants, and (2) performance of HSI reviews that could be undertaken as part of an inspection or other type of regulatory review involving HSI design or incidents involving human performance. The guidance consists of a review process and HFE guidelines. The document describes those aspects of the HSI design review process that are important to the identification and resolution of human engineering discrepancies that could adversely affect plant safety. Guidance is provided that could be used by the staff to review an applicant`s HSI design review process or to guide the development of an HSI design review plan, e.g., as part of an inspection activity. The document also provides detailed HFE guidelines for the assessment of HSI design implementations. NUREG-0700, Revision 1, consists of three stand-alone volumes. Volume 1 consists of two major parts. Part 1 describes those aspects of the review process of the HSI design that are important to identifying and resolving human engineering discrepancies. Part 2 contains detailed guidelines for a human factors engineering review which identify criteria for assessing the implementation of an applicant`s or licensee`s HSI design.

  19. Design of Course-Keeping Controller for a Ship Based on Backstepping and Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the existence of uncertainties and the unknown time variant environmental disturbances for ship course nonlinear control system, the ship course adaptive neural network robust course-keeping controller is designed by combining the backstepping technique. The neural networks (NNs are employed for the compensating of the nonlinear term of the nonlinear ship course-keeping control system. The designed adaptive laws are designed to estimate the weights of NNs and the bounds of unknown environmental disturbances. The first order commander are introduced to solve the problem of repeating differential operations in the traditional backstepping design method, which let the designed controller easier to implement in navigation practice and structure simplicity. Theoretically, it indicates that the proposed controller can track the setting course in arbitrary expected accuracy, while keeping all control signals in the ship course control closed-loop system are uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the training ship of Dalian Maritime University is taken for example; simulation results illustrated the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed controller.

  20. Alternative design of inductive pointing device for oral interface for computers and wheelchairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lontis, Eugen R; Andreasen Struijk, Lotte N S

    2012-01-01

    An inductive pointing device was designed and implemented successfully in a tongue controlled oral interface. Sensors were manufactured as an assembly of multilayer coils in the printed circuit board technology on two pads. The sensor pads were encapsulated together with electronics and battery in a mouthpiece, placed in the upper palate of the oral cavity. The PCB technology allowed surface activation of one or more sensors by gliding over the surface of the coils assembly of a small cylindrical unit attached to the tongue. The model consisted of 8 sensors and allowed real time proportional control of both speed and direction similar to a joystick. However, the size of the oral cavity, the number and geometry of the coil loops and characteristics of the activation unit impose limits in designing the sensors and call for an alternative layout design. Two alternative sensor designs are proposed in this paper, aiming to reduce the size of the sensor pad by one third, extending the target group, including children, and increasing the easiness of wear of the oral interface.

  1. Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Formalization as Automata and Interface Design Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curilem, S. Gloria; Barbosa, Andrea R.; de Azevedo, Fernando M.

    2007-01-01

    This article proposes a mathematical model of Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS), based on observations of the behaviour of these systems. One of the most important problems of pedagogical software is to establish a common language between the knowledge areas involved in their development, basically pedagogical, computing and domain areas. A…

  2. Interfacing the neural system to restore deficient functions: from theoretical studies to neuroprothesis design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiraud, David

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is a valuable technical solution to treat severe deficiencies related to nervous system. It is particularly interesting when no medical treatment exists as for cardiac deficiencies, deafness, blindness or complete paralysis. However, activating excitable cells such as neurons or muscle fibers to recover functions remains a difficult scientific and technological challenge. Indeed, both the function to restore and the way to activate selectively the desired target are not fully understood. The article describes how both theoretical studies based on experiments, and technological developments based on electrophysiology knowledge may help in the development of highly effective solutions. Existing systems such as pacemakers and cochlear implants proved that the recovered functions are of great quality leading to increase of quality of life and autonomy of the patients. However, the challenge for movement restoration is still in front of researchers, developers and clinical teams. The described method is the way we choose to face fundamental and tremendous scientific questions in order to provide disabled people with extended autonomy. Copyright © 2011 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Interface, information, interaction: a narrative review of design and functional requirements for clinical decision support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kristen; Mosby, Danielle; Capan, Muge; Kowalski, Rebecca; Ratwani, Raj; Noaiseh, Yaman; Kraft, Rachel; Schwartz, Sanford; Weintraub, William S; Arnold, Ryan

    2017-11-06

    Provider acceptance and associated patient outcomes are widely discussed in the evaluation of clinical decision support systems (CDSSs), but critical design criteria for tools have generally been overlooked. The objective of this work is to inform electronic health record alert optimization and clinical practice workflow by identifying, compiling, and reporting design recommendations for CDSS to support the efficient, effective, and timely delivery of high-quality care. A narrative review was conducted from 2000 to 2016 in PubMed and The Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics Society to identify papers that discussed/recommended design features of CDSSs that are associated with the success of these systems. Fourteen papers were included as meeting the criteria and were found to have a total of 42 unique recommendations; 11 were classified as interface features, 10 as information features, and 21 as interaction features. Features are defined and described, providing actionable guidance that can be applied to CDSS development and policy. To our knowledge, no reviews have been completed that discuss/recommend design features of CDSS at this scale, and thus we found that this was important for the body of literature. The recommendations identified in this narrative review will help to optimize design, organization, management, presentation, and utilization of information through presentation, content, and function. The designation of 3 categories (interface, information, and interaction) should be further evaluated to determine the critical importance of the categories. Future work will determine how to prioritize them with limited resources for designers and developers in order to maximize the clinical utility of CDSS. This review will expand the field of knowledge and provide a novel organization structure to identify key recommendations for CDSS.

  4. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared

  5. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks for improving optrode-neural tissue interface in optogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Li, Yanling; Pan, Jianqing; Wei, Pengfei; Liu, Nan; Wu, Bifeng; Cheng, Jinbo; Lu, Caiyi; Wang, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The field of optogenetics has been successfully used to understand the mechanisms of neuropsychiatric diseases through the precise spatial and temporal control of specific groups of neurons in a neural circuitry. However, it remains a great challenge to integrate optogenetic modulation with electrophysiological and behavioral read out methods as a means to explore the causal, temporally precise, and behaviorally relevant interactions of neurons in the specific circuits of freely behaving animals. In this study, an eight-channel chronically implantable optrode array was fabricated and modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate)-poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(acrylic acid) interpenetrating polymer networks (PEDOT/PSS-PVA/PAA IPNs) for improving the optrode-neural tissue interface. The conducting polymer-hydrogel IPN films exhibited a significantly higher capacitance and lower electrochemical impedance at 1 kHz as compared to unmodified optrode sites and showed significantly improved mechanical and electrochemical stability as compared to pure conducting polymer films. The cell attachment and neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells on the IPN films were clearly observed through calcein-AM staining. Furthermore, the optrode arrays were chronically implanted into the hippocampus of SD rats after the lentiviral expression of synapsin-ChR2-EYFP, and light-evoked, frequency-dependant action potentials were obtained in freely moving animals. The electrical recording results suggested that the modified optrode arrays showed significantly reduced impedance and RMS noise and an improved SNR as compared to unmodified sites, which may have benefited from the improved electrochemical performance and biocompatibility of the deposited IPN films. All these characteristics are greatly desired in optogenetic applications, and the fabrication method of conducting polymer-hydrogel IPNs can be easily integrated with other modification methods to build a

  6. Neural network and multiple linear regression to predict school children dimensions for ergonomic school furniture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Salah R; Alnahhal, Mohammed J

    2012-11-01

    The current study investigates the possibility of obtaining the anthropometric dimensions, critical to school furniture design, without measuring all of them. The study first selects some anthropometric dimensions that are easy to measure. Two methods are then used to check if these easy-to-measure dimensions can predict the dimensions critical to the furniture design. These methods are multiple linear regression and neural networks. Each dimension that is deemed necessary to ergonomically design school furniture is expressed as a function of some other measured anthropometric dimensions. Results show that out of the five dimensions needed for chair design, four can be related to other dimensions that can be measured while children are standing. Therefore, the method suggested here would definitely save time and effort and avoid the difficulty of dealing with students while measuring these dimensions. In general, it was found that neural networks perform better than multiple linear regression in the current study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  7. Designing Novel Image Search Interfaces by Understanding Unique Characteristics and Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Paul; Cutrell, Edward; Tan, Desney S.; Smith, Greg

    In most major search engines, the interface for image search is the same as traditional Web search: a keyword query followed by a paginated, ranked list of results. Although many image search innovations have appeared in both the literature and on the Web, few have seen widespread use in practice. In this work, we explore the differences between image and general Web search to better support users’ needs. First, we describe some unique characteristics of image search derived through informal interviews with researchers, designers, and managers responsible for building and deploying a major Web search engine. Then, we present results from a large scale analysis of image and Web search logs showing the differences in user behaviour. Grounded in these observations, we present design recommendations for an image search engine supportive of the unique experience of image search. We iterate on a number of designs, and describe a functional prototype that we built.

