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Sample records for neural elements effectiveness

  1. Effect of exposure to trace elements in the soil on the prevalence of neural tube defects in a high-risk area of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Wu, Jilei; Li, Tiejun; Song, Xinming; Zhang, Bingzi; Zhang, Pingwen; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2011-04-01

    Our objective is to build a model that explains the association between the exposure to trace elements in the soil and the risk of neural tube defects. We built a function with different parameters to describe the effects of trace elements on neural tube defects. The association between neural tube defects and trace element levels was transformed into an optimization problem using the maximum likelihood method. Tin, lead, nickel, iron, copper, and aluminum had typical layered effects (dosage effects) on the prevalence of neural tube defects. Arsenic, selenium, zinc, strontium, and vanadium had no effect, and molybdenum had one threshold value that affected the prevalence of birth defects. As an exploratory research work, our model can be used to determine the direction of the effect of the trace element content of cultivated soil on the risk of neural tube defects, which shows the clues by the dosage effect of their toxicological characteristics. Based on our findings, future biogeochemical research should focus on the direct effects of trace elements on human health. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Equivalence of Conventional and Modified Network of Generalized Neural Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Konovalov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of neural networks consisting of generalized neural elements. The first part of the article proposes a new neural network model — a modified network of generalized neural elements (MGNE-network. This network developes the model of generalized neural element, whose formal description contains some flaws. In the model of the MGNE-network these drawbacks are overcome. A neural network is introduced all at once, without preliminary description of the model of a single neural element and method of such elements interaction. The description of neural network mathematical model is simplified and makes it relatively easy to construct on its basis a simulation model to conduct numerical experiments. The model of the MGNE-network is universal, uniting properties of networks consisting of neurons-oscillators and neurons-detectors. In the second part of the article we prove the equivalence of the dynamics of the two considered neural networks: the network, consisting of classical generalized neural elements, and MGNE-network. We introduce the definition of equivalence in the functioning of the generalized neural element and the MGNE-network consisting of a single element. Then we introduce the definition of the equivalence of the dynamics of the two neural networks in general. It is determined the correlation of different parameters of the two considered neural network models. We discuss the issue of matching the initial conditions of the two considered neural network models. We prove the theorem about the equivalence of the dynamics of the two considered neural networks. This theorem allows us to apply all previously obtained results for the networks, consisting of classical generalized neural elements, to the MGNE-network.

  3. Galanin-like immunoreactive neural elements in domestic ruminant pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltazar, E T; Kitamura, N; Sasaki, M; Cottrell, D F; Boloron, H M; Yamada, J

    2001-08-01

    The distribution and ontogeny of the galanin-like immunoreactive (Gal-IR) neural structures in the pancreas of cattle, sheep and goat were investigated immunohistochemically. The present study confirmed the previous findings on the immunolocalization of galanin both in the neural elements and endocrine cells of cattle, and reported for the first time its exclusive localization in the neural elements of sheep and goat. The frequency of Gal-IR nerve fibers and nerve cell bodies was high in cattle and low in sheep and goat. Their first detection was at the first fetal trimester in cattle and third trimester in sheep and goat. In cattle, a marked increase in the frequency of Gal-IR nerve fibers was observed from the third trimester to early neonatal stage followed by a decrease after three months postnatal. In contrast to the non-preferential distribution pattem in sheep, the Gal-IR nerve fibers in cattle and goat pancreas were predominantly associated with the acini, excretory ducts and blood vessels, but rarely detected in the pancreatic islets. The Gal-IR nerve cell bodies were observed as isolated bodies in the intra- and interlobular connective tissues and as a group within the intrapancreatic ganglia. At the vicinity of the nerve cell bodies, Gal-IR nerve fibers were observed. The present findings may suggest that: (1) galanin regulates pancreatic function as neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in ruminants; (2) galanin plays a more important role in large than in small ruminants; and (3) particularly in cattle, it exerts its most dramatic effect during perinatal development.

  4. Numerical simulation with finite element and artificial neural network ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further, this database after the neural network training; is used to analyse measured material properties of different test pieces. The ANN predictions are reconfirmed with contact type finite element analysis for an arbitrary selected test sample. The methodology evolved in this work can be extended to predict material ...

  5. Dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbits followed to skeletal maturity: Effect on thoracic dimensions, spine growth and neural elements

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    Canavese Federico

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that severe spinal deformity and early arthrodesis can adversely affect the development of the spine and thorax by changing their shape and reducing their normal function. This article analyzes the consequences of posterior fusion on the growth of spine, thorax and neural elements in New Zealand white rabbits and compares with similar human data. Materials and Methods : The first section of the article analyzes the consequences of T1-T6 dorsal arthrodesis on the growth of the spine, sternum, thorax volume and neural elements in 12 prepubertal female New Zealand white rabbits, through a study of CT scans and histology specimens. The second part, evaluates thoracic dimensions in 21 children with spinal arthrodesis for treatment of deformity performed prior to nine years of age. Results: Dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal rabbits changes thoracic growth patterns. In operated rabbits thoracic depth grows more slowly than thoracic width. The sternum as well as length of thoracic vertebral bodies in the spinal segment T1-T6 show reduced growth. Children undergoing spinal arthrodesis before nine years of age were noted to have shortened height, short trunk and disproportionate body habitus at skeletal maturity. Observed spine height and chest dimension values were reduced compared to the expected norms. The ratio between chest width and chest depth was below normal values. Conclusions: The first part of the study shows that thoracic dorsal arthrodesis in prepubertal New Zealand white rabbit influences thoracic, spine growth and affects the shape of pseudo unipolar neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. The second part demonstrates that children treated before nine years of age have significantly reduced spine height and thoracic dimensions. The thorax becomes elliptical as chest depth grows less than chest width. Both experimental and clinical findings contribute to explain reduced chest growth and subsequent thoracic

  6. Simulating dynamic plastic continuous neural networks by finite elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joghataie, Abdolreza; Torghabehi, Omid Oliyan

    2014-08-01

    We introduce dynamic plastic continuous neural network (DPCNN), which is comprised of neurons distributed in a nonlinear plastic medium where wire-like connections of neural networks are replaced with the continuous medium. We use finite element method to model the dynamic phenomenon of information processing within the DPCNNs. During the training, instead of weights, the properties of the continuous material at its different locations and some properties of neurons are modified. Input and output can be vectors and/or continuous functions over lines and/or areas. Delay and feedback from neurons to themselves and from outputs occur in the DPCNNs. We model a simple form of the DPCNN where the medium is a rectangular plate of bilinear material, and the neurons continuously fire a signal, which is a function of the horizontal displacement.

  7. Role of lumbar interspinous distraction on the neural elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfieri, Alex; Gazzeri, Roberto; Prell, Julian; Scheller, Christian; Rachinger, Jens; Strauss, Christian; Schwarz, Andreas

    2012-10-01

    The interspinous distraction devices are used to treat variable pathologies ranging from facet syndrome, diskogenic low back pain, degenerative spinal stenosis, diskopathy, spondylolisthesis, and instability. The insertion of a posterior element with an interspinous device (ISD) is commonly judged responsive to a relative kyphosis of a lumbar segment with a moderate but persistent increase of the spinal canal and of the foraminal width and area, and without influence on low-grade spondylolisthesis. The consequence is the need of shared specific biomechanical concepts to give for each degenerative problem the right indication through a critical analysis of all available experimental and clinical biomechanical data. We reviewed systematically the available clinical and experimental data about kyphosis, enlargement of the spinal canal, distraction of the interspinous distance, increase of the neural foramina, ligamentous structures, load of the posterior annulus, intradiskal pressure, strength of the spinous processes, degeneration of the adjacent segment, complications, and cost-effectiveness of the ISD. The existing literature does not provide actual scientific evidence over the superiority of the ISD strategy, but most of the experimental and clinical data show a challenging potential. These considerations are applicable with different types of ISD with only few differences between the different categories. Despite--or because of--the low invasiveness of the surgical implantation of the ISD, this technique promises to play a major role in the future degenerative lumbar microsurgery. The main indications for ISD remain lumbar spinal stenoses and painful facet arthroses. A clear documented contraindication is the presence of an anterolisthesis. Nevertheless, the existing literature does not provide evidence of superiority of outcome and cost-effectiveness of the ISD strategy over laminectomy or other surgical procedures. At this time, the devices should be used in

  8. Neural network applied to elemental archaeological Marajoara ceramic compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyota, Rosimeiri G.; Munita, Casimiro S., E-mail: rosimeiritoy@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: camunita@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Boscarioli, Clodis, E-mail: boscarioli@gmail.co [Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Parana, Cascavel, PR (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas. Colegiado de Informatica; Hernandez, Emilio D.M., E-mail: boscarioli@gmail.co [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica; Neves, Eduardo G.; Demartini, Celia C., E-mail: eduardo@pq.cnpq.b [Museu de Arqueologia e Etnologia (MAE/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In the last decades several analytical techniques have been used in archaeological ceramics studies. However, instrumental neutron activation analysis, INAA, employing gamma-ray spectrometry seems to be the most suitable technique because it is a simple analytical method in its purely instrumental form. The purpose of this work was to determine the concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb, and Zn in 160 original marajoara ceramic fragments by INAA. Marajoara ceramics culture was sophisticated and well developed. This culture reached its peak during the V and XIV centuries in Marajo Island located on the Amazon River delta area in Brazil. The purpose of the quantitative data was to identify compositionally homogeneous groups within the database. Having this in mind, the data set was first converted to base-10 logarithms to compensate for the differences in magnitude between major elements and trace elements, and also to yield a closer to normal distribution for several trace elements. After that, the data were analyzed using the Mahalanobis distance and using the lambda Wilks as critical value to identify the outliers. The similarities among the samples were studied by means of cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Additional confirmation of these groups was made by using elemental concentration bivariate plots. The results showed that there were two very well defined groups in the data set. In addition, the database was studied using artificial neural network with unsupervised learning strategy known as self-organizing maps to classify the marajoara ceramics. The experiments carried out showed that self-organizing maps artificial neural network is capable of discriminating ceramic fragments like multivariate statistical methods, and, again the results showed that the database was formed by two groups. (author)

  9. Tip Deflection Determination of a Barrel for the Effect of an Accelerating Projectile Before Firing Using Finite Element and Artificial Neural Network Combined Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akif Koç

    Full Text Available Abstract For realistic applications, design and control engineers have limited modelling options in dealing with some vibration problems that hold many nonlinearity such as non-uniform geometry, variable velocity loadings, indefinite damping cases, etc. For these reasons numerous time consuming experimental studies at high costs must be done for determining the actual behaviour such nonlinear systems. However, using advantages of multiple computational methods like Finite Element Method (FEM together with an Artificial Intelligence (ANN, many complicated engineering problems can be handled and solved to some extent. This study, proposes a new collective method to deal with the nonlinear vibrations of the barrels in order to fulfil accurate shooting expectancy. Using known analytical methods, in practical, to determine dynamic behaviour of the barrel beam is not possible for all conditions of firing that include numerous varieties of ammunition for different purposes, and each projectile of different ammunition has different mass and exit velocity. In order to cover all cases this study proposes a new method that combines a precise FEM with ANN, and can be used for determining the exact dynamic behaviour of a barrel for some cases and then for precisely predicting the behaviour for all other possible cases of firing. In this study, the whole nonlinear behaviour of an antiaircraft barrel were obtained with 3.5% accuracy errors by ANN trained by FEM using calculated analysis results of ammunitions for a particular range. The proposed FEM-ANN combined method can be very useful for design and control engineers in design and control of barrels in order to compensate the effect of nonlinear vibrations of a barrel for achieving a higher shooting accuracy; and can reduce high-cost experimental works.

  10. Neural networks-based damage detection for bridges considering errors in baseline finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Jae; Lee, Jong Won; Yi, Jin Hak; Yun, Chung Bang; Jung, Hie Young

    2005-02-01

    Structural health monitoring has become an important research topic in conjunction with damage assessment and safety evaluation of structures. The use of system identification approaches for damage detection has been expanded in recent years owing to the advancements in signal analysis and information processing techniques. Soft computing techniques such as neural networks and genetic algorithm have been utilized increasingly for this end due to their excellent pattern recognition capability. In this study, a neural networks-based damage detection method using the modal properties is presented, which can effectively consider the modelling errors in the baseline finite element model from which the training patterns are to be generated. The differences or the ratios of the mode shape components between before and after damage are used as the input to the neural networks in this method, since they are found to be less sensitive to the modelling errors than the mode shapes themselves. Two numerical example analyses on a simple beam and a multi-girder bridge are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. Results of laboratory test on a simply supported bridge model and field test on a bridge with multiple girders confirm the applicability of the present method.

  11. Controlling the elements: an optogenetic approach to understanding the neural circuits of fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Joshua P; Wolff, Steffen B E; Lüthi, Andreas; LeDoux, Joseph E

    2012-06-15

    Neural circuits underlie our ability to interact in the world and to learn adaptively from experience. Understanding neural circuits and how circuit structure gives rise to neural firing patterns or computations is fundamental to our understanding of human experience and behavior. Fear conditioning is a powerful model system in which to study neural circuits and information processing and relate them to learning and behavior. Until recently, technological limitations have made it difficult to study the causal role of specific circuit elements during fear conditioning. However, newly developed optogenetic tools allow researchers to manipulate individual circuit components such as anatomically or molecularly defined cell populations, with high temporal precision. Applying these tools to the study of fear conditioning to control specific neural subpopulations in the fear circuit will facilitate a causal analysis of the role of these circuit elements in fear learning and memory. By combining this approach with in vivo electrophysiological recordings in awake, behaving animals, it will also be possible to determine the functional contribution of specific cell populations to neural processing in the fear circuit. As a result, the application of optogenetics to fear conditioning could shed light on how specific circuit elements contribute to neural coding and to fear learning and memory. Furthermore, this approach may reveal general rules for how circuit structure and neural coding within circuits gives rise to sensory experience and behavior. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Failure Diagnosis and Prognosis of Rolling - Element Bearings using Artificial Neural Networks: A Critical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. K. N.; Srinivasa Pai, P.; Nagabhushana, T. N.

    2012-05-01

    Rolling - Element Bearings are extensively used in almost all global industries. Any critical failures in these vitally important components would not only affect the overall systems performance but also its reliability, safety, availability and cost-effectiveness. Proactive strategies do exist to minimise impending failures in real time and at a minimum cost. Continuous innovative developments are taking place in the field of Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) technology. Significant research and development are taking place in many universities, private and public organizations and a wealth of published literature is available highlighting the potential benefits of employing ANNs in intelligently monitoring, diagnosing, prognosing and managing rolling-element bearing failures. This paper attempts to critically review the recent trends in this topical area of interest.

  13. Multiscale methodology for bone remodelling simulation using coupled finite element and neural network computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambli, Ridha; Katerchi, Houda; Benhamou, Claude-Laurent

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop a multiscale hierarchical hybrid model based on finite element analysis and neural network computation to link mesoscopic scale (trabecular network level) and macroscopic (whole bone level) to simulate the process of bone remodelling. As whole bone simulation, including the 3D reconstruction of trabecular level bone, is time consuming, finite element calculation is only performed at the macroscopic level, whilst trained neural networks are employed as numerical substitutes for the finite element code needed for the mesoscale prediction. The bone mechanical properties are updated at the macroscopic scale depending on the morphological and mechanical adaptation at the mesoscopic scale computed by the trained neural network. The digital image-based modelling technique using μ-CT and voxel finite element analysis is used to capture volume elements representative of 2 mm³ at the mesoscale level of the femoral head. The input data for the artificial neural network are a set of bone material parameters, boundary conditions and the applied stress. The output data are the updated bone properties and some trabecular bone factors. The current approach is the first model, to our knowledge, that incorporates both finite element analysis and neural network computation to rapidly simulate multilevel bone adaptation.

  14. Research on quasi-dynamic calibration model of plastic sensitive element based on neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Kong, Deren; Yang, Lixia; Zhang, Zouzou

    2017-08-01

    Quasi-dynamic calibration accuracy of the plastic sensitive element depends on the accuracy of the fitting model between pressure and deformation. By using the excellent nonlinear mapping ability of RBF (Radial Basis Function) neural network, a calibration model is established which use the peak pressure as the input and use the deformation of the plastic sensitive element as the output in this paper. The calibration experiments of a batch of copper cylinders are carried out on the quasi-dynamic pressure calibration device, which pressure range is within the range of 200MPa to 700MPa. The experiment data are acquired according to the standard pressure monitoring system. The network train and study are done to quasi dynamic calibration model based on neural network by using MATLAB neural network toolbox. Taking the testing samples as the research object, the prediction accuracy of neural network model is compared with the exponential fitting model and the second-order polynomial fitting model. The results show that prediction of the neural network model is most close to the testing samples, and the accuracy of prediction model based on neural network is better than 0.5%, respectively one order higher than the second-order polynomial fitting model and two orders higher than the exponential fitting model. The quasi-dynamic calibration model between pressure peak and deformation of plastic sensitive element, which is based on neural network, provides important basis for creating higher accuracy quasi-dynamic calibration table.

  15. A Method for Assessing the Retention of Trace Elements in Human Body Using Neural Network Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunakova, Yulia; Novikova, Svetlana; Ragimov, Aligejdar; Faizullin, Rashat; Valiev, Vsevolod

    2017-01-01

    Models that describe the trace element status formation in the human organism are essential for a correction of micromineral (trace elements) deficiency. A direct trace element retention assessment in the body is difficult due to the many internal mechanisms. The trace element retention is determined by the amount and the ratio of incoming and excreted substance. So, the concentration of trace elements in drinking water characterizes the intake, whereas the element concentration in urine characterizes the excretion. This system can be interpreted as three interrelated elements that are in equilibrium. Since many relationships in the system are not known, the use of standard mathematical models is difficult. The artificial neural network use is suitable for constructing a model in the best way because it can take into account all dependencies in the system implicitly and process inaccurate and incomplete data. We created several neural network models to describe the retentions of trace elements in the human body. On the model basis, we can calculate the microelement levels in the body, knowing the trace element levels in drinking water and urine. These results can be used in health care to provide the population with safe drinking water.

  16. Are concentrations of alkaline earth elements in maternal hair associated with risk of neural tube defects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenjiang; Wang, Bin; Huo, Wenhua; Liu, Yingying; Zhu, Yibing; Xie, Jing; Li, Zhiwen; Ren, Aiguo

    2017-12-31

    The relationship between maternal intake of alkaline earth elements (AEEs) during the period of neural tube closure and the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) is still unclear. We propose that AEE deficiency during the early period of pregnancy is associated with an elevated risk of NTDs in the offspring. In this study, we recruited 191 women with NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 261 women who delivered healthy infants (controls). The concentrations of four AEEs (Ca, Mg, Sr, Ba) in maternal hair sections that grew during early pregnancy were analyzed. Information on the dietary habits of the mothers was also collected by questionnaire. Higher concentrations of the four AEEs in hair had protective effects against the risk of total NTDs, with odds ratios with 95% confidence interval (comparing groups separated by each median level) of 0.44 (0.28-0.68) for Mg, 0.56 (0.36-0.87) for Ca, 0.45 (0.28-0.70) for Sr, and 0.41 (0.26-0.65) for Ba. Significant negative dose-response trends were identified for the relationships between the four AEE concentrations in maternal hair and the risks of anencephaly and spina bifida, but not for encephalocele. The frequencies of maternal consumption of fresh green vegetables, fresh fruit, and meat or fish were positively correlated with the concentrations of AEEs in hair. We concluded that the maternal intake of AEEs may play an important role in preventing NTD formation in offspring, and that this intake is related to maternal dietary habits of consuming fresh green vegetables, fresh fruit, and fish or meat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial neural networks applied to quantitative elemental analysis of organic material using PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, R. [Universidad Tecnologica Metropolitana, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Jose Pedro Alessandri 1242, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: rcorrea@utem.cl; Chesta, M.A. [Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Medina Allende s/n Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)]. E-mail: chesta@famaf.unc.edu.ar; Morales, J.R. [Universidad de Chile, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Las Palmeras 3425, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: rmorales@uchile.cl; Dinator, M.I. [Universidad de Chile, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Las Palmeras 3425, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: mdinator@uchile.cl; Requena, I. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Ciencias de la Computacion e Inteligencia Artificial, Daniel Saucedo Aranda s/n, 18071 Granada (Spain)]. E-mail: requena@decsai.ugr.es; Vila, I. [Universidad de Chile, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Ecologia, Las Palmeras 3425, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile)]. E-mail: limnolog@uchile.cl

    2006-08-15

    An artificial neural network (ANN) has been trained with real-sample PIXE (particle X-ray induced emission) spectra of organic substances. Following the training stage ANN was applied to a subset of similar samples thus obtaining the elemental concentrations in muscle, liver and gills of Cyprinus carpio. Concentrations obtained with the ANN method are in full agreement with results from one standard analytical procedure, showing the high potentiality of ANN in PIXE quantitative analyses.

  18. Application of artificial neural network in precise prediction of cement elements percentages based on the neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari Zadeh, E.; Feghhi, S. A. H.; Roshani, G. H.; Rezaei, A.

    2016-05-01

    Due to variation of neutron energy spectrum in the target sample during the activation process and to peak overlapping caused by the Compton effect with gamma radiations emitted from activated elements, which results in background changes and consequently complex gamma spectrum during the measurement process, quantitative analysis will ultimately be problematic. Since there is no simple analytical correlation between peaks' counts with elements' concentrations, an artificial neural network for analyzing spectra can be a helpful tool. This work describes a study on the application of a neural network to determine the percentages of cement elements (mainly Ca, Si, Al, and Fe) using the neutron capture delayed gamma-ray spectra of the substance emitted by the activated nuclei as patterns which were simulated via the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, version 2.7. The Radial Basis Function (RBF) network is developed with four specific peaks related to Ca, Si, Al and Fe, which were extracted as inputs. The proposed RBF model is developed and trained with MATLAB 7.8 software. To obtain the optimal RBF model, several structures have been constructed and tested. The comparison between simulated and predicted values using the proposed RBF model shows that there is a good agreement between them.

  19. Fluidic Elements based on Coanda Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin OLIVOTTO

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains first some definitions and classifications regarding the fluidic elements. Thegeneral current status is presented, nominating the main specific elements based on the Coanda effect developedspecially in Romania. In particularly the development of an original bistable element using industrial compressedair at industrial pressure supply is presented. The function of this element is based on the controlled attachmentof the main jet at a curved wall through the Coanda effect. The methods used for particular calculation andexperiments are nominated. The main application of these elements was to develop a specific execution element:a fluidic step–by-step motor based on the Coanda effect.

  20. High-Lift Optimization Design Using Neural Networks on a Multi-Element Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Roxana M.; Roth, Karlin R.; Smith, Charles A. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The high-lift performance of a multi-element airfoil was optimized by using neural-net predictions that were trained using a computational data set. The numerical data was generated using a two-dimensional, incompressible, Navier-Stokes algorithm with the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. Because it is difficult to predict maximum lift for high-lift systems, an empirically-based maximum lift criteria was used in this study to determine both the maximum lift and the angle at which it occurs. Multiple input, single output networks were trained using the NASA Ames variation of the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for each of the aerodynamic coefficients (lift, drag, and moment). The artificial neural networks were integrated with a gradient-based optimizer. Using independent numerical simulations and experimental data for this high-lift configuration, it was shown that this design process successfully optimized flap deflection, gap, overlap, and angle of attack to maximize lift. Once the neural networks were trained and integrated with the optimizer, minimal additional computer resources were required to perform optimization runs with different initial conditions and parameters. Applying the neural networks within the high-lift rigging optimization process reduced the amount of computational time and resources by 83% compared with traditional gradient-based optimization procedures for multiple optimization runs.

  1. Artificial Neural Network Based Fault Diagnostics of Rolling Element Bearings Using Time-Domain Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, B.; Al-Balushi, K. R.

    2003-03-01

    A procedure is presented for fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings through artificial neural network (ANN). The characteristic features of time-domain vibration signals of the rotating machinery with normal and defective bearings have been used as inputs to the ANN consisting of input, hidden and output layers. The features are obtained from direct processing of the signal segments using very simple preprocessing. The input layer consists of five nodes, one each for root mean square, variance, skewness, kurtosis and normalised sixth central moment of the time-domain vibration signals. The inputs are normalised in the range of 0.0 and 1.0 except for the skewness which is normalised between -1.0 and 1.0. The output layer consists of two binary nodes indicating the status of the machine—normal or defective bearings. Two hidden layers with different number of neurons have been used. The ANN is trained using backpropagation algorithm with a subset of the experimental data for known machine conditions. The ANN is tested using the remaining set of data. The effects of some preprocessing techniques like high-pass, band-pass filtration, envelope detection (demodulation) and wavelet transform of the vibration signals, prior to feature extraction, are also studied. The results show the effectiveness of the ANN in diagnosis of the machine condition. The proposed procedure requires only a few features extracted from the measured vibration data either directly or with simple preprocessing. The reduced number of inputs leads to faster training requiring far less iterations making the procedure suitable for on-line condition monitoring and diagnostics of machines.

  2. Discover regulatory DNA elements using chromatin signatures and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firpi, Hiram A; Ucar, Duygu; Tan, Kai

    2010-07-01

    Recent large-scale chromatin states mapping efforts have revealed characteristic chromatin modification signatures for various types of functional DNA elements. Given the important influence of chromatin states on gene regulation and the rapid accumulation of genome-wide chromatin modification data, there is a pressing need for computational methods to analyze these data in order to identify functional DNA elements. However, existing computational tools do not exploit data transformation and feature extraction as a means to achieve a more accurate prediction. We introduce a new computational framework for identifying functional DNA elements using chromatin signatures. The framework consists of a data transformation and a feature extraction step followed by a classification step using time-delay neural network. We implemented our framework in a software tool CSI-ANN (chromatin signature identification by artificial neural network). When applied to predict transcriptional enhancers in the ENCODE region, CSI-ANN achieved a 65.5% sensitivity and 66.3% positive predictive value, a 5.9% and 11.6% improvement, respectively, over the previously best approach. CSI-ANN is implemented in Matlab. The source code is freely available at http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/Labs/tan/CSIANNsoft.zip kai-tan@uiowa.edu Supplementary Materials are available at Bioinformatics online.

  3. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  4. Inclusion mechanical property estimation using tactile images, finite element method, and artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Ha; Won, Chang-Hee

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we developed a methodology for estimating three parameters of tissue inclusion: size, depth, and Young's modulus from the tactile data obtained at the tissue surface with the tactile sensation imaging system. The estimation method consists of the forward algorithm using finite element method, and inversion algorithm using artificial neural network. The forward algorithm is designed to comprehensively predict the tactile data based on the mechanical properties of the tissue inclusion. This forward information is used to develop an inversion algorithm that will be used to extract the size, depth, and Young's modulus of a tissue inclusion from the tactile image. The proposed method is then validated with custom made tissue phantoms with matching elasticities of typical human breast tissues. The experimental results showed that the proposed estimation method estimates the size, depth, and Young's modulus of tissue inclusions with root mean squared errors of 1.25 mm, 2.09 mm, and 28.65 kPa, respectively.

  5. A DWT and SVM based method for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis and its comparison with Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Tyagi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A classification technique using Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier for detection of rolling element bearing fault is presented here.  The SVM was fed from features that were extracted from of vibration signals obtained from experimental setup consisting of rotating driveline that was mounted on rolling element bearings which were run in normal and with artificially faults induced conditions. The time-domain vibration signals were divided into 40 segments and simple features such as peaks in time domain and spectrum along with statistical features such as standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis etc. were extracted. Effectiveness of SVM classifier was compared with the performance of Artificial Neural Network (ANN classifier and it was found that the performance of SVM classifier is superior to that of ANN. The effect of pre-processing of the vibration signal by Discreet Wavelet Transform (DWT prior to feature extraction is also studied and it is shown that pre-processing of vibration signal with DWT enhances the effectiveness of both ANN and SVM classifiers. It has been demonstrated from experiment results that performance of SVM classifier is better than ANN in detection of bearing condition and pre-processing the vibration signal with DWT improves the performance of SVM classifier.

  6. Neural Adaptation Effects in Conceptual Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara F. M. Marino

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the conceptual processing of nouns referring to objects characterized by a highly typical color and orientation. We used a go/no-go task in which we asked participants to categorize each noun as referring or not to natural entities (e.g., animals after a selective adaptation of color-edge neurons in the posterior LV4 region of the visual cortex was induced by means of a McCollough effect procedure. This manipulation affected categorization: the green-vertical adaptation led to slower responses than the green-horizontal adaptation, regardless of the specific color and orientation of the to-be-categorized noun. This result suggests that the conceptual processing of natural entities may entail the activation of modality-specific neural channels with weights proportional to the reliability of the signals produced by these channels during actual perception. This finding is discussed with reference to the debate about the grounded cognition view.

  7. The Effects of GABAergic Polarity Changes on Episodic Neural Network Activity in Developing Neural Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Blanco

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Early in development, neural systems have primarily excitatory coupling, where even GABAergic synapses are excitatory. Many of these systems exhibit spontaneous episodes of activity that have been characterized through both experimental and computational studies. As development progress the neural system goes through many changes, including synaptic remodeling, intrinsic plasticity in the ion channel expression, and a transformation of GABAergic synapses from excitatory to inhibitory. What effect each of these, and other, changes have on the network behavior is hard to know from experimental studies since they all happen in parallel. One advantage of a computational approach is that one has the ability to study developmental changes in isolation. Here, we examine the effects of GABAergic synapse polarity change on the spontaneous activity of both a mean field and a neural network model that has both glutamatergic and GABAergic coupling, representative of a developing neural network. We find some intuitive behavioral changes as the GABAergic neurons go from excitatory to inhibitory, shared by both models, such as a decrease in the duration of episodes. We also find some paradoxical changes in the activity that are only present in the neural network model. In particular, we find that during early development the inter-episode durations become longer on average, while later in development they become shorter. In addressing this unexpected finding, we uncover a priming effect that is particularly important for a small subset of neurons, called the “intermediate neurons.” We characterize these neurons and demonstrate why they are crucial to episode initiation, and why the paradoxical behavioral change result from priming of these neurons. The study illustrates how even arguably the simplest of developmental changes that occurs in neural systems can present non-intuitive behaviors. It also makes predictions about neural network behavioral changes

  8. A multiscale modelling of bone ultrastructure elastic proprieties using finite elements simulation and neural network method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Tlili, Brahim; Vercher-Martínez, Ana; Hambli, Ridha

    2016-10-01

    Bone is a living material with a complex hierarchical structure which entails exceptional mechanical properties, including high fracture toughness, specific stiffness and strength. Bone tissue is essentially composed by two phases distributed in approximately 30-70%: an organic phase (mainly type I collagen and cells) and an inorganic phase (hydroxyapatite-HA-and water). The nanostructure of bone can be represented throughout three scale levels where different repetitive structural units or building blocks are found: at the first level, collagen molecules are arranged in a pentameric structure where mineral crystals grow in specific sites. This primary bone structure constitutes the mineralized collagen microfibril. A structural organization of inter-digitating microfibrils forms the mineralized collagen fibril which represents the second scale level. The third scale level corresponds to the mineralized collagen fibre which is composed by the binding of fibrils. The hierarchical nature of the bone tissue is largely responsible of their significant mechanical properties; consequently, this is a current outstanding research topic. Scarce works in literature correlates the elastic properties in the three scale levels at the bone nanoscale. The main goal of this work is to estimate the elastic properties of the bone tissue in a multiscale approach including a sensitivity analysis of the elastic behaviour at each length scale. This proposal is achieved by means of a novel hybrid multiscale modelling that involves neural network (NN) computations and finite elements method (FEM) analysis. The elastic properties are estimated using a neural network simulation that previously has been trained with the database results of the finite element models. In the results of this work, parametric analysis and averaged elastic constants for each length scale are provided. Likewise, the influence of the elastic constants of the tissue constituents is also depicted. Results highlight

  9. Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Särkämö, Teppo; Soto, David

    2012-01-01

    .... Then we will present findings about the short‐ and long‐term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects...

  10. Unconscious emotional effects of packaging design elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis; Corsi, Armando; Lockshin, Larry

    on a convenience sample of 120 participants. The results suggest that image is the only element able to generate a significant effect on consumers’ unconscious emotional response. In addition, the results also suggest the interaction between image and colour has a significant effect on consumers’ unconscious...

  11. Behavioral deficits and neural damage of Caenorhabditis elegans induced by three rare earth elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tiantian; Zhang, Manke; Hu, Jiani; Li, Zihan; Wu, Taipu; Bao, Jianing; Wu, Siyu; Lei, Lili; He, Defu

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) are widely used in industry, agriculture, medicine and daily life in recent years. However, environmental and health risks of REEs are still poorly understood. In this study, neurotoxicity of trichloride neodymium, praseodymium and scandium were evaluated using nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as the assay system. Median lethal concentrations (48 h) were 99.9, 157.2 and 106.4 mg/L for NdCl3, PrCl3 and ScCl3, respectively. Sublethal dose (10-30 mg/L) of these trichloride salts significantly inhibited body length of nematodes. Three REEs resulted in significant declines in locomotor frequency of body bending, head thrashing and pharyngeal pumping. In addition, mean speed and wavelength of crawling movement were significantly reduced after chronic exposure. Using transgenic nematodes, we found NdCl3, PrCl3 and ScCl3 resulted in loss of dendrite and soma of neurons, and induced down-expression of dat-1::GFP and unc-47::GFP. It indicates that REEs can lead to damage of dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons. Our data suggest that exposure to REEs may cause neurotoxicity of inducing behavioral deficits and neural damage. These findings provide useful information for understanding health risk of REE materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Elements of Effective Board Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this book is to act as a guide to good governance by exploring its various aspects and the key elements of success. It is intended to be used by anybody who is a member of a board, particularly in the nonprofit sector. This book is intended to help board members maximize their effectiveness both individually and collectively.…

  13. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, T W; Stins, J F; Daffertshofer, A; Beek, P J

    2007-04-01

    Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of sleep deprivation on brain activity include reduced cortical responsiveness to incoming stimuli, reflecting reduced attention. On a microscopic level, sleep deprivation is associated with increased levels of adenosine, a neuromodulator that has a general inhibitory effect on neural activity. The inhibition of cholinergic nuclei appears particularly relevant, as the associated decrease in cortical acetylcholine seems to cause effects of sleep deprivation on macroscopic brain activity. In general, however, the relationships between the neural effects of sleep deprivation across observation scales are poorly understood and uncovering these relationships should be a primary target in future research.

  14. CONCEPTION OF USE VIBROACOUSTIC SIGNALS AND NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DIAGNOSING OF CHOSEN ELEMENTS OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN CAR VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr CZECH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used diagnostics systems are not always efficient and do not give straightforward results which allow for the assessment of the technological condition of the engine or for the identification of the possible damages in their early stages of development. Growing requirements concerning durability, reliability, reduction of costs to minimum and decrease of negative influence on the natural environment are the reasons why there is a need to acquire information about the technological condition of each of the elements of a vehicle during its exploitation. One of the possibilities to achieve information about technological condition of a vehicle are vibroacoustic phenomena. Symptoms of defects, achieved as a result of advanced methods of vibroacoustic signals processing can serve as models which can be used during construction of intelligent diagnostic system based on artificial neural networks. The work presents conception of use artificial neural networks in the task of combustion engines diagnosis.

  15. Periodic Table of the Elements in the Perspective of Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Mauricio R.; Dal Pino, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    Although several chemical elements were not known by end of the 19th century, Mendeleev came up with an astonishing achievement, the periodic table of elements. He was not only able to predict the existence of (then) new elements, but also to provide accurate estimates of their chemical and physical properties. This is a profound example of the…

  16. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, T.W.; Stins, J.F.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P.J.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of

  17. A two-dimensional flow sensor with integrated micro thermal sensing elements and a back propagation neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Que, Ruiyi; Zhu, Rong

    2013-12-31

    This paper demonstrates a novel flow sensor with two-dimensional 360° direction sensitivity achieved with a simple structure and a novel data fusion algorithm. Four sensing elements with roundabout wires distributed in four quadrants of a circle compose the sensor probe, and work in constant temperature difference (CTD) mode as both Joule heaters and temperature detectors. The magnitude and direction of a fluid flow are measured by detecting flow-induced temperature differences among the four elements. The probe is made of Ti/Au thin-film with a diameter of 2 mm, and is fabricated using micromachining techniques. When a flow goes through the sensor, the flow-induced temperature differences are detected by the sensing elements that also serve as the heaters of the sensor. By measuring the temperature differences among the four sensing elements symmetrically distributed in the sensing area, a full 360° direction sensitivity can be obtained. By using a BP neural network to model the relationship between the readouts of the four sensor elements and flow parameters and execute data fusion, the magnitude and direction of the flow can be deduced. Validity of the sensor design was proven through both simulations and experiments. Wind tunnel experimental results show that the measurement accuracy of the airflow speed reaches 0.72 m/s in the range of 3 m/s-30 m/s and the measurement accuracy of flow direction angle reaches 1.9° in the range of 360°.

  18. Intraoral digital radiography: elements of effective imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederberg, Robert

    2012-10-01

    Intraoral digital imaging has evolved from an experimental and sometimes disparaged technique in the mid 1980s to a reliable and ubiquitously used technology today. There are many advantages for use of digital radiographic techniques in dentistry, one of the chief ones being patient dose reduction. However, as important as dose reduction is for safe and effective radiography, practicing dentists would also like to understand the fundamental differences between digital system configurations so they may be able to make an informed choice as to which system best fits their needs. In addition, there has been considerable debate on the following topics: sensor technology; factors associated with image display; optimum techniques for image manipulation; and image storage, retrieval, and archiving. This article provides insight into these and other elements of effective imaging in intraoral digital imaging.

  19. Elements of an algorithm for optimizing a parameter-structural neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrówczyńska Maria

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The field of processing information provided by measurement results is one of the most important components of geodetic technologies. The dynamic development of this field improves classic algorithms for numerical calculations in the aspect of analytical solutions that are difficult to achieve. Algorithms based on artificial intelligence in the form of artificial neural networks, including the topology of connections between neurons have become an important instrument connected to the problem of processing and modelling processes. This concept results from the integration of neural networks and parameter optimization methods and makes it possible to avoid the necessity to arbitrarily define the structure of a network. This kind of extension of the training process is exemplified by the algorithm called the Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH, which belongs to the class of evolutionary algorithms. The article presents a GMDH type network, used for modelling deformations of the geometrical axis of a steel chimney during its operation.

  20. Effects of Spaceflight on Drosophila Neural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshishian, Haig S.

    1997-01-01

    The major goal from the animal side, however, has been achieved, namely to develop Drosophila lines where we can assay individual neuromuscular endings directly without dissection. This was achieved by means of using the GAL4-UAS system, where we have succeeded in establishing stocks of flies where the key neuromuscular connections can be assayed directly in undissected larvae by means of the expression of endogenously fluorescent reporters in the specific motor endings. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter allows scoring of neural anatomy en-masse in whole mount using fluorescent microscopy without the need for either dissection or specific labeling. Two stocks have been developed. The first, which we developed first, uses the S65T mutant form, which has a dramatically brighter expression than the native protein. This animal will use GAL4 drivers with expression under the control of the elav gene, and which will ensure expression in all neurons of the embryo and larva. The second transgenic animal we have developed is of a novel kind, and makes use of dicistronic design, so that two copies of the protein will be expressed per insert. We have also developed a tricistronic form, but this has not yet been transformed into flies, and we do not imagine that this third line will be ready in time for the flight.

  1. The neural bases of framing effects in social dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Ramsøy, Thomas Z.; Skov, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human behavior in social dilemmas is strongly framed by the social context, but the mechanisms underlying this framing effect remain poorly understood. To identify the behavioral and neural responses mediating framing of social interactions, participants underwent functional MRI while playing a p...

  2. Effects of intranasal oxytocin on neural processing within a socially relevant neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Fiza; Nunag, Jason; Muldoon, Glennis; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Pineda, Jaime A; Feifel, David

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) in schizophrenia (SCZ) may underlie the cognitive and behavioral manifestations of social dysfunction associated with that disorder. In healthy subjects intranasal (IN) oxytocin (OT) improves neural processing in the MNS and is associated with improved social cognition. OT's brain effects can be measured through its modulation of the MNS by suppressing EEG mu-band electrical activity (8-13Hz) in response to motion perception. Although IN OT's effects on social cognition have been tested in SCZ, OT's impact on the MNS has not been evaluated to date. Therefore, we designed a study to investigate the effects of two different OT doses on biological motion-induced mu suppression in SCZ and healthy subjects. EEG recordings were taken after each subject received a single IN administration of placebo, OT-24IU and OT-48IU in randomized order in a double-blind crossover design. The results provide support for OT's regulation of the MNS in both healthy and SCZ subjects, with the optimal dose dependent on diagnostic group and sex of subject. A statistically significant response was seen in SCZ males only, indicating a heightened sensitivity to those effects, although sex hormone related effects cannot be ruled out. In general, OT appears to have positive effects on neural circuitry that supports social cognition and socially adaptive behaviors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Music listening after stroke: beneficial effects and potential neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Särkämö, Teppo; Soto, David

    2012-04-01

    Music is an enjoyable leisure activity that also engages many emotional, cognitive, and motor processes in the brain. Here, we will first review previous literature on the emotional and cognitive effects of music listening in healthy persons and various clinical groups. Then we will present findings about the short- and long-term effects of music listening on the recovery of cognitive function in stroke patients and the underlying neural mechanisms of these music effects. First, our results indicate that listening to pleasant music can have a short-term facilitating effect on visual awareness in patients with visual neglect, which is associated with functional coupling between emotional and attentional brain regions. Second, daily music listening can improve auditory and verbal memory, focused attention, and mood as well as induce structural gray matter changes in the early poststroke stage. The psychological and neural mechanisms potentially underlying the rehabilitating effect of music after stroke are discussed. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Effects of sleep deprivation on neural functioning: an integrative review

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, T.W.; Stins, J. F.; Daffertshofer, A; Beek, P. J.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract. Sleep deprivation has a broad variety of effects on human performance and neural functioning that manifest themselves at different levels of description. On a macroscopic level, sleep deprivation mainly affects executive functions, especially in novel tasks. Macroscopic and mesoscopic effects of sleep deprivation on brain activity include reduced cortical responsiveness to incoming stimuli, reflecting reduced attention. On a microscopic level, sleep deprivation is associated with in...

  5. The effect of soil risk element contamination level on the element contents in Ocimum basilicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Růžičková Petra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Red basil (Ocimum basilicum L. cv. Red Rubin was cultivated in model pot experiment in the soil amended by arsenic, cadmium and lead solutions in stepwise concentrations representing the soil concentration levels of former mining area in the vicinity of Příbram, Czech Republic. The element levels added to the soil reached up to 40 mg Cd, 100 mg As, and 2000 mg Pb per kg of soil. Moreover, essential macro-and microelements as well as cyanidine contents were investigated to assess their potential interactions with the risk elements. The extractable element portions in soils determined at the end of vegetation period differed according to the individual elements. Whereas the plant-available (extractable with 0.11M CH3COOH content of Cd represented 70-100% of the added Cd, the mobile portion of Pb did not exceed 1%. The risk element content in plants reflected the increasing element contents in soil. The dominant element portions remained in plant roots indicating the limited translocation ability of risk elements to the aboveground biomass of this plant species. Although the risk element contents in amended plants significantly increased, no visible symptoms of phytotoxicity occurred. However, the effect of enhanced risk element contents on the essential element uptake was assessed. Considering inter-element relationships, elevated sulphur levels were seen in amended plants, indicating its possible role of phytochelatin synthesis in the plants. Moreover, the molybdenum contents in plant biomass dropped down with increasing risk element uptake by plants confirming As-Mo and Cd-Mo antagonism. The increasing content of cyanidine in the plant biomass confirmed possible role of anthocyanins in detoxification mechanism of risk element contaminated plants and suggested the importance of anthocyanin pigments for risk element tolerance of plants growing in contaminated areas.

  6. The generation effect: activating broad neural circuits during memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Zachary A; Elman, Jeremy A; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2013-01-01

    The generation effect is a robust memory phenomenon in which actively producing material during encoding acts to improve later memory performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis, we explored the neural basis of this effect. During encoding, participants generated synonyms from word-fragment cues (e.g., GARBAGE-W_ST_) or read other synonym pairs (e.g., GARBAGE-WASTE). Compared to simply reading target words, generating target words significantly improved later recognition memory performance. During encoding, this benefit was associated with a broad neural network that involved both prefrontal (inferior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus) and posterior cortex (inferior temporal gyrus, lateral occipital cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, ventral posterior parietal cortex). These findings define the prefrontal-posterior cortical dynamics associated with the mnemonic benefits underlying the generation effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective learning in recurrent max-min neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Kia Fock; Teow, Loo Nin

    1998-04-01

    Max and min operations have interesting properties that facilitate the exchange of information between the symbolic and real-valued domains. As such, neural networks that employ max-min activation functions have been a subject of interest in recent years. Since max-min functions are not strictly differentiable, we propose a mathematically sound learning method based on using Fourier convergence analysis of side-derivatives to derive a gradient descent technique for max-min error functions. We then propose a novel recurrent max-min neural network model that is trained to perform grammatical inference as an application example. Comparisons made between this model and recurrent sigmoidal neural networks show that our model not only performs better in terms of learning speed and generalization, but that its final weight configuration allows a deterministic finite automation (DFA) to be extracted in a straightforward manner. In essence, we are able to demonstrate that our proposed gradient descent technique does allow max-min neural networks to learn effectively.

  8. Determination of penetration depth at high velocity impact using finite element method and artificial neural network tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namık KılıÇ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Determination of ballistic performance of an armor solution is a complicated task and evolved significantly with the application of finite element methods (FEM in this research field. The traditional armor design studies performed with FEM requires sophisticated procedures and intensive computational effort, therefore simpler and accurate numerical approaches are always worthwhile to decrease armor development time. This study aims to apply a hybrid method using FEM simulation and artificial neural network (ANN analysis to approximate ballistic limit thickness for armor steels. To achieve this objective, a predictive model based on the artificial neural networks is developed to determine ballistic resistance of high hardness armor steels against 7.62 mm armor piercing ammunition. In this methodology, the FEM simulations are used to create training cases for Multilayer Perceptron (MLP three layer networks. In order to validate FE simulation methodology, ballistic shot tests on 20 mm thickness target were performed according to standard Stanag 4569. Afterwards, the successfully trained ANN(s is used to predict the ballistic limit thickness of 500 HB high hardness steel armor. Results show that even with limited number of data, FEM-ANN approach can be used to predict ballistic penetration depth with adequate accuracy.

  9. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  10. Analyzing effective elements in agile supply chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babak Jamshidi Navid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Agile supply chain plays an important role on having efficient production planning. There are different factors affecting the efficiency of a supply chain and the attempt of this paper is to find the most important elements in agile supply chain. The proposed model of this paper gathers decision makers' opinions and based on DEMATEL technique determines the most important items. The preliminary results of this survey indicate that we could divide the factors into four groups and two elements including automation and utilization of technical tools of relations and information play the most important roles among other factors.

  11. Neural Plastic Effects of Cognitive Training on Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Natalie T Y; Tam, Helena M K; Chu, Leung W; Kwok, Timothy C Y; Chan, Felix; Lam, Linda C W; Woo, Jean; Lee, Tatia M C

    2015-01-01

    Increasing research has evidenced that our brain retains a capacity to change in response to experience until late adulthood. This implies that cognitive training can possibly ameliorate age-associated cognitive decline by inducing training-specific neural plastic changes at both neural and behavioral levels. This longitudinal study examined the behavioral effects of a systematic thirteen-week cognitive training program on attention and working memory of older adults who were at risk of cognitive decline. These older adults were randomly assigned to the Cognitive Training Group (n = 109) and the Active Control Group (n = 100). Findings clearly indicated that training induced improvement in auditory and visual-spatial attention and working memory. The training effect was specific to the experience provided because no significant difference in verbal and visual-spatial memory between the two groups was observed. This pattern of findings is consistent with the prediction and the principle of experience-dependent neuroplasticity. Findings of our study provided further support to the notion that the neural plastic potential continues until older age. The baseline cognitive status did not correlate with pre- versus posttraining changes to any cognitive variables studied, suggesting that the initial cognitive status may not limit the neuroplastic potential of the brain at an old age.

  12. Environmental effects on fish neural plasticity and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbesson, L O E; Braithwaite, V A

    2012-12-01

    Most fishes experiencing challenging environments are able to adjust and adapt their physiology and behaviour to help them cope more effectively. Much of this flexibility is supported and influenced by cognition and neural plasticity. The understanding of fish cognition and the role played by different regions of the brain has improved significantly in recent years. Techniques such as lesioning, tract tracing and quantifying changes in gene expression help in mapping specialized brain areas. It is now recognized that the fish brain remains plastic throughout a fish's life and that it continues to be sensitive to environmental challenges. The early development of fish brains is shaped by experiences with the environment and this can promote positive and negative effects on both neural plasticity and cognitive ability. This review focuses on what is known about the interactions between the environment, the telencephalon and cognition. Examples are used from a diverse array of fish species, but there could be a lot to be gained by focusing research on neural plasticity and cognition in fishes for which there is already a wealth of knowledge relating to their physiology, behaviour and natural history, e.g. the Salmonidae. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  13. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  14. MANF Promotes Differentiation and Migration of Neural Progenitor Cells with Potential Neural Regenerative Effects in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Anttila, Jenni E; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia activates endogenous reparative processes, such as increased proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migration of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward the ischemic area. However, this reparative process is limited because most of the NPCs...

  15. Effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplementation on milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... During the past decade, significant advances were made in understanding the effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplement on milk production of dairy cows. This work discussed the effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplementation on milk production of dairy cows. Studies have indicated.

  16. Effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplementation on milk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the past decade, significant advances were made in understanding the effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplement on milk production of dairy cows. This work discussed the effects of vitamins and trace-elements supplementation on milk production of dairy cows. Studies have indicated that vitamin A (VA) and ...

  17. A neural network model of ventriloquism effect and aftereffect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Magosso

    Full Text Available Presenting simultaneous but spatially discrepant visual and auditory stimuli induces a perceptual translocation of the sound towards the visual input, the ventriloquism effect. General explanation is that vision tends to dominate over audition because of its higher spatial reliability. The underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. We address this question via a biologically inspired neural network. The model contains two layers of unimodal visual and auditory neurons, with visual neurons having higher spatial resolution than auditory ones. Neurons within each layer communicate via lateral intra-layer synapses; neurons across layers are connected via inter-layer connections. The network accounts for the ventriloquism effect, ascribing it to a positive feedback between the visual and auditory neurons, triggered by residual auditory activity at the position of the visual stimulus. Main results are: i the less localized stimulus is strongly biased toward the most localized stimulus and not vice versa; ii amount of the ventriloquism effect changes with visual-auditory spatial disparity; iii ventriloquism is a robust behavior of the network with respect to parameter value changes. Moreover, the model implements Hebbian rules for potentiation and depression of lateral synapses, to explain ventriloquism aftereffect (that is, the enduring sound shift after exposure to spatially disparate audio-visual stimuli. By adaptively changing the weights of lateral synapses during cross-modal stimulation, the model produces post-adaptive shifts of auditory localization that agree with in-vivo observations. The model demonstrates that two unimodal layers reciprocally interconnected may explain ventriloquism effect and aftereffect, even without the presence of any convergent multimodal area. The proposed study may provide advancement in understanding neural architecture and mechanisms at the basis of visual-auditory integration in the spatial realm.

  18. Determination of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage by coupling poroelastic-based finite element models of indentation with artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabi, Vahid; Pouran, Behdad; Campoli, Gianni; Weinans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir A

    2016-03-21

    One of the most widely used techniques to determine the mechanical properties of cartilage is based on indentation tests and interpretation of the obtained force-time or displacement-time data. In the current computational approaches, one needs to simulate the indentation test with finite element models and use an optimization algorithm to estimate the mechanical properties of cartilage. The modeling procedure is cumbersome, and the simulations need to be repeated for every new experiment. For the first time, we propose a method for fast and accurate estimation of the mechanical and physical properties of cartilage as a poroelastic material with the aid of artificial neural networks. In our study, we used finite element models to simulate the indentation for poroelastic materials with wide combinations of mechanical and physical properties. The obtained force-time curves are then divided into three parts: the first two parts of the data is used for training and validation of an artificial neural network, while the third part is used for testing the trained network. The trained neural network receives the force-time curves as the input and provides the properties of cartilage as the output. We observed that the trained network could accurately predict the properties of cartilage within the range of properties for which it was trained. The mechanical and physical properties of cartilage could therefore be estimated very fast, since no additional finite element modeling is required once the neural network is trained. The robustness of the trained artificial neural network in determining the properties of cartilage based on noisy force-time data was assessed by introducing noise to the simulated force-time data. We found that the training procedure could be optimized so as to maximize the robustness of the neural network against noisy force-time data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pentobarbital anesthesia alters neural responses in the precedence effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Penglong; Wang, Ningyu; Wang, Hui; Xie, Yan; Jia, Jun; Li, Huijun

    2011-07-01

    The precedence effect (PE) is thought to be beneficial for proper localization and perception of sounds. The majority of recent physiological studies focus on the neural discharges correlated with PE in the inferior colliculus (IC). Pentobarbital anesthesia is widely used in physiological studies. However, little is known of the effect of pentobarbital on the discharge of neurons in PE. Neuronal responses in the IC from 23 male SD rats were recorded by standard extracellular recording techniques following presentation of 4 ms white noise bursts, presented from either or both of two loud speakers, at different interstimulus delays (ISDs). The neural responses were recorded for off-line analysis before or after intraperitoneal administration of pentobarbital at a loading or maintenance dose. Data were assessed by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and pairwise comparisons. When the ipsilateral stimuli were leading, pentobarbital at a loading dose significantly increased normalized response to lagging stimuli during recovery from anesthesia. However, it was not the case when the contralateral stimuli were leading. At a maintenance dose, the normalized response to lagging stimuli were significantly reduced, independent of whether contralateral or ipsilateral stimuli were leading. These data show that pentobarbital have no effect on the normalized response of leading stimuli but can prolong the recovery time of lagging stimuli to paired sources produced PE illusions, which was gradually attenuated during recovery from anesthesia. Thus, extracellular recording immediately after administration of pentobarbital should be avoided in physiological studies of neural correlates of PE. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  1. Determination of chilling temperature effects on nutrient elements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Baydas E (2006). Trace element changes during hibernation of. Drosophila melanogaster by WDXRF analyses at chilling temperature. J. Quant. Spec. Rad. Tran. 102: 492-498. Dumlupinar R, Demir F, Bostan H (2007). Determination of Chilling. Temprature Effects on Inorganic Element Composition and.

  2. Determination of chilling temperature effects on nutrient elements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... Full Length Research Paper. Determination of chilling temperature effects on ... Results indicated that the distribution of some inorganic elements among organs (roots, stem and leaves) of cole ... Key words: Common cole (Brassica oleracea cv. Acephala), inorganic element, chilling temperature, X-ray,.

  3. The Effects of Leptin Replacement on Neural Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Filho, Gilberto J

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipokine synthesized and secreted mainly by the adipose tissue, has multiple effects on the regulation of food intake, energy expenditure, and metabolism. Its recently-approved analogue, metreleptin, has been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with leptin deficiency due to mutations in the leptin gene, lipodystrophy syndromes, and hypothalamic amenorrhea. In such patients, leptin replacement therapy has led to changes in brain structure and function in intra- and extrahypothalamic areas, including the hippocampus. Furthermore, in one of those patients, improvements in neurocognitive development have been observed. In addition to this evidence linking leptin to neural plasticity and function, observational studies evaluating leptin-sufficient humans have also demonstrated direct correlation between blood leptin levels and brain volume and inverse associations between circulating leptin and risk for the development of dementia. This review summarizes the evidence in the literature on the role of leptin in neural plasticity (in leptin-deficient and in leptin-sufficient individuals) and its effects on synaptic activity, glutamate receptor trafficking, neuronal morphology, neuronal development and survival, and microglial function.

  4. The Effects of Leptin Replacement on Neural Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto J. Paz-Filho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptin, an adipokine synthesized and secreted mainly by the adipose tissue, has multiple effects on the regulation of food intake, energy expenditure, and metabolism. Its recently-approved analogue, metreleptin, has been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with leptin deficiency due to mutations in the leptin gene, lipodystrophy syndromes, and hypothalamic amenorrhea. In such patients, leptin replacement therapy has led to changes in brain structure and function in intra- and extrahypothalamic areas, including the hippocampus. Furthermore, in one of those patients, improvements in neurocognitive development have been observed. In addition to this evidence linking leptin to neural plasticity and function, observational studies evaluating leptin-sufficient humans have also demonstrated direct correlation between blood leptin levels and brain volume and inverse associations between circulating leptin and risk for the development of dementia. This review summarizes the evidence in the literature on the role of leptin in neural plasticity (in leptin-deficient and in leptin-sufficient individuals and its effects on synaptic activity, glutamate receptor trafficking, neuronal morphology, neuronal development and survival, and microglial function.

  5. Finite size effects of a pion matrix element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guagnelli, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata and INFN, Sezione di Roma II, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Jansen, K. [NIC/DESY Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Palombi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata and INFN, Sezione di Roma II, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); E. Fermi Research Center, c/o Compendio Viminale, pal. F, I-00184 Rome (Italy); Petronzio, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata and INFN, Sezione di Roma II, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Shindler, A. [NIC/DESY Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Wetzorke, I. [NIC/DESY Zeuthen, Platanenallee 6, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany)]. E-mail: ines.wetzorke@desy.de

    2004-09-09

    We investigate finite size effects of the pion matrix element of the non-singlet, twist-2 operator corresponding to the average momentum of non-singlet quark densities. Using the quenched approximation, they come out to be surprisingly large when compared to the finite size effects of the pion mass. As a consequence, simulations of corresponding nucleon matrix elements could be affected by finite size effects even stronger which could lead to serious systematic uncertainties in their evaluation.

