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Sample records for neural crest specification

  1. Neural crest specification: tissues, signals, and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, C D; Jayasena, C S; Nie, S; Bronner, M E

    2012-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient population of multipotent and migratory cells unique to vertebrate embryos. Initially derived from the borders of the neural plate, these cells undergo an epithelial to mesenchymal transition to leave the central nervous system, migrate extensively in the periphery, and differentiate into numerous diverse derivatives. These include but are not limited to craniofacial cartilage, pigment cells, and peripheral neurons and glia. Attractive for their similarities to stem cells and metastatic cancer cells, neural crest cells are a popular model system for studying cell/tissue interactions and signaling factors that influence cell fate decisions and lineage transitions. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms required for neural crest formation in various vertebrate species, focusing on the importance of signaling factors from adjacent tissues and conserved gene regulatory interactions, which are required for induction and specification of the ectodermal tissue that will become neural crest. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Signaling and transcriptional regulation in neural crest specification and migration: lessons from xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Caterina; Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a population of highly migratory and multipotent cells, which arises from the border of the neural plate in vertebrate embryos. In the last few years, the molecular actors of neural crest early development have been intensively studied, notably by using the frog embryo, as a prime model for the analysis of the earliest embryonic inductions. In addition, tremendous progress has been made in understanding the molecular and cellular basis of Xenopus cranial neural crest migration, by combining in vitro and in vivo analysis. In this review, we examine how the action of previously known neural crest-inducing signals [bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), wingless-int (Wnt), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)] is controlled by newly discovered modulators during early neural plate border patterning and neural crest specification. This regulation controls the induction of key transcription factors that cooperate to pattern the premigratory neural crest progenitors. These data are discussed in the perspective of the gene regulatory network that controls neural and neural crest patterning. We then address recent findings on noncanonical Wnt signaling regulation, cell polarization, and collective cell migration which highlight how cranial neural crest cells populate their target tissue, the branchial arches, in vivo. More than ever, the neural crest stands as a powerful and attractive model to decipher complex vertebrate regulatory circuits in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Neural crest specification by noncanonical Wnt signaling and PAR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossipova, Olga; Sokol, Sergei Y.

    2011-01-01

    Neural crest (NC) cells are multipotent progenitors that form at the neural plate border, undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition and migrate to diverse locations in vertebrate embryos to give rise to many cell types. Multiple signaling factors, including Wnt proteins, operate during early embryonic development to induce the NC cell fate. Whereas the requirement for the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in NC specification has been well established, a similar role for Wnt proteins that do not stabilize β-catenin has remained unclear. Our gain- and loss-of-function experiments implicate Wnt11-like proteins in NC specification in Xenopus embryos. In support of this conclusion, modulation of β-catenin-independent signaling through Dishevelled and Ror2 causes predictable changes in premigratory NC. Morpholino-mediated depletion experiments suggest that Wnt11R, a Wnt protein that is expressed in neuroectoderm adjacent to the NC territory, is required for NC formation. Wnt11-like signals might specify NC by altering the localization and activity of the serine/threonine polarity kinase PAR-1 (also known as microtubule-associated regulatory kinase or MARK), which itself plays an essential role in NC formation. Consistent with this model, PAR-1 RNA rescues NC markers in embryos in which noncanonical Wnt signaling has been blocked. These experiments identify novel roles for Wnt11R and PAR-1 in NC specification and reveal an unexpected connection between morphogenesis and cell fate. PMID:22110058

  4. Anterior Hox Genes Interact with Components of the Neural Crest Specification Network to Induce Neural Crest Fates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James; Gavalas, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Hox genes play a central role in neural crest (NC) patterning particularly in the cranial region of the body. Despite evidence that simultaneous loss of Hoxa1 and Hoxb1 function resulted in NC specification defects, the role of Hox genes in NC specification has remained unclear due to extended genetic redundancy among Hox genes. To circumvent this problem, we expressed anterior Hox genes in the trunk neural tube of the developing chick embryo. This demonstrated that anterior Hox genes play a central role in NC cell specification by rapidly inducing the key transcription factors Snail2 and Msx1/2 and a neural progenitor to NC cell fate switch characterized by cell adhesion changes and an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cells delaminated from dorsal and medial neural tube levels and generated ectopic neurons, glia progenitors, and melanocytes. The mobilization of the NC genetic cascade was dependent upon bone morphogenetic protein signaling and optimal levels of Notch signaling. Therefore, anterior Hox patterning genes participate in NC specification and EMT by interacting with NC-inducing signaling pathways and regulating the expression of key genes involved in these processes. Stem Cells 2011;29:858–870 PMID:21433221

  5. Evolutionarily conserved role for SoxC genes in neural crest specification and neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, Benjamin R; Simoes-Costa, Marcos; Koo, Daniel E S; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Bronner, Marianne E

    2015-01-15

    Members of the Sox family of transcription factors play a variety of critical developmental roles in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Whereas SoxBs and SoxEs are involved in neural and neural crest development, respectively, far less is known about members of the SoxC subfamily. To address this from an evolutionary perspective, we compare expression and function of SoxC genes in neural crest cells and their derivatives in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), a basal vertebrate, to frog (Xenopus laevis). Analysis of transcript distribution reveals conservation of lamprey and X. laevis SoxC expression in premigratory neural crest, branchial arches, and cranial ganglia. Moreover, morpholino-mediated loss-of-function of selected SoxC family members demonstrates essential roles in aspects of neural crest development in both organisms. The results suggest important and conserved functions of SoxC genes during vertebrate evolution and a particularly critical, previously unrecognized role in early neural crest specification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An FGF3-BMP Signaling Axis Regulates Caudal Neural Tube Closure, Neural Crest Specification and Anterior-Posterior Axis Extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Matthew J; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewandoski, Mark

    2016-05-01

    During vertebrate axis extension, adjacent tissue layers undergo profound morphological changes: within the neuroepithelium, neural tube closure and neural crest formation are occurring, while within the paraxial mesoderm somites are segmenting from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Little is known about the signals between these tissues that regulate their coordinated morphogenesis. Here, we analyze the posterior axis truncation of mouse Fgf3 null homozygotes and demonstrate that the earliest role of PSM-derived FGF3 is to regulate BMP signals in the adjacent neuroepithelium. FGF3 loss causes elevated BMP signals leading to increased neuroepithelium proliferation, delay in neural tube closure and premature neural crest specification. We demonstrate that elevated BMP4 depletes PSM progenitors in vitro, phenocopying the Fgf3 mutant, suggesting that excessive BMP signals cause the Fgf3 axis defect. To test this in vivo we increased BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants by removing one copy of Noggin, which encodes a BMP antagonist. In such mutants, all parameters of the Fgf3 phenotype were exacerbated: neural tube closure delay, premature neural crest specification, and premature axis termination. Conversely, genetically decreasing BMP signaling in Fgf3 mutants, via loss of BMP receptor activity, alleviates morphological defects. Aberrant apoptosis is observed in the Fgf3 mutant tailbud. However, we demonstrate that cell death does not cause the Fgf3 phenotype: blocking apoptosis via deletion of pro-apoptotic genes surprisingly increases all Fgf3 defects including causing spina bifida. We demonstrate that this counterintuitive consequence of blocking apoptosis is caused by the increased survival of BMP-producing cells in the neuroepithelium. Thus, we show that FGF3 in the caudal vertebrate embryo regulates BMP signaling in the neuroepithelium, which in turn regulates neural tube closure, neural crest specification and axis termination. Uncovering this FGF3-BMP signaling axis is

  7. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  8. The Neural Crest in Cardiac Congenital Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyte, Anna; Hutson, Mary Redmond

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the function of neural crest as they relate to cardiovascular defects. The cardiac neural crest cells are a subpopulation of cranial neural crest discovered nearly 30 years ago by ablation of premigratory neural crest. The cardiac neural crest cells are necessary for normal cardiovascular development. We begin with a description of the crest cells in normal development, including their function in remodeling the pharyngeal arch arteries, outflow tract septation, valvulogenesis, and development of the cardiac conduction system. The cells are also responsible for modulating signaling in the caudal pharynx, including the second heart field. Many of the molecular pathways that are known to influence specification, migration, patterning and final targeting of the cardiac neural crest cells are reviewed. The cardiac neural crest cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of various human cardiocraniofacial syndromes such as DiGeorge, Velocardiofacial, CHARGE, Fetal Alcohol, Alagille, LEOPARD, and Noonan syndromes, as well as Retinoic Acid Embryopathy. The loss of neural crest cells or their dysfunction may not always directly cause abnormal cardiovascular development, but are involved secondarily because crest cells represent a major component in the complex tissue interactions in the head, pharynx and outflow tract. Thus many of the human syndromes linking defects in the heart, face and brain can be better understood when considered within the context of a single cardiocraniofacial developmental module with the neural crest being a key cell type that interconnects the regions. PMID:22595346

  9. SNW1 is a critical regulator of spatial BMP activity, neural plate border formation, and neural crest specification in vertebrate embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Y Wu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP gradients provide positional information to direct cell fate specification, such as patterning of the vertebrate ectoderm into neural, neural crest, and epidermal tissues, with precise borders segregating these domains. However, little is known about how BMP activity is regulated spatially and temporally during vertebrate development to contribute to embryonic patterning, and more specifically to neural crest formation. Through a large-scale in vivo functional screen in Xenopus for neural crest fate, we identified an essential regulator of BMP activity, SNW1. SNW1 is a nuclear protein known to regulate gene expression. Using antisense morpholinos to deplete SNW1 protein in both Xenopus and zebrafish embryos, we demonstrate that dorsally expressed SNW1 is required for neural crest specification, and this is independent of mesoderm formation and gastrulation morphogenetic movements. By exploiting a combination of immunostaining for phosphorylated Smad1 in Xenopus embryos and a BMP-dependent reporter transgenic zebrafish line, we show that SNW1 regulates a specific domain of BMP activity in the dorsal ectoderm at the neural plate border at post-gastrula stages. We use double in situ hybridizations and immunofluorescence to show how this domain of BMP activity is spatially positioned relative to the neural crest domain and that of SNW1 expression. Further in vivo and in vitro assays using cell culture and tissue explants allow us to conclude that SNW1 acts upstream of the BMP receptors. Finally, we show that the requirement of SNW1 for neural crest specification is through its ability to regulate BMP activity, as we demonstrate that targeted overexpression of BMP to the neural plate border is sufficient to restore neural crest formation in Xenopus SNW1 morphants. We conclude that through its ability to regulate a specific domain of BMP activity in the vertebrate embryo, SNW1 is a critical regulator of neural plate

  10. A gene network that coordinates preplacodal competence and neural crest specification in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Neha; Kwon, Hye-Joo; Riley, Bruce B

    2013-01-01

    Preplacodal ectoderm (PPE) and neural crest (NC) are specified at the interface of neural and nonneural ectoderm and together contribute to the peripheral nervous system in all vertebrates. Bmp activates early steps for both fates during late blastula stage. Low Bmp activates expression of transcription factors Tfap2a and Tfap2c in the lateral neural plate, thereby specifying neural crest fate. Elevated Bmp establishes preplacodal competence throughout the ventral ectoderm by coinducing Tfap2a, Tfap2c, Foxi1 and Gata3. PPE specification occurs later at the end of gastrulation and requires complete attenuation of Bmp, yet expression of PPE competence factors continues well past gastrulation. Here we show that competence factors positively regulate each other's expression during gastrulation, forming a self-sustaining network that operates independently of Bmp. Misexpression of Tfap2a in embryos blocked for Bmp from late blastula stage can restore development of both PPE and NC. However, Tfap2a alone is not sufficient to activate any other competence factors nor does it rescue individual placodes. On the other hand, misexpression of any two competence factors in Bmp-blocked embryos can activate the entire transcription factor network and support the development of NC, PPE and some individual placodes. We also show that while these factors are partially redundant with respect to PPE specification, they later provide non-redundant functions needed for development of specific placodes. Thus, we have identified a gene regulatory network that coordinates development of NC, PPE and individual placodes in zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Neural crest contributions to the lamprey head

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, David W.; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    The neural crest is a vertebrate-specific cell population that contributes to the facial skeleton and other derivatives. We have performed focal DiI injection into the cranial neural tube of the developing lamprey in order to follow the migratory pathways of discrete groups of cells from origin to destination and to compare neural crest migratory pathways in a basal vertebrate to those of gnathostomes. The results show that the general pathways of cranial neural crest migration are conserved throughout the vertebrates, with cells migrating in streams analogous to the mandibular and hyoid streams. Caudal branchial neural crest cells migrate ventrally as a sheet of cells from the hindbrain and super-pharyngeal region of the neural tube and form a cylinder surrounding a core of mesoderm in each pharyngeal arch, similar to that seen in zebrafish and axolotl. In addition to these similarities, we also uncovered important differences. Migration into the presumptive caudal branchial arches of the lamprey involves both rostral and caudal movements of neural crest cells that have not been described in gnathostomes, suggesting that barriers that constrain rostrocaudal movement of cranial neural crest cells may have arisen after the agnathan/gnathostome split. Accordingly, neural crest cells from a single axial level contributed to multiple arches and there was extensive mixing between populations. There was no apparent filling of neural crest derivatives in a ventral-to-dorsal order, as has been observed in higher vertebrates, nor did we find evidence of a neural crest contribution to cranial sensory ganglia. These results suggest that migratory constraints and additional neural crest derivatives arose later in gnathostome evolution.

  12. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially re...

  13. CHARGEd with neural crest defects.

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    Pauli, Silke; Bajpai, Ruchi; Borchers, Annette

    2017-10-30

    Neural crest cells are highly migratory pluripotent cells that give rise to diverse derivatives including cartilage, bone, smooth muscle, pigment, and endocrine cells as well as neurons and glia. Abnormalities in neural crest-derived tissues contribute to the etiology of CHARGE syndrome, a complex malformation disorder that encompasses clinical symptoms like coloboma, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retarded growth and development, genital hypoplasia, ear anomalies, and deafness. Mutations in the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) gene are causative of CHARGE syndrome and loss-of-function data in different model systems have firmly established a role of CHD7 in neural crest development. Here, we will summarize our current understanding of the function of CHD7 in neural crest development and discuss possible links of CHARGE syndrome to other developmental disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Enteric neurospheres are not specific to neural crest cultures : Implications for neural stem cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, E. (Ellen); D. Natarajan (Dipa); J.E. Cooper (Julie E.); Kronfli, R. (Rania); Cananzi, M. (Mara); J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); C. Mccann; A.J. Burns (Alan); N. Thapar (Nikhil)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Enteric neural stem cells provide hope of curative treatment for enteric neuropathies. Current protocols for their harvesting from humans focus on the generation of 'neurospheres' from cultures of dissociated gut tissue. The study aims to better understand the derivation,

  15. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    such as sea urchins, flies, fish and humans. (ii) Embryos (and so larvae and adults) form by differentiation from these germ layers. (iii) Homologous structures in different animals arise from the same germ layers. The germ-layer theory exerted a profound influence on those claiming a neural crest — that is, an ectodermal.

  16. A novel FoxD3 gene trap line reveals neural crest precursor movement and a role for FoxD3 in their specification.

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    Hochgreb-Hägele, Tatiana; Bronner, Marianne E

    2013-02-01

    Neural crest cells migrate extensively and contribute to diverse derivatives, including the craniofacial skeleton, peripheral neurons and glia, and pigment cells. Although several transgenic lines label neural crest subpopulations, few are suited for studying early events in neural crest development. Here, we present a zebrafish gene/protein trap line gt(foxd3-citrine)(ct110a) that expresses a Citrine fusion protein with FoxD3, a transcription factor expressed in premigratory and migrating neural crest cells. In this novel line, citrine expression exactly parallels endogenous foxd3 expression. High-resolution time-lapse imaging reveals the dynamic phases of precursor and migratory neural crest cell movements from the neural keel stage to times of active cell migration. In addition, Cre-recombination produces a variant line FoxD3-mCherry-pA whose homozygosis generates a FoxD3 mutant. Taking advantage of the endogenously regulated expression of FoxD3-mCherry fusion protein, we directly assess early effects of FoxD3 loss-of-function on specification and morphogenesis of dorsal root ganglia, craniofacial skeleton and melanophores. These novel lines provide new insights and useful new tools for studying specification, migration and differentiation of neural crest cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Pax7 lineage contributions to the mammalian neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Murdoch

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells are vertebrate-specific multipotent cells that contribute to a variety of tissues including the peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, and craniofacial bones and cartilage. Abnormal development of the neural crest is associated with several human maladies including cleft/lip palate, aggressive cancers such as melanoma and neuroblastoma, and rare syndromes, like Waardenburg syndrome, a complex disorder involving hearing loss and pigment defects. We previously identified the transcription factor Pax7 as an early marker, and required component for neural crest development in chick embryos. In mammals, Pax7 is also thought to play a role in neural crest development, yet the precise contribution of Pax7 progenitors to the neural crest lineage has not been determined.Here we use Cre/loxP technology in double transgenic mice to fate map the Pax7 lineage in neural crest derivates. We find that Pax7 descendants contribute to multiple tissues including the cranial, cardiac and trunk neural crest, which in the cranial cartilage form a distinct regional pattern. The Pax7 lineage, like the Pax3 lineage, is additionally detected in some non-neural crest tissues, including a subset of the epithelial cells in specific organs.These results demonstrate a previously unappreciated widespread distribution of Pax7 descendants within and beyond the neural crest. They shed light regarding the regionally distinct phenotypes observed in Pax3 and Pax7 mutants, and provide a unique perspective into the potential roles of Pax7 during disease and development.

  18. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  19. DHODH modulates transcriptional elongation in the neural crest and melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard Mark; Cech, Jennifer; Ratanasirintrawoot, Sutheera; Lin, Charles Y; Rahl, Peter B; Burke, Christopher J; Langdon, Erin; Tomlinson, Matthew L; Mosher, Jack; Kaufman, Charles; Chen, Frank; Long, Hannah K; Kramer, Martin; Datta, Sumon; Neuberg, Donna; Granter, Scott; Young, Richard A; Morrison, Sean; Wheeler, Grant N; Zon, Leonard I

    2011-03-24

    Melanoma is a tumour of transformed melanocytes, which are originally derived from the embryonic neural crest. It is unknown to what extent the programs that regulate neural crest development interact with mutations in the BRAF oncogene, which is the most commonly mutated gene in human melanoma. We have used zebrafish embryos to identify the initiating transcriptional events that occur on activation of human BRAF(V600E) (which encodes an amino acid substitution mutant of BRAF) in the neural crest lineage. Zebrafish embryos that are transgenic for mitfa:BRAF(V600E) and lack p53 (also known as tp53) have a gene signature that is enriched for markers of multipotent neural crest cells, and neural crest progenitors from these embryos fail to terminally differentiate. To determine whether these early transcriptional events are important for melanoma pathogenesis, we performed a chemical genetic screen to identify small-molecule suppressors of the neural crest lineage, which were then tested for their effects on melanoma. One class of compound, inhibitors of dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), for example leflunomide, led to an almost complete abrogation of neural crest development in zebrafish and to a reduction in the self-renewal of mammalian neural crest stem cells. Leflunomide exerts these effects by inhibiting the transcriptional elongation of genes that are required for neural crest development and melanoma growth. When used alone or in combination with a specific inhibitor of the BRAF(V600E) oncogene, DHODH inhibition led to a marked decrease in melanoma growth both in vitro and in mouse xenograft studies. Taken together, these studies highlight developmental pathways in neural crest cells that have a direct bearing on melanoma formation.

  20. DNA methyltransferase 3b is dispensable for mouse neural crest development.

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    Bridget T Jacques-Fricke

    Full Text Available The neural crest is a population of multipotent cells that migrates extensively throughout vertebrate embryos to form diverse structures. Mice mutant for the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3b exhibit defects in two neural crest derivatives, the craniofacial skeleton and cardiac ventricular septum, suggesting that DNMT3b activity is necessary for neural crest development. Nevertheless, the requirement for DNMT3b specifically in neural crest cells, as opposed to interacting cell types, has not been determined. Using a conditional DNMT3b allele crossed to the neural crest cre drivers Wnt1-cre and Sox10-cre, neural crest DNMT3b mutants were generated. In both neural crest-specific and fully DNMT3b-mutant embryos, cranial neural crest cells exhibited only subtle migration defects, with increased numbers of dispersed cells trailing organized streams in the head. In spite of this, the resulting cranial ganglia, craniofacial skeleton, and heart developed normally when neural crest cells lacked DNMT3b. This indicates that DNTM3b is not necessary in cranial neural crest cells for their development. We conclude that defects in neural crest derivatives in DNMT3b mutant mice reflect a requirement for DNMT3b in lineages such as the branchial arch mesendoderm or the cardiac mesoderm that interact with neural crest cells during formation of these structures.