  8. Interface Design for CMOS-Integrated Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjang Hassibi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS is a powerful electrochemical technique to detect biomolecules. EIS has the potential of carrying out label-free and real-time detection, and in addition, can be easily implemented using electronic integrated circuits (ICs that are built through standard semiconductor fabrication processes. This paper focuses on the various design and optimization aspects of EIS ICs, particularly the bio-to-semiconductor interface design. We discuss, in detail, considerations such as the choice of the electrode surface in view of IC manufacturing, surface linkers, and development of optimal bio-molecular detection protocols. We also report experimental results, using both macro- and micro-electrodes to demonstrate the design trade-offs and ultimately validate our optimization procedures.

  9. Evolution of integrated panel structural design and interfaces for PV power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, J. C.; Anderson, A. J.; Robertson, R. E.

    1983-11-01

    The evolution of integrated photovoltaic (PV) panel design at ARCO Solar is discussed. Historically, framed PV modules of about 1 x 4-ft size were individually mounted in the field on fixed support structures and interconnected electrically with cables to build higher-power arrays. When ARCO Solar saw the opportunity in 1982 to marry its PV modules with state-of-the-art heliostat trackers developed by ARCO Power Systems, it became obvious that mounting individual modules was impractical. For this project, the framed modules were factory-assembled into panels and interconnected with cables before being mounted on the trackers. Since then, ARCO Solar made considerable progress and gained substantial experience in the design and fabrication of large PV panels. Constraints and criteria considered in these design activities included static and dynamic loads; assembly and transportation equipment and logistics, structural and electrical interfaces, and safety and grounding concerns.

  10. Theoretical designs for novel photonic crystal nanocavities with Si (111) interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasmusinto, Alyssa; Sotto, Moïse; Al-Attili, Abdelrahman Zaher; Debnath, Kapil; Saito, Shinichi

    2017-09-01

    We designed a series of photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities using atomically flat silicon (111) interfaces and examined the impacts of the surfaces on the optical confinement. The nanocavities were simulated using the 3D finite-difference time-domain method and assessed against existing PhCs. Despite the design restrictions, we showed that a Q value up to 115,800 and Q/V values of 103-105λ-3 are achievable without further design optimization. The results suggest that silicon (111) surfaces can be used for fabricating PhC nanocavity-based devices in a practical and economical way with high manufacturing tolerance and increased repeatability.

  11. The Development of the CONDUIT Advanced Control System Design and Evaluation Interface with a Case Study Application to an Advanced Fly by Wire Helicopter Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbourne, Jason

    1999-01-01

    This report details the development and use of CONDUIT (Control Designer's Unified Interface). CONDUIT is a design tool created at Ames Research Center for the purpose of evaluating and optimizing aircraft control systems against handling qualities. Three detailed design problems addressing the RASCAL UH-60A Black Hawk are included in this report to show the application of CONDUIT to helicopter control system design.

  12. Ontology-Driven Search and Triage: Design of a Web-Based Visual Interface for MEDLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demelo, Jonathan; Parsons, Paul; Sedig, Kamran

    2017-02-02

    Diverse users need to search health and medical literature to satisfy open-ended goals such as making evidence-based decisions and updating their knowledge. However, doing so is challenging due to at least two major difficulties: (1) articulating information needs using accurate vocabulary and (2) dealing with large document sets returned from searches. Common search interfaces such as PubMed do not provide adequate support for exploratory search tasks. Our objective was to improve support for exploratory search tasks by combining two strategies in the design of an interactive visual interface by (1) using a formal ontology to help users build domain-specific knowledge and vocabulary and (2) providing multi-stage triaging support to help mitigate the information overload problem. We developed a Web-based tool, Ontology-Driven Visual Search and Triage Interface for MEDLINE (OVERT-MED), to test our design ideas. We implemented a custom searchable index of MEDLINE, which comprises approximately 25 million document citations. We chose a popular biomedical ontology, the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO), to test our solution to the vocabulary problem. We implemented multistage triaging support in OVERT-MED, with the aid of interactive visualization techniques, to help users deal with large document sets returned from searches. Formative evaluation suggests that the design features in OVERT-MED are helpful in addressing the two major difficulties described above. Using a formal ontology seems to help users articulate their information needs with more accurate vocabulary. In addition, multistage triaging combined with interactive visualizations shows promise in mitigating the information overload problem. Our strategies appear to be valuable in addressing the two major problems in exploratory search. Although we tested OVERT-MED with a particular ontology and document collection, we anticipate that our strategies can be transferred successfully to other contexts.

  13. Design and experimental validation of an adaptive phononic crystal using highly dissipative polymeric material interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billon, K.; Ouisse, M.; Sadoulet-Reboul, E.; Collet, M.; Chevallier, G.; Khelif, A.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, some numerical tools for dispersion analysis of periodic structures are presented, with a focus on the ability of the methods to deal with dissipative behaviour of the systems. An adaptive phononic crystal based on the combination of metallic parts and highly dissipative polymeric interface is designed. The system consists in an infinite periodic bidirectional waveguide. The periodic cylindrical pillars include a layer of shape memory polymer and Aluminum. The mechanical properties of the polymer depend on both temperature and frequency and can radically change from glassy to rubbery state, with various combination of high/low stiffness and high/low dissipation. A fractional derivative Zener model is used for the description of the frequency-dependent behaviour of the polymer. A 3D finite element model of the cell is developed for the design of the metamaterial. The "Shifted-Cell Operator" technique consists in a reformulation of the PDE problem by "shifting" in terms of wave number the space derivatives appearing in the mechanical behaviour operator inside the cell, while imposing continuity boundary conditions on the borders of the domain. Damping effects can easily be introduced in the system and a quadratic eigenvalue problem yields to the dispersion properties of the periodic structure. In order to validate the design and the adaptive character of the metamaterial, results issued from a full 3D model of a finite structure embedding an interface composed by a distributed set of the unit cells are presented. Various driving temperature are used to change the behaviour of the system. After this step, a comparison between the results obtained using the tunable structure simulation and the experimental results is presented. Two states are obtained by changing the temperature of the polymeric interface: at 25°C, the bandgap is visible around a selected frequency. Above the glass transition, the phononic crystal tends to behave as an homogeneous plate.

  14. Design of a Self Don/Doffing Rear Entry Planetary Suit to Interface with a Suit Port/Lock Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under Phase 1 of subject SBIR, Air-Lock, Incorporated will design a self donning and doffing Rear Entry Hard Upper Torso (REHUT) that interfaces with a suit port....

  15. Evaluation of ecological interface design for nuclear process control: situation awareness effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Catherine M; Skraaning, Gyrd; Jamieson, Greg A; Lau, Nathan; Kwok, Jordanna; Welch, Robin; Andresen, Gisle

    2008-08-01

    We determine whether an ecological interface display for nuclear power plant operations supports improved situation awareness over traditional and user-centered displays in a realistic environment. Ecological interface design (EID) has not yet been fully evaluated with real operators facing realistic scenarios. Ecological displays were evaluated alongside traditional and user-centered "advanced" displays in a full-scope nuclear power plant simulation. Licensed plant operators used the displays in realistic scenarios that either had procedural support or did not have procedural support. All three displays were evaluated for their ability to support operator situation awareness. A significant three-way interaction effect was observed on two independent measures of situation awareness. For both measures, ecological displays improved situation awareness in scenarios that did not have procedural support, primarily in the detection phases of those scenarios. No other pronounced effects appeared across both measures. The observed improvement was sufficiently large to suggest that EID could improve situation awareness in situations where procedures are unavailable. However, the EID displays did not lead to improved situation awareness in the other conditions of the evaluation, and participants using these displays occasionally underperformed on single measures of situation awareness. This suggests that the approach requires further development, particularly in integrating EID with procedural support. This research has important findings for the ongoing development of the EID approach, the design of industrial operator displays, and design to support situation awareness.