  6. The effects of gratitude expression on neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kini, Prathik; Wong, Joel; McInnis, Sydney; Gabana, Nicole; Brown, Joshua W

    2016-03-01

    Gratitude is a common aspect of social interaction, yet relatively little is known about the neural bases of gratitude expression, nor how gratitude expression may lead to longer-term effects on brain activity. To address these twin issues, we recruited subjects who coincidentally were entering psychotherapy for depression and/or anxiety. One group participated in a gratitude writing intervention, which required them to write letters expressing gratitude. The therapy-as-usual control group did not perform a writing intervention. After three months, subjects performed a "Pay It Forward" task in the fMRI scanner. In the task, subjects were repeatedly endowed with a monetary gift and then asked to pass it on to a charitable cause to the extent they felt grateful for the gift. Operationalizing gratitude as monetary gifts allowed us to engage the subjects and quantify the gratitude expression for subsequent analyses. We measured brain activity and found regions where activity correlated with self-reported gratitude experience during the task, even including related constructs such as guilt motivation and desire to help as statistical controls. These were mostly distinct from brain regions activated by empathy or theory of mind. Also, our between groups cross-sectional study found that a simple gratitude writing intervention was associated with significantly greater and lasting neural sensitivity to gratitude - subjects who participated in gratitude letter writing showed both behavioral increases in gratitude and significantly greater neural modulation by gratitude in the medial prefrontal cortex three months later. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Electromyostimulation training effects on neural drive and muscle architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondin, Julien; Guette, Marie; Ballay, Yves; Martin, Alain

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of 4 and 8 wk of electromyostimulation (EMS) training on both muscular and neural adaptations of the knee extensor muscles. Twenty males were divided into the electrostimulated group (EG, N = 12) and the control group (CG, N = 8). The training program consisted of 32 sessions of isometric EMS over an 8-wk period. All subjects were tested at baseline (B) and retested after 4 (WK4) and 8 (WK8) wk of EMS training. The EMG activity and muscle activation obtained under maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) was used to assess neural adaptations. Torque and EMG responses obtained under electrically evoked contractions, muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA), and vastus lateralis (VL) pennation angle, both measured by ultrasonography imaging, were examined to analyze muscular changes. At WK8, knee extensor MVC significantly increased by 27% (P < 0.001) and was accompanied by an increase in muscle activation (+6%, P < 0.01), quadriceps muscle ACSA (+6%, P < 0.001), and VL pennation angle (+14%, P < 0.001). A significant increase in normalized EMG activity of both VL and vastus medialis (VM) muscles (+69 and +39%, respectively, P < 0.001) but not of rectus femoris (RF) muscle was also found at WK8. The ACSA of the VL, VM, and vastus intermedius muscles significantly increased at WK8 (5-8%, P < 0.001) but not at WK4, whereas no changes occurred in the RF muscle. We concluded that the voluntary torque gains obtained after EMS training could be attributed to both muscular and neural adaptations. Both changes selectively involved the monoarticular vastii muscles.

  8. Teniasis: effect on element status of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celiksoz, Ali; Kilic, Eser; Yazar, Suleyman; Saraymen, Recep

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of level of the essential elements of copper, magnesium, and zinc status in cases of teniasis in children. Copper, magnesium, and zinc levels were measured in 40 children who were positive for intestinal parasite of Taenia saginata. Scores were obtained for the positives and their 30 age- and sex-matched T. saginata-negative healthy children. The mean concentration of copper, magnesium, and zinc in blood showed no statistically difference in T. saginata-positive children than in their controls both in females (p>0.05) and males (p>0.05). However, a clear numerically decrease was observed especially in magnesium and zinc levels compared to the controls both in females and males. The average magnesium concentration in T. saginata-positive female children and male children were 20+/-1.9 and 22+/-2.2 mg/L and it was 27+/-2.1 and 27+/-2.3 mg/L in controls, respectively. The mean values of the zinc in blood were 0.76+/-0.5 and 0.72+/-0.4 mg/L in T. saginata-positive female children and male children and 0.85+/-0.3 and 0.81+/-0.5 mg/L in female and male controls, respectively. No correlation could be demonstrated between age and mean values of copper, magnesium, and zinc in T. saginata-positive females and males and controls (p>0.05). No significant correlation could be found between blood copper, magnesium and zinc levels in T. saginata-positive female and male children and controls (p>0.05). Although there was no statistical correlation observed in copper, magnesium, and zinc levels between patients and controls, there seem to be, especially in magnesium and zinc levels, a decrease, whereas no change was seen in the zinc level in children infected with T. saginata compared to controls.

  9. Effective elements of science teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, Amy

    Educational reform efforts to improve students' learning outcomes are often present in teacher professional development opportunities; however, the structure and design of these opportunities vary and often focus on a homogenous student population; that is, White students in suburban schools. Reform efforts in teacher professional development that aim to educate teachers not only about science content and pedagogy, but also about practices that aim to reach a diverse student population is needed. This study examines three, science teacher summer professional development (PD) programs [SUN, SEPA, and CLA], and explores how programs affect teacher learning outcome(s) and any subsequent translation into classroom practice(s). The design and delivery, alignment to Ladson-Billings (1994) tenets of culturally responsive practices, and measurement(s) of teachers' learning outcome(s) are evaluated. Fliers were sent to science teachers who participated in SUN, SEPA, and CLA in an effort to recruit volunteers for this study. Program document analysis and teacher post-survey data from each program, focus groups, evidence of program integration, and a culturally responsive practice survey were collected and analyzed. Results show SEPA to include content knowledge (CK), pedagogical content knowledge (PCK), culturally responsive practices (CRP), and some elements of the conceptual change model (CCM) (Larkin, 2012) in program design, structure, and delivery along with translation into classroom practice. SUN and CLA both show incorporation of CK and PCK, with SUN also showing some evidence of CRP. The findings indicate that when teachers are modeled a practice they are able to translate that practice in their classroom. The potential impact of modeling CRP during science teacher PD may address the achievement gap still present among students of color. Program designers must consider the inclusion of CRP alongside CK and PCK during the development of science teacher PD.

  10. Effect of Ionic Diffusion on Extracellular Potentials in Neural Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geir Halnes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recorded potentials in the extracellular space (ECS of the brain is a standard measure of population activity in neural tissue. Computational models that simulate the relationship between the ECS potential and its underlying neurophysiological processes are commonly used in the interpretation of such measurements. Standard methods, such as volume-conductor theory and current-source density theory, assume that diffusion has a negligible effect on the ECS potential, at least in the range of frequencies picked up by most recording systems. This assumption remains to be verified. We here present a hybrid simulation framework that accounts for diffusive effects on the ECS potential. The framework uses (1 the NEURON simulator to compute the activity and ionic output currents from multicompartmental neuron models, and (2 the electrodiffusive Kirchhoff-Nernst-Planck framework to simulate the resulting dynamics of the potential and ion concentrations in the ECS, accounting for the effect of electrical migration as well as diffusion. Using this framework, we explore the effect that ECS diffusion has on the electrical potential surrounding a small population of 10 pyramidal neurons. The neural model was tuned so that simulations over ∼100 seconds of biological time led to shifts in ECS concentrations by a few millimolars, similar to what has been seen in experiments. By comparing simulations where ECS diffusion was absent with simulations where ECS diffusion was included, we made the following key findings: (i ECS diffusion shifted the local potential by up to ∼0.2 mV. (ii The power spectral density (PSD of the diffusion-evoked potential shifts followed a 1/f2 power law. (iii Diffusion effects dominated the PSD of the ECS potential for frequencies up to several hertz. In scenarios with large, but physiologically realistic ECS concentration gradients, diffusion was thus found to affect the ECS potential well within the frequency range picked up in

  11. A pilot study on the association between rare earth elements in maternal hair and the risk of neural tube defects in north China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Wenhua; Zhu, Yibing; Li, Zhenjiang; Pang, Yiming; Wang, Bin; Li, Zhiwen

    2017-07-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have many applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, resulting in occupational and environmental exposure and concerns regarding REE-associated health effects. However, few epidemiological studies have examined the adverse effects of REEs on pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between the REE concentrations in maternal hair growing during early pregnancy and the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) in offspring. We included 191 women with NTD-affected pregnancies (cases) and 261 women delivering healthy infants (controls). The cases were divided into three subtypes: anencephaly, spina bifida, and encephalocele. Four REEs in maternal hair were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), and neodymium (Nd). A questionnaire was used to collect information about maternal sociodemographic characteristics and dietary habits. The median concentrations of Ce and Pr in the NTD group were higher than those in the control group, whereas there were no significant differences for La and Nd. The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the four REE concentrations above the median in the case groups were not significantly > 1. An increasing frequency of the consumption of beans or bean products and fresh fruit was negatively correlated with the four REE concentrations. Our results did not suggest that the concentrations of REEs in maternal hair were associated with the risk of NTDs or any subtype of NTDs in the general population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Du; Linna Zhang; Scorsone, Kathleen A.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formatio...

  13. Qualitative elements constituting effective agricultural cooperatives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural cooperatives like all cooperatives are built on the principle of cooperation and community spirit, also known as ubuntu. They are widely promoted as a positive force for collective effort in smallholder agriculture development. However, research suggests that they generally have not been effective and successful ...

  14. The Neural Bases of Framing Effects in Social Dilemmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Ramsøy, Thomas; Skov, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Human behavior in social dilemmas is strongly framed by the social context, but the mechanisms underlying this framing effect remains poorly understood. To identify the behavioral and neural responses mediating framing of social interactions, subjects underwent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging...... while playing a Prisoners Dilemma game. In separate neuroimaging sessions, the game was either framed as a cooperation game or a competition game. Social decisions where subjects were affected by the frame engaged the hippocampal formation, precuneus, dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and lateral temporal...... gyrus. Among these regions, the engagement of the left hippocampus was further modulated by individual differences in empathy. Social decisions not adhering to the frame were associated with stronger engagement of the angular gyrus and trend increases in lateral orbitofrontal cortex, posterior...

  15. An effective convolutional neural network model for Chinese sentiment analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Mengdong; Liu, Lianzhong; Wang, Yadong

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays microblog is getting more and more popular. People are increasingly accustomed to expressing their opinions on Twitter, Facebook and Sina Weibo. Sentiment analysis of microblog has received significant attention, both in academia and in industry. So far, Chinese microblog exploration still needs lots of further work. In recent years CNN has also been used to deal with NLP tasks, and already achieved good results. However, these methods ignore the effective use of a large number of existing sentimental resources. For this purpose, we propose a Lexicon-based Sentiment Convolutional Neural Networks (LSCNN) model focus on Weibo's sentiment analysis, which combines two CNNs, trained individually base on sentiment features and word embedding, at the fully connected hidden layer. The experimental results show that our model outperforms the CNN model only with word embedding features on microblog sentiment analysis task.

  16. Evidence-Based Systematic Review: Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation on Swallowing and Neural Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather; Lazarus, Cathy; Arvedson, Joan; Schooling, Tracy; Frymark, Tobi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically review the literature examining the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on swallowing and neural activation. The review was conducted as part of a series examining the effects of oral motor exercises (OMEs) on speech, swallowing, and neural activation. Method: A systematic search was conducted to…

  17. Research Notes ~ Elements of Effective e-Learning Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Brown

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Preparing and developing e-learning materials is a costly and time consuming enterprise. This paper highlights the elements of effective design that we consider assist in the development of high quality materials in a cost efficient way. We introduce six elements of design and discuss each in some detail. These elements focus on paying attention to the provision of a rich learning activity, situating this activity within an interesting story line, providing meaningful opportunities for student reflection and third party criticism, considering appropriate technologies for delivery, ensuring that the design is suitable for the context in which it will be used, and bearing in mind the personal, social, and environmental impact of the designed activities. Along the way, we describe how these design elements can be effectively utilized by contextualizing them with examples from an e-learning initiative.

  18. Optimizing finite element predictions of local subchondral bone structural stiffness using neural network-derived density-modulus relationships for proximal tibial subchondral cortical and trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, S Majid; Amini, Morteza; Kontulainen, Saija A; Milner, Jaques S; Holdsworth, David W; Masri, Bassam A; Wilson, David R; Johnston, James D

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative computed tomography based subject-specific finite element modeling has potential to clarify the role of subchondral bone alterations in knee osteoarthritis initiation, progression, and pain. However, it is unclear what density-modulus equation(s) should be applied with subchondral cortical and subchondral trabecular bone when constructing finite element models of the tibia. Using a novel approach applying neural networks, optimization, and back-calculation against in situ experimental testing results, the objective of this study was to identify subchondral-specific equations that optimized finite element predictions of local structural stiffness at the proximal tibial subchondral surface. Thirteen proximal tibial compartments were imaged via quantitative computed tomography. Imaged bone mineral density was converted to elastic moduli using multiple density-modulus equations (93 total variations) then mapped to corresponding finite element models. For each variation, root mean squared error was calculated between finite element prediction and in situ measured stiffness at 47 indentation sites. Resulting errors were used to train an artificial neural network, which provided an unlimited number of model variations, with corresponding error, for predicting stiffness at the subchondral bone surface. Nelder-Mead optimization was used to identify optimum density-modulus equations for predicting stiffness. Finite element modeling predicted 81% of experimental stiffness variance (with 10.5% error) using optimized equations for subchondral cortical and trabecular bone differentiated with a 0.5g/cm(3) density. In comparison with published density-modulus relationships, optimized equations offered improved predictions of local subchondral structural stiffness. Further research is needed with anisotropy inclusion, a smaller voxel size and de-blurring algorithms to improve predictions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural Circuitry of the Bilingual Mental Lexicon: Effect of Age of Second Language Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isel, Frederic; Baumgaertner, Annette; Thran, Johannes; Meisel, Jurgen M.; Buchel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Numerous studies have proposed that changes of the human language faculty caused by neural maturation can explain the substantial differences in ultimate attainment of grammatical competences between first language (L1) acquirers and second language (L2) learners. However, little evidence on the effect of neural maturation on the attainment of…

  20. Triple Effect of Mimetic Peptides Interfering with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Homophilic Cis Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, S. Z.; Kolkova, Kateryna; Rudenko, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is pivotal in neural development, regeneration, and learning. Here we characterize two peptides, termed P1-B and P2, derived from the homophilic binding sites in the first two N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of NCAM, with regard to their effects...

  1. Electric field effects in hyperexcitable neural tissue: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, D.M

    2003-07-01

    Uniform electric fields applied to neural tissue can modulate neuronal excitability with a threshold value of about 1mV mm{sup -1} in normal physiological conditions. However, electric fields could have a lower threshold in conditions where field sensitivity is enhanced, such as those simulating epilepsy. Uniform electrical fields were applied to hippocampal brain slices exposed to picrotoxin, high potassium or low calcium solutions. The results in the low calcium medium show that neuronal activity can be completely blocked in 10% of the 30 slices tested with a field amplitude of 1mV mm{sup -1}. These results suggest that the threshold for this effect is clearly smaller than 1mV mm{sup -1}. The hypothesis that the extracellular resistance could affect the sensitivity to the electrical fields was tested by measuring the effect of the osmolarity of the extracellular solution on the efficacy of the field. A 10% decrease on osmolarity resulted in a 56% decrease (n=4) in the minimum field required for full suppression. A 14% in osmolarity produced an 81% increase in the minimum field required for full suppression. These results show that the extracellular volume can modulate the efficacy of the field and could lower the threshold field amplitudes to values lower than {approx}1mmV mm{sup -.} (author)

  2. The effects of cultural learning in populations of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Dara; O'Riordan, Colm

    2007-01-01

    Population learning can be described as the iterative Darwinian process of fitness-based selection and genetic transfer of information leading to populations of higher fitness and is often simulated using genetic algorithms. Cultural learning describes the process of information transfer between individuals in a population through non-genetic means. Cultural learning has been simulated by combining genetic algorithms and neural networks using a teacher-pupil scenario where highly fit individuals are selected as teachers and instruct the next generation. By examining the innate fitness of a population (i.e., the fitness of the population measured before any cultural learning takes place), it is possible to examine the effects of cultural learning on the population's genetic makeup. Our model explores the effect of cultural learning on a population and employs three benchmark sequential decision tasks as the evolutionary task for the population: connect-four, tic-tac-toe, and blackjack. Experiments are conducted with populations employing population learning alone and populations combining population and cultural learning. The article presents results showing the gradual transfer of knowledge from genes to the cultural process, illustrated by the simultaneous decrease in the population's innate fitness and the increase of its acquired fitness measured after learning takes place.

  3. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yan; Tang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Di; Wang, Sha-Li

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  6. The neural correlates of placebo effects: a disruption account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Matthew D; Jarcho, Johanna M; Berman, Steve; Naliboff, Bruce D; Suyenobu, Brandall Y; Mandelkern, Mark; Mayer, Emeran A

    2004-05-01

    The neurocognitive pathways by which placebo effects operate are poorly understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging was used to assess the brain response of patients with chronic abdominal pain (irritable bowel syndrome; IBS) to induced intestinal discomfort both before and after a 3-week placebo regimen. A daily symptom diary was used to measure symptom improvement. Increases in right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (RVLPFC) activity from pre- to post-placebo predicted self-reported symptom improvement, and this relationship was mediated by changes in dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC), typically associated with pain unpleasantness. These results are consistent with disruption theory [Lieberman, M.D., 2003. Reflective and reflexive judgment processes: a social cognitive neuroscience approach. In: Forgas, J.P., Williams, K.R., von Hippel, W. (Eds.), Social Judgments: Explicit and Implicit Processes. Cambridge Univ. Press, New York, pp. 44-67], which proposes that activation of prefrontal regions associated with thinking about negative affect can diminish dACC and amygdala reactivity to negative affect stimuli. This is the first study to identify a neural pathway from a region of the brain associated with placebos and affective thought to a region closely linked to the placebo-related outcome of diminished pain unpleasantness.

  7. Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 28; Issue 4. Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base superalloys for gas turbines and strategies for manufacture. O P Sinha M Chatterjee V V R S Sarma S N Jha. Volume 28 Issue 4 July 2005 pp 379-382 ...

  8. Cardiopulmonary bypass. The effect on blood elements in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, Jeroen Cornelis Frans de

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis the components of the heart-lung machine for CPB operations have been tested for their effects on blood elements. The purpose of the experimental investigation in dogs is: 1. To determine the hematological alterations induced by the various components from which an extracorporeal

  9. The Effect of Training Data Set Composition on the Performance of a Neural Image Caption Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-TR-8124 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory The Effect of Training Data Set Composition on the Performance of a Neural...Laboratory The Effect of Training Data Set Composition on the Performance of a Neural Image Caption Generator by Abigail Wilson Montgomery Blair...REPORT TYPE Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Effect of Training Data Set Composition on the Performance of a

  10. Neural Underpinnings of Cortisol Effects on Fear Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Christian Josef; Hamacher-Dang, Tanja Christina; Stark, Rudolf; Wolf, Oliver Tobias; Hermann, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear embodies a crucial mechanism incorporated in exposure therapy. Clinical studies demonstrated that application of the stress hormone cortisol before exposure sessions facilitates exposure success, but the underlying neural correlates remain unknown. Context- and stimulus-dependent cortisol effects on extinction learning will be characterized in this study and tested in the extinction and in a new context. Forty healthy men participated in a 3-day fear conditioning experiment with fear acquisition in context A (day 1), extinction training in context B (day 2), and recall in context B and a new context C one week later (day 3). Hydrocortisone (30 mg) or placebo was given before extinction training. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent responses and skin conductance responses (SCRs) served as dependent measures. At the beginning of extinction training, cortisol reduced conditioned SCRs, diminished activation of the amygdala-hippocampal complex, and enhanced functional connectivity of the anterior parahippocampal gyrus with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). After one week, the cortisol group showed increased hippocampal activation and connectivity to the vmPFC toward an extinguished stimulus and reduced insula activation toward a nonextinguished stimulus in the extinction context. However, this inhibitory cortisol effect did not extend to the new context. Taken together, cortisol reduced fear recall at the beginning of extinction and facilitated the consolidation of the extinction memory as evidenced by an inhibitory activation pattern one week later. The stress hormone exerted a critical impact on the amygdala-hippocampus-vmPFC network underlying fear and extinction memories. However, cortisol did not attenuate the context dependency of extinction.

  11. Elemental magic, v.2 the technique of special effects animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gilland, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Design beautiful, professional-level animated effects with these detailed step-by-step tutorials from former Disney animator and animated effects expert Joseph Gilland. Filled with beautiful, full-color artwork, Elemental Magic, Volume II, breaks down the animated effect process from beginning to end-including booming explosions, gusting winds, magical incantations, and raging fires. He also breaks down the process of effects ""clean-up,"" as well as timing and frame rates. The companion website includes real-time footage of the author lecturing as he animates the drawings from the

  12. The radiographic results and neurologic complications of instrumented reduction and fusion of high-grade spondylolisthesis without decompression of the neural elements: a retrospective review of 44 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailhan, Frederic; Gollogly, Sohrab; Roussouly, Pierre

    2006-01-15

    A retrospective review of all cases of high-grade spondylolisthesis treated by 1 surgeon between the years 1991 and 2003. To report the radiographic results and neurologic complications following instrumented posterior reduction and fusion without decompression of the neural elements. Despite a large number of published reviews of the clinical results of operative intervention, controversy remains about the surgical treatment of high-grade spondylolisthesis. A retrospective review of the clinical charts and radiographs of all patients with L5-S1 spondylolisthesis and more than 50% anterior displacement of L5 on S1 who were treated by the same surgical team at 1 institution. With this technique, an average reduction in the displacement of L5 on S1 from 64% to 38% was achieved. At a minimum 2-year follow-up (41 patients), we have detected 5 cases with evidence of pseudarthrosis or loss of reduction (11.4%). Overall, a neurologic complication rate of 9.1% occurred in this series, with a 2.3% chance of a persistent motor deficit. We did not detect any loss of bowel or bladder function after surgery. At last follow-up, and after revision procedures, we were able to achieve good or fair clinical results in 40 (90.9%) of 44 patients. These data suggest that a posterior instrumented reduction and fusion of high-grade spondylolisthesis without decompression of the neural elements can be accomplished with acceptable radiographic and clinical results.

  13. To compare the effect of Active Neural Mobilization during Intermittent Lumbar Traction and Intermittent Lumbar Traction followed by Active Neural Mobilization in cases of Lumbar Radiculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Jaywant Nagulkar; Kalyani Nagulkar

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of Active neural mobilization (ANM) during intermittent lumbar traction (ILT) and intermittent lumbar traction followed by active neural mobilization treatment in patients of low back pain (LBP) with radiculopathy.. To study the effect of ANM during ILT and ILT followed by ANM in patients of LBP with radiculopathy on VAS scale, P1 angle of SLR, P2 angle of SLR and Oswestry disability index(ODI). To compare the effect of ANM during ILT and ILT followed ...

  14. Therapists’ Perspectives on the Effective Elements of Consultation Following Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S.; Edmunds, Julie M.; Cannuscio, Carolyn C.; Gallagher, Mark; Downey, Margaret Mary; Kendall, Philip C.

    2013-01-01

    Consultation is an effective implementation strategy to improve uptake of evidence-based practices for youth. However, little is known about what makes consultation effective. The present study used qualitative methods to explore therapists’ perspectives about consultation. We interviewed 50 therapists who had been trained 2 years prior in cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety. Three themes emerged regarding effective elements of consultation: (1) connectedness with other therapists and the consultant, (2) authentic interactions around actual cases, and (3) the responsiveness of the consultant to the needs of individual therapists. Recommendations for the design of future consultation endeavors are offered. PMID:23435832

  15. Rethinking neural efficiency : Effects of controlling for strategy use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toffanin, Paolo; Johnson, Addie; de Jong, Ritske; Martens, Sander

    2007-01-01

    A sentence verification task (SVT) was used to test whether differences in neural activation patterns that have been attributed to IQ may actually depend on differential strategy use between IQ groups. Electroencephalograms were recorded from 14 low (89

  16. The effects of alloying elements on strength, hardenability, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of alloying elements (Nb, V, Mo) on dual phase steels have been studied in relation to ultimate tensile strength (U.T.S.) ductility and hardenability. C-Mn, Nb-Mo, Nb and Nb-V steels were hot rolled from 25mm to 4.5mm finishing at temperatures in the range 780oC – 950oC. They were then air cooled before ...

  17. Time- and task-dependent non-neural effects of real and sham TMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Duecker

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is widely used in experimental brain research to manipulate brain activity in humans. Next to the intended neural effects, every TMS pulse produces a distinct clicking sound and sensation on the head which can also influence task performance. This necessitates careful consideration of control conditions in order to ensure that behavioral effects of interest can be attributed to the neural consequences of TMS and not to non-neural effects of a TMS pulse. Surprisingly, even though these non-neural effects of TMS are largely unknown, they are often assumed to be unspecific, i.e. not dependent on TMS parameters. This assumption is inherent to many control strategies in TMS research but has recently been challenged on empirical grounds. Here, we further develop the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research. We investigated the time-dependence and task-dependence of the non-neural effects of TMS and compared real and sham TMS over vertex. Critically, we show that non-neural TMS effects depend on a complex interplay of these factors. Although TMS had no direct neural effects, both pre- and post-stimulus TMS time windows modulated task performance on both a sensory detection task and a cognitive angle judgment task. For the most part, these effects were quantitatively similar across tasks but effect sizes were clearly different. Moreover, the effects of real and sham TMS were almost identical with interesting exceptions that shed light on the relative contribution of auditory and somato-sensory aspects of a TMS pulse. Knowledge of such effects is of critical importance for the interpretation of TMS experiments and helps deciding what constitutes an appropriate control condition. Our results broaden the empirical basis of control strategies in TMS research and point at potential pitfalls that should be avoided.

  18. Creating buzz: the neural correlates of effective message propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Morelli, Sylvia A; Welborn, B Locke; Dambacher, Karl; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2013-07-01

    Social interaction promotes the spread of values, attitudes, and behaviors. Here, we report on neural responses to ideas that are destined to spread. We scanned message communicators using functional MRI during their initial exposure to the to-be-communicated ideas. These message communicators then had the opportunity to spread the messages and their corresponding subjective evaluations to message recipients outside the scanner. Successful ideas were associated with neural responses in the communicators' mentalizing systems and reward systems when they first heard the messages, prior to spreading them. Similarly, individuals more able to spread their own views to others produced greater mentalizing-system activity during initial encoding. Unlike prior social-influence studies that focused on the individuals being influenced, this investigation focused on the brains of influencers. Successful social influence is reliably associated with an influencer-to-be's state of mind when first encoding ideas.

  19. Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Kofman, I. S.; Cassady, K.; Yuan, P.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Riascos, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post spaceflight. Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that are conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. We have collected data on several crewmembers and preliminary findings will be presented. Eventual comparison to results from our parallel bed rest study will enable us to parse out the multiple mechanisms contributing to any spaceflight-induced neural structural and behavioral changes that we observe.

  20. Cultural effects on the neural basis of theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi Frank, Chiyoko; Temple, Elise

    2009-01-01

    "Theory of mind" has been described as the ability to attribute and understand other people's desires and intentions as distinct from one's own. It has been found to develop as early as between 3 and 4 years old, with precursor abilities possibly developing much earlier. There has been debate about the extent to which the developmental trajectory of theory of mind may differ across cultures or language systems. Although very few neuroimaging studies have directly compared different groups from different culture and language systems, across studies of a number of cultural/language groups have been used to explore the neural correlates of theory of mind. A summary of these findings suggests that there may be both universal and culture or language-specific neural correlates related to theory of mind. These studies, while still preliminary in many ways, illustrate the importance of taking into account the cultural background of participants. Furthermore these results suggest that there may be important cultural influence on theory of mind and the neural correlates associated with this ability.

  1. Effects of the popular food additive sodium benzoate on neural tube development in the chicken embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emon, Selin Tural; Orakdogen, Metin; Uslu, Serap; Somay, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Many more additives have been introduced with the development of processed foods. Neural tube defects are congenital malformations of the central nervous system. More than 300 000 children are born with neural tube defects every year and surviving children remain disabled for life. Sodium benzoate is used intensively in our daily lives. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effects of sodium benzoate on neural tube defects in chicken embryos. Fertile, specific pathogen-free eggs were used. The study was conducted on five groups. After 30 hours of incubation, the eggs were opened under 4x optical magnification. The embryonic disc was identified and sodium benzoate solution was injected. Eggs were closed with sterile adhesive strips and incubation was continued till the end of the 72nd hour. All eggs were then reopened and embryos were dissected from embryonic membranes and evaluated histopathologically. We found that the development of all embryos was consistent with the stage. We detected neural tube obstruction in one embryo. Neural tube defects were not detected in any embryos. This study showed that sodium benzoate as one of the widely used food preservatives has no effect to neural tube defect development in chicken embryos even at high doses.

  2. Elements of effective palliative care models: a rapid review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Population ageing, changes to the profiles of life-limiting illnesses and evolving societal attitudes prompt a critical evaluation of models of palliative care. We set out to identify evidence-based models of palliative care to inform policy reform in Australia. Method A rapid review of electronic databases and the grey literature was undertaken over an eight week period in April-June 2012. We included policy documents and comparative studies from countries within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) published in English since 2001. Meta-analysis was planned where >1 study met criteria; otherwise, synthesis was narrative using methods described by Popay et al. (2006). Results Of 1,959 peer-reviewed articles, 23 reported systematic reviews, 9 additional RCTs and 34 non-randomised comparative studies. Variation in the content of models, contexts in which these were implemented and lack of detailed reporting meant that elements of models constituted a more meaningful unit of analysis than models themselves. Case management was the element most consistently reported in models for which comparative studies provided evidence for effectiveness. Essential attributes of population-based palliative care models identified by policy and addressed by more than one element were communication and coordination between providers (including primary care), skill enhancement, and capacity to respond rapidly to individuals’ changing needs and preferences over time. Conclusion Models of palliative care should integrate specialist expertise with primary and community care services and enable transitions across settings, including residential aged care. The increasing complexity of care needs, services, interventions and contextual drivers warrants future research aimed at elucidating the interactions between different components and the roles played by patient, provider and health system factors. The findings of this review are limited by its

  3. Longterm effects of cardiac mediastinal nerve cryoablation on neural inducibility of atrial fibrillation in canines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz; Glavinovic, Tamara; Armour, J Andrew; Cardinal, René; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Kus, Teresa

    2011-04-26

    In canines, excessive activation of select mediastinal nerve inputs to the intrinsic cardiac nervous system induces atrial fibrillation (AF). Since ablation of neural elements is proposed as an adjunct to circumferential pulmonary vein ablation for AF, we investigated the short and long-term effects of mediastinal nerve ablation on AF inducibility. Under general anesthesia, in 11 dogs several mediastinal nerve sites were identified on the superior vena cava that, when stimulated electrically during the atrial refractory period, reproducibly initiated AF. Cryoablation of one nerve site was then performed and inducibility retested early (1-2 months post Cryo; n=7) or late (4 months post Cryo; n=4). Four additional dogs that underwent a sham procedure were retested 1 to 2 months post-surgery. Stimulation induced AF at 91% of nerve sites tested in control versus 21% nerve sites early and 54% late post-ablation (both P<0.05). Fewer stimuli were required to induce AF in controls versus the Early Cryo group; this capacity returned to normal values in the Late Cryo group. AF episodes were longer in control versus the Early or Late Cryo groups. Heart rate responses to vagal or stellate ganglion stimulation, as well as to local nicotine infusion into the right coronary artery, were similar in all groups. In conclusion, focal damage to intrinsic cardiac neuronal inputs causes short-term stunning of neuronal inducibility of AF without major loss of overall adrenergic or cholinergic efferent neuronal control. That recovery of AF inducibility occurs rapidly post-surgery indicates the plasticity of intrathoracic neuronal elements to focal injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of Building Design Elements on Residential Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingbao Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Residential thermal environment affects the life of residents in terms of their physical and mental health. Many studies have shown that building design elements affect the urban thermal environment. In this study, Nanjing City was used as the study area. A three-dimensional microclimate model was used to simulate and analyze the effects of four main factors, namely, building height, density, layout and green ratio, on thermal environment in residential areas. Results showed that 25% building density obtained a low average air temperature (ATa and average predicted mean vote (APMV during 24 h. Thus, a higher building height indicates a lower ATa and APMV and better outdoor comfort level. In addition, peripheral layout had the lowest ATa and APMV, followed by the determinant and point group layouts. The green ratio increased from 0% to 50% with a 10% step and the ATa and APMV decreased gradually. However, when the green ratio increased from 30% to 40%, ATa and APMV decreased most. The effects of building height, density and green ratio on the thermal environment in residential areas were interactive. The effects of building density, green ratio and layout on hourly air temperature and hourly predicted mean vote in daytime varied from these indicators during night time. How the four building design elements interact with thermal environment were probed from two aspects of air temperature and thermal comfort based on the validated ENVI-met, which is the element of novelty in this study. However, thermal comfort has rarely been considered in the past studies about urban outdoor thermal environment.

  5. Prediction horizon effects on stochastic modelling hints for neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drossu, R.; Obradovic, Z. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between stochastic models and neural network (NN) approaches to time series modelling. Experiments on a complex real life prediction problem (entertainment video traffic) indicate that prior knowledge can be obtained through stochastic analysis both with respect to an appropriate NN architecture as well as to an appropriate sampling rate, in the case of a prediction horizon larger than one. An improvement of the obtained NN predictor is also proposed through a bias removal post-processing, resulting in much better performance than the best stochastic model.

  6. The N400 effect during speaker-switch – Towards a conversational approach of measuring neural correlates of language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Goregliad Fjaellingsdal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Language occurs naturally in conversations. However, the study of the neural underpinnings of language has mainly taken place in single individuals using controlled language material. The interactive elements of a conversation (e.g., turn-taking are often not part of neurolinguistic setups. The prime reason is the difficulty to combine open unrestricted conversations with the requirements of neuroimaging. It is necessary to find a trade-off between the naturalness of a conversation and the restrictions imposed by neuroscientific methods to allow for ecologically more valid studies.Here we make an attempt to study the effects of a conversational element, namely turn-taking, on linguistic neural correlates, specifically the N400 effect. We focus on the physiological aspect of turn-taking, the speaker-switch, and its effect on the detectability of the N400 effect. The N400 event-related potential reflects expectation violations in a semantic context; the N400 effect describes the difference of the N400 amplitude between semantically expected and unexpected items.Sentences with semantically congruent and incongruent final words were presented in two turn-taking modes: (1 reading aloud first part of the sentence and listening to speaker-switch for the final word, and (2 listening to first part of the sentence and speaker-switch for the final word.A significant N400 effect was found for both turn-taking modes, which was not influenced by the mode itself. However, the mode significantly affected the P200, which was increased for the reading aloud mode compared to the listening mode.Our results show that an N400 effect can be detected during a speaker-switch. Speech articulation (reading aloud before the analyzed sentence fragment did also not impede the N400 effect detection for the final word. The speaker-switch, however, seems to influence earlier components of the electroencephalogram, related to processing of salient stimuli. We conclude that the N

  7. Linguistic Effects on the Neural Basis of Theory of Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, C. Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    “Theory of mind” (ToM) has been described as the ability to attribute and understand other people’s desires and intentions as distinct from one’s own. There has been a debate about the extent to which language influences ToM development. Although very few studies directly examined linguistic influence on the neural basis of ToM, results from these studies indicate at least moderate influence of language on ToM. In this review both behavioral and neurological studies that examined the relationship between language and ToM are selectively discussed. This review focuses on cross-linguistic / cultural studies (especially Japanese vs. American / English) since my colleagues and I found evidence of significant linguistic influence on the neural basis of ToM through a series of functional brain imaging experiments. Evidence from both behavioral and neurological studies of ToM (including ours) suggests that the pragmatic (not the constitutive) aspects of language influence ToM understanding more significantly. PMID:21113278

  8. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  9. Effectiveness of Multimedia Elements in Computer Supported Instruction: Analysis of Personalization Effects, Students' Performances and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidel, Mark; Luo, XiaoHui

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the efficiency of multimedia instruction at the college level by comparing the effectiveness of multimedia elements used in the computer supported learning with the cost of their preparation. Among the various technologies that advance learning, instructors and students generally identify interactive multimedia elements as…

  10. Neural responses to nostalgia-evoking music modeled by elements of dynamic musical structure and individual differences in affective traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Frederick S; Janata, Petr

    2016-10-01

    Nostalgia is an emotion that is most commonly associated with personally and socially relevant memories. It is primarily positive in valence and is readily evoked by music. It is also an idiosyncratic experience that varies between individuals based on affective traits. We identified frontal, limbic, paralimbic, and midbrain brain regions in which the strength of the relationship between ratings of nostalgia evoked by music and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal was predicted by affective personality measures (nostalgia proneness and the sadness scale of the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales) that are known to modulate the strength of nostalgic experiences. We also identified brain areas including the inferior frontal gyrus, substantia nigra, cerebellum, and insula in which time-varying BOLD activity correlated more strongly with the time-varying tonal structure of nostalgia-evoking music than with music that evoked no or little nostalgia. These findings illustrate one way in which the reward and emotion regulation networks of the brain are recruited during the experiencing of complex emotional experiences triggered by music. These findings also highlight the importance of considering individual differences when examining the neural responses to strong and idiosyncratic emotional experiences. Finally, these findings provide a further demonstration of the use of time-varying stimulus-specific information in the investigation of music-evoked experiences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Discrete Element Model for Suppression of Coffee-Ring Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ting; Lam, Miu Ling; Chen, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-02-01

    When a sessile droplet evaporates, coffee-ring effect drives the suspended particulate matters to the droplet edge, eventually forming a ring-shaped deposition. Because it causes a non-uniform distribution of solid contents, which is undesired in many applications, attempts have been made to eliminate the coffee-ring effect. Recent reports indicated that the coffee-ring effect can be suppressed by a mixture of spherical and non-spherical particles with enhanced particle-particle interaction at air-water interface. However, a model to comprehend the inter-particulate activities has been lacking. Here, we report a discrete element model (particle system) to investigate the phenomenon. The modeled dynamics included particle traveling following the capillary flow with Brownian motion, and its resultant 3D hexagonal close packing of particles along the contact line. For particles being adsorbed by air-water interface, we modeled cluster growth, cluster deformation, and cluster combination. We found that the suppression of coffee-ring effect does not require a circulatory flow driven by an inward Marangoni flow at air-water interface. Instead, the number of new cluster formation, which can be enhanced by increasing the ratio of non-spherical particles and the overall number of microspheres, is more dominant in the suppression process. Together, this model provides a useful platform elucidating insights for suppressing coffee-ring effect for practical applications in the future.

  12. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Michael; Zhang, Linna; Scorsone, Kathleen A; Woodfield, Sarah E; Zage, Peter E

    2016-06-10

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formation and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were performed to measure the induction of apoptosis after nifurtimox treatment. Inhibition of intracellular signaling was measured by Western blot analysis of treated and untreated cells. Tumor cells were then treated with combinations of nifurtimox and BSO and evaluated for viability using MTT assays. All neural tumor cell lines were sensitive to nifurtimox, and IC50 values ranged from approximately 20 to 210 μM. Nifurtimox treatment inhibited ERK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Furthermore, the combination of nifurtimox and BSO demonstrated significant synergistic efficacy in all tested cell lines. Additional preclinical and clinical studies of the combination of nifurtimox and BSO in patients with neural tumors are warranted.

  13. Feasibility Study of Extended-Gate-Type Silicon Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors for Neural Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongki; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Nam, Yoonkey

    2017-01-01

    In this research, a high performance silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (transconductance as high as 34 µS and sensitivity as 84 nS/mV) is extensively studied and directly compared with planar passive microelectrode arrays for neural recording application. Electrical and electrochemical characteristics are carefully characterized in a very well-controlled manner. We especially focused on the signal amplification capability and intrinsic noise of the transistors. A neural recording system using both silicon nanowire field-effect transistor-based active-type microelectrode array and platinum black microelectrode-based passive-type microelectrode array are implemented and compared. An artificial neural spike signal is supplied as input to both arrays through a buffer solution and recorded simultaneously. Recorded signal intensity by the silicon nanowire transistor was precisely determined by an electrical characteristic of the transistor, transconductance. Signal-to-noise ratio was found to be strongly dependent upon the intrinsic 1/f noise of the silicon nanowire transistor. We found how signal strength is determined and how intrinsic noise of the transistor determines signal-to-noise ratio of the recorded neural signals. This study provides in-depth understanding of the overall neural recording mechanism using silicon nanowire transistors and solid design guideline for further improvement and development. PMID:28350370

  14. Neural correlates of perceptual grouping effects in the processing of sound omission by musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kentaro; Altmann, Christian F; Matsuhashi, Masao; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual grouping is the process of organizing sounds into perceptually meaningful elements. Psychological studies have found that tones presented as a regular frequency or temporal pattern are grouped according to gestalt principles, such as similarity, proximity, and good continuity. Predictive coding theory suggests that this process helps create an internal model for the prediction of sounds in a tone sequence and that an omission-related brain response reflects the violation of this prediction. However, it remains unclear which brain areas are related to this process, especially in paying attention to the stimuli. To clarify this uncertainty, the present study investigated the neural correlates of perceptual grouping effects. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we recorded the evoked response fields (ERFs) of amateur musicians and nonmusicians to sound omissions in tone sequences with a regular or random pattern of three different frequencies during an omission detection task. Omissions in the regular sequences were detected faster and evoked greater activity in the left Heschl's gyrus (HG), right postcentral gyrus, and bilateral superior temporal gyrus (STG) than did omissions in the irregular sequences. Additionally, an interaction between musical experience and regularity was found in the left HG/STG. Tone-evoked responses did not show this difference, indicating that the expertise effect did not reflect the superior tone processing acquired by amateur musicians due to musical training. These results suggest that perceptual grouping based on repetition of a pattern of frequencies affects the processing of omissions in tone sequences and induces more activation of the bilateral auditory cortex by violating internal models. The interaction in the left HG/STG may suggest different styles of processing for musicians and nonmusicians, although this difference was not reflected at the behavioral level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The neural bases of the multiplication problem-size effect across countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Jérôme; Lu, Jiayan; Liu, Li; Dong, Qi; Zhou, Xinlin; Booth, James R

    2013-01-01

    Multiplication problems involving large numbers (e.g., 9 × 8) are more difficult to solve than problems involving small numbers (e.g., 2 × 3). Behavioral research indicates that this problem-size effect might be due to different factors across countries and educational systems. However, there is no neuroimaging evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we compared the neural correlates of the multiplication problem-size effect in adults educated in China and the United States. We found a greater neural problem-size effect in Chinese than American participants in bilateral superior temporal regions associated with phonological processing. However, we found a greater neural problem-size effect in American than Chinese participants in right intra-parietal sulcus (IPS) associated with calculation procedures. Therefore, while the multiplication problem-size effect might be a verbal retrieval effect in Chinese as compared to American participants, it may instead stem from the use of calculation procedures in American as compared to Chinese participants. Our results indicate that differences in educational practices might affect the neural bases of symbolic arithmetic.

  16. Effects of Contamination and Cleaning on Parachute Structural Textile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Throughout their lifecycle, parachute textiles come into contact with various other substances. This contact may occur during manufacturing and repair, storage and transportation, packing, or actual use. While this interaction does not always result in negative repercussions, it may cause a loss in material strength. This paper examines the strength degradation due to several contaminants as well as the effects of cleaning agents on common parachute materials. Materials tested were: Kevlar cord and webbing, Nylon broadcloth and webbing, and Vectran cord; all of these constitute the major structural elements for CPAS (Capsule Parachute Assembly System), the parachute system for the NASA Orion Crew Module. Contaminants tested were: sewing machine oil, dried stamping ink, dirt, basting glue, Sergene, and rust. Recommendations for cleaning (or not cleaning) these materials with respect to each of the contaminants are given in this paper, as well as recommendations for future tests.

  17. Thermal effects on rare earth element and strontium isotope chemistry in single conodont elements.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armstrong, H.A.; Pearson, D.G.; Griselin, M.

    2001-01-01

    A low-blank, high sensitivity isotope dilution, ICP-MS analytical technique has been used to obtain REE abundance data from single conodont elements weighing as little as 5 μg. Sr isotopes can also be measured from the column eluants enabling Sr isotope ratios and REE abundance to be determined from

  18. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 23; Issue 3. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy steel ... Effect of alloy elements on corrosion of low alloy steel was studied under simulated offshore conditions. The results showed that the elements Cu, P, Mo, W, V had evident effect on ...

  19. Effect of short-term escitalopram treatment on neural activation during emotional processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Eduard; Wall, Matt; Norbury, Ray; Godlewska, Beata; Terbeck, Sylvia; Cowen, Philip; Matthews, Paul; Nutt, David J

    2016-01-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) imaging studies have revealed that subchronic medication with escitalopram leads to significant reduction in both amygdala and medial frontal gyrus reactivity during processing of emotional faces, suggesting that escitalopram may have a distinguishable modulatory effect on neural activation as compared with other serotonin-selective antidepressants. In this fMRI study we aimed to explore whether short-term medication with escitalopram in healthy volunteers is associated with reduced neural response to emotional processing, and whether this effect is predicted by drug plasma concentration. The neural response to fearful and happy faces was measured before and on day 7 of treatment with escitalopram (10mg) in 15 healthy volunteers and compared with those in a control unmedicated group (n=14). Significantly reduced activation to fearful, but not to happy facial expressions was observed in the bilateral amygdala, cingulate and right medial frontal gyrus following escitalopram medication. This effect was not correlated with plasma drug concentration. In accordance with previous data, we showed that escitalopram exerts its rapid direct effect on emotional processing via attenuation of neural activation in pathways involving medial frontal gyrus and amygdala, an effect that seems to be distinguishable from that of other SSRIs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Effective Message Elements for Disclosures about Chemicals in Cigarette Smoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Dannielle E; Boynton, Marcella H; Noar, Seth M; Morgan, Jennifer C; Mendel, Jennifer R; Ribisl, Kurt M; Stepanov, Irina; Nylander-French, Leena A; Brewer, Noel T

    2017-05-17

    Cigarette smoke contains at least 93 chemicals or "constituents" that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has identified as harmful or potentially harmful to human health. Our study sought to identify which constituent disclosure message elements are most effective in discouraging people from smoking. Three hundred eighty-eight current smokers ages 18 and older completed an online survey in February 2015. We randomized participants to respond to one of two sets of 13 toxic products that contain cigarette constituents and 25 health effects associated with cigarette constituents. Products that elicited the most discouragement were those with lower chances of exposure (e.g., explosives), followed by products with possible exposure (e.g., rat poison) and products with a high likelihood of exposure (e.g., floor cleaner). Awareness of toxic products that constituents are found in (pelements. Our study identified health effects and toxic products, especially cancers and rarely encountered toxic products, that may discourage smoking when included in disclosure messages. By constructing messages that communicate the harms associated with tobacco use by contextualizing those harms in terms of specific constituents, tobacco education messaging efforts may be increasingly successful.

  1. Hybrid Neural Network Model of an Industrial Ethanol Fermentation Process Considering the Effect of Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovanelli, Ivana C. C.; Rivera, Elmer Ccopa; da Costa, Aline C.; Filho, Rubens Maciel

    In this work a procedure for the development of a robust mathematical model for an industrial alcoholic fermentation process was evaluated. The proposed model is a hybrid neural model, which combines mass and energy balance equations with functional link networks to describe the kinetics. These networks have been shown to have a good nonlinear approximation capability, although the estimation of its weights is linear. The proposed model considers the effect of temperature on the kinetics and has the neural network weights reestimated always so that a change in operational conditions occurs. This allow to follow the system behavior when changes in operating conditions occur.

  2. LEARNING ALGORITHM EFFECT ON MULTILAYER FEED FORWARD ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK PERFORMANCE IN IMAGE CODING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OMER MAHMOUD

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the essential factors that affect the performance of Artificial Neural Networks is the learning algorithm. The performance of Multilayer Feed Forward Artificial Neural Network performance in image compression using different learning algorithms is examined in this paper. Based on Gradient Descent, Conjugate Gradient, Quasi-Newton techniques three different error back propagation algorithms have been developed for use in training two types of neural networks, a single hidden layer network and three hidden layers network. The essence of this study is to investigate the most efficient and effective training methods for use in image compression and its subsequent applications. The obtained results show that the Quasi-Newton based algorithm has better performance as compared to the other two algorithms.

  3. Neural correlates of effective and ineffective mood induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenberg, Irina; Kellermann, Thilo; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Gur, Ruben C.; Habel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    Emotional reactivity and the ability to modulate an emotional state, which are important factors for psychological well-being, are often dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Neural correlates of emotional states have mostly been studied at the group level, thereby neglecting individual differences in the intensity of emotional experience. This study investigates the relationship between brain activity and interindividual variation in subjective affect ratings. A standardized mood induction (MI) procedure, using positive facial expression and autobiographical memories, was applied to 54 healthy participants (28 female), who rated their subjective affective state before and after the MI. We performed a regression analysis with brain activation during MI and changes in subjective affect ratings. An increase in positive affective ratings correlated with activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and the fusiform gyrus (FFG), whereas reduced positive affect correlated with activity of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. Activations in the amygdala, hippocampus and FFG are possibly linked to strategies adopted by the participants to achieve mood changes. Subgenual cingulate cortex activation has been previously shown to relate to rumination. This finding is in line with previous observations of the subgenual cingulate’s role in emotion regulation and its clinical relevance to therapy and prognosis of mood disorders. PMID:23576810

  4. Neural effects of positive and negative incentives during marijuana withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca M Filbey

    Full Text Available In spite of evidence suggesting two possible mechanisms related to drug-seeking behavior, namely reward-seeking and harm avoidance, much of the addiction literature has focused largely on positive incentivization mechanisms associated with addiction. In this study, we examined the contributing neural mechanisms of avoidance of an aversive state to drug-seeking behavior during marijuana withdrawal. To that end, marijuana users were scanned while performing the monetary incentive delay task in order to assess positive and negative incentive processes. The results showed a group x incentive interaction, such that marijuana users had greater response in areas that underlie reward processes during positive incentives while controls showed greater response in the same areas, but to negative incentives. Furthermore, a negative correlation between withdrawal symptoms and response in the amygdala during negative incentives was found in the marijuana users. These findings suggest that although marijuana users have greater reward sensitivity and less harm avoidance than controls, that attenuated amygdala response, an area that underlies fear and avoidance, was present in marijuana users with greater marijuana withdrawal symptoms. This is concordant with models of drug addiction that involve multiple sources of reinforcement in substance use disorders, and suggests the importance of strategies that focus on respective mechanisms.

  5. Neural correlates of effective and ineffective mood induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Nils; Falkenberg, Irina; Kellermann, Thilo; Eickhoff, Simon B; Gur, Ruben C; Habel, Ute

    2014-06-01

    Emotional reactivity and the ability to modulate an emotional state, which are important factors for psychological well-being, are often dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Neural correlates of emotional states have mostly been studied at the group level, thereby neglecting individual differences in the intensity of emotional experience. This study investigates the relationship between brain activity and interindividual variation in subjective affect ratings. A standardized mood induction (MI) procedure, using positive facial expression and autobiographical memories, was applied to 54 healthy participants (28 female), who rated their subjective affective state before and after the MI. We performed a regression analysis with brain activation during MI and changes in subjective affect ratings. An increase in positive affective ratings correlated with activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and the fusiform gyrus (FFG), whereas reduced positive affect correlated with activity of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex. Activations in the amygdala, hippocampus and FFG are possibly linked to strategies adopted by the participants to achieve mood changes. Subgenual cingulate cortex activation has been previously shown to relate to rumination. This finding is in line with previous observations of the subgenual cingulate's role in emotion regulation and its clinical relevance to therapy and prognosis of mood disorders. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghadir, Ahmad H; Gabr, Sami A; Al-Eisa, Einas S

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults. Objective The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs) in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults. Methods A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years) were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA) score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45), moderate (n=30), and severe (n=25). Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA) questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively. Results Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45) had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55) had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92) and severe (score 31–62). There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01) and moderate (P=0.01) cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural damage mechanism. Conclusion This study found significant associations among trace elements, anti-GADAs, and cognitive function in older adults. The homeostatic balance of trace elements should be recommended among older adults for better cognitive

  7. Neural response to alcohol taste cues in youth : Effects of the OPRM1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korucuoglu, Ozlem; Gladwin, Thomas E.; Baas, Frank; Mocking, Roel J. T.; Ruhé, Henricus G.; Groot, Paul F. C.; Wiers, Reinout W.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variations in the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) gene have been related to high sensitivity to rewarding effects of alcohol. The current study focuses on the neural circuitry underlying this phenomenon using an alcohol versus water taste-cue reactivity paradigm in a young sample at relatively

  8. Effect of anatomical variability on neural stimulation strength and focality in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2009-01-01

    We present a quantitative comparison of two metrics-neural stimulation strength and focality-in electrocon-vulsive therapy (ECT) and magnetic seizure therapy (MST) using finite-element method (FEM) simulation in a spherical head model. Five stimulation modalities were modeled, including bilateral ECT, unilateral ECT, focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST), and MST with circular and double-cone coils, with stimulation parameters identical to those applied in clinical practice. We further examine the effect on the stimulation metrics of individual-, sex- and age-related variability in tissue layer thickness and conductivity. Neural stimulation by MST is shown to be more focal and superficial than ECT. This result suggests that it may be advantageous to reduce the current used in ECT. The stimulation strength in MST is also less sensitive to variations in head geometry and tissue conductivity than in ECT. Individualization of pulse amplitude in both ECT and MST could compensate for anatomical variability, which could lead to more consistent clinical outcomes.

  9. Neural oscillations associated with the primacy and recency effects of verbal working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephane, Massoud; Ince, Nuri F; Kuskowski, Michael; Leuthold, Arthur; Tewfik, Ahmed H; Nelson, Katie; McClannahan, Kate; Fletcher, Charles R; Tadipatri, Vijay Aditya

    2010-04-12

    For sequential information, the first (primacy) and last (recency) items are better remembered than items in the middle of the sequence. The cognitive operations and neural correlates for the primacy and recency effects are unclear. In this paper, we investigate brain oscillations associated with these effects. MEG recordings were obtained on 19 subjects performing a modified Sternberg paradigm. Correlation analyses were performed between brain oscillatory activity and primacy and recency indices. Oscillatory activity during information maintenance, not encoding, was correlated with the primacy and recency effects. The primacy effect was associated with occipital post-desynchrony, and temporal post-synchrony. The recency effect was associated with parietal and temporal desynchrony. Differences were also observed according to the maintenance strategy. These data indicate that the primacy and recency effects are related to different neural, and likely cognitive, operations that are dependant on the strategy for information maintenance. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. The Effects of Low-Dose Bisphenol A and Bisphenol F on Neural Differentiation of a Fetal Brain-Derived Neural Progenitor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Fujiwara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental chemicals are known to disrupt the endocrine system in humans and to have adverse effects on several organs including the developing brain. Recent studies indicate that exposure to environmental chemicals during gestation can interfere with neuronal differentiation, subsequently affecting normal brain development in newborns. Xenoestrogen, bisphenol A (BPA, which is widely used in plastic products, is one such chemical. Adverse effects of exposure to BPA during pre- and postnatal periods include the disruption of brain function. However, the effect of BPA on neural differentiation remains unclear. In this study, we explored the effects of BPA or bisphenol F (BPF, an alternative compound for BPA, on neural differentiation using ReNcell, a human fetus-derived neural progenitor cell line. Maintenance in growth factor-free medium initiated the differentiation of ReNcell to neuronal cells including neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. We exposed the cells to BPA or BPF for 3 days from the period of initiation and performed real-time PCR for neural markers such as β III-tubulin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and Olig2. The β III-tubulin mRNA level decreased in response to BPA, but not BPF, exposure. We also observed that the number of β III-tubulin-positive cells in the BPA-exposed group was less than that of the control group. On the other hand, there were no changes in the MAP2 mRNA level. These results indicate that BPA disrupts neural differentiation in human-derived neural progenitor cells, potentially disrupting brain development.

  11. Neural effects in copper defiient Menkes disease: ATP7A-a distinctive marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K Kanthlal

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Menkes disease, also termed as “Menkes’s syndrome”, is a disastrous infantile neurodegenerative disorder originated by diverse mutations in cupric cation-transport gene called ATP7A. This gene encodes a protein termed as copper transporting P-type ATPase, essential for copper ion transport from intestine to the other parts of our body along with other transporters like copper transporter receptor 1 and divalent metal transporter 1. The copper transportation is vital in the neuronal development and synthesis of various enzymes. It is found to be an appreciated trace element for normal biological functioning but toxic in excess. It is essential for the metallation of cuproenzymes which is responsible for the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and other vital physiological mechanisms. Copper is also actively involved in the transmission pathway of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and its subsequent molecular changes in neural cells. The expression of ATP7A gene in regions of brain depicts the importance of copper in neural development and stabilization. Studies revealed that the mutation of ATP7A gene leads the pathophysiology of various neurodegenerative disorders. This review focused on the normal physiological function of the gene with respect to their harmful outcome of the mutated gene and its associated deficiency which detriments the neural mechanism in Menkes patients.

  12. Effects of mood stabilizers on adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boku, Shuken; Nakagawa, Shin; Masuda, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kato, Akiko; Toda, Hiroyuki; Song, Ning; Kitaichi, Yuji; Inoue, Takeshi; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2011-01-15

    Neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus (DG) is considered to be partly involved in the action of mood stabilizers. However, it remains unclear how mood stabilizers affect neural precursor cells in adult DG. We have established a culture system of adult rat DG-derived neural precursor cells (ADP) and have shown that lithium, a mood stabilizer, and dexamethasone, an agonist of glucocorticoid receptor, reciprocally regulate ADP proliferation. Neurogenesis constitutes not only proliferation of neural precursor cells but also apoptosis and differentiation. To develop further understanding of mood stabilizer effects on neural precursor cells in adult DG, we investigated and compared the effects of four common mood stabilizers-lithium, valproate, carbamazepine, and lamotrigine-on ADP proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. ADP proliferation, decreased by dexamethasone, was examined using Alamar Blue assay. Using TUNEL assay, ADP apoptosis induced by staurosporine was examined. The differentiated ADP induced by retinoic acid was characterized by immunostaining with anti-GFAP or anti-Tuj1 antibody. Lithium and valproate, but not carbamazepine and lamotrigine, recovered ADP proliferation decreased by dexamethasone. All four mood stabilizers decreased ADP apoptosis. Retinoic acid differentiated ADP into both neurons and astrocytes. Lithium and carbamazepine increased the ratio of neurons and decreased that of astrocytes. However, valproate and lamotrigine increased the ratio of astrocytes and decreased that of neurons. Therefore, these four stabilizers exhibited both common and differential effects on ADP proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Task-dependent neural and behavioral effects of verb argument structure features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyutina, Svetlana; den Ouden, Dirk-Bart

    2017-05-01

    Understanding which verb argument structure (VAS) features (if any) are part of verbs' lexical entries and under which conditions they are accessed provides information on the nature of lexical representations and sentence construction. We investigated neural and behavioral effects of three understudied VAS characteristics (number of subcategorization options, number of thematic options and overall number of valency frames) in lexical decision and sentence well-formedness judgment in healthy adults. VAS effects showed strong dependency on processing conditions. As reflected by behavioral performance and neural recruitment patterns, increased VAS complexity in terms of subcategorization options and thematic options had a detrimental effect on sentence processing, but facilitated lexical access to single words, possibly by providing more lexico-semantic associations and access routes (facilitation through complexity). Effects of the number of valency frames are equivocal. We suggest that VAS effects may be mediated semantically rather than by a dedicated VAS module in verbs' representations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  15. Neural Acupuncture Unit: A New Concept for Interpreting Effects and Mechanisms of Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Wang, Xiao-Min; McAlonan, Grainne M.