  1. Neural crest development in fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Susan M; Garic, Ana; Flentke, George R; Berres, Mark E

    2014-09-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Some affected individuals possess distinctive craniofacial deficits, but many more lack overt facial changes. An understanding of the mechanisms underlying these deficits would inform their diagnostic utility. Our understanding of these mechanisms is challenged because ethanol lacks a single receptor when redirecting cellular activity. This review summarizes our current understanding of how ethanol alters neural crest development. Ample evidence shows that ethanol causes the "classic" fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) face (short palpebral fissures, elongated upper lip, deficient philtrum) because it suppresses prechordal plate outgrowth, thereby reducing neuroectoderm and neural crest induction and causing holoprosencephaly. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) at premigratory stages elicits a different facial appearance, indicating FASD may represent a spectrum of facial outcomes. PAE at this premigratory period initiates a calcium transient that activates CaMKII and destabilizes transcriptionally active β-catenin, thereby initiating apoptosis within neural crest populations. Contributing to neural crest vulnerability are their low antioxidant responses. Ethanol-treated neural crest produce reactive oxygen species and free radical scavengers attenuate their production and prevent apoptosis. Ethanol also significantly impairs neural crest migration, causing cytoskeletal rearrangements that destabilize focal adhesion formation; their directional migratory capacity is also lost. Genetic factors further modify vulnerability to ethanol-induced craniofacial dysmorphology and include genes important for neural crest development, including shh signaling, PDFGA, vangl2, and ribosomal biogenesis. Because facial and brain development are mechanistically and functionally linked, research into ethanol's effects on neural crest also informs our understanding of ethanol's CNS pathologies. © 2014

  2. Modeling Neural Crest Induction, Melanocyte Specification, and Disease-Related Pigmentation Defects in hESCs and Patient-Specific iPSCs

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    Yvonne Mica

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Melanocytes are pigment-producing cells of neural crest (NC origin that are responsible for protecting the skin against UV irradiation. Pluripotent stem cell (PSC technology offers a promising approach for studying human melanocyte development and disease. Here, we report that timed exposure to activators of WNT, BMP, and EDN3 signaling triggers the sequential induction of NC and melanocyte precursor fates under dual-SMAD-inhibition conditions. Using a SOX10::GFP human embryonic stem cell (hESC reporter line, we demonstrate that the temporal onset of WNT activation is particularly critical for human NC induction. Subsequent maturation of hESC-derived melanocytes yields pure populations that match the molecular and functional properties of adult melanocytes. Melanocytes from Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome and Chediak-Higashi syndrome patient-specific induced PSCs (iPSCs faithfully reproduce the ultrastructural features of disease-associated pigmentation defects. Our data define a highly specific requirement for WNT signaling during NC induction and enable the generation of pure populations of human iPSC-derived melanocytes for faithful modeling of pigmentation disorders.

  3. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cardiovascular Development and the Colonizing Cardiac Neural Crest Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige Snider

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that transgenic manipulation of mammalian neural crest-related gene expression and microsurgical removal of premigratory chicken and Xenopus embryonic cardiac neural crest progenitors results in a wide spectrum of both structural and functional congenital heart defects, the actual functional mechanism of the cardiac neural crest cells within the heart is poorly understood. Neural crest cell migration and appropriate colonization of the pharyngeal arches and outflow tract septum is thought to be highly dependent on genes that regulate cell-autonomous polarized movement (i.e., gap junctions, cadherins, and noncanonical Wnt1 pathway regulators. Once the migratory cardiac neural crest subpopulation finally reaches the heart, they have traditionally been thought to participate in septation of the common outflow tract into separate aortic and pulmonary arteries. However, several studies have suggested these colonizing neural crest cells may also play additional unexpected roles during cardiovascular development and may even contribute to a crest-derived stem cell population. Studies in both mice and chick suggest they can also enter the heart from the venous inflow as well as the usual arterial outflow region, and may contribute to the adult semilunar and atrioventricular valves as well as part of the cardiac conduction system. Furthermore, although they are not usually thought to give rise to the cardiomyocyte lineage, neural crest cells in the zebrafish (Danio rerio can contribute to the myocardium and may have different functions in a species-dependent context. Intriguingly, both ablation of chick and Xenopus premigratory neural crest cells, and a transgenic deletion of mouse neural crest cell migration or disruption of the normal mammalian neural crest gene expression profiles, disrupts ventral myocardial function and/or cardiomyocyte proliferation. Combined, this suggests that either the cardiac neural crest

  5. Defective ALK5 signaling in the neural crest leads to increased postmigratory neural crest cell apoptosis and severe outflow tract defects

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    Sucov Henry M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cardiovascular diseases are the most common form of birth defects in humans. A substantial portion of these defects has been associated with inappropriate induction, migration, differentiation and patterning of pluripotent cardiac neural crest stem cells. While TGF-β-superfamily signaling has been strongly implicated in neural crest cell development, the detailed molecular signaling mechanisms in vivo are still poorly understood. Results We deleted the TGF-β type I receptor Alk5 specifically in the mouse neural crest cell lineage. Failure in signaling via ALK5 leads to severe cardiovascular and pharyngeal defects, including inappropriate remodeling of pharyngeal arch arteries, abnormal aortic sac development, failure in pharyngeal organ migration and persistent truncus arteriosus. While ALK5 is not required for neural crest cell migration, our results demonstrate that it plays an important role in the survival of post-migratory cardiac neural crest cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ALK5-mediated signaling in neural crest cells plays an essential cell-autonomous role in the pharyngeal and cardiac outflow tract development.

  6. Metabolic syndromes and neural crest development

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    A. Berio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to investigate for the possible connection between abnormal neural crest cell (NCC development and NCC-derived abnormal facial and cerebral structures in 3 children with pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH and in 10 cases with oxidative phosphorylation deficiency diagnosed from the Author by standard laboratory assays [i.e. 3 cases of Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, 2 cases of Leigh syndrome, 1 case of KSS with De Toni-Debrè-Fanconi and rachitis (Berio disease, 1 case of KSS with aortic insuffiency and sub-aortic septum hyperthophy, 3 cases of chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia]. There patients presented with hyperlactacidemia, hyperpyruvicemia and facial abnormalities, similar to those observed in the fetal alcohol syndrome (a typical neurocristopathy due to PDH deficiency, down-regulating NCC genes. The Author hypothesizes that the metabolic defect of scarce energy production is responsible of abnormal NCC proliferation/migration and consequent facial abnormalities.

  7. CtBP2 downregulation during neural crest specification induces expression of Mitf and REST, resulting in melanocyte differentiation and sympathoadrenal lineage suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongzi; Fekete, Donna M; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2011-03-01

    Trunk neural crest (NC) cells differentiate to neurons, melanocytes, and glia. In NC cultures, cyclic AMP (cAMP) induces melanocyte differentiation while suppressing the neuronal sympathoadrenal lineage, depending on the signal intensity. Melanocyte differentiation requires activation of CREB and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), but the role of PKA is not understood. We have demonstrated, in NC cultures, cAMP-induced transcription of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene (Mitf) and the RE-1 silencing transcription factor gene (REST), both Wnt-regulated genes. In NC cultures and zebrafish, knockdown of the corepressor of Wnt-mediated transcription C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) but not CtBP1 derepressed Mitf and REST expression and enhanced melanocyte differentiation. cAMP in NC and B16 melanoma cells decreased CtBP2 protein levels, while inhibition of PKA or proteasome rescued CtBP2 degradation. Interestingly, knockdown of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), a CtBP stability modulator, increased CtBP2 levels, suppressed expression of Mitf, REST, and melanocyte differentiation, and increased neuronal gene expression and sympathoadrenal lineage differentiation. We conclude that cAMP/PKA via HIPK2 promotes CtBP2 degradation, leading to Mitf and REST expression. Mitf induces melanocyte specification, and REST suppresses neuron-specific gene expression and the sympathoadrenal lineage. Our studies identify a novel role for REST in NC cell differentiation and suggest cross talk between cAMP and Wnt signaling in NC lineage specification.

  8. CtBP2 Downregulation during Neural Crest Specification Induces Expression of Mitf and REST, Resulting in Melanocyte Differentiation and Sympathoadrenal Lineage Suppression ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hongzi; Fekete, Donna M.; Andrisani, Ourania M.

    2011-01-01

    Trunk neural crest (NC) cells differentiate to neurons, melanocytes, and glia. In NC cultures, cyclic AMP (cAMP) induces melanocyte differentiation while suppressing the neuronal sympathoadrenal lineage, depending on the signal intensity. Melanocyte differentiation requires activation of CREB and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), but the role of PKA is not understood. We have demonstrated, in NC cultures, cAMP-induced transcription of the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor gene (Mitf) and the RE-1 silencing transcription factor gene (REST), both Wnt-regulated genes. In NC cultures and zebrafish, knockdown of the corepressor of Wnt-mediated transcription C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) but not CtBP1 derepressed Mitf and REST expression and enhanced melanocyte differentiation. cAMP in NC and B16 melanoma cells decreased CtBP2 protein levels, while inhibition of PKA or proteasome rescued CtBP2 degradation. Interestingly, knockdown of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), a CtBP stability modulator, increased CtBP2 levels, suppressed expression of Mitf, REST, and melanocyte differentiation, and increased neuronal gene expression and sympathoadrenal lineage differentiation. We conclude that cAMP/PKA via HIPK2 promotes CtBP2 degradation, leading to Mitf and REST expression. Mitf induces melanocyte specification, and REST suppresses neuron-specific gene expression and the sympathoadrenal lineage. Our studies identify a novel role for REST in NC cell differentiation and suggest cross talk between cAMP and Wnt signaling in NC lineage specification. PMID:21199918

  9. The mych gene is required for neural crest survival during zebrafish development.

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    Sung-Kook Hong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among Myc family genes, c-Myc is known to have a role in neural crest specification in Xenopus and in craniofacial development in the mouse. There is no information on the function of other Myc genes in neural crest development, or about any developmental role of zebrafish Myc genes.We isolated the zebrafish mych (myc homologue gene. Knockdown of mych leads to severe defects in craniofacial development and in certain other tissues including the eye. These phenotypes appear to be caused by cell death in the neural crest and in the eye field in the anterior brain.Mych is a novel factor required for neural crest cell survival in zebrafish.

  10. Resolving time and space constraints during neural crest formation and delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duband, Jean-Loup; Dady, Alwyn; Fleury, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    A striking feature of neural crest development in vertebrates is that all the specification, delamination, migration, and differentiation steps occur consecutively in distinct areas of the embryo and at different timings of development. The significance and consequences of this partition into clearly separated events are not fully understood yet, but it ought to be related to the necessity of controlling precisely and independently each step, given the wide array of cell types and tissues derived from the neural crest and the long duration of their development spanning almost the entire embryonic life. In this chapter, using the examples of early neural crest induction and delamination, we discuss how time and space constraints influence their development and describe the molecular and cellular responses that are employed by cells to adapt. In the first example, we analyze how cell sorting and cell movements cooperate to allow nascent neural crest cells, which are initially mingled with other neurectodermal progenitors after induction, to segregate from the neural tube and ectoderm populations and settle at the apex of the neural tube prior to migration. In the second example, we examine how cadherins drive the entire process of neural crest segregation from the rest of the neurectoderm by their dual role in mediating first cell sorting and cohesion during specification and later in promoting their delamination. In the third example, we describe how the expression and activity of the transcription factors known to drive epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) are regulated timely and spatially by the cellular machinery so that they can alternatively and successively regulate neural crest specification and delamination. In the last example, we briefly tackle the problem of how factors triggering EMT may elicit different cell responses in neural tube and neural crest progenitors. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Isolation and characterization of neural crest-derived stem cells from dental pulp of neonatal mice.

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    Kajohnkiart Janebodin

    Full Text Available Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs are shown to reside within the tooth and play an important role in dentin regeneration. DPSCs were first isolated and characterized from human teeth and most studies have focused on using this adult stem cell for clinical applications. However, mouse DPSCs have not been well characterized and their origin(s have not yet been elucidated. Herein we examined if murine DPSCs are neural crest derived and determined their in vitro and in vivo capacity. DPSCs from neonatal murine tooth pulp expressed embryonic stem cell and neural crest related genes, but lacked expression of mesodermal genes. Cells isolated from the Wnt1-Cre/R26R-LacZ model, a reporter of neural crest-derived tissues, indicated that DPSCs were Wnt1-marked and therefore of neural crest origin. Clonal DPSCs showed multi-differentiation in neural crest lineage for odontoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, neurons, and smooth muscles. Following in vivo subcutaneous transplantation with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate, based on tissue/cell morphology and specific antibody staining, the clones differentiated into odontoblast-like cells and produced dentin-like structure. Conversely, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs gave rise to osteoblast-like cells and generated bone-like structure. Interestingly, the capillary distribution in the DPSC transplants showed close proximity to odontoblasts whereas in the BMSC transplants bone condensations were distant to capillaries resembling dentinogenesis in the former vs. osteogenesis in the latter. Thus we demonstrate the existence of neural crest-derived DPSCs with differentiation capacity into cranial mesenchymal tissues and other neural crest-derived tissues. In turn, DPSCs hold promise as a source for regenerating cranial mesenchyme and other neural crest derived tissues.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Neural Crest-Derived Stem Cells from Dental Pulp of Neonatal Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janebodin, Kajohnkiart; Horst, Orapin V.; Ieronimakis, Nicholas; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Reesukumal, Kanit; Pratumvinit, Busadee; Reyes, Morayma

    2011-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are shown to reside within the tooth and play an important role in dentin regeneration. DPSCs were first isolated and characterized from human teeth and most studies have focused on using this adult stem cell for clinical applications. However, mouse DPSCs have not been well characterized and their origin(s) have not yet been elucidated. Herein we examined if murine DPSCs are neural crest derived and determined their in vitro and in vivo capacity. DPSCs from neonatal murine tooth pulp expressed embryonic stem cell and neural crest related genes, but lacked expression of mesodermal genes. Cells isolated from the Wnt1-Cre/R26R-LacZ model, a reporter of neural crest-derived tissues, indicated that DPSCs were Wnt1-marked and therefore of neural crest origin. Clonal DPSCs showed multi-differentiation in neural crest lineage for odontoblasts, chondrocytes, adipocytes, neurons, and smooth muscles. Following in vivo subcutaneous transplantation with hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate, based on tissue/cell morphology and specific antibody staining, the clones differentiated into odontoblast-like cells and produced dentin-like structure. Conversely, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) gave rise to osteoblast-like cells and generated bone-like structure. Interestingly, the capillary distribution in the DPSC transplants showed close proximity to odontoblasts whereas in the BMSC transplants bone condensations were distant to capillaries resembling dentinogenesis in the former vs. osteogenesis in the latter. Thus we demonstrate the existence of neural crest-derived DPSCs with differentiation capacity into cranial mesenchymal tissues and other neural crest-derived tissues. In turn, DPSCs hold promise as a source for regenerating cranial mesenchyme and other neural crest derived tissues. PMID:22087335

  13. Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor is critical for neural crest cell function in Xenopus laevis.

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    Barnett, Chris; Yazgan, Oya; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Malakar, Sreepurna; Thomas, Trevor; Fitzgerald, Amanda; Harbour, William; Henry, Jonathan J; Krebs, Jocelyn E

    2012-01-01

    Williams Syndrome Transcription Factor (WSTF) is one of ∼25 haplodeficient genes in patients with the complex developmental disorder Williams Syndrome (WS). WS results in visual/spatial processing defects, cognitive impairment, unique behavioral phenotypes, characteristic "elfin" facial features, low muscle tone and heart defects. WSTF exists in several chromatin remodeling complexes and has roles in transcription, replication, and repair. Chromatin remodeling is essential during embryogenesis, but WSTF's role in vertebrate development is poorly characterized. To investigate the developmental role of WSTF, we knocked down WSTF in Xenopus laevis embryos using a morpholino that targets WSTF mRNA. BMP4 shows markedly increased and spatially aberrant expression in WSTF-deficient embryos, while SHH, MRF4, PAX2, EPHA4 and SOX2 expression are severely reduced, coupled with defects in a number of developing embryonic structures and organs. WSTF-deficient embryos display defects in anterior neural development. Induction of the neural crest, measured by expression of the neural crest-specific genes SNAIL and SLUG, is unaffected by WSTF depletion. However, at subsequent stages WSTF knockdown results in a severe defect in neural crest migration and/or maintenance. Consistent with a maintenance defect, WSTF knockdowns display a specific pattern of increased apoptosis at the tailbud stage in regions corresponding to the path of cranial neural crest migration. Our work is the first to describe a role for WSTF in proper neural crest function, and suggests that neural crest defects resulting from WSTF haploinsufficiency may be a major contributor to the pathoembryology of WS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Meis2 is essential for cranial and cardiac neural crest development.

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    Machon, Ondrej; Masek, Jan; Machonova, Olga; Krauss, Stefan; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2015-11-06

    TALE-class homeodomain transcription factors Meis and Pbx play important roles in formation of the embryonic brain, eye, heart, cartilage or hematopoiesis. Loss-of-function studies of Pbx1, 2 and 3 and Meis1 documented specific functions in embryogenesis, however, functional studies of Meis2 in mouse are still missing. We have generated a conditional allele of Meis2 in mice and shown that systemic inactivation of the Meis2 gene results in lethality by the embryonic day 14 that is accompanied with hemorrhaging. We show that neural crest cells express Meis2 and Meis2-defficient embryos display defects in tissues that are derived from the neural crest, such as an abnormal heart outflow tract with the persistent truncus arteriosus and abnormal cranial nerves. The importance of Meis2 for neural crest cells is further confirmed by means of conditional inactivation of Meis2 using crest-specific AP2α-IRES-Cre mouse. Conditional mutants display perturbed development of the craniofacial skeleton with severe anomalies in cranial bones and cartilages, heart and cranial nerve abnormalities. Meis2-null mice are embryonic lethal. Our results reveal a critical role of Meis2 during cranial and cardiac neural crest cells development in mouse.

  15. Aebp2 as an epigenetic regulator for neural crest cells.

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    Hana Kim

    Full Text Available Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2. We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism.

  16. CHD7 cooperates with PBAF to control multipotent neural crest formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Ruchi; Chen, Denise A.; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Zhang, Junmei; Xiong, Yiqin; Helms, Jill; Chang, Ching-Pin; Zhao, Yingming; Swigut, Tomek; Wysocka, Joanna

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding CHD7, an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler result in a complex constellation of congenital anomalies called CHARGE syndrome. Here we show that in humans and in Xenopus, CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, a transient cell population that is ectodermal in origin, but undergoes a major gene expression reprogramming to acquire a remarkably broad differentiation potential and ability to migrate throughout the body to give rise to bones, cartilages, nerves, and cardiac structures. We demonstrate that CHD7 function is essential for activation of core components of neural crest transcriptional circuitry, including Sox9, Twist and Slug. Moreover, the major features of CHARGE are recapitulated in Xenopus embryo by the downregulation of CHD7 levels or overexpression of its catalytically inactive ATP-ase mutant. We further show that in human multipotent neural crest cells, CHD7 associates with a BRG1-containing complex PBAF, and both factors co-occupy a neural crest-specific distal SOX9 enhancer, as well as a novel genomic element located upstream from TWIST1 gene and marked by H3K4me1. Furthermore, in the embryo CHD7 and PBAF act synergistically to promote neural crest gene expression and cell migration. Our work identifies an evolutionary conserved role for CHD7 in orchestrating neural crest gene expression programs, provides insights into the synergistic regulation of distal genomic elements by two distinct chromatin remodelers, and illuminates the patho-embryology of CHARGE syndrome. PMID:20130577

  17. Translocation of latex beads after laser ablation of the avian neural crest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, J N; Bronner-Fraser, M

    1984-11-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory (M.E. Bronner-Fraser, 1982, Dev. Biol. 91, 50-63) have demonstrated that latex beads translocate ventrally after injection into avian embryos during the phase of neural crest migration, to settle in the vicinity of neural-crest-derived structures. In order to examine the role of host neural crest cells in the ventral translocation of implanted beads, latex beads have been injected into regions of embryos from which the neural crest cells have been ablated using a laser microbeam. Prior to their migratory phase, neural crest cells reside in the dorsal portion of the neural tube. Laser irradiation of the dorsal neural tube was used to reproducibly achieve either partial or complete ablation of neural crest cells from the irradiated regions. The effectiveness of the ablation was assessed by the degree of reduction in dorsal root ganglia, a neural crest derivative. Because of the rapidity and precision of this technique, it was possible to selectively remove neural crest cells without significantly altering other embryonic structures. The results indicate that, after injection of latex beads into the somites of embryos whose neural crest cells were removed by laser irradiation, the beads translocate ventrally in the absence of the endogenous neural crest.