  16. Design and Performance of a PCI Interface with four 2 Gbit/s Serial Optical Links

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, S; Iwanski, W; 10th Workshop on Electronics for LHC and Future Experiments

    2004-01-01

    A reconfigurable PCI interface card (FILAR) with four on-board high-speed serial optical links has been developed for application in DAQ and test systems. FILAR cards, installed in low cost PCs, are currently being used in the combined test-beam of the ATLAS experiment at CERN as well as in several laboratory set-ups. The hardware and firmware design of the module and results from performance measurements are presented. The four on-board 2 Gbit/s serial optical links conform to the S-LINK specification and are compatible with the Readout Link (ROL) implementation for the ATLAS experiment. The board design is largely based on FPGAs and the firmware uses a commercial 64-bit/66 MHz PCI IP core for the bus interface. Different firmware versions were developed which can be used to configure the hardware as either a data source or a destination card. Design optimizations have been made during the development cycle of the firmware to maximize the data throughput and reduce the PCI bus overhead as well as the CPU loa...

  17. Design Development and Implementation of the Human-System Interface for Lungmen Nuclear Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chang-Fu; Chou, Hwai-Pwu

    2008-10-01

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Project (LMNPP), under construction in Taiwan, consists of two GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) units, each with 1350 MW electrical output. Major Human-System Interfaces (HSIs) of LMNPP are different from traditional operating BWRs or ABWRs. Video display units (VDUs) are the main human-system interface for operators to manipulate and to know the status of the equipment and plant information. Based upon NUREG-0711, the applicable human factors engineering (HFE) guideline in the design of HSIs has been adopted. An important aspect of the Lungmen HFE program has been the direct involvement of the end user, Taiwan Power Company (TPC), throughout the design development and implementation to ensure that the process for the design is compliant with the HFE principles, and that the necessary displays, control, and alarms are provided to support the identified personnel tasks. This paper reviews the applicable HFE principles and the HSI design process including verification and validation (V&V) process in the design of HSIs for the LMNPP. This paper also presents three topics of interest in the LMNPP HSI design development and implementation process-validation with simulator, alarm auto reset, and VDU operational configuration strategy. The objective for developing the VDU operational configuration strategy was, after appropriate V&V, to reinforce operation discipline and optimize operator crew task assignments and workload during typical operations, and to confirm the need for an intensive training program that addresses the knowledge and skill requirements of the operators to meet the task characteristics and the responses of the plant processes. The results to date and implications for going forward from this process are also presented.

  18. Topographical dynamics of brain connections for the design of asynchronous brain-computer interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouy-Pailler, Cédric; Achard, Sophie; Rivet, Bertrand; Jutten, Christian; Maby, Emmanuel; Souloumiac, Antoine; Congedo, Marco

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a new processing method to design brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). It shows how to use the perturbations of the communication between different cortical areas due to a cognitive task. For this, the network of the cerebral connections is built from correlations between cortical areas at specific frequencies and is analyzed using graph theory. This allows us to describe the topological organisation of the networks using quantitative measures. This method is applied to an auditive steady-state evoked potentials experiment (dichotic binaural listening) and compared to a more classical method based on spectral filtering.

  19. A Guide to Visual Multi-Level Interface Design From Synthesis of Empirical Study Evidence

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Heidi

    2010-01-01

    Displaying multiple levels of data visually has been proposed to address the challenge of limited screen space. Although many previous empirical studies have addressed different aspects of this question, the information visualization research community does not currently have a clearly articulated consensus on how, when, or even if displaying data at multiple levels is effective. To shed more light on this complex topic, we conducted a systematic review of 22 existing multi-level interface studies to extract high-level design guidelines. To facilitate discussion, we cast our analysis findings

  20. An Exploration into Framing Effects and Information Preferences: Implications for the Design of Energy Feedback Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Brown, Peter

    A recent topic in the energy industry involves developing strategies to reduce the necessary peak production capacity of our future electricity infrastructure. One of these strategies is promoting behavioral change among individual energy consumers. An inherent problem with electricity consumption is that electricity is invisible, intangible, and abstract. Interfaces that provide people with useful feedback on their usage can help with understanding and reduction of consumption. These interfaces intend to empower individuals with ability to adopt less wasteful energy consumption behaviors. Skillful HCI design will include attention to informational preferences, and framing effects due to presentation choices. An online questionnaire was utilized to explore this domain, and the results identified design requirements for a home feedback interface. The final dataset contained responses from 36 male and 49 female United States residents. Cost () was perceived as the most useful metric and kW as the least useful. Respondent preference was expressed for lower levels of automation, which was not attributable to distrust of automation. Further, a test of framings effects showed a higher likelihood to change behavior to save 100 dollars per year than 2 per week (U=1248.5, p=0.001). A feedback interface design based on the questionnaire results was used in the second phase of the research. A 2x2x2 factorial design compared the effects of goal-type (specific vs. open-ended), metric-use ( vs. kWh), and visualization (graphical vs. text-only) on user experience, learning and behavior during a consumption reduction task. Results showed that goal-type affects the amount of diagnostic behavior conducted by participants (U=351.0, p=0.001). Goal-type and metric-use independently affect participant belief that they could reduce their consumption in their real home with the same feedback shown in the task, F(df=1,39)=24.77, p=0.001; F(df=1,39)=5.55, p=0.05. In addition, visualization

  1. Designing Multiagent Dental Materials for Enhanced Resistance to Biofilm Damage at the Bonded Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Mary Anne; Orrego, Santiago; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Huakun H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2016-05-11

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin-tooth bonded interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different dental materials loaded with multiagents to improve the durability of the complex dental bonding interface. A combined effect of bacterial acid attack and fatigue on the bonding interface simulated the harsh oral environment. Human saliva-derived oral biofilm was grown on each sample prior to the cyclic loading. The oral biofilm viability during the fatigue performance was monitored by the live-dead assay. Damage of the samples that developed during the test was quantified from the fatigue life distributions. Results indicate that the resultant multiagent dental composite materials were able to reduce the acidic impact of the oral biofilm, thereby improving the strength and resistance to fatigue failure of the dentin-resin bonded interface. In summary, this study shows that dental restorative materials containing multiple therapeutic agents of different chemical characteristics can be beneficial toward improving resistance to mechanical and acidic challenges in oral

  2. Controlling the Biomimetic Implant Interface: Modulating Antimicrobial Activity by Spacer Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Cate; Vanoosten, Sarah Kay; Boone, Kyle W.; Khvostenko, Dmytro; Arnold, Paul M.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Tamerler, Candan

    2016-08-01

    Surgical site infection is a common cause of post-operative morbidity, often leading to implant loosening, ultimately requiring revision surgery, increased costs and worse surgical outcomes. Since implant failure starts at the implant surface, creating and controlling the bio-material interface will play a critical role in reducing infection while improving host cell-to-implant interaction. Here, we engineered a biomimetic interface based upon a chimeric peptide that incorporates a titanium binding peptide (TiBP) with an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) into a single molecule to direct binding to the implant surface and deliver an antimicrobial activity against S. mutans and S. epidermidis, two bacteria which are linked with clinical implant infections. To optimize antimicrobial activity, we investigated the design of the spacer domain separating the two functional domains of the chimeric peptide. Lengthening and changing the amino acid composition of the spacer resulted in an improvement of minimum inhibitory concentration by a three-fold against S. mutans. Surfaces coated with the chimeric peptide reduced dramatically the number of bacteria, with up to a nine-fold reduction for S. mutans and a 48-fold reduction for S. epidermidis. Ab initio predictions of antimicrobial activity based on structural features were confirmed. Host cell attachment and viability at the biomimetic interface were also improved compared to the untreated implant surface. Biomimetic interfaces formed with this chimeric peptide offer interminable potential by coupling antimicrobial and improved host cell responses to implantable titanium materials, and this peptide based approach can be extended to various biomaterials surfaces.