    2012-01-01

    When an acupuncture needle is inserted into a designated point on the body and mechanical or electrical stimulation is delivered, various neural and neuroactive components are activated. The collection of the activated neural and neuroactive components distributed in the skin, muscle, and connective tissues surrounding the inserted needle is defined as a neural acupuncture unit (NAU). The traditionally defined acupoints represent an anatomical landmark system that indicates local sites where NAUs may contain relatively dense and concentrated neural and neuroactive components, upon which acupuncture stimulation would elicit a more efficient therapeutic response. The NAU-based local mechanisms of biochemical and biophysical reactions play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia. Different properties of NAUs are associated with different components of needling sensation. There exist several central pathways to convey NAU-induced acupuncture signals, Electroacupuncture (EA) frequency-specific neurochemical effects are related to different peripheral and central pathways transmitting afferent signals from different frequency of NAU stimulation. More widespread and intense neuroimaging responses of brain regions to acupuncture may be a consequence of more efficient NAU stimulation modes. The introduction of the conception of NAU provides a new theoretical approach to interpreting effects and mechanisms of acupuncture in modern biomedical knowledge framework. PMID:22474503

  16. Neural circuitry of the bilingual mental lexicon: effect of age of second language acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isel, Frédéric; Baumgaertner, Annette; Thrän, Johannes; Meisel, Jürgen M; Büchel, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Numerous studies have proposed that changes of the human language faculty caused by neural maturation can explain the substantial differences in ultimate attainment of grammatical competences between first language (L1) acquirers and second language (L2) learners. However, little evidence on the effect of neural maturation on the attainment of lexical knowledge in L2 is available. The present functional magnetic resonance study addresses this question via a cross-linguistic neural adaptation paradigm. Age of acquisition (AoA) of L2 was systematically manipulated. Concrete nouns were repeated across language (e.g., French-German, valise(suitcase)-Koffer(suitcase)). Whereas early bilinguals (AoA of L210years) showed larger RE effects in the middle portion of the left insula and in the right middle frontal gyrus (MFG). We suggest that, as for grammatical knowledge, the attainment of lexical knowledge in L2 is affected by neural maturation. The present findings lend support to neurocognitive models of bilingual word recognition postulating that, for both early and late bilinguals, the two languages are interconnected at the conceptual level. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterizing Deep Brain Stimulation effects in computationally efficient neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteri, Alberta; Arena, Paolo; Mazzone, Paolo

    2011-04-15

    Recent studies on the medical treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) led to the introduction of the so called Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) technique. This particular therapy allows to contrast actively the pathological activity of various Deep Brain structures, responsible for the well known PD symptoms. This technique, frequently joined to dopaminergic drugs administration, replaces the surgical interventions implemented to contrast the activity of specific brain nuclei, called Basal Ganglia (BG). This clinical protocol gave the possibility to analyse and inspect signals measured from the electrodes implanted into the deep brain regions. The analysis of these signals led to the possibility to study the PD as a specific case of dynamical synchronization in biological neural networks, with the advantage to apply the theoretical analysis developed in such scientific field to find efficient treatments to face with this important disease. Experimental results in fact show that the PD neurological diseases are characterized by a pathological signal synchronization in BG. Parkinsonian tremor, for example, is ascribed to be caused by neuron populations of the Thalamic and Striatal structures that undergo an abnormal synchronization. On the contrary, in normal conditions, the activity of the same neuron populations do not appear to be correlated and synchronized. To study in details the effect of the stimulation signal on a pathological neural medium, efficient models of these neural structures were built, which are able to show, without any external input, the intrinsic properties of a pathological neural tissue, mimicking the BG synchronized dynamics.We start considering a model already introduced in the literature to investigate the effects of electrical stimulation on pathologically synchronized clusters of neurons. This model used Morris Lecar type neurons. This neuron model, although having a high level of biological plausibility, requires a large computational effort

  18. A common oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism modulates intranasal oxytocin effects on the neural response to social cooperation in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Feng, C; Lori, A; Waldman, I. D; Binder, E. B; Haroon, E; Rilling, J. K

    2015-01-01

    .... However, OT effects are often heterogeneous across individuals. Here we explore individual differences in OT effects on the neural response to social cooperation as a function of the rs53576 polymorphism of the oxytocin receptor gene ( OXTR...

  19. Effect of soil moisture on trace elements concentrations using

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Sahraoui and M. Hachicha

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... produced by the water influence moisture content and corrected ... Previous studies indicated that PXRF analysis was capable of detecting soil trace elements ..... determination of some heavy metals in soil using an x-ray ...

  20. Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

  1. To compare the effect of Active Neural Mobilization during Intermittent Lumbar Traction and Intermittent Lumbar Traction followed by Active Neural Mobilization in cases of Lumbar Radiculopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaywant Nagulkar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To compare the effectiveness of Active neural mobilization (ANM during intermittent lumbar traction (ILT and intermittent lumbar traction followed by active neural mobilization treatment in patients of low back pain (LBP with radiculopathy.. To study the effect of ANM during ILT and ILT followed by ANM in patients of LBP with radiculopathy on VAS scale, P1 angle of SLR, P2 angle of SLR and Oswestry disability index(ODI. To compare the effect of ANM during ILT and ILT followed by ANM in patients of LBP with radiculopathy on visual analog scale (VAS scale, P1 angle of SLR, P2 angle of SLR and Oswestry disability index. In this study 107 patients of LBP with radiculopathy were randomly assigned into two different groups. Group A containing 54 patients received active neural mobilization during intermittent lumber traction and group B received intermittent lumber traction followed by active neural mobilization. The data on all the outcome measures were recorded on day 0 pre-treatment and on 10th day post treatment. Data were analyzed using statistical software Intercorted STATA VERSION 9.0. Patients in both the groups showed improvement in all 4 outcome measures as compared to baseline assessment values. Patients treated in group A showed more improvement as compared to group B. This study concluded that ANM during ILT gives more relief and yields better responses in patients of LBP with radiculopathy and may help person to resume his daily activities.

  2. The effect of caffeine citrate on neural breathing pattern in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, Vilhelmiina; Beck, Jennifer; Zhai, Qian; Leppäsalo, Juha; Lehtonen, Liisa; Soukka, Hanna

    2015-10-01

    Caffeine citrate is widely used to prevent and treat prematurity-associated apnea. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of caffeine citrate on the neural control of breathing, especially central apnea, in premature infants. Preterm infants were evaluated for 30min before and 30min after caffeine citrate loading (20mg/kg). A feeding tube including miniaturized sensors was used to measure the diaphragm electrical activity (Edi) waveform. Central apnea was defined as any period where the Edi waveform was flat for >5s. Seventeen preterm infants with a mean age of three days and mean birth weight of 900 grams were evaluated. In addition to central apnea, several parameters including neural inspiratory time, neural respiratory rate, peak Edi, delta inspiratory change in Edi (phasic Edi) and minimum Edi on exhalation were measured. The majority of the apnea were short (5 to 10s) and the number of apnea correlated with birth weight (p=0.039). Caffeine citrate reduced significantly the number of 5-to-10-second-long central apnea during the 30-minute periods (12±11 to 7±7; p=0.02). Caffeine citrate increased both peak and phasic Edi leading to a significant increase in the diaphragm energy expenditure. Edi signal can be reliably measured and processed to study changes in premature infants' neural breathing. The beneficial effect of caffeine citrate on the reduction of the number of apnea is mediated through stimulated neural breathing increasing the diaphragm energy expenditure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathophysiological effects of dietary essential fatty acid balance on neural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S; Sato, A; Okuyama, H

    1998-05-01

    Dietary fatty acid balance has been revealed to affect neural functions as well as chronic diseases such as cancer, cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases, and allergic hyper-reactivity. In this review, we focused on the pathophysiological effects of n-6 and n-3 fatty acids on brain functions. Long-term n-3 fatty acid deficiency in the presence of n-6 fatty acids has been shown to affect learning behavior, drug sensitivity and retinal functions. Some membrane enzymes and ion channel functions have been shown in experimental animals to be regulated by membrane fatty acid modifications. We also summarized the effects of these fatty acids in diets on human psychotic aspects and brain diseases. Although biochemical mechanisms remain to be elucidated, investigations on the effect of dietary fatty acids on neural networks may provide an important clue to clarify complex brain functions.

  4. Sex differences in neural efficiency: Are they due to the stereotype threat effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Beate; Benedek, Mathias; Bergner, Sabine; Athenstaedt, Ursula; Neubauer, Aljoscha C

    2013-10-01

    The neural efficiency hypothesis postulates a more efficient use of brain resources in more intelligent people as compared to less intelligent ones. However, this relationship was found to be moderated by sex and task content. While the phenomenon of neural efficiency was previously supported for men when performing visuo-spatial tasks it occurred for women only when performing verbal tasks. One possible explanation for this finding could be provided by the well-studied phenomenon called stereotype threat. Stereotype threat arises when a negative stereotype of one's own group is made salient and can result in behavior that confirms the stereotype. Overall, 32 boys and 31 girls of varying intellectual ability were tested with a mental rotation task, either under a stereotype exposure or a no-stereotype exposure condition while measuring their EEG. The behavioral results show that an activated negative stereotype not necessarily hampers the performance of girls. Physiologically, a confirmation of the neural efficiency phenomenon was only obtained for boys working under a no-stereotype exposure condition. This result pattern replicates previous findings without threat and thus suggests that sex differences in neural efficiency during visuo-spatial tasks may not be due to the stereotype threat effect.

  5. Prioritizing selection of new elements: on the time-course of the preview effect.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donk, M.

    2005-01-01

    The preview effect demonstrates that if observers in a visual search task are allowed a preview of a subset of elements before another subset of new elements is added, the first subset of elements does no longer compete for attentional selection. The aim of the present study was to investigate how

  6. Chronic neurobehavioural effects of elemental mercury in dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngim, C H; Foo, S C; Boey, K W; Jeyaratnam, J

    1992-11-01

    Neurobehavioural tests were performed by 98 dentists (mean age 32, range 24-49) exposed to elemental mercury vapour and 54 controls (mean age 34, range 23-50) with no history of occupational exposure to mercury. The dentists were exposed to an average personal air concentration time weighted average (TWA) of 0.014 (range 0.0007-0.042) mg/m3 for a mean period of 5.5 (range 0.7-24) years and had a mean blood mercury concentration of 9.8 (range 0.6-57) micrograms/l. In neurobehavioural tests measuring motor speed (finger tapping), visual scanning (trail making), visuomotor coordination and concentration (digit symbol), verbal memory (digit span, logical memory delayed recall), visual memory (visual reproduction, immediate and delayed recall), and visuomotor coordination speed (bender-gestalt time), the performance of the dentists was significantly worse than that of the controls. The dentists scored 3.9 to 38.9% (mean 13.9%) worse in these tests. In trail making, digit span, logical memory delayed recall, visual reproduction delayed recall, and bender-gestalt time test scores were more than 10% poorer. In each of the tests in which significant differences were found and in the block design time, the performance decreased as the exposed dose (product of the TWA of air mercury concentrations and the years of exposure) increased. These results raise the question as to whether the current threshold limit value of 0.050 mg/m3 (TWA) provides adequate protection against adverse effects of mercury.

  7. Effect of industrial residue combinations on availability of elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brännvall, Evelina, E-mail: evelina.brannvall@ltu.se [Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Zamora, Carles Belmonte [Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Sjöblom, Rolf [Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Tekedo AB, Spinnarvägen 10, 611 37 Nyköping (Sweden); Kumpiene, Jurate [Waste Science and Technology, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Beneficial combination of fly ash and biosolids. • Nutrient availability increase. • Potentially toxic element availability decrease. • Measured element availability was differed from the calculated leaching potential. - Abstract: Industrial residues, such as fly ashes and biosolids, contain elements (e.g., N, P, K, S, Ca and Zn) that make them a viable alternative for synthetic fertilizers in forestry and agriculture. However, the use of these materials is often limited due to the presence of potentially toxic substances. It is therefore necessary to assess and, when warranted, modify the chemical and physical form of these and similar waste materials before any advantages are taken of their beneficial properties. Biofuel fly ash, municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash, biosolids, peat, peat residues and gypsum board waste were combined in various proportions, and this resulted in increased leaching of N, P, S, Cu and Mn, but decreased leaching of Ca, K, Mg, Cr, Fe, Ni, Zn, Al, As and Pb. Chemical fractionation revealed that elements Ca, K, Mg, S and Mn were predominantly exchangeable, while the rest of the elements were less mobile. Cadmium was mostly exchangeable in MSWI fly ash, but less mobile in biofuel fly ash mixtures. Recycling of MSWI fly ash in the mixtures with fertilizers is considerably less attractive, due to the high levels of salts and exchangeable Cd.

  8. Neural Mechanisms of Exercise: Effects on Gut Miccrobiota and Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Paes,Flávia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Machado, Sergio; Sá Filho, Alberto Souza de

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota is a set of microorganisms resident in gut ecosystem that reacts to psychological stressful stimuli, and is involved in depressed or anxious status in both animals and human being. Interestingly, a series of studies have shown the effects of physical exercise on gut microbiota dynamics, suggesting that gut microbiota regulation might act as one mediator for the effects of exercise on the brain. Recent studies found that gut microbiota dynamics are also regulated by metabolism chang...

  9. Effect of Heterogeneity on Decorrelation Mechanisms in Spiking Neural Networks: A Neuromorphic-Hardware Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Pfeil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High-level brain function, such as memory, classification, or reasoning, can be realized by means of recurrent networks of simplified model neurons. Analog neuromorphic hardware constitutes a fast and energy-efficient substrate for the implementation of such neural computing architectures in technical applications and neuroscientific research. The functional performance of neural networks is often critically dependent on the level of correlations in the neural activity. In finite networks, correlations are typically inevitable due to shared presynaptic input. Recent theoretical studies have shown that inhibitory feedback, abundant in biological neural networks, can actively suppress these shared-input correlations and thereby enable neurons to fire nearly independently. For networks of spiking neurons, the decorrelating effect of inhibitory feedback has so far been explicitly demonstrated only for homogeneous networks of neurons with linear subthreshold dynamics. Theory, however, suggests that the effect is a general phenomenon, present in any system with sufficient inhibitory feedback, irrespective of the details of the network structure or the neuronal and synaptic properties. Here, we investigate the effect of network heterogeneity on correlations in sparse, random networks of inhibitory neurons with nonlinear, conductance-based synapses. Emulations of these networks on the analog neuromorphic-hardware system Spikey allow us to test the efficiency of decorrelation by inhibitory feedback in the presence of hardware-specific heterogeneities. The configurability of the hardware substrate enables us to modulate the extent of heterogeneity in a systematic manner. We selectively study the effects of shared input and recurrent connections on correlations in membrane potentials and spike trains. Our results confirm that shared-input correlations are actively suppressed by inhibitory feedback also in highly heterogeneous networks exhibiting broad

  10. Neural Mechanisms of Exercise: Effects on Gut Miccrobiota and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Paes, Flávia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Machado, Sergio; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota is a set of microorganisms resident in gut ecosystem that reacts to psychological stressful stimuli, and is involved in depressed or anxious status in both animals and human being. Interestingly, a series of studies have shown the effects of physical exercise on gut microbiota dynamics, suggesting that gut microbiota regulation might act as one mediator for the effects of exercise on the brain. Recent studies found that gut microbiota dynamics are also regulated by metabolism changes, such as through physical exercise or diet change. Interestingly, physical exercise modulates different population of gut bacteria in compared to food restriction or rich diet, and alleviates gut syndromes to toxin intake. Gut microbiota could as well contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise on cognition and emotion, either directly through serotonin signaling or indirectly by modulating metabolism and exercise performance.

  11. Disrupting morphosyntactic and lexical semantic processing has opposite effects on the sample entropy of neural signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, André; Boboeva, Vezha; Brederoo, Sanne; Baggio, Giosuè

    2015-04-16

    Converging evidence in neuroscience suggests that syntax and semantics are dissociable in brain space and time. However, it is possible that partly disjoint cortical networks, operating in successive time frames, still perform similar types of neural computations. To test the alternative hypothesis, we collected EEG data while participants read sentences containing lexical semantic or morphosyntactic anomalies, resulting in N400 and P600 effects, respectively. Next, we reconstructed phase space trajectories from EEG time series, and we measured the complexity of the resulting dynamical orbits using sample entropy - an index of the rate at which the system generates or loses information over time. Disrupting morphosyntactic or lexical semantic processing had opposite effects on sample entropy: it increased in the N400 window for semantic anomalies, and it decreased in the P600 window for morphosyntactic anomalies. These findings point to a fundamental divergence in the neural computations supporting meaning and grammar in language. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural inhibition during maximal eccentric and concentric quadriceps contraction: effects of resistance training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Per; Simonsen, E.B.; Andersen, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    neuromuscular activation, muscle strength, neural efferent drive, eccentric activation deficiency, force inhibition......neuromuscular activation, muscle strength, neural efferent drive, eccentric activation deficiency, force inhibition...

  13. EFFECTS OF NEURAL MOBILIZATION IN POSTERIOR MYOFASCIAL CHAIN FLEXIBILITY IN NORMAL SUBJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Stuti Sharma; Shiv Kumar Verma; Vaibhav Agarwal

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this research is to see the effectiveness of neural mobilization on posterior myofascial chain flexibility. Methodology: Samples of 70 subjects were recruited for the study. Pre mobilization readings for finger floor distance, tibiotarsal angle and finger floor grades were taken for each individual, after whom slump mobilization was given and post mobilization readings were again taken in the same sequence after mobilization. Results: Both finger floor di...

  14. The Effects of Spaceflight on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Rachael D.; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott; Mason, Sara; Mulavara, Ajit; Kofman, Igor; De Dios, Yiri; Gadd, Nicole; Stepanyan, Vahagn; Szecsy, Darcy

    2017-01-01

    Spaceflight effects on gait, balance, & manual motor control have been well studied; some evidence for cognitive deficits. Rodent cortical motor & sensory systems show neural structural alterations with spaceflight. We found extensive changes in behavior, brain structure & brain function following 70 days of HDBR. Specific Aim: Aim 1-Identify changes in brain structure, function, and network integrity as a function of spaceflight and characterize their time course. Aim 2-Specify relationships between structural and functional brain changes and performance and characterize their time course.

  15. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effects of alloying elements on strength, hardenability, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They were then air cooled before being cold rolled to ~0.9mm and annealed. Dual phase heat treatment was carried out at 755oC followed by quenching in water. Tensile and hardenability tests were carried out. Results showed that alloying elements in steel increased strength in the dual phase steels by amounts ranging ...

  17. Effects of quenching and partial quenching on penguin matrix elements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golterman, Maarten; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2001-01-01

    In the calculation of non-leptonic weak decay rates, a "mismatch" arises when the QCD evolution of the relevant weak hamiltonian down to hadronic scales is performed in unquenched QCD, but the hadronic matrix elements are then computed in (partially) quenched lattice QCD. This mismatch arises

  18. Effect of Processing on the Elemental Composition of Selected Leafy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The elemental composition of leaves of Vernonia amygdalina, Gnetum africana, Gongronema latifolium and Ocimum gratissimum subjected to different processing methods were investigated. Processing methods employed include oven drying, sun drying, fresh milling, steaming and a combination of these while the mineral ...

  19. Experimental investigation of system effects in stressed-skin elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela Stang, B.; Isaksson, T.; Hansson, M.

    What kind of behaviour can be expected from stressed-skin elements at failure? To answer this question was a primary objective of the experimental investigation presented in this report. Systems of 3 roof units, each made of 5 parallel beams, have been tested for load-carrying capacity...

  20. The Effects of Leptin Replacement on Neural Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Gilberto J. Paz-Filho

    2016-01-01

    Leptin, an adipokine synthesized and secreted mainly by the adipose tissue, has multiple effects on the regulation of food intake, energy expenditure, and metabolism. Its recently-approved analogue, metreleptin, has been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with leptin deficiency due to mutations in the leptin gene, lipodystrophy syndromes, and hypothalamic amenorrhea. In such patients, leptin replacement therapy has led to changes in brain structure and function in intr...

  1. Evolving artificial neural networks for cross-adaptive audio effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jordal, Iver

    2017-01-01

    Cross-adaptive audio effects have many applications within music technology, including for automatic mixing and live music. Commonly used methods of signal analysis capture the acoustical and mathematical features of the signal well, but struggle to capture the musical meaning. Together with the vast number of possible signal interactions, this makes manual exploration of signal interactions difficult and tedious. This project investigates Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for finding usef...

  2. Temperature Effect on Capacitive Humidity Sensors and its Compensation Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarikul ISLAM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the study of the effect of temperature on different capacitive humidity sensors used in practice. Capacitance of the humidity sensor, which is a function of concentration of water vapor, also depends on ambient temperature. This variation of ambient temperature causes error in the performance of sensor outputs and its compensation is essential. In this paper, we have used an artificial neural network to compensate the effect of ambient temperature error. The proposed artificial neural network technique is based on inverse model of the sensor. The technique is applicable for compensation of linear or nonlinear temperature effect of humidity sensor. It can also compensate the nonlinearity of the capacitive humidity response which is an issue for all most all types of humidity sensor. Our simulation studies show the sensor output and artificial neural network model output matches closely. Even though sensor characteristics change with temperature, the proposed model performs well irrespective of any change in temperature. It can be extended for the temperature compensation of other sensors. The maximum error for nonlinearity using the ANN technique are 0.2 % and temperature error of 0.08 % for temperature range between 10 0C to 60 0C of Sensor 3 and 0.01 % for temperature range between 25 0C to 85 0C of Sensor 4 respectively.

  3. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  4. The effects of dynamical synapses on firing rate activity: a spiking neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Radwa; Moftah, Marie Z; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2017-11-01

    Accumulating evidence relates the fine-tuning of synaptic maturation and regulation of neural network activity to several key factors, including GABA A signaling and a lateral spread length between neighboring neurons (i.e., local connectivity). Furthermore, a number of studies consider short-term synaptic plasticity (STP) as an essential element in the instant modification of synaptic efficacy in the neuronal network and in modulating responses to sustained ranges of external Poisson input frequency (IF). Nevertheless, evaluating the firing activity in response to the dynamical interaction between STP (triggered by ranges of IF) and these key parameters in vitro remains elusive. Therefore, we designed a spiking neural network (SNN) model in which we incorporated the following parameters: local density of arbor essences and a lateral spread length between neighboring neurons. We also created several network scenarios based on these key parameters. Then, we implemented two classes of STP: (1) short-term synaptic depression (STD) and (2) short-term synaptic facilitation (STF). Each class has two differential forms based on the parametric value of its synaptic time constant (either for depressing or facilitating synapses). Lastly, we compared the neural firing responses before and after the treatment with STP. We found that dynamical synapses (STP) have a critical differential role on evaluating and modulating the firing rate activity in each network scenario. Moreover, we investigated the impact of changing the balance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I) on stabilizing this firing activity. © 2017 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Neural correlates of testing effects in vocabulary learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broek, Gesa S E; Takashima, Atsuko; Segers, Eliane; Fernández, Guillén; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2013-09-01

    Tests that require memory retrieval strongly improve long-term retention in comparison to continued studying. For example, once learners know the translation of a word, restudy practice, during which they see the word and its translation again, is less effective than testing practice, during which they see only the word and retrieve the translation from memory. In the present functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated the neuro-cognitive mechanisms underlying this striking testing effect. Twenty-six young adults without prior knowledge of Swahili learned the translation of 100 Swahili words and then further practiced the words in an fMRI scanner by restudying or by testing. Recall of the translations on a final memory test after one week was significantly better and faster for tested words than for restudied words. Brain regions that were more active during testing than during restudying included the left inferior frontal gyrus, ventral striatum, and midbrain areas. Increased activity in the left inferior parietal and left middle temporal areas during testing but not during restudying predicted better recall on the final memory test. Together, results suggest that testing may be more beneficial than restudying due to processes related to targeted semantic elaboration and selective strengthening of associations between retrieval cues and relevant responses, and may involve increased effortful cognitive control and modulations of memory through striatal motivation and reward circuits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Neural correlates of the numerical distance effect in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eMussolin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In number comparison tasks, the performance is better when the distance between the two numbers to compare increases. During development this so-called numerical distance effect decreases with age and the neuroanatomical correlates of these age-related changes are poorly known. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we recorded the brain activity changes in children aged from 8 to 14 years while they performed a number comparison task on pairs of Arabic digits and a control colour comparison task on non-numerical symbols. On the one hand, we observed developmental changes in the recruitment of frontal regions and the left intraparietal sulcus, with lower activation as the age increased. On the other hand, we found that a behavioural index of selective sensitivity to the numerical distance effect was positively correlated with higher brain activity in a right lateralized occipito-temporo-parietal network including the intraparietal sulcus. This leads us to propose that the left intraparietal sulcus would be engaged in the refinement of cognitive processes involved in number comparison during development, while the right intraparietal sulcus would underlie the semantic representation of numbers and its activation would be mainly affected by the numerical proximity between them.

  7. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miconi, Thomas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-01-01

    Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space...

  8. Q-value effects in the synthesis of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graeger, Reimar

    2010-07-02

    Superheavy elements (Z>or similar 104) only exist due to nuclear shell effects, which stabilize them against spontaneous fission (SF). Theoretical calculations predict these shell stabilization effects to reach a maximum at the closures of the next spherical proton and neutron shells, which are anticipated in the region between Z=114 and Z=126 and at N=184. More recent calculations, that also consider deformed nuclear shapes extended this picture and predicted deformed shell closures at Z=108 and at N=162, creating a region of enhanced stability around {sup 270}Hs, confirmed in recent Hs chemistry experiments by measuring the decay of {sup 270}Hs for the first time. Recently, the formation of deformed doubly-magic {sup 270}Hs in the 4n evaporation channel in the fusion reactions {sup 248}Cm({sup 26}Mg,4n), {sup 244}Pu({sup 30}Si,4n), {sup 238}U({sup 36}S,4n), and {sup 226}Ra({sup 48}Ca,4n) was studied theoretically using a two-parameter Smoluchowski equation. Simple entrance channel arguments make compound nucleus (CN) formation appear favorable for systems with larger mass asymmetry. However, due to a lower reaction Q value, the reactions {sup 238}U({sup 36}S,4n){sup 270}Hs and {sup 226}Ra({sup 48}Ca,4n){sup 270}Hs are predicted to have higher cross sections compared to the reactions {sup 248}Cm({sup 26}Mg,4n){sup 270}Hs and {sup 244}Pu({sup 30}Si,4n){sup 270}Hs. The aim of the research done in the framework of this thesis was to study the influence of the reaction (B-Q)-value on the yield of SHE produced in nuclear fusion reactions. Therefore the most promising reactions {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 226}Ra have been investigated and compared with the already measured reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm. The reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U was investigated at two beam energies. One correlated decay chain attributed to {sup 270}Hs was found at E{sup *}=51 MeV resulting in a cross section of 0.8{sub -0.7}{sup +2.6} pb. The reaction {sup 48}Ca+{sup 226}Ra was

  9. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghadir AH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad H Alghadir,1 Sami A Gabr,1,2 Einas Al-Eisa11Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptBackground: Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and zinc (Zn demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults.Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults.Methods: A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45, moderate (n=30, and severe (n=25. Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA, serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively.Results: Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45 had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55 had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92 and severe (score 31–62. There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01 and moderate (P=0.01 cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural

  10. Effect of Explicit Evaluation on Neural Connectivity Related to Listening to Unfamiliar Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Brattico, Elvira; Abu-Jamous, Basel

    2017-01-01

    People can experience different emotions when listening to music. A growing number of studies have investigated the brain structures and neural connectivities associated with perceived emotions. However, very little is known about the effect of an explicit act of judgment on the neural processing...... of emotionally-valenced music. In this study, we adopted the novel consensus clustering paradigm, called binarisation of consensus partition matrices (Bi-CoPaM), to study whether and how the conscious aesthetic evaluation of the music would modulate brain connectivity networks related to emotion and reward...... processing. Participants listened to music under three conditions - one involving a non-evaluative judgment, one involving an explicit evaluative aesthetic judgment, and one involving no judgment at all (passive listening only). During non-evaluative attentive listening we obtained auditory...

  11. Effect of inhibitory firing pattern on coherence resonance in random neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Zhang, Lianghao; Guo, Xinmeng; Wang, Jiang; Cao, Yibin; Liu, Jing

    2018-01-01

    The effect of inhibitory firing patterns on coherence resonance (CR) in random neuronal network is systematically studied. Spiking and bursting are two main types of firing pattern considered in this work. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the inhibitory firing patterns, the regularity of network is maximized by an optimal intensity of external noise, indicating the occurrence of coherence resonance. Moreover, the firing pattern of inhibitory neuron indeed has a significant influence on coherence resonance, but the efficacy is determined by network property. In the network with strong coupling strength but weak inhibition, bursting neurons largely increase the amplitude of resonance, while they can decrease the noise intensity that induced coherence resonance within the neural system of strong inhibition. Different temporal windows of inhibition induced by different inhibitory neurons may account for the above observations. The network structure also plays a constructive role in the coherence resonance. There exists an optimal network topology to maximize the regularity of the neural systems.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of mobile phones on the neural tube development of chick embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Ahmet Sukru; Yaldiz, Can; Bursali, Adem; Umur, Nurcan; Kara, Burcu; Barutcuoglu, Mustafa; Vatansever, Seda; Selcuki, Deniz; Selcuki, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the effects of radiation of mobile phones on developing neural tissue of chick embryos. There were 4 study groups. All Groups were placed in equal distance, from the mobile phones. Serial sections were taken from each Group to study the neural tube segments. The TUNEL results were statistically significant (p negative in the 48 and 72 hours in the Control Group, had moderate activity in the third Group 3, weak activity in the 48 hour, and was negative in the 72 hour in other groups. Caspase-9 immunoreactivity was weak in Group 1, 2 and 3 at 30 hours and was negative in Group 1 and 4 at 48 and 72 hours. Caspase-9 activity in the third Group was weak in all three stages. Electromagnetic radiation emitted by mobile phones caused developmental delay in chick embryos in early period. This finding suggests that the use of mobile phones by pregnant women may pose risks.

  13. Neural Correlates of the False Consensus Effect: Evidence for Motivated Projection and Regulatory Restraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welborn, B Locke; Gunter, Benjamin C; Vezich, I Stephanie; Lieberman, Matthew D

    2017-04-01

    The false consensus effect (FCE), the tendency to project our attitudes and opinions on to others, is a pervasive bias in social reasoning with a range of ramifications for individuals and society. Research in social psychology has suggested that numerous factors (anchoring and adjustment, accessibility, motivated projection, etc.) may contribute to the FCE. In this study, we examine the neural correlates of the FCE and provide evidence that motivated projection plays a significant role. Activity in reward regions (ventromedial pFC and bilateral nucleus accumbens) during consensus estimation was positively associated with bias, whereas activity in right ventrolateral pFC (implicated in emotion regulation) was inversely associated with bias. Activity in reward and regulatory regions accounted for half of the total variation in consensus bias across participants (R 2 = .503). This research complements models of the FCE in social psychology, providing a glimpse into the neural mechanisms underlying this important phenomenon.

  14. Differential effects of perturbation direction and magnitude on the neural processing of voice pitch feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjun; Meshman, Michelle; Behroozmand, Roozbeh; Larson, Charles R

    2011-05-01

    The present study examined the differential effects of voice auditory feedback perturbation direction and magnitude on voice fundamental frequency (F(0)) responses and event-related potentials (ERPs) from EEG electrodes on the scalp. The voice F(0) responses and N1 and P2 components of ERPs were examined from 12 right-handed speakers when they sustained a vowel phonation and their mid-utterance voice pitch feedback was shifted ±100, ±200, and ±500 cents with 200 ms duration. Downward voice pitch feedback perturbations led to larger voice F(0) responses than upward perturbations. The amplitudes of N1 and P2 components were larger for downward compared with upward pitch-shifts for 200 and 500 cents stimulus magnitudes. Shorter N1 and P2 latencies were also associated with larger magnitudes of pitch feedback perturbations. Corresponding changes in vocal and neural responses to upward and downward voice pitch feedback perturbations suggest that the N1 and P2 components of ERPs reflect neural concomitants of the vocal responses. The findings of interactive effects between the magnitude and direction of voice feedback pitch perturbation on N1 and P2 ERP components indicate that the neural mechanisms underlying error detection and correction in voice pitch auditory feedback are differentially sensitive to both the magnitude and direction of pitch perturbations. Copyright © 2010 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    KAUST Repository

    Webber, Matthew A

    2013-03-12

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave. © 2013 IOP Publishing Ltd and SISSA Medialab srl.

  16. The effects of noise on binocular rivalry waves: a stochastic neural field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Matthew A.; Bressloff, Paul C.

    2013-03-01

    We analyze the effects of extrinsic noise on traveling waves of visual perception in a competitive neural field model of binocular rivalry. The model consists of two one-dimensional excitatory neural fields, whose activity variables represent the responses to left-eye and right-eye stimuli, respectively. The two networks mutually inhibit each other, and slow adaptation is incorporated into the model by taking the network connections to exhibit synaptic depression. We first show how, in the absence of any noise, the system supports a propagating composite wave consisting of an invading activity front in one network co-moving with a retreating front in the other network. Using a separation of time scales and perturbation methods previously developed for stochastic reaction-diffusion equations, we then show how extrinsic noise in the activity variables leads to a diffusive-like displacement (wandering) of the composite wave from its uniformly translating position at long time scales, and fluctuations in the wave profile around its instantaneous position at short time scales. We use our analysis to calculate the first-passage-time distribution for a stochastic rivalry wave to travel a fixed distance, which we find to be given by an inverse Gaussian. Finally, we investigate the effects of noise in the depression variables, which under an adiabatic approximation lead to quenched disorder in the neural fields during propagation of a wave.

  17. Effect of alloy elements on the anti-corrosion properties of low alloy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Effect of alloy elements on corrosion of low alloy steel was studied under simulated offshore condi- tions. The results showed that the elements Cu, P, Mo, W, V had evident effect on corrosion resistance in the atmosphere zone; Cu, P, V, Mo in the splash zone and Cr, Al, Mo in the submerged zone. Keywords.

  18. Effect of Explicit Evaluation on Neural Connectivity Related to Listening to Unfamiliar Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Brattico, Elvira; Abu-jamous, Basel; Pereira, Carlos S.; Jacobsen, Thomas; Nandi, Asoke K.

    2017-01-01

    People can experience different emotions when listening to music. A growing number of studies have investigated the brain structures and neural connectivities associated with perceived emotions. However, very little is known about the effect of an explicit act of judgment on the neural processing of emotionally-valenced music. In this study, we adopted the novel consensus clustering paradigm, called binarisation of consensus partition matrices (Bi-CoPaM), to study whether and how the conscious aesthetic evaluation of the music would modulate brain connectivity networks related to emotion and reward processing. Participants listened to music under three conditions – one involving a non-evaluative judgment, one involving an explicit evaluative aesthetic judgment, and one involving no judgment at all (passive listening only). During non-evaluative attentive listening we obtained auditory-limbic connectivity whereas when participants were asked to decide explicitly whether they liked or disliked the music excerpt, only two clusters of intercommunicating brain regions were found: one including areas related to auditory processing and action observation, and the other comprising higher-order structures involved with visual processing. Results indicate that explicit evaluative judgment has an impact on the neural auditory-limbic connectivity during affective processing of music. PMID:29311874

  19. Effect of Explicit Evaluation on Neural Connectivity Related to Listening to Unfamiliar Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available People can experience different emotions when listening to music. A growing number of studies have investigated the brain structures and neural connectivities associated with perceived emotions. However, very little is known about the effect of an explicit act of judgment on the neural processing of emotionally-valenced music. In this study, we adopted the novel consensus clustering paradigm, called binarisation of consensus partition matrices (Bi-CoPaM, to study whether and how the conscious aesthetic evaluation of the music would modulate brain connectivity networks related to emotion and reward processing. Participants listened to music under three conditions – one involving a non-evaluative judgment, one involving an explicit evaluative aesthetic judgment, and one involving no judgment at all (passive listening only. During non-evaluative attentive listening we obtained auditory-limbic connectivity whereas when participants were asked to decide explicitly whether they liked or disliked the music excerpt, only two clusters of intercommunicating brain regions were found: one including areas related to auditory processing and action observation, and the other comprising higher-order structures involved with visual processing. Results indicate that explicit evaluative judgment has an impact on the neural auditory-limbic connectivity during affective processing of music.

  20. Effects and mechanisms of melatonin on neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Tao; Wu, Tao; Pang, Mao; Liu, Chang; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Juan; Liu, Bin; Rong, Limin

    2016-06-03

    Melatonin, a lipophilic molecule mainly synthesized in the pineal gland, has properties of antioxidation, anti-inflammation, and antiapoptosis to improve neuroprotective functions. Here, we investigate effects and mechanisms of melatonin on neural differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). iPSCs were induced into neural stem cells (NSCs), then further differentiated into neurons in medium with or without melatonin, melatonin receptor antagonist (Luzindole) or Phosphatidylinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (LY294002). Melatonin significantly promoted the number of neurospheres and cell viability. In addition, Melatonin markedly up-regulated gene and protein expression of Nestin and MAP2. However, Luzindole or LY294002 attenuated these increase. The expression of pAKT/AKT were increased by Melatonin, while Luzindole or LY294002 declined these melatonin-induced increase. These results suggest that melatonin significantly increased neural differentiation of iPSCs via activating PI3K/AKT signaling pathway through melatonin receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of Spike Anticipation on the Spiking Dynamics of Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel ede Santos-Sierra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Synchronization is one of the central phenomena involved in information processing in living systems. It is known that the nervous system requires the coordinated activity of both local and distant neural populations. Such an interplay allows to merge different information modalities in a whole processing supporting high-level mental skills as understanding, memory, abstraction, etc. Though the biological processes underlying synchronization in the brain are not fully understood there have been reported a variety of mechanisms supporting different types of synchronization both at theoretical and experimental level. One of the more intriguing of these phenomena is the anticipating synchronization, which has been recently reported in a pair of unidirectionally coupled artificial neurons under simple conditions cite{Pyragas}, where the slave neuron is able to anticipate in time the behaviour of the master one. In this paper we explore the effect of spike anticipation over the information processing performed by a neural network at functional and structural level. We show that the introduction of intermediary neurons in the network enhances spike anticipation and analyse how these variations in spike anticipation can significantly change the firing regime of the neural network according to its functional and structural properties. In addition we show that the interspike interval (ISI, one of the main features of the neural response associated to the information coding, can be closely related to spike anticipation by each spike, and how synaptic plasticity can be modulated through that relationship. This study has been performed through numerical simulation of a coupled system of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons.

  2. The Effects of Spaceflight and a Spaceflight Analog on Neurocognitive Perfonnance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, R. D.; Mulavara, A. P.; Koppelmans, V.; Erdeniz, B.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Szecsy, D. L.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    We are conducting ongoing experiments in which we are performing structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging to identify the relationships between changes in neurocognitive function and neural structural alterations following a six month International Space Station mission and following 70 days exposure to a spaceflight analog, head down tilt bedrest. Our central hypothesis is that measures of brain structure, function, and network integrity will change from pre to post intervention (spaceflight, bedrest). Moreover, we predict that these changes will correlate with indices of cognitive, sensory, and motor function in a neuroanatomically selective fashion. Our interdisciplinary approach utilizes cutting edge neuroimaging techniques and a broad ranging battery of sensory, motor, and cognitive assessments that will be conducted pre flight, during flight, and post flight to investigate potential neuroplastic and maladaptive brain changes in crewmembers following long-duration spaceflight. Success in this endeavor would 1) result in identification of the underlying neural mechanisms and operational risks of spaceflight-induced changes in behavior, and 2) identify whether a return to normative behavioral function following re-adaptation to Earth's gravitational environment is associated with a restitution of brain structure and function or instead is supported by substitution with compensatory brain processes. With the bedrest study, we will be able to determine the neural and neurocognitive effects of extended duration unloading, reduced sensory inputs, and increased cephalic fluid distribution. This will enable us to parse out the multiple mechanisms contributing to any spaceflight-induced neural structural and behavioral changes that we observe in the flight study. In this presentation I will discuss preliminary results from six participants who have undergone the bed rest protocol. These individuals show decrements in balance and functional mobility

  3. The effects of inhibitory control training for preschoolers on reasoning ability and neural activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qian; Zhu, Xinyi; Ziegler, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children in the trai......Inhibitory control (including response inhibition and interference control) develops rapidly during the preschool period and is important for early cognitive development. This study aimed to determine the training and transfer effects on response inhibition in young children. Children....... Furthermore, gender differences in the training-induced changes in neural activity were found in preschoolers....

  4. Effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation on ultrastructure of rats’ hippocampal neural stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-shui LUO; Wei-hua CHU; Zi-bing WAN; Sheng-li HU; Rong HU; Nan WU; Bo HU; Hua FENG; Gang ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 900MHz electromagnetic radiation on the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro in order to provide basic materials for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic wave on the central nervous system. Methods Rat NSCs were divided into sham group, Radi1 group and Radi2 group, and they were respectively exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic wave at power density of 0, 1, and 3mW/cm2 in vitro. Cells in Radi1 group and Radi2 g...

  5. Effects of Oxytocin on Neural Response to Facial Expressions in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Na Young; Park, Hye Yoon; Jung, Wi Hoon; Park, Jin Woo; Yun, Je-Yeon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Hyun Jung; Kim, So-Yeon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-07-01

    Impaired facial emotion recognition is a core deficit in schizophrenia. Oxytocin has been shown to improve social perception in patients with schizophrenia; however, the effect of oxytocin on the neural activity underlying facial emotion recognition has not been investigated. This study was aimed to assess the effect of a single dose of intranasal oxytocin on brain activity in patients with schizophrenia using an implicit facial emotion-recognition paradigm. Sixteen male patients with schizophrenia and 16 age-matched healthy male control subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial at Seoul National University Hospital. Delivery of a single dose of 40 IU intranasal oxytocin and the placebo was separated by 1 week. Drug conditions were compared by performing a region of interest (ROI) analysis of the bilateral amygdala on responses to the emotion recognition test. It was found that nasal spray decreased amygdala activity for fearful emotion and increased activity for happy faces. Further, oxytocin elicited differential effects between the patient and control groups. Intranasal oxytocin attenuated amygdala activity for emotional faces in patients with schizophrenia, whereas intranasal oxytocin significantly increased amygdala activity in healthy controls. Oxytocin-induced BOLD signal changes in amygdala in response to happy faces was related to attachment style in the control group. Our result provides new evidence of a modulatory effect of oxytocin on neural response to emotional faces for patients with schizophrenia. Future studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of long-term treatment with intranasal oxytocin on neural activity in patients with schizophrenia.

  6. Investigating Effects of Screen Layout Elements on Interface and Screen Design Aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamed Altaboli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study suggested the use of the screen layout elements of balance, unity, and sequence as a part of a computational model of interface aesthetics. It is argued that these three elements are the most contributed terms in the model. In the current study, a controlled experiment was designed and conducted to systematically investigate effects of these three elements (balance, unity, and sequence on the perceived interface aesthetics. Results showed that the three elements have significant effects on the perceived interface aesthetics. Significant interactions were also found among the three elements. A regression model relating the perceived visual aesthetics to the three elements was constructed. When validating the model using standard questionnaire scores of real web pages, high correlations were found between the values computed by the model and scores of questionnaire items related to visual layout of the web pages, indicating that layout-based measures are good at assessing the classical dimension of website aesthetics.

  7. Effects of radiofrequency exposure emitted from a GSM mobile phone on proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eghlidospour, Mahsa; Ghanbari, Amir; Mortazavi, Seyyed Mohammad Javad; Azari, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Due to the importance of neural stem cells (NSCs) in plasticity of the nervous system and treating neurodegenerative diseases, the main goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiofrequency radiation emitted from a GSM 900-MHz mobile phone with different exposure duration on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of adult murine NSCs in vitro. We used neurosphere assay to evaluate NSCs proliferation, and immunofluorescence assay of neural cell markers to examine NSCs differen...

  8. [Physiological effects of rare earth elements and their application in traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Guo, Lanping; Xiao, Wenjuan; Geng, Yanling; Wang, Xiao; Shi, Xin'gang; Dan, Staerk

    2012-08-01

    The process in the studies on physiological effects of rare earth elements in plants and their action mechanisms were summarized in the aspects of seed germination, photosynthesis, mineral metabolism and stress resistance. And the applications of rare earth elements in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in recent years were also overviewed, which will provide reference for further development and application of rare earth elements in TCM.

  9. Entrance channel effects in superheavy element production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasirov Avazbek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The difference between evaporation residue cross sections measured in the cold (X+208Pb, 209Bi and hot (48Ca+actinides fusion reactions can be related to the stage of compound nucleus (CN formation and/or to the stage of its survival against fission. The cold fusion reactions are favorable in synthesis of the superheavy elements (SHE with charge numbers Z < 112 in comparison with the hot fusion reactions due to small excitation energy and large fission barrier of the CN formed in these reactions. The strong decrease of the cross sections of the synthesis of the SHE Z = 113 in the cold fusion reactions in comparison with the ones in the hot fusion reactions is the result of the increase of hindrance to the CN formation in the cold fusion reactions. The origin of the intrinsic fusion barrier, B*fus, causing the strong decrease of the probability PCN in the cold fusion is discussed.

  10. Effective visual working memory capacity: an emergent effect from the neural dynamics in an attractor network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Dempere-Marco

    Full Text Available The study of working memory capacity is of outmost importance in cognitive psychology as working memory is at the basis of general cognitive function. Although the working memory capacity limit has been thoroughly studied, its origin still remains a matter of strong debate. Only recently has the role of visual saliency in modulating working memory storage capacity been assessed experimentally and proved to provide valuable insights into working memory function. In the computational arena, attractor networks have successfully accounted for psychophysical and neurophysiological data in numerous working memory tasks given their ability to produce a sustained elevated firing rate during a delay period. Here we investigate the mechanisms underlying working memory capacity by means of a biophysically-realistic attractor network with spiking neurons while accounting for two recent experimental observations: 1 the presence of a visually salient item reduces the number of items that can be held in working memory, and 2 visually salient items are commonly kept in memory at the cost of not keeping as many non-salient items. Our model suggests that working memory capacity is determined by two fundamental processes: encoding of visual items into working memory and maintenance of the encoded items upon their removal from the visual display. While maintenance critically depends on the constraints that lateral inhibition imposes to the mnemonic activity, encoding is limited by the ability of the stimulated neural assemblies to reach a sufficiently high level of excitation, a process governed by the dynamics of competition and cooperation among neuronal pools. Encoding is therefore contingent upon the visual working memory task and has led us to introduce the concept of effective working memory capacity (eWMC in contrast to the maximal upper capacity limit only reached under ideal conditions.

  11. Effective Visual Working Memory Capacity: An Emergent Effect from the Neural Dynamics in an Attractor Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempere-Marco, Laura; Melcher, David P.; Deco, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The study of working memory capacity is of outmost importance in cognitive psychology as working memory is at the basis of general cognitive function. Although the working memory capacity limit has been thoroughly studied, its origin still remains a matter of strong debate. Only recently has the role of visual saliency in modulating working memory storage capacity been assessed experimentally and proved to provide valuable insights into working memory function. In the computational arena, attractor networks have successfully accounted for psychophysical and neurophysiological data in numerous working memory tasks given their ability to produce a sustained elevated firing rate during a delay period. Here we investigate the mechanisms underlying working memory capacity by means of a biophysically-realistic attractor network with spiking neurons while accounting for two recent experimental observations: 1) the presence of a visually salient item reduces the number of items that can be held in working memory, and 2) visually salient items are commonly kept in memory at the cost of not keeping as many non-salient items. Our model suggests that working memory capacity is determined by two fundamental processes: encoding of visual items into working memory and maintenance of the encoded items upon their removal from the visual display. While maintenance critically depends on the constraints that lateral inhibition imposes to the mnemonic activity, encoding is limited by the ability of the stimulated neural assemblies to reach a sufficiently high level of excitation, a process governed by the dynamics of competition and cooperation among neuronal pools. Encoding is therefore contingent upon the visual working memory task and has led us to introduce the concept of effective working memory capacity (eWMC) in contrast to the maximal upper capacity limit only reached under ideal conditions. PMID:22952608

  12. Effective visual working memory capacity: an emergent effect from the neural dynamics in an attractor network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempere-Marco, Laura; Melcher, David P; Deco, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    The study of working memory capacity is of outmost importance in cognitive psychology as working memory is at the basis of general cognitive function. Although the working memory capacity limit has been thoroughly studied, its origin still remains a matter of strong debate. Only recently has the role of visual saliency in modulating working memory storage capacity been assessed experimentally and proved to provide valuable insights into working memory function. In the computational arena, attractor networks have successfully accounted for psychophysical and neurophysiological data in numerous working memory tasks given their ability to produce a sustained elevated firing rate during a delay period. Here we investigate the mechanisms underlying working memory capacity by means of a biophysically-realistic attractor network with spiking neurons while accounting for two recent experimental observations: 1) the presence of a visually salient item reduces the number of items that can be held in working memory, and 2) visually salient items are commonly kept in memory at the cost of not keeping as many non-salient items. Our model suggests that working memory capacity is determined by two fundamental processes: encoding of visual items into working memory and maintenance of the encoded items upon their removal from the visual display. While maintenance critically depends on the constraints that lateral inhibition imposes to the mnemonic activity, encoding is limited by the ability of the stimulated neural assemblies to reach a sufficiently high level of excitation, a process governed by the dynamics of competition and cooperation among neuronal pools. Encoding is therefore contingent upon the visual working memory task and has led us to introduce the concept of effective working memory capacity (eWMC) in contrast to the maximal upper capacity limit only reached under ideal conditions.

  13. Neural circuitry of emotion regulation: Effects of appraisal, attention, and cortisol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Sean T; Abelson, James L; Okada, Go; Taylor, Stephan F; Liberzon, Israel

    2017-04-01

    Psychosocial well-being requires effective regulation of emotional responding in context of threat or stress. Neuroimaging studies have focused on instructed, volitional regulation (e.g., reappraisal or distancing), largely ignoring implicit regulation that does not involve purposeful effort to alter emotional experience. These implicit processes may or may not involve the same neural pathways as explicit regulatory strategies. We examined the neurobiology of implicit emotional regulation processes and the impact of the stress hormone cortisol on these processes. Our study task employed composite pictures of faces and places to examine neural activity during implicit emotional processing (of emotional faces), while these responses were implicitly regulated by attention shift away from the emotionally evocative stimuli, and while subjects reflectively appraised their own emotional response to them. Subjects completed the task in an fMRI scanner after random assignment to receive placebo or hydrocortisone (HCT), an orally administered version of cortisol. Implicit emotional processing activated insula/IFG, dACC/dMPFC, midbrain and amygdala. With attention shifting, we saw diminished signal in emotion generating/response regions (e.g., amygdala) and increased activations in task specific attention regions like parahippocampus. With appraisal of emotions, we observed robust activations in medial prefrontal areas, where activation is also seen in instructed reappraisal studies. We observed no main effects of HCT administration on brain, but males and females showed opposing neural effects in prefrontal areas. The data suggest that different types of emotion regulation utilize overlapping circuits, but with some strategy specific activation. Further study of the dimorphic sex response to cortisol is needed.

  14. Effects of age and MAOA genotype on the neural processing of social rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, C L; Roiser, J P; Tan, G C Y; Viding, E; Wood, N W; Blakemore, S-J

    2010-08-01

    Adolescents are often sensitive to peer rejection, a factor that might contribute to the risk of affective disorder in this age group. Previous studies suggest a significant overlap among socioaffective brain regions involved in the response to social rejection, regions continuing to develop functionally during adolescence and regions influenced by monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) polymorphism. The current study investigated whether the neural response to social rejection is functionally immature in adolescents compared with adults, and whether these responses are modulated by MAOA genotype. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent response was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a rejection-themed emotional Stroop task in 19 adolescents (aged 14-16) and 16 adults (aged 23-28) genotyped for MAOA polymorphism. Similar numbers of MAOA-L and MAOA-H carriers were recruited to maximize power to detect genotype effects. Main effects of rejection stimuli (relative to neutral and acceptance control stimuli) were seen in predicted socioaffective brain regions. Adolescents did not show the adult pattern of modulation by rejection stimuli in the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, suggesting continued functional maturation of this regulatory region during adolescence. Age and genotype interacted in the left amygdala, in which the predicted effect of genotype on responses to rejection stimuli was seen in the adults, but not in the adolescents. The data suggest continued functional development of the circuitry underlying the processing of social rejection between adolescence and adulthood, and show that the effects of MAOA genotype on neural responses may vary with age.

  15. Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: A systematic review of reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L.W.H.; Kok, G.; Ten Dam, G.T.M.; Buijs, G.J.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements

  16. Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, L.W.H.; Kok, G.; ten Dam, G.T.M.; Buijs, G.J.; Paulussen, T.G.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements

  17. Effective Simulation of Delamination in Aeronautical Structures Using Shells and Cohesive Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Carlos G.; Camanho, Pedro P.; Turon, Albert

    2007-01-01

    A cohesive element for shell analysis is presented. The element can be used to simulate the initiation and growth of delaminations between stacked, non-coincident layers of shell elements. The procedure to construct the element accounts for the thickness offset by applying the kinematic relations of shell deformation to transform the stiffness and internal force of a zero-thickness cohesive element such that interfacial continuity between the layers is enforced. The procedure is demonstrated by simulating the response and failure of the Mixed Mode Bending test and a skin-stiffener debond specimen. In addition, it is shown that stacks of shell elements can be used to create effective models to predict the inplane and delamination failure modes of thick components. The results indicate that simple shell models can retain many of the necessary predictive attributes of much more complex 3D models while providing the computational efficiency that is necessary for design.

  18. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  19. Prior perceptual processing enhances the effect of emotional arousal on the neural correlates of memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew, Ilana T Z; Ritchey, Maureen; LaBar, Kevin S; Cabeza, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    A fundamental idea in memory research is that items are more likely to be remembered if encoded with a semantic, rather than perceptual, processing strategy. Interestingly, this effect has been shown to reverse for emotionally arousing materials, such that perceptual processing enhances memory for emotional information or events. The current fMRI study investigated the neural mechanisms of this effect by testing how neural activations during emotional memory retrieval are influenced by the prior encoding strategy. Participants incidentally encoded emotional and neutral pictures under instructions to attend to either semantic or perceptual properties of each picture. Recognition memory was tested 2 days later. fMRI analyses yielded three main findings. First, right amygdalar activity associated with emotional memory strength was enhanced by prior perceptual processing. Second, prior perceptual processing of emotional pictures produced a stronger effect on recollection- than familiarity-related activations in the right amygdala and left hippocampus. Finally, prior perceptual processing enhanced amygdalar connectivity with regions strongly associated with retrieval success, including hippocampal/parahippocampal regions, visual cortex, and ventral parietal cortex. Taken together, the results specify how encoding orientations yield alterations in brain systems that retrieve emotional memories. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of multitasking-training on gray matter structure and resting state neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Nouchi, Rui; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Sassa, Yuko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2014-08-01

    Multitasking (MT) constitutes engaging in two or more cognitive activities at the same time. MT-training improves performance on untrained MT tasks and alters the functional activity of the brain during MT. However, the effects of MT-training on neural mechanisms beyond MT-related functions are not known. We investigated the effects of 4 weeks of MT-training on regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and functional connectivity during rest (resting-FC) in young human adults. MT-training was associated with increased rGMV in three prefrontal cortical regions (left lateral rostral prefrontal cortex (PFC), dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), and left inferior frontal junction), the left posterior parietal cortex, and the left temporal and lateral occipital areas as well as decreased resting-FC between the right DLPFC and an anatomical cluster around the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Our findings suggest that participation in MT-training is as a whole associated with task-irrelevant plasticity (i.e., neural changes are not limited to certain specific task conditions) in regions and the network that are assumed to play roles in MT as well as diverse higher-order cognitive functions. We could not dissociate the effects of each task component and the diverse cognitive processes involved in MT because of the nature of the study, and these remain to be investigated. © 2013 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Effects of halobenzoquinone and haloacetic acid water disinfection byproducts on human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Katherine Z; Li, Jinhua; Vemula, Sai; Moe, Birget; Li, Xing-Fang

    2017-08-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) are a useful tool to assess the developmental effects of various environmental contaminants; however, the application of hNSCs to evaluate water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) is scarce. Comprehensive toxicological results are essential to the prioritization of DBPs for further testing and regulation. Therefore, this study examines the effects of DBPs on the proliferation and differentiation of hNSCs. Prior to DBP treatment, characteristic protein markers of hNSCs from passages 3 to 6 were carefully examined and it was determined that hNSCs passaged 3 or 4 times maintained stem cell characteristics and can be used for DBP analysis. Two regulated DBPs, monobromoacetic acid (BAA) and monochloroacetic acid (CAA), and two emerging DBPs, 2,6-dibromo-1,4-benzoquinone (2,6-DBBQ) and 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (2,6-DCBQ), were chosen for hNSC treatment. Both 2,6-DBBQ and 2,6-DCBQ induced cell cycle arrest at S-phase at concentrations up to 1μmol/L. Comparatively, BAA and CAA at 0.5μmol/L affected neural differentiation. These results suggest DBP-dependent effects on hNSC proliferation and differentiation. The DBP-induced cell cycle arrest and inhibition of normal hNSC differentiation demonstrate the need to assess the developmental neurotoxicity of DBPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Effects of rare earth elements on callus growth, soluble protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of lanthanum nitrate (La3+) and cerium nitrate (Ce4+) on Echinacea angustifolia callus growth and subculture were studied by the measurement of callus fresh weight, dry weight and time-course curve. The effects of La3+ on soluble protein content, peroxidase activity and shoot differentiation of callus were also ...

  3. Defining collaborative elements in an effective and efficient collaboration in a construction project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohnstedt, Kristian Ditlev; Wandahl, Søren

    2018-01-01

    through experimental construction projects and debates and, on this basis, demanded and released guidelines for public and publicly funded construction projects. In the quest of defining collaborative elements, previous efforts have been reviewed, thus, identifying most successful initiatives and the used...... collaborative elements. These elements will be included in a study where they will go through a verification process. The themes derived from a contraction of the identified aspects in collaboration through the past two decades in the Danish construction industry were examined to conclude on which of the themes...... are actually encompassed in effective and efficient collaboration. This verification process will generate collaborative elements. There will be a fixed focus on which of the themes and elements that is theoretically included in an effective and efficient collaboration and how these relate to practical...