  18. Ets-1 Confers Cranial Features on Neural Crest Delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théveneau, Eric; Duband, Jean-Loup; Altabef, Muriel

    2007-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) have the particularity to invade the environment where they differentiate after separation from the neuroepithelium. This process, called delamination, is strikingly different between cranial and trunk NCCs. If signalings controlling slow trunk delamination start being deciphered, mechanisms leading to massive and rapid cranial outflow are poorly documented. Here, we show that the chick cranial NCCs delamination is the result of two events: a substantial cell mobilization and an epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT). We demonstrate that ets-1, a transcription factor specifically expressed in cranial NCCs, is responsible for the former event by recruiting massively cranial premigratory NCCs independently of the S-phase of the cell cycle and by leading the gathered cells to straddle the basal lamina. However, it does not promote the EMT process alone but can cooperate with snail-2 (previously called slug) to this event. Altogether, these data lead us to propose that ets-1 plays a pivotal role in conferring specific cephalic characteristics on NCC delamination. PMID:17987123

  19. Ets-1 confers cranial features on neural crest delamination.

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    Eric Théveneau

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC have the particularity to invade the environment where they differentiate after separation from the neuroepithelium. This process, called delamination, is strikingly different between cranial and trunk NCCs. If signalings controlling slow trunk delamination start being deciphered, mechanisms leading to massive and rapid cranial outflow are poorly documented. Here, we show that the chick cranial NCCs delamination is the result of two events: a substantial cell mobilization and an epithelium to mesenchyme transition (EMT. We demonstrate that ets-1, a transcription factor specifically expressed in cranial NCCs, is responsible for the former event by recruiting massively cranial premigratory NCCs independently of the S-phase of the cell cycle and by leading the gathered cells to straddle the basal lamina. However, it does not promote the EMT process alone but can cooperate with snail-2 (previously called slug to this event. Altogether, these data lead us to propose that ets-1 plays a pivotal role in conferring specific cephalic characteristics on NCC delamination.

  20. Regeneration of neural crest derivatives in the Xenopus tadpole tail

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    Slack Jonathan MW

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After amputation of the Xenopus tadpole tail, a functionally competent new tail is regenerated. It contains spinal cord, notochord and muscle, each of which has previously been shown to derive from the corresponding tissue in the stump. The regeneration of the neural crest derivatives has not previously been examined and is described in this paper. Results Labelling of the spinal cord by electroporation, or by orthotopic grafting of transgenic tissue expressing GFP, shows that no cells emigrate from the spinal cord in the course of regeneration. There is very limited regeneration of the spinal ganglia, but new neurons as well as fibre tracts do appear in the regenerated spinal cord and the regenerated tail also contains abundant peripheral innervation. The regenerated tail contains a normal density of melanophores. Cell labelling experiments show that melanophores do not arise from the spinal cord during regeneration, nor from the mesenchymal tissues of the skin, but they do arise by activation and proliferation of pre-existing melanophore precursors. If tails are prepared lacking melanophores, then the regenerates also lack them. Conclusion On regeneration there is no induction of a new neural crest similar to that seen in embryonic development. However there is some regeneration of neural crest derivatives. Abundant melanophores are regenerated from unpigmented precursors, and, although spinal ganglia are not regenerated, sufficient sensory systems are produced to enable essential functions to continue.

  1. Multiple cranial organ defects after conditionally knocking out Fgf10 in the neural crest

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    Tathyane H.N. Teshima

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fgf10 is necessary for the development of a number of organs that fail to develop or are reduced in size in the null mutant. Here we have knocked out Fgf10 specifically in the neural crest driven by Wnt1cre. The Wnt1creFgf10fl/fl mouse phenocopies many of the null mutant defects, including cleft palate, loss of salivary glands and ocular glands, highlighting the neural crest origin of the Fgf10 expressing mesenchyme surrounding these organs. In contrast tissues such as the limbs and lungs, where Fgf10 is expressed by the surrounding mesoderm, were unaffected, as was the pituitary gland where Fgf10 is expressed by the neuroepithelium. The circumvallate papilla of the tongue formed but was hypoplastic in the conditional and Fgf10 null embryos, suggesting that other sources of FGF can compensate in development of this structure. The tracheal cartilage rings showed normal patterning in the conditional knockout, indicating that the source of Fgf10 for this tissue is mesodermal, which was confirmed using Wnt1cre-dtTom to lineage trace the boundary of the neural crest in this region. The thyroid, thymus and parathyroid glands surrounding the trachea were present but hypoplastic in the conditional mutant, indicating that a neighbouring source of mesodermal Fgf10 might be able to partially compensate for loss of neural crest derived Fgf10.

  2. Caldesmon regulates actin dynamics to influence cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shuyi; Kee, Yun; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2011-09-01

    Caldesmon (CaD) is an important actin modulator that associates with actin filaments to regulate cell morphology and motility. Although extensively studied in cultured cells, there is little functional information regarding the role of CaD in migrating cells in vivo. Here we show that nonmuscle CaD is highly expressed in both premigratory and migrating cranial neural crest cells of Xenopus embryos. Depletion of CaD with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides causes cranial neural crest cells to migrate a significantly shorter distance, prevents their segregation into distinct migratory streams, and later results in severe defects in cartilage formation. Demonstrating specificity, these effects are rescued by adding back exogenous CaD. Interestingly, CaD proteins with mutations in the Ca(2+)-calmodulin-binding sites or ErK/Cdk1 phosphorylation sites fail to rescue the knockdown phenotypes, whereas mutation of the PAK phosphorylation site is able to rescue them. Analysis of neural crest explants reveals that CaD is required for the dynamic arrangements of actin and, thus, for cell shape changes and process formation. Taken together, these results suggest that the actin-modulating activity of CaD may underlie its critical function and is regulated by distinct signaling pathways during normal neural crest migration.

  3. Gap Junction–mediated Cell–Cell Communication Modulates Mouse Neural Crest Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G.Y.; Cooper, E.S.; Waldo, K.; Kirby, M L; Gilula, N B; Lo, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies showed that conotruncal heart malformations can arise with the increase or decrease in α1 connexin function in neural crest cells. To elucidate the possible basis for the quantitative requirement for α1 connexin gap junctions in cardiac development, a neural crest outgrowth culture system was used to examine migration of neural crest cells derived from CMV43 transgenic embryos overexpressing α1 connexins, and from α1 connexin knockout (KO) mice and FC transgenic mice expressi...

  4. Enteric neural crest cells regulate vertebrate stomach patterning and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Sandrine; McKey, Jennifer; Sagnol, Sébastien; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2015-01-15

    In vertebrates, the digestive tract develops from a uniform structure where reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions pattern this complex organ into regions with specific morphologies and functions. Concomitant with these early patterning events, the primitive GI tract is colonized by the vagal enteric neural crest cells (vENCCs), a population of cells that will give rise to the enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the GI tract. The influence of vENCCs on early patterning and differentiation of the GI tract has never been evaluated. In this study, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is required for proper chick stomach development, patterning and differentiation. We show that reducing the number of vENCCs by performing vENCC ablations induces sustained activation of the BMP and Notch pathways in the stomach mesenchyme and impairs smooth muscle development. A reduction in vENCCs also leads to the transdifferentiation of the stomach into a stomach-intestinal mixed phenotype. In addition, sustained Notch signaling activity in the stomach mesenchyme phenocopies the defects observed in vENCC-ablated stomachs, indicating that inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway is essential for stomach patterning and differentiation. Finally, we report that a crucial number of vENCCs is also required for maintenance of stomach identity and differentiation through inhibition of the Notch signaling pathway. Altogether, our data reveal that, through the regulation of mesenchyme identity, vENCCs act as a new mediator in the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions that control stomach development. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

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    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  6. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  7. Physiological Plasticity of Neural-Crest-Derived Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Carotid Body

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    Valentina Annese

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem cell plasticity, or the ability of somatic stem cells to cross boundaries and differentiate into unrelated cell types, has been a matter of debate in the last decade. Neural-crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs display a remarkable plasticity during development. Whether adult populations of NCSCs retain this plasticity is largely unknown. Herein, we describe that neural-crest-derived adult carotid body stem cells (CBSCs are able to undergo endothelial differentiation in addition to their reported role in neurogenesis, contributing to both neurogenic and angiogenic processes taking place in the organ during acclimatization to hypoxia. Moreover, CBSC conversion into vascular cell types is hypoxia inducible factor (HIF dependent and sensitive to hypoxia-released vascular cytokines such as erythropoietin. Our data highlight a remarkable physiological plasticity in an adult population of tissue-specific stem cells and could have impact on the use of these cells for cell therapy.

  8. [Phenotypic plasticity of neural crest-derived melanocytes and Schwann cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupin, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Melanocytes, the pigmented cells of the skin, and the glial Schwann cells lining peripheral nerves are developmentally derived from an early and transient ectodermal structure of the vertebrate embryo, the neural crest, which is also at the origin of multiple neural and non-neural cell types. Besides melanocytes and neural cells of the peripheral nervous system, the neural crest cells give rise to mesenchymal cell types in the head, which form most of the craniofacial skeleton, dermis, fat tissue and vascular musculo-connective components. How such a wide diversity of differentiation fates is established during embryogenesis and is later maintained in adult tissues are among key questions in developmental and stem cell biology. The analysis of the developmental potentials of single neural crest cells cultured in vitro led to characterizing multipotent stem/progenitor cells as well as more restricted precursors in the early neural crest of avian and mammalian embryos. Data support a hierarchical model of the diversification of neural crest lineages through progressive restrictions of multipotent stem cell potentials driven by local environmental factors. In particular, melanocytes and glial Schwann cells were shown to arise from a common bipotent progenitor, which depends upon the peptide endothelin-3 for proliferation and self-renewal ability. In vivo, signaling by endothelin-3 and its receptor is also required for the early development of melanocytes and proper pigmentation of the vertebrate body. It is generally assumed that, after lineage specification and terminal differentiation, specialized cell types, like the melanocytes and Schwann cells, do not change their identity. However, this classic notion that somatic cell differentiation is a stable and irreversible process has been challenged by emerging evidence that dedifferentiation can occur in different biological systems through nuclear transfer, cell fusion, epigenetic modifications and ectopic gene

  9. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived... neural crests http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests.bed ...

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  11. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  15. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  19. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_crests [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. Neural Crest Cells Isolated from the Bone Marrow of Transgenic Mice Express JCV T-Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Gordon

    Full Text Available JC virus (JCV, a common human polyomavirus, is the etiological agent of the demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. In addition to its role in PML, studies have demonstrated the transforming ability of the JCV early protein, T-antigen, and its association with some human cancers. JCV infection occurs in childhood and latent virus is thought to be maintained within the bone marrow, which harbors cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic lineages. Here we show that non-hematopoietic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs isolated from the bone marrow of JCV T-antigen transgenic mice give rise to JCV T-antigen positive cells when cultured under neural conditions. JCV T-antigen positive cells exhibited neural crest characteristics and demonstrated p75, SOX-10 and nestin positivity. When cultured in conditions typical for mesenchymal cells, a population of T-antigen negative cells, which did not express neural crest markers arose from the MSCs. JCV T-antigen positive cells could be cultured long-term while maintaining their neural crest characteristics. When these cells were induced to differentiate into neural crest derivatives, JCV T-antigen was downregulated in cells differentiating into bone and maintained in glial cells expressing GFAP and S100. We conclude that JCV T-antigen can be stably expressed within a fraction of bone marrow cells differentiating along the neural crest/glial lineage when cultured in vitro. These findings identify a cell population within the bone marrow permissible for JCV early gene expression suggesting the possibility that these cells could support persistent viral infection and thus provide clues toward understanding the role of the bone marrow in JCV latency and reactivation. Further, our data provides an excellent experimental model system for studying the cell-type specificity of JCV T-antigen expression, the role of bone marrow-derived stem cells in the pathogenesis of JCV-related diseases

  6. The connections between neural crest development and neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Manrong; Stanke, Jennifer; Lahti, Jill M

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood, is an extremely heterogeneous disease both biologically and clinically. Although significant progress has been made in identifying molecular and genetic markers for NB, this disease remains an enigmatic challenge. Since NB is thought to be an embryonal tumor that is derived from precursor cells of the peripheral (sympathetic) nervous system, understanding the development of normal sympathetic nervous system may highlight abnormal events that contribute to NB initiation. Therefore, this review focuses on the development of the peripheral trunk neural crest, the current understanding of how developmental factors may contribute to NB and on recent advances in the identification of important genetic lesions and signaling pathways involved in NB tumorigenesis and metastasis. Finally, we discuss how future advances in identification of molecular alterations in NB may lead to more effective, less toxic therapies, and improve the prognosis for NB patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  8. Involvement of Neptune in induction of the hatching gland and neural crest in the Xenopus embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauchi, Takayuki; Izutsu, Yumi; Maéno, Mitsugu

    2010-01-01

    Neptune, a Krüppel-like transcription factor, is expressed in various regions of the developing Xenopus embryo and it has multiple functions in the process of development in various organs. In situ hybridization analysis showed that Neptune is expressed in the boundary region between neural and non-neural tissues at the neurula stage, but little is known about the function of Neptune in this region. Here, we examined the expression and function of Neptune in the neural plate border (NPB) in the Xenopus embryo. Depletion of Neptune protein in developing embryos by using antisense MO caused loss of the hatching gland and otic vesicle as well as malformation of neural crest-derived cranial cartilages and melanocytes. Neptune MO also suppressed the expression of hatching gland and neural crest markers such as he, snail2, sox9 and msx1 at the neurula stage. Subsequent experiments showed that Neptune is necessary and sufficient for the differentiation of hatching gland cells and that it is located downstream of pax3 in the signal regulating the differentiation of these cells. Thus, Neptune is a new member of hatching gland specifier and plays a physiological role in determination and specification of multiple lineages derived from the NPB region.

  9. Cadherin-6B undergoes macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis during cranial neural crest cell EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Taneyhill, Lisa A

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for the formation of migratory neural crest cells during development and is co-opted in human diseases such as cancer metastasis. Chick premigratory cranial neural crest cells lose intercellular contacts, mediated in part by Cadherin-6B (Cad6B), migrate extensively, and later form a variety of adult derivatives. Importantly, modulation of Cad6B is crucial for proper neural crest cell EMT. Although Cad6B possesses a long half-life, it is rapidly lost from premigratory neural crest cell membranes, suggesting the existence of post-translational mechanisms during EMT. We have identified a motif in the Cad6B cytoplasmic tail that enhances Cad6B internalization and reduces the stability of Cad6B upon its mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Cad6B is removed from premigratory neural crest cells through cell surface internalization events that include clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Both of these processes are dependent upon the function of dynamin, and inhibition of Cad6B internalization abrogates neural crest cell EMT and migration. Collectively, our findings reveal the significance of post-translational events in controlling cadherins during neural crest cell EMT and migration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K.; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D’Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096717696; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric C; Zon, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly

  11. Neural crest does not contribute to the neck and shoulder in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Henning Epperlein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major step during the evolution of tetrapods was their transition from water to land. This process involved the reduction or complete loss of the dermal bones that made up connections to the skull and a concomitant enlargement of the endochondral shoulder girdle. In the mouse the latter is derived from three separate embryonic sources: lateral plate mesoderm, somites, and neural crest. The neural crest was suggested to sustain the muscle attachments. How this complex composition of the endochondral shoulder girdle arose during evolution and whether it is shared by all tetrapods is unknown. Salamanders that lack dermal bone within their shoulder girdle were of special interest for a possible contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral elements and muscle attachment sites, and we therefore studied them in this context. RESULTS: We grafted neural crest from GFP+ fluorescent transgenic axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum donor embryos into white (d/d axolotl hosts and followed the presence of neural crest cells within the cartilage of the shoulder girdle and the connective tissue of muscle attachment sites of the neck-shoulder region. Strikingly, neural crest cells did not contribute to any part of the endochondral shoulder girdle or to the connective tissue at muscle attachment sites in axolotl. CONCLUSIONS: Our results in axolotl suggest that neural crest does not serve a general function in vertebrate shoulder muscle attachment sites as predicted by the "muscle scaffold theory," and that it is not necessary to maintain connectivity of the endochondral shoulder girdle to the skull. Our data support the possibility that the contribution of the neural crest to the endochondral shoulder girdle, which is observed in the mouse, arose de novo in mammals as a developmental basis for their skeletal synapomorphies. This further supports the hypothesis of an increased neural crest diversification during vertebrate evolution.

  12. Adipose stromal cells contain phenotypically distinct adipogenic progenitors derived from neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Sowa

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs contain phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous subpopulations of cells, but their developmental origin and their relative differentiation potential remain elusive. In the present study, we aimed at investigating how and to what extent the neural crest contributes to ASCs using Cre-loxP-mediated fate mapping. ASCs harvested from subcutaneous fat depots of either adult P0-Cre/or Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-reporter mice contained a few neural crest-derived ASCs (NCDASCs. This subpopulation of cells was successfully expanded in vitro under standard culture conditions and their growth rate was comparable to non-neural crest derivatives. Although NCDASCs were positive for several mesenchymal stem cell markers as non-neural crest derivatives, they exhibited a unique bipolar or multipolar morphology with higher expression of markers for both neural crest progenitors (p75NTR, Nestin, and Sox2 and preadipocytes (CD24, CD34, S100, Pref-1, GATA2, and C/EBP-delta. NCDASCs were able to differentiate into adipocytes with high efficiency but their osteogenic and chondrogenic potential was markedly attenuated, indicating their commitment to adipogenesis. In vivo, a very small proportion of adipocytes were originated from the neural crest. In addition, p75NTR-positive neural crest-derived cells were identified along the vessels within the subcutaneous adipose tissue, but they were negative for mural and endothelial markers. These results demonstrate that ASCs contain neural crest-derived adipocyte-restricted progenitors whose phenotype is distinct from that of non-neural crest derivatives.

  13. A negative modulatory role for rho and rho-associated kinase signaling in delamination of neural crest cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groysman, Maya; Shoval, Irit; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural crest progenitors arise as epithelial cells and then undergo a process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition that precedes the generation of cellular motility and subsequent migration. We aim at understanding the underlying molecular network. Along this line, possible roles of Rho GTPases that act as molecular switches to control a variety of signal transduction pathways remain virtually unexplored, as are putative interactions between Rho proteins and additional known components of this cascade. Results We investigated the role of Rho/Rock signaling in neural crest delamination. Active RhoA and RhoB are expressed in the membrane of epithelial progenitors and are downregulated upon delamination. In vivo loss-of-function of RhoA or RhoB or of overall Rho signaling by C3 transferase enhanced and/or triggered premature crest delamination yet had no effect on cell specification. Consistently, treatment of explanted neural primordia with membrane-permeable C3 or with the Rock inhibitor Y27632 both accelerated and enhanced crest emigration without affecting cell proliferation. These treatments altered neural crest morphology by reducing stress fibers, focal adhesions and downregulating membrane-bound N-cadherin. Reciprocally, activation of endogenous Rho by lysophosphatidic acid inhibited emigration while enhancing the above. Since delamination is triggered by BMP and requires G1/S transition, we examined their relationship with Rho. Blocking Rho/Rock function rescued crest emigration upon treatment with noggin or with the G1/S inhibitor mimosine. In the latter condition, cells emigrated while arrested at G1. Conversely, BMP4 was unable to rescue cell emigration when endogenous Rho activity was enhanced by lysophosphatidic acid. Conclusion Rho-GTPases, through Rock, act downstream of BMP and of G1/S transition to negatively regulate crest delamination by modifying cytoskeleton assembly and intercellular adhesion. PMID:18945340

  14. Methods for Derivation of Multipotent Neural Crest Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration.

  15. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  16. Caldesmon regulates actin dynamics to influence cranial neural crest migration in Xenopus

    OpenAIRE

    Nie, Shuyi; Kee, Yun; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Caldesmon (CaD) is an important actin modulator that associates with actin filaments to regulate cell morphology and motility. Although extensively studied in cultured cells, there is little functional information regarding the role of CaD in migrating cells in vivo. Here we show that nonmuscle CaD is highly expressed in both premigratory and migrating cranial neural crest cells of Xenopus embryos. Depletion of CaD with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides causes cranial neural crest cells t...