  3. Seismic Design Value Evaluation Based on Checking Records and Site Geological Conditions Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tienfuan Kerh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an improved computational neural network model that uses three seismic parameters (i.e., local magnitude, epicentral distance, and epicenter depth and two geological conditions (i.e., shear wave velocity and standard penetration test value as the inputs for predicting peak ground acceleration—the key element for evaluating earthquake response. Initial comparison results show that a neural network model with three neurons in the hidden layer can achieve relatively better performance based on the evaluation index of correlation coefficient or mean square error. This study further develops a new weight-based neural network model for estimating peak ground acceleration at unchecked sites. Four locations identified to have higher estimated peak ground accelerations than that of the seismic design value in the 24 subdivision zones are investigated in Taiwan. Finally, this study develops a new equation for the relationship of horizontal peak ground acceleration and focal distance by the curve fitting method. This equation represents seismic characteristics in Taiwan region more reliably and reasonably. The results of this study provide an insight into this type of nonlinear problem, and the proposed method may be applicable to other areas of interest around the world.

  4. Functional Mobility Testing: A Novel Method to Establish Human System Interface Design Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Scott A.; Benson, Elizabeth A.; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2008-01-01

    Across all fields of human-system interface design it is vital to posses a sound methodology dictating the constraints on the system based on the capabilities of the human user. These limitations may be based on strength, mobility, dexterity, cognitive ability, etc. and combinations thereof. Data collected in an isolated environment to determine, for example, maximal strength or maximal range of motion would indeed be adequate for establishing not-to-exceed type design limitations, however these restraints on the system may be excessive over what is basally needed. Resources may potentially be saved by having a technique to determine the minimum measurements a system must accommodate. This paper specifically deals with the creation of a novel methodology for establishing mobility requirements for a new generation of space suit design concepts. Historically, the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station vehicle and space hardware design requirements documents such as the Man-Systems Integration Standards and International Space Station Flight Crew Integration Standard explicitly stated that the designers should strive to provide the maximum joint range of motion capabilities exhibited by a minimally clothed human subject. In the course of developing the Human-Systems Integration Requirements (HSIR) for the new space exploration initiative (Constellation), an effort was made to redefine the mobility requirements in the interest of safety and cost. Systems designed for manned space exploration can receive compounded gains from simplified designs that are both initially less expensive to produce and lighter, thereby, cheaper to launch.

  5. Virtual reality interface devices in the reorganization of neural networks in the brain of patients with neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Gatica-Rojas, Valeska; Méndez-Rebolledo, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Two key characteristics of all virtual reality applications are interaction and immersion. Systemic interaction is achieved through a variety of multisensory channels (hearing, sight, touch, and smell), permitting the user to interact with the virtual world in real time. Immersion is the degree to which a person can feel wrapped in the virtual world through a defined interface. Virtual reality interface devices such as the Nintendo® Wii and its peripheral nunchuks-balance board, head mounted ...

  6. Control System Design for Cylindrical Tank Process Using Neural Model Predictive Control Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sridevi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical manufacturing and process industry requires innovative technologies for process identification. This paper deals with model identification and control of cylindrical process. Model identification of the process was done using ARMAX technique. A neural model predictive controller was designed for the identified model. The performance of the controllers was evaluated using MATLAB software. The performance of NMPC controller was compared with Smith Predictor controller and IMC controller based on rise time, settling time, overshoot and ISE and it was found that the NMPC controller is better suited for this process.

  7. Backstepping fuzzy-neural-network control design for hybrid maglev transportation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Rong-Jong; Yao, Jing-Xiang; Lee, Jeng-Dao

    2015-02-01

    This paper focuses on the design of a backstepping fuzzy-neural-network control (BFNNC) for the online levitated balancing and propulsive positioning of a hybrid magnetic levitation (maglev) transportation system. The dynamic model of the hybrid maglev transportation system including levitated hybrid electromagnets to reduce the suspension power loss and the friction force during linear movement and a propulsive linear induction motor based on the concepts of mechanical geometry and motion dynamics is first constructed. The ultimate goal is to design an online fuzzy neural network (FNN) control methodology to cope with the problem of the complicated control transformation and the chattering control effort in backstepping control (BSC) design, and to directly ensure the stability of the controlled system without the requirement of strict constraints, detailed system information, and auxiliary compensated controllers despite the existence of uncertainties. In the proposed BFNNC scheme, an FNN control is utilized to be the major control role by imitating the BSC strategy, and adaptation laws for network parameters are derived in the sense of projection algorithm and Lyapunov stability theorem to ensure the network convergence as well as stable control performance. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy for the hybrid maglev transportation system is verified by experimental results, and the superiority of the BFNNC scheme is indicated in comparison with the BSC strategy and the backstepping particle-swarm-optimization control system in previous research.

  8. Software Design Challenges in Time Series Prediction Systems Using Parallel Implementation of Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan Manikandan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Software development life cycle has been characterized by destructive disconnects between activities like planning, analysis, design, and programming. Particularly software developed with prediction based results is always a big challenge for designers. Time series data forecasting like currency exchange, stock prices, and weather report are some of the areas where an extensive research is going on for the last three decades. In the initial days, the problems with financial analysis and prediction were solved by statistical models and methods. For the last two decades, a large number of Artificial Neural Networks based learning models have been proposed to solve the problems of financial data and get accurate results in prediction of the future trends and prices. This paper addressed some architectural design related issues for performance improvement through vectorising the strengths of multivariate econometric time series models and Artificial Neural Networks. It provides an adaptive approach for predicting exchange rates and it can be called hybrid methodology for predicting exchange rates. This framework is tested for finding the accuracy and performance of parallel algorithms used.

  9. Adsorption of rationally designed "surf-tides" to a liquid-crystal interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badami, Joseph V; Bernstein, Chaim; Maldarelli, Charles; Tu, Raymond S

    2015-09-07

    The interfacial adsorption of proteins in surfactant laden systems occurs both in nature and industrial processing, yet much of the fundamental behavior behind these systems is still not well understood. We report the development of a system that monitors optical transitions of a liquid-crystalline/aqueous interface to examine the dynamics of adsorption of two rationally designed model peptide molecules. The two molecules synthesized in this study were both designed to become surface-active upon folding and contain the same net charge of +3, but one of the peptides, K-2.5, has its three charges separated by 2.5 amino acids as compared to K-6.0, which has its three charges separated by 6 amino acids. Our study examines the roles that surfactant adsorption, peptide charge distribution and secondary structure have on the relative adsorption dynamics of these two models peptides onto a fluid/fluid interface. Using the optical detection of molecular adsorption and image analysis of these events, we obtain quantitative information about the dynamics as a function of the charge spacing and initial peptide concentration. We show that both peptides initially follow a diffusion-limited adsorption model onto the interface. Additionally, our results suggest that the K-6.0 peptides demonstrate enhanced adsorption kinetics, where the enhanced rates are a consequence of the well-folded adsorbed state and spatial distribution on the surface. These findings provide further insights into the role that charge spacing has on secondary structure and subsequently the dynamics of adsorption, while developing a versatile system capable of extracting quantitative information from a simple inexpensive optical system.

  10. Design and analysis of closed-loop decoder adaptation algorithms for brain-machine interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Siddharth; Orsborn, Amy L; Moorman, Helene G; Carmena, Jose M

    2013-07-01

    Closed-loop decoder adaptation (CLDA) is an emerging paradigm for achieving rapid performance improvements in online brain-machine interface (BMI) operation. Designing an effective CLDA algorithm requires making multiple important decisions, including choosing the timescale of adaptation, selecting which decoder parameters to adapt, crafting the corresponding update rules, and designing CLDA parameters. These design choices, combined with the specific settings of CLDA parameters, will directly affect the algorithm's ability to make decoder parameters converge to values that optimize performance. In this article, we present a general framework for the design and analysis of CLDA algorithms and support our results with experimental data of two monkeys performing a BMI task. First, we analyze and compare existing CLDA algorithms to highlight the importance of four critical design elements: the adaptation timescale, selective parameter adaptation, smooth decoder updates, and intuitive CLDA parameters. Second, we introduce mathematical convergence analysis using measures such as mean-squared error and KL divergence as a useful paradigm for evaluating the convergence properties of a prototype CLDA algorithm before experimental testing. By applying these measures to an existing CLDA algorithm, we demonstrate that our convergence analysis is an effective analytical tool that can ultimately inform and improve the design of CLDA algorithms.