  4. Elements for Effective Management of Operating Pump and Treat Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet summarizes key aspects of effective management for operating pump and treat (P&T) systems based on lessons learned from conducting optimization evaluations at 20 Superfund-financed P&T systems.

  5. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A; Schroeder, Karen E; Patel, Paras R; Irwin, Zachary T; Thompson, David E; Nicole Bentley, J; Lempka, Scott F; Chestek, Cynthia A; Patil, Parag G

    2016-02-01

    We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the recording site-tissue interface rather than

  6. Data-driven model comparing the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions on chronic neural recordings in non-human primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaga, Karlo A.; Schroeder, Karen E.; Patel, Paras R.; Irwin, Zachary T.; Thompson, David E.; Bentley, J. Nicole; Lempka, Scott F.; Chestek, Cynthia A.; Patil, Parag G.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. We characterized electrode stability over twelve weeks of impedance and neural recording data from four chronically-implanted Utah arrays in two rhesus macaques, and investigated the effects of glial scarring and interface interactions at the electrode recording site on signal quality using a computational model. Approach. A finite-element model of a Utah array microelectrode in neural tissue was coupled with a multi-compartmental model of a neuron to quantify the effects of encapsulation thickness, encapsulation resistivity, and interface resistivity on electrode impedance and waveform amplitude. The coupled model was then reconciled with the in vivo data. Histology was obtained seventeen weeks post-implantation to measure gliosis. Main results. From week 1-3, mean impedance and amplitude increased at rates of 115.8 kΩ/week and 23.1 μV/week, respectively. This initial ramp up in impedance and amplitude was observed across all arrays, and is consistent with biofouling (increasing interface resistivity) and edema clearing (increasing tissue resistivity), respectively, in the model. Beyond week 3, the trends leveled out. Histology showed that thin scars formed around the electrodes. In the model, scarring could not match the in vivo data. However, a thin interface layer at the electrode tip could. Despite having a large effect on impedance, interface resistivity did not have a noticeable effect on amplitude. Significance. This study suggests that scarring does not cause an electrical problem with regard to signal quality since it does not appear to be the main contributor to increasing impedance or significantly affect amplitude unless it displaces neurons. This, in turn, suggests that neural signals can be obtained reliably despite scarring as long as the recording site has sufficiently low impedance after accumulating a thin layer of biofouling. Therefore, advancements in microelectrode technology may be expedited by focusing on improvements to the

  7. Effects of task demands on the early neural processing of fearful and happy facial expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itier, Roxane J; Neath-Tavares, Karly N

    2017-05-15

    Task demands shape how we process environmental stimuli but their impact on the early neural processing of facial expressions remains unclear. In a within-subject design, ERPs were recorded to the same fearful, happy and neutral facial expressions presented during a gender discrimination, an explicit emotion discrimination and an oddball detection tasks, the most studied tasks in the field. Using an eye tracker, fixation on the face nose was enforced using a gaze-contingent presentation. Task demands modulated amplitudes from 200 to 350ms at occipito-temporal sites spanning the EPN component. Amplitudes were more negative for fearful than neutral expressions starting on N170 from 150 to 350ms, with a temporo-occipital distribution, whereas no clear effect of happy expressions was seen. Task and emotion effects never interacted in any time window or for the ERP components analyzed (P1, N170, EPN). Thus, whether emotion is explicitly discriminated or irrelevant for the task at hand, neural correlates of fearful and happy facial expressions seem immune to these task demands during the first 350ms of visual processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The effects of Nigella sativa on neural damage after pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Seghatoleslam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nigella sativa (NS has been suggested to have neuroprotective and anti-seizures properties. The aim of current study was to investigate the effects of NS hydro-alcoholic extract on neural damage after pentylenetetrazole (PTZ – induced repeated seizures. The rats were divided into five groups: (1 control (saline, (2 PTZ (50 mg/kg, i.p., (3–5 PTZ-NS 100, PTZ-NS 200 and PTZ-NS 400 (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of NS extract respectively, 30 min prior to each PTZ injection on 5 consecutive days. The passive avoidance (PA test was done and the brains were then removed for histological measurements. The PTZ-NS 100, PTZ-NS 200 and PTZ-NS 400 groups had lower seizure scores than PTZ group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001. The latency to enter the dark compartment by the animals of PTZ group was lower than control in PA test (P < 0.01. Pre-treatment by 400 mg/kg of the extract increased the latency to enter the dark compartment (P < 0.05. Meanwhile, different doses of the extract inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of hippocampus (P < 0.001. The present study allows us to suggest that the NS possesses a potential ability to prevent hippocampal neural damage which is accompanied with improving effects on memory.

  9. Neural emotion regulation circuitry underlying anxiolytic effects of perceived control over pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomons, Tim V; Nusslock, Robin; Detloff, Allison; Johnstone, Tom; Davidson, Richard J

    2015-02-01

    Anxiolytic effects of perceived control have been observed across species. In humans, neuroimaging studies have suggested that perceived control and cognitive reappraisal reduce negative affect through similar mechanisms. An important limitation of extant neuroimaging studies of perceived control in terms of directly testing this hypothesis, however, is the use of within-subject designs, which confound participants' affective response to controllable and uncontrollable stress. To compare neural and affective responses when participants were exposed to either uncontrollable or controllable stress, two groups of participants received an identical series of stressors (thermal pain stimuli). One group ("controllable") was led to believe they had behavioral control over the pain stimuli, whereas another ("uncontrollable") believed they had no control. Controllable pain was associated with decreased state anxiety, decreased activation in amygdala, and increased activation in nucleus accumbens. In participants who perceived control over the pain, reduced state anxiety was associated with increased functional connectivity between each of these regions and ventral lateral/ventral medial pFC. The location of pFC findings is consistent with regions found to be critical for the anxiolytic effects of perceived control in rodents. Furthermore, interactions observed between pFC and both amygdala and nucleus accumbens are remarkably similar to neural mechanisms of emotion regulation through reappraisal in humans. These results suggest that perceived control reduces negative affect through a general mechanism involved in the cognitive regulation of emotion.

  10. Effect of external auditory pacing on the neural activity of stuttering speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyomura, Akira; Fujii, Tetsunoshin; Kuriki, Shinya

    2011-08-15

    External auditory pacing, such as metronome sound and speaking in unison with others, has a fluency-enhancing effect in stuttering speakers. The present study investigated the neural mechanism of the fluency-enhancing effect by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). 12 stuttering speakers and 12 nonstuttering controls were scanned while performing metronome-timed speech, choral speech, and normal speech. Compared to nonstuttering controls, stuttering speakers showed a significantly greater increase in activation in the superior temporal gyrus under both metronome-timed and choral speech conditions relative to a normal speech condition. The caudate, globus pallidus, and putamen of the basal ganglia showed clearly different patterns of signal change from rest among the different conditions and between stuttering and nonstuttering speakers. The signal change of stuttering speakers was significantly lower than that of nonstuttering controls under the normal speech condition but was raised to the level of the controls, with no intergroup difference, in metronome-timed speech. In contrast, under the chorus condition the signal change of stuttering speakers remained lower than that of the controls. Correlation analysis further showed that the signal change of the basal ganglia and motor areas was negatively correlated with stuttering severity, but it was not significantly correlated with the stuttering rate during MRI scanning. These findings shed light on the specific neural processing of stuttering speakers when they time their speech to auditory stimuli, and provide additional evidence of the efficacy of external auditory pacing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of GABA, Neural Regulation, and Intrinsic Cardiac Factors on Heart Rate Variability in Zebrafish Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Rafael Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Heart rate (HR) is a periodic activity that is variable over time due to intrinsic cardiac factors and extrinsic neural control, largely by the autonomic nervous system. Heart rate variability (HRV) is analyzed by measuring consecutive beat-to-beat intervals. This variability can contain information about the factors regulating cardiac activity under normal and pathological conditions, but the information obtained from such analyses is not yet fully understood. In this article, HRV in zebrafish larvae was evaluated under normal conditions and under the effect of substances that modify intrinsic cardiac activity and cardiac activity modulated by the nervous system. We found that the factors affecting intrinsic activity have negative chronotropic and arrhythmogenic effects at this stage of development, whereas neural modulatory factors have a lesser impact. The results suggest that cardiac activity largely depends on the intrinsic properties of the heart tissue in the early stages of development and, to a lesser extent, in the maturing nervous system. We also report, for the first time, the influence of the neurotransmitter gamma amino butyric acid on HRV. The results demonstrate the larval zebrafish model as a useful tool in the study of intrinsic cardiac activity and its role in heart diseases.

  12. Finite element analysis of the effectiveness of bicycle helmets in head impacts against roads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    OIKAWA, Shoko; NAKADATE, Hiromichi; ZHANG, Yuelin; UENO, Takahiro; AOMURA, Shigeru; MATSUI, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    ...% of cyclist fatalities in 2015 (ITARDA, 2016). The purpose of this study is to estimate head injuries for cyclists and quantify the effectiveness of a bicycle helmet by performing finite element (FE...

  13. Effect of abacus training on executive function development and underlying neural correlates in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunjie; Weng, Jian; Yao, Yuan; Dong, Shanshan; Liu, Yuqiu; Chen, Feiyan

    2017-10-01

    Executive function (EF) refers to a set of cognitive abilities involved in self-regulated behavior. Given the critical role of EF in cognition, strategies for improving EF have attracted intensive attention in recent years. Previous studies have explored the effects of abacus-based mental calculation (AMC) training on several cognitive abilities. However, it remains unclear whether AMC training affects EF and its neural correlates. In this study, participants were randomly assigned to AMC or control groups upon starting primary school. The AMC group received 2 h AMC training every week, while the control group did not have any abacus experience. Neural activity during an EF task was examined using functional MRI for both groups in their 4th and 6th grades. Our results showed that the AMC group performed better and faster than the control group in both grades. They also had lower activation in the frontoparietal reigons than the control group in the 6th grade. From the 4th to the 6th grade, the AMC group showed activation decreases in the frontoparietal regions, while the control group exhibited an opposite pattern. Furthermore, voxel-wise regression analyses revealed that better performance was associated with lower task-relevant brain activity in the AMC group but associated with greater task-relevant brain activity in the control group. These results suggest that long-term AMC training, with calculation ability as its original target, may improve EF and enhance neural efficiency of the frontoparietal regions during development. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5234-5249, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Modeling of structural effects in biomedical elements after titanium oxidation in fluidized bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendzik K.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation is one of the most employed methods to improve titanium and its alloys properties especially due to medical application. This process like most of the thermochemical treatment processes substantially influences on the characteristic of surface layers and the same on its mechanical and useful properties. Oxide coatings produced during titanium oxidation were examined due to their composition identification. Titanium was oxidized in fluidized bed in temperature range between 500÷700°C. Microstructures of titanium with a visible oxide coating on its surface after thermochemical treatment and changes of grain size in core of titanium samples are described. Moreover Xray phase analysis of obtained oxides coatings was made as well as microhardness measurements of titanium surface layers after oxidation process. Finally, the surfaces of titanium after oxidation in fluidized bed were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. All research results are used to built numerical model of oxidation process in fluidized. Titanium oxidation process in fluidized bed is very complicated, because changes of parameters are non linear characteristics. This fact and lack of mathematical algorithms describing this process makes modeling properties of titanium elements by traditional numerical methods difficult or even impossible. In this case it is possible to try using artificial neural network. Using neural networks for modeling oxidizing in fluidized bed is caused by several nets' features: non linear character, ability to generalize the results of calculations for data out of training set, no need for mathematical algorithms describing influence changes input parameters on modeling materials properties.

  15. Modeling of structural effects in biomedical elements after titanium oxidation in fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiński, J.; Szota, M.; Mendzik, K.

    2010-06-01

    Oxidation is one of the most employed methods to improve titanium and its alloys properties especially due to medical application. This process like most of the thermochemical treatment processes substantially influences on the characteristic of surface layers and the same on its mechanical and useful properties. Oxide coatings produced during titanium oxidation were examined due to their composition identification. Titanium was oxidized in fluidized bed in temperature range between 500÷700°C. Microstructures of titanium with a visible oxide coating on its surface after thermochemical treatment and changes of grain size in core of titanium samples are described. Moreover Xray phase analysis of obtained oxides coatings was made as well as microhardness measurements of titanium surface layers after oxidation process. Finally, the surfaces of titanium after oxidation in fluidized bed were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. All research results are used to built numerical model of oxidation process in fluidized. Titanium oxidation process in fluidized bed is very complicated, because changes of parameters are non linear characteristics. This fact and lack of mathematical algorithms describing this process makes modeling properties of titanium elements by traditional numerical methods difficult or even impossible. In this case it is possible to try using artificial neural network. Using neural networks for modeling oxidizing in fluidized bed is caused by several nets' features: non linear character, ability to generalize the results of calculations for data out of training set, no need for mathematical algorithms describing influence changes input parameters on modeling materials properties.

  16. A Global Overview of Exposure Levels and Biological Effects of Trace Elements in Penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Winfred; Celis, José E; GonzÃlez-Acuña, Daniel; Banegas, Andiranel; Barra, Ricardo; Chiang, Gustavo

    2017-09-13

    Trace elements are chemical contaminants that can be present almost anywhere on the planet. The study of trace elements in biotic matrices is a topic of great relevance for the implications that it can have on wildlife and human health. Penguins are very useful, since they live exclusively in the Southern Hemisphere and represent about 90% of the biomass of birds of the Southern Ocean. The levels of trace elements (dry weight) in different biotic matrices of penguins were reviewed here. Maps of trace element records in penguins were included. Data on exposure and effects of trace elements in penguins were collected from the literature. The most reported trace elements in penguins are aluminum, arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, copper, zinc, and manganese. Trace elements have been measured in 11 of the 18 species of penguins. The most studied biotic matrices are feathers and excreta. Most of the studies have been performed in Antarctica and subantarctic Islands. Little is known about the interaction among metals, which could provide better knowledge about certain mechanisms of detoxification in penguins. Future studies of trace elements in penguins must incorporate other metals such as vanadium, cobalt, nickel, and chromium. Data of metals in the species such as Eudyptes pachyrhynchus, Eudyptes moseleyi, Eudyptes sclateri, Eudyptes robustus, Eudyptes schlegeli, Spheniscus demersus, Spheniscus mendiculus, and Megadyptes antipodes are urged. It is important to correlate levels of metals in different biotic matrices with the effects on different species and in different geographic locations.

  17. Effects of simulation parameters on residual stresses for laser shock peening finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hee [Korea Military Academy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yun Jae [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joung Soo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-15

    By using finite element analysis, we proposed an applicable finite element method of laser shock peening (LSP) and discussed various parameters, such as solution time, stability limit, dynamic yield stress, peak pressure, pressure pulse duration, laser spot size, and multiple LSP. The effects of parameters related to the finite element simulation of the LSP process on the residual stresses of 35CD4 30HRC steel alloy are discussed. Parametric sensitivity analyses were performed to establish the optimum processing variables of the LSP process. In addition, we evaluated the effects of initial residual stress, such as welding-induced residual stress field.

  18. Trace elements in migrating high-temperature fluids: Effects of diffusive exchange with the adjoining solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Patricia M.

    1993-01-01

    Trace element concentrations and isotopic ratios are frequently used to study the behavior of high-temperature fluids in both metamorphic and igneous systems. Many theoretical formulations of the effects of fluid migration on trace elements have assumed instantaneous reequilibration between the migrating fluid and the solid material through which it is passing. This paper investigates the additional effects which arise when equilibration is not instantaneous due to a limited rate of diffusion in the solid, using an analytical steady state solution to a set of partial differential equations describing the exchange of trace elements between the fluid and the solid during the migration of the fluid.

  19. Effect of alkaline elements on the reactivity, strength and structural properties of blast furnace cokes

    OpenAIRE

    A. Bhattacharyya; J. Schenk; G. Rantitsch; C. Thaler; H. Stocker

    2015-01-01

    The present study concerns itself on the adverse effects of alkaline elements like sodium and potassium on blast furnace cokes. To achieve a deeper insight on the effects of alkaline elements on coke reactivity and strength, industrial coke samples impregnated with different alkaline species in various amounts have been tested under standard conditions to find out their Coke Reactivity Index (CRI) and Coke Strength after Reaction (CSR) values. Scanning electron microscopy, petrographic and Ra...

  20. Reading's non-negotiables elements of effective reading instruction

    CERN Document Server

    Gabriel, Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This book can be used as a guide for program design and evaluation, as well as a source of ideas and (re)assurances for those currently engaged in the ongoing pursuit of effective literacy instruction for every reader, every day.

  1. Effects of Abstract and Concrete Simulation Elements on Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakkola, T.; Veermans, K.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary evidence on the effectiveness of concrete and abstract representations in science education is based solely on studies conducted in college context. There it has been found that learning with abstract representations produces predominantly better outcomes than learning with concrete representations and combining the representations…

  2. Determination Effective Elements of Continuing Interprofessional Education Models

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Safabakhsh; Alireza Irajpour; Nikoo Yamani

    2017-01-01

    Background: Traditional continuing education (CE) approaches have limited impact on patient management and outcomes. Continuing interprofessional education is an innovated educational approach that can improve patient care and outcomes related to health care. There is a need to provide guidance to continuing education professionals in the development, implementation, and evaluation of continuing interprofessional education activities. Objectives: This study attempted to identity effective ele...

  3. 9777 A REVIEW OF EFFECTS OF NUTRIENT ELEMENTS ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mimi

    Some more examples where fruit quality increased due K application are presented in Table 3. All the increase in quality as describe in this section can be attributed to the involvement of K in synthesis and movement of different products to their sinks [6]. A condensed review on the effect of K on fruits and vegetable quality ...

  4. Elements of effective nutrition education for adults with Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review article highlights the key factors that need consideration in planning an effective nutrition education programme for adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus in resource-poor settings. Type 2 diabetes is increasing to epidemic levels globally. Low socio-economic status is associated with poorer health outcomes and a ...

  5. Effects of rare earth elements on callus growth, soluble protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... medicinal plants native of North America, was introduced into China in ... 10 days and then moved to light conditions with a 12 h photoperiod of 25 µmol/m2 ·s .... ion might produce different effects on cell growth through changing the ... 1.0 mg/l La3+ or Ce4+ treatment appeared color changed from green to ...

  6. An Effective and Novel Neural Network Ensemble for Shift Pattern Detection in Control Charts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Barghash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition in control charts is critical to make a balance between discovering faults as early as possible and reducing the number of false alarms. This work is devoted to designing a multistage neural network ensemble that achieves this balance which reduces rework and scrape without reducing productivity. The ensemble under focus is composed of a series of neural network stages and a series of decision points. Initially, this work compared using multidecision points and single-decision point on the performance of the ANN which showed that multidecision points are highly preferable to single-decision points. This work also tested the effect of population percentages on the ANN and used this to optimize the ANN’s performance. Also this work used optimized and nonoptimized ANNs in an ensemble and proved that using nonoptimized ANN may reduce the performance of the ensemble. The ensemble that used only optimized ANNs has improved performance over individual ANNs and three-sigma level rule. In that respect using the designed ensemble can help in reducing the number of false stops and increasing productivity. It also can be used to discover even small shifts in the mean as early as possible.

  7. [Comprehensive regulation effect of traditional Chinese medicine on proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Jin; Li, Jing-Jing; Ke, Hui; Xu, Xiao-Yu

    2017-11-01

    Since the discovery of neural stem cells(NSCs) in embryonic and adult mammalian central nervous systems, new approaches for proliferation and differentiation of NSCs have been put forward. One of the approaches to promote the clinical application of NSCs is to search effective methods to regulate the proliferation and differentiation. This problem is urgently to be solved in the medical field. Previous studies have shown that traditional Chinese medicine could promote the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs by regulating the relevant signaling pathway in vivo and in vitro. Domestic and foreign literatures for regulating the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells in recent 10 years and the reports for their target and signaling pathways were analyzed in this paper. Traditional Chinese medicine could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs through signaling pathways of Notch, PI3K/Akt, Wnt/β-catenin and GFs. However, studies about NSCs and traditional Chinese medicine should be further deepened; the mechanism of multiple targets and the comprehensive regulation function of traditional Chinese medicine should be clarified. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Effects of Interactive Function Forms and Refractoryperiod in a Self-Organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ming; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the standard self-organizing map neural network model and an integrate-and-tire mechanism, we investigate the effect of the nonlinear interactive function on the self-organized criticality in our model. Based on these we also investigate the effect of the refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality of the system.

  9. Neural evidence for description dependent reward processing in the framing effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongjun eYu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human decision making can be influenced by emotionally valenced contexts, known as the framing effect. We used event-related brain potentials to investigate how framing influences the encoding of reward. We found that the feedback related negativity (FRN, which indexes the worse than expected negative prediction error in the anterior cingulate cortex, was more negative for the negative frame than for the positive frame in the win domain. Consistent with previous findings that the FRN is not sensitive to better than expected positive prediction error, the FRN did not differentiate the positive and negative frame in the loss domain. Our results provide neural evidence that the description invariance principle which states that reward representation and decision making are not influenced by how options are presented is violated in the framing effect.

  10. The effect of dead elements on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachutka, Jaromir; Dolezal, Ladislav; Kollmann, Christian; Klein, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of multiple dead elements in an ultrasound probe on the accuracy of Doppler ultrasound measurements. For this work, we used a specially designed ultrasound imaging system, the Ultrasonix Sonix RP, that provides the user with the ability to disable selected elements in the probe. Using fully functional convex, linear, and phased array probes, we established a performance baseline by measuring the parameters of a laminar parabolic flow profile. These same parameters were then measured using probes with 1 to 10 disabled elements. The acquired velocity spectra from the functional probes and the probes with disabled elements were then analyzed to determine the overall Doppler power, maximum flow velocity, and average flow velocity. Color Flow Doppler images were also evaluated in a similar manner. The analysis of the Doppler spectra indicates that the overall Doppler power as well as the detected maximum and average velocities decrease with the increasing number of disabled elements. With multiple disabled elements, decreases in the detected maximum and average velocities greater than 20% were recorded. Similar results were also observed with Color Flow Doppler measurements. Our results confirmed that the degradation of the ultrasound probe through the loss of viable elements will negatively affect the quality of the Doppler-derived diagnostic information. We conclude that the results of Doppler measurements cannot be considered accurate or reliable if there are four or more contiguous dead elements in any given probe.

  11. Upset Prediction in Friction Welding Using Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the upset prediction problem of friction welded joints. Based on finite element simulations of inertia friction welding (IFW, a radial basis function (RBF neural network was developed initially to predict the final upset for a number of welding parameters. The predicted joint upset by the RBF neural network was compared to validated finite element simulations, producing an error of less than 8.16% which is reasonable. Furthermore, the effects of initial rotational speed and axial pressure on the upset were investigated in relation to energy conversion with the RBF neural network. The developed RBF neural network was also applied to linear friction welding (LFW and continuous drive friction welding (CDFW. The correlation coefficients of RBF prediction for LFW and CDFW were 0.963 and 0.998, respectively, which further suggest that an RBF neural network is an effective method for upset prediction of friction welded joints.

  12. Effect of temporal predictability on the neural processing of self-triggered auditory stimulation during vocalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhaocong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensory consequences of our own actions are perceived differently from the sensory stimuli that are generated externally. The present event-related potential (ERP study examined the neural responses to self-triggered stimulation relative to externally-triggered stimulation as a function of delays between the motor act and the stimulus onset. While sustaining a vowel phonation, subjects clicked a mouse and heard pitch-shift stimuli (PSS in voice auditory feedback at delays of either 0 ms (predictable or 500–1000 ms (unpredictable. The motor effect resulting from the mouse click was corrected in the data analyses. For the externally-triggered condition, PSS were delivered by a computer with a delay of 500–1000 ms after the vocal onset. Results As compared to unpredictable externally-triggered PSS, P2 responses to predictable self-triggered PSS were significantly suppressed, whereas an enhancement effect for P2 responses was observed when the timing of self-triggered PSS was unpredictable. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the effect of the temporal predictability of stimulus delivery with respect to the motor act on the neural responses to self-triggered stimulation. Responses to self-triggered stimulation were suppressed or enhanced compared with the externally-triggered stimulation when the timing of stimulus delivery was predictable or unpredictable. Enhancement effect of unpredictable self-triggered stimulation in the present study supports the idea that sensory suppression of self-produced action may be primarily caused by an accurate prediction of stimulus timing, rather than a movement-related non-specific suppression.

  13. The Effectiveness of Neural Mobilization for Neuromusculoskeletal Conditions: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Annalie; Olivier, Benita; Ellis, Richard; Coppieters, Michel; Stewart, Aimee; Mudzi, Witness

    2017-09-01

    Study Design Systematic review with meta-analysis. Objectives To determine the efficacy of neural mobilization (NM) for musculoskeletal conditions with a neuropathic component. Background Neural mobilization, or neurodynamics, is a movement-based intervention aimed at restoring the homeostasis in and around the nervous system. The current level of evidence for NM is largely unknown. Methods A database search for randomized trials investigating the effect of NM on neuromusculoskeletal conditions was conducted, using standard methods for article identification, selection, and quality appraisal. Where possible, studies were pooled for meta-analysis, with pain, disability, and function as the primary outcomes. Results Forty studies were included in this review, of which 17 had a low risk of bias. Meta-analyses could only be performed on self-reported outcomes. For chronic low back pain, disability (Oswestry Disability Questionnaire [0-50]: mean difference, -9.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -14.50, -4.01; P.11) but showed some positive neurophysiological effects (eg, reduced intraneural edema). Due to a scarcity of studies or conflicting results, the effect of NM remains uncertain for various conditions, such as postoperative low back pain, cubital tunnel syndrome, and lateral epicondylalgia. Conclusion This review reveals benefits of NM for back and neck pain, but the effect of NM on other conditions remains unclear. Due to the limited evidence and varying methodological quality, conclusions may change over time. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1a. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(9):593-615. Epub 13 Jul 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7117.

  14. Effects of aripiprazole on caffeine-induced hyperlocomotion and neural activation in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Luara A; Viana, Thércia G; Silveira, Vívian T; Aguiar, Daniele C; Moreira, Fabrício A

    2016-01-01

    Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic that acts as a partial agonist at dopamine D2 receptors. In addition to its antipsychotic activity, this compound blocks the effects of some psychostimulant drugs. It has not been verified, however, if aripiprazole interferes with the effects of caffeine. Hence, this study tested the hypothesis that aripiprazole prevents caffeine-induced hyperlocomotion and investigated the effects of these drugs on neural activity in the striatum. Male Swiss mice received injections of vehicle or antipsychotic drugs followed by vehicle or caffeine. Locomotion was analyzed in a circular arena and c-Fos protein expression was quantified in the dorsolateral, dorsomedial, and ventrolateral striatum, and in the core and shell regions of nucleus accumbens. Aripiprazole (0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg) prevented caffeine (10 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion at doses that do not change basal locomotion. Haloperidol (0.01, 0.03, and 0.1 mg/kg) also decreased caffeine-induced hyperlocomotion at all doses, although at the two higher doses, this compound reduced basal locomotion. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that aripiprazole increases c-Fos protein expression in all regions studied, whereas caffeine did not alter c-Fos protein expression. Combined treatment of aripiprazole and caffeine resulted in a decrease in the number of c-Fos positive cells as compared to the group receiving aripiprazole alone. In conclusion, aripiprazole prevents caffeine-induced hyperlocomotion and increases neural activation in the striatum. This latter effect is reduced by subsequent administration of caffeine. These results advance our understanding on the pharmacological profile of aripiprazole.

  15. Effect of Large Negative Phase of Blast Loading on Structural Response of RC Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Zubair Iman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural response of reinforced concrete (RC elements for analysis and design are often obtained using the positive phase of the blast pressure curve disregarding the negative phase assuming insignificant contribution from the negative phase of the loading. Although, some insight on the effect of negative phase of blast pressure based on elastic single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF analysis was presented before, the influence of negative phase on different types of resistance functions of SDOF models and on realistic finite element analysis has not been explored. In this study, the effects of inclusion of pulse negative phase on structural response of RC elements from SDOF analysis and from more detailed finite element analysis have been investigated. Investigation of SDOF part has been conducted using MATLAB code that utilizes non-linear resistance functions of SDOF model. Detailed numerical investigation using finite element code DIANA was conducted on the significance of the negative phase on structural response. In the FE model, different support stiffness was used to explore the effect of support stiffness on the structural response due to blast negative phase. Results from SDOF and FE analyses present specific situations where the effect of large negative phase was found to be significant on the structural response of RC elements.

  16. Effect of microalloying elements on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered constructional steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingshen; Huang, Leqing; Di, Guobiao; Wang, Yanfeng; Yang, Yongda; Ma, Changwen

    2017-09-01

    The effects of microalloying elements Nb, V and Ti on microstructure and properties of quenched and tempered steel were studied. Results showed that the addition of microalloying elements led to the formation of bainite and increased strength, while the austenization and ferrite transformation temperature was barely affected, i.e. 10°C. Microalloying elements shortened the incubation time for bainite transformation by refinement of austenite grain, and decreased the hardenability by forming carbides and therefore reducing the carbon content of super-cooled austenite. Either of them promoted the bainite transformation. The better tempering stability was ascribed to the as hot-rolled bainite microstructure and secondary carbide precipitation during tempering.

  17. Effect of pulsed infrared lasers on neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselmann, Ursula; Rymer, William Z.; Lin, Shien-Fong

    1990-06-01

    Over the past ten years there has been an increasing interest in the use of lasers for neurosurgical and neurological procedures. Novel recent applications range from neurosurgical procedures such as dorsal root entry zone lesions made with argon and carbon dioxide microsurgical lasers to pain relief by low power laser irradiation of the appropriate painful nerve or affected region1 '2 However, despite the widespread clinical applications of laser light, very little is known about the photobiological interactions between laser light and nervous tissue. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effects of pulsed Nd:YAG laser light on neural impulse conduction and axoplasmic transport in sensory nerves in rats and cats. Our data indicate that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can induce a preferential impairment of (1) the synaptic effects of small afferent fibers on dorsal horn cells in the spinal cord and of (2) small slow conducting sensory nerve fibers in dorsal roots and peripheral nerves. These results imply that laser light might have selective effects on impulse conduction in slow conducting sensory nerve fibers. In agreement with our elecirophysiological observations recent histological data from our laboratory show, that axonal transport of the enzyme horseradish peroxidase is selectively impaired in small sensory nerve fibers. In summary these data indicate, that Q-switched Nd:YAG laser irradiation can selectively impair neural conduction and axoplasmic transport in small sensory nerve fibers as compared to fast conducting fibers. A selective influence of laser irradiation on slow conducting fibers could have important clinical applications, especially for the treatment of chronic pain.

  18. Effects of segregation of primary alloying elements on the creep response in magnesium alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Y.D.; Dieringa, H.; Hort, N.

    2008-01-01

    The segregation of primary alloying elements deteriorates the high temperature creep resistance of magnesium alloys. Annealing at high temperatures alleviating their segregations can improve the creep resistance. Present investigation on the effect of segregation of primary alloying elements...... on the creep response may provide some useful information about how to improve the creep resistance of magnesium alloys in the future. (c) 2008 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. Finite elements and fluid dynamics. [instability effects on solution of nonlinear equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, G.

    1975-01-01

    Difficulties concerning a use of the finite element method in the solution of the nonlinear equations of fluid dynamics are partly related to various 'hidden' instabilities which often arise in fluid calculations. The instabilities are typically due to boundary effects or nonlinearities. It is shown that in certain cases these instabilities can be avoided if certain conservation laws are satisfied, and that the latter are often intimately related to finite elements.

  20. Effects of nitrogen and water addition on trace element stoichiometry in five grassland species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiangping; Weiner, Jacob; Wang, Ruzhen; Luo, Wentao; Zhang, Yongyong; Liu, Heyong; Xu, Zhuwen; Li, Hui; Zhang, Yuge; Jiang, Yong

    2017-07-01

    A 9-year manipulative experiment with nitrogen (N) and water addition, simulating increasing N deposition and changing precipitation regime, was conducted to investigate the bioavailability of trace elements, iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in soil, and their uptake by plants under the two environmental change factors in a semi-arid grassland of Inner Mongolia. We measured concentrations of trace elements in soil and in foliage of five common herbaceous species including 3 forbs and 2 grasses. In addition, bioaccumulation factors (BAF, the ratio of the chemical concentration in the organism and the chemical concentration in the growth substrate) and foliar Fe:Mn ratio in each plant was calculated. Our results showed that soil available Fe, Mn and Cu concentrations increased under N addition and were negatively correlated with both soil pH and cation exchange capacity. Water addition partly counteracted the positive effects of N addition on available trace element concentrations in the soil. Foliar Mn, Cu and Zn concentrations increased but Fe concentration decreased with N addition, resulting in foliar elemental imbalances among Fe and other selected trace elements. Water addition alleviated the effect of N addition. Forbs are more likely to suffer from Mn toxicity and Fe deficiency than grass species, indicating more sensitivity to changing elemental bioavailability in soil. Our results suggested that soil acidification due to N deposition may accelerate trace element cycling and lead to elemental imbalance in soil-plant systems of semi-arid grasslands and these impacts of N deposition on semi-arid grasslands were affected by water addition. These findings indicate an important role for soil trace elements in maintaining ecosystem functions associated with atmospheric N deposition and changing precipitation regimes in the future.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on the neural interface Focus on the neural interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Dominique M.

    2009-10-01

    they can fail to record reliably neural signals for long periods of time. McConnell et al show that by measuring the impedance of the tissue, one can evaluate the extent of the tissue response to the presence of the electrode. Another problem with the neural interface is the mismatch of the mechanical properties between electrode and tissue. Basinger et al use finite element modeling to analyze this mismatch in retinal prostheses and guide the design of new implantable devices. Electrical stimulation has been the method of choice to activate externally the nervous system. However, Zhang et al show that a novel dual hybrid device integrating electrical and optical stimulation can provide an effective interface for simultaneous recording and stimulation. By interfacing an EMG recording system and a movement detection system, Johnson and Fuglevand develop a model capable of predicting muscle activity during movement that could be important for the development of motor prostheses. Sensory restoration is another unsolved problem in neural prostheses. By developing a novel interface between the dorsal root ganglia and electrodes arrays, Gaunt et al show that it is possible to recruit afferent fibers for sensory substitution. Finally, by interfacing directly with muscles, Jung and colleagues show that stimulation of muscles involved in locomotion following spinal cord damage in rats can provide an effective treatment modality for incomplete spinal cord injury. This series of articles clearly shows that the interface is indeed one of the keys to successful therapeutic neural devices. The next Neural Interfaces Conference will take place in Los Angeles, CA in June 2010 and one can expect to see new developments in neural engineering obtained by focusing on the neural interface.

  2. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on Tissue Trace Element Concentration of Rats Exposed to Second-hand Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    K, Ergen; F, Yildiz; M, Ozcan; M, Cekmen; -, Tanyeri P; -, Utkan T; Y, Karakoc

    2012-01-01

    Trace elements have an important effect on and play a key role in a variety of the processes necessary for life. Studies have indicated a definite correlation between content of trace elements and many common diseases. It has been concluded that smoking may be a substantial source of intake of these hazardous elements, not only to the smoker, but to nonsmokers via passive smoke, as well. Even passive intake of such elements can change the metabolism of other trace elements and influence their...

  3. The effect of ionic diffusion on extracellular potentials in neural tissue

    CERN Document Server

    Halnes, Geir; Keller, Daniel; Pettersen, Klas H; Eivenoll, Gaute T

    2015-01-01

    In computational neuroscience, it is common to use the simplifying assumption that diffusive currents are negligible compared to Ohmic currents. However, endured periods of intense neural signaling may cause local ion concentration changes in the millimolar range. Theoretical studies have identified scenarios where steep concentration gradients give rise to diffusive currents that are of comparable magnitude with Ohmic currents, and where the simplifying assumption that diffusion can be neglected does not hold. We here propose a novel formalism for computing (1) the ion concentration dynamics and (2) the electrical potential in the extracellular space surrounding multi-compartmental neuron models or networks of such (e.g., the Blue-Brain simulator). We use this formalism to explore the effects that diffusive currents can have on the extracellular (ECS) potential surrounding a small population of active cortical neurons. Our key findings are: (i) Sustained periods of neuronal output (simulations were run for 8...

  4. Effect of the size of an artificial neural network used as pattern identifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynoso V, M.R.; Vega C, J.J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    A novel way to extract relevant parameters associated with the outgoing ions from nuclear reactions, obtained by digitizing the signals provided by a Bragg curve spectrometer (BCS) is presented. This allowed the implementation of a more thorough pulse-shape analysis. Due to the complexity of this task, it was required to take advantage of new and more powerful computational paradigms. This was fulfilled using a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) as a pattern identifier. Over training of ANNs is a common problem during the training stage. In the performance of the ANN there is a compromise between its size and the size of the training set. Here, this effect will be illustrated in relation to the problem of Bragg Curve (BC) identification. (Author)

  5. Effect of orthography over neural regions in bilinguals: a view from neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Uttam

    2014-09-19

    Effects of written script processing on neural regions have been explored using fMRI in a group of bilingual population that has not so far been studied, namely, Urdu-Hindi skilled bilinguals. Hindi and Urdu languages are very similar at the spoken level but differ greatly in scripts; Hindi is a highly transparent script, whereas Urdu is more opaque. The common regions (conjunction analyses) observed for Urdu-Hindi bilingual readers are left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) (BA 44/45), bilateral middle temporal (BA 22), left fusiform gyrus (BA 37) and bilateral middle occipital regions. The distinct regions for Urdu words were found in left superior frontal and left middle frontal regions whereas; no distinct region was found for Hindi words. Imaging result suggests that middle and superior frontal regions are crucial for the orthography and graphemic complexity of Urdu script. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effectiveness of neural mobilization in patients with spinal radiculopathy: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Michalis A; Stefanakis, Manos; Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2015-04-01

    Spinal radiculopathy (SR) is a multifactorial nerve root injury that can result in significant pain, psychological stress and disability. It can occur at any level of the spinal column with the highest percentage in the lumbar spine. Amongst the various interventions that have been suggested, neural mobilization (NM) has been advocated as an effective treatment option. The purpose of this review is to (1) examine pathophysiological aspects of spinal roots and peripheral nerves, (2) analyze the proposed mechanisms of NM as treatment of injured nerve tissues and (3) critically review the existing research evidence for the efficacy of NM in patients with lumbar or cervical radiculopathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of social sustainability signaling on neural valuation signals and taste-experience of food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enax, Laura; Krapp, Vanessa; Piehl, Alexandra; Weber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Value-based decision making occurs when individuals choose between different alternatives and place a value on each alternative and its attributes. Marketing actions frequently manipulate product attributes, by adding, e.g., health claims on the packaging. A previous imaging study found that an emblem for organic products increased willingness to pay (WTP) and activity in the ventral striatum (VS). The current study investigated neural and behavioral processes underlying the influence of Fair Trade (FT) labeling on food valuation and choice. Sustainability is an important product attribute for many consumers, with FT signals being one way to highlight ethically sustainable production. Forty participants valuated products in combination with an FT emblem or no emblem and stated their WTP in a bidding task while in an MRI scanner. After that, participants tasted-objectively identical-chocolates, presented either as "FT" or as "conventionally produced". In the fMRI task, WTP was significantly higher for FT products. FT labeling increased activity in regions important for reward-processing and salience, that is, in the VS, anterior and posterior cingulate, as well as superior frontal gyrus. Subjective value, that is, WTP was correlated with activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). We find that the anterior cingulate, VS and superior frontal gyrus exhibit task-related increases in functional connectivity to the vmPFC when an FT product was evaluated. Effective connectivity analyses revealed a highly probable directed modulation of the vmPFC by those three regions, suggesting a network which alters valuation processes. We also found a significant taste-placebo effect, with higher experienced taste pleasantness and intensity for FT labeled chocolates. Our results reveal a possible neural mechanism underlying valuation processes of certified food products. The results are important in light of understanding current marketing trends as well as designing

  8. Categorical and continuous - disentangling the neural correlates of the carry effect in multi-digit addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dressel Katharina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently it was suggested that the carry effect observed in addition involves both categorical and continuous processing characteristics. Methods In the present study, we aimed at identifying the specific neural correlates associated with processing either categorical or continuous aspects of the carry effect in an fMRI study on multi-digit addition. Results In line with our expectations, we observed two distinct parts of the fronto-parietal network subserving numerical cognition to be associated with either one of these two characteristics. On the one hand, the categorical aspect of the carry effect was associated with left-hemispheric language areas and the basal ganglia probably reflecting increased demands on procedural and problem solving processes. Complementarily, the continuous aspect of the carry effect was associated with increased intraparietal activation indicating increasing demands on magnitude processing as well as place-value integration with increasing unit sum. Conclusions In summary, the findings suggest representations and processes underlying the carry effect in multi-digit addition to be more complex and interactive than assumed previously.

  9. Trace elements in floodplain soils - effects of redox conditions on the mobility of trace elements and volatilization of mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Hindersmann, Iris

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Floodplains are characterized by periodic flooding and their soils can contain high concentrations of trace elements. The flooding events lead to varying oxygen contents in the soil. This is accompanied with varying redox conditions that are expressed by strongly fluc-tuating redox potentials. This study investigated the influence of flooding events on the mo-bilization of the trace elements arsenic, cadmium, cobalt, chromium, copper, molybdenum, nickel, lead, antimony, and zinc, as ...

  10. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Leemans, A.; Dupré, L.

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically,

  11. Enhanced dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells by synergistic effect of Bcl-xL and reduced oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Christina; Courtois, Elise; Jensen, Pia

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. Here we investigated the effect of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-x(L) and oxygen tension on dopaminergic different...

  12. Elemental composition of Tibetan Plateau top soils and its effect on evaluating atmospheric pollution transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoliu; Kang, Shichang; Zhang, Qianggong

    2009-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is an ideal place for monitoring the atmospheric environment of low to mid latitudes. In total 54 soil samples from the western TP were analyzed for major and trace elements. Results indicate that concentrations of some typical "pollution" elements (such as As) are naturally high here, which may cause incorrect evaluation for the source region of these elements, especially when upper continental crust values are used to calculate enrichment factors. Because only particles elemental concentrations of this fraction of the TP soils are more reliable for the future aerosol related studies over the TP. In addition, REE compositions of the TP soils are unusual, highly characteristic and can be used as an effective index for identifying dust aerosol from the TP.

  13. The effect of visual parameters on neural activation during nonsymbolic number comparison and its relation to math competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Eric D; Barone, Jordan C; Mazzocco, Michèle M M; Vogel, Stephan E; Price, Gavin R

    2017-10-01

    Nonsymbolic numerical comparison task performance (whereby a participant judges which of two groups of objects is numerically larger) is thought to index the efficiency of neural systems supporting numerical magnitude perception, and performance on such tasks has been related to individual differences in math competency. However, a growing body of research suggests task performance is heavily influenced by visual parameters of the stimuli (e.g. surface area and dot size of object sets) such that the correlation with math is driven by performance on trials in which number is incongruent with visual cues. Almost nothing is currently known about whether the neural correlates of nonsymbolic magnitude comparison are also affected by visual congruency. To investigate this issue, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to analyze neural activity during a nonsymbolic comparison task as a function of visual congruency in a sample of typically developing high school students (n = 36). Further, we investigated the relation to math competency as measured by the preliminary scholastic aptitude test (PSAT) in 10th grade. Our results indicate that neural activity was modulated by the ratio of the dot sets being compared in brain regions previously shown to exhibit an effect of ratio (i.e. left anterior cingulate, left precentral gyrus, left intraparietal sulcus, and right superior parietal lobe) when calculated from the average of congruent and incongruent trials, as it is in most studies, and that the effect of ratio within those regions did not differ as a function of congruency condition. However, there were significant differences in other regions in overall task-related activation, as opposed to the neural ratio effect, when congruent and incongruent conditions were contrasted at the whole-brain level. Math competency negatively correlated with ratio-dependent neural response in the left insula across congruency conditions and showed distinct correlations when

  14. Effect of Trace Elements (Boron and Lead) on the Properties of Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankamma, Kandula

    2014-04-01

    In the present work an effort has been made to correlate the "Effect of trace elements (B and Pb) on the tensile strength, hardness and microstructure of gray cast iron". These elements have a significant effect on the properties and microstructure of gray cast iron. These elements are deliberately added to study their effect on properties and microstructure. Boron up to 0.02 % in gray cast iron showed an improvement in tensile strength and hardness values. While beyond this amount it shows a decreasing trend, due to the formation of type B and type D graphitic structure. Lead in gray cast iron shows a decreasing trend in tensile strength and hardness values, even if present in trace amount, due to the formation of spiky or mesh type graphite.

  15. Digital liquid-scintillation counting and effective pulse-shape discrimination with artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langrock, Gert; Wiehl, Norbert; Kling, Hans-Otto; Mendel, Matthias; Naehler, Andrea; Tharun, Udo; Eberhardt, Klaus; Trautmann, Norbert; Kratz, Jens Volker [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernchemie; Omtvedt, Jon-Petter [Oslo Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Chemistry; Skarnemark, Gunnar [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2015-05-01

    A typical problem in low-level liquid scintillation (LS) counting is the identification of α particles in the presence of a high background of β and γ particles. Especially the occurrence of β-β and β-γ pile-ups may prevent the unambiguous identification of an α signal by commonly used analog electronics. In this case, pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) and pile-up rejection (PUR) units show an insufficient performance. This problem was also observed in own earlier experiments on the chemical behaviour of transactinide elements using the liquid-liquid extraction system SISAK in combination with LS counting. α-particle signals from the decay of the transactinides could not be unambiguously assigned. However, the availability of instruments for the digital recording of LS pulses changes the situation and provides possibilities for new approaches in the treatment of LS pulse shapes. In a SISAK experiment performed at PSI, Villigen, a fast transient recorder, a PC card with oscilloscope characteristics and a sampling rate of 1 giga samples s{sup -1} (1 ns per point), was used for the first time to record LS signals. It turned out, that the recorded signals were predominantly α β-β and β-γ pile up, and fission events. This paper describes the subsequent development and use of artificial neural networks (ANN) based on the method of 'back-propagation of errors' to automatically distinguish between different pulse shapes. Such networks can 'learn' pulse shapes and classify hitherto unknown pulses correctly after a learning period. The results show that ANN in combination with fast digital recording of pulse shapes can be a powerful tool in LS spectrometry even at high background count rates.

  16. Morphogenetic movements during cranial neural tube closure in the chick embryo and the effect of homocysteine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, M.R.; Afman, L.A.; Hauten, B.A.M. van; Hekking, J.W.M.; Köhler, E.S.; Straaten, H.W.M. van

    2005-01-01

    In order to unravel morphogenetic mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, critical cell movements that are fundamental to remodelling of the cranial neural tube in the chick embryo were studied in vitro by quantitative time-lapse video microscopy. Two main directions of movements were observed.

  17. Morphogenetic movements during cranial neural tube closure in the chick embryo and the effect of homocysteine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, M.R.; Afman, L.A.; VanHauten, B.A.M.; Hekking, J.W.M.; Kohler, E.S.; Straaten, van H.W.M.

    2005-01-01

    In order to unravel morphogenetic mechanisms involved in neural tube closure, critical cell movements that are fundamental to remodelling of the cranial neural tube in the chick embryo were studied in vitro by quantitative time-lapse video microscopy. Two main directions of movements were observed.

  18. In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural stem cells have the capacity to respond to their environment, migrate to the injury site and generate functional cell types, and thus they hold great promise for cell therapies. In addition to representing a source for central nervous system (CNS) repair, neural stem and progenitor cells als...

  19. Dynamic neural network-based methods for compensation of nonlinear effects in multimode communication lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidelnikov, O. S.; Redyuk, A. A.; Sygletos, S.

    2017-12-01

    We consider neural network-based schemes of digital signal processing. It is shown that the use of a dynamic neural network-based scheme of signal processing ensures an increase in the optical signal transmission quality in comparison with that provided by other methods for nonlinear distortion compensation.

  20. The Effects of Experimental Manipulation of Sleep Duration on Neural Response to Food Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, Kathryn E; Sweet, Lawrence H; Hart, Chantelle N; McCaffery, Jeanne M; Williams, Samantha E; Mailloux, Kimberly A; Trautvetter, Jennifer; Owens, Max M; Wing, Rena R

    2017-11-01

    Despite growing literature on neural food cue responsivity in obesity, little is known about how the brain processes food cues following partial sleep deprivation and whether short sleep leads to changes similar to those observed in obesity. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the hypothesis that short sleep leads to increased reward-related and decreased inhibitory control-related processing of food cues.In a within-subject design, 30 participants (22 female, mean age = 36.7 standard deviation = 10.8 years, body mass index range 20.4-40.7) completed four nights of 6 hours/night time-in-bed (TIB; short sleep) and four nights of 9 hours/night TIB (long sleep) in random counterbalanced order in their home environments. Following each sleep condition, participants completed an fMRI scan while viewing food and nonfood images.A priori region of interest analyses revealed increased activity to food in short versus long sleep in regions of reward processing (eg, nucleus accumbens/putamen) and sensory/motor signaling (ie, right paracentral lobule, an effect that was most pronounced in obese individuals). Contrary to the hypothesis, whole brain analyses indicated greater food cue responsivity during short sleep in an inhibitory control region (right inferior frontal gyrus) and ventral medial prefrontal cortex, which has been implicated in reward coding and decision-making (false discovery rate corrected q = 0.05).These findings suggest that sleep restriction leads to both greater reward and control processing in response to food cues. Future research is needed to understand the dynamic functional connectivity between these regions during short sleep and whether the interplay between these neural processes determines if one succumbs to food temptation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The Effect of Age on Neural Processing of Pleasant Soft Touch Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April C May

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tactile interactions with our environment stimulate afferent fibers within the skin, which deliver information about sensations of pain, texture, itch and other feelings to the brain as a comprehensive sense of self. These tactile interactions can stimulate brain regions involved in interoception and reward processing. This study examined subjective, behavioral, and neural processing as a function of age during stimulation of A-beta (Aβ and C tactile (CT afferents using a soft brush stroke task. 16 adolescents (ages 15-17, 22 young adults (ages 20-28, and 20 mature adults (ages 29-55 underwent a simple continuous performance task while periodically anticipating and experiencing a soft touch to the palm or forearm, during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. fMRI results showed that adolescents displayed greater bilateral posterior insula activation than young and mature adults across all conditions and stimulus types. Adolescents also demonstrated greater bilateral posterior insula activation than young and mature adults specifically in response to the soft touch condition. Adolescents also exhibited greater activation than mature adults in bilateral inferior frontal gyrus and striatum during the soft touch condition. However, mature adults showed greater striatum activation than adolescents and young adults during anticipation. In the left anterior cingulate cortex, mature adults exhibited greater activation than adolescents and young adults when anticipating the upcoming touch. These results support the hypothesis that adolescents show an exaggerated neural response to pleasant stimulation of afferents, which may have profound effects on how they approach or avoid social and risky situations. In particular, heightened interoceptive reactivity to pleasant stimuli might cause adolescents to seek experiences that are associated with pleasant stimulation.

  2. Effects of social sustainability signals on neural valuation signals and taste-experience of food products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eEnax

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Value-based decision making occurs when individuals choose between different alternatives and place a value on each alternative and its attributes. Marketing actions frequently manipulate product attributes, by adding e.g., health claims on the packaging. A previous imaging study found that an emblem for organic products increased willingness to pay (WTP and activity in the ventral striatum (VS. The current study investigated neural and behavioral processes underlying the influence of Fair Trade (FT labeling on food valuation and choice. Sustainability is an important product attribute for many consumers, with FT signals being one way to highlight ethically sustainable production. Forty participants valuated products in combination with an FT emblem or no emblem and stated their WTP in a bidding task while in an MRI scanner. After that, participants tasted – objectively identical – chocolates, presented either as FT or as conventionally produced. In the fMRI task, WTP was significantly higher for FT products. FT labeling increased activity in regions important for reward-processing and salience, that is, in the VS, anterior and posterior cingulate, as well as superior frontal gyrus. Subjective value, that is, WTP was correlated with activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC. We find that the anterior cingulate, VS and superior frontal gyrus exhibit task-related increases in functional connectivity to the vmPFC when an FT product was evaluated, suggesting a network which alters valuation processes. We also found a significant taste-placebo effect, with higher experienced taste pleasantness and intensity for FT labeled chocolates. Our results reveal a possible neural mechanism underlying valuation processes of certified food products. The results are important in light of understanding current marketing trends as well as designing future interventions that aim at positively influencing food choice.

  3. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Marek [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Knight, Julia [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Mao-Draayer, Yang, E-mail: yang.mao-draayer@vtmednet.org [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  4. Effects of cryotherapy methods on circulatory, metabolic, inflammatory and neural properties: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Freire

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The cooling therapy (cryotherapy is commonly used in clinical environmental for the injuries treatment according to its beneficial effects on pain, local inflammation and the recovery time of patients. However, there is no consensus in the literature about the effects of cryotherapy in the physiological reactions of affected tissues after an injury. Objective: To realize a systematic review to analyze the cryotherapy effects on circulatory, metabolic, inflammatory and neural parameters. Materials and methods: A search was performed in PubMed, SciELO, PEDro and Scopus databases following the eligibility criteria. Included studies were methodologically assessed by PEDro scale. Results: 13 original studies were selected and presented high methodological quality. Discussion: The cryotherapy promotes a significant decrease in blood flow, in venous capillary pressure, oxygen saturation and hemoglobin (only for superficial tissues and nerve conduction velocity. However, the effect of cryotherapy on the concentration of inflammatory substances induced by exercise, as the creatine kinase enzyme and myoglobin, remains unclear. Conclusion: The physiological reactions to the cryotherapy application are favorable to the use of this therapeutic tool in inflammatory treatment and pain decrease, and demonstrate its importance in the neuromuscular system injuries rehabilitation.

  5. Effect of alkaline elements on the reactivity, strength and structural properties of blast furnace cokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bhattacharyya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns itself on the adverse effects of alkaline elements like sodium and potassium on blast furnace cokes. To achieve a deeper insight on the effects of alkaline elements on coke reactivity and strength, industrial coke samples impregnated with different alkaline species in various amounts have been tested under standard conditions to find out their Coke Reactivity Index (CRI and Coke Strength after Reaction (CSR values. Scanning electron microscopy, petrographic and Raman Spectrometric investigations demonstrate the change of structural properties. The mechanism of catalysis has been postulated.

  6. Effective elements of school health promotion across behavioral domains: a systematic review of reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Louk WH

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most school health education programs focus on a single behavioral domain. Integrative programs that address multiple behaviors may be more efficient, but only if the elements of change are similar for these behaviors. The objective of this study was to examine which effective elements of school health education are similar across three particular behavioral domains. Methods A systematic review of reviews of the effectiveness of school-based health promotion programs was conducted for the domains of substance abuse, sexual behavior, and nutrition. The literature search spanned the time period between 1995 and October 2006 and included three databases, websites of review centers and backward search. Fifty-five reviews and meta-analyses met predetermined relevance and publication criteria and were included. Data was extracted by one reviewer and checked by a second reviewer. A standardized data extraction form was used, with detailed attention to effective elements pertaining to program goals, development, content, methods, facilitator, components and intensity. Two assessors rated the quality of reviews as strong, moderate or weak. We included only strong and moderate reviews in two types of analysis: one based on interpretation of conflicting results, the other on a specific vote-counting rule. Results Thirty six reviews were rated strong, 6 moderate, and 13 weak. A multitude of effective elements was identified in the included reviews and many elements were similar for two or more domains. In both types of analysis, five elements with evidence from strong reviews were found to be similar for all three domains: use of theory; addressing social influences, especially social norms; addressing cognitive-behavioral skills; training of facilitators; and multiple components. Two additional elements had positive results in all domains with the rule-based method of analysis, but had inconclusive results in at least one domain with

  7. Computational Assessment of Neural Probe and Brain Tissue Interface under Transient Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Polanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The functional longevity of a neural probe is dependent upon its ability to minimize injury risk during the insertion and recording period in vivo, which could be related to motion-related strain between the probe and surrounding tissue. A series of finite element analyses was conducted to study the extent of the strain induced within the brain in an area around a neural probe. This study focuses on the transient behavior of neural probe and brain tissue interface with a viscoelastic model. Different stages of the interface from initial insertion of neural probe to full bonding of the probe by astro-glial sheath formation are simulated utilizing analytical tools to investigate the effects of relative motion between the neural probe and the brain while friction coefficients and kinematic frequencies are varied. The analyses can provide an in-depth look at the quantitative benefits behind using soft materials for neural probes.

  8. Neural Temporal Dynamics of Facial Emotion Processing: Age Effects and Relationship to Cognitive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Liao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study used event-related potentials (ERPs to investigate the effects of age on neural temporal dynamics of processing task-relevant facial expressions and their relationship to cognitive functions. Negative (sad, afraid, angry, and disgusted, positive (happy, and neutral faces were presented to 30 older and 31 young participants who performed a facial emotion categorization task. Behavioral and ERP indices of facial emotion processing were analyzed. An enhanced N170 for negative faces, in addition to intact right-hemispheric N170 for positive faces, was observed in older adults relative to their younger counterparts. Moreover, older adults demonstrated an attenuated within-group N170 laterality effect for neutral faces, while younger adults showed the opposite pattern. Furthermore, older adults exhibited sustained temporo-occipital negativity deflection over the time range of 200–500 ms post-stimulus, while young adults showed posterior positivity and subsequent emotion-specific frontal negativity deflections. In older adults, decreased accuracy for labeling negative faces was positively correlated with Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scores, and accuracy for labeling neutral faces was negatively correlated with age. These findings suggest that older people may exert more effort in structural encoding for negative faces and there are different response patterns for the categorization of different facial emotions. Cognitive functioning may be related to facial emotion categorization deficits observed in older adults. This may not be attributable to positivity effects: it may represent a selective deficit for the processing of negative facial expressions in older adults.