  17. Neural crest cell-derived VEGF promotes embryonic jaw extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Anderson, Peter; Kabbara, Samuela; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Schwarz, Quenten

    2015-01-01

    Jaw morphogenesis depends on the growth of Meckel’s cartilage during embryogenesis. However, the cell types and signals that promote chondrocyte proliferation for Meckel’s cartilage growth are poorly defined. Here we show that neural crest cells (NCCs) and their derivatives provide an essential source of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to enhance jaw vascularization and stabilize the major mandibular artery. We further show in two independent mouse models that blood vessels promote Meckel’s cartilage extension. Coculture experiments of arterial tissue with NCCs or chondrocytes demonstrated that NCC-derived VEGF promotes blood vessel growth and that blood vessels secrete factors to instruct chondrocyte proliferation. Computed tomography and X-ray scans of patients with hemifacial microsomia also showed that jaw hypoplasia correlates with mandibular artery dysgenesis. We conclude that cranial NCCs and their derivatives provide an essential source of VEGF to support blood vessel growth in the developing jaw, which in turn is essential for normal chondrocyte proliferation, and therefore jaw extension. PMID:25922531

  18. Neural crest delamination and migration: from epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition to collective cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theveneau, Eric; Mayor, Roberto

    2012-06-01

    After induction and specification in the ectoderm, at the border of the neural plate, the neural crest (NC) population leaves its original territory through a delamination process. Soon afterwards, the NC cells migrate throughout the embryo and colonize a myriad of tissues and organs where they settle and differentiate. The delamination involves a partial or complete epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) regulated by a complex network of transcription factors including several proto-oncogenes. Studying the relationship between these genes at the time of emigration, and their individual or collective impact on cell behavior, provides valuable information about their role in EMT in other contexts such as cancer metastasis. During migration, NC cells are exposed to large number of positive and negative regulators that control where they go by generating permissive and restricted areas and by modulating their motility and directionality. In addition, as most NC cells migrate collectively, cell-cell interactions play a crucial role in polarizing the cells and interpreting external cues. Cell cooperation eventually generates an overall polarity to the population, leading to directional collective cell migration. This review will summarize our current knowledge on delamination, EMT and migration of NC cells using key examples from chicken, Xenopus, zebrafish and mouse embryos. Given the similarities between neural crest migration and cancer invasion, these cells may represent a useful model for understanding the mechanisms of metastasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Motohashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NC cells are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+ cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells.

  20. Mir-29b Mediates the Neural Tube versus Neural Crest Fate Decision during Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Wu, Yukang; Li, Guoping; Ma, Li; Feng, Ke; Guo, Xudong; Jia, Wenwen; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Guang; Li, Ping; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-08-08

    During gastrulation, the neuroectoderm cells form the neural tube and neural crest. The nervous system contains significantly more microRNAs than other tissues, but the role of microRNAs in controlling the differentiation of neuroectodermal cells into neural tube epithelial (NTE) cells and neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unknown. Using embryonic stem cell (ESC) neural differentiation systems, we found that miR-29b was upregulated in NTE cells and downregulated in NCCs. MiR-29b promoted the differentiation of ESCs into NTE cells and inhibited their differentiation into NCCs. Accordingly, the inhibition of miR-29b significantly inhibited the differentiation of NTE cells. A mechanistic study revealed that miR-29b targets DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) to regulate neural differentiation. Moreover, miR-29b mediated the function of Pou3f1, a critical neural transcription factor. Therefore, our study showed that the Pou3f1-miR-29b-Dnmt3a regulatory axis was active at the initial stage of neural differentiation and regulated the determination of cell fate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Skeletogenic fate of zebrafish cranial and trunk neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kague

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a major contributor to the vertebrate craniofacial skeleton, detailed in model organisms through embryological and genetic approaches, most notably in chick and mouse. Despite many similarities between these rather distant species, there are also distinct differences in the contribution of the NC, particularly to the calvariae of the skull. Lack of information about other vertebrate groups precludes an understanding of the evolutionary significance of these differences. Study of zebrafish craniofacial development has contributed substantially to understanding of cartilage and bone formation in teleosts, but there is currently little information on NC contribution to the zebrafish skeleton. Here, we employ a two-transgene system based on Cre recombinase to genetically label NC in the zebrafish. We demonstrate NC contribution to cells in the cranial ganglia and peripheral nervous system known to be NC-derived, as well as to a subset of myocardial cells. The indelible labeling also enables us to determine NC contribution to late-forming bones, including the calvariae. We confirm suspected NC origin of cartilage and bones of the viscerocranium, including cartilages such as the hyosymplectic and its replacement bones (hymandibula and symplectic and membranous bones such as the opercle. The cleithrum develops at the border of NC and mesoderm, and as an ancestral component of the pectoral girdle was predicted to be a hybrid bone composed of both NC and mesoderm tissues. However, we find no evidence of a NC contribution to the cleithrum. Similarly, in the vault of the skull, the parietal bones and the caudal portion of the frontal bones show no evidence of NC contribution. We also determine a NC origin for caudal fin lepidotrichia; the presumption is that these are derived from trunk NC, demonstrating that these cells have the ability to form bone during normal vertebrate development.

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. ADAM10 is essential for cranial neural crest-derived maxillofacial bone development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Yu, E-mail: tanyu2048@163.com; Fu, Runqing, E-mail: furunqing@sjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Jiaqiang, E-mail: liujqmj@163.com; Wu, Yong, E-mail: wyonger@gmail.com; Wang, Bo, E-mail: wb228@126.com; Jiang, Ning, E-mail: 179639060@qq.com; Nie, Ping, E-mail: nieping1011@sina.com; Cao, Haifeng, E-mail: 0412chf@163.com; Yang, Zhi, E-mail: wcums1981@163.com; Fang, Bing, E-mail: fangbing@sjtu.edu.cn

    2016-07-08

    Growth disorders of the craniofacial bones may lead to craniofacial deformities. The majority of maxillofacial bones are derived from cranial neural crest cells via intramembranous bone formation. Any interruption of the craniofacial skeleton development process might lead to craniofacial malformation. A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 plays an essential role in organ development and tissue integrity in different organs. However, little is known about its function in craniofacial bone formation. Therefore, we investigated the role of ADAM10 in the developing craniofacial skeleton, particularly during typical mandibular bone development. First, we showed that ADAM10 was expressed in a specific area of the craniofacial bone and that the expression pattern dynamically changed during normal mouse craniofacial development. Then, we crossed wnt1-cre transgenic mice with adam10-flox mice to generate ADAM10 conditional knockout mice. The stereomicroscopic, radiographic, and von Kossa staining results showed that conditional knockout of ADAM10 in cranial neural crest cells led to embryonic death, craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. Furthermore, we demonstrated that impaired mineralization could be triggered by decreased osteoblast differentiation, increased cell death. Overall, these findings show that ADAM10 plays an essential role in craniofacial bone development. -- Highlights: •We firstly reported that ADAM10 was essentially involved in maxillofacial bone development. •ADAM10 cKO mice present craniofacial dysmorphia and bone defects. •Impaired osteoblast differentiation,proliferation and apoptosis underlie the bone deformity.

  14. Physiological Plasticity of Neural-Crest-Derived Stem Cells in the Adult Mammalian Carotid Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annese, Valentina; Navarro-Guerrero, Elena; Rodríguez-Prieto, Ismael; Pardal, Ricardo

    2017-04-18

    Adult stem cell plasticity, or the ability of somatic stem cells to cross boundaries and differentiate into unrelated cell types, has been a matter of debate in the last decade. Neural-crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) display a remarkable plasticity during development. Whether adult populations of NCSCs retain this plasticity is largely unknown. Herein, we describe that neural-crest-derived adult carotid body stem cells (CBSCs) are able to undergo endothelial differentiation in addition to their reported role in neurogenesis, contributing to both neurogenic and angiogenic processes taking place in the organ during acclimatization to hypoxia. Moreover, CBSC conversion into vascular cell types is hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) dependent and sensitive to hypoxia-released vascular cytokines such as erythropoietin. Our data highlight a remarkable physiological plasticity in an adult population of tissue-specific stem cells and could have impact on the use of these cells for cell therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  16. Evolutionary and Developmental Origins of the Cardiac Neural Crest: Building a Divided Outflow Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyte, Anna L.; Alonzo-Johnsen, Martha; Hutson, Mary R.

    2015-01-01

    The cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs) have played an important role in the evolution and development of the vertebrate cardiovascular system: from reinforcement of the developing aortic arch arteries early in vertebrate evolution, to later orchestration of aortic arch artery remodeling into the great arteries of the heart, and finally outflow tract septation in amniotes. A critical element necessary for the evolutionary advent of outflow tract septation was the co-evolution of the cardiac neural crest cells with the second heart field. This review highlights the major transitions in vertebrate circulatory evolution, explores the evolutionary developmental origins of the CNCCs from the third stream cranial neural crest, and explores candidate signaling pathways in CNCC and outflow tract evolution drawn from our knowledge of DiGeorge Syndrome. PMID:25227322

  17. Wave transmission at low-crested structures using neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosten, R.P.; Peixó Marco, J.; Van der Meer, J.W.; Van Gent, M.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    The European Union funded project DELOS was focused on wave transmission and an extensive database on low-crested rubble mound structures was generated. During DELOS, new empirical wave transmission formulae were derived. These formulae still showed a considerable scatter due to a limited number of

  18. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  19. Pax3 and Hippo Signaling Coordinate Melanocyte Gene Expression in Neural Crest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J. Manderfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Loss of Pax3, a developmentally regulated transcription factor expressed in premigratory neural crest, results in severe developmental defects and embryonic lethality. Although Pax3 mutations produce profound phenotypes, the intrinsic transcriptional activation exhibited by Pax3 is surprisingly modest. We postulated the existence of transcriptional coactivators that function with Pax3 to mediate developmental functions. A high-throughput screen identified the Hippo effector proteins Taz and Yap65 as Pax3 coactivators. Synergistic coactivation of target genes by Pax3-Taz/Yap65 requires DNA binding by Pax3, is Tead independent, and is regulated by Hippo kinases Mst1 and Lats2. In vivo, Pax3 and Yap65 colocalize in the nucleus of neural crest progenitors in the dorsal neural tube. Neural crest deletion of Taz and Yap65 results in embryo-lethal neural crest defects and decreased expression of the Pax3 target gene, Mitf. These results suggest that Pax3 activity is regulated by the Hippo pathway and that Pax factors are Hippo effectors.

  20. A population of caudally migrating cranial neural crest cells: functional and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGonnell, I M; McKay, I J; Graham, A

    2001-08-15

    The deployment of the cranial neural crest is central to the patterning of the skeletomuscular elements of the vertebrate head, with cranial muscles invariably attaching to skeletal elements formed by crest from the same axial level. Here we demonstrate, through gene expression analysis, ablation studies and fate-mapping, the existence of a population of caudally migrating cranial crest that arise from the postotic neural tube. As with the rest of the postotic crest, these cells express the transcription factor Mafb, and this marker can be used to highlight their posterior migration. They pass out between the anterior somite and the otic vesicle, before turning caudally and running along the base of the somites. With long-term fate mapping, we show that these cells migrate to the clavicle and settle at the site of formation of the attachment point for the cleidohyoid muscle. As such, the influence of the cranial neural crest in organising skeletomuscular connectivity seems to extend beyond the head into the trunk. These results are of further importance as they help explain how, even though the pectoral girdle and the skull became physically dissociated during tetrapod evolution, skeletomuscular connectivity has been maintained. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for maintenance but not activation of Pitx2 expression in neural crest during eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Amanda L; Gage, Philip J

    2010-12-01

    Pitx2 is a paired-like homeodomain gene that acts as a key regulator of eye development. Despite its significance, upstream regulation of Pitx2 expression during eye development remains incompletely understood. We use neural crest-specific ablation of Ctnnb1 to demonstrate that canonical Wnt signaling is not required for initial activation of Pitx2 in neural crest. However, canonical Wnt signaling is subsequently required to maintain Pitx2 expression in the neural crest. Eye development in Ctnnb1-null mice appears grossly normal early but significant phenotypes emerge following loss of Pitx2 expression. LEF-1 and β-catenin bind Pitx2 promoter sequences in ocular neural crest, indicating a likely direct effect of canonical Wnt signaling on Pitx2 expression. Combining our data with previous reports, we propose a model wherein a sequential code of retinoic acid followed by canonical Wnt signaling are required for activation and maintenance of Pitx2 expression, respectively. Other key transcription factors in the neural crest, including Foxc1, do not require intact canonical Wnt signaling. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  3. Cranial muscles in amphibians: development, novelties and the role of cranial neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer; Piekarski, Nadine; Olsson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Our research on the evolution of the vertebrate head focuses on understanding the developmental origins of morphological novelties. Using a broad comparative approach in amphibians, and comparisons with the well-studied quail-chicken system, we investigate how evolutionarily conserved or variable different aspects of head development are. Here we review research on the often overlooked development of cranial muscles, and on its dependence on cranial cartilage development. In general, cranial muscle cell migration and the spatiotemporal pattern of cranial muscle formation appears to be very conserved among the few species of vertebrates that have been studied. However, fate-mapping of somites in the Mexican axolotl revealed differences in the specific formation of hypobranchial muscles (tongue muscles) in comparison to the chicken. The proper development of cranial muscles has been shown to be strongly dependent on the mostly neural crest-derived cartilage elements in the larval head of amphibians. For example, a morpholino-based knock-down of the transcription factor FoxN3 in Xenopus laevis has drastic indirect effects on cranial muscle patterning, although the direct function of the gene is mostly connected to neural crest development. Furthermore, extirpation of single migratory streams of cranial neural crest cells in combination with fate-mapping in a frog shows that individual cranial muscles and their neural crest-derived connective tissue attachments originate from the same visceral arch, even when the muscles attach to skeletal components that are derived from a different arch. The same pattern has also been found in the chicken embryo, the only other species that has been thoroughly investigated, and thus might be a conserved pattern in vertebrates that reflects the fundamental nature of a mechanism that keeps the segmental order of the head in place despite drastic changes in adult anatomy. There is a need for detailed comparative fate-mapping of pre

  4. Embryonic requirements for ErbB signaling in neural crest development and adult pigment pattern formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budi, Erine H.; Patterson, Larissa B.; Parichy, David M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertebrate pigment cells are derived from neural crest cells and are a useful system for studying neural crest-derived traits during post-embryonic development. In zebrafish, neural crest-derived melanophores differentiate during embryogenesis to produce stripes in the early larva. Dramatic changes to the pigment pattern occur subsequently during the larva-to-adult transformation, or metamorphosis. At this time, embryonic melanophores are replaced by newly differentiating metamorphic melanophores that form the adult stripes. Mutants with normal embryonic/early larval pigment patterns but defective adult patterns identify factors required uniquely to establish, maintain, or recruit the latent precursors to metamorphic melanophores. We show that one such mutant, picasso, lacks most metamorphic melanophores and results from mutations in the ErbB gene erbb3b, encoding an EGFR-like receptor tyrosine kinase. To identify critical periods for ErbB activities, we treated fish with pharmacological ErbB inhibitors and also knocked-down erbb3b by morpholino injection. These analyses reveal an embryonic critical period for ErbB signaling in promoting later pigment pattern metamorphosis, despite the normal patterning of embryonic/early larval melanophores. We further demonstrate a peak requirement during neural crest migration that correlates with early defects in neural crest pathfinding and peripheral ganglion formation. Finally, we show that erbb3b activities are both autonomous and non-autonomous to the metamorphic melanophore lineage. These data identify a very early, embryonic, requirement for erbb3b in the development of much later metamorphic melanophores, and suggest complex modes by which ErbB signals promote adult pigment pattern development. PMID:18508863

  5. Neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells require Wnt signaling for their development and drive invagination of the telencephalic midline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngshik Choe

    Full Text Available Embryonic neural crest cells contribute to the development of the craniofacial mesenchyme, forebrain meninges and perivascular cells. In this study, we investigated the function of ß-catenin signaling in neural crest cells abutting the dorsal forebrain during development. In the absence of ß-catenin signaling, neural crest cells failed to expand in the interhemispheric region and produced ectopic smooth muscle cells instead of generating dermal and calvarial mesenchyme. In contrast, constitutive expression of stabilized ß-catenin in neural crest cells increased the number of mesenchymal lineage precursors suggesting that ß-catenin signaling is necessary for the expansion of neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, the loss of neural crest-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs leads to failure of telencephalic midline invagination and causes ventricular system defects. This study shows that ß-catenin signaling is required for the switch of neural crest cells to MSCs and mediates the expansion of MSCs to drive the formation of mesenchymal structures of the head. Furthermore, loss of these structures causes striking defects in forebrain morphogenesis.

  6. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M H F; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    2014-08-01

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation of multipotent migratory neural crest cells, which migrate from the neural tube to many regions of the embryo, where they differentiate into various tissues including craniofacial and heart structures. So far, only few CHD7 target genes involved in neural crest cell development have been identified and the role of CHD7 in neural crest cell guidance and the regulation of mesenchymal-epithelial transition are unknown. Therefore, we undertook a genome-wide microarray expression analysis on wild-type and CHD7 deficient (Chd7 (Whi/+) and Chd7 (Whi/Whi)) mouse embryos at day 9.5, a time point of neural crest cell migration. We identified 98 differentially expressed genes between wild-type and Chd7 (Whi/Whi) embryos. Interestingly, many misregulated genes are involved in neural crest cell and axon guidance such as semaphorins and ephrin receptors. By performing knockdown experiments for Chd7 in Xenopus laevis embryos, we found abnormalities in the expression pattern of Sema3a, a protein involved in the pathogenesis of Kallmann syndrome, in vivo. In addition, we detected non-synonymous SEMA3A variations in 3 out of 45 CHD7-negative CHARGE patients. In summary, we discovered for the first time that Chd7 regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance, demonstrating a new aspect in the pathogenesis of CHARGE syndrome. Furthermore, we showed for Sema3a a conserved regulatory mechanism across different species, highlighting its significance during development. Although we postulated that the non-synonymous SEMA3A variants which we found in CHD7-negative CHARGE patients alone are not sufficient to produce the phenotype, we suggest an important modifier role for SEMA3A in the

  7. Conditional beta1-integrin gene deletion in neural crest cells causes severe developmental alterations of the peripheral nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier; Breau, Marie Anne

    2004-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors that are known to interact with the extracellular matrix and to be required for migration, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have generated mice with a neural crest cell-specific deletion of the beta1-integrin gene to analyse the role of beta1-....... There was an almost complete absence of Schwann cells and sensory axon segregation and defective maturation in neuromuscular synaptogenesis. Thus, beta1-integrins are important for the control of embryonic and postnatal peripheral nervous system development....

  8. Making headway: the roles of Hox genes and neural crest cells in craniofacial development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Paul A

    2003-04-14

    Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  9. SOX10-Nano-Lantern Reporter Human iPS Cells; A Versatile Tool for Neural Crest Research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Horikiri

    Full Text Available The neural crest is a source to produce multipotent neural crest stem cells that have a potential to differentiate into diverse cell types. The transcription factor SOX10 is expressed through early neural crest progenitors and stem cells in vertebrates. Here we report the generation of SOX10-Nano-lantern (NL reporter human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS by using CRISPR/Cas9 systems, that are beneficial to investigate the generation and maintenance of neural crest progenitor cells. SOX10-NL positive cells are produced transiently from hiPS cells by treatment with TGFβ inhibitor SB431542 and GSK3 inhibitor CHIR99021. We found that all SOX10-NL-positive cells expressed an early neural crest marker NGFR, however SOX10-NL-positive cells purified from differentiated hiPS cells progressively attenuate their NL-expression under proliferation. We therefore attempted to maintain SOX10-NL-positive cells with additional signaling on the plane and sphere culture conditions. These SOX10-NL cells provide us to investigate mass culture with neural crest cells for stem cell research.