  11. Examining the electro-neural interface of cochlear implant users using psychophysics, CT scans, and speech understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher J; Holden, Timothy A; McClelland, Gary H; Parkinson, Wendy S; Shelton, Clough; Kelsall, David C; Smith, Zachary M

    2014-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between focused-stimulation thresholds, electrode positions, and speech understanding in deaf subjects treated with a cochlear implant (CI). Focused stimulation is more selective than monopolar stimulation, which excites broad regions of the cochlea, so may be more sensitive as a probe of neural survival patterns. Focused thresholds are on average higher and more variable across electrodes than monopolar thresholds. We presume that relatively high focused thresholds are the result of larger distances between the electrodes and the neurons. Two factors are likely to contribute to this distance: (1) the physical position of electrodes relative to the modiolus, where the excitable auditory neurons are normally located, and (2) the pattern of neural survival along the length of the cochlea, since local holes in the neural population will increase the distance between an electrode and the nearest neurons. Electrode-to-modiolus distance was measured from high-resolution CT scans of the cochleae of CI users whose focused-stimulation thresholds were also measured. A hierarchical set of linear models of electrode-to-modiolus distance versus threshold showed a significant increase in threshold with electrode-to-modiolus distance (average slope = 11 dB/mm). The residual of these models was hypothesized to reflect neural survival in each subject. Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant (CNC) word scores were significantly correlated with the within-subject variance of threshold (r(2) = 0.82), but not with within-subject variance of electrode distance (r(2) = 0.03). Speech understanding also significantly correlated with how well distance explained each subject's threshold data (r(2) = 0.63). That is, subjects with focused thresholds that were well described by electrode position had better speech scores. Our results suggest that speech understanding is highly impacted by individual patterns of neural survival and that these patterns manifest themselves

  12. Low-Frequency Noise and Offset Rejection in DC-Coupled Neural Amplifiers: A Review and Digitally-Assisted Design Tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Arezu; Salam, Muhammad Tariqus; Perez Velazquez, Jose Luis; Genov, Roman

    2017-02-01

    We review integrated circuits for low-frequency noise and offset rejection as a motivation for the presented digitally-assisted neural amplifier design methodology. Conventional AC-coupled neural amplifiers inherently reject input DC offset but have key limitations in area, linearity, DC drift, and spectral accuracy. Their chopper stabilization reduces low-frequency intrinsic noise at the cost of degraded area, input impedance and design complexity. DC-coupled implementations with digital high-pass filtering yield improved area, linearity, drift, and spectral accuracy and are inherently suitable for simple chopper stabilization. As a design example, a 56-channel 0.13 [Formula: see text] CMOS intracranial EEG interface is presented. DC offset of up to ±50 mV is rejected by a digital low-pass filter and a 16-bit delta-sigma DAC feeding back into the folding node of a folded-cascode LNA with CMRR of 65 dB. A bank of seven column-parallel fully differential SAR ADCs with ENOB of 6.6 are shared among 56 channels resulting in 0.018 [Formula: see text] effective channel area. Compensation-free direct input chopping yields integrated input-referred noise of 4.2 μVrms over the bandwidth of 1 Hz to 1 kHz. The 8.7 [Formula: see text] chip dissipating 1.07 mW has been validated in vivo in online intracranial EEG monitoring in freely moving rats.

  13. Interface design for DE based stack-actuators considering various application cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochmann, Helge; von Heckel, Benedikt; Hoffstadt, Thorben; Maas, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Transducers based on dielectric elastomers (DE) are able to fulfill various requirements as generator, sensor and actuator applications. Depending on the application their design implementation differs. An advantageous transducer topology to improve the strain and force are DE stack-transducers which consist of multiple layers of DE films coated with a compliant electrode. Their actuation behavior is strongly depended on the total number of layers and the mechanical interface to its environment. Considering different application cases customized actuator designs are proposed and the utilized manufacturing process is briefly presented. Within this publication a FE model is used to simulate the deformation under consideration of various mechanical boundaries. After-wards, experimental investigations are conducted to verify the simulation results. Actuator configurations with different mechanical interfaces are analyzed regarding their static actuation behavior. Furthermore, dynamic tests were conducted to show differences between actuators made from silicone and polyurethane (PUR). In summary, the tests confirm the results of the FE analysis and provide promising results appropriate for various future applications.

  14. Grasp specific and user friendly interface design for myoelectric hand prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Alireza; Lavranos, Jim; Howe, Rob; Choong, Peter; Oetomo, Denny

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the design and characterisation of a hand prosthesis and its user interface, focusing on performing the most commonly used grasps in activities of daily living (ADLs). Since the operation of a multi-articulated powered hand prosthesis is difficult to learn and master, there is a significant rate of abandonment by amputees in preference for simpler devices. In choosing so, amputees chose to live with fewer features in their prosthesis that would more reliably perform the basic operations. In this paper, we look simultaneously at a hand prosthesis design method that aims for a small number of grasps, a low complexity user interface and an alternative method to the current use of EMG as a preshape selection method through the use of a simple button; to enable amputees to get to and execute the intended hand movements intuitively, quickly and reliably. An experiment is reported at the end of the paper comparing the speed and accuracy with which able-bodied naive subjects are able to select the intended preshapes through the use of a simplified EMG method and a simple button. It is shown that the button was significantly superior in the speed of successful task completion and marginally superior in accuracy (success of first attempt).

  15. Design and Evaluation of Shape-Changing Haptic Interfaces for Pedestrian Navigation Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Adam J; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Shape-changing interfaces are a category of device capable of altering their form in order to facilitate communication of information. In this work, we present a shape-changing device that has been designed for navigation assistance. 'The Animotus' (previously, 'The Haptic Sandwich' ), resembles a cube with an articulated upper half that is able to rotate and extend (translate) relative to the bottom half, which is fixed in the user's grasp. This rotation and extension, generally felt via the user's fingers, is used to represent heading and proximity to navigational targets. The device is intended to provide an alternative to screen or audio based interfaces for visually impaired, hearing impaired, deafblind, and sighted pedestrians. The motivation and design of the haptic device is presented, followed by the results of a navigation experiment that aimed to determine the role of each device DOF, in terms of facilitating guidance. An additional device, 'The Haptic Taco', which modulated its volume in response to target proximity (negating directional feedback), was also compared. Results indicate that while the heading (rotational) DOF benefited motion efficiency, the proximity (translational) DOF benefited velocity. Combination of the two DOF improved overall performance. The volumetric Taco performed comparably to the Animotus' extension DOF.

  16. A MATLAB Graphical User Interface Dedicated to the Optimal Design of the High Power Induction Motor with Heavy Starting Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Brojboiu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a Matlab graphical user interface dedicated to the optimal design of the high power induction motor with heavy starting conditions is presented. This graphical user interface allows to input the rated parameters, the selection of the induction motor type and the optimization criterion of the induction motor design also. For the squirrel cage induction motor the graphical user interface allows the selection of the rotor bar geometry, the material of the rotor bar as well as the fastening technology of the shorting ring on the rotor bar. The Matlab graphical user interface is developed and applied to the general optimal design program of the induction motor described in [1], [2].

  17. Design of a Workstation for People with Upper-Limb Disabilities Using a Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Muñoz-Cardona

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available  This paper shows the design of work-station for work-related inclusion people upper-limb disability. The system involves the use of novel brain computer interface used to bridge the user-computer interaction. Our hope objective is elucidating functional, technological, ergonomic and procedural aspects to runaway operation station; with propose to scratch barrier to impossibility access to TIC’s tools and work done for individual disability person. We found access facility ergonomics, adaptability and portable issue of workstation are most important design criteria. Prototype implementations in workplace environment have TIR estimate of 43% for retrieve. Finally we list a typology of services that could be the most appropriate for the process of labor including: telemarketing, telesales, telephone surveys, order taking, social assistance in disasters, general information and inquiries, reservations at tourist sites, technical support, emergency, online support and after-sales services.

  18. Practical experience with graphical user interfaces and object-oriented design in the clinical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, I G; Cartwright, R Y; Farnan, L P

    1993-12-15

    The computing strategy in our laboratories evolved from research in Artificial Intelligence, and is based on powerful software tools running on high performance desktop computers with a graphical user interface. This allows most tasks to be regarded as design problems rather than implementation projects, and both rapid prototyping and an object-oriented approach to be employed during the in-house development and enhancement of the laboratory information systems. The practical application of this strategy is discussed, with particular reference to the system designer, the laboratory user and the laboratory customer. Routine operation covers five departments, and the systems are stable, flexible and well accepted by the users. Client-server computing, currently undergoing final trials, is seen as the key to further development, and this approach to Pathology computing has considerable potential for the future.