  9. The Protective Effect of Melatonin on Neural Stem Cell against LPS-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy for tissue regeneration has several limitations in the fact that transplanted cells could not survive for a long time. For solving these limitations, many studies have focused on the antioxidants to increase survival rate of neural stem cells (NSCs. Melatonin, an antioxidant synthesized in the pineal gland, plays multiple roles in various physiological mechanisms. Melatonin exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. To determine the effect of melatonin on NSCs which is in LPS-induced inflammatory stress state, we first investigated nitric oxide (NO production and cytotoxicity using Griess reagent assays, LDH assay, and neurosphere counting. Also, we investigated the effect of melatonin on NSCs by measuring the mRNA levels of SOX2, TLX, and FGFR-2. In addition, western blot analyses were performed to examine the activation of PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling in LPS-treated NSCs. In the present study, we suggested that melatonin inhibits NO production and protects NSCs against LPS-induced inflammatory stress. In addition, melatonin promoted the expression of SOX2 and activated the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling under LPS-induced inflammation condition. Based on our results, we conclude that melatonin may be an important factor for the survival and proliferation of NSCs in neuroinflammatory diseases.

  10. Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Promotes Process Outgrowth in Neural Cells and Exerts Protective Effects against Tropodithietic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Wichmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment harbors a plethora of bioactive substances, including drug candidates of potential value in the field of neuroscience. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP, produced by several algae, corals and higher plants, on cells of the mammalian nervous system, i.e., neuronal N2a and OLN-93 cells as model system for nerve cells and glia, respectively. Additionally, the protective capabilities of DMSP were assessed in cells treated with tropodithietic acid (TDA, a marine metabolite produced by several Roseobacter clade bacteria. Both cell lines, N2a and OLN-93, have previously been shown to be a sensitive target for the action of TDA, and cytotoxic effects of TDA have been connected to the induction of oxidative stress. Our data shows that DMSP promotes process outgrowth and microtubule reorganization and bundling, accompanied by an increase in alpha-tubulin acetylation. Furthermore, DMSP was able to prevent the cytotoxic effects exerted by TDA, including the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of heat shock protein Hsp32 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2. Our study points to the conclusion that DMSP provides an antioxidant defense, not only in algae but also in mammalian neural cells.

  11. Pounding Effects on the Earthquake Response of Adjacent Reinforced Concrete Structures Strengthened by Cable Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liolios, Angelos; Liolios, Asterios; Hatzigeorgiou, George; Radev, Stefan

    2014-06-01

    A numerical approach for estimating the effects of pounding (seismic interaction) on the response of adjacent Civil Engineering structures is presented. Emphasis is given to reinforced concrete (RC) frames of existing buildings which are seismically strengthened by cable-elements. A double discretization, in space by the Finite Element Method and in time by a direct incremental approach is used. The unilateral behaviours of both, the cable-elements and the interfaces contact-constraints, are taken strictly into account and result to inequality constitutive conditions. So, in each time-step, a non-convex linear complementarity problem is solved. It is found that pounding and cable strengthening have significant effects on the earthquake response and, hence, on the seismic upgrading of existing adjacent RC structures.

  12. Assessing the effect of quantitative and qualitative predictors on gastric cancer individuals survival using hierarchical artificial neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Zohreh; Mohammad, Kazem; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Zeraati, Hojjat

    2013-01-01

    ). Probabilities of survival were calculated using three neural network models with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer, and it has been observed that none of the predictions was significantly different from results with the Kaplan-Meier method and they appeared more comparable towards the last months (fifth year). However, we observed better accuracy using the neural network with 5 nodes in the hidden layer. Using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with 3 nodes in the hidden layer, we found enhanced accuracy with the neural network model. Neural networks can provide more accurate predictions for survival probabilities compared to the Cox proportional hazards mode, especially now that advances in computer sciences have eliminated limitations associated with complex computations. It is not recommended in order to adding too many hidden layer nodes because sample size related effects can reduce the accuracy. We recommend increasing the number of nodes to a point that increased accuracy continues (decrease in mean standard error), however increasing nodes should cease when a change in this trend is observed.

  13. The effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-04-01

    Lithium has been used in modern psychiatry for more than 65 years, constituting a cornerstone for the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. A number of biological properties of lithium have been discovered, including its hematological, antiviral and neuroprotective effects. In this article, a systematic review of the effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells is presented. The beneficial effects of lithium on the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and growth factors have been reported since 1970s. Lithium improves homing of stem cells, the ability to form colonies and HSC self-renewal. Lithium also exerts a favorable influence on the proliferation and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Studies on the effect of lithium on neurogenesis have indicated an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and enhanced mitotic activity of Schwann cells. This may be connected with the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of lithium, reflected in an improvement in synaptic plasticity promoting cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis. In clinical studies, lithium treatment increases cerebral gray matter, mainly in the frontal lobes, hippocampus and amygdala. Recent findings also suggest that lithium may reduce the risk of dementia and exert a beneficial effect in neurodegenerative diseases. The most important mediators and signaling pathways of lithium action are the glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Recently, to study of bipolar disorder pathogenesis and the mechanism of lithium action, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) obtained from bipolar patients have been used. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Contour integration and aging: the effects of element spacing, orientation alignment and stimulus duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudaia, Eugenie; Bennett, Patrick J.; Sekuler, Allison B.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to extract contours in cluttered visual scenes, which is a crucial step in visual processing, declines with healthy aging, but the reasons for this decline are not well understood. In three experiments, we examined how the effect of aging on contour discrimination varies as a function of contour and distracter inter-element spacing, collinearity, and stimulus duration. Spiral-shaped contours composed of Gabors were embedded within a field of distracter Gabors of uniform density. In a four alternative forced-choice task, younger and older subjects were required to report the global orientation of the contour. In Experiment 1, the absolute contour element spacing varied from two to eight times the Gabor wavelength and contour element collinearity was disrupted with five levels of orientation jitter. Contour discrimination accuracy was lower in older subjects, but the effect of aging did not vary with contour spacing or orientation jitter. Experiment 2 found that decreasing stimulus durations from 0.8 to 0.04 s had a greater effect on older subjects' performance, but only for less salient contours. Experiment 3 examined the effect of the background on contour discrimination by varying the spacing and orientation of the distracter elements for contours with small and large absolute spacing. As in Experiment, the effect of aging did not vary with absolute contour spacing. Decreasing the distracter spacing, however, had a greater detrimental effect on accuracy in older subjects compared to younger subjects. Finally, both groups showed equally high accuracy when all distracters were iso-oriented. In sum, these findings suggest that aging does not affect the sensitivity of contour integration to proximity or collinearity. However, contour integration in older adults is slower and is especially vulnerable when distracters are denser than contour elements. PMID:23801978

  15. The effect of almond consumption on elements of endurance exercise performance in trained athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonds are a healthy tree nut food with high nutrient density. Their consumption has been shown to ameliorate oxidative stress, inflammation, etc. The objective of the study was to examine the effect of almonds on elements of endurance exercise performance in trained athletes. A 10-week crossover, ...

  16. The Effects of Social Capital Elements on Job Satisfaction and Motivation Levels of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydak Özan, Mukadder; Yavuz Özdemir, Tuncay; Yaras, Zübeyde

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of social capital elements' on job satisfaction and motivation levels of teachers. The mixed method was used in the study. The quantitative data were analyzed through Correlation and Multiple Regression analyses. An interview form developed by the researchers was used for analyzing the…

  17. Effect of elemental sulphur and compost on pH, electrical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of elemental sulphur and compost on pH, electrical conductivity and phosphorus availability of one clay soil. ... Soil water content was held close to field capacity and green house temperature was kept to 25 ± 5°C. Before the experiment, the physicochemical properties of soil and chemical properties of the compost ...

  18. Effectiveness of the random sequential absorption algorithm in the analysis of volume elements with nanoplatelets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontefisso, Alessandro; Zappalorto, Michele; Quaresimin, Marino

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a study of the Random Sequential Absorption (RSA) algorithm in the generation of nanoplatelet Volume Elements (VEs) is carried out. The effect of the algorithm input parameters on the reinforcement distribution is studied through the implementation of statistical tools, showing...

  19. Nuclear mass predictions based on Bayesian neural network approach with pairing and shell effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Z. M.; Liang, H. Z.

    2018-03-01

    Bayesian neural network (BNN) approach is employed to improve the nuclear mass predictions of various models. It is found that the noise error in the likelihood function plays an important role in the predictive performance of the BNN approach. By including a distribution for the noise error, an appropriate value can be found automatically in the sampling process, which optimizes the nuclear mass predictions. Furthermore, two quantities related to nuclear pairing and shell effects are added to the input layer in addition to the proton and mass numbers. As a result, the theoretical accuracies are significantly improved not only for nuclear masses but also for single-nucleon separation energies. Due to the inclusion of the shell effect, in the unknown region, the BNN approach predicts a similar shell-correction structure to that in the known region, e.g., the predictions of underestimation of nuclear mass around the magic numbers in the relativistic mean-field model. This manifests that better predictive performance can be achieved if more physical features are included in the BNN approach.

  20. Effects of intranasal oxytocin on the neural basis of face processing in autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domes, Gregor; Heinrichs, Markus; Kumbier, Ekkehardt; Grossmann, Annette; Hauenstein, Karlheinz; Herpertz, Sabine C

    2013-08-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is associated with altered face processing and decreased activity in brain regions involved in face processing. The neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to promote face processing and modulate brain activity in healthy adults. The present study examined the effects of oxytocin on the neural basis of face processing in adults with Asperger syndrome (AS). A group of 14 individuals with AS and a group of 14 neurotypical control participants performed a face-matching and a house-matching task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The effects of a single dose of 24 IU intranasally administered oxytocin were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled, within-subject, cross-over design. Under placebo, the AS group showed decreased activity in the right amygdala, fusiform gyrus, and inferior occipital gyrus compared with the control group during face processing. After oxytocin treatment, right amygdala activity to facial stimuli increased in the AS group. These findings indicate that oxytocin increases the saliency of social stimuli and in ASD and suggest that oxytocin might promote face processing and eye contact in individuals with ASD as prerequisites for neurotypical social interaction. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of synapse dilution on the memory retrieval in structured attractor neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, N.

    1993-08-01

    We investigate a simple model of structured attractor neural network (ANN). In this network a module codes for the category of the stored information, while another group of neurons codes for the remaining information. The probability distribution of stabilities of the patterns and the prototypes of the categories are calculated, for two different synaptic structures. The stability of the prototypes is shown to increase when the fraction of neurons coding for the category goes down. Then the effect of synapse destruction on the retrieval is studied in two opposite situations : first analytically in sparsely connected networks, then numerically in completely connected ones. In both cases the behaviour of the structured network and that of the usual homogeneous networks are compared. When lesions increase, two transitions are shown to appear in the behaviour of the structured network when one of the patterns is presented to the network. After the first transition the network recognizes the category of the pattern but not the individual pattern. After the second transition the network recognizes nothing. These effects are similar to syndromes caused by lesions in the central visual system, namely prosopagnosia and agnosia. In both types of networks (structured or homogeneous) the stability of the prototype is greater than the stability of individual patterns, however the first transition, for completely connected networks, occurs only when the network is structured.

  2. Effect of retinoic acid on expression of LINGO-1 and neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Hong-yi; Meng, Er-yan; Xia, Yuan-peng; Peng, Hai

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the expression of LINGO-1 after cerebral ischemia, investigate the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on the expression of LINGO-1 and GAP-43, and the number of synapses, and to emplore the repressive effect of LINGO-1 on neural regeneration after cerebral ischemia. The model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia was established by the modified suture method of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The expression of LINGO-1 was detected by Western blotting and that of GAP-43 by immunohistochemistry. The number of synapses was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The SD rats were divided into three groups: sham operation (sham) group, cerebral ischemia (CI) group and RA treatment (RA) group. The results showed that the expression level of LINGO-1 at 7th day after MCAO in sham, CI and RA groups was 0.266 ± 0.019, 1.215 ± 0.063 and 0.702 ± 0.081, respectively (PLINGO-1 expression is up-regulated after cerebral ischemia, and RA inhibits the expression of LINGO-1, promotes the expression of GAP-43 and increases the number of synapses. It suggests that LINGO-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral ischemia, which may provide an experimenal basis for LINGO-1 antogonist, RA, for the treatment of cerebral ischemia.

  3. Neural effects of social environmental stress - an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothersill, O; Donohoe, G

    2016-07-01

    Social environmental stress, including childhood abuse and deprivation, is associated with increased rates of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. However, the neural mechanisms mediating risk are not completely understood. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have reported effects of social environmental stress on a variety of brain regions, but interpretation of results is complicated by the variety of environmental risk factors examined and different methods employed. We examined brain regions consistently showing differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response in individuals exposed to higher levels of environmental stress by performing a coordinate-based meta-analysis on 54 functional MRI studies using activation likelihood estimation (ALE), including an overall sample of 3044 participants. We performed separate ALE analyses on studies examining adults (mean age ⩾18 years) and children/adolescents (mean age environmental stress across multiple studies. These clusters incorporated several brain regions, among which the right amygdala was most frequently implicated. These findings suggest that a variety of social environmental stressors is associated with differences in the BOLD response of specific brain regions such as the right amygdala in both children/adolescents and adults. What remains unknown is whether these environmental stressors have differential effects on treatment response in these brain regions.

  4. Phase-dependent stimulation effects on bursting activity in a neural network cortical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, William S; Kudela, Pawel; Weinberg, Seth; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

    2009-03-01

    A neural network simulation with realistic cortical architecture has been used to study synchronized bursting as a seizure representation. This model has the property that bursting epochs arise and cease spontaneously, and bursting epochs can be induced by external stimulation. We have used this simulation to study the time-frequency properties of the evolving bursting activity, as well as effects due to network stimulation. The model represents a cortical region of 1.6 mm x 1.6mm, and includes seven neuron classes organized by cortical layer, inhibitory or excitatory properties, and electrophysiological characteristics. There are a total of 65,536 modeled single compartment neurons that operate according to a version of Hodgkin-Huxley dynamics. The intercellular wiring is based on histological studies and our previous modeling efforts. The bursting phase is characterized by a flat frequency spectrum. Stimulation pulses are applied to this modeled network, with an electric field provided by a 1mm radius circular electrode represented mathematically in the simulation. A phase dependence to the post-stimulation quiescence is demonstrated, with local relative maxima in efficacy occurring before or during the network depolarization phase in the underlying activity. Brief periods of network insensitivity to stimulation are also demonstrated. The phase dependence was irregular and did not reach statistical significance when averaged over the full 2.5s of simulated bursting investigated. This result provides comparison with previous in vivo studies which have also demonstrated increased efficacy of stimulation when pulses are applied at the peak of the local field potential during cortical after discharges. The network bursting is synchronous when comparing the different neuron classes represented up to an uncertainty of 10 ms. Studies performed with an excitatory chandelier cell component demonstrated increased synchronous bursting in the model, as predicted from

  5. Effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation on ultrastructure of rats’ hippocampal neural stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-shui LUO

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of 900MHz electromagnetic radiation on the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs in vitro in order to provide basic materials for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic wave on the central nervous system. Methods Rat NSCs were divided into sham group, Radi1 group and Radi2 group, and they were respectively exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic wave at power density of 0, 1, and 3mW/cm2 in vitro. Cells in Radi1 group and Radi2 group were sub-grouped according to the way radiation was given: continuous irradiation, in which cells were exposed on the second day after culture for 2h per day for 6 consecutive days; single exposure to irradiation, in which cells were exposed for 12h on the sixth day after the culture. The ultrastructural changes on the surface of the cells were observed with atomic force microscope (AFM, whereas the ultrastructural changes in the cells were observed with transmission electron microscope (TEM. Results After 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation, when compared with the sham group (0mW/cm2, it was shown that the surface of neural stem cells in the exposure groups (1 and 3mW/cm2 became rough, and there were some changes such as "cavitation" and "fissure formation" in the membrane. The intracellular ultrastructure was found to have obviously disrupted in the exposure groups, such as homogenization of cytoplasm, obvious change organelle structure, morphological damage of structure of nucleus, nuclear membrane disappearance, and chromatin pyknosis, and the changes were more obvious in Radi2 group. Compared with the sham group, the surface roughness (Ra of cells in the exposure group was significantly intensified (P < 0.05, and it was higher in Radi2 group than that in Radi1 group (P < 0.05. Conclusion A 900MHz electromagnetic radiation may cause injury changes in NSCs membrane and ultrastructure in vitro, and the extent of injury may be related to the

  6. Effects of Substrate and Co-Culture on Neural Progenitor Cell Differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Erin Boote [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the study of stem and progenitor cells has moved to the forefront of research. Since the isolation of human hematopoietic stem cells in 1988 and the subsequent discovery of a self renewing population of multipotent cells in many tissues, many researchers have envisioned a better understanding of development and potential clinical usage in intractable diseases. Both these goals, however, depend on a solid understanding of the intracellular and extracellular forces that cause stem cells to differentiate to a specific cell fate. Many diseases of large scale cell loss have been suggested as candidates for stem cell based treatments. It is proposed that replacing the function of the damaged or defective cells by specific differentiation of stem or progenitor cells could treat the disease. Before cells can be directed to specific lineages, the mechanisms of differentiation must be better understood. Differentiation in vivo is an intensively complex system that is difficult to study. The goal of this research is to develop further understanding of the effects of soluble and extracellular matrix (ECM) cues on the differentiation of neural progenitor cells with the use of a simplified in vitro culture system. Specific research objectives are to study the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in response to astrocyte conditioned medium and protein substrate composition and concentration. In an effort to reveal the mechanism of the conditioned medium interaction, a test for the presence of a feedback loop between progenitor cells and astrocytes is presented along with an examination of conditioned medium storage temperature, which can reveal enzymatic dependencies. An examination of protein substrate composition and concentration will help to reveal the role of any ECM interactions on differentiation. This thesis is organized into a literature review covering recent advances in use of external modulators of differentiation such as surface coatings, co

  7. [Effects of rare earth elements on soil fauna community structure and their ecotoxicity to Holotrichia parallela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guiting; Jiang, Junqi; Chen, Jie; Zou, Yunding; Zhang, Xincai

    2006-01-01

    By the method of OECD filter paper contact, this paper studied the effects of applied rare earth elements on soil fauna community structure and their ecological toxicity to Holotrichia parallela in bean field. The results showed that there were no significant differences between the treatments and the control in soil fauna species, quantity of main species, and diversity index. Urgent and chronic toxic test showed that the differences between the treatments and the control were not significant. It was suggested that within the range of test dosages, rare earth elements had little ecological toxicity to Holotrichia parallela, and did not change the soil fauna community structure.

  8. Gait features analysis using artificial neural networks - testing the footwear effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; Zielińska, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide the methods for automatic detection of the difference in gait features depending on a footwear. Artificial neural networks were applied in the study. The gait data were recorded during the walk with different footwear for testing and validation of the proposed method. The gait properties were analyzed considering EMG (electromyography) signals and using two types of artificial neural networks: the learning vector quantization (LVQ) classifying network, and the clustering competitive network. Obtained classification and clustering results were discussed. For comparative studies, velocities of the leg joint trajectories, and accelerations were used. The features indicated by neural networks were compared with the conclusions formulated analyzing the above mentioned trajectories for ankle and knee joints. The matching between experimentally recorded joint trajectories and the results given by neural networks was studied. It was indicated what muscles are most influenced by the footwear, the relation between the footwear type and the muscles work was concluded.

  9. Effects of preoperative oral carbohydrates and trace elements on perioperative nutritional status in elective surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yoshimasa; Iwasaka, Hideo; Shiihara, Keisuke; Hagiwara, Satoshi; Kubo, Nobuhiro; Fujitomi, Yutaka; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2011-10-01

    In order to enhance postoperative recovery, preoperative consumption of carbohydrate (CHO) drinks has been used to suppress metabolic fluctuations. Trace elements such as zinc and copper are known to play an important role in postoperative recovery. Here, we examined the effects of preoperatively consuming a CHO drink containing zinc and copper. Subjects were 122 elective surgery patients divided into two groups (overnight fasting and CHO groups); each group was further divided into morning or afternoon surgery groups. Subjects in the CHO group consumed 300 mL of a CHO drink the night before surgery, followed by 200 ml before morning surgery or 700 ml before afternoon surgery (> or =2 hours before anesthesia induction). Blood levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), retinol-binding protein, zinc, and copper were determined. One subject in the CHO group was excluded after refusing the drink. There were no adverse effects from the CHO drink. NEFA levels increased in the fasting groups. Although zinc levels increased in the CHO group immediately after anesthesia induction, no group differences were observed the day after surgery. Preoperative consumption of a CHO drink containing trace elements suppressed preoperative metabolic fluctuations without complications and prevented trace element deficiency. Further beneficial effects during the perioperative period can be expected by adding trace elements to CHO supplements.

  10. Effect of meshing element on J-integral value for homogenous crown fracture behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasnulhadi, K.; Daud, R.; Mat, F.; Basaruddin, K. S.; Sulaiman, M. H.; Ariffin, A. K.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the meshing strategy schemes to solve the inconsistency of J-integral value for stress intensity factor (SIF) evaluation using finite element (FE) analysis. The effect of meshing element types on homogenous crown fracture behavior is investigated using developed ANSYS APDL code. For simplicity of the analysis, complex geometry of the dental crown was simplified into four point bending model. Two-dimensional FE single edge notch four-point bending model on In-Ceram Alumina was implemented in this study. A series of convergence analysis was performed to reveal the effect of various element types and combination quadrilateral and triangular elements on J-Integral for 10 contours. The meshing region was divided by two; non-critical part was set as global region and the critical part which is the pre-cracked area was set as local region. The effect of meshing size and combination of meshing shape were observed. For validation, the results of SIF through FE analysis using J-Integral have been compared and proved to have the good agreement with published theoretical result. It can be concluded that the smallest the meshing size at local region, the highest the number of contour of integration can be drawn.

  11. Study of the Matrix Effect on the Plasma Characterization of Heavy Elements in Soil Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik W.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS has been applied to perform a study of the matrix effect on the plasma characterization of soil sediment targets. The plasma is generated by focusing a pulsed Nd: YAG laser on the target in air at atmospheric pressure. The plasma emission spectrum was detected using a portable Echelle spectrometer (Mechelle 7500 — Multichannel Instruments, Stockholm, Sweden with intensified CCD camera. Spectroscopic analysis of plasma evolution of laser produced plasmas has been characterized in terms of their spectra, and electron temperature. Four heavy elements V, Pb, Mn and Co were determined in the obtained spectra. The LTE and optically thin plasma conditions were verified for the produced plasma. The electron temperature and density were determined using the emission intensity and stark broadening, respectively, of the spectral lines of the heavy elements in the soil sediments. The electron temperature does not change with concentration. For environmental applications, the obtained results showed the capability of the proposed LIBS setup with the portable Mechelle 7500 spectrometer to be applied in-situ for real-time measurements of the variation of the matrix elemental composition of soil sediments by following up only a single element as a marker for the composition of the soil sediment without need of analysis of the other elements.

  12. Effects of land use and parent materials on trace elements accumulation in topsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Cheng-Long; He, Teng-Bing; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Lu, Xiao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of parent material and land use on the concentration of trace elements in the agricultural topsoil of Guizhou Province, China, a total of 584 agricultural topsoil samples were collected in a typical region. The results indicate that the contents of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) in agricultural soils were greater than in the uncultivated soils, and the paddy fields exhibited higher contents of trace elements than dry lands. The enrichments of most trace elements in agricultural topsoil derived from carbonate rock were more serious. In paddy fields, Cd, Cr, and As showed positive relationships with soil organic matter ( 0.05). Lead and Hg formed the second component in principal component analysis (PCA) and were closely related to pH and clay content. In dry lands, the trace elements were well correlated with pH, C/N, and clay ( properties, especially in dry lands. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  13. Neural mechanisms for the effect of prior knowledge on audiovisual integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Zhang, Ye; Campos, Jennifer L; Zhang, Qinglin; Sun, Hong-Jin

    2011-05-01

    Converging evidence indicates that prior knowledge plays an important role in multisensory integration. However, the neural mechanisms underlying the processes with which prior knowledge is integrated with current sensory information remains unknown. In this study, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) while manipulating prior knowledge using a novel visual letter recognition task in which auditory information was always presented simultaneously. The color of the letters was assigned to a particular probability of being associated with audiovisual congruency (e.g., green=high probability (HP) and blue=low probability (LP)). Results demonstrate that this prior began affecting reaction times to the congruent audiovisual stimuli at about the 900th trial. Consequently, the ERP data was analyzed in two phases: the "early phase" (trial 900). The effects of prior knowledge were revealed through difference waveforms generated by subtracting the ERPs for the congruent audiovisual stimuli in the LP condition from those in the HP condition. A frontal-central probability effect (90-120 ms) was observed in the early phase. A right parietal-occipital probability effect (40-96 ms) and a frontal-central probability effect (170-200 ms) were observed in the late phase. The results suggest that during the initial acquisition of the knowledge about the probability of congruency, the brain assigned more attention to audiovisual stimuli for the LP condition. Following the acquisition of this prior knowledge, it was then used during early stages of visual processing and modulated the activity of multisensory cortical areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulatory effects of modafinil on neural circuits regulating emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetti, Roberta; Mattay, Venkata S; Stankevich, Beth; Skjei, Kelsey; Blasi, Giuseppe; Sambataro, Fabio; Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel C; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-09-01

    Modafinil differs from other arousal-enhancing agents in chemical structure, neurochemical profile, and behavioral effects. Most functional neuroimaging studies to date examined the effect of modafinil only on information processing underlying executive cognition, but cognitive enhancers in general have been shown to have pronounced effects on emotional behavior, too. We examined the effect of modafinil on neural circuits underlying affective processing and cognitive functions. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial (100 mg/day for 7 days). They underwent BOLD fMRI while performing an emotion information-processing task that activates the amygdala and two prefrontally dependent cognitive tasks-a working memory (WM) task and a variable attentional control (VAC) task. A clinical assessment that included measurement of blood pressure, heart rate, the Hamilton anxiety scale, and the profile of mood state (POMS) questionnaire was also performed on each test day. BOLD fMRI revealed significantly decreased amygdala reactivity to fearful stimuli on modafinil compared with the placebo condition. During executive cognition tasks, a WM task and a VAC task, modafinil reduced BOLD signal in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate. Although not statistically significant, there were trends for reduced anxiety, for decreased fatigue-inertia and increased vigor-activity, as well as decreased anger-hostility on modafinil. Modafinil in low doses has a unique physiologic profile compared with stimulant drugs: it enhances the efficiency of prefrontal cortical cognitive information processing, while dampening reactivity to threatening stimuli in the amygdala, a brain region implicated in anxiety.

  15. Distinguishing Neurocognitive Processes Reflected by P600 Effects: Evidence from ERPs and Neural Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Stefanie; Meyer, Lars; Gunter, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Research on language comprehension using event-related potentials (ERPs) reported distinct ERP components reliably related to the processing of semantic (N400) and syntactic information (P600). Recent ERP studies have challenged this well-defined distinction by showing P600 effects for semantic and pragmatic anomalies. So far, it is still unresolved whether the P600 reflects specific or rather common processes. The present study addresses this question by investigating ERPs in response to a syntactic and pragmatic (irony) manipulation, as well as a combined syntactic and pragmatic manipulation. For the syntactic condition, a morphosyntactic violation was applied, whereas for the pragmatic condition, such as “That is rich”, either an ironic or literal interpretation was achieved, depending on the prior context. The ERPs at the critical word showed a LAN-P600 pattern for syntactically incorrect sentences relative to correct ones. For ironic compared to literal sentences, ERPs showed a P200 effect followed by a P600 component. In comparison of the syntax-related P600 to the irony-related P600, distributional differences were found. Moreover, for the P600 time window (i.e., 500–900 ms), different changes in theta power between the syntax and pragmatics effects were found, suggesting that different patterns of neural activity contributed to each respective effect. Thus, both late positivities seem to be differently sensitive to these two types of linguistic information, and might reflect distinct neurocognitive processes, such as reanalysis of the sentence structure versus pragmatic reanalysis. PMID:24844290

  16. Modulatory Effects of Modafinil on Neural Circuits Regulating Emotion and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetti, Roberta; Mattay, Venkata S; Stankevich, Beth; Skjei, Kelsey; Blasi, Giuseppe; Sambataro, Fabio; Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel C; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Modafinil differs from other arousal-enhancing agents in chemical structure, neurochemical profile, and behavioral effects. Most functional neuroimaging studies to date examined the effect of modafinil only on information processing underlying executive cognition, but cognitive enhancers in general have been shown to have pronounced effects on emotional behavior, too. We examined the effect of modafinil on neural circuits underlying affective processing and cognitive functions. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial (100 mg/day for 7 days). They underwent BOLD fMRI while performing an emotion information-processing task that activates the amygdala and two prefrontally dependent cognitive tasks—a working memory (WM) task and a variable attentional control (VAC) task. A clinical assessment that included measurement of blood pressure, heart rate, the Hamilton anxiety scale, and the profile of mood state (POMS) questionnaire was also performed on each test day. BOLD fMRI revealed significantly decreased amygdala reactivity to fearful stimuli on modafinil compared with the placebo condition. During executive cognition tasks, a WM task and a VAC task, modafinil reduced BOLD signal in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate. Although not statistically significant, there were trends for reduced anxiety, for decreased fatigue-inertia and increased vigor-activity, as well as decreased anger-hostility on modafinil. Modafinil in low doses has a unique physiologic profile compared with stimulant drugs: it enhances the efficiency of prefrontal cortical cognitive information processing, while dampening reactivity to threatening stimuli in the amygdala, a brain region implicated in anxiety. PMID:20555311

  17. [Protective effects and its mechanism on neural cells after folic acid intervention in preeclampsia rat model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Ge, Jing; Yang, Li-na; Xue, Dan; Li, Ju

    2011-08-01

    To investigate protective effects and mechanism of folic acid on brain neural cells in preeclampsia rat model. Adult pregnant Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10 in each group). Rats in model group were injected intraperitoneally with homocysteine (Hcy, 200 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) daily and were injected subcutaneously every other day with monosodium glutamate (MSG, 1 g × kg(-1)· 48 h(-1)) from the 10th day of pregnancy to establish the model of preeclampsia. Low-dose folic acid (low dose group 10 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) and high-dose folic acid (high dose group 20 mg × kg(-1) × d(-1)) were given intragastric administration with folic acid tablets dissolved in saline daily at the same time of establishing model. Rats in control group were injected or intragastric administration with the same dose of saline as above up to the 20th day of pregnancy. Brain tissue was fixed on the 20th day of pregnancy, so was that plasma folic acid was measured with automatic electro-chemiluminescence. Rats' neural nerve cells apoptosis was observed with tunel. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation was observed with immunohistochemical staining. bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression changes were observed by using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blot. (1) Plasma folate concentrations were (39.5 ± 3.4) nmol/L in low dose group and (40.1 ± 5.4) nmol/L in high dose group, which were all significantly higher than (26.9 ± 6.7) nmol/L in model group (P 0.05); (2) Apoptosis cell were 48.2 ± 9.1 in low dose group and 44.7 ± 8.3 in high dose group, which were significantly lower than 75.8 ± 10.1 in model group (P apoptosis cell in low dose and high dose group did not show significant difference (P > 0.05); (3) NF-κB activation were 48 ± 9 in low dose group and 45 ± 8 in high dose group, which were significantly lower 76 ± 10 in model group (P 0.05); (4) bcl-2 mRNA and protein expression were 0.98 ± 0.49 and 0.89 ± 0.52 in low dose group and 0.95 ± 0.38 and

  18. Neural plasticity and proliferation in the generation of antidepressant effects: hippocampal implication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilar-Cuéllar, Fuencisla; Vidal, Rebeca; Díaz, Alvaro; Castro, Elena; dos Anjos, Severiano; Pascual-Brazo, Jesús; Linge, Raquel; Vargas, Veronica; Blanco, Helena; Martínez-Villayandre, Beatriz; Pazos, Ángel; Valdizán, Elsa M

    2013-01-01

    It is widely accepted that changes underlying depression and antidepressant-like effects involve not only alterations in the levels of neurotransmitters as monoamines and their receptors in the brain, but also structural and functional changes far beyond. During the last two decades, emerging theories are providing new explanations about the neurobiology of depression and the mechanism of action of antidepressant strategies based on cellular changes at the CNS level. The neurotrophic/plasticity hypothesis of depression, proposed more than a decade ago, is now supported by multiple basic and clinical studies focused on the role of intracellular-signalling cascades that govern neural proliferation and plasticity. Herein, we review the state-of-the-art of the changes in these signalling pathways which appear to underlie both depressive disorders and antidepressant actions. We will especially focus on the hippocampal cellularity and plasticity modulation by serotonin, trophic factors as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through intracellular signalling pathways-cAMP, Wnt/ β -catenin, and mTOR. Connecting the classic monoaminergic hypothesis with proliferation/neuroplasticity-related evidence is an appealing and comprehensive attempt for improving our knowledge about the neurobiological events leading to depression and associated to antidepressant therapies.

  19. The effects of neural mobilization on cervical radiculopathy patients' pain, disability, ROM, and deep flexor endurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Gyu; Chung, Sin Ho; Jung, Ho Bal

    2017-09-22

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR) is a disease of the cervical spine and a space-occupying lesion that occurs because of pathological problems with cervical nerve roots. Nerve root injury to produce functional disability. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of neural mobilization with manual cervical traction (NMCT) compared with manual cervical traction (MCT) on pain, functional disability, muscle endurance, and range of motion (ROM) in individuals with CR patients. A blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Thirty CR patients were divided into two groups - those who received NMCT and those who received MCT. The intervention was applied three times per week for eight weeks. It was measured in order to determine the pain and functional disability in patients with CR. The numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), neck disability index (NDI), ROM, and deep flexor endurance of patients were measured prior to the experiment, four weeks, and eight weeks after the experiment to compare the time points. A repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to compare differences within each group prior to the experiment. And Bonferroni test was performed to examine the significance of each time point. There were significant differences within each group prior to the intervention, four weeks after the intervention, and eight weeks after the intervention in NPRS, NDI, ROM, and deep flexor endurance (PROM and deep flexor endurance increased in the NMCT group than the MCT group (PROM, and deep flexor endurance for patients with CR.

  20. Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Kobanbay, Begüm; Proulx, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the “linguistic network” to this area. PMID:26075102

  1. Task relevance modulates the behavioural and neural effects of sensory predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auksztulewicz, Ryszard; Friston, Karl J; Nobre, Anna C

    2017-12-01

    The brain is thought to generate internal predictions to optimize behaviour. However, it is unclear whether predictions signalling is an automatic brain function or depends on task demands. Here, we manipulated the spatial/temporal predictability of visual targets, and the relevance of spatial/temporal information provided by auditory cues. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to measure participants' brain activity during task performance. Task relevance modulated the influence of predictions on behaviour: spatial/temporal predictability improved spatial/temporal discrimination accuracy, but not vice versa. To explain these effects, we used behavioural responses to estimate subjective predictions under an ideal-observer model. Model-based time-series of predictions and prediction errors (PEs) were associated with dissociable neural responses: predictions correlated with cue-induced beta-band activity in auditory regions and alpha-band activity in visual regions, while stimulus-bound PEs correlated with gamma-band activity in posterior regions. Crucially, task relevance modulated these spectral correlates, suggesting that current goals influence PE and prediction signalling.

  2. The effects of life stress and neural learning signals on fluid intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Eva; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Beck, Anne; Dolan, Raymond J; Huys, Quentin J M; Rapp, Michael A; Heinz, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Fluid intelligence (fluid IQ), defined as the capacity for rapid problem solving and behavioral adaptation, is known to be modulated by learning and experience. Both stressful life events (SLES) and neural correlates of learning [specifically, a key mediator of adaptive learning in the brain, namely the ventral striatal representation of prediction errors (PE)] have been shown to be associated with individual differences in fluid IQ. Here, we examine the interaction between adaptive learning signals (using a well-characterized probabilistic reversal learning task in combination with fMRI) and SLES on fluid IQ measures. We find that the correlation between ventral striatal BOLD PE and fluid IQ, which we have previously reported, is quantitatively modulated by the amount of reported SLES. Thus, after experiencing adversity, basic neuronal learning signatures appear to align more closely with a general measure of flexible learning (fluid IQ), a finding complementing studies on the effects of acute stress on learning. The results suggest that an understanding of the neurobiological correlates of trait variables like fluid IQ needs to take socioemotional influences such as chronic stress into account.

  3. Neural Stimulation Has a Long-Term Effect on Foreign Vocabulary Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Kobanbay, Begüm; Proulx, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of a foreign language is a challenging task that is becoming increasingly more important in the world nowadays. There is evidence suggesting that the frontal and temporal cortices are involved in language processing and comprehension, but it is still unknown whether foreign language acquisition recruits additional cortical areas in a causal manner. For the first time, we used transcranial random noise stimulation on the frontal and parietal brain areas, in order to compare its effect on the acquisition of unknown foreign words and a sham, or placebo, condition was also included. This type of noninvasive neural stimulation enhances cortical activity by boosting the spontaneous activity of neurons. Foreign vocabulary acquisition was tested both immediately and seven days after the stimulation. We found that stimulation on the posterior parietal, but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or sham stimulation, significantly improved the memory performance in the long term. These results suggest that the posterior parietal cortex is directly involved in acquisition of foreign vocabulary, thus extending the "linguistic network" to this area.

  4. The Effects of Topographical Patterns and Sizes on Neural Stem Cell Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lin; Li, Ning; Huang, Rong; Song, Qin; Wang, Long; Zhang, Qi; Su, Ruigong; Kong, Tao; Tang, Mingliang; Cheng, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Engineered topographical manipulation, a paralleling approach with conventional biochemical cues, has recently attracted the growing interests in utilizations to control stem cell fate. In this study, effects of topological parameters, pattern and size are emphasized on the proliferation and differentiation of adult neural stem cells (ANSCs). We fabricate micro-scale topographical Si wafers with two different feature sizes. These topographical patterns present linear micro-pattern (LMP), circular micro-pattern (CMP) and dot micro-pattern (DMP). The results show that the three topography substrates are suitable for ANSC growth, while they all depress ANSC proliferation when compared to non-patterned substrates (control). Meanwhile, LMP and CMP with two feature sizes can both significantly enhance ANSC differentiation to neurons compared to control. The smaller the feature size is, the better upregulation applies to ANSC for the differentiated neurons. The underlying mechanisms of topography-enhanced neuronal differentiation are further revealed by directing suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (MAPK/Erk) signaling pathway in ANSC using U0126, known to inhibit the activation of Erk. The statistical results suggest MAPK/Erk pathway is partially involved in topography-induced differentiation. These observations provide a better understanding on the different roles of topographical cues on stem cell behavior, especially on the selective differentiation, and facilitate to advance the field of stem cell therapy. PMID:23527077

  5. Neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2008-12-01

    Although the influence of long-term musical training on the processing of heard music has been the subject of many studies, the neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise remain insufficiently understood. By means of magnetoencephalography (MEG) we compared musicians and nonmusicians in a musical imagery task with familiar melodies. Subjects listened to the beginnings of the melodies, continued them in their imagination and then heard a tone which was either a correct or an incorrect further continuation of the melody. Only in musicians was the imagery of these melodies strong enough to elicit an early preattentive brain response to unexpected incorrect continuations of the imagined melodies; this response, the imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN), peaked approximately 175 ms after tone onset and was right-lateralized. In contrast to previous studies the iMMN was not based on a heard but on a purely imagined memory trace. Our results suggest that in trained musicians imagery and perception rely on similar neuronal correlates, and that the musicians' intense musical training has modified this network to achieve a superior ability for imagery and preattentive processing of music.

  6. The Mona Lisa effect: neural correlates of centered and off-centered gaze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyarskaya, Evgenia; Sebastian, Alexandra; Bauermann, Thomas; Hecht, Heiko; Tüscher, Oliver

    2015-02-01

    The Mona Lisa effect describes the phenomenon when the eyes of a portrait appear to look at the observer regardless of the observer's position. Recently, the metaphor of a cone of gaze has been proposed to describe the range of gaze directions within which a person feels looked at. The width of the gaze cone is about five degrees of visual angle to either side of a given gaze direction. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how the brain regions involved in gaze direction discrimination would differ between centered and decentered presentation positions of a portrait exhibiting eye contact. Subjects observed a given portrait's eyes. By presenting portraits with varying gaze directions-eye contact (0°), gaze at the edge of the gaze cone (5°), and clearly averted gaze (10°), we revealed that brain response to gaze at the edge of the gaze cone was similar to that produced by eye contact and different from that produced by averted gaze. Right fusiform gyrus and right superior temporal sulcus showed stronger activation when the gaze was averted as compared to eye contact. Gaze sensitive areas, however, were not affected by the portrait's presentation location. In sum, although the brain clearly distinguishes averted from centered gaze, a substantial change of vantage point does not alter neural activity, thus providing a possible explanation why the feeling of eye contact is upheld even in decentered stimulus positions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Effectiveness of Context-Aware Character Input Method for Mobile Phone Based on Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Matsuhara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opportunities and needs are increasing to input Japanese sentences on mobile phones since performance of mobile phones is improving. Applications like E-mail, Web search, and so on are widely used on mobile phones now. We need to input Japanese sentences using only 12 keys on mobile phones. We have proposed a method to input Japanese sentences on mobile phones quickly and easily. We call this method number-Kanji translation method. The number string inputted by a user is translated into Kanji-Kana mixed sentence in our proposed method. Number string to Kana string is a one-to-many mapping. Therefore, it is difficult to translate a number string into the correct sentence intended by the user. The proposed context-aware mapping method is able to disambiguate a number string by artificial neural network (ANN. The system is able to translate number segments into the intended words because the system becomes aware of the correspondence of number segments with Japanese words through learning by ANN. The system does not need a dictionary. We also show the effectiveness of our proposed method for practical use by the result of the evaluation experiment in Twitter data.

  8. Effects of ethanol and NAP on cerebellar expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule L1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devon M Fitzgerald

    Full Text Available The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 is critical for brain development and plays a role in learning and memory in the adult. Ethanol inhibits L1-mediated cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs, and these actions might underlie the cerebellar dysmorphology of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The peptide NAP potently blocks ethanol inhibition of L1 adhesion and prevents ethanol teratogenesis. We used quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting of extracts of cerebellar slices, CGNs, and astrocytes from postnatal day 7 (PD7 rats to investigate whether ethanol and NAP act in part by regulating the expression of L1. Treatment of cerebellar slices with 20 mM ethanol, 10(-12 M NAP, or both for 4 hours, 24 hours, and 10 days did not significantly affect L1 mRNA and protein levels. Similar treatment for 4 or 24 hours did not regulate L1 expression in primary cultures of CGNs and astrocytes, the predominant cerebellar cell types. Because ethanol also damages the adult cerebellum, we studied the effects of chronic ethanol exposure in adult rats. One year of binge drinking did not alter L1 gene and protein expression in extracts from whole cerebellum. Thus, ethanol does not alter L1 expression in the developing or adult cerebellum; more likely, ethanol disrupts L1 function by modifying its conformation and signaling. Likewise, NAP antagonizes the actions of ethanol without altering L1 expression.

  9. Effects of transient unilateral functional brain disruption on global neural network status in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem M Otte

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Permanent focal brain damage can have critical effects on the function of nearby as well as remote brain regions. However, the effects of transient disturbances on global brain function are largely unknown. Our goal was to develop an experimental in vivo model to map the impact of transient functional brain impairment on large-scale neural networks in the absence of structural damage.We describe a new rat model of transient functional hemispheric disruption using unilateral focal anesthesia by intracarotid pentobarbital injection. The brain’s functional status was assessed with resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI and EEG. We performed network analysis to identify and quantify highly connected network hubs, i.e. ‘rich-club organization’, in pre- and postbarbital functional networks.Perfusion MRI data demonstrated that the catheterized carotid artery predominantly supplied the ipsilateral hemisphere, allowing for selective hemispheric brain silencing. The prebarbital baseline network displayed strong functional connectivity within and between hemispheres. Following pentobarbital injection, the disrupted hemisphere revealed increased intrahemispheric functional connectivity with concomitant decrease of interhemispheric connectivity. The bilateral functional network was characterized by a strong positive rich-club effect, which was not affected by ipsilateral disruption. Nevertheless, the rich-club value was significantly decreased in the ipsilateral hemisphere and to a lesser extent contralaterally. Loss of interhemispheric EEG synchronization supported the rs-fMRI findings.Our data support the concept that densely connected rich-club regions play a central role in global brain communication, and show that network hub configurations can be significantly affected by focal temporary functional hemispheric disruption without structural neuronal damage. Further studies with this rat model will provide essential additional insights into network

  10. Effects of Polyamidoamine Dendrimers on a 3-D Neurosphere System Using Human Neural Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yang; Kurokawa, Yoshika; Zeng, Qin; Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Nansai, Hiroko; Zhang, Zhenya; Sone, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    The practical application of engineered nanomaterials or nanoparticles like polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers has been promoted in medical devices or industrial uses. The safety of PAMAM dendrimers needs to be assessed when used as a drug carrier to treat brain disease. However, the effects of PAMAM on the human nervous system remain unknown. In this study, human neural progenitor cells cultured as a 3D neurosphere model were used to study the effects of PAMAM dendrimers on the nervous system. Neurospheres were exposed to different G4-PAMAM dendrimers for 72 h at concentrations of 0.3, 1, 3, and 10 μg/ml. The biodistribution was investigated using fluorescence-labeled PAMAM dendrimers, and gene expression was evaluated using microarray analysis followed by pathway and network analysis. Results showed that PAMAM dendrimer nanoparticles can penetrate into neurospheres via superficial cells on them. PAMAM-NH2 but not PAMAM-SC can inhibit neurosphere growth. A reduced number of MAP2-positive cells in flare regions were inhibited after 10 days of differentiation, indicating an inhibitory effect of PAMAM-NH2 on cell proliferation and neuronal migration. A microarray assay showed 32 dendrimer toxicity-related genes, with network analysis showing 3 independent networks of the selected gene targets. Inducible immediate early gene early growth response gene 1 (Egr1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI2), and adrenomedullin (ADM) were the key genes in each network, and the expression of these genes was significantly down regulated. These findings suggest that exposure of neurospheres to PAMAM-NH2 dendrimers affects cell proliferation and migration through pathways regulated by Egr1, IGFBP3, TFPI2, and ADM. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. An attention-based effective neural model for drug-drug interactions extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Lin, Hongfei; Luo, Ling; Zhao, Zhehuan; Li, Zhengguang; Zhang, Yijia; Yang, Zhihao; Wang, Jian

    2017-10-10

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) often bring unexpected side effects. The clinical recognition of DDIs is a crucial issue for both patient safety and healthcare cost control. However, although text-mining-based systems explore various methods to classify DDIs, the classification performance with regard to DDIs in long and complex sentences is still unsatisfactory. In this study, we propose an effective model that classifies DDIs from the literature by combining an attention mechanism and a recurrent neural network with long short-term memory (LSTM) units. In our approach, first, a candidate-drug-oriented input attention acting on word-embedding vectors automatically learns which words are more influential for a given drug pair. Next, the inputs merging the position- and POS-embedding vectors are passed to a bidirectional LSTM layer whose outputs at the last time step represent the high-level semantic information of the whole sentence. Finally, a softmax layer performs DDI classification. Experimental results from the DDIExtraction 2013 corpus show that our system performs the best with respect to detection and classification (84.0% and 77.3%, respectively) compared with other state-of-the-art methods. In particular, for the Medline-2013 dataset with long and complex sentences, our F-score far exceeds those of top-ranking systems by 12.6%. Our approach effectively improves the performance of DDI classification tasks. Experimental analysis demonstrates that our model performs better with respect to recognizing not only close-range but also long-range patterns among words, especially for long, complex and compound sentences.

  12. CHRNA5 variants moderate the effect of nicotine deprivation on a neural index of cognitive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D E; MacQueen, D A; Jentink, K G; Park, J Y; Lin, H-Y; Drobes, D J

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with reduced attention and memory cognitive control-related processes may be motivated to smoke as a result of the cognitive enhancing effects of nicotine. Further, nicotine deprivation-induced reductions in cognitive control may negatively reinforce smoking. Minor allele carriers at rs16969968 in the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α5 subunit gene (CHRNA5) have been shown to exhibit both reduced cognitive control and greater nicotine dependence. It is therefore of interest to see if variants in this gene moderate the influence of nicotine deprivation on cognitive control. P3b and P3a components of the event-related brain potential waveform evoked by a three-stimulus visual oddball task are widely viewed as positive indices of cognitive control-related processes. We tested the hypothesis that individuals possessing at least one minor allele at rs16969968 in CHRNA5 would show greater nicotine deprivation-induced reductions in P3b and P3a amplitude. The sample included 72 non-Hispanic, Caucasian heavy smokers (54 men and 18 women) with a mean age of 36.11 years (SD = 11.57). Participants completed the visual oddball task during counterbalanced nicotine and placebo smoking sessions. Findings indicated that rs16969968 status did not moderate nicotine effects on P3b or P3a, whereas variation in other CHRNA5 polymorphisms, which are not as well characterized and are not in linkage disequilibrium with rs16969968, predicted nicotine deprivation-induced reduction of P3a amplitude: rs588765 (F1,68 = 7.74, P = 0.007) and rs17408276 (F1,67 = 7.34, P = 0.009). Findings are interpreted in the context of vulnerability alleles that may predict nicotine effects on cognitive control. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  13. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of tempol and candesartan on neural control of the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppel, Gabriela A; Head, Geoffrey A; Denton, Kate M; Evans, Roger G

    2012-05-21

    We compared the effects of tempol (300 μmol kg(-1) plus 300 μmol kg(-1) h(-1), n=14) and candesartan (10 μg kg(-1) plus 10 μg kg(-1) h(-1), n=14) on renal haemodynamics, excretory function, and responses to electrical stimulation of the renal nerves (RNS) in lean and obese rabbits under pentobarbitone anaesthesia. Depressor responses to tempol (-16 ± 2 mmHg) and candesartan (-12 ± 1 mmHg) were similar. Candesartan, but not tempol, significantly increased basal renal blood flow (RBF; +36 ± 7%). Tempol, but not candesartan, significantly reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR; -30 ± 10%) and sodium excretion (U(Na)V; -44 ± 14%). RNS induced frequency-dependent reductions in RBF (-20 ± 3% at 1 Hz), GFR (-28 ± 6% at 1 Hz) and U(Na)V (-55 ± 6% at 1 Hz). Candesartan blunted these responses. Tempol did not significantly alter RBF and GFR responses to RNS but blunted the U(Na)V response. Responses to RNS, and the effects of tempol and candesartan, were similar in lean compared with obese rabbits. Unlike candesartan, tempol did not induce renal vasodilatation, maintain GFR and U(Na)V during reductions in arterial pressure, or blunt neurally-mediated vasoconstriction. In conclusion, unlike the AT(1)-receptor antagonist candesartan, tempol does not blunt the effects of RNS on renal haemodynamic function. Furthermore, under the current experimental conditions superoxide appears to make little contribution to the actions of endogenous angiotensin II on baseline renal haemodynamics or excretory function, or their responses to RNS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative Effects of Methylphenidate, Modafinil, and MDMA on Response Inhibition Neural Networks in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, André; Müller, Felix; Dolder, Patrick C; Schmid, Yasmin; Zanchi, Davide; Liechti, Matthias E; Borgwardt, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Psychostimulants such as methylphenidate and modafinil are increasingly used by healthy people for cognitive enhancement purposes, whereas the acute effect of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (ecstasy) on cognitive functioning in healthy subjects remains unclear. This study directly compared the acute effects of methylphenidate, modafinil, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on the neural mechanisms underlying response inhibition in healthy subjects. Using a double-blind, within-subject, placebo-controlled, cross-over design, methylphenidate, modafinil, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine were administrated to 21 healthy subjects while performing a go/no-go event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging task to assess brain activation during motor response inhibition. Relative to placebo, methylphenidate and modafinil but not 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine improved inhibitory performance. Methylphenidate significantly increased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus, middle/superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, presupplementary motor area, and anterior cingulate cortex compared with placebo. Methylphenidate also induced significantly higher activation in the anterior cingulate cortex and presupplementary motor area and relative to modafinil. Relative to placebo, modafinil significantly increased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus and superior/inferior parietal lobule, while 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine significantly increased activation in the right middle/inferior frontal gyrus and superior parietal lobule. Direct comparison of methylphenidate, modafinil, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine revealed broad recruitment of fronto-parietal regions but specific effects of methylphenidate on middle/superior temporal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex, and presupplementary motor area activation, suggesting dissociable modulations of response inhibition networks and potentially the superiority of methylphenidate in the

  16. THE EFFECT OF DECOMPOSITION METHOD AS DATA PREPROCESSING ON NEURAL NETWORKS MODEL FOR FORECASTING TREND AND SEASONAL TIME SERIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subanar Subanar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, one of the central topics for the neural networks (NN community is the issue of data preprocessing on the use of NN. In this paper, we will investigate this topic particularly on the effect of Decomposition method as data processing and the use of NN for modeling effectively time series with both trend and seasonal patterns. Limited empirical studies on seasonal time series forecasting with neural networks show that some find neural networks are able to model seasonality directly and prior deseasonalization is not necessary, and others conclude just the opposite. In this research, we study particularly on the effectiveness of data preprocessing, including detrending and deseasonalization by applying Decomposition method on NN modeling and forecasting performance. We use two kinds of data, simulation and real data. Simulation data are examined on multiplicative of trend and seasonality patterns. The results are compared to those obtained from the classical time series model. Our result shows that a combination of detrending and deseasonalization by applying Decomposition method is the effective data preprocessing on the use of NN for forecasting trend and seasonal time series.

  17. Effects of propofol on patient-ventilator synchrony and interaction during pressure support ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaschetto, Rosanna; Cammarota, Gianmaria; Colombo, Davide; Longhini, Federico; Grossi, Francesca; Giovanniello, Andrea; Della Corte, Francesco; Navalesi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating the physiologic effects of varying depths of propofol sedation on patient-ventilator interaction and synchrony during pressure support ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist. Prospective crossover randomized controlled trial. University hospital ICU. Fourteen intubated patients mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure. Six 25-minute trials randomly performed applying both pressure support ventilation and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist during wakefulness and with two doses of propofol, administered by Target Control Infusion, determining light (1.26 ± 0.35 μg/mL) and deep (2.52 ± 0.71 μg/mL) sedation, as defined by the bispectral index and Ramsay Sedation Scale. We measured electrical activity of the diaphragm to assess neural drive and calculated its integral over time during 1 minute (∫electrical activity of the diaphragm/min) to estimate diaphragm energy expenditure (effort), arterial blood gases, airway pressure, tidal volume and its coefficient of variation, respiratory rate, neural timing components, and calculated the ineffective triggering index. Increasing the depth of sedation did not cause significant modifications of respiratory timing, while determined a progressive significant decrease in neural drive (with both modes) and effort (in pressure support ventilation only). In pressure support ventilation, the difference in ineffective triggering index between wakefulness and light sedation was negligible (from 5.9% to 7.6%, p = 0.97); with deep sedation, however, ineffective triggering index increased up to 21.8% (p ventilator interactions. In pressure support ventilation, deep propofol sedation increased asynchronies, while light sedation did not. Propofol reduced the respiratory drive, while breathing timing was not significantly affected. Gas exchange and breathing pattern were also influenced by propofol infusion to an extent that varied with the depth of sedation and the mode of ventilation.

  18. Finite Element Modelling of the Effects of Average Grain Size and Misorientation Angle on the Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sanusi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper comprises an investigation using finite element analysis to study the behaviour of nanocrystalline grain structures during Equal Channel Angular Press (ECAP processing of metals. The effects of average grain size and misorientation angle on the deformation are examined in order to see how microstructural features might explain the observed increase in strength of nanocrsytalline metals. While this approach forms a convenient starting as it offers a simple way of including grain size effects and grain misorientation to which we could add additional phenomena through developing the material model used to describe the anisotropy and techniques that would automatically re-mesh the refined grain structure produced under severe plastic deformation. From this, it can be concluded that these additional techniques incorporated into the finite element model produced effects that correspond to observed behaviour in real polycrystals.

  19. Short term effectiveness of neural sliders and neural tensioners as an adjunct to static stretching of hamstrings on knee extension angle in healthy individuals: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saurab; Balthillaya, Ganesh; Rao, Roopa; Mani, Ramakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the added benefit of nerve-biased interventions over static stretching in hamstring flexibility and to compare the effectiveness of two types of nerve-biased interventions over a week. Three-arm assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial. University Laboratory. Sixty healthy individuals (mean age = 22 ± 2.4 years) with reduced hamstring flexibility were randomized to three groups who received static stretching and neurodynamic sliders (NS-SS); static stretching with neurodynamic tensioner (NT-SS) and static stretching (SS) alone. Knee extension angle (KEA) in degrees. Baseline characteristics including demographic, anthropomorphic and KEA between groups were comparable. A significant interaction was observed between group (intervention) and time, [F (2,114) = 3.595; p = 0.031]. Post-hoc pairwise comparisons analyses revealed significant differences at post-intervention measurement time point between NS-SS and SS (mean difference: -6.8; 95%CI = -12, -1.5; p = 0.011) and NT-SS and SS (mean difference: -11.6; 95%CI = -16.7, -6.3; p tensioners are both effective in increasing hamstring flexibility as an adjunct to static hamstring stretching when compared to static stretching alone. No neural mobilization technique proved to be superior over another. This clinical trial is registered in Clinical Trials Registry- India (CTRI) with registration number CTRI/2012/05/002619. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Geeter, N; Crevecoeur, G; Leemans, A; Dupré, L

    2015-01-21

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron's local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract's position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values.

  1. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on neural correlates of attention and inhibition in adolescents with bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalfe, A W S; MacIntosh, B.J.; Scavone, A; Ou, X; Korczak, D; Goldstein, B I

    2016-01-01

    Executive dysfunction is common during and between mood episodes in bipolar disorder (BD), causing social and functional impairment. This study investigated the effect of acute exercise on adolescents with BD and healthy control subjects (HC) to test for positive or negative consequences on neural response during an executive task. Fifty adolescents (mean age 16.54?1.47 years, 56% female, 30 with BD) completed an attention and response inhibition task before and after 20?min of recumbent cycl...

  2. Which neural mechanisms mediate the effects of a parenting intervention program on parenting behavior: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolijn, Laura; Euser, Saskia; van den Bulk, Bianca G; Huffmeijer, Renske; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2017-03-21

    The Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) has proven effective in increasing parental sensitivity. However, the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. In a randomized controlled trial we examine parental neurocognitive factors that may mediate the intervention effects on parenting behavior. Our aims are to (1) examine whether the intervention influences parents' neural processing of children's emotional expressions and the neural precursors of response inhibition and to (2) test whether neural changes mediate intervention effects on parenting behavior. We will test 100 mothers of 4-6 year old same-sex twins. A random half of the mothers will receive the VIPP-SD Twins (i.e. VIPP-SD adapted for twin families), consisting of 5 home visits in a 3-months period; the other half will receive a dummy intervention. Neurocognitive measures are acquired approximately 2 weeks before and 2 weeks after the intervention. Mothers' electroencephalographic (EEG) activity is measured while performing a stop signal task and in response to children's facial expressions. To obtain a complementary behavioral measure, mothers also perform an emotion recognition task. Parenting behavior will be assessed during parent-child interactions at pre and post intervention lab visits. Our results will shed light on the neurocognitive factors underlying changes in parenting behavior after a parenting support program, which may benefit the development of such programs. Dutch Trial Register: NTR5312 ; Date registered: January 3, 2017.