  10. SMAD4-mediated WNT signaling controls the fate of cranial neural crest cells during tooth morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Huang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Xun; Mayo, Julie; Bringas, Pablo; Jiang, Rulang; Wang, Songling; Chai, Yang

    2011-01-01

    TGFβ/BMP signaling regulates the fate of multipotential cranial neural crest (CNC) cells during tooth and jawbone formation as these cells differentiate into odontoblasts and osteoblasts, respectively. The functional significance of SMAD4, the common mediator of TGFβ/BMP signaling, in regulating the fate of CNC cells remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of SMAD4 in regulating the fate of CNC-derived dental mesenchymal cells through tissue-specific inactivation of Smad4. Ablation of Smad4 results in defects in odontoblast differentiation and dentin formation. Moreover, ectopic bone-like structures replaced normal dentin in the teeth of Osr2-IresCre;Smad4fl/fl mice. Despite the lack of dentin, enamel formation appeared unaffected in Osr2-IresCre;Smad4fl/fl mice, challenging the paradigm that the initiation of enamel development depends on normal dentin formation. At the molecular level, loss of Smad4 results in downregulation of the WNT pathway inhibitors Dkk1 and Sfrp1 and in the upregulation of canonical WNT signaling, including increased β-catenin activity. More importantly, inhibition of the upregulated canonical WNT pathway in Osr2-IresCre;Smad4fl/fl dental mesenchyme in vitro partially rescued the CNC cell fate change. Taken together, our study demonstrates that SMAD4 plays a crucial role in regulating the interplay between TGFβ/BMP and WNT signaling to ensure the proper CNC cell fate decision during organogenesis. PMID:21490069

  11. The "domestication syndrome" in mammals: a unified explanation based on neural crest cell behavior and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Adam S; Wrangham, Richard W; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2014-07-01

    Charles Darwin, while trying to devise a general theory of heredity from the observations of animal and plant breeders, discovered that domesticated mammals possess a distinctive and unusual suite of heritable traits not seen in their wild progenitors. Some of these traits also appear in domesticated birds and fish. The origin of Darwin's "domestication syndrome" has remained a conundrum for more than 140 years. Most explanations focus on particular traits, while neglecting others, or on the possible selective factors involved in domestication rather than the underlying developmental and genetic causes of these traits. Here, we propose that the domestication syndrome results predominantly from mild neural crest cell deficits during embryonic development. Most of the modified traits, both morphological and physiological, can be readily explained as direct consequences of such deficiencies, while other traits are explicable as indirect consequences. We first show how the hypothesis can account for the multiple, apparently unrelated traits of the syndrome and then explore its genetic dimensions and predictions, reviewing the available genetic evidence. The article concludes with a brief discussion of some genetic and developmental questions raised by the idea, along with specific predictions and experimental tests. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Rabconnectin-3a regulates vesicle endocytosis and canonical Wnt signaling in zebrafish neural crest migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Tuttle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration requires dynamic regulation of cell-cell signaling and cell adhesion. Both of these processes involve endocytosis, lysosomal degradation, and recycling of ligand-receptor complexes and cell adhesion molecules from the plasma membrane. Neural crest (NC cells in vertebrates are highly migratory cells, which undergo an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT to leave the neural epithelium and migrate throughout the body to give rise to many different derivatives. Here we show that the v-ATPase interacting protein, Rabconnectin-3a (Rbc3a, controls intracellular trafficking events and Wnt signaling during NC migration. In zebrafish embryos deficient in Rbc3a, or its associated v-ATPase subunit Atp6v0a1, many NC cells fail to migrate and misregulate expression of cadherins. Surprisingly, endosomes in Rbc3a- and Atp6v0a1-deficient NC cells remain immature but still acidify. Rbc3a loss-of-function initially downregulates several canonical Wnt targets involved in EMT, but later Frizzled-7 accumulates at NC cell membranes, and nuclear B-catenin levels increase. Presumably due to this later Wnt signaling increase, Rbc3a-deficient NC cells that fail to migrate become pigment progenitors. We propose that Rbc3a and Atp6v0a1 promote endosomal maturation to coordinate Wnt signaling and intracellular trafficking of Wnt receptors and cadherins required for NC migration and cell fate determination. Our results suggest that different v-ATPases and associated proteins may play cell-type-specific functions in intracellular trafficking in many contexts.

  13. Bmps and id2a act upstream of Twist1 to restrict ectomesenchyme potential of the cranial neural crest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Das

    Full Text Available Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs have the remarkable capacity to generate both the non-ectomesenchyme derivatives of the peripheral nervous system and the ectomesenchyme precursors of the vertebrate head skeleton, yet how these divergent lineages are specified is not well understood. Whereas studies in mouse have indicated that the Twist1 transcription factor is important for ectomesenchyme development, its role and regulation during CNCC lineage decisions have remained unclear. Here we show that two Twist1 genes play an essential role in promoting ectomesenchyme at the expense of non-ectomesenchyme gene expression in zebrafish. Twist1 does so by promoting Fgf signaling, as well as potentially directly activating fli1a expression through a conserved ectomesenchyme-specific enhancer. We also show that Id2a restricts Twist1 activity to the ectomesenchyme lineage, with Bmp activity preferentially inducing id2a expression in non-ectomesenchyme precursors. We therefore propose that the ventral migration of CNCCs away from a source of Bmps in the dorsal ectoderm promotes ectomesenchyme development by relieving Id2a-dependent repression of Twist1 function. Together our model shows how the integration of Bmp inhibition at its origin and Fgf activation along its migratory route would confer temporal and spatial specificity to the generation of ectomesenchyme from the neural crest.

  14. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  15. Sphere-Derived Multipotent Progenitor Cells Obtained From Human Oral Mucosa Are Enriched in Neural Crest Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shigehiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sato, Yutaka; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    : Although isolation of oral mucosal stromal stem cells has been previously reported, complex isolation methods are not suitable for clinical application. The neurosphere culture technique is a convenient method for the isolation of neural stem cells and neural crest stem cells (NCSCs); neurosphere generation is a phenotype of NCSCs. However, the molecular details underlying the isolation and characterization of human oral mucosa stromal cells (OMSCs) by neurosphere culture are not understood. The purpose of the present study was to isolate NCSCs from oral mucosa using the neurosphere technique and to establish effective in vivo bone tissue regeneration methods. Human OMSCs were isolated from excised human oral mucosa; these cells formed spheres in neurosphere culture conditions. Oral mucosa sphere-forming cells (OMSFCs) were characterized by biological analyses of stem cells. Additionally, composites of OMSFCs and multiporous polylactic acid scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. OMSFCs had the capacity for self-renewal and expressed neural crest-related markers (e.g., nestin, CD44, slug, snail, and MSX1). Furthermore, upregulated expression of neural crest-related genes (EDNRA, Hes1, and Sox9) was observed in OMSFCs, which are thought to contain an enriched population of neural crest-derived cells. The expression pattern of α2-integrin (CD49b) in OMSFCs also differed from that in OMSCs. Finally, OMSFCs were capable of differentiating into neural crest lineages in vitro and generating ectopic bone tissues even in the subcutaneous region. The results of the present study suggest that OMSFCs are an ideal source of cells for the neural crest lineage and hard tissue regeneration. The sphere culture technique is a convenient method for isolating stem cells. However, the isolation and characterization of human oral mucosa stromal cells (OMSCs) using the sphere culture system are not fully understood. The present study describes the

  16. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development.

  17. Feasibility Study of Canine Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cell Transplantation in the Spinal Cords of Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahill, Barbara G; Spriet, Mathieu; Sisó, Sílvia; Manzer, Michael D; Mitchell, Gaela; McGee, Jeannine; Garcia, Tanya C; Borjesson, Dori L; Sieber-Blum, Maya; Nolta, Jan A; Sturges, Beverly K

    2015-10-01

    This pilot feasibility study aimed to determine the outcome of canine epidermal neural crest stem cell (cEPI-NCSC) grafts in the normal spinal cords of healthy bred-for-research dogs. This included developing novel protocols for (a) the ex vivo expansion of cEPI-NCSCs, (b) the delivery of cEPI-NCSCs into the spinal cord, and (c) the labeling of the cells and subsequent tracing of the graft in the live animal by magnetic resonance imaging. A total of four million cEPI-NCSCs were injected into the spinal cord divided in two locations. Differences in locomotion at baseline and post-treatment were evaluated by gait analysis and compared with neurological outcome and behavioral exams. Histopathological analyses of the spinal cords and cEPI-NCSC grafts were performed at 3 weeks post-transplantation. Neurological and gait parameters were minimally affected by the stem cell injection. cEPI-NCSCs survived in the canine spinal cord for the entire period of investigation and did not migrate or proliferate. Subsets of cEPI-NCSCs expressed the neural crest stem cell marker Sox10. There was no detectable expression of markers for glial cells or neurons. The tissue reaction to the cell graft was predominantly vascular in addition to a degree of reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the present study, we demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC grafts survive in the spinal cords of healthy dogs without major adverse effects. They persist locally in the normal spinal cord, may promote angiogenesis and tissue remodeling, and elicit a tissue response that may be beneficial in patients with spinal cord injury. It has been established that mouse and human epidermal neural crest stem cells are somatic multipotent stem cells with proved innovative potential in a mouse model of spinal cord injury (SCI) offering promise of a valid treatment for SCI. Traumatic SCI is a common neurological problem in dogs with marked similarities, clinically and pathologically, to the syndrome in people

  18. Constitutively active Notch1 converts cranial neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme to perivascular cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie R. Miller

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular/mural cells originate from either the mesoderm or the cranial neural crest. Regardless of their origin, Notch signalling is necessary for their formation. Furthermore, in both chicken and mouse, constitutive Notch1 activation (via expression of the Notch1 intracellular domain is sufficient in vivo to convert trunk mesoderm-derived somite cells to perivascular cells, at the expense of skeletal muscle. In experiments originally designed to investigate the effect of premature Notch1 activation on the development of neural crest-derived olfactory ensheathing glial cells (OECs, we used in ovo electroporation to insert a tetracycline-inducible NotchΔE construct (encoding a constitutively active mutant of mouse Notch1 into the genome of chicken cranial neural crest cell precursors, and activated NotchΔE expression by doxycycline injection at embryonic day 4. NotchΔE-targeted cells formed perivascular cells within the frontonasal mesenchyme, and expressed a perivascular marker on the olfactory nerve. Hence, constitutively activating Notch1 is sufficient in vivo to drive not only somite cells, but also neural crest-derived frontonasal mesenchyme and perhaps developing OECs, to a perivascular cell fate. These results also highlight the plasticity of neural crest-derived mesenchyme and glia.

  19. Sox10-Venus mice: a new tool for real-time labeling of neural crest lineage cells and oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shinsuke; Yasuda, Akimasa; Renault-Mihara, Francois; Suyama, Satoshi; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Takayoshi; Inoue, Yukiko U; Nagoshi, Narihito; Sato, Momoka; Nakamura, Masaya; Akazawa, Chihiro; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-10-31

    While several mouse strains have recently been developed for tracing neural crest or oligodendrocyte lineages, each strain has inherent limitations. The connection between human SOX10 mutations and neural crest cell pathogenesis led us to focus on the Sox10 gene, which is critical for neural crest development. We generated Sox10-Venus BAC transgenic mice to monitor Sox10 expression in both normal development and in pathological processes. Tissue fluorescence distinguished neural crest progeny cells and oligodendrocytes in the Sox10-Venus mouse embryo. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that Venus expression was restricted to cells expressing endogenous Sox10. Time-lapse imaging of various tissues in Sox10-Venus mice demonstrated that Venus expression could be visualized at the single-cell level in vivo due to the intense, focused Venus fluorescence. In the adult Sox10-Venus mouse, several types of mature and immature oligodendrocytes along with Schwann cells were clearly labeled with Venus, both before and after spinal cord injury. In the newly-developed Sox10-Venus transgenic mouse, Venus fluorescence faithfully mirrors endogenous Sox10 expression and allows for in vivo imaging of live cells at the single-cell level. This Sox10-Venus mouse will thus be a useful tool for studying neural crest cells or oligodendrocytes, both in development and in pathological processes.

  20. Sox10-Venus mice: a new tool for real-time labeling of neural crest lineage cells and oligodendrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibata Shinsuke

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While several mouse strains have recently been developed for tracing neural crest or oligodendrocyte lineages, each strain has inherent limitations. The connection between human SOX10 mutations and neural crest cell pathogenesis led us to focus on the Sox10 gene, which is critical for neural crest development. We generated Sox10-Venus BAC transgenic mice to monitor Sox10 expression in both normal development and in pathological processes. Results Tissue fluorescence distinguished neural crest progeny cells and oligodendrocytes in the Sox10-Venus mouse embryo. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that Venus expression was restricted to cells expressing endogenous Sox10. Time-lapse imaging of various tissues in Sox10-Venus mice demonstrated that Venus expression could be visualized at the single-cell level in vivo due to the intense, focused Venus fluorescence. In the adult Sox10-Venus mouse, several types of mature and immature oligodendrocytes along with Schwann cells were clearly labeled with Venus, both before and after spinal cord injury. Conclusions In the newly-developed Sox10-Venus transgenic mouse, Venus fluorescence faithfully mirrors endogenous Sox10 expression and allows for in vivo imaging of live cells at the single-cell level. This Sox10-Venus mouse will thus be a useful tool for studying neural crest cells or oligodendrocytes, both in development and in pathological processes.

  1. Compound developmental eye disorders following inactivation of TGFβ signaling in neural-crest stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suter Ueli

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of the eye depends partly on the periocular mesenchyme derived from the neural crest (NC, but the fate of NC cells in mammalian eye development and the signals coordinating the formation of ocular structures are poorly understood. Results Here we reveal distinct NC contributions to both anterior and posterior mesenchymal eye structures and show that TGFβ signaling in these cells is crucial for normal eye development. In the anterior eye, TGFβ2 released from the lens is required for the expression of transcription factors Pitx2 and Foxc1 in the NC-derived cornea and in the chamber-angle structures of the eye that control intraocular pressure. TGFβ enhances Foxc1 and induces Pitx2 expression in cell cultures. As in patients carrying mutations in PITX2 and FOXC1, TGFβ signal inactivation in NC cells leads to ocular defects characteristic of the human disorder Axenfeld-Rieger's anomaly. In the posterior eye, NC cell-specific inactivation of TGFβ signaling results in a condition reminiscent of the human disorder persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous. As a secondary effect, retinal patterning is also disturbed in mutant mice. Conclusion In the developing eye the lens acts as a TGFβ signaling center that controls the development of eye structures derived from the NC. Defective TGFβ signal transduction interferes with NC-cell differentiation and survival anterior to the lens and with normal tissue morphogenesis and patterning posterior to the lens. The similarity to developmental eye disorders in humans suggests that defective TGFβ signal modulation in ocular NC derivatives contributes to the pathophysiology of these diseases.

  2. Neural Crest Migration and Survival Are Susceptible to Morpholino-Induced Artifacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena F Boer

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a stem cell-like embryonic population that is essential for generating and patterning the vertebrate body, including the craniofacial skeleton and peripheral nervous system. Defects in NC development underlie many birth defects and contribute to formation of some of the most malignant cancers in humans, such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. For these reasons, significant research efforts have been expended to identify genes that control NC development, as it is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of the genetic mechanisms controlling vertebrate development and identify new treatments for NC-derived diseases and cancers. However, a number of inconsistencies regarding gene function during NC development have emerged from comparative analyses of gene function between mammalian and non-mammalian systems (chick, frog, zebrafish. This poses a significant barrier to identification of single genes and/or redundant pathways to target in NC diseases. Here, we determine whether technical differences, namely morpholino-based approaches used in non-mammalian systems, could contribute to these discrepancies, by examining the extent to which NC phenotypes in fascin1a (fscn1a morphant embryos are similar to or different from fscn1a null mutants in zebrafish. Analysis of fscn1a morphants showed that they mimicked early NC phenotypes observed in fscn1a null mutants; however, these embryos also displayed NC migration and derivative phenotypes not observed in null mutants, including accumulation of p53-independent cell death. These data demonstrate that morpholinos can cause seemingly specific NC migration and derivative phenotypes, and thus have likely contributed to the inconsistencies surrounding NC gene function between species. We suggest that comparison of genetic mutants between different species is the most rigorous method for identifying conserved genetic mechanisms controlling NC development and is critical to identify new

  3. Dental anomalies in different cleft groups related to neural crest developmental fields contributes to the understanding of cleft aetiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Louise Claudius; Kjær, Inger; Mølsted, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze dental deviations in three cleft groups and relate findings to embryological neural crest fields (frontonasal, maxillary, and palatal). The overall purpose was to evaluate how fields are involved in different cleft types. DESIGN: Retrospective audit of clinical photographs...... seen significantly more often in cleft palate. Combined cleft lip and palate: Number and type of dental deviations differed significantly from deviations in other cleft types, e.g. significantly more ageneses. CONCLUSIONS: Cleft lip seems to be caused by a disorder in neural crest migration...... to the frontonasal field and cleft palate by a disorder in neural crest migration to the maxillary and palatal fields. Combined cleft lip and palate seems to be caused by a primary early defect in the cranial course and function of the notochord. The dentition was significantly different in the different cleft types...

  4. High glucose environment inhibits cranial neural crest survival by activating excessive autophagy in the chick embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guang; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chuai, Manli; Cao, Liu; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    High glucose levels induced by maternal diabetes could lead to defects in neural crest development during embryogenesis, but the cellular mechanism is still not understood. In this study, we observed a defect in chick cranial skeleton, especially parietal bone development in the presence of high glucose levels, which is derived from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC). In early chick embryo, we found that inducing high glucose levels could inhibit the development of CNCC, however, cell proliferation was not significantly involved. Nevertheless, apoptotic CNCC increased in the presence of high levels of glucose. In addition, the expression of apoptosis and autophagy relevant genes were elevated by high glucose treatment. Next, the application of beads soaked in either an autophagy stimulator (Tunicamycin) or inhibitor (Hydroxychloroquine) functionally proved that autophagy was involved in regulating the production of CNCC in the presence of high glucose levels. Our observations suggest that the ERK pathway, rather than the mTOR pathway, most likely participates in mediating the autophagy induced by high glucose. Taken together, our observations indicated that exposure to high levels of glucose could inhibit the survival of CNCC by affecting cell apoptosis, which might result from the dysregulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26671447

  5. Neural crest cells pattern the surface cephalic ectoderm during FEZ formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S

    2012-04-01

    Multiple fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) ligands are expressed in the forebrain and facial ectoderm, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is expressed in the facial ectoderm. Both pathways activate the MAP kinase cascade and can be suppressed by SU5402. We placed a bead soaked in SU5402 into the brain after emigration of neural crest cells was complete. Within 24 hr we observed reduced pMEK and pERK staining that persisted for at least 48 hr. This was accompanied by significant apoptosis in the face. By day 15, the upper beaks were truncated. Molecular changes in the FNP were also apparent. Normally, Shh is expressed in the frontonasal ectodermal zone and controls patterned growth of the upper jaw. In treated embryos, Shh expression was reduced. Both the structural and molecular deficits were mitigated after transplantation of FNP-derived mesenchymal cells. Thus, mesenchymal cells actively participate in signaling interactions of the face, and the absence of neural crest cells in neurocristopathies may not be merely structural. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Enrichment and Schwann Cell Differentiation of Neural Crest-derived Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zer, Heba; Apel, Christian; Heiland, Max; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Jung, Ole; Kroeger, Nadja; Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Smeets, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    As already described in previous studies, neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can be found in adult human dental pulp. The present study investigated the methodology for enrichment and differentiation-induction of the above mentioned cells. Dental pulp was extracted from human wisdom teeth of four patients and subsequently cultured as explants on fibronectin-coated plates in neurobasal medium supplemented with B27, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, l-glutamine and neuregulin-β1. The cells were then characterized by immunofluorescence, while their differentiation-potential was tested by the attempt to induce cells into different lineages, i.e. osteogenic, melanocytic and glial. The enriched cell population expressed nestin, CD271 and SOX10, which are well-known markers for NCSCs. Consequently, the cells were successfully induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, melanocytes and Schwann cells, expressing the corresponding differentiation markers. Human adult dental pulp contains a population of stem cells with neural crest ontogeny, which can thus be recruited for multiple regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Zebrafish zic2 controls formation of periocular neural crest and choroid fissure morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedykh, Irina; Yoon, Baul; Roberson, Laura; Moskvin, Oleg; Dewey, Colin N; Grinblat, Yevgenya

    2017-09-01

    The vertebrate retina develops in close proximity to the forebrain and neural crest-derived cartilages of the face and jaw. Coloboma, a congenital eye malformation, is associated with aberrant forebrain development (holoprosencephaly) and with craniofacial defects (frontonasal dysplasia) in humans, suggesting a critical role for cross-lineage interactions during retinal morphogenesis. ZIC2, a zinc-finger transcription factor, is linked to human holoprosencephaly. We have previously used morpholino assays to show zebrafish zic2 functions in the developing forebrain, retina and craniofacial cartilage. We now report that zebrafish with genetic lesions in zebrafish zic2 orthologs, zic2a and zic2b, develop with retinal coloboma and craniofacial anomalies. We demonstrate a requirement for zic2 in restricting pax2a expression and show evidence that zic2 function limits Hh signaling. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis identified an early requirement for zic2 in periocular neural crest as an activator of alx1, a transcription factor with essential roles in craniofacial and ocular morphogenesis in human and zebrafish. Collectively, these data establish zic2 mutant zebrafish as a powerful new genetic model for in-depth dissection of cell interactions and genetic controls during craniofacial complex development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural crest cells pattern the surface cephalic ectoderm during FEZ formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Diane; Marcucio, Ralph S.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) ligands are expressed in the forebrain and facial ectoderm, and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is expressed in the facial ectoderm. Both pathways activate the MAP kinase cascade and can be suppressed by SU5402. We placed a bead soaked in SU5402 into the brain after emigration of neural crest cells was complete. Within 24 hours we observed reduced pMEK and pERK staining that persisted for at least 48 hours. This was accompanied by significant apoptosis in the face. By day 15 the upper beaks were truncated. Molecular changes in the FNP were also apparent. Normally, Shh is expressed in the Frontonasal Ectodermal Zone and controls patterned growth of the upper jaw. In treated embryos Shh expression was reduced. Both the structural and molecular deficits were mitigated after transplantation of FNP-derived mesenchymal cells. Thus, mesenchymal cells actively participate in signaling interactions of the face, and the absence of neural crest cells in neurocristopathies may not be merely structural. PMID:22411554

  9. Making Headway: The Roles of Hox Genes and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Trainor

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial development is an extraordinarily complex process requiring the orchestrated integration of multiple specialized tissues such as the surface ectoderm, neural crest, mesoderm, and pharyngeal endoderm in order to generate the central and peripheral nervous systems, axial skeleton, musculature, and connective tissues of the head and face. How do the characteristic facial structures develop in the appropriate locations with their correct shapes and sizes, given the widely divergent patterns of cell movements that occur during head development? The patterning information could depend upon localized interactions between the epithelial and mesenchymal tissues or alternatively, the developmental program for the characteristic facial structures could be intrinsic to each individual tissue precursor. Understanding the mechanisms that control vertebrate head development is an important issue since craniofacial anomalies constitute nearly one third of all human congenital defects. This review discusses recent advances in our understanding of neural crest cell patterning and the dynamic nature of the tissue interactions that are required for normal craniofacial development.