  19. Conductive nanogel-interfaced neural microelectrode arrays with electrically controlled in-situ delivery of manganese ions enabling high-resolution MEMRI for synchronous neural tracing with deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Chen; Lo, Yu-Chih; Chu, Chao-Yi; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Chen, San-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    Chronic brain stimulation has become a promising physical therapy with increased efficacy and efficiency in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The application of deep brain electrical stimulation (DBS) combined with manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) provides an unbiased representation of the functional anatomy, which shows the communication between areas of the brain responding to the therapy. However, it is challenging for the current system to provide a real-time high-resolution image because the incorporated MnCl2 solution through microinjection usually results in image blurring or toxicity due to the uncontrollable diffusion of Mn2+. In this study, we developed a new type of conductive nanogel-based neural interface composed of amphiphilic chitosan-modified poly(3,4 -ethylenedioxythiophene) (PMSDT) that can exhibit biomimic structural/mechanical properties and ionic/electrical conductivity comparable to that of Au. More importantly, the PMSDT enables metal-ligand bonding with Mn2+ ions, so that the system can release Mn2+ ions rather than MnCl2 solution directly and precisely controlled by electrical stimulation (ES) to achieve real-time high-resolution MEMRI. With the integration of PMSDT nanogel-based coating in polyimide-based microelectrode arrays, the post-implantation DBS enables frequency-dependent MR imaging in vivo, as well as small focal imaging in response to channel site-specific stimulation on the implant. The MR imaging of the implanted brain treated with 5-min electrical stimulation showed a thalamocortical neuronal pathway after 36 h, confirming the effective activation of a downstream neuronal circuit following DBS. By eliminating the susceptibility to artifact and toxicity, this system, in combination with a MR-compatible implant and a bio-compliant neural interface, provides a harmless and synchronic functional anatomy for DBS. The study demonstrates a model of MEMRI-functionalized DBS based on functional

  20. LONG-TERM RELIABILITY OF AL2O3 AND PARYLENE C BILAYER ENCAPSULATED UTAH ELECTRODE ARRAY BASED NEURAL INTERFACES FOR CHRONIC IMPLANTATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xianzong; Rieth, Loren; Williams, Layne; Negi, Sandeep; Bhandari, Rajmohan; Caldwell, Ryan; Sharma, Rohit; Tathireddy, Prashant; Solzbacher, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Objective We focus on improving the long-term stability and functionality of neural interfaces for chronic implantation by using bilayer encapsulation. Approach We evaluated the long-term reliability of Utah electrode array (UEA) based neural interfaces encapsulated by 52 nm of atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 and 6 μm of Parylene C bilayer, and compared these to devices with the baseline Parylene-only encapsulation. Three variants of arrays including wired, wireless, and active UEAs were used to evaluate this bilayer encapsulation scheme, and were immersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 57 °C for accelerated lifetime testing. Main results The median tip impedance of the bilayer encapsulated wired UEAs increased from 60 kΩ to 160 kΩ during the 960 days of equivalent soak testing at 37 °C, the opposite trend as typically observed for Parylene encapsulated devices. The loss of the iridium oxide tip metallization and etching of the silicon tip in PBS solution contributed to the increase of impedance. The lifetime of fully integrated wireless UEAs was also tested using accelerated lifetime measurement techniques. The bilayer coated devices had stable power-up frequencies at ~910 MHz and constant RF signal strength of -50 dBm during up to 1044 days (still under testing) of equivalent soaking time at 37 °C. This is a significant improvement over the lifetime of ~ 100 days achieved with Parylene-only encapsulation at 37 °C. The preliminary samples of bilayer coated active UEAs with a flip-chip bonded ASIC chip had a steady current draw of ~ 3 mA during 228 days of soak testing at 37 °C. An increase in current draw has been consistently correlated to device failures, so is a sensitive metric for their lifetime. Significance The trends of increasing electrode impedance of wired devices and performance stability of wireless and active devices support the significantly greater encapsulation performance of this bilayer encapsulation compared with Parylene

  1. Toward best practice in Human Machine Interface design for older drivers: A review of current design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K L; Koppel, S; Charlton, J L

    2017-09-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the driving population. While there is a strong emphasis for older people to maintain their mobility, the safety of older drivers is a serious community concern. Frailty and declines in a range of age-related sensory, cognitive, and physical impairments can place older drivers at an increased risk of crash-related injuries and death. A number of studies have indicated that in-vehicle technologies such as Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and In-Vehicle Information Systems (IVIS) may provide assistance to older drivers. However, these technologies will only benefit older drivers if their design is congruent with the complex needs and diverse abilities of this driving cohort. The design of ADAS and IVIS is largely informed by automotive Human Machine Interface (HMI) guidelines. However, it is unclear to what extent the declining sensory, cognitive and physical capabilities of older drivers are addressed in the current guidelines. This paper provides a review of key current design guidelines for IVIS and ADAS with respect to the extent they address age-related changes in functional capacities. The review revealed that most of the HMI guidelines do not address design issues related to older driver impairments. In fact, in many guidelines driver age and sensory cognitive and physical impairments are not mentioned at all and where reference is made, it is typically very broad. Prescriptive advice on how to actually design a system so that it addresses the needs and limitations of older drivers is not provided. In order for older drivers to reap the full benefits that in-vehicle technology can afford, it is critical that further work establish how older driver limitations and capabilities can be supported by the system design process, including their inclusion into HMI design guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design Process for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft Improved by Neural Network and Regression Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    A key challenge in designing the new High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) aircraft is determining a good match between the airframe and engine. Multidisciplinary design optimization can be used to solve the problem by adjusting parameters of both the engine and the airframe. Earlier, an example problem was presented of an HSCT aircraft with four mixed-flow turbofan engines and a baseline mission to carry 305 passengers 5000 nautical miles at a cruise speed of Mach 2.4. The problem was solved by coupling NASA Lewis Research Center's design optimization testbed (COMETBOARDS) with NASA Langley Research Center's Flight Optimization System (FLOPS). The computing time expended in solving the problem was substantial, and the instability of the FLOPS analyzer at certain design points caused difficulties. In an attempt to alleviate both of these limitations, we explored the use of two approximation concepts in the design optimization process. The two concepts, which are based on neural network and linear regression approximation, provide the reanalysis capability and design sensitivity analysis information required for the optimization process. The HSCT aircraft optimization problem was solved by using three alternate approaches; that is, the original FLOPS analyzer and two approximate (derived) analyzers. The approximate analyzers were calibrated and used in three different ranges of the design variables; narrow (interpolated), standard, and wide (extrapolated).

  3. Interface Consistency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes that Interface Consistency is an important issue for the development of modular designs. Byproviding a precise specification of component interfaces it becomes possible to check that separately developedcomponents use a common interface in a coherent matter thus avoiding a very...

  4. Design a PID Controller for Suspension System by Back Propagation Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a neural network for designing of a PID controller for suspension system. The suspension system, designed as a quarter model, is used to simplify the problem to one-dimensional spring-damper system. In this paper, back propagation neural network (BPN has been used for determining the gain parameters of a PID controller for suspension system of automotive. The BPN method is found to be the most accurate and quick. The best results were obtained by the BPN by Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm training with 10 neurons in the one hidden layer. Training was continued until the mean squared error is less than . Desired error value was achieved in the BPN, and the BPN was tested with both data used and not used for training. By training of this network, it is possible to estimate the gain parameters of PID controller at any condition. The inputs of network are automotive velocity, overshoot percentage, settling time, and steady state error of suspension system response. Also outputs of the net are the gain parameters of PID controller. Resultant low relative error value of the ANN model indicates the usability of the BPN in this area.

  5. Verification of filter efficiency of horizontal roughing filter by Weglin's design criteria and Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asis Mazumder

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The general objective of this study is to estimate the performance of the Horizontal Roughing Filter (HRF by using Weglin's design criteria based on 1/3–2/3 filter theory. The main objective of the present study is to validate HRF developed in the laboratory with Slow Sand Filter (SSF as a pretreatment unit with the help of Weglin's design criteria for HRF with respect to raw water condition and neuro-genetic model developed based on the filter dataset. The results achieved from the three different models were compared to find whether the performance of the experimental HRF with SSF output conforms to the other two models which will verify the validity of the former. According to the results, the experimental setup was coherent with the neural model but incoherent with the results from Weglin's formula as lowest mean square error was observed in case of the neuro-genetic model while comparing with the values found from the experimental SSF-HRF unit. As neural models are known to learn a problem with utmost efficiency, the model verification result was taken as positive.