  3. The use of artificial neural network for modelling of phycoremediation of toxic elements As(III) and As(V) from wastewater using Botryococcus braunii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, M S; Majumder, C B

    2016-02-15

    In the present study, a thorough investigation has been done on the removal efficiency of both As(III) and As (V) from synthetic wastewater by phycoremediation of Botryococcus braunii algal biomass. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are practised for predicting % phycoremediation efficiency of both As(III) and As(V) ions. The influence of several parameters for example initial pH, inoculum size, contact time and initial arsenic concentration (either As(III) or As(V)) was examined systematically. The maximum phycoremediation of As(III) and As(V) was found to be 85.22% and 88.15% at pH9.0, equilibrium time of 144h by using algal inoculum size of 10% (v/v) and initial arsenic concentration of 50mg/L. The data acquired from laboratory scale experimental set up was utilized for training a three-layer feed-forward back propagation (BP) with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) training algorithm having 4:5:1 architecture. A comparison between the experimental data and model outputs provided a high correlation coefficient (R(2)all_ANN equal to 0.9998) and exhibited that the model was capable for predicting the phycoremediation of both As(III) and As(V) from wastewater. The network topology was optimized by changing number of neurons in hidden layers. ANNs are efficient to model and simulate highly non-liner multivariable relationships. Absolute error and Standard deviation (SD) with respect to experimental output were calculated for ANN model outputs. The comparison of phycoremediation efficiencies of both As(III) and As(V) between experimental results and ANN model outputs exhibited that ANN model can determine the behaviour of As(III) and As(V) elimination process under various circumstances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Burden of Binge and Heavy Drinking on the Brain: Effects on Adolescent and Young Adult Neural Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Cservenka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Adolescence and young adulthood are periods of continued biological and psychosocial maturation. Thus, there may be deleterious effects of consuming large quantities of alcohol on neural development and associated cognition during this time. The purpose of this mini review is to highlight neuroimaging research that has specifically examined the effects of binge and heavy drinking on adolescent and young adult brain structure and function.Methods: We review cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of young binge and heavy drinkers that have examined brain structure (e.g., gray and white matter volume, cortical thickness, white matter microstructure and investigated brain response using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.Results: Binge and heavy-drinking adolescents and young adults have systematically thinner and lower volume in prefrontal cortex and cerebellar regions, and attenuated white matter development. They also show elevated brain activity in fronto-parietal regions during working memory, verbal learning, and inhibitory control tasks. In response to alcohol cues, relative to controls or light-drinking individuals, binge and heavy drinkers show increased neural response mainly in mesocorticolimbic regions, including the striatum, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, hippocampus, and amygdala. Mixed findings are present in risky decision-making tasks, which could be due to large variation in task design and analysis.Conclusions: These findings suggest altered neural structure and activity in binge and heavy-drinking youth may be related to the neurotoxic effects of consuming alcohol in large quantities during a highly plastic neurodevelopmental period, which could result in neural reorganization, and increased risk for developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD.

  5. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure: e1004770

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Miconi; Rufin VanRullen

    2016-01-01

      Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space...

  6. Artificial Neural Systems Application to the Simulation of Air Combat Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    unit, the CPU , whereas neural networks utilize the effects of many, simple processing elements. Traditional computing is done in a step-by-step, serial...Nielsen Neurocomputers (HNC). The ANZA-Plus coprocessor is part of an 80386 -based computer system which is optimized for training and executing neural...host computer for this program is a Zenith 386/16 system running under the DOS 3.31 operating system. The 80386 microprocessor in this machine operates

  7. Effects of elemental sulfur and sulfur-containing waste on nutrient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... Influence of sulfur fertilization on corn (Zea mays L.) plant growth and phosphorus uptake in a calcareous soil. Yüzüncü Yıl University, J. Natural Appl. Sci. 7(1): 37-42. Erdal I, Kepenek K, Kızılgoz I (2006). Effect of elemental sulphur and sulphur containing waste on the iron nutrition of strawberry plants.

  8. Effect of a three-month football training program on trace element ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to examine the effects of a three-month football training program on some trace elements in the serum in male kids aged between eight and twelve years. The study registered eight boys whose mean age was 10.25 ± 0.75 years, mean height was 138.63 ± 3.28 cm and mean weight was 32.13 ...

  9. Effects of sea surface warming on elemental cycling in a pelagic system

    OpenAIRE

    Wohlers, Julia

    2009-01-01

    The present thesis investigates the effects of climate change-induced sea surface warming on elemental cycling in a pelagic system. Human activities, e.g. burning of fossil fuels, changes in land-use practices and deforestation, are changing Earth’s climate at an unprecedented rate in its history. While the ocean mitigates the progress of climate change by taking up and storing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and heat, thus acting as a natural climate buffer, these anthropogenic perturbation...

  10. The Effect of Ligament Modeling Technique on Knee Joint Kinematics: A Finite Element Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kiapour, Ata M.; Kaul, Vikas; Kiapour, Ali; Quatman, Carmen E.; Wordeman, Samuel C.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Demetropoulos, Constantine K.; Goel, Vijay K.

    2014-01-01

    Finite element (FE) analysis has become an increasingly popular technique in the study of human joint biomechanics, as it allows for detailed analysis of the joint/tissue behavior under complex, clinically relevant loading conditions. A wide variety of modeling techniques have been utilized to model knee joint ligaments. However, the effect of a selected constitutive model to simulate the ligaments on knee kinematics remains unclear. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effec...

  11. TRACE ELEMENTS IN FOLLICULAR FLUID AND THEIR EFFECTS ON REPRODUCTIVE FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Kolesárová; Marcela Capcarová

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pollution plays an important role in affecting the internal milieu of animals and humans. The amount of trace elements in the environment is generally low, but these chemicals can interfere with physiological systems. Thus, the health and welfare of individuals could be compromised by exposure to environmental levels of pollutants. In order to understand risk and effects of carious chemicals on the animal and human organism, the input of pollutants into biological systems has to...

  12. Effects of ground fires on element dynamics in mountainous coniferous forest in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Näthe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances such as fires are a natural phenomenon of forested ecosystems, having a different impact on (micro- climate (e.g. emissions of gases and aerosols, ecology (destruction of flora and fauna and nutrient cycles especially in the soils. Forest fires alter the spatial distribution (forest floor vs. mineral soil, binding forms (organic vs. inorganic and availability (water solubility of organic substances and nutrients. The effects of fires on chemical, biological and physical soil properties in forested ecosystems have been intensively studied in the last decades, especially in the Mediterranean area and North America. However, differences in fire intensity, forest type (species, age and location (climate, geological substrate, nutrient status lead to divergent results. Furthermore, only a few case studies focused on the effects of ground fires in hilly landscapes, on the vertical and lateral water-driven fluxes of elements (C, N, nutrients, as well as on the input of fire-released terrestrial nutrients into aquatic ecosystems. Thus, this study will evaluate the effects of low-severity fires on nutrient cycling in a coniferous forest in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system. At three spatially independent sites three paired plots (control and manipulated were chosen at a forested site in Thuringia, Germany. All plots are similar in the vegetation cover and pedogenetic properties.In relation to control sites, this study will examine the effects of low-severity fires on:a the mobilization of organic carbon and nutrients (released from ash material and the forest floor via leachate and erosion paths,b the binding form (inorganic/organic of elements and organic compounds, and c the particle size fraction (DOM/POM of elements and organic compounds.The goal of this study is a better understanding of the impact of forest fires on element cycling and release in a hilly landscape connected to an aquatic system, supposedly driven by

  13. A comparison of the techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry and resonance ionization mass spectrometry for the analysis of potentially toxic element accumulation in neural tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, O R; Perks, R M; Abraham, C J; Telle, H H; Oakley, A E

    1997-01-01

    A comparison is made of the techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) for the detection of the neuro-toxic element aluminium in cortical tissue. Experiments were performed using a reflectron-type time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) in conjunction with an Ar+ source for target sputtering and a pulsed tuneable dye laser system for resonance ionization. It is shown how isobaric interference of species such as CNH and C2H3 in the case of aluminium greatly affect the quantitative accuracy and the detection limit of aluminium in biological samples when analysed using SIMS. In contrast the use of RIMS virtually eliminates this problem, so allowing easier quantification and much lower detection limits to be achieved. Detection limits of approximately 3 ppm for aluminium in brain tissue homogenates were achieved using RIMS, with a spatial resolution of less than 100 microns.

  14. Effect of enzymatic and mechanical methods of dissociation on neural progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Lindsey D; Canda, Claire-Marie A; Hall, Crystal A; Heilingoetter, Cassandra L; Huynh, Joann; Kwok, Susanna S; Kwon, Jin H; Richie, Jacob R; Jensen, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    To determine the most effective method of dissociating neural stem and progenitor cells into a single-cell suspension. Induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated toward the neural fate for 4 weeks before clusters were subjected to enzymatic (Accutase, trypsin, TrypLE, dispase, or DNase I) or mechanical (trituration with pipettes of varying size) or combined dissociation. Images of cells were analyzed for cluster size using ImageJ. Cells treated with the enzymes Accutase, TrypLE, or trypsin/EDTA, these enzymes followed by trituration, or a combination one of these enzymes followed by incubation with another enzyme, including DNase I, were more likely to be dissociated into a single-cell suspension. Cells treated with enzymes or combinations of methods were more likely to be dissociated into a single-cell suspension. Copyright © 2015 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of neural mobilization in addition to standard care in persons with carpal tunnel syndrome from a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heebner, Michelle L; Roddey, Toni S

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether neural mobilization in addition to standard care is more effective than standard care alone in the treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). Sixty participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Group 1 received standard care, and Group 2 performed a neurodynamic mobilization exercise in addition to standard care. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at one and six months using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Questionnaire, the Brigham and Woman's Hospital Carpal Tunnel Specific Questionnaire (CTSQ), and elbow extension range of motion during an upper limb median nerve tension test. There were no significant differences in the outcome measures between groups, except Group 1 had improved scores on the function status scale of the CTSQ compared to Group 2 at six months. The addition of neural mobilization to standard care did not result in improved outcomes in patients with CTS.

  16. Effective Use of Word Order for Text Categorization with Convolutional Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Rie; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Convolutional neural network (CNN) is a neural network that can make use of the internal structure of data such as the 2D structure of image data. This paper studies CNN on text categorization to exploit the 1D structure (namely, word order) of text data for accurate prediction. Instead of using low-dimensional word vectors as input as is often done, we directly apply CNN to high-dimensional text data, which leads to directly learning embedding of small text regions for use in classification....

  17. Clinical and neural effects of six-week administration of oxytocin on core symptoms of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Kuroda, Miho; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yuta; Iwashiro, Norichika; Tatsunobu, Natsubori; Takao, Hidemasa; Nippashi, Yasumasa; Kawakubo, Yuki; Kunimatsu, Akira; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2015-11-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder with no established pharmacological treatment for its core symptoms. Although previous literature has shown that single-dose administration of oxytocin temporally mitigates autistic social behaviours in experimental settings, it remains in dispute whether such potentially beneficial responses in laboratories can result in clinically positive effects in daily life situations, which are measurable only in long-term observations of individuals with the developmental disorder undergoing continual oxytocin administration. Here, to address this issue, we performed an exploratory, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial including 20 high-functional adult males with autism spectrum disorder. Data obtained from 18 participants who completed the trial showed that 6-week intranasal administration of oxytocin significantly reduced autism core symptoms specific to social reciprocity, which was clinically evaluated by Autism Diagnostic Observation Scale (P = 0.034, PFDR oxytocin-induced enhancement of task-independent resting-state functional connectivity between anterior cingulate cortex and dorso-medial prefrontal cortex (rho = -0.60, P = 0.011), which was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Moreover, using the same social-judgement task as used in our previous single-dose oxytocin trial, we confirmed that the current continual administration also significantly mitigated behavioural and neural responses during the task, both of which were originally impaired in autistic individuals (judgement tendency: P = 0.019, d = 0.62; eye-gaze effect: P = 0.03, d = 0.56; anterior cingulate activity: P = 0.00069, d = 0.97; dorso-medial prefrontal activity: P = 0.0014, d = 0.92; all, PFDR effect sizes of the 6-week intervention were not larger than those seen in our previous single-dose intervention. These findings not only provide the evidence for clinically beneficial effects of

  18. Neural correlates of the self-reference effect: evidence from evaluation and recognition processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Ken; Osaka, Mariko; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The self-reference effect (SRE) is defined as better recall or recognition performance when the memorized materials refer to the self. Recently, a number of neuroimaging studies using self-referential and other-referential tasks have reported that self- and other-referential judgments basically show greater activation in common brain regions, specifically in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) when compared with nonmentalizing judgments, but that a ventral-to-dorsal gradient in MPFC emerges from a direct comparison between self- and other-judgments. However, most of these previous studies could not provide an adequate explanation for the neural basis of SRE because they did not directly compare brain activation for recognition/recall of the words referenced to the self with another person. Here, we used an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that measured brain activity during processing of references to the self and another, and for recognition of self and other referenced words. Results from the fMRI evaluation task indicated greater activation in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC) in the self-referential condition. While in the recognition task, VMPFC, posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and bilateral angular gyrus (AG) showed greater activation when participants correctly recognized self-referenced words versus other-referenced words. These data provide evidence that the self-referenced words evoked greater activation in the self-related region (VMPFC) and memory-related regions (PCC and AG) relative to another person in the retrieval phase, and that the words remained as a stronger memory trace that supports recognition.

  19. Neural correlates of the self-reference effect: evidence from evaluation and recognition processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eYaoi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The self-reference effect (SRE is defined as better recall or recognition performance when the memorized materials refer to the self. Recently, a number of neuroimaging studies using self-referential and other-referential tasks have reported that self- and other-referential judgments basically show greater activation in common brain regions, specifically in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC when compared with nonmentalizing judgments, but that a ventral-to-dorsal gradient in MPFC emerges from a direct comparison between self- and other-judgments. However, most of these previous studies could not provide an adequate explanation for the neural basis of SRE because they did not directly compare brain activation for recognition/recall of the words referenced to the self with another person. Here, we used an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI that measured brain activity during processing of references to the self and another, and for recognition of self and other referenced words. Results from the fMRI evaluation task indicated greater activation in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VMPFC in the self-referential condition. While in the recognition task, VMPFC, posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral angular gyrus showed greater activation when participants correctly recognized self-referenced words versus other-referenced words. These data provide evidence that the self-referenced words evoked greater activation in the self-related region (VMPFC and memory-related regions (PCC and angular gyrus relative to another person in the retrieval phase, and that the words remained as a stronger memory trace that supports recognition.

  20. Risk assessment for the combinational effects of food color additives: neural progenitor cells and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mikyung; Park, Hee Ra; Kim, So Jung; Kim, Min-Sun; Kong, Kyoung Hye; Kim, Hyun Soo; Gong, Ein Ji; Kim, Mi Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Byung Mu; Lee, Jaewon

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, the Korea Food and Drug Administration reported that combinations of dietary colors such as allura red AC (R40), tartrazine (Y4), sunset yellow FCF (Y5), amaranth (R2), and brilliant blue FCF (B1) are widely used in food manufacturing. Although individual tar food colors are controlled based on acceptable daily intake (ADI), there is no apparent information available for how combinations of these additives affect food safety. In the current study, the potencies of single and combination use of R40, Y4, Y5, R2, and B1 were examined on neural progenitor cell (NPC) toxicity, a biomarker for developmental stage, and neurogenesis, indicative of adult central nervous system (CNS) functions. R40 and R2 reduced NPC proliferation and viability in mouse multipotent NPC, in the developing CNS model. Among several combinations tested in mouse model, combination of Y4 and B1 at 1000-fold higher than average daily intake in Korea significantly decreased numbers of newly generated cells in adult mouse hippocampus, indicating potent adverse actions on hippocampal neurogenesis. However, other combinations including R40 and R2 did not affect adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Evidence indicates that single and combination use of most tar food colors may be safe with respect to risk using developmental NPC and adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the response to excessively high dose combination of Y4 and B1 is suggestive of synergistic effects to suppress proliferation of NPC in adult hippocampus. Data indicated that combinations of tar colors may adversely affect both developmental and adult hippocampal neurogenesis; thus, further extensive studies are required to assess the safety of these additive combinations.

  1. Consecutive TMS-fMRI reveals remote effects of neural noise to the "occipital face area".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon-Harris, Lily M; Rafique, Sara A; Steeves, Jennifer K E

    2016-11-01

    The human cortical system for face perception comprises a network of connected regions including the middle fusiform gyrus ("fusiform face area" or FFA), the inferior occipital gyrus ("occipital face area" or OFA), and the posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS). Here, we sought to investigate how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the OFA affects activity within the face processing network. We used offline repetitive TMS to temporarily introduce neural noise in the right OFA in healthy subjects. We then immediately performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal across the face network using an fMR-adaptation (fMR-A) paradigm. We hypothesized that TMS to the right OFA would induce abnormal face identity coding throughout the face processing network in regions to which it has direct or indirect connections. Indeed, BOLD signal for face identity, but not non-face (butterfly) identity, decreased in the right OFA and FFA following TMS to the right OFA compared to both sham TMS and TMS to a control site, the nearby object-related lateral occipital area (LO). Further, TMS to the right OFA decreased face-related activation in the left FFA, without any effect in the left OFA. Our findings indicate that TMS to the right OFA selectively disrupts face coding at both the stimulation site and bilateral FFA. TMS to the right OFA also decreased BOLD signal for different identity stimuli in the right pSTS. Together with mounting evidence from patient studies, we demonstrate connectivity of the OFA within the face network and that its activity modulates face processing in bilateral FFA as well as the right pSTS. Moreover, this study shows that deep regions within the face network can be remotely probed by stimulating structures closer to the cortical surface. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Indoor air pollution and neural tube defects: effect modification by maternal genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linlin; Li, Zhiwen; Jin, Lei; Li, Kai; Yuan, Yue; Fu, Yunting; Zhang, Yali; Ye, Rongwei; Ren, Aiguo

    2014-09-01

    Gene-environment interactions have been implicated in the development of neural tube defects (NTDs). We conducted a case-control study to investigate (1) the association of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) genetic variants and phase I metabolic enzymes with the risk of NTDs and (2) the interaction of these variants with maternal exposure to indoor air pollution from smoking and coal combustion or with placental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Blood samples were collected from 534 mothers of fetuses or newborns with NTDs and 534 control mothers who had healthy term newborns and were assayed for 12 polymorphisms in the AHR and cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes. Information on maternal exposure was collected, and placental levels of PAHs were analyzed. Maternal exposure to indoor air pollution was associated with an increased NTD risk. However, no increased NTD risk was observed for individual genetic variants. For mothers with the CYP1B1 rs2855658 GG variant, exposure to indoor air pollution led to a dose-response relationship for NTD risk, with odds ratios (ORs) of 3.0 (95% confidence interval = 1.6-5.7) and 8.1 (3.8-17) for medium and high levels of exposure, respectively. For mothers with GA or AA genotypes, this trend was less apparent. Placental PAHs were associated with an increased risk of NTDs, with an OR of 16 (3.3-75) for high levels compared with low levels of exposure among mothers with the GG genotype; there was no association for mothers with GA or AA genotypes. The CYP1B1 variant modifies the effect of indoor air pollution on NTD risk.

  3. Variable effects of acoustic trauma on behavioral and neural correlates of tinnitus in individual animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan James Longenecker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of tinnitus is known to be diverse in the human population. An appropriate animal model of tinnitus should incorporate this pathological diversity. Previous studies evaluating the effect of acoustic over exposure (AOE have found that animals typically display increased spontaneous firing rates and bursting activity of auditory neurons, which often has been linked to behavioral evidence of tinnitus. However, only a subset of studies directly associated these neural correlates to individual animals. Furthermore the vast majority of tinnitus studies were conducted on anesthetized animals. The goal of this study was to test for a possible relationship between tinnitus, hearing loss, hyperactivity, and bursting activity in the auditory system of individual unanesthetized animals following AOE. Sixteen mice were unilaterally exposed to 116dB SPL narrowband noise (centered at 12.5 kHz for 1 hour under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Gap-induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GPIAS was used to assess behavioral evidence of tinnitus whereas hearing performance was evaluated by measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds and prepulse inhibition (PPI audiometry. Following behavioral assessments, single neuron firing activity was recorded from the inferior colliculus (IC of four awake animals and compared to recordings from four unexposed controls. We found that AOE increased spontaneous activity in all mice tested, independently of tinnitus behavior or severity of threshold shifts. Bursting activity did not increase in two animals identified as tinnitus positive (T+, but did so in a tinnitus negative (T- animal with severe hearing loss (SHL. Hyperactivity does not appear to be a reliable biomarker of tinnitus. Our data suggest that multidisciplinary assessments on individual animals following AOE could offer a powerful experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of tinnitus.

  4. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  5. Effects of rare earth elements on growth and metabolism of medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhong Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The rare earth elements (REEs are a set of 17 chemical elements. They include the lanthanide series from lanthanum (La to lutetium (Lu, scandium (Sc, and yttrium (Y in the periodic table. Although REEs are used widely in industry and agriculture in China for a long time, there has been increasing interest in application of REEs to medicinal plants in recent years. In this paper, we summarize researches in the past few decades regarding the effects of REEs on the germination of seeds, the growth of roots, total biomass, and the production of its secondary metabolites, as well as their effects on the absorption of minerals and metals by medicinal plants. By compilation and analysis of these data, we found that REEs have promoting effects at low concentrations and negative effects at comparatively high concentrations. However, most studies focused only on a few REEs, i.e., La, cerium (Ce, neodymium (Nd and europium (Eu, and they made main emphasis on their effects on regulation of secondary metabolism in tissue-cultured plants, rather than cultivated medicinal plants. Advanced research should be invested regarding on the effects of REEs on yields of cultivated plants, specifically medicinal plants.

  6. The Sustained Effect of Emotional Signals on Neural Processing in 12-Month-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventon, Jacqueline S.; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Around the end of the first year of life, infants develop a social referencing ability -- using emotional information from others to guide their own behavior. Much research on social referencing has focused on changes in behavior in response to emotional information. The present study was an investigation of the changes in neural responses that…

  7. Effects of Acute Alcohol Intoxication on Empathic Neural Responses for Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The questions whether and how empathy for pain can be modulated by acute alcohol intoxication in the non-dependent population remain unanswered. To address these questions, a double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject study design was adopted in this study, in which healthy social drinkers were asked to complete a pain-judgment task using pictures depicting others' body parts in painful or non-painful situations during fMRI scanning, either under the influence of alcohol intoxication or placebo conditions. Empathic neural activity for pain was reduced by alcohol intoxication only in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC. More interestingly, we observed that empathic neural activity for pain in the right anterior insula (rAI was significantly correlated with trait empathy only after alcohol intoxication, along with impaired functional connectivity between the rAI and the fronto-parietal attention network. Our results reveal that alcohol intoxication not only inhibits empathic neural responses for pain but also leads to trait empathy inflation, possibly via impaired top-down attentional control. These findings help to explain the neural mechanism underlying alcohol-related social problems.

  8. Neural networks simulation of a discrete model of continious effects of irrelevant stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, P.C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a general simulation method based on minimal neural network representations of nonmathematical, structural models of information processes. The time-dependent behavior of each component in a given structural model is represented by a simple, noncommittal equation that does not affect the

  9. Higher-order cognitive training effects on processing speed-related neural activity: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motes, Michael A; Yezhuvath, Uma S; Aslan, Sina; Spence, Jeffrey S; Rypma, Bart; Chapman, Sandra B

    2017-10-12

    Higher-order cognitive training has shown to enhance performance in older adults, but the neural mechanisms underlying performance enhancement have yet to be fully disambiguated. This randomized trial examined changes in processing speed and processing speed-related neural activity in older participants (57-71 years of age) who underwent cognitive training (CT, N = 12) compared with wait-listed (WLC, N = 15) or exercise-training active (AC, N = 14) controls. The cognitive training taught cognitive control functions of strategic attention, integrative reasoning, and innovation over 12 weeks. All 3 groups worked through a functional magnetic resonance imaging processing speed task during 3 sessions (baseline, mid-training, and post-training). Although all groups showed faster reaction times (RTs) across sessions, the CT group showed a significant increase, and the WLC and AC groups showed significant decreases across sessions in the association between RT and BOLD signal change within the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). Thus, cognitive training led to a change in processing speed-related neural activity where faster processing speed was associated with reduced PFC activation, fitting previously identified neural efficiency profiles. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Feedback Model of Attention Explains the Diverse Effects of Attention on Neural Firing Rates and Receptive Field Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miconi, Thomas; VanRullen, Rufin

    2016-02-01

    Visual attention has many effects on neural responses, producing complex changes in firing rates, as well as modifying the structure and size of receptive fields, both in topological and feature space. Several existing models of attention suggest that these effects arise from selective modulation of neural inputs. However, anatomical and physiological observations suggest that attentional modulation targets higher levels of the visual system (such as V4 or MT) rather than input areas (such as V1). Here we propose a simple mechanism that explains how a top-down attentional modulation, falling on higher visual areas, can produce the observed effects of attention on neural responses. Our model requires only the existence of modulatory feedback connections between areas, and short-range lateral inhibition within each area. Feedback connections redistribute the top-down modulation to lower areas, which in turn alters the inputs of other higher-area cells, including those that did not receive the initial modulation. This produces firing rate modulations and receptive field shifts. Simultaneously, short-range lateral inhibition between neighboring cells produce competitive effects that are automatically scaled to receptive field size in any given area. Our model reproduces the observed attentional effects on response rates (response gain, input gain, biased competition automatically scaled to receptive field size) and receptive field structure (shifts and resizing of receptive fields both spatially and in complex feature space), without modifying model parameters. Our model also makes the novel prediction that attentional effects on response curves should shift from response gain to contrast gain as the spatial focus of attention drifts away from the studied cell.

  11. Frequency enhancement in coupled noisy excitable elements: effects of network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Wei-Yin; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, Chi-Keung

    2013-07-01

    Coupled excitable elements in the presence of noise can exhibit oscillatory behavior with non-trivial frequency dependence as the coupling strength of the system increases. The phenomenon of frequency enhancement (FE) occurs in some coupling regime, in which the elements can oscillate with a frequency higher than their uncoupled frequencies. In this paper, details of the FE are investigated by simulations of the FitzHugh-Nagumo model with different network topologies. It is found that the characteristics of FE, such as the maximal enhancement coupling, enhancement level etc, are functions of the network topology and spatial dimensions. The effect of excitability and the spatio-temporal patterns during FE are investigated to provide an intuitive picture for the enhancement mechanism. Interestingly, some of these characteristics of FE can be described by scaling laws; suggesting the existence of universality in the FE phenomenon. The relevance of these results to biological rhythms are also discussed.

  12. Networked neural spheroid by neuro-bundle mimicking nervous system created by topology effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Gi Seok; Chang, Joon Young; Park, Ji Soo; Lee, Seung-A; Park, DoYeun; Woo, Junsung; An, Heeyoung; Lee, C Justin; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2015-03-22

    In most animals, the nervous system consists of the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the latter of which connects the CNS to all parts of the body. Damage and/or malfunction of the nervous system causes serious pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders, spinal cord injury, and Alzheimer's disease. Thus, not surprising, considerable research effort, both in vivo and in vitro, has been devoted to studying the nervous system and signal transmission through it. However, conventional in vitro cell culture systems do not enable control over diverse aspects of the neural microenvironment. Moreover, formation of certain nervous system growth patterns in vitro remains a challenge. In this study, we developed a deep hemispherical, microchannel-networked, concave array system and applied it to generate three-dimensional nerve-like neural bundles. The deep hemicylindrical channel network was easily fabricated by exploiting the meniscus induced by the surface tension of a liquid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) prepolymer. Neurospheroids spontaneously aggregated in each deep concave microwell and were networked to neighboring spheroids through the deep hemicylindrical channel. Notably, two types of satellite spheroids also formed in deep hemispherical microchannels through self-aggregation and acted as an anchoring point to enhance formation of nerve-like networks with neighboring spheroids. During neural-network formation, neural progenitor cells successfully differentiated into glial and neuronal cells. These cells secreted laminin, forming an extracellular matrix around the host and satellite spheroids. Electrical stimuli were transmitted between networked neurospheroids in the resulting nerve-like neural bundle, as detected by imaging Ca(2+) signals in responding cells.

  13. The Effect of an Enrichment Reading Program on the Cognitive Processes and Neural Structures of Children Having Reading Difficulties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayriye Gül KURUYER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the current study is to explain the effect of an enrichment reading program on the cognitive processes and neural structures of children experiencing reading difficulties. The current study was carried out in line with a single-subject research method and the between-subjects multiple probe design belonging to this method. This research focuses on a group of eight students with reading difficulties. Within the context of the study, memory capacities, attention spans, reading-related activation and white matter pathways of the students were determined before and after the application of the enrichment reading program. This determination process was carried out in two stages. Neuro-imaging was performed in the first stage and in the second stage the students’ cognitive processes and neural structures were investigated in terms of focusing attention and memory capacities by using the following tools: Stroop Test TBAG Form, Auditory Verbal Digit Span Test-Form B, Cancellation Test and Number Order Learning Test. The results obtained show that the enrichment reading program resulted in an improvement in the reading profiles of the students having reading difficulties in terms of their cognitive processes and neural structures.

  14. Dissociated neural mechanisms for face detection and configural encoding: evidence from N170 and induced gamma-band oscillation effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion-Golumbic, Elana; Bentin, Shlomo

    2007-08-01

    Despite ample research, the structure and the functional characteristics of neural systems involved in human face processing are still a matter of active debate. Here we dissociated between a neural mechanism manifested by the face-sensitive N170 event-related potential effect and a mechanism manifested by induced electroencephalographic oscillations in the gamma band, which have been previously associated with the integration of individually coded features and activation of corresponding neural representations. The amplitude of the N170 was larger in the absence of the face contour but not affected by the configuration of inner components (ICs). Its latency was delayed by scrambling the configuration of the components as well as by the absence of the face contour. Unlike the N170, the amplitude of the induced gamma activity was sensitive to the configuration of ICs but insensitive to their presence within or outside a face contour. This pattern suggests a dual mechanism for early face processing, each utilizing different visual cues, which might indicate their respective roles in face processing. The N170 seems to be associated primarily with the detection and categorization of faces, whereas the gamma oscillations may be involved in the activation of their mental representation.

  15. Evaluating cleansing effects on trace elements and stable isotope values in feathers of oiled birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Sonia; Moreno, Roćio; Jover, Lluis; Sanpera, Carola

    2010-01-01

    Feathers of seabirds are widely used as a nondestructive tissue for pollution monitoring of trace elements, as well as convenient samples for trophic ecology studies by means of stable isotope analysis (SIA). Nevertheless, feathers can be occasionally impregnated with oil from deliberate ship discharges and from massive oil spill accidents. The feather structure makes them effective traps for particles and are subject to external contamination. It is unknown to what extent the oil adhered to feathers can change trace element concentrations or stable isotope signatures. This study has two primary objectives: (1) to assess if there are differences between trace element concentrations and stable isotope signatures of oiled and clean feathers, and (2) to determine if the cleansing of oiled feathers using commonly applied techniques such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH) washes in combination with an organic solvent (hexane) is more effective than using NaOH alone. In order to do this, we analysed trace elements (Se, Hg, Pb, Cu and Zn) and stable isotopes (delta(13)C and delta(15)N) of individual feathers of yellow-legged gulls (Larus michahellis) which were affected by the 2002 Prestige oil spill in Galicia (NW Spain). Two sets of feathers were analysed, one group were oil-free (Control group) and the other had oil adhered to its surface (Oiled group). We expected to find differences between control and oiled feathers when cleaning exclusively with NaOH and no differences when using hexane. Our results did not show significant differences between Control and Oiled groups as a consequence of the cleansing method used. Unexpectedly, the additional cleansing with hexane resulted in decreasing selenium concentrations and increasing zinc and delta(15)N values in all groups of feathers.

  16. Health effects and toxicity mechanisms of rare earth elements-Knowledge gaps and research prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Giovanni; Guida, Marco; Tommasi, Franca; Oral, Rahime

    2015-05-01

    In the recent decades, rare earth elements (REE) have undergone a steady spread in several industrial and medical applications, and in agriculture. Relatively scarce information has been acquired to date on REE-associated biological effects, from studies of bioaccumulation and of bioassays on animal, plant and models; a few case reports have focused on human health effects following occupational REE exposures, in the present lack of epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed groups. The literature is mostly confined to reports on few REE, namely cerium and lanthanum, whereas substantial information gaps persist on the health effects of other REE. An established action mechanism in REE-associated health effects relates to modulating oxidative stress, analogous to the recognized redox mechanisms observed for other transition elements. Adverse outcomes of REE exposures include a number of endpoints, such as growth inhibition, cytogenetic effects, and organ-specific toxicity. An apparent controversy regarding REE-associated health effects relates to opposed data pointing to either favorable or adverse effects of REE exposures. Several studies have demonstrated that REE, like a number of other xenobiotics, follow hormetic concentration-related trends, implying stimulatory or protective effects at low levels, then adverse effects at higher concentrations. Another major role for REE-associated effects should be focused on pH-dependent REE speciation and hence toxicity. Few reports have demonstrated that environmental acidification enhances REE toxicity; these data may assume particular relevance in REE-polluted acidic soils and in REE mining areas characterized by concomitant REE and acid pollution. The likely environmental threats arising from REE exposures deserve a new line of research efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined effect of pulsed electromagnetic field and sound wave on In vitro and In vivo neural differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Urnukhsaikhan, Enerelt; Yoon, Hee-Hoon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Cho, Hyunjin; Jeong, Jong-Seob; Kim, Soo-Chan; Park, Jung-Keug

    2017-01-01

    Biophysical wave stimulus has been used as an effective tool to promote cellular maturation and differentiation in the construction of engineered tissue. Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) and sound waves have been selected as effective stimuli that can promote neural differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic effect of PEMFs and sound waves on the neural differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). In vitro, neural-related genes in hBM-MSCs were accelerated by the combined exposure to both waves more than by individual exposure to PEMFs or sound waves. The combined wave also up-regulated the expression of neural and synaptic-related proteins in a three-dimensional (3-D) culture system through the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-related kinase. In a mouse model of photochemically induced ischemia, exposure to the combined wave reduced the infarction volume and improved post-injury behavioral activity. These results indicate that a combined stimulus of biophysical waves, PEMFs and sound can enhance and possibly affect the differentiation of MSCs into neural cells. Our study is meaningful for highlighting the potential of combined wave for neurogenic effects and providing new therapeutic approaches for neural cell therapy. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:201-211, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Effect of heterogeneity on the quantitative determination of trace elements in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weritz, Friederike; Schaurich, Dieter; Taffe, Alexander; Wilsch, Gerd

    2006-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been used for quantitative measurement of trace elements, e.g. sulfur and chlorine, in concrete. Chloride and sulfate ions have a large effect on the durability of concrete structures, and quantitative measurement is important for condition assessment and quality assurance. Concrete is a highly heterogeneous material in composition and grain-size distribution, i.e. the spatial distribution of elements. Calibration plots were determined by use of laboratory-made reference samples consisting of pressings of cement powder, hydrated cement, cement mortar, and concrete, in which the heterogeneity of the material is increasing because of the aggregates. Coarse aggregate and cement paste are distinguishable by the intensity of the Ca spectral lines. More advanced evaluation is necessary to account for the effect of the fine aggregate. The three series of reference samples enable systematic study of the effects of heterogeneity on spectral intensity, signal fluctuation, uncertainty, and limits of detection. Spatially resolved measurements and many spectra enable statistical evaluation of the data. The heterogeneity has an effect on measurement of the sulfur and chlorine content, because both occur mainly in the cement matrix. Critical chloride concentrations are approximately 0.04% (m/m). The chlorine spectral line at 837.6 nm is evaluated. The natural sulfur content of concrete is approximately 0.1% (m/m). The spectral line at 921.3 nm is evaluated. One future application may be simultaneous determination of the amount of damaging trace elements and the cement content of the concrete.

  19. Rare earth elements (REEs): effects on germination and growth of selected crop and native plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philippe J; Carpenter, David; Boutin, Céline; Allison, Jane E

    2014-02-01

    The phytotoxicity of rare earth elements (REEs) is still poorly understood. The exposure-response relationships of three native Canadian plant species (common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca L., showy ticktrefoil, Desmodium canadense (L.) DC. and switchgrass, Panicum virgatum L.) and two commonly used crop species (radish, Raphanus sativus L., and tomato, Solanum lycopersicum L.) to the REEs lanthanum (La), yttrium (Y) and cerium (Ce) were tested. In separate experiments, seven to eight doses of each element were added to the soil prior to sowing seeds. Effects of REE dose on germination were established through measures of total percent germination and speed of germination; effects on growth were established through determination of above ground biomass. Ce was also tested at two pH levels and plant tissue analysis was conducted on pooled samples. Effects on germination were mostly observed with Ce at low pH. However, effects on growth were more pronounced, with detectable inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 25% reductions in biomass for the two native forb species (A. syriaca and D. canadense) with all REEs and on all species tested with Ce in both soil pH treatments. Concentration of Ce in aboveground biomass was lower than root Ce content, and followed the dose-response trend. From values measured in natural soils around the world, our results continue to support the notion that REEs are of limited toxicity and not considered extremely hazardous to the environment. However, in areas where REE contamination is likely, the slow accumulation of these elements in the environment could become problematic. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of neural cryptography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Kanter, Ido

    2007-05-01

    Synchronization of neural networks has been used for public channel protocols in cryptography. In the case of tree parity machines the dynamics of both bidirectional synchronization and unidirectional learning is driven by attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. Thus it can be described well by a random walk model for the overlap between participating neural networks. For that purpose transition probabilities and scaling laws for the step sizes are derived analytically. Both these calculations as well as numerical simulations show that bidirectional interaction leads to full synchronization on average. In contrast, successful learning is only possible by means of fluctuations. Consequently, synchronization is much faster than learning, which is essential for the security of the neural key-exchange protocol. However, this qualitative difference between bidirectional and unidirectional interaction vanishes if tree parity machines with more than three hidden units are used, so that those neural networks are not suitable for neural cryptography. In addition, the effective number of keys which can be generated by the neural key-exchange protocol is calculated using the entropy of the weight distribution. As this quantity increases exponentially with the system size, brute-force attacks on neural cryptography can easily be made unfeasible.

  1. A neural network model for texture discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, J; Gerstein, G L

    1993-01-01

    A model of texture discrimination in visual cortex was built using a feedforward network with lateral interactions among relatively realistic spiking neural elements. The elements have various membrane currents, equilibrium potentials and time constants, with action potentials and synapses. The model is derived from the modified programs of MacGregor (1987). Gabor-like filters are applied to overlapping regions in the original image; the neural network with lateral excitatory and inhibitory interactions then compares and adjusts the Gabor amplitudes in order to produce the actual texture discrimination. Finally, a combination layer selects and groups various representations in the output of the network to form the final transformed image material. We show that both texture segmentation and detection of texture boundaries can be represented in the firing activity of such a network for a wide variety of synthetic to natural images. Performance details depend most strongly on the global balance of strengths of the excitatory and inhibitory lateral interconnections. The spatial distribution of lateral connective strengths has relatively little effect. Detailed temporal firing activities of single elements in the lateral connected network were examined under various stimulus conditions. Results show (as in area 17 of cortex) that a single element's response to image features local to its receptive field can be altered by changes in the global context.

  2. Alloying effects of refractory elements in the dislocation of Ni-based single crystal superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyu Ma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The alloying effects of W, Cr and Re in the [100] (010 edge dislocation cores (EDC of Ni-based single crystal superalloys are investigated using first-principles based on the density functional theory (DFT. The binding energy, Mulliken orbital population, density of states, charge density and radial distribution functions are discussed, respectively. It is clearly demonstrated that the addition of refractory elements improves the stability of the EDC systems. In addition, they can form tougher bonds with their nearest neighbour (NN Ni atoms, which enhance the mechanical properties of the Ni-based single crystal superalloys. Through comparative analysis, Cr-doped system has lower binding energy, and Cr atom has evident effect to improve the systemic stability. However, Re atom has the stronger alloying effect in Ni-based single crystal superalloys, much more effectively hindering dislocation motion than W and Cr atoms.

  3. Effects of gamma radiation on the Elemental composition of the flour moth Ephestia kuhniella z

    OpenAIRE

    Souka, Soheir; Ashry, Hoda; Abdu, R. M.; El Sawaf, Bahira; Abbasy, Somaya

    1994-01-01

    The effect of gamma radiation on the elemental composition of larvae, pupae and adults stages of the flour moth Ephestia kuhniella after irradiation of eggs to the sterilizing dose was studied. The elemental composition as well as the concentration level of elements detected in the different stages are summarized in the following: تناول البحث دراسة العناصر الرئيسية والنادرة في الأطوار المختلفة لحشرة فراشة الدقيق وتأثير الجرعة المعقمة من أشعة جاما على هذه العناصر . وذلك بهدف تفهم دور هذه ال...

  4. Effect of Superficial Atmospheric Corrosion Upon the Internal Stresses in Structural Steel Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monel Leiba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A research program is presented showing the stress status determined by the corrosion phenomenon inside a specimen of a structural steel element. Several stains are studied their diameters ranging from 1~mm to 6~mm and thickness of the corroded layer under 0.5~mm. The physical modeling is the result of testing in laboratory the phenomenon of superficial atmospheric corrosion and the numerical modeling was developed under a FEM program, ALGOR. A number of 3,200 finite elements of BRICK type were created and the evolution of normal and tangential stresses was scrutinized under the process of loosing elementary material transformed into scrap. Stresses in the damaged sphere were graphically put into evidence and determined with accuracy due to the performances of the program, showing the local perturbations and the pattern of stress concentrators. The studies showed the importance of reproducing with both physical and mathematical methods the intricate mechanism and sometimes unpredictable effects of corrosion phenomenon upon the structural steel elements.

  5. Effect of intrusive and retraction forces in labial and lingual orthodontics: A finite element study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohan Mascarenhas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Lingual orthodontics differs in biomechanics as compared to labial system and has biomechanical advantages. Although theoretical approaches have explained the differences between labial and lingual orthodontics, the finite element method (FEM may be better suited to analyze these differences. This study analyzes the effect of vertical and horizontal forces together on the tooth using FEM. Materials and Methods: An extracted right maxillary central incisor was radiographed and was used to create a solid model using ANSYS. The geometric model was converted into a finite element model with the help of ANSYS software. The model consists of 27,000 elements and 30,000 nodes. Two force vectors (vertical and horizontal were applied labially and lingually at 3 different heights- 4 mm, 5 mm and 6 mm from the incisal edge. Results: In the labial system, the net force vector passes through the center of resistance (CR and brings about intrusion. The net force vector in lingual orthodontics does not pass through the center of resistance and produces lingual tipping of the incisors. Conclusion: Intrusion and retraction forces bring about tipping of incisors in lingual orthodontics. The same amount of intrusion and retraction forces brings about intrusion of incisors in labial orthodontics. Therefore, direction and amount of forces should be carefully and judiciously applied after taking into consideration the resultant biomechanical differences.

  6. Effect of Rare Earth Elements Burning Loss on Microstructure and Properties in TbDyFe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DENG Zhong-hua

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to simulate low vacuum experimental environment,Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe1.91 alloy round bars were prepared through melting with Tb, Dy and Fe elements, directional solidification and heat treatment in low vacuum environment. The magnetostriction of the alloy rods was tested. The microstructures and the causes of defects in the alloy were investigated. The results indicate that under the low vacuum experimental environment, there are plenty of twin dendritic lamellar microstructures and ordinary twin microstructures are generated in alloy, among which the mechanical properties and "jump" effect of twin dendritic lamellar structures are good, while the ordinary twins are bad to the magnetostrictive property in the alloy. REFe2 and REFe3 coupling phase is the main phase in the matrix, the burning loss of rare earth elements lead variations in chemical composition, resulting coupling growth with REFe3 phase and REFe2 phase. The thermal stress and the burning loss of rare earth elements segregate at grain boundaries resulting in the presence of micro-cracks and micro-holes. These microstructures and defects generate bad impact on mechanical properties and magnetostriction of TbDyFe alloy rods.

  7. Using the Delphi Technique to Identify Key Elements for Effective and Sustainable Visitor Use Planning Frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica P. Fefer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Protected areas around the world receive nearly 800 billion visits/year, with international tourism continuing to increase. While protected areas provide necessary benefits to communities and visitors, the increased visitation may negatively impact the resource and the recreational experience, hence the need to manage visitor use in protected areas around the world. This research focused on obtaining information from experts to document their experiences utilizing one visitor use planning framework: Visitor Experience and Resource Protection (VERP. Using the Delphi Technique, 31 experts from seven regions around the world were asked to identify elements necessary for effective visitor management, as well as elements that facilitated or limited success when using VERP. Elements were categorized and rated in terms of importance. Scoring of the final categories was analyzed using Wilcoxon and Median non-parametric statistical tests. Results suggest that planning challenges stem from limitations in organizational capacity to support a long-term, adaptive management process, inferring that VERP may be sufficiently developed, but implementation capacity may not. The results can be used to refine existing frameworks, and to aid in the development of new recreation frameworks.

  8. Preliminary assessment of trace elements effects on essential oil production of Melissa officinalis L. (Lemon balm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussa, Fabio V.; Duarte, Celina L.; Andrade, Luana S.; Silva, Paulo S.C., E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br, E-mail: clduarte@ipen.br, E-mail: fabiosussa@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Furlan, Marcos R., E-mail: furlanagro@gmail.com [Universidade de Taubate, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias Agrarias

    2013-07-01

    Melissa officinalis L., Lemon balm, (Lamiaceae) is an herb used as medicine, condiment and in the cosmetic and perfumery industry due to its essential oil. In this study a preliminary assessment of trace elements effects on essential oil production was performed in order to verify an improvement in its quality. The Melissa officinalis samples were harvested from three different soil sites localized in Ibirapuera Park, São Paulo, Brazil. Elemental concentration for the elements As, Ba, Br, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Ta, Tb, Ti, Th, U, V, Yb, Zn and Zr was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) in Melissa officinalis leaves and surrounding soil. The essential oil was extracted from its leaves by hydrodistillation process in Clevenger apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer (GC-MS). Certified reference materials NIST SRM-1515 Apple Leaves, NIST SRM-1547 Peach Leaves and NIST SRM-1573a Tomato Leaves were analyzed for quality control. Our results showed Geranial and Neral were identified as the major compounds in the essential oil extracted from Melissa officinalis L. for all collected sites. However, the relative proportion of some chemical constituents was altered according to the site collected. The preliminary results showed that the production of essential oil by Melissa officinalis must be positively correlated with the concentrations of Rb, Zn and negatively correlated with Sc, Mn, La, K, Fe, and Cr. (author)

  9. Investigating the effect of traditional Persian music on ECG signals in young women using wavelet transform and neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, Behzad; Abbasi, Ataollah; Goshvarpour, Atefeh

    2017-05-01

    In the past few decades, several studies have reported the physiological effects of listening to music. The physiological effects of different music types on different people are different. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of listening to traditional Persian music on electrocardiogram (ECG) signals in young women. Twenty-two healthy females participated in this study. ECG signals were recorded under two conditions: rest and music. For each ECG signal, 20 morphological and wavelet-based features were selected. Artificial neural network (ANN) and probabilistic neural network (PNN) classifiers were used for the classification of ECG signals during and before listening to music. Collected data were separated into two data sets: train and test. Classification accuracies of 88% and 97% were achieved in train data sets using ANN and PNN, respectively. In addition, the test data set was employed for evaluating the classifiers, and classification rates of 84% and 93% were obtained using ANN and PNN, respectively. The present study investigated the effect of music on ECG signals based on wavelet transform and morphological features. The results obtained here can provide a good understanding on the effects of music on ECG signals to researchers.

  10. Effect of Adding Elements on Microstructure of Mg-3Si Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CUI Bin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure of alloy Mg-3Si(mass fraction/%, same as below after successive additions with different elements of Zn, Nd, Gd and Y was observed and the microstructure evolution was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The results show the primary Mg2Si particles co-exist with eutectic Mg2Si particles in binary alloy Mg-Si. With minor addition of Zn element, only primary Mg2Si can be found in ternary Mg-3Si-3Zn system while eutectic Mg2Si particles disappear. In quaternary alloy Mg-2.0Nd-3.0Zn-3.0Si, the addition of Nd element can effectively refine the primary Mg2Si particles and form some Mg41Nd5 particles. After continuous adding of Gd and Y elements into quaternary system, Gd5Si3 and YSi particles increase significantly in the alloy Mg-8.0Gd-4.0Y-2.0Nd-3.0Zn-3.0Si, while volume fraction of primary Mg2Si decrease significantly. Thermo-Calc calculation predicts that the Gibbs free energy for primary particles Gd5Si3, YSi is lower, and therefore Gd, Y atom and Si are more likely to form compounds. In Mg-8Gd-4Y-2Nd-3Zn-3Si alloy, room temperature Gibbs free energy for primary particles Mg2Si, Gd5Si3, YSi is -9.56×104, -8.72×104, -2.83×104J/mol, respectively, and the mass fraction of these particles is 8.07%, 5.27%, 1.40% respectively.

  11. [Effects of LED spectrum combinations on the absorption of mineral elements of hydroponic lettuce].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Li; Guo, Wen-Zhong; Xue, Xu-Zhang; Mmanake Beauty, Morewane

    2014-05-01

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was hydroponically cultured in a completely enclosed plant factory, in which spectrum proportion-adjustable LED panels were used as sole light source for plant growth. Absorption and content of eleven mineral elements such as K, P, Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, B and Mo in Lactuca sativa under different spectral component conditions were studied by ICP -AES technology. The results showed that: (1) Single or combined spectrums corresponding to the absorbing peaks of chlorophyll a and b (450, 660 nm) could enhance the absorbing ability of roots especially for mineral elements Na, Fe, Mn, Cu and Mo, the single red spectrum had the most significant promoting effect under which contents of those four elements were respectively 7. 8, 4. 2, 4. 0 and 3. 7 times more than that under FL; (2) Absorption of K and B was the highest under FL which was 10. 309 mg g-1 and 32. 6 microg g-1 while the values decreased significantly under single or combined spectrum of red and blue; (3) Plants grown under single blue spectrum had the lowest absorption of Ca and Mg which respectively decreased by 35% and 33% than FL; (4) Lettuce grown under the spectrum combination of 30% blue and 70% red had the highest accumulations of biomass while those grown under 20% blue and 80% red had the highest accumulations of the following seven elements Ca, Mg, Na, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. The results provided theoretical basis for adjusting nutrient solution formula and selecting light spectrum of hydroponic lettuce.

  12. Effects of methionine containing paracetamol formulation on serum vitamins and trace elements in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyanda, A A; Anetor, J I; Oparinde, D P; Adeniyi, F A A

    2010-11-28

    Methionine is an effective antidote in the treatment of paracetamol-induced toxicity but at large doses it has been reported to induce or aggravate a number of pathological conditions. It also alters plasma levels of many vital elements and molecules. This study was designed to identify if the alteration observed for antioxidant vitamins and minerals especially at sub-toxic and toxic levels of exposure in our earlier study of 24-hour exposure period may warrant trace elements supplementation. This was investigated by carrying out a 48-hour study to test the ability of a living organism to restore homeostasis of these vital molecules and elements. The levels of antioxidant minerals and vitamins were estimated in the serum samples obtained from adult male Wistar rats exposed to paracetamol tablets. At 100 mg\\kg BW (body weight) vitamin A, niacin, riboflavin, selenium and manganese were not significantly different from the control group. Moreover at 350 mg\\kg, all these indices except zinc were not significantly different in the exposed group compared with controls whereas at 1000 mg\\kg level of exposure manganese, selenium and vitamin E were not significantly decreased at the end of 48 hours of exposure but copper, niacin and vitamin A were significantly increased in the exposed group compared with the controls. These results suggest that with time the body may be capable of bringing about restoration of the levels of some of these elements\\vitamins. This was more evident at 350 mg\\kg level of exposure than a higher dose of 1000 mg\\kg level.

  13. Neural-like growing networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchenko, Vitaliy A.

    2000-03-01

    On the basis of the analysis of scientific ideas reflecting the law in the structure and functioning the biological structures of a brain, and analysis and synthesis of knowledge, developed by various directions in Computer Science, also there were developed the bases of the theory of a new class neural-like growing networks, not having the analogue in world practice. In a base of neural-like growing networks the synthesis of knowledge developed by classical theories - semantic and neural of networks is. The first of them enable to form sense, as objects and connections between them in accordance with construction of the network. With thus each sense gets a separate a component of a network as top, connected to other tops. In common it quite corresponds to structure reflected in a brain, where each obvious concept is presented by certain structure and has designating symbol. Secondly, this network gets increased semantic clearness at the expense owing to formation not only connections between neural by elements, but also themselves of elements as such, i.e. here has a place not simply construction of a network by accommodation sense structures in environment neural of elements, and purely creation of most this environment, as of an equivalent of environment of memory. Thus neural-like growing networks are represented by the convenient apparatus for modeling of mechanisms of teleological thinking, as a fulfillment of certain psychophysiological of functions.

  14. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  15. Reinforcement and backpropagation training for an optical neural network using self-lensing effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Cabrera, A A; Yang, M; Cui, G; Behrman, E C; Steck, J E; Skinner, S R

    2000-01-01

    The optical bench training of an optical feedforward neural network, developed by the authors, is presented. The network uses an optical nonlinear material for neuron processing and a trainable applied optical pattern as the network weights. The nonlinear material, with the applied weight pattern, modulates the phase front of a forward propagating information beam by dynamically altering the index of refraction profile of the material. To verify that the network can be trained in real time, six logic gates were trained using a reinforcement training paradigm. More importantly, to demonstrate optical backpropagation, three gates were trained via optical error backpropagation. The output error is optically backpropagated, detected with a CCD camera, and the weight pattern is updated and stored on a computer. The obtained results lay the ground work for the implementation of multilayer neural networks that are trained using optical error backpropagation and are able to solve more complex problems.

  16. Neural and behavioral effects of interference resolution in depression and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marc G; Nee, Derek Evan; Casement, Melynda; Kim, Hyang Sook; Deldin, Patricia; Kross, Ethan; Gonzalez, Richard; Demiralp, Emre; Gotlib, Ian H; Hamilton, Paul; Joormann, Jutta; Waugh, Christian; Jonides, John

    2011-03-01

    Individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) often ruminate about their depression and their life situations, impairing their concentration and performance on daily tasks. We examined whether rumination might be due to a deficit in the ability to expel negative information from short-term memory (STM), and fMRI was used to examine the neural structures involved in this ability. MDD and healthy control (HC) participants were tested using a directed-forgetting procedure in a short-term item recognition task. As predicted, MDD participants had more difficulty than did HCs in expelling negative, but not positive, words from STM. Overall, the neural networks involved in directed forgetting were similar for both groups, but the MDDs exhibited more spatial variability in activation in the left inferior frontal gyrus (a region critical for inhibiting irrelevant information), which may contribute to their relative inability to inhibit negative information.

  17. Effective Multifocus Image Fusion Based on HVS and BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of multifocus image fusion is to fuse the images taken from the same scene with different focuses to obtain a resultant image with all objects in focus. In this paper, a novel multifocus image fusion method based on human visual system (HVS and back propagation (BP neural network is presented. Three features which reflect the clarity of a pixel are firstly extracted and used to train a BP neural network to determine which pixel is clearer. The clearer pixels are then used to construct the initial fused image. Thirdly, the focused regions are detected by measuring the similarity between the source images and the initial fused image followed by morphological opening and closing operations. Finally, the final fused image is obtained by a fusion rule for those focused regions. Experimental results show that the proposed method can provide better performance and outperform several existing popular fusion methods in terms of both objective and subjective evaluations.

  18. Artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto-Pazos, Ana B; Veiguela, Noha; Mesejo, Pablo; Navarrete, Marta; Alvarellos, Alberto; Ibáñez, Oscar; Pazos, Alejandro; Araque, Alfonso

    2011-04-19

    Compelling evidence indicates the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Astrocytes, a type of glial cells classically considered to be passive supportive cells, have been recently demonstrated to be actively involved in the processing and regulation of synaptic information, suggesting that brain function arises from the activity of neuron-glia networks. However, the actual impact of astrocytes in neural network function is largely unknown and its application in artificial intelligence remains untested. We have investigated the consequences of including artificial astrocytes, which present the biologically defined properties involved in astrocyte-neuron communication, on artificial neural network performance. Using connectionist systems and evolutionary algorithms, we have compared the performance of artificial neural networks (NN) and artificial neuron-glia networks (NGN) to solve classification problems. We show that the degree of success of NGN is superior to NN. Analysis of performances of NN with different number of neurons or different architectures indicate that the effects of NGN cannot be accounted for an increased number of network elements, but rather they are specifically due to astrocytes. Furthermore, the relative efficacy of NGN vs. NN increases as the complexity of the network increases. These results indicate that artificial astrocytes improve neural network performance, and established the concept of Artificial Neuron-Glia Networks, which represents a novel concept in Artificial Intelligence with implications in computational science as well as in the understanding of brain function.

  19. On the effects of grid ill-conditioning in three dimensional finite element vector potential magnetostatic field computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R.; Demerdash, N. A.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of finite element grid geometries and associated ill-conditioning were studied in single medium and multi-media (air-iron) three dimensional magnetostatic field computation problems. The sensitivities of these 3D field computations to finite element grid geometries were investigated. It was found that in single medium applications the unconstrained magnetic vector potential curl-curl formulation in conjunction with first order finite elements produce global results which are almost totally insensitive to grid geometries. However, it was found that in multi-media (air-iron) applications first order finite element results are sensitive to grid geometries and consequent elemental shape ill-conditioning. These sensitivities were almost totally eliminated by means of the use of second order finite elements in the field computation algorithms. Practical examples are given in this paper to demonstrate these aspects mentioned above.