  10. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth exhibit stromal-derived inducing activity and lead to generation of neural crest cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Tanhaei, Somayyeh; Rabiei, Farzaneh; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Masoudi, Najmeh Sadat; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs). These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs) and NCCs. In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA) and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  11. Exploring the developmental mechanisms underlying Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome: Evidence for defects in neural crest cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Erin L; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2016-12-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome (WHS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by mental retardation, craniofacial malformation, and defects in skeletal and heart development. The syndrome is associated with irregularities on the short arm of chromosome 4, including deletions of varying sizes and microduplications. Many of these genotypic aberrations in humans have been correlated with the classic WHS phenotype, and animal models have provided a context for mapping these genetic irregularities to specific phenotypes; however, there remains a significant knowledge gap concerning the cell biological mechanisms underlying these phenotypes. This review summarizes literature that has made recent contributions to this topic, drawing from the vast body of knowledge detailing the genetic particularities of the disorder and the more limited pool of information on its cell biology. Finally, we propose a novel characterization for WHS as a pathophysiology owing in part to defects in neural crest cell motility and migration during development. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo transplantation of fetal human gut-derived enteric neural crest cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J E; Natarajan, D; McCann, C J; Choudhury, S; Godwin, H; Burns, A J; Thapar, N

    2017-01-01

    The prospect of using neural cell replacement for the treatment of severe enteric neuropathies has seen significant progress in the last decade. The ability to harvest and transplant enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) that functionally integrate within recipient intestine has recently been confirmed by in vivo murine studies. Although similar cells can be harvested from human fetal and postnatal gut, no studies have as yet verified their functional viability upon in vivo transplantation. We sought to determine whether ENCCs harvested from human fetal bowel are capable of engraftment and functional integration within recipient intestine following in vivo transplantation into postnatal murine colon. Enteric neural crest cells selected and harvested from fetal human gut using the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) were lentivirally labeled with either GFP or calcium-sensitive GCaMP and transplanted into the hindgut of Rag2(-) /γc(-) /C5(-) -immunodeficient mice at postnatal day 21. Transplanted intestines were assessed immunohistochemically for engraftment and differentiation of donor cells. Functional viability and integration with host neuromusculature was assessed using calcium imaging. Transplanted human fetal gut-derived ENCC showed engraftment within the recipient postnatal colon in 8/15 mice (53.3%). At 4 weeks posttransplantation, donor cells had spread from the site of transplantation and extended projections over distances of 1.2 ± 0.6 mm (n = 5), and differentiated into enteric nervous system (ENS) appropriate neurons and glia. These cells formed branching networks located with the myenteric plexus. Calcium transients (change in intensity F/F0 = 1.25 ± 0.03; 15 cells) were recorded in transplanted cells upon stimulation of the recipient endogenous ENS demonstrating their viability and establishment of functional connections. © 2016 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. The Calcium-Mediated Repression of β-Catenin and Its Transcriptional Signaling Mediates Neural Crest Cell Death in an Avian Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R.; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates a G protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol’s calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol’s repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically-relevant ethanol concentrations (22–78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion and survival. Using forced expression studies we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative TCF) recapitulates ethanol’s effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol’s presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol’s calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol’s repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol’s teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. PMID:21630427

  15. Melanoma Spheroids Grown Under Neural Crest Cell Conditions Are Highly Plastic Migratory/Invasive Tumor Cells Endowed with Immunomodulator Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalou, Claude; Lauden, Laura; Michel, Laurence; de la Grange, Pierre; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Charron, Dominique; Alcaide-Loridan, Catherine; Al-Daccak, Reem

    2011-01-01

    Background The aggressiveness of melanoma tumors is likely to rely on their well-recognized heterogeneity and plasticity. Melanoma comprises multi-subpopulations of cancer cells some of which may possess stem cell-like properties. Although useful, the sphere-formation assay to identify stem cell-like or tumor initiating cell subpopulations in melanoma has been challenged, and it is unclear if this model can predict a functional phenotype associated with aggressive tumor cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the molecular and functional phenotypes of melanoma spheroids formed in neural crest cell medium. Whether from metastatic or advanced primary tumors, spheroid cells expressed melanoma-associated markers. They displayed higher capacity to differentiate along mesenchymal lineages and enhanced expression of SOX2, NANOG, KLF4, and/or OCT4 transcription factors, but not enhanced self-renewal or tumorigenicity when compared to their adherent counterparts. Gene expression profiling attributed a neural crest cell signature to these spheroids and indicated that a migratory/invasive and immune-function modulating program could be associated with these cells. In vitro assays confirmed that spheroids display enhanced migratory/invasive capacities. In immune activation assays, spheroid cells elicited a poorer allogenic response from immune cells and inhibited mitogen-dependent T cells activation and proliferation more efficiently than their adherent counterparts. Our findings reveal a novel immune-modulator function of melanoma spheroids and suggest specific roles for spheroids in invasion and in evasion of antitumor immunity. Conclusion/Significance The association of a more plastic, invasive and evasive, thus a more aggressive tumor phenotype with melanoma spheroids reveals a previously unrecognized aspect of tumor cells expanded as spheroid cultures. While of limited efficiency for melanoma initiating cell identification, our melanoma spheroid model predicted

  16. The Lamprey: A jawless vertebrate model system for examining origin of the neural crest and other vertebrate traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stephen A.; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Lampreys are a group of jawless fishes that serve as an important point of comparison for studies of vertebrate evolution. Lampreys and hagfishes are agnathan fishes, the cyclostomes, which sit at a crucial phylogenetic position as the only living sister group of the jawed vertebrates. Comparisons between cyclostomes and jawed vertebrates can help identify shared derived (i.e. synapomorphic) traits that might have been inherited from ancestral early vertebrates, if unlikely to have arisen convergently by chance. One example of a uniquely vertebrate trait is the neural crest, an embryonic tissue that produces many cell types crucial to vertebrate features, such as the craniofacial skeleton, pigmentation of the skin, and much of the peripheral nervous system (Gans and Northcutt, 1983). Invertebrate chordates arguably lack unambiguous neural crest homologs, yet have cells with some similarities, making comparisons with lampreys and jawed vertebrates essential for inferring characteristics of development in early vertebrates, and how they may have evolved from nonvertebrate chordates. Here we review recent research on cyclostome neural crest development, including research on lamprey gene regulatory networks and differentiated neural crest fates. PMID:24560767

  17. Neural crest-derived cells with stem cell features can be traced back to multiple lineages in the adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Wong (Christine); S. Paratore (Sabrina); M.T. Dours-Zimmermann (María); T. Rochat (Thierry); T. Pietri (Thomas); U. Suter (Ueli); D. Zimmermann (Dieter); S. Dufour (Sylvie); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); D.N. Meijer (Dies); C. Beermann (Christopher); Y. Barrandon (Yann); L. Sommer (Lukas)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGiven their accessibility, multipotent skin-derived cells might be useful for future cell replacement therapies. We describe the isolation of multipotent stem cell-like cells from the adult trunk skin of mice and humans that express the neural crest stem cell markers p75 and Sox10 and

  18. CHARGE syndrome modeling using patient-iPSCs reveals defective migration of neural crest cells harboring CHD7 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuno, Hironobu; Renault Mihara, Francois; Ohta, Shigeki; Fukuda, Kimiko; Kurosawa, Kenji; Akamatsu, Wado; Sanosaka, Tsukasa; Kohyama, Jun; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Nakajima, Kazunori; Takahashi, Takao; Wysocka, Joanna; Kosaki, Kenjiro; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-11-28

    CHARGE syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the chromatin remodeler, CHD7, and is characterized by a set of malformations that, on clinical grounds, were historically postulated to arise from defects in neural crest formation during embryogenesis. To better delineate neural crest defects in CHARGE syndrome, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from two patients with typical syndrome manifestations, and characterized neural crest cells differentiated in vitro from these iPSCs (iPSC-NCCs). We found that expression of genes associated with cell migration was altered in CHARGE iPSC-NCCs compared to control iPSC-NCCs. Consistently, CHARGE iPSC-NCCs showed defective delamination, migration and motility in vitro, and their transplantation in ovo revealed overall defective migratory activity in the chick embryo. These results support the historical inference that CHARGE syndrome patients exhibit defects in neural crest migration, and provide the first successful application of patient-derived iPSCs in modeling craniofacial disorders.

  19. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

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    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  20. Genomic factors that shape craniofacial outcome and neural crest vulnerability in FASD

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    Susan M. Smith

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE causes distinctive facial characteristics in some pregnancies and not others; genetic factors may contribute to this differential vulnerability. Ethanol disrupts multiple events of neural crest development including induction, survival, migration, and differentiation. Animal models and genomic approaches have substantially advanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying these facial changes. PAE during gastrulation produces craniofacial changes corresponding with human fetal alcohol syndrome. These result because PAE reduces prechordal plate extension and suppresses sonic hedgehog, leading to holoprosencephaly and malpositioned facial primordia. Haploinsufficiency in sonic hedgehog signaling increases vulnerability to facial deficits and may influence some PAE pregnancies. In contrast, PAE during early neurogenesis produces facial hypoplasia, preceded by neural crest reductions due to significant apoptosis. Factors mediating this apoptosis include intracellular calcium mobilization, elevated reactive oxygen species, and loss of trophic support from β-catenin/calcium, sonic hedgehog, and mTOR signaling. Genomewide SNP analysis links PDGF receptor genes with facial outcomes in human PAE. Multiple genomic-level comparisons of ethanol-sensitive and –resistant early embryos, in both mouse and chick, independently identify common candidate genes that may potentially modify craniofacial vulnerability, including ribosomal proteins, proteosome, RNA splicing, and focal adhesion. In summary, research using animal models with genome-level differences in ethanol vulnerability, as well as targeted loss- and gain-of-function mutants, has clarified the mechanisms mediating craniofacial change in PAE. The findings additionally suggest that craniofacial deficits may represent a gene-ethanol interaction for some affected individuals. Genetic-level changes may prime individuals toward greater sensitivity or resistance to

  1. Oxidative stress during diabetic pregnancy disrupts cardiac neural crest migration and causes outflow tract defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sarah C; Relaix, Frédéric; Sandell, Lisa L; Loeken, Mary R

    2008-06-01

    Maternal diabetes increases risk for congenital malformations, particularly cardiac outflow tract defects. Maternal diabetes inhibits expression of Pax3 in neuroepithelium through hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. The neuroepithelium gives rise to the neural crest, and Pax3 expression in cardiac neural crest (CNC) is required for CNC migration to the heart and for outflow tract septation. Here we tested whether maternal diabetes, through hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, before the onset of CNC delamination, impairs CNC migration and cardiac outflow tract septation. CNC migration was mapped in mouse embryos whose mothers were diabetic, or transiently hyperglycemic, or in which oxidative stress was transiently induced, using reporters linked to Pax3 expression. CNC apoptosis was examined by TUNEL assay. Outflow tract septation was examined histologically and by gross inspection. Few, if any, migrating CNC cells were observed in embryos of diabetic mice, and this was associated with increased apoptosis along the path of CNC migration. Outflow tract defects were significantly increased in fetuses of diabetic mice. Notably, induction of hyperglycemia or oxidative stress on the day prior to the onset of Pax3 expression and CNC migration also impaired CNC migration, increased apoptosis, and caused outflow tract defects. However, antioxidants administered on the day prior to the onset of Pax3 expression and CNC migration prevented these effects of hyperglycemia or oxidative stress. In diabetic pregnancy, oxidative stress, which inhibits expression of genes required for CNC viability, causes subsequent CNC depletion by apoptosis during migration, which leads to outflow tract defects. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Impairment of human neural crest cell migration by prolonged exposure to interferon-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallocca, Giorgia; Nyffeler, Johanna; Dolde, Xenia; Grinberg, Marianna; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Waldmann, Tanja; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Sachinidis, Agapios; Leist, Marcel

    2017-10-01

    Human cell-based toxicological assays have been used successfully to detect known toxicants, and to distinguish them from negative controls. However, there is at present little experience on how to deal with hits from screens of compounds with yet unknown hazard. As a case study to this issue, we characterized human interferon-beta (IFNβ) as potential developmental toxicant affecting neural crest cells (NCC). The protein was identified as a hit during a screen of clinically used drugs in the 'migration inhibition of neural crest' (MINC) assay. Concentration-response studies in the MINC combined with immunocytochemistry and mRNA quantification of cellular markers showed that IFNβ inhibited NCC migration at concentrations as low as 20 pM. The effective concentrations found here correspond to levels found in human plasma, and they were neither cytostatic nor cytotoxic nor did they did they affect the differentiation state and overall phenotype of NCC. Data from two other migration assays confirmed that picomolar concentration of IFNβ reduced the motility of NCC, while other interferons were less potent. The activation of JAK kinase by IFNβ, as suggested by bioinformatics analysis of the transcriptome changes, was confirmed by biochemical methods. The degree and duration of pathway activation correlated with the extent of migration inhibition, and pharmacological block of this signaling pathway before, or up to 6 h after exposure to the cytokine prevented the effects of IFNβ on migration. Thus, the reduction of vital functions of human NCC is a hitherto unknown potential hazard of endogenous or pharmacologically applied interferons.

  3. Phosphorylation of Sox9 is required for neural crest delamination and is regulated downstream of BMP and canonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jessica A J; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Yan, Carol H; Chau, Bolton K H; So, Henry; Ng, Alvis; Chan, Alan; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Briscoe, James; Cheung, Martin

    2013-02-19

    Coordination of neural crest cell (NCC) induction and delamination is orchestrated by several transcription factors. Among these, Sry-related HMG box-9 (Sox9) and Snail2 have been implicated in both the induction of NCC identity and, together with phoshorylation, NCC delamination. How phosphorylation effects this function has not been clear. Here we show, in the developing chick neural tube, that phosphorylation of Sox9 on S64 and S181 facilitates its SUMOylation, and the phosphorylated forms of Sox9 are essential for trunk neural crest delamination. Both phosphorylation and to a lesser extent SUMOylation, of Sox9 are required to cooperate with Snail2 to promote delamination. Moreover, bone morphogenetic protein and canonical Wnt signaling induce phosphorylation of Sox9, thereby connecting extracellular signals with the delamination of NCCs. Together the data suggest a model in which extracellular signals initiate phosphorylation of Sox9 and its cooperation with Snail2 to induce NCC delamination.

  4. Stephen L. Gans Distinguished Overseas Lecture. The neural crest in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Juan A

    2007-06-01

    This review highlights the relevance of the neural crest (NC) as a developmental control mechanism involved in several pediatric surgical conditions and the investigative interest of following some of its known signaling pathways. The participation of the NC in facial clefts, ear defects, branchial fistulae and cysts, heart outflow tract and aortic arch anomalies, pigmentary disorders, abnormal enteric innervation, neural tumors, hemangiomas, and vascular anomalies is briefly reviewed. Then, the literature on clinical and experimental esophageal atresia-tracheoesophageal fistula (EA-TEF) and congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is reviewed for the presence of associated NC defects. Finally, some of the molecular signaling pathways involved in both conditions (sonic hedgehog, Hox genes, and retinoids) are summarized. The association of facial, cardiovascular, thymic, parathyroid, and C-cell defects together with anomalies of extrinsic and intrinsic esophageal innervation in babies and/or animals with both EA-TEF and CDH strongly supports the hypothesis that NC is involved in the pathogenesis of these malformative clusters. On the other hand, both EA-TEF and CDH are observed in mice mutant for genes involved in the previously mentioned signaling pathways. The investigation of NC-related molecular pathogenic pathways involved in malformative associations like EA-TEF and CDH that are induced by chromosomal anomalies, chemical teratogens, and engineered mutations is a promising way of clarifying why and how some pediatric surgical conditions occur. Pediatric surgeons should be actively involved in these investigations.

  5. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting of EGFP-Labeled Neural Crest Cells From Murine Embryonic Craniofacial Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Singh

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available During the early stages of embryogenesis, pluripotent neural crest cells (NCC are known to migrate from the neural folds to populate multiple target sites in the embryo where they differentiate into various derivatives, including cartilage, bone, connective tissue, melanocytes, glia, and neurons of the peripheral nervous system. The ability to obtain pure NCC populations is essential to enable molecular analyses of neural crest induction, migration, and/or differentiation. Crossing Wnt1-Cre and Z/EG transgenic mouse lines resulted in offspring in which the Wnt1-Cre transgene activated permanent EGFP expression only in NCC. The present report demonstrates a flow cytometric method to sort and isolate populations of EGFP-labeled NCC. The identity of the sorted neural crest cells was confirmed by assaying expression of known marker genes by TaqMan Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QRT-PCR. The molecular strategy described in this report provides a means to extract intact RNA from a pure population of NCC thus enabling analysis of gene expression in a defined population of embryonic precursor cells critical to development.

  6. [Retinoic acid signal pathway regulation of zebra fish tooth development through manipulation of the differentiation of neural crest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Huang, Xing; Xu, Zhiyun; Yang, Deqin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the mechanism of retinoic acid (RA) signal in dental evolution, RA is used to explore the influence of the mechanism on neural crest's migration during the early stage of zebra fish embryos. We divided embryos of wild type and transgenic line zebra fish into three groups. 1 x 10(-7) to 6 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1) RA and 1 x 10(-7) mo x L(-1) 4-diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) were added into egg water at 24 hpf for 9 h. Dimethyl sulfoxid (DMSO) with the concentration was used as control group. Then, antisense probes of dlx2a, dlx2b, and barxl were formulated to perform whole-mount in situ hybridization to check the expressions of the genes in 48 hpf to 72 hpf embryos. We observed fluorescence of transgenic line in 4 dpf embryos. We obtained three mRNA probes successfully. Compared with DMSO control group, a low concentration (1 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1)) of RA could up-regulate the expression of mRNA (barx1, dlx2a) in neural crest. Obvious migration trend was observed toward the pharyngeal arch in which teeth adhered. Transgenic fish had spreading fluorescence tendency in pharyngeal arch. However, a high concentration (4 x 10(-7) mol x L(-1)) of RA malformed the embryos and killed them after treatment. One third of the embryos of middle concentration (3 x 10(-7) mo x L(-1)) exhibited delayed development. DEAB resulted in neural crest dysplasia. The expression of barxl and dlx2a were suppressed, and the appearance of dlx2b in tooth was delayed. RA signal pathway can regulate the progenitors of tooth by controlling the growth of the neural crest and manipulating tooth development

  7. Asymmetric localization of DLC1 defines avian trunk neural crest polarity for directional delamination and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jessica Aijia; Rao, Yanxia; Cheung, May Pui Lai; Hui, Man-Ning; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Chan, Lo-Kong; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin; Niu, Ben; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Sharma, Rakesh; Hodgson, Louis; Cheung, Martin

    2017-10-30

    Following epithelial-mesenchymal transition, acquisition of avian trunk neural crest cell (NCC) polarity is prerequisite for directional delamination and migration, which in turn is essential for peripheral nervous system development. However, how this cell polarization is established and regulated remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that, using the RHOA biosensor in vivo and in vitro, the initiation of NCC polarization is accompanied by highly activated RHOA in the cytoplasm at the cell rear and its fluctuating activity at the front edge. This differential RHOA activity determines polarized NC morphology and motility, and is regulated by the asymmetrically localized RhoGAP Deleted in liver cancer (DLC1) in the cytoplasm at the cell front. Importantly, the association of DLC1 with NEDD9 is crucial for its asymmetric localization and differential RHOA activity. Moreover, NC specifiers, SOX9 and SOX10, regulate NEDD9 and DLC1 expression, respectively. These results present a SOX9/SOX10-NEDD9/DLC1-RHOA regulatory axis to govern NCC migratory polarization.