  6. Diseño de interfaces de usuario como apoyo a las estrategias de aprendizaje User interfaces design to support the learning strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leguízamo León Ana Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo hace referencia a la importancia que tiene el diseño de la interfaz de usuario en el desarrollo de un software educativo, haciendo énfasis en aquellos elementos de la Interacción Humano Computador (IHC que permiten potenciar las estrategias de aprendizaje en estos contextos. Se describen las funciones que debe cumplir una interfaz de usuario en un ambiente de aprendizaje y se definen principios y lineamientos para el diseño de estos ambientes. This paper refers the importance of designing the user interface in the development of educational software, with emphasis on those elements of the Human Computer Interaction (HCI to enhance learning strategies in these contexts. We describe the functions to be fulfilled by a user interface in a learning environment and define principles and guidelines for the design of these environments.

  7. Emerging trends in neuro engineering and neural computation

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kendall; Garmestani, Hamid; Lim, Chee

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on neuro-engineering and neural computing, a multi-disciplinary field of research attracting considerable attention from engineers, neuroscientists, microbiologists and material scientists. It explores a range of topics concerning the design and development of innovative neural and brain interfacing technologies, as well as novel information acquisition and processing algorithms to make sense of the acquired data. The book also highlights emerging trends and advances regarding the applications of neuro-engineering in real-world scenarios, such as neural prostheses, diagnosis of neural degenerative diseases, deep brain stimulation, biosensors, real neural network-inspired artificial neural networks (ANNs) and the predictive modeling of information flows in neuronal networks. The book is broadly divided into three main sections including: current trends in technological developments, neural computation techniques to make sense of the neural behavioral data, and application of these technologie...

  8. Real-time ocular artifact suppression using recurrent neural network for electro-encephalogram based brain-computer interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian, A; Mahmoudi, B

    2005-03-01

    The paper presents an adaptive noise canceller (ANC) filter using an artificial neural network for real-time removal of electro-oculogram (EOG) interference from electro-encephalogram (EEG) signals. Conventional ANC filters are based on linear models of interference. Such linear models provide poorer prediction for biomedical signals. In this work, a recurrent neural network was employed for modelling the interference signals. The eye movement and eye blink artifacts were recorded by the placing of an electrode on the forehead above the left eye and an electrode on the left temple. The reference signal was then generated by the data collected from the forehead electrode being added to data recorded from the temple electrode. The reference signal was also contaminated by the EEG. To reduce the EEG interference, the reference signal was first low-pass filtered by a moving averaged filter and then applied to the ANC. Matlab Simulink was used for real-time data acquisition, filtering and ocular artifact suppression. Simulation results show the validity and effectiveness of the technique with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the primary signal. On average, a significant improvement in SNR up to 27 dB was achieved with the recurrent neural network. The results from real data demonstrate that the proposed scheme removes ocular artifacts from contaminated EEG signals and is suitable for real-time and short-time EEG recordings.

  9. PLGA nanofibers blended with designer self-assembling peptides for peripheral neural regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nune, Manasa; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan, E-mail: swami@sastra.edu

    2016-05-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are attractive candidates for neural regeneration due to similarity to the extracellular matrix. Several synthetic polymers have been used but they lack in providing the essential biorecognition motifs on their surfaces. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds (SAPNFs) like RADA16 and recently, designer SAPs with functional motifs RADA16-I-BMHP1 areexamples, which showed successful spinal cord regeneration. But these peptide nanofiber scaffolds have poor mechanical properties and faster degradation rates that limit their use for larger nerve defects. Hence, we have developed a novel hybrid nanofiber scaffold of polymer poly(L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and RADA16-I-BMHP1. The scaffolds were characterized for the presence of peptides both qualitatively and quantitatively using several techniques like SEM, EDX, FTIR, CHN analysis, Circular Dichroism analysis, Confocal and thermal analysis. Peptide self-assembly was retained post-electrospinning and formed rod-like nanostructures on PLGA nanofibers. In vitro cell compatibility was studied using rat Schwann cells and their adhesion, proliferation and gene expression levels on the designed scaffolds were evaluated. Our results have revealed the significant effects of the peptide blended scaffolds on promoting Schwann cell adhesion, extension and phenotypic expression. Neural development markers (SEM3F, NRP2 & PLX1) gene expression levels were significantly upregulated in peptide blended scaffolds compared to the PLGA scaffolds. Thus the hybrid blended novel designer scaffolds seem to be promising candidates for successful and functional regeneration of the peripheral nerve. - Highlights: • A novel blended scaffold of polymer PLGA and designer self-assembling peptide RADA16-I-BMPH1 was designed • The peptide retained the self-assembling features and formed rod like nanostructures on top of PLGA nanofibers • PLGA-peptide scaffolds have promoted the Schwann cell bipolar extension and

  10. Project Ukko - Design of a climate service visualisation interface for seasonal wind forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemment, Drew; Stefaner, Moritz; Makri, Stephann; Buontempo, Carlo; Christel, Isadora; Torralba-Fernandez, Veronica; Gonzalez-Reviriego, Nube; Doblas-Reyes, Francisco; de Matos, Paula; Dykes, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Project Ukko is a prototype climate service to visually communicate probabilistic seasonal wind forecasts for the energy sector. In Project Ukko, an interactive visualisation enhances the accessibility and readability to the latests advances in seasonal wind speed predictions developed as part of the RESILIENCE prototype of the EUPORIAS (EC FP7) project. Climate services provide made-to-measure climate information, tailored to the specific requirements of different users and industries. In the wind energy sector, understanding of wind conditions in the next few months has high economic value, for instance, for the energy traders. Current energy practices use retrospective climatology, but access to reliable seasonal predictions based in the recent advances in global climate models has potential to improve their resilience to climate variability and change. Despite their potential benefits, a barrier to the development of commercially viable services is the complexity of the probabilistic forecast information, and the challenge of communicating complex and uncertain information to decision makers in industry. Project Ukko consists of an interactive climate service interface for wind energy users to explore probabilistic wind speed predictions for the coming season. This interface enables fast visual detection and exploration of interesting features and regions likely to experience unusual changes in wind speed in the coming months.The aim is not only to support users to better understand the future variability in wind power resources, but also to bridge the gap between practitioners' traditional approach and the advanced prediction systems developed by the climate science community. Project Ukko is presented as a case study of cross-disciplinary collaboration between climate science and design, for the development of climate services that are useful, usable and effective for industry users. The presentation will reflect on the challenge of developing a climate

  11. Multiobjective optimization of building design using TRNSYS simulations, genetic algorithm, and Artificial Neural Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnier, Laurent; Haghighat, Fariborz [Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W., BE-351, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1M8 (Canada)

    2010-03-15

    Building optimization involving multiple objectives is generally an extremely time-consuming process. The GAINN approach presented in this study first uses a simulation-based Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to characterize building behaviour, and then combines this ANN with a multiobjective Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) for optimization. The methodology has been used in the current study for the optimization of thermal comfort and energy consumption in a residential house. Results of ANN training and validation are first discussed. Two optimizations were then conducted taking variables from HVAC system settings, thermostat programming, and passive solar design. By integrating ANN into optimization the total simulation time was considerably reduced compared to classical optimization methodology. Results of the optimizations showed significant reduction in terms of energy consumption as well as improvement in thermal comfort. Finally, thanks to the multiobjective approach, dozens of potential designs were revealed, with a wide range of trade-offs between thermal comfort and energy consumption. (author)

  12. Design and simulation of a nanoelectronic DG MOSFET current source using artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djeffal, F. [LEA, Department of Electronics, University of Batna 05000 (Algeria)], E-mail: faycaldzdz@hotmail.com; Dibi, Z. [LEA, Department of Electronics, University of Batna 05000 (Algeria)], E-mail: zohirdibi@univ-batna.dz; Hafiane, M.L.; Arar, D. [LEA, Department of Electronics, University of Batna 05000 (Algeria)

    2007-09-15

    The double gate (DG) MOSFET has received great attention in recent years owing to the inherent suppression of short channel effects (SCEs), excellent subthreshold slope (S), improved drive current (I{sub ds}) and transconductance (gm), volume inversion for symmetric devices and excellent scalability. Therefore, simulation tools which can be applied to design nanoscale transistors in the future require new theory and modeling techniques that capture the physics of quantum transport accurately and efficiently. In this sense, this work presents the applicability of the artificial neural networks (ANN) for the design and simulation of a nanoelectronic DG MOSFET current source. The latter is based on the 2D numerical Non-Equilibrium Green's Function (NEGF) simulation of the current-voltage characteristics of an undoped symmetric DG MOSFET. Our results are discussed in order to obtain some new and useful information about the ULSI technology.