  20. An "as soon as possible" effect in human intertemporal decision making: behavioral evidence and neural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Joseph W; Glimcher, Paul W

    2010-05-01

    Many decisions involve a trade-off between the quality of an outcome and the time at which that outcome is received. In psychology and behavioral economics, the most widely studied models hypothesize that the values of future gains decline as a roughly hyperbolic function of delay from the present. Recently, it has been proposed that this hyperbolic-like decline in value arises from the interaction of two separate neural systems: one specialized to value immediate rewards and the other specialized to value delayed rewards. Here we report behavioral and functional magnetic resonance imaging results that are inconsistent with both the standard behavioral models of discounting and the hypothesis that separate neural systems value immediate and delayed rewards. Behaviorally, we find that human subjects do not necessarily make the impulsive preference reversals predicted by hyperbolic-like discounting. We also find that blood oxygenation level dependent activity in ventral striatum, medial prefrontal, and posterior cingulate cortex does not track whether an immediate reward was present, as proposed by the separate neural systems hypothesis. Activity in these regions was correlated with the subjective value of both immediate and delayed rewards. Rather than encoding only the relative value of one reward compared with another, these values are represented on a more absolute scale. These data support an alternative behavioral-neural model (which we call "ASAP"), in which subjective value declines hyperbolically relative to the soonest currently available reward and a small number of valuation areas serve as a final common pathway through which these subjective values guide choice.

  1. A Neural network model for the separation of atmospheric effects on attenuation: Application to frequency scaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Barthès, Laurent; Mallet, Cécile; Brisseau, O.

    2006-01-01

    Attenuation due to the propagation of radio waves through the Earth's atmosphere plays a major role in satellite link attenuation at frequencies beyond 20 GHz. This paper presents the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) to separate out the respective roles played by the three types of contributor, namely, gases (oxygen and water vapor), clouds, and rain, to the overall attenuation of radio waves. Whereas the inputs to the ANN are the total attenuation measured at either one, two...

  2. Effects of heat treatment on properties of multi-element low alloy wear-resistant steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Xu-ding

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper has studied the mechanical properties and heat treatment effects on multi-element low alloy wear-resistant steel (MLAWS used as a material for the liner of rolling mill torii. The results show that when quenched at 900-920℃ and tempered at 350-370℃, the MLAWS has achieved hardness above 60 HRC, tensile strength greater than 1 600 MPa, impact toughness higher than 18J/cm2 and fracture toughness greater than 37 MPa

  3. Effects of Crimping on Mechanical Performance of Nitinol Stent Designed for Femoral Artery: Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematzadeh, F.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.

    2013-11-01

    Nitinol stents are used to minimize improper dynamic behavior, low twistability, and inadequate radial mechanical strength of femoral artery stents. In this study, finite element method is used to investigate the effect of crimping and Austenite finish temperature ( A f) of Nitinol on mechanical performance of Z-shaped open-cell femoral stent under crimping conditions. Results show that low A f Nitinol has better mechanical and clinical performance due to small chronic outward force, large radial resistive force, and appropriate superelastic behavior.

  4. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaž; Turk, Goran; Srpcic, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity...

  5. Stability and Convergence of an Effective Finite Element Method for Multiterm Fractional Partial Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjun Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A finite element method (FEM for multiterm fractional partial differential equations (MT-FPDEs is studied for obtaining a numerical solution effectively. The weak formulation for MT-FPDEs and the existence and uniqueness of the weak solutions are obtained by the well-known Lax-Milgram theorem. The Diethelm fractional backward difference method (DFBDM, based on quadrature for the time discretization, and FEM for the spatial discretization have been applied to MT-FPDEs. The stability and convergence for numerical methods are discussed. The numerical examples are given to match well with the main conclusions.

  6. Finite element modeling of acousto-optic effect and optimization of the figure of merit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert; Bhalla, Amar S.; Guo, Ruyan

    2012-10-01

    A study of the acousto-optic (AO) effect in a family of oxide crystals (including e.g., TiO2, ZnO, LiNbO3, and ferroelectric perovskites) as well as semiconductors has been conducted by finite element analysis method. In addition, the acousto-optic figure of merit (FOM) as a function of material's refractive index, density, effective AO coefficient and the velocity of the acoustic wave in the material, is also investigated. By examining the directional dependent velocity, acousto-optic coefficients, and refractive index, the acousto-optic FOM can be calculated and plotted in all directions revealing the optimal crystal orientation to maximize coupling between the optical and acoustic waves. A finite element model was developed to corroborate the predicted interaction. The model examines the diffraction that occurs by the optical wave as it travels through an acousto-optic medium. The combined information gained from Mathematica and COMSOL Multiphysics-based modeling is shown to be an effective means of predicating acousto-optic device functionality.

  7. Effect of kombucha on some trace element levels in different organs of electromagnetic field exposed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola A. Gharib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones have increased exponentially all over the world. The present study was performed to evaluate the effect of kombucha (KT on some trace element levels of brain, spleen and intestine in male albino rats exposed to a 950 MHz electromagnetic field (EMF. Four experimental groups labelled as controls, EMF group, KT group and KT + EMF group were formed with six randomly chosen animals in each group. After EMF exposure for eight weeks and the animals were sacrificed by decapitation. Brain, spleen and intestine samples were collected for trace element analysis. The group of animals subjected to electromagnetic waves caused significant increases in iron copper levels and copper/zinc ratio accompanied with a decrease of zinc level in all studied organs. Combined treatment of kombucha with EMF resulted in a successful attenuation of these adverse effects of EMF. From present findings we can state that kombucha as a supplement has an ameliorative signs against the effects of electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Effect of NPK fertilization and elemental sulphur on growth and yield of lowbush blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. STARAST

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to determine the effect of fertilizers on the pH of former arable soils and on the growth and the yield of the lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.. Lowbush blueberry fertilization experiments were established in 1999 at two locations – at Kärla, Saaremaa, West Estonia and at Vasula, Tartu County, South Estonia. Experimental sites were situated on different soils: soil pHKCl at Kärla was 5.5 and at Vasula 6.2. Elemental sulphur and acidifying fertilizers (ammonium sulfate, potassium sulfate and superphosphate were used in both plantations. Fertilizers were applied based on nutrient in the soil and sulphur was applied at 100 g m–2. Plant growth was recorded in 2001, 2002 and 2003. A positive influence of NPK fertilization on yield was found in both Kärla and Vasula, and yield were 336 g and 41 g higher compared to the control, respectively. The vegetative growth and yield of blueberry depended significantly on soil pH. Elemental sulphur increased soil acidity and on loamy sand soil did not increase plant productivity. The sulphur effect on soil pH began to decrease three years after application. Sulphur can be recommended to increase soil acidity in nutrient-rich soil but, not nutrient poor soil with light texture, where only NPK fertilizers were effective.;

  9. Effects of Alloying Elements (Cr, Mn) on Corrosion Properties of Carbon Steel in Synthetic Seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, Youngmin; Kim, Heesan [Hongik University, Sejong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Effects of alloying elements, manganese and chromium, on corrosion resistance of carbon steel were examined using weight loss test and electrochemical tests (polarization test and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)) in synthetic seawater at 60 ℃. The results from the weight loss test showed that chromium effectively improved corrosion resistance of carbon steel during the entire immersion time, but manganese improved corrosion resistance after the lowered corrosion resistance at the beginnings of immersion. Unlike the weight loss test, the electrochemical tests showed that the corrosion resistance did not increase with immersion time, in all the specimens. This disagreement is explained by the presence of rust involved in electrochemical reaction during electrochemical tests. The analysis of rust with transmission electron microscopy (TEM)−energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) showed that the amorphous-like rust layer located at the metal/rust interface with enriched alloying element (Cr, Mn) prevents diffusion of corrosive species into a metal/rust interface effectively, which leads to increased corrosion resistance. The initial corrosion behaviour is also affected by the rust types. In other words, manganese accelerated the formation of spinel oxides, negatively affecting corrosion resistance. Meanwhile, chromium accelerated the formation of goethite but impeded the formation of spinel oxides, positively affecting the corrosion resistance. From the above results, the corrosion resistance of steel is closely related with a rust type.

  10. Unified-theory-of-reinforcement neural networks do not simulate the blocking effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, Nicholas T; J McDowell, J

    2015-11-01

    For the last 20 years the unified theory of reinforcement (Donahoe et al., 1993) has been used to develop computer simulations to evaluate its plausibility as an account for behavior. The unified theory of reinforcement states that operant and respondent learning occurs via the same neural mechanisms. As part of a larger project to evaluate the operant behavior predicted by the theory, this project was the first replication of neural network models based on the unified theory of reinforcement. In the process of replicating these neural network models it became apparent that a previously published finding, namely, that the networks simulate the blocking phenomenon (Donahoe et al., 1993), was a misinterpretation of the data. We show that the apparent blocking produced by these networks is an artifact of the inability of these networks to generate the same conditioned response to multiple stimuli. The piecemeal approach to evaluate the unified theory of reinforcement via simulation is critiqued and alternatives are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Neural responses to social exclusion in adolescents: Effects of peer status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Water, Erik; Mies, Gabry W; Ma, Ili; Mennes, Maarten; Cillessen, Antonius H N; Scheres, Anouk

    2017-07-01

    We examined whether adolescents' neural responses to social exclusion and inclusion are influenced by their own popularity and acceptance and by the popularity of their excluders and includers. Accepted adolescents are highly prosocial. In contrast, popular adolescents, who are central and influential, show prosocial as well as antisocial behaviors, such as peer exclusion. Fifty-two 12-16 year-old adolescents underwent an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan while playing the ball-tossing game Cyberball in which they received or did not receive the ball from other virtual players. The other virtual players were described as either highly popular or average in popularity. Participants' own popularity and acceptance were assessed with peer nominations at school (n = 31). Participants' acceptance was positively correlated with activity of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during exclusion. Participants' popularity was positively associated with ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex activity during exclusion, but only when the excluders were popular virtual players. Participants showed increased rostral ACC activation to inclusion by players who were average in popularity. These findings indicate that peer status plays an important role in adolescents' neural processing of social exclusion and inclusion. Moreover, these findings underscore that popularity and acceptance are distinct types of high peer status in adolescence, with not only distinct behavioral correlates, but also distinct neural correlates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling positional effects of regulatory sequences with spline transformations increases prediction accuracy of deep neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsec, Žiga; Barekatain, Mohammadamin; Cheng, Jun; Gagneur, Julien

    2017-11-16

    Regulatory sequences are not solely defined by their nucleic acid sequence but also by their relative distances to genomic landmarks such as transcription start site, exon boundaries, or polyadenylation site. Deep learning has become the approach of choice for modeling regulatory sequences because of its strength to learn complex sequence features. However, modeling relative distances to genomic landmarks in deep neural networks has not been addressed. Here we developed spline transformation, a neural network module based on splines to flexibly and robustly model distances. Modeling distances to various genomic landmarks with spline transformations significantly increased state-of-the-art prediction accuracy of in vivo RNA-binding protein binding sites for 120 out of 123 proteins. We also developed a deep neural network for human splice branchpoint based on spline transformations that outperformed the current best, already distance-based, machine learning model. Compared to piecewise linear transformation, as obtained by composition of rectified linear units, spline transformation yields higher prediction accuracy as well as faster and more robust training. As spline transformation can be applied to further quantities beyond distances, such as methylation or conservation, we foresee it as a versatile component in the genomics deep learning toolbox. Spline transformation is implemented as a Keras layer in the CONCISE python package: https://github.com/gagneurlab/concise. Analysis code is available at goo.gl/3yMY5w. avsec@in.tum.de; gagneur@in.tum.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on neural correlates of attention and inhibition in adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, A W S; MacIntosh, B J; Scavone, A; Ou, X; Korczak, D; Goldstein, B I

    2016-05-17

    Executive dysfunction is common during and between mood episodes in bipolar disorder (BD), causing social and functional impairment. This study investigated the effect of acute exercise on adolescents with BD and healthy control subjects (HC) to test for positive or negative consequences on neural response during an executive task. Fifty adolescents (mean age 16.54±1.47 years, 56% female, 30 with BD) completed an attention and response inhibition task before and after 20 min of recumbent cycling at ~70% of age-predicted maximum heart rate. 3 T functional magnetic resonance imaging data were analyzed in a whole brain voxel-wise analysis and as regions of interest (ROI), examining Go and NoGo response events. In the whole brain analysis of Go trials, exercise had larger effect in BD vs HC throughout ventral prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus; the profile of these effects was of greater disengagement after exercise. Pre-exercise ROI analysis confirmed this 'deficit in deactivation' for BDs in rostral ACC and found an activation deficit on NoGo errors in accumbens. Pre-exercise accumbens NoGo error activity correlated with depression symptoms and Go activity with mania symptoms; no correlations were present after exercise. Performance was matched to controls and results survived a series of covariate analyses. This study provides evidence that acute aerobic exercise transiently changes neural response during an executive task among adolescents with BD, and that pre-exercise relationships between symptoms and neural response are absent after exercise. Acute aerobic exercise constitutes a biological probe that may provide insights regarding pathophysiology and treatment of BD.

  14. Antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of major and trace element composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasieva, O G; Suslov, N I; Shilova, I V

    2013-06-01

    The antidepressant, psychostimulant, and nootropic effects of a composition of major and trace elements including KCl, RbNO3, magnesium sulfate, and zinc sulfate were studied on the models of behavioural despair (Porsolt test) and conditioned passive avoidance test. The preparation was found to shorten the immobilization time in the Porsolt test and promote retention of the conditioned passive avoidance. The most pronounced psychostimulant effect of the substance was observed at a dose of 4.68 mg/kg and the most pronounced antidepressant effect was found at a dose of 18.72 mg/kg. Maximum nootropic activity of the preparation was found at a dose of 93.6 mg/kg.

  15. Two novel mixed effects models for prognostics of rolling element bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Tsui, Kwok-Leung

    2018-01-01

    Rolling element bearings are widely used in various machines to support rotating shafts. Due to harsh working environments, the health condition of a bearing degrades over time. A typical bearing degradation process includes two phases. In Phase I, the health condition of the bearing is in normal and it exhibits a stable trend. In Phase II, the health condition of the bearing degrades exponentially. To analytically model the bearing degradation process, two novel mixed effects models are proposed in this paper. Each of the two mixed effects models is able to simultaneously model Phases I and II of the bearing degradation process. The main difference between the two mixed effects models is that different error assumptions including multiplicative normal random error and multiplicative Brownian motion error are respectively considered in the two mixed effects models. Consequently, two different closed-form distributions of bearing remaining useful life are derived from the two mixed effects models via Bayes' theorem once real-time bearing condition monitoring data are available. 25 sets of bearing degradation data collected from an experimental machine are used to illustrate how the two mixed effects models work. Comparisons are conducted to show that the mixed effects model with multiplicative Brownian motion error results in lower prediction errors than the mixed effects model with multiplicative normal random error for bearing remaining useful life prediction.

  16. Neural Correlates of Biased Responses: The Negative Method Effect in the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale Is Associated with Right Amygdala Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinan; Kong, Feng; Huang, Lijie; Liu, Jia

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem is a widely studied construct in psychology that is typically measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES). However, a series of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have suggested that a simple and widely used unidimensional factor model does not provide an adequate explanation of RSES responses due to method effects. To identify the neural correlates of the method effect, we sought to determine whether and how method effects were associated with the RSES and investigate the neural basis of these effects. Two hundred and eighty Chinese college students (130 males; mean age = 22.64 years) completed the RSES and underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Behaviorally, method effects were linked to both positively and negatively worded items in the RSES. Neurally, the right amygdala volume negatively correlated with the negative method factor, while the hippocampal volume positively correlated with the general self-esteem factor in the RSES. The neural dissociation between the general self-esteem factor and negative method factor suggests that there are different neural mechanisms underlying them. The amygdala is involved in modulating negative affectivity; therefore, the current study sheds light on the nature of method effects that are related to self-report with a mix of positively and negatively worded items. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. EFFECT OF Nb ELEMENT CONTENT IN U-Zr ALLOY ON HARDNESS, MICROSTRUCTURE AND PHASE FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masrukan Masrukan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available EFFECT OF Nb ELEMENT CONTENT IN U-Zr-Nb ALLOY ON HARDNESS, MICROSTRUCTURE AND PHASE FORMATION. Experiments to determine the effect of Nb element in the U-Zr alloys on hardness, microstructure and phase formation has been done. The addition of Nb element would effect the hardness, microstructure and phase which formed. The U-Zr-Nb alloy was made with the variation of Nb 2%, 5% and 8% by melting in an electric arc melting furnace that equipped with water cooling and the argon atmosphere. The U-Zr-Nb alloy to be cut divided to some testing, such as hardness test, microstructure, and phase analysis. Hardness testing was done by Vickers hardness testing equipment, microstructure by an optical microscope, and diffraction pattern by XRD and phase analysis was done by GSAS. Hardness testing results showed that the addition of 2% to 5% Nb element in U-Zr alloys will increased in hardness, but the addition of Nb element over 5% the hardness was decreased. Observations the microstructure showed that the addition of 2% to 5%Nb element, grains were formed from fine into coarse. Phase analysis for diffraction pattern showed that the phase changed from αU and γU (Zr,Nbat 2% Nb to be αU, γU (Zr,Nb and δ1 (UZr2 phase at 5% and 8% Nb. Phase changes was followed by changes in its compositions. The composition of αU at 2% Nb was 40% increased to 81% at 5% Nb and decreased to 3.9% at 8% Nb. The composition of γU decreased from 59,86% to 14,91% with increased Nb from 2% to 5% and further increased to 52,74% at 8% Nb.   PENGARUH KADAR UNSUR Nb PADA PADUAN U-Zr-Nb TERHADAP SIFAT MEKANIK, MIKROSTRUKTUR DAN PEMBENTUKAN FASA. Percobaan untuk mengtahui pengaruh kadar Nb pada paduan U-Zr-Nb terhadap sifat mekanik, mikrostruktur dan pembentukan fasa telah dilakukan. Penambahan unsur Nb diduga akan mempengaruhi sifat mekanik, mikrosruktur, ketahanan korosi dan fasa yang terbentuk. Penambahan unsur Nb ke dalam paduan U-Zr dimaksudkan untuk memperluas daerah fasa gamma

  18. Effect of shorter pulse duration in cochlear neural activation with an 810-nm near-infrared laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxuan; Tian, Lan; Lu, Jianren; Xia, Ming; Wei, Ying

    2017-02-01

    Optical neural stimulation in the cochlea has been presented as an alternative technique to the electrical stimulation due to its potential in spatially selectivity enhancement. So far, few studies have selected the near-infrared (NIR) laser in cochlear neural stimulation and limited optical parameter space has been examined. This paper focused on investigating the optical parameter effect on NIR stimulation of auditory neurons, especially under shorter pulse durations. The spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea of deafened guinea pigs were stimulated with a pulsed 810-nm NIR laser in vivo. The laser radiation was delivered by an optical fiber and irradiated towards the modiolus. Optically evoked auditory brainstem responses (OABRs) with various optical parameters were recorded and investigated. The OABRs could be elicited with the cochlear deafened animals by using the 810-nm laser in a wide pulse duration ranged from 20 to 1000 μs. Results showed that the OABR intensity increased along with the increasing laser radiant exposure of limited range at each specific pulse duration. In addition, for the pulse durations from 20 to 300 μs, the OABR intensity increased monotonically along with the pulse duration broadening. While for pulse durations above 300 μs, the OABR intensity basically kept stable with the increasing pulse duration. The 810-nm NIR laser could be an effective stimulus in evoking the cochlear neuron response. Our experimental data provided evidence to optimize the pulse duration range, and the results suggested that the pulse durations from 20 to 300 μs could be the optimized range in cochlear neural activation with the 810-nm-wavelength laser.

  19. Prediction of human actions: expertise and task-related effects on neural activation of the action observation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Nils; Lorey, Britta; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Stark, Rudolf; Bischoff, Matthias; Zentgraf, Karen; Williams, Andrew Mark; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-08-01

    The action observation network (AON) is supposed to play a crucial role when athletes anticipate the effect of others' actions in sports such as tennis. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to explore whether motor expertise leads to a differential activation pattern within the AON during effect anticipation and whether spatial and motor anticipation tasks are associated with a differential activation pattern within the AON depending on participant expertise level. Expert (N=16) and novice (N=16) tennis players observed video clips depicting forehand strokes with the instruction to either indicate the predicted direction of ball flight (spatial anticipation) or to decide on an appropriate response to the observed action (motor anticipation). The experts performed better than novices on both tennis anticipation tasks, with the experts showing stronger neural activation in areas of the AON, namely, the superior parietal lobe, the intraparietal sulcus, the inferior frontal gyrus, and the cerebellum. When novices were contrasted with experts, motor anticipation resulted in stronger activation of the ventral premotor cortex, the supplementary motor area, and the superior parietal lobe than spatial anticipation task did. In experts, the comparison of motor and spatial anticipation revealed no increased activation. We suggest that the stronger activation of areas in the AON during the anticipation of action effects in experts reflects their use of the more fine-tuned motor representations they have acquired and improved during years of training. Furthermore, results suggest that the neural processing of different anticipation tasks depends on the expertise level. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mitigation of Effects of Occlusion on Object Recognition with Deep Neural Networks through Low-Level Image Completion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Chandler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavily occluded objects are more difficult for classification algorithms to identify correctly than unoccluded objects. This effect is rare and thus hard to measure with datasets like ImageNet and PASCAL VOC, however, owing to biases in human-generated image pose selection. We introduce a dataset that emphasizes occlusion and additions to a standard convolutional neural network aimed at increasing invariance to occlusion. An unmodified convolutional neural network trained and tested on the new dataset rapidly degrades to chance-level accuracy as occlusion increases. Training with occluded data slows this decline but still yields poor performance with high occlusion. Integrating novel preprocessing stages to segment the input and inpaint occlusions is an effective mitigation. A convolutional network so modified is nearly as effective with more than 81% of pixels occluded as it is with no occlusion. Such a network is also more accurate on unoccluded images than an otherwise identical network that has been trained with only unoccluded images. These results depend on successful segmentation. The occlusions in our dataset are deliberately easy to segment from the figure and background. Achieving similar results on a more challenging dataset would require finding a method to split figure, background, and occluding pixels in the input.

  1. Effects of radiofrequency exposure emitted from a GSM mobile phone on proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis of neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghlidospour, Mahsa; Ghanbari, Amir; Mortazavi, Seyyed Mohammad Javad; Azari, Hassan

    2017-06-01

    Due to the importance of neural stem cells (NSCs) in plasticity of the nervous system and treating neurodegenerative diseases, the main goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of radiofrequency radiation emitted from a GSM 900-MHz mobile phone with different exposure duration on proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of adult murine NSCs in vitro. We used neurosphere assay to evaluate NSCs proliferation, and immunofluorescence assay of neural cell markers to examine NSCs differentiation. We also employed alamarBlue and caspase 3 apoptosis assays to assess harmful effects of mobile phone on NSCs. Our results showed that the number and size of resulting neurospheres and also the percentage of cells differentiated into neurons decreased significantly with increasing exposure duration to GSM 900-MHz radiofrequency (RF)-electromagnetic field (EMF). In contrast, exposure to GSM 900-MHz RF-EMF at different durations did not influence cell viability and apoptosis of NSCs and also their astrocytic differentiation. It is concluded that accumulating dose of GSM 900-MHz RF-EMF might have devastating effects on NSCs proliferation and neurogenesis requiring more causations in terms of using mobile devices.

  2. The effects of selective attention and speech acoustics on neural speech-tracking in a multi-talker scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmele, Johanna M.; Golumbic, Elana Zion; Schröger, Erich; Poeppel, David

    2015-01-01

    Attending to one speaker in multi-speaker situations is challenging. One neural mechanism proposed to underlie the ability to attend to a particular speaker is phase-locking of low-frequency activity in auditory cortex to speech’s temporal envelope (“speech-tracking”), which is more precise for attended speech. However, it is not known what brings about this attentional effect, and specifically if it reflects enhanced processing of the fine structure of attended speech. To investigate this question we compared attentional effects on speech-tracking of natural vs. vocoded speech which preserves the temporal envelope but removes the fine-structure of speech. Pairs of natural and vocoded speech stimuli were presented concurrently and participants attended to one stimulus and performed a detection task while ignoring the other stimulus. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) and compared attentional effects on the speech-tracking response in auditory cortex. Speech-tracking of natural, but not vocoded, speech was enhanced by attention, whereas neural tracking of ignored speech was similar for natural and vocoded speech. These findings suggest that the more precise speech tracking of attended natural speech is related to processing its fine structure, possibly reflecting the application of higher-order linguistic processes. In contrast, when speech is unattended its fine structure is not processed to the same degree and thus elicits less precise speech tracking more similar to vocoded speech. PMID:25650107

  3. A common oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism modulates intranasal oxytocin effects on the neural response to social cooperation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, C; Lori, A; Waldman, I D; Binder, E B; Haroon, E; Rilling, J K

    2015-09-01

    Intranasal oxytocin (OT) can modulate social-emotional functioning and related brain activity in humans. Consequently, OT has been discussed as a potential treatment for psychiatric disorders involving social behavioral deficits. However, OT effects are often heterogeneous across individuals. Here we explore individual differences in OT effects on the neural response to social cooperation as a function of the rs53576 polymorphism of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR). Previously, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which healthy men and women were randomized to treatment with intranasal OT or placebo. Afterwards, they were imaged with functional magnetic resonance imaging while playing an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma Game with same-sex partners. Within the left ventral caudate nucleus, intranasal OT treatment increased activation to reciprocated cooperation in men, but tended to decrease activation in women. Here, we show that these sex differences in OT effects are specific to individuals with the rs53576 GG genotype, and are not found for other genotypes (rs53576 AA/AG). Thus, OT may increase the reward or salience of positive social interactions for male GG homozygotes, while decreasing those processes for female GG homozygotes. These results suggest that rs53576 genotype is an important variable to consider in future investigations of the clinical efficacy of intranasal OT treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  4. Blood lead: Its effect on trace element levels and iron structure in hemoglobin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, C. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Li, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)], E-mail: LY@sinap.ac.cn; Li, Y.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zou, Y. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, G.L. [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Normura, M. [Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, KEK, Oho, Tsukuba 305 (Japan); Zhu, G.Y. [Institute of Radiation Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2008-08-15

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate its effects on trace elements and the iron structure in hemoglobin. Blood samples were collected from rats that had been exposed to lead. The concentration of trace elements in whole blood and blood plasma was determined by ICP-MS and the results indicate that lead exists mainly in the red blood cells and only about 1-3% in the blood plasma. Following lead exposure, the concentrations of zinc and iron in blood decrease, as does the hemoglobin level. This indicates that the heme biosynthetic pathway is inhibited by lead toxicity and that lead poisoning-associated anemia occurs. The selenium concentration also decreases after lead exposure, which may lead to an increased rate of free radical production. The effect of lead in the blood on iron structure in hemoglobin was determined by EXAFS. After lead exposure, the Fe-O bond length increases by about 0.07 A and the Fe-Np bond length slightly increases, but the Fe-N{sub {epsilon}} bond length remains unchanged. This indicates that the blood content of Hb increases, but that the content of HbO{sub 2} decreases.

  5. Thermal Effects on Vibration and Control of Piezocomposite Kirchhoff Plate Modeled by Finite Elements Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sanbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical and numerical results of the modeling of a smart plate are presented for optimal active vibration control. The smart plate consists of a rectangular aluminum piezocomposite plate modeled in cantilever configuration with surface bonded thermopiezoelectric patches. The patches are symmetrically bonded on top and bottom surfaces. A generic thermopiezoelastic theory for piezocomposite plate is derived, using linear thermopiezoelastic theory and Kirchhoff assumptions. Finite element equations for the thermopiezoelastic medium are obtained by using the linear constitutive equations in Hamilton’s principle together with the finite element approximations. The structure is modelled analytically and then numerically and the results of simulations are presented in order to visualize the states of their dynamics and the state of control. The optimal control LQG-Kalman filter is applied. By using this model, the study first gives the influences of the actuator/sensor pair placement and size on the response of the smart plate. Second, the effects of thermoelastic and pyroelectric couplings on the dynamics of the structure and on the control procedure are studied and discussed. It is shown that the effectiveness of the control is not affected by the applied thermal gradient and can be applied with or without this gradient at any time of plate vibrations.

  6. Blood lead: Its effect on trace element levels and iron structure in hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, C.; Li, Y.; Li, Y. L.; Zou, Y.; Zhang, G. L.; Normura, M.; Zhu, G. Y.

    2008-08-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant that induce a broad range of physiological and biochemical dysfunctions. The purpose of this study was to investigate its effects on trace elements and the iron structure in hemoglobin. Blood samples were collected from rats that had been exposed to lead. The concentration of trace elements in whole blood and blood plasma was determined by ICP-MS and the results indicate that lead exists mainly in the red blood cells and only about 1-3% in the blood plasma. Following lead exposure, the concentrations of zinc and iron in blood decrease, as does the hemoglobin level. This indicates that the heme biosynthetic pathway is inhibited by lead toxicity and that lead poisoning-associated anemia occurs. The selenium concentration also decreases after lead exposure, which may lead to an increased rate of free radical production. The effect of lead in the blood on iron structure in hemoglobin was determined by EXAFS. After lead exposure, the Fe-O bond length increases by about 0.07 Å and the Fe-Np bond length slightly increases, but the Fe-N ɛ bond length remains unchanged. This indicates that the blood content of Hb increases, but that the content of HbO 2 decreases.

  7. Calculation of the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects in nanowires using a decoupled finite element analysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Geng, Dalong; Wang, Xudong, E-mail: xudong.wang@wisc.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-04-21

    A simple and effective decoupled finite element analysis method was developed for simulating both the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects of zinc oxide (ZnO) and barium titanate (BTO) nanowires (NWs). The piezoelectric potential distribution on a ZnO NW was calculated under three deformation conditions (cantilever, three-point, and four-point bending) and compared to the conventional fully coupled method. The discrepancies of the electric potential maximums from these two methods were found very small, validating the accuracy and effectiveness of the decoupled method. Both ZnO and BTO NWs yielded very similar potential distributions. Comparing the potential distributions induced by the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects, we identified that the middle segment of a four-point bending NW beam is the ideal place for measuring the flexoelectric coefficient, because the uniform parallel plate capacitor-like potential distribution in this region is exclusively induced by the flexoelectric effect. This decoupled method could provide a valuable guideline for experimental measurements of the piezoelectric effects and flexoelectric effects in the nanometer scale.

  8. Features analysis of five-element theory and its basal effects on construction of visceral manifestation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zimi; Jia, Chunhua; Guo, Jin; Gu, Haorong; Miao, Yanhuan

    2014-02-01

    To study the Chinese ancient five-element theory, one of the philosophical foundations of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory construction, from the perspective of comtemporary cognitive science, and to reveal the important functions of five-element theory in the construction of TCM theory. The basic effects of five-element theory in the construction of TCM theory are intensively expounded and proved from the following aspects: embodiment of five-element theory in cognizing the world, quasi axiom of five-element theory in essence, classification thery of family resemblance and deductive inference pattern of five-element theory, and the openness and expansibility of five-element theory. If five-element theory is considered a cognitive pattern or cognitive system related to culture, then there should be features of cognitive embodiment in the cognitive system. If five-element theory is regarded as a symbolic system, however, then there should be a quasi-axiom for the system, and inferential deduction. If, however, five-element theory is taken as a theoretical constructive metaphor, then there should be features of opening and expansibility for the metaphor. Based on five-element theory, this study provides a cognitive frame for the construction of TCM (a medicine that originated in China, and is characterized by holism and treatment based on pattern identification differentiation) theory with the function of constructing a concept base, thereby implying further research strategies. Useful information may be produced from the creative inferences obtained from the incorporation of five-element theory.

  9. Age and gender effects on bone mass density variation: finite elements simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Ben Kahla, Rabeb; Merzouki, Tarek; Hambli, Ridha

    2017-04-01

    Bone remodeling is a physiological process by which bone constantly adapts its structure to changes in long-term loading manifested by interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. This process can be influenced by many local factors, via effects on bone cells differentiation and proliferation, which are produced by bone cells and act in a paracrine or autocrine way. The aim of the current work is to provide mechanobiological finite elements modeling coupling both cellular activities and mechanical behavior in order to investigate age and gender effects on bone remodeling evolution. A series of computational simulations have been performed on a 2D and 3D human proximal femur. An age- and gender-related impacts on bulk density alteration of trabecular bone have been noticed, and the major actors responsible of this phenomenon have been then discussed.

  10. Finite Element Analysis of Magnetic Damping Effects on G-Jitter Induced Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bo; Li, Ben Q.; deGroh, Henry C., III

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports some interim results on numerical modeling and analyses of magnetic damping of g-jitter driven fluid flow in microgravity. A finite element model is developed to represent the fluid flow, thermal and solute transport phenomena in a 2-D cavity under g-jitter conditions with and without an applied magnetic field. The numerical model is checked by comparing with analytical solutions obtained for a simple parallel plate channel flow driven by g-jitter in a transverse magnetic field. The model is then applied to study the effect of steady state g-jitter induced oscillation and on the solute redistribution in the liquid that bears direct relevance to the Bridgman-Stockbarger single crystal growth processes. A selection of computed results is presented and the results indicate that an applied magnetic field can effectively damp the velocity caused by g-jitter and help to reduce the time variation of solute redistribution.

  11. The effect of rare earth elements on the texture and formability of asymmetrically rolled magnesium sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderman, Dr. Martyn [Magnesium Elektron North America; Cavin, Odis Burl [ORNL; Davis, Dr. Bruce [Magnesium Elektron North America; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Muth, Thomas R [ORNL; Peter, William H [ORNL; Randman, David [Magnesium Elektron North America; Watkins, Thomas R [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The lack of formability is a serious issue when considering magnesium alloys for various applications. Standard symmetric rolling introduces a strong basal texture that decreases the formability; however, asymmetric rolling has been put forward as a possible route to produce sheet with weaker texture and greater ductility. It has also been shown in recent work that weaker textures can be produced through the addition of rare earth elements to magnesium alloys. Therefore, this study has been carried out to investigate the effect of rare earth additions on the texture changes during asymmetric rolling. Two alloys have been used, AZ31B and ZEK100. The effect that the rare earth additions have on the texture of asymmetrically rolled sheet and the subsequent changes in formability will be discussed.

  12. Quantifying the effects of soil temperature, moisture and sterilization on elemental mercury formation in boreal soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannu, Ravinder; Siciliano, Steven D; O'Driscoll, Nelson J

    2014-10-01

    Soils are a source of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) to the atmosphere, however the effects of soil temperature and moisture on Hg(0) formation is not well defined. This research quantifies the effect of varying soil temperature (278-303 K), moisture (15-80% water filled pore space (WFPS)) and sterilization on the kinetics of Hg(0) formation in forested soils of Nova Scotia, Canada. Both, the logarithm of cumulative mass of Hg(0) formed in soils and the reduction rate constants (k values) increased with temperature and moisture respectively. Sterilizing soils significantly (p rate limiting biotic process that generates a large pool of reducible Hg(II). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Marking Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata and Rhodnius nasutus Nymphs with Trace Elements: Element Persistence and Effects of Marking on Insect Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valença-Barbosa, Carolina; Sarquis, Otília; Freire, Aline Soares; David, Mariana R.; Santelli, Ricardo E.; Monteiro, Fernando A.; Lima, Marli M.; Maciel-de-Freitas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Field ecologists often rely on mark-release-recapture (MRR) experiments to estimate population dynamics parameters for a given species. In the case of a medically important taxon, i.e., a disease vector, inferences on species survival and dispersal rates are particularly important as they have the potential to provide insights into disease transmission dynamics in endemic areas. Medical entomologists have traditionally used fluorescent dusts to externally mark the cuticle of insects. However, dust marking is usually restricted to the adult life stage because immature insects lose the mark when they molt. Methodology/Principal Findings We evaluated the efficacy of 13 trace elements in marking nymphs of three native Brazilian Chagas disease vectors: Triatoma brasiliensis, Triatoma pseudomaculata, and Rhodnius nasutus. Cr and Cu were detected in over 97% of T. brasiliensis (34/35 31/31 for Cr and Cu), while Cu and Mn were detected in more than 95% of T. pseudomaculata (29/29 for Cu and 28/29 for Mn) tested 120 days after marking. Only Mn marked over 90% of R. nasutus nymphs (38/41). Overall, trace elements had no negative effects on T. pseudomaculata longevity, but As-marked T. brasiliensis nymphs (ptrace elements that can be used for mark and recapture studies of three triatomine species in Brazil. PMID:27027503

  14. Effects of soil lanthanum on growth and elemental composition of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastovets, Ilya; Kotelnikova, Anna; Olga, Rogova; Nikolai, Sushkov; Elena, Pashkevich

    2017-04-01

    Effects of soil lanthanum on growth and elemental composition of plants In recent years, lanthanum (La) has been found effective in increasing crop productivity. This results in its growing application in agriculture. However, it is controversial whether lanthanum has beneficial or negative impact on plants (Kabata-Pendias, 2011). In the present study we carried out a pot experiment to understand how soil La affects barley (Hordeum vulgare L., 'Mikhaylovsky' cv.) growth and elemental composition. The pot experiment was conducted in a growbox under artificial light in sod-podzolic soil. The soil was sprayed with LaCl3 solutions to achieve the following concentrations of exogenous La: 0 (control), 10, 20, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. The plants were grown for 40 days in 2-litre pots, 6 plants in each pot, with 4 replications per group (24 pots total), and were irrigated with distilled water. Fresh aboveground biomass was weighed, chlorophylls α and β and carotenoids were measured in fresh leaves. Dry leaves, stems and soil were subject to atomic emission (ICP-AES) elemental analysis. Statistical computations involved simulated Kruskal-Wallis and Jonckheere-Terpstra tests as well as Gao modification of Campbell-Skillings test for nonparametric multiple comparisons. Multiple regression and correlation analyzes were also performed. All differences were considered significant at α=0.05. Our results indicate that both leaves and stems of barley readily accumulate La. Leaves accumulate up to 1.2% of soil La concentration, and significantly more La than stems. Significant accumulation of La by stems and leaves was observed in pots with La soil concentrations higher than 50 and 20 mg/kg, respectively. Plant biomass uniformly increases up to 13.5 % compared to the control, and significant increase in plant biomass was observed at concentrations 100 and 200 mg/kg La. Chlorophyll α and β and carotenoid content decrease significantly at 100 mg/kg La compared to the control group

  15. Effects of Bone Young’s Modulus on Finite Element Analysis in the Lateral Ankle Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. X. Niu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a powerful tool in biomechanics. The mechanical properties of biological tissue used in FEA modeling are mainly from experimental data, which vary greatly and are sometimes uncertain. The purpose of this study was to research how Young’s modulus affects the computations of a foot-ankle FEA model. A computer simulation and an in-vitro experiment were carried out to investigate the effects of incremental Young’s modulus of bone on the stress and strain outcomes in the computational simulation. A precise 3-dimensional finite element model was constructed based on an in-vitro specimen of human foot and ankle. Young’s moduli were assigned as four levels of 7.3, 14.6, 21.9 and 29.2 GPa respectively. The proximal tibia and fibula were completely limited to six degrees of freedom, and the ankle was loaded to inversion 10° and 20° through the calcaneus. Six cadaveric foot-ankle specimens were loaded as same as the finite element model, and strain was measured at two positions of the distal fibula. The bone stress was less affected by assignment of Young’s modulus. With increasing of Young’s modulus, the bone strain decreased linearly. Young’s modulus of 29.2 GPa was advisable to get the satisfactory surface strain results. In the future study, more ideal model should be constructed to represent the nonlinearity, anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as the same time to provide reasonable outputs of the interested parameters.

  16. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects and elemental accumulation derived from air pollution in community urban gardens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato-Lourenco, Luís Fernando; Lobo, Debora Jã A; Guimarães, Eliane T; Moreira, Tiana Carla Lopes; Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais

    2017-01-01

    Urban gardening is a growing global phenomenon with a positive impact on society. Despite several associated benefits, growing vegetables in urban gardens that are localized in highly polluted areas poses questions about the safety of the produced food. Therefore, the identification of risk factors that result in possible deleterious effects to human health is important for realizing all of the benefits to society. We evaluated the use of two biomonitoring methods in ten urban gardens of Sao Paulo city and one control site: the micronuclei frequencies for early tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. "Purpurea" Boom (hereafter, Trad-MCN) as a short-term indicator of genotoxic response and tree barks to quantify the accumulation of traffic-related chemical elements as a long-term biomarker of air pollution in urban gardens. Mature plants of Tradescantia pallida were exposed in each garden, and their inflorescences were sampled over three months. A random set of 300 early tetrads in 13 to 21 slides per garden were evaluated for micronuclei frequencies. Elemental concentrations in 428 tree barks samples from 107 different trees in the areas surrounding urban gardens were quantified using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The frequency of Trad-MCN has a significant correlation with traffic variables and chemical elements related to road dust and tailpipe emissions deposited in tree barks. Negative associations between Trad-MCN and both the distance through traffic and the presence of vertical obstacles were observed in the community gardens. The Mn/Zn concentrations in tree barks were associated with increased Trad-MCN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of lubricant sulfur on the morphology and elemental composition of diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Piqiang; Li, Yuan; Shen, Hanyan

    2017-05-01

    This work investigates the effects of lubricant sulfur contents on the morphology, nanostructure, size distribution and elemental composition of diesel exhaust particle on a light-duty diesel engine. Three kinds of lubricant (LS-oil, MS-oil and HS-oil, all of which have different sulfur contents: 0.182%, 0.583% and 1.06%, respectively) were used in this study. The morphologies and nanostructures of exhaust particles were analyzed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Size distributions of primary particles were determined through advanced image-processing software. Elemental compositions of exhaust particles were obtained through X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results show that as lubricant sulfur contents increase, the macroscopic structure of diesel exhaust particles turn from chain-like to a more complex agglomerate. The inner cores of the core-shell structure belonging to these primary particles change little; the shell thickness decreases, and the spacing of carbon layer gradually descends, and amorphous materials that attached onto outer carbon layer of primary particles increase. Size distributions of primary particles present a unimodal and normal distribution, and higher sulfur contents lead to larger size primary particles. The sulfur content in lubricants directly affects the chemical composition in the particles. The content of C (carbon) decreases as sulfur increases in the lubricants, while the contents of O (oxygen), S (sulfur) and trace elements (including S, Si (silicon), Fe (ferrum), P (phosphorus), Ca (calcium), Zn (zinc), Mg (magnesium), Cl (chlorine) and Ni (nickel)) all increase in particles. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Effects of processed oil shale on the element content of Atriplex cancescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    Samples of four-wing saltbush were collected from the Colorado State University Intensive Oil Shale Revegetation Study Site test plots in the Piceance basin, Colorado. The test plots were constructed to evaluate the effects of processed oil shale geochemistry on plant growth using various thicknesses of soil cover over the processed shale and/or over a gravel barrier between the shale and soil. Generally, the thicker the soil cover, the less the influence of the shale geochemistry on the element concentrations in the plants. Concentrations of 20 elements were larger in the ash of four-wing saltbush growing on the plot with the gravel barrier (between the soil and processed shale) when compared to the sample from the control plot. A greater water content in the soil in this plot has been reported, and the interaction between the increased, percolating water and shale may have increased the availability of these elements for plant uptake. Concentrations of boron, copper, fluorine, lithium, molybdenum, selenium, silicon, and zinc were larger in the samples grown over processed shale, compared to those from the control plot, and concentrations for barium, calcium, lanthanum, niobium, phosphorus, and strontium were smaller. Concentrations for arsenic, boron, fluorine, molybdenum, and selenium-- considered to be potential toxic contaminants--were similar to results reported in the literature for vegetation from the test plots. The copper-to-molybdenum ratios in three of the four samples of four-wing saltbush growing over the processed shale were below the ratio of 2:1, which is judged detrimental to ruminants, particularly cattle. Boron concentrations averaged 140 ppm, well above the phytotoxicity level for most plant species. Arsenic, fluorine, and selenium concentrations were below toxic levels, and thus should not present any problem for revegetation or forage use at this time.

  19. Effective feature selection of clinical and genetic to predict warfarin dose using artificial neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Karim Sohrabi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Warfarin is one of the most common oral anticoagulant, which role is to prevent the clots. The dose of this medicine is very important because changes can be dangerous for patients. Diagnosis is difficult for physicians because increase and decrease in use of warfarin is so dangerous for patients. Identifying the clinical and genetic features involved in determining dose could be useful to predict using data mining techniques. The aim of this paper is to provide a convenient way to select the clinical and genetic features to determine the dose of warfarin using artificial neural networks (ANN and evaluate it in order to predict the dose patients. Methods: This experimental study, was investigate from April to May 2014 on 552 patients in Tehran Heart Center Hospital (THC candidates for warfarin anticoagulant therapy within the international normalized ratio (INR therapeutic target. Factors affecting the dose include clinical characteristics and genetic extracted, and different methods of feature selection based on genetic algorithm and particle swarm optimization (PSO and evaluation function neural networks in MATLAB (MathWorks, MA, USA, were performed. Results: Between algorithms used, particle swarm optimization algorithm accuracy was more appropriate, for the mean square error (MSE, root mean square error (RMSE and mean absolute error (MAE were 0.0262, 0.1621 and 0.1164, respectively. Conclusion: In this article, the most important characteristics were identified using methods of feature selection and the stable dose had been predicted based on artificial neural networks. The output is acceptable and with less features, it is possible to achieve the prediction warfarin dose accurately. Since the prescribed dose for the patients is important, the output of the obtained model can be used as a decision support system.

  20. Output Effect Evaluation Based on Input Features in Neural Incremental Attribute Learning for Better Classification Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning is a very important approach to pattern classification. This paper provides a better insight into Incremental Attribute Learning (IAL with further analysis as to why it can exhibit better performance than conventional batch training. IAL is a novel supervised machine learning strategy, which gradually trains features in one or more chunks. Previous research showed that IAL can obtain lower classification error rates than a conventional batch training approach. Yet the reason for that is still not very clear. In this study, the feasibility of IAL is verified by mathematical approaches. Moreover, experimental results derived by IAL neural networks on benchmarks also confirm the mathematical validation.

  1. Effect of signal noise on the learning capability of an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, J. J.; Reynoso, R.; Calvet, H. Carrillo

    2009-07-01

    Digital Pulse Shape Analysis (DPSA) by artificial neural networks (ANN) is becoming an important tool to extract relevant information from digitized signals in different areas. In this paper, we present a systematic evidence of how the concomitant noise that distorts the signals or patterns to be identified by an ANN set limits to its learning capability. Also, we present evidence that explains overtraining as a competition between the relevant pattern features, on the one side, against the signal noise, on the other side, as the main cause defining the shape of the error surface in weight space and, consequently, determining the steepest descent path that controls the ANN adaptation process.

  2. Effect of signal noise on the learning capability of an artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, J.J. [Departamento del Acelerador, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F. 11801 (Mexico)], E-mail: jjvc@nuclear.inin.mx; Reynoso, R. [Departamento del Acelerador, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Apartado Postal 18-1027, Mexico D.F. 11801 (Mexico); Calvet, H. Carrillo [Laboratorio de Dinamica no Lineal, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2009-07-21

    Digital Pulse Shape Analysis (DPSA) by artificial neural networks (ANN) is becoming an important tool to extract relevant information from digitized signals in different areas. In this paper, we present a systematic evidence of how the concomitant noise that distorts the signals or patterns to be identified by an ANN set limits to its learning capability. Also, we present evidence that explains overtraining as a competition between the relevant pattern features, on the one side, against the signal noise, on the other side, as the main cause defining the shape of the error surface in weight space and, consequently, determining the steepest descent path that controls the ANN adaptation process.

  3. Effects of aripiprazole and haloperidol on neural activation during a simple motor task in healthy individuals: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goozee, Rhianna; O'Daly, Owen; Handley, Rowena; Reis Marques, Tiago; Taylor, Heather; McQueen, Grant; Hubbard, Kathryn; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Reinders, Antje A T S; Dazzan, Paola

    2017-04-01

    The dopaminergic system plays a key role in motor function and motor abnormalities have been shown to be a specific feature of psychosis. Due to their dopaminergic action, antipsychotic drugs may be expected to modulate motor function, but the precise effects of these drugs on motor function remain unclear. We carried out a within-subject, double-blind, randomized study of the effects of aripiprazole, haloperidol and placebo on motor function in 20 healthy men. For each condition, motor performance on an auditory-paced task was investigated. We entered maps of neural activation into a random effects general linear regression model to investigate motor function main effects. Whole-brain imaging revealed a significant treatment effect in a distributed network encompassing posterior orbitofrontal/anterior insula cortices, and the inferior temporal and postcentral gyri. Post-hoc comparison of treatments showed neural activation after aripiprazole did not differ significantly from placebo in either voxel-wise or region of interest analyses, with the results above driven primarily by haloperidol. We also observed a simple main effect of haloperidol compared with placebo, with increased task-related recruitment of posterior cingulate and precentral gyri. Furthermore, region of interest analyses revealed greater activation following haloperidol compared with placebo in the precentral and post-central gyri, and the putamen. These diverse modifications in cortical motor activation may relate to the different pharmacological profiles of haloperidol and aripiprazole, although the specific mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear. Evaluating healthy individuals can allow investigation of the effects of different antipsychotics on cortical activation, independently of either disease-related pathology or previous treatment. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1833-1845, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Arginine Vasopressin Effects on Subjective Judgments and Neural Responses to Same and Other-Sex Faces in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, James K; Li, Ting; Chen, Xiangchuan; Gautam, Pritam; Haroon, Ebrahim; Thompson, Richmond R

    2017-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) influences social and emotional behaviors across a wide range of species. In humans, intranasal AVP has been previously shown to alter physiological responses to and subjective judgments of same-sex faces in both men and women. The present study attempted to elucidate the neural mechanism for these effects by randomizing 40 healthy men and 40 healthy women to treatment with either 40 IU intranasal AVP or a saline placebo approximately 30 min before imaging their brain function with fMRI as they viewed same and other-sex faces. All subjects were also scanned a second time several days later with no treatment to evaluate the persistence of AVP effects over time. AVP acutely increased positive ratings of same-sex faces in women, with some evidence that these effects persisted until the second scan. While AVP had no acute effects on same-sex ratings in men, AVP increased positive ratings of same-sex faces several days later. On the other hand, AVP had no effect on other-sex face judgments in either sex. AVP modulation of brain function was focused on the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the lateral septum, two reward processing areas involved in the formation of social bonds. AVP provoked acute increases in right NAc and bilateral lateral septum responses to female faces among men, with left lateral septum responses persisting over time while right NAc responses reversed over time. Finally, AVP modulated hypothalamic activation to faces in both men and women. The present study therefore indicates that intranasal AVP affects subjective ratings and neural responses to same and other-sex faces in men and women, with some effects persisting and others emerging over time. Future studies should investigate whether AVP effects are modulated by individual variables such as genotype, personality, or attachment style as previously reported for other nonapeptides.

  5. The effect of magnetic nanoparticles on neuronal differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiráková, Klára; Šeneklová, Monika; Jirák, Daniel; Turnovcová, Karolína; Vosmanská, Magda; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Veverka, Pavel; Jendelová, Pavla

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is suitable for noninvasive long-term tracking. We labeled human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural precursors (iPSC-NPs) with two types of iron-based nanoparticles, silica-coated cobalt zinc ferrite nanoparticles (CZF) and poly-l-lysine-coated iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3) and studied their effect on proliferation and neuronal differentiation. Materials and methods We investigated the effect of these two contrast agents on neural precursor cell proliferation and differentiation capability. We further defined the intracellular localization and labeling efficiency and analyzed labeled cells by MR. Results Cell proliferation was not affected by PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3 but was slowed down in cells labeled with CZF. Labeling efficiency, iron content and relaxation rates measured by MR were lower in cells labeled with CZF when compared to PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3. Cytoplasmic localization of both types of nanoparticles was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Flow cytometry and immunocytochemical analysis of specific markers expressed during neuronal differentiation did not show any significant differences between unlabeled cells or cells labeled with both magnetic nanoparticles. Conclusion Our results show that cells labeled with PLL-coated γ-Fe2O3 are suitable for MR detection, did not affect the differentiation potential of iPSC-NPs and are suitable for in vivo cell therapies in experimental models of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27920532

  6. Gestational naltrexone ameliorates fetal ethanol exposures enhancing effect on the postnatal behavioral and neural response to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngentob, Steven L; Kent, Paul F; Youngentob, Lisa M

    2012-10-01

    The association between gestational exposure to ethanol and adolescent ethanol abuse is well established. Recent animal studies support the role of fetal ethanol experience-induced chemosensory plasticity as contributing to this observation. Previously, we established that fetal ethanol exposure, delivered through a dam's diet throughout gestation, tuned the neural response of the peripheral olfactory system of early postnatal rats to the odor of ethanol. This occurred in conjunction with a loss of responsiveness to other odorants. The instinctive behavioral response to the odor of ethanol was also enhanced. Importantly, there was a significant contributory link between the altered response to the odor of ethanol and increased ethanol avidity when assessed in the same animals. Here, we tested whether the neural and behavioral olfactory plasticity, and their relationship to enhanced ethanol intake, is a result of the mere exposure to ethanol or whether it requires the animal to associate ethanol's reinforcing properties with its odor attributes. In this later respect, the opioid system is important in the mediation (or modulation) of the reinforcing aspects of ethanol. To block endogenous opiates during prenatal life, pregnant rats received daily intraperitoneal administration of the opiate antagonist naltrexone from gestational day 6-21 jointly with ethanol delivered via diet. Relative to control progeny, we found that gestational exposure to naltrexone ameliorated the enhanced postnatal behavioral response to the odor of ethanol and postnatal drug avidity. Our findings support the proposition that in utero ethanol-induced olfactory plasticity (and its relationship to postnatal intake) requires, at least in part, the associative pairing between ethanol's odor quality and its reinforcing aspects. We also found suggestive evidence that fetal naltrexone ameliorated the untoward effects of gestational ethanol exposure on the neural response to non

  7. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  8. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibition on neural activity related to risky decisions and monetary rewards in healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Fisher, Patrick M; Haahr, Mette E; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2014-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine are commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs targeting the dysfunctional serotonin (5-HT) system, yet little is known about the functional effects of prolonged serotonin reuptake inhibition in healthy individuals. Here we used functional MRI (fMRI) to investigate how a three-week fluoxetine intervention influences neural activity related to risk taking and reward processing. Employing a double-blinded parallel-group design, 29 healthy young males were randomly assigned to receive 3 weeks of a daily dose of 40 mg fluoxetine or placebo. Participants underwent task-related fMRI prior to and after the three-week intervention while performing a card gambling task. The task required participants to choose between two decks of cards. Choices were associated with different risk levels and potential reward magnitudes. Relative to placebo, the SSRI intervention did not alter individual risk-choice preferences, but modified neural activity during decision-making and reward processing: During the choice phase, SSRI reduced the neural response to increasing risk in lateral orbitofrontal cortex, a key structure for value-based decision-making. During the outcome phase, a midbrain region showed an independent decrease in the responsiveness to rewarding outcomes. This midbrain cluster included the raphe nuclei from which serotonergic modulatory projections originate to both cortical and subcortical regions. The findings corroborate the involvement of the normally functioning 5HT-system in decision-making under risk and processing of monetary rewards. The data suggest that prolonged SSRI treatment might reduce emotional engagement by reducing the impact of risk during decision-making or the impact of reward during outcome evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of the resistive properties of bone on neural excitation and electric fields in cochlear implant models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malherbe, T K; Hanekom, T; Hanekom, J J

    2015-09-01

    The resistivity of bone is the most variable of all the tissues in the human body, ranging from 312 Ω cm to 84,745 Ω cm. Volume conduction models of cochlear implants have generally used a resistivity value of 641 Ω cm for the bone surrounding the cochlea. This study investigated the effect that bone resistivity has on modelled neural thresholds and intracochlear potentials using user-specific volume conduction models of implanted cochleae applying monopolar stimulation. The complexity of the description of the head volume enveloping the cochlea was varied between a simple infinite bone volume and a detailed skull containing a brain volume, scalp and accurate return electrode position. It was found that, depending on the structure of the head model and implementation of the return electrode, different bone resistivity values are necessary to match model predictions to data from literature. Modelled forward-masked spatial tuning curve (fmSTC) widths and slopes and intracochlear electric field profile length constants were obtained for a range of bone resistivity values for the various head models. The predictions were compared to measurements found in literature. It was concluded that, depending on the head model, a bone resistivity value between 3500 Ω cm and 10,500 Ω cm allows prediction of neural and electrical responses that match measured data. A general recommendation is made to use a resistivity value of approximately 10,000 Ω cm for bone volumes in conduction models of the implanted cochlea when neural excitation is predicted and a value of approximately 6500 Ω cm when predicting electric fields inside the cochlear duct. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  11. The effects of Chinese five-element music therapy on nursing students with depressed mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chen-Jung; Sung, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Ming-Shinn; Chang, Ching-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Chinese five-element music therapy on nursing students with depressed mood. We randomly assigned 71 nursing students from Taiwan with depressed mood to the music and control groups. The music group (n = 31) received Chinese five-element music therapy, whereas the participants in the control group (n = 40) maintained their routine lifestyles with no music therapy. All of the participants were assessed using the Depression Mood Self-Report Inventory for Adolescence, and their salivary cortisol levels were measured. The study found that there was a significant reduction in depression between the pre- and posttherapy test scores and in salivary cortisol levels over time in the music group. After receiving the music therapy, the nursing students' depression levels were significantly reduced (P = 0.038) compared with the control group (P music therapy has the potential to reduce the level of depression in nursing students with depressed mood. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. Effects of alloying elements on elastic properties of Al by first-principles calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of alloying elements (Co, Cu, Fe, Ge, Hf, Mg, Mn, Ni, Si, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and Zr on elastic properties of Al have been investigated using first-principles calculations within the generalized gradient approximation. A supercell consisting of 31 Al atoms and one solute atom is used. A good agreement is obtained between calculated and available experimental data. Lattice parameters of the studied Al alloys are found to be depended on atomic radii of solute atoms. The elastic properties of polycrystalline aggregates including bulk modulus (B, shear modulus (G, Young’s modulus (E, and the B/G ratio are also determined based on the calculated elastic constants (cij’s. It is found that the bulk modulus of Al alloys decreases with increasing volume due to the addition of alloying elements and the bulk modulus is also related to the total molar volume (Vm and electron density (nAl31x with the relationship of nAl31x=1.0594+0.0207√B/Vm. These results are of relevance to tailor the properties of Al alloys.