  8. Are neural crest stem cells the missing link between hematopoietic and neurogenic niches?

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    Cécile eCoste

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic niches are defined as cellular and molecular microenvironments that regulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC function together with stem cell autonomous mechanisms. Many different cell types have been characterized as contributors to the formation of HSC niches, such as osteoblasts, endothelial cells, Schwann cells, and mesenchymal progenitors. These mesenchymal progenitors have themselves been classified as CXC chemokine ligand (CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR cells, stem cell factor expressing cells, or nestin-positive mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, which have been recently identified as neural crest-derived cells (NCSCs. Together, these cells are spatially associated with HSCs and believed to provide appropriate microenvironments for HSC self-renewal, differentiation, mobilization and hibernation both by cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors. Interestingly, it appears that regulatory pathways governing the hematopoietic niche homeostasis are operating in the neurogenic niche as well. Therefore, this review paper aims to compare both the regulation of hematopoietic and neurogenic niches, in order to highlight the role of NCSCs and nervous system components in the development and the regulation of the hematopoietic system.

  9. Sox2 acts as a rheostat of epithelial to mesenchymal transition during neural crest development

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    Nikolaos eMandalos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise control of self-renewal and differentiation of progenitor cells into the cranial neural crest (CNC pool ensures proper head development, guided by signaling pathways such as BMPs, FGFs, Shh and Notch. Here, we show that murine Sox2 plays an essential role in controlling progenitor cell behavior during craniofacial development. A Conditional by Inversion Sox2 allele (Sox2COIN has been employed to generate an epiblast ablation of Sox2 function (Sox2EpINV. Sox2EpINV/+(H haploinsufficient and conditional (Sox2EpINV/mosaic mutant embryos proceed beyond gastrulation and die around E11. These mutant embryos exhibit severe anterior malformations, with hydrocephaly and frontonasal truncations, which could be attributed to the deregulation of CNC progenitor cells during their epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This irregularity results in an exacerbated and aberrant migration of Sox10+ NCC in the branchial arches and frontonasal process of the Sox2 mutant embryos. These results suggest a novel role for Sox2 as a regulator of the epithelial to mesenchymal transitions that are important for the cell flow in the developing head.

  10. Prospect of Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells in Clinical Application

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    Qian Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs represent a transient and multipotent cell population that contributes to numerous anatomical structures such as peripheral nervous system, teeth, and cornea. NCSC maldevelopment is related to various human diseases including pigmentation abnormalities, disorders affecting autonomic nervous system, and malformations of teeth, eyes, and hearts. As human pluripotent stem cells including human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs can serve as an unlimited cell source to generate NCSCs, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs can be a valuable tool to study the underlying mechanisms of NCSC-associated diseases, which paves the way for future therapies for these abnormalities. In addition, hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs with the capability of differentiating to various cell types are highly promising for clinical organ repair and regeneration. In this review, we first discuss NCSC generation methods from human pluripotent stem cells and differentiation mechanism of NCSCs. Then we focus on the clinical application potential of hESC/hiPSC-derived NCSCs on peripheral nerve injuries, corneal blindness, tooth regeneration, pathological melanogenesis, Hirschsprung disease, and cardiac repair and regeneration.

  11. Alcohol exposure induces chick craniofacial bone defects by negatively affecting cranial neural crest development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Wang, Guang; Lin, Zhuangling; Wu, Yushi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Meng; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Chuai, Manli; Yang, Xuesong

    2017-11-05

    Excess alcohol consumption during pregnancy could lead to fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). However, the molecular mechanism leading to craniofacial abnormality, a feature of FAS, is still poorly understood. The cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) contribute to the formation of the craniofacial bones. Therefore, NCCs exposed to ethanol was investigated - using chick embryos and in vitro explant culture as experimental models. We demonstrated that exposure to 2% ethanol induced craniofacial defects, which includes parietal defect, in the developing chick fetus. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that ethanol treatment downregulated Ap-2ɑ, Pax7 and HNK-1 expressions by cranial NCCs. Using double-immunofluorescent stainings for Ap-2ɑ/pHIS3 and Ap-2ɑ/c-Caspase3, we showed that ethanol treatment inhibited cranial NCC proliferation and increased NCC apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, ethanol treatment of the dorsal neuroepithelium increased Laminin, N-Cadherin and Cadherin 6B expressions while Cadherin 7 expression was repressed. In situ hybridization also revealed that ethanol treatment up-regulated Cadherin 6B expression but down-regulated slug, Msx1, FoxD3 and BMP4 expressions. In summary, our experimental results demonstrated that ethanol treatment interferes with the production of cranial NCCs by affecting the proliferation and apoptosis of these cells. In addition, ethanol affected the delamination, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration of cranial NCCs, which may have contributed to the etiology of the craniofacial defects. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. UTX-guided neural crest function underlies craniofacial features of Kabuki syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpargel, Karl B; Starmer, Joshua; Wang, Chaochen; Ge, Kai; Magnuson, Terry

    2017-10-24

    Kabuki syndrome, a congenital craniofacial disorder, manifests from mutations in an X-linked histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase (UTX/KDM6A) or a H3 lysine 4 methylase (KMT2D). However, the cellular and molecular etiology of histone-modifying enzymes in craniofacial disorders is unknown. We now establish Kabuki syndrome as a neurocristopathy, whereby the majority of clinical features are modeled in mice carrying neural crest (NC) deletion of UTX, including craniofacial dysmorphism, cardiac defects, and postnatal growth retardation. Female UTX NC knockout (FKO) demonstrates enhanced phenotypic severity over males (MKOs), due to partial redundancy with UTY, a Y-chromosome demethylase-dead homolog. Thus, NC cells may require demethylase-independent UTX activity. Consistently, Kabuki causative point mutations upstream of the JmjC domain do not disrupt UTX demethylation. We have isolated primary NC cells at a phenocritical postmigratory timepoint in both FKO and MKO mice, and genome-wide expression and histone profiling have revealed UTX molecular function in establishing appropriate chromatin structure to regulate crucial NC stem-cell signaling pathways. However, the majority of UTX regulated genes do not experience aberrations in H3K27me3 or H3K4me3, implicating alternative roles for UTX in transcriptional control. These findings are substantiated through demethylase-dead knockin mutation of UTX, which supports appropriate facial development. Published under the PNAS license.

  13. Cardio-cephalic neural crest syndrome: A novel hypothesis of vascular neurocristopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, M

    2017-12-01

    A novel hypothesis proposes that "cardio-cephalic neural crest (NC) syndrome," i.e. cephalic NC including cardiac NC, contributes to the concurrent occurrence of vascular diseases in the cardio- and cerebrovascular regions. NC is a transient structure present in early embryogenesis. Cephalic NC provides mesenchymal cells to the vascular media in these regions. Concurrent cardio- and cerebrovascular lesions have been reported in PHACE syndrome, ACTA2 mutation syndrome, and less frequently in the spontaneous occlusion of the circle of Willis (so-called moyamoya disease). Cardiovascular lesions in these syndromes include coarctation of the aorta, persistent truncus arteriosus, patent ductus arteriosus, and coronary artery disease, and cerebrovascular lesions include agenesis and stenosis/occlusion of the internal carotid arteries, and moyamoya phenomenon. These concurrent vascular lesions both in the cardio- and cerebrovascular regions might be related to cephalic NC. This hypothesis, although not proven, may facilitate a better understanding of the above-mentioned NC-related vascular pathologies and lead to appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for clinicians and chart future direction for researchers.

  14. Depletion of Neural Crest-Derived Cells Leads to Reduction in Plasma Noradrenaline and Alters B Lymphopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunokuma, Naoki; Yamane, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Tsuneto, Motokazu; Isono, Kana; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells and their lymphoid progenitors are supported by the bone marrow (BM) microenvironmental niches composed of various stromal cells and Schwann cells and sympathetic nerve fibers. Although neural crest (NC) cells contribute to the development of all the three, their function in BM is not well understood. In this study, NC-derived cells were ablated with diphtheria toxin in double-transgenic mice expressing NC-specific Cre and Cre-driven diphtheria toxin receptor with yellow fluorescent protein reporter. We found that yellow fluorescent protein-expressing, NC-derived nonhematopoietic cells in BM expressed hematopoietic factors Cxcl12 and stem cell factor The ablation of NC-derived cells led to a significant decrease in B cell progenitors but not in hematopoietic stem cells or myeloid lineage cells in BM. Interestingly, plasma noradrenaline was markedly decreased in these mice. The i.p. administration of 6-hydroxydopamine, a known neurotoxin for noradrenergic neurons, led to a similar phenotype, whereas the administration of a noradrenaline precursor in NC-ablated mice partially rescued this phenotype. Additionally, the continuous administration of adrenergic receptor β antagonists partially decreased the number of B cell progenitors while preserving B lymphopoiesis in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that NC-derived cell depletion leads to abnormal B lymphopoiesis partially through decreased plasma noradrenaline, suggesting this as a novel mechanism regulated by molecules released by the sympathetic neurons. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. The “Domestication Syndrome” in Mammals: A Unified Explanation Based on Neural Crest Cell Behavior and Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Adam S.; Wrangham, Richard W.; Fitch, W. Tecumseh

    2014-01-01

    Charles Darwin, while trying to devise a general theory of heredity from the observations of animal and plant breeders, discovered that domesticated mammals possess a distinctive and unusual suite of heritable traits not seen in their wild progenitors. Some of these traits also appear in domesticated birds and fish. The origin of Darwin’s “domestication syndrome” has remained a conundrum for more than 140 years. Most explanations focus on particular traits, while neglecting others, or on the possible selective factors involved in domestication rather than the underlying developmental and genetic causes of these traits. Here, we propose that the domestication syndrome results predominantly from mild neural crest cell deficits during embryonic development. Most of the modified traits, both morphological and physiological, can be readily explained as direct consequences of such deficiencies, while other traits are explicable as indirect consequences. We first show how the hypothesis can account for the multiple, apparently unrelated traits of the syndrome and then explore its genetic dimensions and predictions, reviewing the available genetic evidence. The article concludes with a brief discussion of some genetic and developmental questions raised by the idea, along with specific predictions and experimental tests. PMID:25024034

  16. Design of a high-throughput human neural crest cell migration assay to indicate potential developmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyffeler, Johanna; Karreman, Christiaan; Leisner, Heidrun; Kim, Yong Jun; Lee, Gabsang; Waldmann, Tanja; Leist, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Migration of neural crest cells (NCCs) is one of the pivotal processes of human fetal development. Malformations arise if NCC migration and differentiation are impaired genetically or by toxicants. In the currently available test systems for migration inhibition of NCC (MINC), the manual generation of a cell-free space results in extreme operator dependencies, and limits throughput. Here a new test format was established. The assay avoids scratching by plating cells around a commercially available circular stopper. Removal of the stopper barrier after cell attachment initiates migration. This microwell-based circular migration zone NCC function assay (cMINC) was further optimized for toxicological testing of human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived NCCs. The challenge of obtaining data on viability and migration by automated image processing was addressed by developing a freeware. Data on cell proliferation were obtained by labelling replicating cells, and by careful assessment of cell viability for each experimental sample. The role of cell proliferation as an experimental confounder was tested experimentally by performing the cMINC in the presence of the proliferation-inhibiting drug cytosine arabinoside (AraC), and by a careful evaluation of mitotic events over time. Data from these studies led to an adaptation of the test protocol, so that toxicant exposure was limited to 24 h. Under these conditions, a prediction model was developed that allows classification of toxicants as either inactive, leading to unspecific cytotoxicity, or specifically inhibiting NC migration at non-cytotoxic concentrations.

  17. Derivation of corneal endothelial cell-like cells from rat neural crest cells in vitro.

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    Chengqun Ju

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing rat neural crest cells (NCC to differentiate to functional corneal endothelial cell (CEC-like cells in vitro. Rat NCC were induced with adult CEC-derived conditioned medium. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real time RT-PCR assay were used to detect expression of the corneal endothelium differentiation marker N-cadherin and transcription factors FoxC1 and Pitx2. CFDA SE-labeled CEC-like cells were transplanted to the corneal endothelium of a rat corneal endothelium deficiency model, and an eye-down position was maintained for 24 hours to allow cell attachment. The animals were observed for as long as 2 months after surgery and underwent clinical and histological examination. Spindle-like NCC turned to polygonal CEC-like after induction and expressed N-cadherin, FoxC1, Pitx2, zonula occludens-1 and sodium-potassium pump Na(+/K(+ ATPase. The corneas of the experimental group were much clearer than those of the control group and the mean corneal thickness in the experimental group was significantly less than in the control group7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery. Confocal microscopy through focusing and histological analysis confirmed that green fluorescence-positive CEC-like cells formed a monolayer covering the Descemet's membrane in the experimental group. In conclusion, CEC-like cells derived from NCCs displayed characters of native CEC, and the induction protocol provides guidance for future human CEC induction from NCC.

  18. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The dual origin of the peripheral olfactory system: placode and neural crest

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    Katoh Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The olfactory epithelium (OE has a unique capacity for continuous neurogenesis, extending axons to the olfactory bulb with the assistance of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs. The OE and OECs have been believed to develop solely from the olfactory placode, while the neural crest (NC cells have been believed to contribute only the underlying structural elements of the olfactory system. In order to further elucidate the role of NC cells in olfactory development, we examined the olfactory system in the transgenic mice Wnt1-Cre/Floxed-EGFP and P0-Cre/Floxed-EGFP, in which migrating NC cells and its descendents permanently express GFP, and conducted transposon-mediated cell lineage tracing studies in chick embryos. Results Examination of these transgenic mice revealed GFP-positive cells in the OE, demonstrating that NC-derived cells give rise to OE cells with morphologic and antigenic properties identical to placode-derived cells. OECs were also positive for GFP, confirming their NC origin. Cell lineage tracing studies performed in chick embryos confirmed the migration of NC cells into the OE. Furthermore, spheres cultured from the dissociated cells of the olfactory mucosa demonstrated self-renewal and trilineage differentiation capacities (neurons, glial cells, and myofibroblasts, demonstrating the presence of NC progenitors in the olfactory mucosa. Conclusion Our data demonstrates that the NC plays a larger role in the development of the olfactory system than previously believed, and suggests that NC-derived cells may in part be responsible for the remarkable capacity of the OE for neurogenesis and regeneration.

  20. Cranial neural crest contributes to the bony skull vault in adult Xenopus laevis: insights from cell labeling studies.

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    Gross, Joshua B; Hanken, James

    2005-03-15

    As a step toward resolving the developmental origin of the ossified skull in adult anurans, we performed a series of cell labeling and grafting studies of the cranial neural crest (CNC) in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We employ an indelible, fixative-stable fluorescent dextran as a cell marker to follow migration of the three embryonic streams of cranial neural crest and to directly assess their contributions to the bony skull vault, which forms weeks after hatching. The three streams maintain distinct boundaries in the developing embryo. Their cells proliferate widely through subsequent larval (tadpole) development, albeit in regionally distinct portions of the head. At metamorphosis, each stream contributes to the large frontoparietal bone, which is the primary constituent of the skull vault in adult anurans. The streams give rise to regionally distinct portions of the bone, thereby preserving their earlier relative position anteroposteriorly within the embryonic neural ridge. These data, when combined with comparable experimental observations from other model species, provide insights into the ancestral pattern of cranial development in tetrapod vertebrates as well as the origin of differences reported between birds and mammals. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Epigenetic marks define the lineage and differentiation potential of two distinct neural crest-derived intermediate odontogenic progenitor populations.

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    Gopinathan, Gokul; Kolokythas, Antonia; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H

    2013-06-15

    Epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, play an active role in the differentiation and lineage commitment of mesenchymal stem cells. In the present study, epigenetic states and differentiation profiles of two odontogenic neural crest-derived intermediate progenitor populations were compared: dental pulp (DP) and dental follicle (DF). ChIP on chip assays revealed substantial H3K27me3-mediated repression of odontoblast lineage genes DSPP and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) in DF cells, but not in DP cells. Mineralization inductive conditions caused steep increases of mineralization and patterning gene expression levels in DP cells when compared to DF cells. In contrast, mineralization induction resulted in a highly dynamic histone modification response in DF cells, while there was only a subdued effect in DP cells. Both DF and DP progenitors featured H3K4me3-active marks on the promoters of early mineralization genes RUNX2, MSX2, and DLX5, while OSX, IBSP, and BGLAP promoters were enriched for H3K9me3 or H3K27me3. Compared to DF cells, DP cells expressed higher levels of three pluripotency-associated genes, OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2. Finally, gene ontology comparison of bivalent marks unique for DP and DF cells highlighted cell-cell attachment genes in DP cells and neurogenesis genes in DF cells. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the DF intermediate odontogenic neural crest lineage is distinguished from its DP counterpart by epigenetic repression of DSPP and DMP1 genes and through dynamic histone enrichment responses to mineralization induction. Findings presented here highlight the crucial role of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in the terminal differentiation of odontogenic neural crest lineages.

  2. Dynamics of BMP and Hes1/Hairy1 signaling in the dorsal neural tube underlies the transition from neural crest to definitive roof plate.

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    Nitzan, Erez; Avraham, Oshri; Kahane, Nitza; Ofek, Shai; Kumar, Deepak; Kalcheim, Chaya

    2016-03-24

    The dorsal midline region of the neural tube that results from closure of the neural folds is generally termed the roof plate (RP). However, this domain is highly dynamic and complex, and is first transiently inhabited by prospective neural crest (NC) cells that sequentially emigrate from the neuroepithelium. It only later becomes the definitive RP, the dorsal midline cells of the spinal cord. We previously showed that at the trunk level of the axis, prospective RP progenitors originate ventral to the premigratory NC and progressively reach the dorsal midline following NC emigration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the end of NC production and formation of the definitive RP remain virtually unknown. Based on distinctive cellular and molecular traits, we have defined an initial NC and a subsequent RP stage, allowing us to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the transition between the two phases. We demonstrate that in spite of the constant production of BMP4 in the dorsal tube at both stages, RP progenitors only transiently respond to the ligand and lose competence shortly before they arrive at their final location. In addition, exposure of dorsal tube cells at the NC stage to high levels of BMP signaling induces premature RP traits, such as Hes1/Hairy1, while concomitantly inhibiting NC production. Reciprocally, early inhibition of BMP signaling prevents Hairy1 mRNA expression at the RP stage altogether, suggesting that BMP is both necessary and sufficient for the development of this RP-specific trait. Furthermore, when Hes1/Hairy1 is misexpressed at the NC stage, it inhibits BMP signaling and downregulates BMPR1A/Alk3 mRNA expression, transcription of BMP targets such as Foxd3, cell-cycle progression, and NC emigration. Reciprocally, Foxd3 inhibits Hairy1, suggesting that repressive cross-interactions at the level of, and downstream from, BMP ensure the temporal separation between both lineages. Together, our data suggest that BMP signaling is

  3. Stem cell property of postmigratory cranial neural crest cells and their utility in alveolar bone regeneration and tooth development.

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    Chung, Il-Hyuk; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Zhao, Hu; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Shi, Songtao; Chai, Yang

    2009-04-01

    The vertebrate neural crest is a multipotent cell population that gives rise to a variety of different cell types. We have discovered that postmigratory cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) maintain mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and show potential utility for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. We are able to induce the osteogenic differentiation of postmigratory CNCCs, and this differentiation is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways. After transplantation into a host animal, postmigratory CNCCs form bone matrix. CNCC-formed bones are distinct from bones regenerated by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, CNCCs support tooth germ survival via BMP signaling in our CNCC-tooth germ cotransplantation system. Thus, we conclude that postmigratory CNCCs preserve stem cell features, contribute to craniofacial bone formation, and play a fundamental role in supporting tooth organ development. These findings reveal a novel function for postmigratory CNCCs in organ development, and demonstrate the utility of these CNCCs in regenerating craniofacial structures.

  4. Differentiation defect in neural crest-derived smooth muscle cells in patients with aortopathy associated with bicuspid aortic valves

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    Jiao Jiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with bicuspid aortic valves (BAV are at a higher risk of developing thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA than patients with trileaflet aortic valves (TAV. The aneurysms associated with BAV most commonly involve the ascending aorta and spare the descending aorta. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs in the ascending and descending aorta arise from neural crest (NC and paraxial mesoderm (PM, respectively. We hypothesized defective differentiation of the neural crest stem cells (NCSCs-derived SMCs but not paraxial mesoderm cells (PMCs-derived SMCs contributes to the aortopathy associated with BAV. When induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from BAV/TAA patients were differentiated into NCSC-derived SMCs, these cells demonstrated significantly decreased expression of marker of SMC differentiation (MYH11 and impaired contraction compared to normal control. In contrast, the PMC-derived SMCs were similar to control cells in these aspects. The NCSC-SMCs from the BAV/TAA also showed decreased TGF-β signaling based on phosphorylation of SMAD2, and increased mTOR signaling. Inhibition of mTOR pathway using rapamycin rescued the aberrant differentiation. Our data demonstrates that decreased differentiation and contraction of patient's NCSC-derived SMCs may contribute to that aortopathy associated with BAV.