  13. What do spinal cord injury consumers want? A review of spinal cord injury consumer priorities and neuroprosthesis from the 2008 neural interfaces conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jennifer S; Anderson-Erisman, Kim D; Sutter, Maria

    2010-07-01

      To summarize research to understand the priorities of consumers with spinal cord injury (SCI) as related to neuroprosthesis.   This review is generated from results presented during a session at the 2008 Neural Interfaces Conference held in Cleveland, OH including presentations of research, observation of a panel discussion, and a case study.   Understanding priorities of consumers living with SCI may help guide development of technology to potentially increase quality of life, confidence, and independence. Those living with quadriplegia desire arm and hand function while persons with paraplegia wish to regain sexual function. Shared priorities in the SCI population are the restoration of bladder and bowel function and the importance of exercise for functional recovery.   Understanding the consumer is the cornerstone to successful delivery of a neuroprosthesis. Translational research by multidisciplinary teams is needed to understand these issues and move technology for people living with SCI from the bench to the bedside. © 2010 International Neuromodulation Society.

  14. Layout Design of Human-Machine Interaction Interface of Cabin Based on Cognitive Ergonomics and GA-ACA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Wang, Guohua; Yu, Suihuai

    2016-01-01

    In order to consider the psychological cognitive characteristics affecting operating comfort and realize the automatic layout design, cognitive ergonomics and GA-ACA (genetic algorithm and ant colony algorithm) were introduced into the layout design of human-machine interaction interface. First, from the perspective of cognitive psychology, according to the information processing process, the cognitive model of human-machine interaction interface was established. Then, the human cognitive characteristics were analyzed, and the layout principles of human-machine interaction interface were summarized as the constraints in layout design. Again, the expression form of fitness function, pheromone, and heuristic information for the layout optimization of cabin was studied. The layout design model of human-machine interaction interface was established based on GA-ACA. At last, a layout design system was developed based on this model. For validation, the human-machine interaction interface layout design of drilling rig control room was taken as an example, and the optimization result showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Guidelines for cognitively efficient multimedia learning tools: educational strategies, cognitive load, and interface design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Tiffany; Corsbie-Massay, Charisse

    2006-03-01

    The field of medical education has consistently embraced new technologies in an attempt to improve the training process of our nation's doctors. There are thousands of available multimedia learning tools (MMLTs), but no quantitative scale exists to assess their efficiency and overall educational value. The authors review existing literature and suggest guidelines for creating cognitively efficient medical MMLTs. In 2004, the authors searched PubMed to identify articles regarding mutimedia learning, including educational strategies and existing MMLTs. The primary search terms included "multimedia learning," "cognitive load," and "surgical education." The resulting articles were evaluated and reviewed for educational and interface design techniques, and a list of common features was generated. The authors cross-referenced these features with extensive theories of cognitive load to create a list of methods that demonstrated improved learning. Techniques common to existing MMLTs often neglect to account for theories of cognitive load and may be detrimental to the learning process. The authors outlined important educational considerations and guidelines for the design of effective MMLTs. With large resources being spent to produce MMLTs, more research is necessary to establish successful design techniques. The authors summarized existing research, outlined educational issues in multimedia design, and proposed future directions for study.

  16. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukabache, Hamza; Escriba, Christophe; Fourniols, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures' reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure's integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated. PMID:25365457

  17. PDBj Mine: design and implementation of relational database interface for Protein Data Bank Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R.; Yamashita, Reiko; Nakamura, Haruki

    2010-01-01

    This article is a tutorial for PDBj Mine, a new database and its interface for Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj). In PDBj Mine, data are loaded from files in the PDBMLplus format (an extension of PDBML, PDB's canonical XML format, enriched with annotations), which are then served for the user of PDBj via the worldwide web (WWW). We describe the basic design of the relational database (RDB) and web interfaces of PDBj Mine. The contents of PDBMLplus files are first broken into XPath entities, and these paths and data are indexed in the way that reflects the hierarchical structure of the XML files. The data for each XPath type are saved into the corresponding relational table that is named as the XPath itself. The generation of table definitions from the PDBMLplus XML schema is fully automated. For efficient search, frequently queried terms are compiled into a brief summary table. Casual users can perform simple keyword search, and 'Advanced Search' which can specify various conditions on the entries. More experienced users can query the database using SQL statements which can be constructed in a uniform manner. Thus, PDBj Mine achieves a combination of the flexibility of XML documents and the robustness of the RDB. Database URL: http://www.pdbj.org/ PMID:20798081

  18. Toward Smart Aerospace Structures: Design of a Piezoelectric Sensor and Its Analog Interface for Flaw Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boukabache

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring using noninvasive methods is one of the major challenges that aerospace manufacturers face in this decade. Our work in this field focuses on the development and the system integration of millimetric piezoelectric sensors/ actuators to generate and measure specific guided waves. The aim of the application is to detect mechanical flaws on complex composite and alloy structures to quantify efficiently the global structures’ reliability. The study begins by a physical and analytical analysis of a piezoelectric patch. To preserve the structure’s integrity, the transducers are directly pasted onto the surface which leads to a critical issue concerning the interfacing layer. In order to improve the reliability and mitigate the influence of the interfacing layer, the global equations of piezoelectricity are coupled with a load transfer model. Thus we can determine precisely the shear strain developed on the surface of the structure. To exploit the generated signal, a high precision analog charge amplifier coupled to a double T notch filter were designed and scaled. Finally, a novel joined time-frequency analysis based on a wavelet decomposition algorithm is used to extract relevant structures signatures. Finally, this paper provides examples of application on aircraft structure specimens and the feasibility of the system is thus demonstrated.

  19. A low noise interface circuit design of micro-machined gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Di, Xipeng; Yin, Liang; Liu, Xiaowei

    2017-07-01

    The analyses of MEMS gyroscope interface circuit on thermal noise, 1/f noise and phase noise are made in this paper. A closed-loop differential driving circuit and a low-noise differential detecting circuit based on the high frequency modulation are designed to limit the noise. The interface chip is implemented in a standard 0.5 μm CMOS process. The test results show that the resolution of sensitive capacity can reach to 6.47 × 10-20 F at the bandwidth of 60 Hz. The measuring range is ± 200°/s and the nonlinearity is 310 ppm. The output noise density is 5.8^\\circ/({{h}}\\cdot \\sqrt{{Hz}}). The angular random walk (allen-variance) is 0.092^\\circ/\\sqrt{{{h}}} and the bias instability is 2.63°/h. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61204121), the National Hi-Tech Research and Development Program of China (No. 2013AA041107), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (No. HIT.NSRIF.2013040).

  20. Designing the user interfaces of a behavior modification intervention for obesity & eating disorders prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulos, Ioannis; Maramis, Christos; Mourouzis, Alexandros; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2015-01-01

    The recent immense diffusion of smartphones has significantly upgraded the role of mobile user interfaces in interventions that build and/or maintain healthier lifestyles. Indeed, high-quality, user-centered smartphone applications are able to serve as advanced front-ends to such interventions. These smartphone applications, coupled with portable or wearable sensors, are being employed for monitoring day to day health-related behaviors, including eating and physical activity. Some of them take one step forward by identifying unhealthy behaviors and contributing towards their modification. This work presents the design as well as the preliminary implementation of the mobile user interface of SPLENDID, a novel, sensor-oriented intervention for preventing obesity and eating disorders in young populations. This is implemented by means of an Android application, which is able to monitor the eating and physical activity behaviors of young individuals at risk for obesity and/or eating disorders, subsequently guiding them towards the modification of those behaviors that put them at risk. Behavior monitoring is based on multiple data provided by a set of communicating sensors and self-reported information, while guidance is facilitated through a feedback/encouragement provision and goal setting mechanism.