  13. Beam focusing characteristics and alloying element effects on high-intensity electron beam welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, P. S.; Chow, Y. T.

    1992-01-01

    Effects of focusing characteristics of the beam as well as concentrations of a volatile alloying element in the workpiece on the shape of the cavity produced by a high-energy beam are systematically and quantitatively investigated. The energy flux of the focused energy beam is independently specified by the convergence angle, the energy distribution parameter at the focal spot, and the focal spot location relative to the workpiece surface. Energy flux at any cross section of the beam is a Gaussian distribution. The geometry of the cavity is determined by satisfying interfacial energy and momentum balances. By accounting for beam focusing characteristics, the cavity surface temperatures, depths of penetration, and cavity shapes are found to agree with experimental data. The opening diameter and depth of the cavity depend primarily upon the energy distribution parameter at the workpiece surface for a surface-focused weld t increase in the content of the volatile alloying element zinc in aluminum exhibits a pronounced influence on the shape of the cavity.

  14. Soft-x-ray magneto-optical Kerr effect and element-specific hysteresis measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Interest in the utilization of x-ray magneto-optical properties to provide element-specific magnetic information, combined with recent development of tunable linear polarizers for spectroscopic polarization measurement, have led the authors to the study of magneto-optical rotation (MOR) near core levels of magnetic atoms in magnetic multilayer and alloy films. Their initial observation of Faraday rotation (in transmission) demonstrated that for Fe MOR is easily measured and is larger at its L{sub 3} resonance than in the near-visible spectral regions. This work also demonstrated that the spectroscopic behavior of the MOR signal in transmission, resulting from the differential reaction of left- and right-circular components of a linearly polarized beam, is related to the magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), or differential absorption, as expected by a Kramers-Kronig transformation. Thus MCD measurements using circular polarization and MOR measurements using linear polarization can provide complementary, and in some cases equivalent, information. On beamline 6.3.2 the authors have begun to investigate soft x-ray MOR in the reflection geometry, the x-ray magneto-optic Kerr effect (XMOKE). Early measurements have demonstrated the ability to measure element-specific hysteresis loops and large rotations compared to analogous near-visible measurements. The authors are investigating the spectral dependence of the XMOKE signal, and have initiated systematic materials studies of sputter-deposited films of Fe, Fe{sub x}Cr{sub 1{minus}x} alloys, and Fe/Cr multilayers.

  15. Effect of mineral elements on physicochemical properties of oxidised starches and generation of free radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Sławomir; Fortuna, Teresa; Królikowska, Karolina; Rogozińska, Ewelina; Labanowska, Maria; Kurdziel, Magdalena

    2013-09-12

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of enrichment of oxidised starches with mineral compounds on their physicochemical properties and capability for free radical generation. Potato and spelt wheat starches were oxidised with sodium hypochlorite and, afterwards, modified with ions of potassium, magnesium and iron. The modified starches were analysed for: content of mineral elements, colour parameters (L*a*b*), water binding capacity solubility in water at temperature of 50 and 80 °C, and susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis with α-amylase. In addition, thermodynamic characteristics of gelatinisation was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and the number and character of thermally generated free radicals was assayed using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Based on the results achieved, it was concluded that the quantity of incorporated minerals and changes in the assayed physicochemical parameters depended not only on the botanical type of starch but also on the type of the incorporated mineral element. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of the Domestic Cooking on Elemental Chemical Composition of Beans Species (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra S. T. Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cooking is imperative for beans owing to the presence of compounds that can negatively affect nutritional value. Additionally, the heating of beans can increase protein digestibility and induce desirable sensory properties. However, cooking also causes considerable changes in the composition of numerous chemical constituents, including amino acids, vitamins, and minerals. For this, effects of domestic cooking on the essential element concentrations in various beans species (Phaseolus vulgaris L. were investigated using jalo, fradinho, rajado, rosinha, bolinha, black, and common species. Elemental determination was made with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry after sample digestion in a closed-vessel microwave oven using a diluted oxidant mixture. Analytical methods were evaluated with an addition and recovery test and analysis of certified reference materials (apple and citrus leaves. Ca, Cu, K, and Mg were present mainly in rajado, Cu in jalo, Fe in black, S and Zn in fradinho, and P in rosinha species. Thermal treatment did not affect Cu, Fe, S, and Zn concentrations, but it increased Ca, K, Mg, P, and Zn concentrations in jalo and black species. Ca concentration decreased in fradinho and rajado species, as did Fe concentration in jalo and rajado species.

  17. Enrichment of trace elements in bottom ash from coal oxy-combustion: Effect of coal types

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oboirien, BO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the enrichment of trace elements in two coals under air and oxy-combustion conditions was studied. Twenty-one trace elements were evaluated. The two coal samples had a different concentration for the 21 trace elements, which was due...

  18. Effects of Intermittent and Continuous Magnetic Fields on Trace Element Levels in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Onur; Akay, Cemal; Cevher, Sule Coşkun; Canseven, Ayse Gulnihal; Aydın, Ahmet; Seyhan, Nesrin

    2017-05-22

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can affect living cells due to biochemical changes, followed by changes in levels of trace elements in serum and different organs. This study focuses on the effect of whole body exposure to EMF, presented everywhere in our environment, and on the levels of trace elements in serum, femur, brain, kidney, and liver tissues. The analyses performed on 29 guinea pigs were divided into five groups. Guinea pigs were exposed to a magnetic field of 50 Hz of 1.5 mT. Groups A and B were exposed to the magnetic field for a period of 4 h/day continuously (4 h/day) for 4 and 7 days, respectively. Groups C and D were exposed to the magnetic field for a period of 4 h/day intermittently for 4 and 7 days, respectively. Group E animals were enrolled as control. Copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), calcium (Ca), and magnesium (Mg) levels were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in serum, femur, brain, kidney, and liver tissues in all guinea pigs. When compared to the control groups, the changes in the levels of Cu in serum samples, femur, and kidney tissues of the treated groups were statistically significant. The same was also true for the levels of Mg in the brain, kidney, and lung tissues. Our results suggest that in vivo continuous and intermittent exposure to EMF may cause disturbances in homeostasis of bioelements. These effects could be important risk factors for toxic effects of EMF, especially in relation to deterioration of bioelements.

  19. Study on the effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk, Ho Chun; Cho, Moon Sung; Jeon, Ji Su

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the CANFLEX-NU fuel element bowing on the critical heat flux is reviewed and analyzed, which is requested by KINS as the Government design licensing condition for the use of the fuel bundles in CANDU power reactors. The effect of the gap between two adjacent fuel elements on the critical heat flux and onset-of-dryout power is studied. The reduction of the width of a single inter-rod gap from its nominal size to the minimum manufacture allowance of 1 mm has a negligible effects on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the bundle for the given set of boundary conditions applied to the CANFLEX-43 element bundle in an uncrept channel. As expected, the in-reactor irradiation test results show that there are no evidence of the element bow problems on the bundle performance.

  20. Influence of relativistic effect on chemical properties of element 104; Wplyw efektu relatywistycznego na wlasnosci chemiczne pierwiastka 104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilewicz, A.

    1997-12-31

    The influence of relativistic effect upon chemical properties of element 104 is discussed. An original method of measurements of adsorption on the surface of thin film of cobalt ferrocyanate was developed and applied for the studies of 104{sup 4+} hydrolysis. Results of this experiments indicate that in the Group 4 tendency to hydrolysis decreases in the order 104{sup 4+}>Zr{sup 4+}>Hf{sup 4+}. The results were explained on the basis of relativistic effect. Unexpected chemical properties of element 104 in aqueous solutions indicate, that due to relativistic effect element 104 differs distinctly from its congeners - Zr and Hf. In contrary it becomes similar to the lightest element in the Group, Ti, through atomic mass of latter is 213 unit less. (author). 119 refs, 22 figs, 7 tabs.

  1. Evaluation of effect of selected trace elements on dynamics of sperm dna fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Wdowiak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lead and cadmium can lead to negative effects on sperm chromatin DNA integrity. Copper, zinc and selenium are essential components of many enzymes which are important for reproduction. The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of lead, cadmium, zinc, copper and selenium on the dynamics of semen DNA fragmentation.Material and methods: The present study concerned 85 fertile and 131 infertile men aged 25-35. DNA fragmentation in the samples was determined after 3 h, 6 h and 12 h. The Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, and Se measurements were performed by the electrothermal-atomic absorption spectrometry method.Results: We found that sperm DNA fragmentation was a dynamic process which was intensified with an increase in the level of lead in seminal plasma. The levels of lead and cadmium were higher in seminal plasma of infertile men, compared to fertile men. The levels of zinc, copper and selenium in seminal plasma were higher in men with proven fertility, compared to infertile men, and did not exert a significant effect on the dynamics of sperm DNA fragmentation. The level of cadmium had no significant effect on intensification of sperm DNA fragmentation in time.Discussion: Reports in the literature which concern the effect of trace elements on human reproduction are equivocal. The present study confirmed an unfavourable effect, especially that of lead, on the dynamics of sperm DNA fragmentation; however, these studies need to be expanded and continued in the future.

  2. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  3. The effects of neural synchronization and peripheral compression on the acoustic-reflex threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Wehlau, Matthias; Mauermann, Manfred; Dau, Torsten; Kollmeier, Birger

    2005-05-01

    This study investigates the acoustic reflex threshold (ART) dependency on stimulus phase utilizing low-level reflex audiometry [Neumann et al., Audiol. Neuro-Otol. 1, 359-369 (1996)]. The goal is to obtain optimal broadband stimuli for elicitation of the acoustic reflex and to obtain objective determinations of cochlear hearing loss. Three types of tone complexes with different phase characteristics were investigated: A stimulus that compensates for basilar-membrane dispersion, thus causing a large overall neural synchrony (basilar-membrane tone complex-BMTC), the temporally inversed stimulus (iBMTC), and random-phase tone complexes (rTC). The ARTs were measured in eight normal-hearing and six hearing-impaired subjects. Five different conditions of peak amplitude and stimulus repetition rate were used for each stimulus type. The results of the present study suggest that the ART is influenced by at least two different factors: (a) the degree of synchrony of neural activity across frequency, and (b) the fast-acting compression mechanism in the cochlea that is reduced in the case of a sensorineural hearing loss. The results allow a clear distinction of the two subjects groups based on the different ART for the utilized types and conditions of the stimuli. These differences might be useful for objective recruitment detection in clinical diagnostics. .

  4. The neural substrate of naming events: effects of processing demands but not of grammatical class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Simona; Tettamanti, Marco; Cappa, Stefano F; Della Rosa, Pasquale; Saccuman, Cristina; Scifo, Paola; Vigliocco, Gabriella

    2008-01-01

    Grammatical class is a fundamental property of language, and all natural languages distinguish between nouns and verbs. Brain activation studies have provided conflicting evidence concerning the neural substrates of noun and verb processing. A major limitation of many previous imaging studies is that they did not disentangle the impact of grammatical class from the differences in semantic correlates. In order to tease apart the role of semantic and grammatical factors, we performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study presenting Italian speakers with pictures of events and asked them to name them as 1) Infinitive Verb (e.g., mangiare [to eat]); 2) Inflected Verb (e.g., mangia [she/he eats]); and 3) Action Noun (e.g., mangiata [the eating]). We did not find any verb-specific activation. However, reliable left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) activations were found when contrasting the Action Noun with the Infinitive Verb condition. A second-level analysis indicated then that activation in left IFG was greatest for Action Nouns, intermediate for Inflected Verbs, and least for Infinitive Verbs. We conclude that, when all other factors are controlled, nouns and verbs are processed by a common neural system. In the present case, differences in left IFG activation emerge as a consequence of increasing linguistic and/or general processing demands.

  5. Neural circulatory control in vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lieshout, J. J.; Wieling, W.; Karemaker, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    The orthostatic volume displacement associated with the upright position necessitates effective neural cardiovascular modulation. Neural control of cardiac chronotropy and inotropy, and vasomotor tone aims at maintaining venous return, thus opposing gravitational pooling of blood in the lower part

  6. Neural elements in dental pulp and dentin.

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, P N R

    1995-01-01

    This article addresses the structural and quantitative aspects of human tooth innervation and briefly considers the functions and clinical relevance of tooth axons. The classification of peripheral axons, the pulpal and dentinal innervation, and the theories of dentin sensitivity are discussed. Quantitative studies on tooth innervation are also reviewed. Human premolars receive about 2300 axons at the root-apex of which about 13% are myelinated and 87% are nonmyelinated fibers. Most apical my...

  7. The effect of exogenous cortisol during sleep on the behavioral and neural correlates of emotional memory consolidation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, Hein J F; Hermans, Erno J; Qin, Shaozheng; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Fernández, Guillén

    2013-09-01

    A host of animal work demonstrates that the retention benefit for emotionally aversive over neutral memories is regulated by glucocorticoid action during memory consolidation. Particularly, glucocorticoids may affect systems-level processes that promote the gradual reorganization of emotional memory traces. These effects remain largely uninvestigated in humans. Therefore, in this functional magnetic resonance imaging study we administered hydrocortisone during a polysomnographically monitored night of sleep directly after healthy volunteers studied negative and neutral pictures in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design. The following evening memory consolidation was probed during a recognition memory test in the MR scanner by assessing the difference in brain activity associated with memory for the consolidated items studied before sleep and new, unconsolidated items studied shortly before test (remote vs. recent memory paradigm). Hydrocortisone administration resulted in elevated cortisol levels throughout the experimental night with no group difference at recent encoding or test. Behaviorally, we showed that cortisol enhanced the difference between emotional and neutral consolidated memory, effectively prioritizing emotional memory consolidation. On a neural level, we found that cortisol reduced amygdala reactivity related to the retrieval of these same consolidated, negative items. These findings show that cortisol administration during first post-encoding sleep had a twofold effect on the first 24h of emotional memory consolidation. While cortisol prioritized recognition memory for emotional items, it reduced reactivation of the neural circuitry underlying emotional responsiveness during retrieval. These findings fit recent theories on emotional depotentiation following consolidation during sleep, although future research should establish the sleep-dependence of this effect. Moreover, our data may shed light on mechanisms underlying

  8. Martensitic transformations in nanostructured nitinol: Finite element modeling of grain size and distribution effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Hong-Sheng; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2013-01-01

    transformation are totally suppressed. Graded and localized distributions of grain sizes of nitinol were compared with nitinol samples with homogeneous grain size distribution. In the materials with localized region of small grains, it was observed that the martensite rich regions form first on the border......A computational model of martensitic phase transformation in nanostructured nitinol is developed which takes into account the grain size effect. On the basis of the theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic transformation criterion and the energy barrier for phase transformation......, it was demonstrated that the energy barrier for martensitic phase transformation in nanocrystalline nitinol increase drastically with decreasing the grain size. Finite element simulations of phase transformations and structure evolution in nanocrystalline nitinol under mechanical (tensile) loading are carried out...

  9. The effect of changing ambient humidity on moisture condition in timber elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaẑ; Turk, Goran; Srpĉiĉ, Stanislav

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the effect of the changing ambient humidity on moisture conditions in timber elements. The naturally varying humidity is possible to model as a relative combination of different harmonic cycles, with different periods and amplitudes. For the determination of the moisture field...... a fully coupled transport model including a model for the influential sorption hysteresis of wood is used. The coupled model accounts for both vapor transport in pores and bound water transport in wood tissue. Moisture state history influences relationship between moisture state of wood and air humidity......, it must therefore be taken into account. In order to include history dependency, a hysteresis model is used here. Results from numerical calculations for timber specimen exposed to combined daily and annually cyclic variation of outside humidity are presented. Copyright © (2012) by WCTE 2012 Committee....

  10. Effects of reactive element additions and sulfur removal on the oxidation behavior of FECRAL alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stasik, M.C.; Pettit, F.S.; Meier, G.H. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Ashary, A. (Praxair, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Smialek, J.L. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-12-15

    The results of this study have shown that desulfurization of FeCrAl alloys by hydrogen annealing can result in improvements in cyclic oxidation comparable to that achieved by doping with reactive elements. Moreover, specimens of substantial thicknesses can be effectively desulfurized because of the high diffusivity of sulfur in bcc iron alloys. The results have also shown that there is less stress generation during the cyclic oxidation of Y-doped FeCrAl compared to Ti-doped or desulfurized FeCrAl. This indicates that the growth mechanism, as well as the strength of the oxide/alloy interface, influences the ultimate oxidation morphology and stress state which will certainly affect the length of time the alumina remains protective.

  11. Broadband beam shaping using two cascaded diffractive optical elements with different sizes of effective phase region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Li; Cao, Guowei; Guo, Jin; Wang, Jun; Huang, Kun; Li, Yongping; Kang, Xueliang; Wang, Liang

    2017-10-01

    A unique design method of two cascaded diffractive optical elements (DOEs) with different sizes of effective phase region to modulate broadband beam is presented with consideration of single production material and low relief height on DOE. The iterative algorithm to calculate the relief heights on these DOEs is introduced at first. Where after, a broadband beam at wavelength from 500nm to 600nm propagates through the designed DOEs and is focused on the target plane in the simulation part. The shaping results demonstrate the excellent shaping ability of this unique design method. The shaping system proposed in this paper is significant for nonmonochromatic light modulation and has many applications such as graphic encryption, three-dimensional color display and multi wavelength division multiplexing.

  12. Effectiveness and Successful Program Elements of SOAR’s Afterschool Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L. Johnson

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Project SOAR provided after-school programs that afforded expanded learning opportunities to help students succeed in local public schools and to contribute to the general welfare of the community. Program components focused on building students’ academic skills and positive attitudes, aided by teachers, mentors, parent education, and local agencies. Instructional programs were conducted to help reduce drug use and violence. Activities included academic assistance, technology training, mentoring, service learning projects, and education in life skills and the arts. Parent involvement was encouraged. Behavioral and academic outcomes—especially at the high school level—were analyzed to determine program effectiveness regarding academic achievement, dropout rates, and rates and frequency of suspensions. Successful program elements and strategies are noted.

  13. Effect of Punch Stroke on Deformation During Sheet Forming Through Finite Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinlabi, Stephen; Akinlabi, Esther

    2017-08-01

    Forming is one of the traditional methods of making shapes, bends and curvature in metallic components during a fabrication process. Mechanical forming, in particular, employs the use of a punch, which is pressed against the sheet material to be deformed into a die by the application of an external force. This study reports on the finite element analysis of the effects of punch stroke on the resulting sheet deformation, which is directly a function of the structural integrity of the formed components for possible application in the automotive industry. The results show that punch stroke is directly proportional to the resulting bend angle of the formed components. It was further revealed that the developed plastic strain increases as the punch stroke increases.

  14. Nonreciprocal optical element of ring laser gyroscope based on the effect of light entrainment with moving medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, V. O.; Goryushkina, D. D.; Kuryatov, V. N.

    2017-11-01

    This article describes the use of Fresnel-Fizeau effect in order to reduce the entrapment effect in a ring laser gyroscope. The study gives an analysis of the nonreciprocal optical element impact on the gyroscope output characteristic. Moreover, it numerically estimates the method’s effectiveness.

  15. Analysis of the role of diffraction in topographic site effects using boundary element techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Juan; Restrepo, Doriam; Jaramillo, Juan; Valencia, Camilo

    2013-10-01

    The role played by the diffraction field on the problem of seismic site effects is studied. For that purpose we solve and analyze simple scattering problems under P and SV in-plane wave assumptions, using two well known direct boundary-element-based numerical methods. After establishing the difference between scattered and diffracted motions, and introducing the concept of artificious and physically based incoming fields, we obtain the amplitude of the Fourier spectra for the diffracted part of the response: this is achieved after establishing the connection between the spatial distribution of the transfer function over the studied simple topographies and the diffracted field. From the numerical simulations it is observed that this diffracted part of the response is responsible for the amplification of the surface ground motions due to the geometric effect. Furthermore, it is also found that the diffraction field sets in a fingerprint of the topographic effect in the total ground motions. These conclusions are further supported by observations in the time-domain in terms of snapshots of the propagation patterns over the complete computational model. In this sense the geometric singularities are clearly identified as sources of diffraction and for the considered range of dimensionless frequencies it is evident that larger amplifications are obtained for the geometries containing a larger number of diffraction sources thus resulting in a stronger topographic effect. The need for closed-form solutions of canonical problems to construct a robust analysis method based on the diffraction field is identified.

  16. Accounting of Multiplier Effect as a Required Element in Assessing the Effects of Social Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Georgievna Lavrikova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the importance of taking into account indirect effects of the programs, projects, activities (mainly social when deciding on the need to implement them. The problem of providing society with decent living conditions is studied. The article proves that in spite of some positive trends in the Russian construction market the issues of housing availability do not lose their significance. It notes that a variety of approaches to solving this problem have been developed, that is why it is critical to assess the effectiveness of each solution in order to choose the most suitable one. One of the tools for alleviating this problem – a program of housing construction savings – is discussed in detail; by means of the specially designed universal computational model we determine fiscal effectiveness of this program application in the Sverdlovsk Oblast. The analysis shows that the accounting of multiplier effect reveals the full range of possible effects of the program that can significantly affect the adoption of the decision to initiate actions necessary for their implementation

  17. Selective effects of social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and negative affectivity on the neural bases of emotional face processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Tali Manber; Sullivan, Sarah; Flagan, Taru; Hitchcock, Carla A; Simmons, Alan; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2012-01-16

    Individuals with high anxiety show heightened neural activation in affective processing regions, including the amygdala and insula. Activations have been shown to be correlated with anxiety severity, but although anxiety is a heterogeneous state, prior studies have not systematically disentangled whether neural activity in affective processing circuitry is uniquely related to specific domains of anxiety. Forty-five young adults were tested on an emotional face processing task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants completed the Social Interactional Anxiety Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, and Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory. Using a robust multiple regression approach, we examined the effects of social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and trait anxiety (which overlapped with depressive symptoms, and can therefore be considered a measure of negative affectivity) on activation in insula, amygdala, and medial prefrontal cortex, in response to emotional faces. Adjusting for negative affectivity and anxiety sensitivity, social anxiety was associated with activity in left amygdala, right insula, and subgenual anterior cingulate across all emotional faces. When comparing negative and positive faces directly, greater negative affectivity was uniquely associated with less activity to positive faces in left amygdala, left anterior insula, and dorsal anterior cingulate. The current findings support the hypothesis that hyperactivity in brain areas during general emotional face processing is predominantly a function of social anxiety. In comparison, hypoactivity to positively valenced faces was predominantly associated with negative affectivity. Implications for the understanding of emotion processing in anxiety are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of dialectic-behavioral-therapy on the neural correlates of affective hyperarousal in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Knut; Herpertz, Sabine C

    2007-11-01

    Affective hyperarousal is the hallmark of borderline personality disorder (BPD) and the main target for dialectic-behavioral-therapy (DBT). This pilot study examined whether improved regulation of affective arousal following DBT translates into changes in relevant neural systems. We applied five sequential fMRI scans over a 12-week in-patient treatment program. Six female BPD patients and six controls were included in an event-related fMRI design which induced emotional arousal through standardized images. In addition to analyzing valence-based stimulus categories over time, the study assessed the modulation of hemodynamic responses through emotional arousal by means of parametric HRF modulation with self-ratings of stimulus dependent arousal. BPD data revealed a decreasing hemodynamic response to negative stimuli in the right-sided anterior cingulate, temporal and posterior cingulate cortices as well as in the left insula. In addition, these areas displayed a continuous decrease in HRF modulation through individual arousal in BPD patients. Moreover the four DBT responders displayed reduction of HRF modulation in the left amygdala and both hippocampi. fMRI designs that use multiple repeated measures are suitable for application in therapy research. In our pilot study DBT treatment was accompanied by neural changes in limbic and cortical regions resembling those reported on psychotherapy effects in other mental disorders.

  19. Effect of maternal rumination and disengagement during childhood on offspring neural response to reward in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Judith K; Shaw, Daniel S; Jacobs, Rachel H; Romens, Sarah E; Sitnick, Stephanie L; Forbes, Erika E

    2017-04-30

    Maternal rumination is a cognitive-affective trait that could influence offspring's ability to respond flexibly to positive and negative events, depending on the quality of maternal problem-solving behaviors with which rumination co-occurs. As reward circuitry is sensitive to stressors and related to risk for depression, reward circuitry is an appropriate candidate mechanism for how maternal characteristics influence offspring. We evaluated the independent and combined effect of maternal rumination and disengagement on adolescent neural response to reward win and loss. Participants were 122 boys and their mothers from low-income, urban backgrounds followed prospectively in a longitudinal study. The combination of high maternal rumination at child age 6 and high maternal disengagement during problem-solving at child age 10-12 was associated with lower anterior cingulate response to winning reward at age 20, but unrelated to neural response to losing reward. Lower anterior cingulate response to winning reward was associated with fewer anxiety symptoms during late adulthood. Findings suggest that maternal rumination occurring within the context of maternal disengagement during challenging experiences may be related to offspring blunted engagement during positive events. Helping highly ruminative mothers to restructure repetitive negative thoughts and to develop context-appropriate problem-solving behaviors may be important for promoting offspring affective development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mode of Effective Connectivity within a Putative Neural Network Differentiates Moral Cognitions Related to Care and Justice Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceda, Ricardo; James, G. Andrew; Ely, Timothy D.; Snarey, John; Kilts, Clinton D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Moral sensitivity refers to the interpretive awareness of moral conflict and can be justice or care oriented. Justice ethics is associated primarily with human rights and the application of moral rules, whereas care ethics is related to human needs and a situational approach involving social emotions. Among the core brain regions involved in moral issue processing are: medial prefrontal cortex, anterior (ACC) and posterior (PCC) cingulate cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS), insula and amygdala. This study sought to inform the long standing debate of whether care and justice moral ethics represent one or two different forms of cognition. Methodology/Principal Findings Model-free and model-based connectivity analysis were used to identify functional neural networks underlying care and justice ethics for a moral sensitivity task. In addition to modest differences in patterns of associated neural activity, distinct modes of functional and effective connectivity were observed for moral sensitivity for care and justice issues that were modulated by individual variation in moral ability. Conclusions/Significance These results support a neurobiological differentiation between care and justice ethics and suggest that human moral behavior reflects the outcome of integrating opposing rule-based, self-other perspectives, and emotional responses. PMID:21364916

  1. Mode of effective connectivity within a putative neural network differentiates moral cognitions related to care and justice ethics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cáceda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Moral sensitivity refers to the interpretive awareness of moral conflict and can be justice or care oriented. Justice ethics is associated primarily with human rights and the application of moral rules, whereas care ethics is related to human needs and a situational approach involving social emotions. Among the core brain regions involved in moral issue processing are: medial prefrontal cortex, anterior (ACC and posterior (PCC cingulate cortex, posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS, insula and amygdala. This study sought to inform the long standing debate of whether care and justice moral ethics represent one or two different forms of cognition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Model-free and model-based connectivity analysis were used to identify functional neural networks underlying care and justice ethics for a moral sensitivity task. In addition to modest differences in patterns of associated neural activity, distinct modes of functional and effective connectivity were observed for moral sensitivity for care and justice issues that were modulated by individual variation in moral ability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a neurobiological differentiation between care and justice ethics and suggest that human moral behavior reflects the outcome of integrating opposing rule-based, self-other perspectives, and emotional responses.

  2. Elements of effective community engagement: lessons from a targeted malaria elimination study in Lao PDR (Laos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bipin; Pell, Christopher; Phommasone, Koukeo; Soundala, Xayaphone; Kommarasy, Palingnaphone; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Henriques, Gisela; Day, Nicholas P J; Mayxay, Mayfong; Cheah, Phaik Yeong

    2017-01-01

    Mass drug (antimalarial) administration (MDA) is currently under study in Southeast Asia as part of a package of interventions referred to as targeted malaria elimination (TME). This intervention relies on effective community engagement that promotes uptake and adherence in target communities (above 80%). Based on the experienced of designing and implementing the community engagement for TME in Laos, in this article we aim to present the elements of effective community engagement for mass antimalarial administration. The design and implementation of community engagement, which took place from September 2015 to August 2016 was recorded as field notes, meeting minutes and photographs. These data underwent qualitative content analysis. The community engagement strategy that accompanied TME in Laos was successful in terms of contributing to high levels of participation in mass anti-malarial administration (above 85%). Based on the experience of designing and implementing the community engagement, five key elements were identified: (1) stakeholder and authority engagement, which proceeded from national level, to regional/district and local level; (2) local human resources, particularly the recruitment of local volunteers who were integral to the design and implementation of activities in the study villages; (3) formative research, to rapidly gain insight into the local social and economic context; (4) responsiveness whereby the approach was adapted according to the needs of the community and their responses to the various study components; and (5) sharing control/leadership with the community in terms of decisions on the organization of TME activities. The community engagement that accompanied TME in Laos had to deal with challenges of implementing a complex study in remote and linguistically isolated villages. Despite these challenges, the study recorded high population coverage. Lessons learnt from this experience are useful for studies and intervention programs in

  3. Elements of effective community engagement: lessons from a targeted malaria elimination study in Lao PDR (Laos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bipin; Pell, Christopher; Phommasone, Koukeo; Soundala, Xayaphone; Kommarasy, Palingnaphone; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Henriques, Gisela; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Mayxay, Mayfong; Cheah, Phaik Yeong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Mass drug (antimalarial) administration (MDA) is currently under study in Southeast Asia as part of a package of interventions referred to as targeted malaria elimination (TME). This intervention relies on effective community engagement that promotes uptake and adherence in target communities (above 80%). Objective: Based on the experienced of designing and implementing the community engagement for TME in Laos, in this article we aim to present the elements of effective community engagement for mass antimalarial administration. Methods: The design and implementation of community engagement, which took place from September 2015 to August 2016 was recorded as field notes, meeting minutes and photographs. These data underwent qualitative content analysis. Results: The community engagement strategy that accompanied TME in Laos was successful in terms of contributing to high levels of participation in mass anti-malarial administration (above 85%). Based on the experience of designing and implementing the community engagement, five key elements were identified: (1) stakeholder and authority engagement, which proceeded from national level, to regional/district and local level; (2) local human resources, particularly the recruitment of local volunteers who were integral to the design and implementation of activities in the study villages; (3) formative research, to rapidly gain insight into the local social and economic context; (4) responsiveness whereby the approach was adapted according to the needs of the community and their responses to the various study components; and (5) sharing control/leadership with the community in terms of decisions on the organization of TME activities. Conclusions: The community engagement that accompanied TME in Laos had to deal with challenges of implementing a complex study in remote and linguistically isolated villages. Despite these challenges, the study recorded high population coverage. Lessons learnt from this

  4. Thyroid hormone response element half-site organization and its effect on thyroid hormone mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Martin A; Atlas, Ella; Wade, Mike G; Yauk, Carole L

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) exerts its effects by binding to the thyroid hormone receptor (TR), which binds to TH response elements (TREs) to regulate target gene expression. We investigated the relative ability of liganded homodimers TR and retinoid X receptor (RXR), and the heterodimer TR/RXR, to regulate gene expression for the TRE half-site organizations: direct repeat 4 (DR4), inverted repeat 0 (IR0) and everted repeat 6 (ER6). Luciferase reporter assays using a DR4 TRE suggest that both the TR homodimer and TR/RXR heterodimer regulate luciferase expression in the presence of their respective ligands. However, in the presence of the IR0 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR and RXR alone increased luciferase activity and there was no effect of TR alone. The presence of 9-cis-retinoic acid was necessary for luciferase expression, whereas TH treatment alone was insufficient. For the ER6 TRE, transfection with TR/RXR, TR alone and RXR alone (in the presence of their respective ligands) all caused a significant increase in luciferase activity. When both ligands were present, transfection with both TR/RXR caused more activation. Finally, we investigated the efficacy of the TR-antagonist 1-850 in inhibiting transcription by TR or TR/RXR at DR4 and ER6 TREs. We found that 1-850 did not suppress luciferase activation in the presence of TR/RXR for the ER6 TRE, suggesting conformational changes of the ligand binding domain of the TR when bound to different TRE half-site organizations. Collectively, the findings indicate that there are fundamental differences between TRE configurations that affect nuclear receptor interactions with the response element and ability to bind ligands and antagonists.

  5. Effects of heavy metal and other elemental additives to activated sludge on growth of Eisenia foetida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartenstein, R. (State Univ. of New York, Syracuse); Neuhauser, E.F.; Narahara, A.

    1981-09-01

    The approximate level at which added concentrations of certain elements would cause an activated sludge to induce a toxic effect upon the growth of Eisenia foetida was determined. During 43 trials on sludge samples obtained throughout 1 year of study, earthworms grew from 3 to 10 mg live wt at hatching to 792 mg +- 18% (mean +- C.V.) in 8 weeks, when sludge was 24/sup 0/C and contained no additives. None of several elements commonly used in microbial growth media enhanced the growth rate of the earthworm. At salt concentrations up to about 6.6% on a dry wt basis, none of six anions tested was in and of itself toxic, while five of 15 cations - Co, Hg, Cu, Ni, and Cd - appeared specifically to inhibit growth rate or cause death. Manganese, Cr, and Pb were innocuous even at the highest levels of application - 22,000, 46,000, and 52,000 mg/kg, respectively. Neither the anionic nor cationic component of certain salts, such as NaCl or NH/sub 4/Cl, could be said to inhibit growth, which occurred only at high concentrations of these salts (about 3.3 and/or 6.6%). Below 7 mmho/cm, toxicity could not be correlated with electrolytic conductance, though higher values may help to explain the nonspecific growth inhibitory effects of salts like NaCl and KCl. Nor could toxicity ever be ascribed to hydrogen ion activity, since sludge pH was not altered even at the highest salt dose. It is concluded that except under very extreme conditions, the levels of heavy metals and salts generally found in activated sludges will not have an adverse affect on the growth of E. foetida.

  6. Effect of RE elements on the microstructural evolution of as cast and SIMA processed Mg-4Al alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayyeri, Mohammad Javad, E-mail: m_javad21@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khomamizadeh, Farzad [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-02-03

    Research highlights: > In this article, we examined the effect of Rare Earth elements on the microstructural development of as cast and semisolid Mg-4Al alloy produced by SIMA process. > Our investigations contained metallographic observation, scanning electron microscope and quantitative metallographic methods. > Results showed that alloy's dendrites turn into larger fully dendritic shape with sharp and narrow arms from equiaxed rosette type as the amount of RE elements increased from 0 through 4 percent. > Also we studied the effect of RE elements on the quality and quantityof intragranular liquid droplets as well as kinetic of microstructural changes. > Moreover, the effect of REs on the other parameters such as fraction of liquid, shape factor and particle size was studied.In this article, we examined the effect of Rare Earth elements on the microstructural development of as cast and semisolid Mg-4Al alloy produced by SIMA process. Our investigations contained metallographic observation, scanning electron microscope and quantitative metallographic methods. Results showed that alloy's dendrites turn into larger fully dendritic shape with sharp and narrow arms from equiaxed rosette type as the amount of RE elements increased from 0 through 4 percent. Also we studied the effect of RE elements on the quality and quantityof intragranular liquid droplets as well as kinetic of microstructural changes. Moreover, the effect of REs on the other parameters such as fraction of liquid, shape factor and particle size was studied. - Abstract: In the present article, the effect of Rare Earth elements on the microstructural development of as cast and semisolid Mg-4Al alloy produced by SIMA process is studied. Investigation conducted by metallographic observation, scanning electron microscope and quantitative metallographic methods. Results showed that alloy's dendrites turn into larger fully dendritic shape with sharp and narrow arms from equiaxed rosette type as

  7. Memristor-based neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andy

    2013-03-01

    The synapse is a crucial element in biological neural networks, but a simple electronic equivalent has been absent. This complicates the development of hardware that imitates biological architectures in the nervous system. Now, the recent progress in the experimental realization of memristive devices has renewed interest in artificial neural networks. The resistance of a memristive system depends on its past states and exactly this functionality can be used to mimic the synaptic connections in a (human) brain. After a short introduction to memristors, we present and explain the relevant mechanisms in a biological neural network, such as long-term potentiation and spike time-dependent plasticity, and determine the minimal requirements for an artificial neural network. We review the implementations of these processes using basic electric circuits and more complex mechanisms that either imitate biological systems or could act as a model system for them.

  8. Influence of neural adaptation on dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiyama, Ken

    2017-12-01

    How neural adaptation affects neural information processing (i.e. the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities) is a central question in computational neuroscience. In my previous works, I analytically clarified the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring-type neural network model that is widely used to model the visual cortex, motor cortex, and several other brain regions. The neural dynamics and the equilibrium state in the neural network model corresponded to a Bayesian computation and statistically optimal multiple information integration, respectively, under a biologically inspired condition. These results were revealed in an analytically tractable manner; however, adaptation effects were not considered. Here, I analytically reveal how the dynamics and equilibrium state of neural activities in a ring neural network are influenced by spike-frequency adaptation (SFA). SFA is an adaptation that causes gradual inhibition of neural activity when a sustained stimulus is applied, and the strength of this inhibition depends on neural activities. I reveal that SFA plays three roles: (1) SFA amplifies the influence of external input in neural dynamics; (2) SFA allows the history of the external input to affect neural dynamics; and (3) the equilibrium state corresponds to the statistically optimal multiple information integration independent of the existence of SFA. In addition, the equilibrium state in a ring neural network model corresponds to the statistically optimal integration of multiple information sources under biologically inspired conditions, independent of the existence of SFA.

  9. Prediction and assessment of drought effects on surface water quality using artificial neural networks: case study of Zayandehrud River, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Hamid R; Malek Ahmadi, Kian

    2015-01-01

    Although drought impacts on water quantity are widely recognized, the impacts on water quality are less known. The Zayandehrud River basin in the west-central part of Iran plateau witnessed an increased contamination during the recent droughts and low flows. The river has been receiving wastewater and effluents from the villages, a number of small and large industries, and irrigation drainage systems along its course. What makes the situation even worse is the drought period the river basin has been going through over the last decade. Therefore, a river quality management model is required to include the adverse effects of industrial development in the region and the destructive effects of droughts which affect the river's water quality and its surrounding environment. Developing such a model naturally presupposes investigations into pollution effects in terms of both quality and quantity to be used in such management tools as mathematical models to predict the water quality of the river and to prevent pollution escalation in the environment. The present study aims to investigate electrical conductivity of the Zayandehrud River as a water quality parameter and to evaluate the effect of this parameter under drought conditions. For this purpose, artificial neural networks are used as a modeling tool to derive the relationship between electrical conductivity and the hydrological parameters of the Zayandehrud River. The models used in this research include multi-layer perceptron and radial basis function. Finally, these two models are compared in terms of their performance using the time series of electrical conductivity at eight monitoring-hydrometric stations during drought periods between the years 1997-2012. Results show that artificial neural networks can be used for modeling the relationship between electrical conductivity and hydrological parameters under drought conditions. It is further shown that radial basis function works better for the upstream stretches

  10. Neural tube defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. Marshall

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects refer to any defect in the morphogenesis of the neural tube, the most common types being spina bifida and anencephaly. Spina bifida has been recognised in skeletons found in north-eastern Morocco and estimated to have an age of almost 12 000 years. It was also known to the ancient Greek and Arabian physicians who thought that the bony defect was due to the tumour. The term spina bifida was first used by Professor Nicolai Tulp of Amsterdam in 1652. Many other terms have been used to describe this defect, but spina bifida remains the most useful general term, as it describes the separation of the vertebral elements in the midline.

  11. Cognitive-Neural Effects of Brush Writing of Chinese Characters: Cortical Excitation of Theta Rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese calligraphy has been scientifically investigated within the contexts and principles of psychology, cognitive science, and the cognitive neuroscience. On the basis of vast amount of research in the last 30 years, we have developed a cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy to account for the intricate interactions of several psychological dimensions involved in the dynamic act of graphic production. Central to this system of writing are the role of sensory, bio-, cognitive, and neurofeedback mechanisms for the initiation, guidance, and regulation of the writing motions vis-a-vis visual-geometric variations of Chinese characters. This experiment provided the first evidence of cortical excitation in EEG theta wave as a neural hub that integrates information coming from changes in the practitioner’s body, emotions, and cognition. In addition, it has also confirmed neurofeedback as an essential component of the cybernetic theory of handwriting and calligraphy.

  12. The effect of surface wave propagation on neural responses to vibration in primate glabrous skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise R Manfredi

    Full Text Available Because tactile perception relies on the response of large populations of receptors distributed across the skin, we seek to characterize how a mechanical deformation of the skin at one location affects the skin at another. To this end, we introduce a novel non-contact method to characterize the surface waves produced in the skin under a variety of stimulation conditions. Specifically, we deliver vibrations to the fingertip using a vibratory actuator and measure, using a laser Doppler vibrometer, the surface waves at different distances from the locus of stimulation. First, we show that a vibration applied to the fingertip travels at least the length of the finger and that the rate at which it decays is dependent on stimulus frequency. Furthermore, the resonant frequency of the skin matches the frequency at which a subpopulation of afferents, namely Pacinian afferents, is most sensitive. We show that this skin resonance can lead to a two-fold increase in the strength of the response of a simulated afferent population. Second, the rate at which vibrations propagate across the skin is dependent on the stimulus frequency and plateaus at 7 m/s. The resulting delay in neural activation across locations does not substantially blur the temporal patterning in simulated populations of afferents for frequencies less than 200 Hz, which has important implications about how vibratory frequency is encoded in the responses of somatosensory neurons. Third, we show that, despite the dependence of decay rate and propagation speed on frequency, the waveform of a complex vibration is well preserved as it travels across the skin. Our results suggest, then, that the propagation of surface waves promotes the encoding of spectrally complex vibrations as the entire neural population is exposed to essentially the same stimulus. We also discuss the implications of our results for biomechanical models of the skin.

  13. Neural basis of feature-based contextual effects on visual search behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eShen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Searching for a visual object is known to be adaptable to context, and it is thought to result from the selection of neural representations distributed on a visual salience map, wherein stimulus-driven and goal-directed signals are combined. Here we investigated the neural basis of this adaptability by recording superior colliculus (SC neurons while three female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta searched with saccadic eye movements for a target presented in an array of visual stimuli whose feature composition varied from trial to trial. We found that sensory-motor activity associated with distracters was enhanced or suppressed depending on the search array composition and that it corresponded to the monkey's search strategy, as assessed by the distribution of the occasional errant saccades. This feature-related modulation occurred independently from the saccade goal and facilitated the process of saccade target selection. We also observed feature-related enhancement in the activity associated with distracters that had been the search target during the previous session. Consistent with recurrent processing, both feature-related neuronal modulations occurred more than 60 ms after the onset of the visually evoked responses, and their near coincidence with the time of saccade target selection suggests that they are integral to this process. These results suggest that SC neuronal activity is shaped by the visual context as dictated by both stimulus-driven and goal-directed signals. Given the close proximity of the SC to the motor circuit, our findings suggest a direct link between perception and action and no need for distinct salience and motor maps.

  14. Effects of mindfulness based stress reduction therapy on subjective bother and neural connectivity in chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Lauren T; Lenze, Eric J; Hardin, Frances Mei; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Nicklaus, Joyce; Wineland, Andre M; Fendell, Ginny; Peelle, Jonathan E; Piccirillo, Jay F

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of a Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program in patients with chronic bothersome tinnitus on the (1) severity of symptoms of tinnitus and (2) functional connectivity in neural attention networks. Open-label interventional pilot study. Outpatient academic medical center. A total of 13 adult participants with a median age of 55 years, suffering from bothersome tinnitus. An 8-week MBSR program was conducted by a trained MBSR instructor. The primary outcome measure was the difference in patient-reported tinnitus symptoms using the Tinnitus Handicap Index (THI) and Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI) between pre-intervention, post-MBSR, and 4-week post-MBSR assessments. Secondary outcomes included change in measurements of depression, anxiety, mindfulness, and cognitive abilities. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed at pre- and post-MBSR intervention time points to serve as a neuroimaging biomarker of critical cortical networks. Scores on the THI and TFI showed statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement over the course of the study with a median ΔTHI of -16 and median ΔTFI of -14.8 between baseline and 4-week follow-up scores. Except for depression, there was no significant change in any of the secondary outcome measures. Analysis of the resting state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI) data showed increased connectivity in the post-MBSR group in attention networks but not the default network. Participation in an MBSR program is associated with decreased severity in tinnitus symptoms and depression and connectivity changes in neural attention networks. MBSR is a promising treatment option for chronic bothersome tinnitus that is both noninvasive and inexpensive. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  15. Neural correlates of second-language communication and the effect of language anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyeonjeong; Sugiura, Motoaki; Suzuki, Wataru; Sassa, Yuko; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-01-01

    Communicative speech is a type of language use that involves goal-directed action targeted at another person based on social interactive knowledge. Previous studies regarding one's first language (L1) have treated the theory of mind system, which is associated with understanding others, and the sensorimotor system, which is associated with action simulation, as important contributors to communication. However, little is known about the neural basis of communication in a second language (L2), which is limited in terms of its use as a communication tool. In this fMRI study, we manipulated the type of speech (i.e., communication vs. description) and the type of language (L1 vs. L2) to identify the specific brain areas involved in L2 communication. We also attempted to examine how the cortical mechanisms underlying L2 speech production are influenced by oral proficiency and anxiety regarding L2. Thirty native Japanese speakers who had learned English as an L2, performed communicative and descriptive speech-production tasks in both L1 and L2 while undergoing fMRI scanning. We found that the only the L2 communication task recruited the left posterior supramarginal gyrus (pSMG), which may be associated with the action simulation or prediction involved in generating goal-directed actions. Furthermore, the neural mechanisms underlying L2 communication, but not L2 description, were sensitive to both oral proficiency and anxiety levels; (a) activation in the left middle temporal gyrus (MTG) increased as oral proficiency levels increased, and (b) activation in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), including the left insula, decreased as L2 anxiety levels increased. These results reflect the successful retrieval of lexical information in a pragmatic context and an inability to monitor social behaviors due to anxiety. Taken together, the present results suggest that L2 communication relies on social skills and is mediated by anxiety and oral proficiency. Copyright © 2014. Published

  16. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  17. Sludge bio-drying: Effective to reduce both antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junya; Sui, Qianwen; Tong, Juan; Buhe, Chulu; Wang, Rui; Chen, Meixue; Wei, Yuansong

    2016-12-01

    Sewage sludge is considered as one of major contributors to the increased environmental burden of ARGs. Sludge bio-drying was increasingly adopted due to its faster sludge reduction compared with composting. The fate of ARGs during full-scale sludge bio-drying was investigated to determine whether it could effectively reduce ARGs, and the contributions of bacterial community, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) through mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and co-selection from heavy metals to ARGs profiles were discussed in detail. Two piles with different aeration strategies (Pile I, the improved and Pile II, the control) were operated to elucidate effects of aeration strategy on ARGs profiles. Results showed that sludge bio-drying could effectively reduce both most of targeted ARGs (0.4-3.1 logs) and MGEs (0.8-3.3 logs) by the improved aeration strategy, which also enhanced both the sludge bio-drying performance and ARGs reduction. The enrichment of ARGs including ermF, tetX and sulII could be well explained by the evolution of bioavailable heavy metals, not HGT through MGEs, and their potential host bacteria mainly existed in Bacteroidetes. Although changes of bacterial community contributed the most to ARGs profiles, HGT through MGEs should be paid more attention especially in the thermophilic stage of sludge bio-drying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Elements of QED-NRQED effective field theory: NLO scattering at leading power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Steven P.; Gonderinger, Matthew; Paz, Gil

    2016-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle, i.e. the large discrepancy in the extraction of the proton charge radius between regular and muonic hydrogen, challenges our understanding of the structure of the proton. It can also be an indication of a new force that couples to muons, but not to electrons. An effective field theory analysis using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics (NRQED) indicates that the muonic hydrogen result can be interpreted as a large, compared to some model estimates, muon-proton spin-independent contact interaction. The muonic hydrogen result can be tested by a muon-proton scattering experiment, MUSE, that is planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The typical momenta of the muons in this experiment are of the order of the muon mass. In this energy regime the muons are relativistic but the protons are still nonrelativistic. The interaction between the muons and protons can be described by a hybrid QED-NRQED effective field theory. We present some elements of this effective field theory. In particular we consider O (Z α ) scattering up to power m2/M2 , where m (M ) is the muon (proton) mass and Z =1 for a proton, and O (Z2α2) scattering at leading power. We show how the former reproduces Rosenbluth scattering up to power m2/M2 and the latter the relativistic scattering off a static potential. Proton structure corrections at O (Z2α2) will be considered in a subsequent paper.

  19. Elements of Effective Interventions for Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Latina Women: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Carmen P.; Davidson, Patricia M.; Fleming, Christina; Glass, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence remains a global problem and is of particular concern in Latina diasporas. Aim To identify effective elements of interventions to address intimate partner violence in Latina women. Method The systematic review was undertaken according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. We focused the search on intervention studies assessing intimate partner violence as an outcome measure and on publications in English and Spanish from the last 11 years (2004–2015). Results Despite the scope of the problem, from the 1,274 studies screened only four met the search criteria and only a single study included an exclusive Latino population. Of the four interventions, one was only as effective as the control treatment. Heterogeneity of study populations and designs prohibited meta-analytic methods. Conclusions Theoretically derived interventions that are gender specific, culturally appropriate, target mutual aid through group dynamics, and that are developed collaboratively with the target population are likely to be most effective. PMID:27504833

  20. Memory effects using an elemental analyser to combust radiocarbon samples: Failure and recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedi, M.E. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Liccioli, L. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Chimica Ugo Schiff, Università di Firenze, via della Lastruccia 3-13, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Castelli, L. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Czelusniak, C.; Giuntini, L.; Mandò, P.A. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Palla, L. [INFN Sezione di Pisa e Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Taccetti, F. [INFN Sezione di Firenze, via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    In the combustion and graphitization line for {sup 14}C-AMS samples used at INFN-LABEC for archaeological and geological applications, samples are burnt using an elemental analyser (EA). Advantages and drawbacks of EAs are known, a drawback being the possibility to introduce some contaminations or memory effects. Different parts inside an EA, e.g. the autosampler and the gas-chromatography column, might in principle be responsible of such problems. During a measurement run some time ago, we measured, indeed, radiocarbon concentration values somewhat higher than usual in nominally blank samples. These “bad” data could be explained by memory effects. By assuming a constant contribution from the sample of the prior combustion, this effect might be corrected: indeed, by repeating cycles of sequential combustions of standards and blanks, we observed a good reproducibility of the amount of contamination from the previous sample needed to explain the results. However, we were obviously unhappy with the fact itself of such corrections being needed, and several tests were performed to identify the source of contamination and eliminate it. Eventually, we succeeded in finding the cause of this failure and in recovering the full performance of the system.

  1. A mathematical analysis of the effects of Hebbian learning rules on the dynamics and structure of discrete-time random recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Benoît; Berry, Hugues; Cessac, Bruno; Delord, Bruno; Quoy, Mathias

    2008-12-01

    We present a mathematical analysis of the effects of Hebbian learning in random recurrent neural networks, with a generic Hebbian learning rule, including passive forgetting and different timescales, for neuronal activity and learning dynamics. Previous numerical work has reported that Hebbian learning drives the system from chaos to a steady state through a sequence of bifurcations. Here, we interpret these results mathematically and show that these effects, involving a complex coupling between neuronal dynamics and synaptic graph structure, can be analyzed using Jacobian matrices, which introduce both a structural and a dynamical point of view on neural network evolution. Furthermore, we show that sensitivity to a learned pattern is maximal when the largest Lyapunov exponent is close to 0. We discuss how neural networks may take advantage of this regime of high functional interest.

  2. Quantitative computed tomography-based finite element models of the human lumbar vertebral body: effect of element size on stiffness, damage, and fracture strength predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, R Paul; Rosenberg, William S; Keaveny, Tony M

    2003-08-01

    This study investigated the numerical convergence characteristics of specimen-specific "voxel-based" finite element models of 14 excised human cadaveric lumbar vertebral bodies (age: 37-87; M = 6, F = 8) that were generated automatically from clinical-type CT scans. With eventual clinical applications in mind, the ability of the model stiffness to predict the experimentally measured compressive fracture strength of the vertebral bodies was also assessed. The stiffness of "low"-resolution models (3 x 3 x 3 mm element size) was on average only 4% greater (p = 0.03) than for "high"-resolution models (1 x 1 x 1.5 mm) despite interspecimen variations that varied over four-fold. Damage predictions using low- vs high-resolution models were significantly different (p = 0.01) at loads corresponding to an overall strain of 0.5%. Both the high (r2 = 0.94) and low (r2 = 0.92) resolution model stiffness values were highly correlated with the experimentally measured ultimate strength values. Because vertebral stiffness variations in the population are much greater than those that arise from differences in voxel size, these results indicate that imaging resolution is not critical in cross-sectional studies of this parameter. However, longitudinal studies that seek to track more subtle changes in stiffness over time should account for the small but highly significant effects of voxel size. These results also demonstrate that an automated voxel-based finite element modeling technique may provide an excellent noninvasive assessment of vertebral strength.

  3. The effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on protocatechuate 3,4-dioxygenase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Scaramal da Silva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenanthracene is a highly toxic organic compound capable of contaminating water and soils, and biodegradation is an important tool for remediating polluted environments. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of trace elements, cations, and environmental conditions on the activity of the protocatechol 3,4-dioxygenase (P3,4O enzyme produced by the isolate Leifsonia sp. in cell-free and immobilized extracts. The isolate was grown in Luria Bertani broth medium (LB amended with 250 mg L-1 of phenanthrene. Various levels of pH (4.0-9.0, temperature (5-80 °C, time (0-90 min, trace elements (Cu2+, Hg2+ and Fe3+, and cations (Mg2+, Mn2+, K+ and NH4+ were tested to determine which conditions optimized enzyme activity. In general, the immobilized extract exhibited higher enzyme activity than the cell-free extract in the presence of trace elements and cations. Adding iron yielded the highest relative activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 16 and 99 %, respectively. Copper also increased enzyme activity for both cell-free and immobilized extracts, with values of 8 and 44 %, respectively. Enzyme activity in the phosphate buffer was high across a wide range of pH, reaching 80 % in the pH range between 6.5 and 8.0. The optimum temperatures for enzyme activity differed for cell-free and immobilized extracts, with maximum enzyme activity observed at 35 ºC for the cell-free extract and at 55 ºC for the immobilized extract. The cell-free extract of the P3,4O enzyme exhibited high activity only during the first 3 min of incubation, when it showed 50 % relative activity, and dropped to 0 % after 60 min of incubation. By contrast, activity in the immobilized extract was maintained during 90 min of incubation. This isolate has important characteristics for phenanthrene biodegradation, producing high quantities of the P3,4O enzyme that forms part of the most important pathway for PAH biodegradation.

  4. Element cycling in forest soils - modelling the effects of a changing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walse, C.

    1998-11-01

    Element cycling and nutrient supply in forest ecosystems are of vital importance for short-term productivity and for longer-term land management in terms of nutrient leaching and CO{sub 2} fixation. This thesis includes a series of studies with the objective of modelling some aspects of the effect of acidification and climate change on element cycling and nutrient supply in forest soil. A reconstruction model of atmospheric deposition and nutrient uptake and cycling, MAKEDEP, was developed. An existing model of soil chemistry, SAFE, was analyzed and applied. SAFE+MAKEDEP were then applied in combination with the RAINS model to perform scenario analyses of soil acidification/recovery for six European forest sites. A decomposition model intended to run in conjunction with the SAFE model was developed. Key elements were N, Ca, K, Mg, S and Al. In the decomposition model, only carbon release was included to date.The results show, that understanding the history of soil geochemistry is important for modelling the system and for projecting the future impact of acidification on nutrient supply in forest soils. The applied reconstruction models of acid deposition (MAKEDEP, RAINS) seem to generate reasonable and consistent estimates of historic acid deposition, so that present day conditions can be simulated starting from pre-acidification conditions. From applications of the SAFE model to large-scale forest manipulation experiments, we conclude that the geochemical processes and the degree of detail in process descriptions included in SAFE are adequate to capture the most important aspects of soil solution dynamics of forest soils in northern and central Europe. Therefore, SAFE is appropriate for the simulation of acidification and recovery scenarios for these soils. The precision in model prediction on a more general scale is often limited by factors other than model formulation, such as consistency and representativity of input data. It is shown that the physical

  5. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect from pH control or adsorption mechanisms on the stabilization of cationic trace elements from inorganic amendments in acidic and neutral soil. Furthermore, acid mine drainage sludge has shown great potential for stabilizing most trace elements. In a phytotoxicity test, the ratio of the bioavailable fraction to the pseudo-total fraction significantly affected the uptake of trace elements by bok choy. While inorganic amendments efficiently decreased the bioavailability of trace elements, significant effects from organic amendments were not noticeable due to the short-term cultivation period. Therefore, the application of organic amendments for stabilizing trace elements in agricultural soil requires further study.

  6. Ameliorative Effects of Dietary Selenium Against Cadmium Toxicity Is Related to Changes in Trace Elements in Chicken Kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Runxiang; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Chao; Zhao, Peng; Liu, Huo; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2017-04-01

    The ameliorative effects of selenium (Se) against cadmium (Cd)-induced toxicity have been reported extensively. However, few studies have assessed the effects of multiple ions simultaneously on the variations of elements. In this study, the changes in Se, Cd, and 26 other element concentrations were investigated in chicken kidneys. One hundred and twenty-eight 31-week-old laying hens were fed a diet supplemented with either Se, Cd, or both Se and Cd for 90 days. The ion content was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We found that the Se, Cd, and combined Se and Cd treatments significantly affected the trace elements in the chicken kidneys. The Cd supplement caused ion profile disorders, including reduced concentrations of V, Cr, Mn, Mo, As, Ba, Hg, Ti, and Pb and increased Si, Cu, Li, Cd, and Sb. The Se supplement reduced the contents of Co, Mo, and Pb and increased the contents of Cr, Fe, and Se. Moreover, Se also increased the concentrations of Cr, Mn, Zn, and Se and decreased those of Li and Pb, which in contrast were induced by Cd. Complex interactions between elements were analyzed, and both positive and negative correlations among these elements are presented. The present study indicated that Se can help against the negative effects of Cd and may be related to the homeostasis of the trace elements in chicken kidneys.

  7. The Effects of Various Amendments on Trace Element Stabilization in Acidic, Neutral, and Alkali Soil with Similar Pollution Index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Suk Kim

    Full Text Available Many studies have examined the application of soil amendments, including pH change-induced immobilizers, adsorbents, and organic materials, for soil remediation. This study evaluated the effects of various amendments on trace element stabilization and phytotoxicity, depending on the initial soil pH in acid, neutral, and alkali conditions. As in all types of soils, Fe and Ca were well stabilized on adsorption sites. There was an effect fro