  5. Deletion of integrin-linked kinase from neural crest cells in mice results in aortic aneurysms and embryonic lethality

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    Thomas D. Arnold

    2013-09-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs participate in the remodeling of the cardiac outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries during cardiovascular development. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK is a serine/threonine kinase and a major regulator of integrin signaling. It links integrins to the actin cytoskeleton and recruits other adaptor molecules into a large complex to regulate actin dynamics and integrin function. Using the Cre-lox system, we deleted Ilk from NCCs of mice to investigate its role in NCC morphogenesis. The resulting mutants developed a severe aneurysmal arterial trunk that resulted in embryonic lethality during late gestation. Ilk mutants showed normal cardiac NCC migration but reduced differentiation into smooth muscle within the aortic arch arteries and the outflow tract. Within the conotruncal cushions, Ilk-deficient NCCs exhibited disorganization of F-actin stress fibers and a significantly rounder morphology, with shorter cellular projections. Additionally, absence of ILK resulted in reduced in vivo phosphorylation of Smad3 in NCCs, which correlated with reduced αSMA levels. Our findings resemble those seen in Pinch1 and β1 integrin conditional mutant mice, and therefore support that, in neural crest-derived cells, ILK and Pinch1 act as cytoplasmic effectors of β1 integrin in a pathway that protects against aneurysms. In addition, our conditional Ilk mutant mice might prove useful as a model to study aortic aneurysms caused by reduced Smad3 signaling, as occurs in the newly described aneurysms-osteoarthritis syndrome, for example.

  6. The taming of the neural crest: a developmental perspective on the origins of morphological covariation in domesticated mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Geiger, Madeleine; Schneider, Richard A

    2016-06-01

    Studies on domestication are blooming, but the developmental bases for the generation of domestication traits and breed diversity remain largely unexplored. Some phenotypic patterns of human neurocristopathies are suggestive of those reported for domesticated mammals and disrupting neural crest developmental programmes have been argued to be the source of traits deemed the 'domestication syndrome'. These character changes span multiple organ systems and morphological structures. But an in-depth examination within the phylogenetic framework of mammals including domesticated forms reveals that the distribution of such traits is not universal, with canids being the only group showing a large set of predicted features. Modularity of traits tied to phylogeny characterizes domesticated mammals: through selective breeding, individual behavioural and morphological traits can be reordered, truncated, augmented or deleted. Similarly, mammalian evolution on islands has resulted in suites of phenotypic changes like those of some domesticated forms. Many domesticated mammals can serve as valuable models for conducting comparative studies on the evolutionary developmental biology of the neural crest, given that series of their embryos are readily available and that their phylogenetic histories and genomes are well characterized.

  7. SPECC1L deficiency results in increased adherens junction stability and reduced cranial neural crest cell delamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan R; Olm-Shipman, Adam J; Acevedo, Diana S; Palaniyandi, Kanagaraj; Hall, Everett G; Kosa, Edina; Stumpff, Kelly M; Smith, Guerin J; Pitstick, Lenore; Liao, Eric C; Bjork, Bryan C; Czirok, Andras; Saadi, Irfan

    2016-01-20

    Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) delaminate from embryonic neural folds and migrate to pharyngeal arches, which give rise to most mid-facial structures. CNCC dysfunction plays a prominent role in the etiology of orofacial clefts, a frequent birth malformation. Heterozygous mutations in SPECC1L have been identified in patients with atypical and syndromic clefts. Here, we report that in SPECC1L-knockdown cultured cells, staining of canonical adherens junction (AJ) components, β-catenin and E-cadherin, was increased, and electron micrographs revealed an apico-basal diffusion of AJs. To understand the role of SPECC1L in craniofacial morphogenesis, we generated a mouse model of Specc1l deficiency. Homozygous mutants were embryonic lethal and showed impaired neural tube closure and CNCC delamination. Staining of AJ proteins was increased in the mutant neural folds. This AJ defect is consistent with impaired CNCC delamination, which requires AJ dissolution. Further, PI3K-AKT signaling was reduced and apoptosis was increased in Specc1l mutants. In vitro, moderate inhibition of PI3K-AKT signaling in wildtype cells was sufficient to cause AJ alterations. Importantly, AJ changes induced by SPECC1L-knockdown were rescued by activating the PI3K-AKT pathway. Together, these data indicate SPECC1L as a novel modulator of PI3K-AKT signaling and AJ biology, required for neural tube closure and CNCC delamination.

  8. In vitro cementoblast-like differentiation of postmigratory neural crest-derived p75{sup +} stem cells with dental follicle cell conditioned medium

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    Wen, Xiujie; Liu, Luchuan; Deng, Manjing; Liu, Rui; Zhang, Li; Nie, Xin, E-mail: dr.xinnie@gmail.com

    2015-09-10

    Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) play important role in epithelial–mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis. However, the heterogeneity of CNCCs and their tendency to spontaneously differentiate along smooth muscle or osteoblast lineages in vitro limit further understanding of their biological properties. We studied the differentiation properties of isolated rat embryonic postmigratory CNCCs, expressing p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). These p75NTR positive (p75{sup +}) CNCCs, isolated using fluorescence activated cell sorter, exhibited fibroblast-like morphology and characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. Incubation of p75{sup +} CNCCs in dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) combined with dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs), altered their morphological features to cementoblast-like appearance. These cells also showed low proliferative activity, high ALP activity and significantly increased calcified nodule formation. Markers related to mineralization or specific to cementoblast lineage were highly expressed in dNCPs/DFCCM-treated p75{sup +} cells, suggesting their differentiation along cementoblast-like lineage. p75{sup +} stem cells selected from postmigratory CNCCs represent a pure stem cell population and could be used as a stem cell model for in vitro studies due to their intrinsic ability to differentiate to neuronal cells and transform from neuroectoderm to ectomesenchyme. They can provide a potential stem cell resource for tooth engineering studies and help to further investigate mechanisms of epithelial–mesenchymal interactions in tooth morphogenesis. - Highlights: • Cranial neural crest-derived cells (CNCCs) take part in tooth morphogenesis. • positive (p75{sup +}) CNCCs are fibroblast-like and resemble mesenchymal stem cells. • p75{sup +} CNCCs in dental follicle cell medium (DFCCM/dNCP) appear like cementoblasts. • DFCCM/dNCP-treated p75{sup +} cells express cementoblast specific mineralization

  9. Search for the Missing lncs: Gene Regulatory Networks in Neural Crest Development and Long Non-coding RNA Biomarkers of Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), a birth defect characterized by variable aganglionosis of the gut, affects about 1 in 5000 births, and is a consequence of abnormal development of neural crest cells, from which enteric ganglia derive. In the companion article in this issue (S...

  10. Pdgfrα functions in endothelial-derived cells to regulate neural crest cells and the development of the great arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanian, Haig; Cho, Young Kuk; Rizer, Nicholas W; Wang, Qiaohong; Li, Li; Degenhardt, Karl; Jain, Rajan

    2017-09-01

    Originating as a single vessel emerging from the embryonic heart, the truncus arteriosus must septate and remodel into the aorta and pulmonary artery to support postnatal life. Defective remodeling or septation leads to abnormalities collectively known as conotruncal defects, which are associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Multiple populations of cells must interact to coordinate outflow tract remodeling, and the cardiac neural crest has emerged as particularly important during this process. Abnormalities in the cardiac neural crest have been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple conotruncal defects, including persistent truncus arteriosus, double outlet right ventricle and tetralogy of Fallot. However, the role of the neural crest in the pathogenesis of another conotruncal abnormality, transposition of the great arteries, is less well understood. In this report, we demonstrate an unexpected role of Pdgfra in endothelial cells and their derivatives during outflow tract development. Loss of Pdgfra in endothelium and endothelial-derived cells results in double outlet right ventricle and transposition of the great arteries. Our data suggest that loss of Pdgfra in endothelial-derived mesenchyme in the outflow tract endocardial cushions leads to a secondary defect in neural crest migration during development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Search for the Missing lncs: Gene Regulatory Networks in Neural Crest Development and Long Non-coding RNA Biomarkers of Hirschsprung's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR), a birth defect characterized by variable aganglionosis of the gut, affects about 1 in 5000 births, and is a consequence of abnormal development of neural crest cells, from which enteric ganglia derive. In the companion article in this issue (Shen et...

  12. EGF–FGF{sub 2} stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal commitment of mouse epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs)

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    Bressan, Raul Bardini; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Almeida, Patricia Alves; Bittencourt, Denise Avani; Visoni, Silvia; Jeremias, Talita Silva [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil); Costa, Ana Paula; Leal, Rodrigo Bainy [Departamento de Bioquímica, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil); Trentin, Andrea Gonçalves, E-mail: andrea.trentin@ufsc.br [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Embriologia e Genética, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, 88040-900 Florianópolis SC (Brazil)

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal neural crest stem cells (EPI-NCSCs), which reside in the bulge of hair follicles, are attractive candidates for several applications in cell therapy, drug screening and tissue engineering. As suggested remnants of the embryonic neural crest (NC) in an adult location, EPI-NCSCs are able to generate a wide variety of cell types and are readily accessible by a minimally invasive procedure. Since the combination of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and fibroblast growth factor type 2 (FGF{sub 2}) is mitogenic and promotes the neuronal commitment of various stem cell populations, we examined its effects in the proliferation and neuronal potential of mouse EPI-NCSCs. By using a recognized culture protocol of bulge whiskers follicles, we were able to isolate a population of EPI-NCSCs, characterized by the migratory potential, cell morphology and expression of phenotypic markers of NC cells. EPI-NCSCs expressed neuronal, glial and smooth muscle markers and exhibited the NC-like fibroblastic morphology. The treatment with the combination EGF and FGF{sub 2}, however, increased their proliferation rate and promoted the acquisition of a neuronal-like morphology accompanied by reorganization of neural cytoskeletal proteins βIII-tubulin and nestin, as well as upregulation of the pan neuronal marker βIII-tubulin and down regulation of the undifferentiated NC, glial and smooth muscle cell markers. Moreover, the treatment enhanced the response of EPI-NCSCs to neurogenic stimulation, as evidenced by induction of GAP43, and increased expression of Mash-1 in neuron-like cell, both neuronal-specific proteins. Together, the results suggest that the combination of EGF–FGF2 stimulates the proliferation and improves the neuronal potential of EPI-NCSCs similarly to embryonic NC cells, ES cells and neural progenitor/stem cells of the central nervous system and highlights the advantage of using EGF–FGF{sub 2} in neuronal differentiation protocols. - Highlights: • EPI

  13. Efficient genome editing of genes involved in neural crest development using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in Xenopus embryos.

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    Liu, Zhongzhen; Cheng, Tina Tsz Kwan; Shi, Zhaoying; Liu, Ziran; Lei, Yong; Wang, Chengdong; Shi, Weili; Chen, Xiongfeng; Qi, Xufeng; Cai, Dongqing; Feng, Bo; Deng, Yi; Chen, Yonglong; Zhao, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The RNA guided CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases have been proven to be effective for gene disruption in various animal models including Xenopus tropicalis. The neural crest (NC) is a transient cell population during embryonic development and contributes to a large variety of tissues. Currently, loss-of-function studies on NC development in X. tropicalis are largely based on morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. It is worthwhile establishing targeted gene knockout X. tropicails line using CRISPR/Cas9 system to study NC development. We utilized CRISPR/Cas9 to disrupt genes that are involved in NC formation in X. tropicalis embryos. A single sgRNA and Cas9 mRNA synthesized in vitro, were co-injected into X. tropicalis embryos at one-cell stage to induce single gene disruption. We also induced duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions in X. tropicalis by injecting Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. The specificity of CRISPR/Cas9 was assessed in X. tropicalis embryos and the Cas9 nickase was used to reduce the off-target cleavages. Finally, we crossed the G0 mosaic frogs with targeted mutations to wild type frogs and obtained the germline transmission. Total 16 target sites in 15 genes were targeted by CRISPR/Cas9 and resulted in successful indel mutations at 14 loci with disruption efficiencies in a range from 9.3 to 57.8 %. Furthermore, we demonstrated the feasibility of generation of duplex mutations, large segmental deletions and inversions by using Cas9 and a pair of sgRNAs. We observed that CRISPR/Cas9 displays obvious off-target effects at some loci in X. tropicalis embryos. Such off-target cleavages was reduced by using the D10A Cas9 nickase. Finally, the Cas9 induced indel mutations were efficiently passed to G1 offspring. Our study proved that CRISPR/Cas9 could mediate targeted gene mutation in X. tropicalis with high efficiency. This study expands the application of CRISPR/Cas9 platform in X. tropicalis and set a basis for studying NC development using genetic

  14. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-04-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, calledTg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to producesox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis ofTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. TreatingTg(snai1b:GFP)embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RAin vivoand raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. E-cigarette aerosol exposure can cause craniofacial defects in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian neural crest cells.

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    Allyson E Kennedy

    Full Text Available Since electronic cigarette (ECIG introduction to American markets in 2007, vaping has surged in popularity. Many, including women of reproductive age, also believe that ECIG use is safer than traditional tobacco cigarettes and is not hazardous when pregnant. However, there are few studies investigating the effects of ECIG exposure on the developing embryo and nothing is known about potential effects on craniofacial development. Therefore, we have tested the effects of several aerosolized e-cigarette liquids (e-cigAM in an in vivo craniofacial model, Xenopus laevis, as well as a mammalian neural crest cell line. Results demonstrate that e-cigAM exposure during embryonic development induces a variety of defects, including median facial clefts and midface hypoplasia in two of e-cigAMs tested e-cigAMs. Detailed quantitative analyses of the facial morphology revealed that nicotine is not the main factor in inducing craniofacial defects, but can exacerbate the effects of the other e-liquid components. Additionally, while two different e-cigAMs can have very similar consequences on facial appearances, there are subtle differences that could be due to the differences in e-cigAM components. Further assessment of embryos exposed to these particular e-cigAMs revealed cranial cartilage and muscle defects and a reduction in the blood supply to the face. Finally, the expression of markers for vascular and cartilage differentiation was reduced in a mammalian neural crest cell line corroborating the in vivo effects. Our work is the first to show that ECIG use could pose a potential hazard to the developing embryo and cause craniofacial birth defects. This emphasizes the need for more testing and regulation of this new popular product.

  16. LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural crest-like cells have the potential to develop into mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takehito; Morikawa, Satoru; Shibata, Shinsuke; Fukuda, Kimiko; Okuno, Hironobu; Fujimura, Takumi; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Ohyama, Manabu; Akamatsu, Wado; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as non-hematopoietic, plastic-adherent, self-renewing cells that are capable of tri-lineage differentiation into bone, cartilage or fat in vitro. Thus, MSCs are promising candidates for cell-based medicine. However, classifications of MSCs have been defined retrospectively; moreover, this conventional criterion may be inaccurate due to contamination with other hematopoietic lineage cells. Human MSCs can be enriched by selection for LNGFR and THY-1, and this population may be analogous to murine PDGFRα(+)Sca-1(+) cells, which are developmentally derived from neural crest cells (NCCs). Murine NCCs were labeled by fluorescence, which provided definitive proof of neural crest lineage, however, technical considerations prevent the use of a similar approach to determine the origin of human LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) MSCs. To further clarify the origin of human MSCs, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were used in this study. Under culture conditions required for the induction of neural crest cells, human ESCs and iPSCs-derived cells highly expressed LNGFR and THY-1. These LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) neural crest-like cells, designated as LT-NCLCs, showed a strong potential to differentiate into both mesenchymal and neural crest lineages. LT-NCLCs proliferated to form colonies and actively migrated in response to serum concentration. Furthermore, we transplanted LT-NCLCs into chick embryos, and traced their potential for survival, migration and differentiation in the host environment. These results suggest that LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) cells identified following NCLC induction from ESCs/iPSCs shared similar potentials with multipotent MSCs. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vivo Transplantation of Enteric Neural Crest Cells into Mouse Gut; Engraftment, Functional Integration and Long-Term Safety.

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    Julie E Cooper

    Full Text Available Enteric neuropathies are severe gastrointestinal disorders with unsatisfactory outcomes. We aimed to investigate the potential of enteric neural stem cell therapy approaches for such disorders by transplanting mouse enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs into ganglionic and aganglionic mouse gut in vivo and analysing functional integration and long-term safety.Neurospheres generated from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP expressing ENCCs selected from postnatal Wnt1-cre;R26R-YFP/YFP murine gut were transplanted into ganglionic hindgut of wild-type littermates or aganglionic hindgut of Ednrbtm1Ywa mice (lacking functional endothelin receptor type-B. Intestines were then assessed for ENCC integration and differentiation using immunohistochemistry, cell function using calcium imaging, and long-term safety using PCR to detect off-target YFP expression.YFP+ ENCCs engrafted, proliferated and differentiated into enteric neurons and glia within recipient ganglionic gut. Transplanted cells and their projections spread along the endogenous myenteric plexus to form branching networks. Electrical point stimulation of endogenous nerve fibres resulted in calcium transients (F/F0 = 1.16 ± 0.01;43 cells, n = 6 in YFP+ transplanted ENCCs (abolished with TTX. Long-term follow-up (24 months showed transplanted ENCCs did not give rise to tumours or spread to other organs (PCR negative in extraintestinal sites. In aganglionic gut ENCCs similarly spread and differentiated to form neuronal and glial networks with projections closely associated with endogenous neural networks of the transition zone.Transplanted ENCCs successfully engrafted into recipient ganglionic and aganglionic gut showing appropriate spread, localisation and, importantly, functional integration without any long-term safety issues. This study provides key support for the development and use of enteric neural stem cell therapies.

  18. The Wnt Co-Receptor Lrp5 Is Required for Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Willems

    Full Text Available During vertebrate neurulation, cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, delaminate from the neural plate border, and migrate as separate streams into different cranial regions. There, they differentiate into distinct parts of the craniofacial skeleton. Canonical Wnt signaling has been shown to be essential for this process at different levels but the involved receptors remained unclear. Here we show that the frizzled co-receptor low-density-lipoprotein (LDL receptor-related protein 5 (Lrp5 plays a crucial role in CNCC migration and morphogenesis of the cranial skeleton. Early during induction and migration of CNCCs, lrp5 is expressed ubiquitously but later gets restricted to CNCC derivatives in the ventral head region besides different regions in the CNS. A knock-down of lrp5 does not interfere with induction of CNCCs but leads to reduced proliferation of premigratory CNCCs. In addition, cell migration is disrupted as CNCCs are found in clusters at ectopic positions in the dorsomedial neuroepithelium after lrp5 knock-down and transient CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing. These migratory defects consequently result in malformations of the craniofacial skeleton. To date, Lrp5 has mainly been associated with bone homeostasis in mammals. Here we show that in zebrafish, lrp5 also controls cell migration during early morphogenetic processes and contributes to shaping the craniofacial skeleton.

  19. Folic acid and homocysteine affect neural crest and neuroepithelial cell outgrowth and differentiation in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, M.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Poelmann, R.E.; Iperen, L. van; Lindemans, J.; Groot, A. de

    2003-01-01

    The beneficial effect of additional folic acid in the periconceptional period to prevent neural tube defects, orofacial clefts, and conotruncal heart defects in the offspring has been shown. Folate shortage results in homocysteine accumulation. Elevated levels of homocysteine have been related to

  20. Impaired Cellular Immunity in the Murine Neural Crest Conditional Deletion of Endothelin Receptor-B Model of Hirschsprung’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosain, Ankush; Barlow-Anacker, Amanda J.; Erickson, Chris S.; Pierre, Joseph F.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Epstein, Miles L.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is characterized by aganglionosis from failure of neural crest cell (NCC) migration to the distal hindgut. Up to 40% of HSCR patients suffer Hirschsprung’s-associated enterocolitis (HAEC), with an incidence that is unchanged from the pre-operative to the post-operative state. Recent reports indicate that signaling pathways involved in NCC migration may also be involved in the development of secondary lymphoid organs. We hypothesize that gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal immune defects occur in HSCR that may contribute to enterocolitis. EdnrB was deleted from the neural crest (EdnrBNCC-/-) resulting in mutants with defective NCC migration, distal colonic aganglionosis and the development of enterocolitis. The mucosal immune apparatus of these mice was interrogated at post-natal day (P) 21–24, prior to histological signs of enterocolitis. We found that EdnrBNCC-/- display lymphopenia of their Peyer’s Patches, the major inductive site of GI mucosal immunity. EdnrBNCC-/- Peyer’s Patches demonstrate decreased B-lymphocytes, specifically IgM+IgDhi (Mature) B-lymphocytes, which are normally activated and produce IgA following antigen presentation. EdnrBNCC-/- animals demonstrate decreased small intestinal secretory IgA, but unchanged nasal and bronchial airway secretory IgA, indicating a gut-specific defect in IgA production or secretion. In the spleen, which is the primary source of IgA-producing Mature B-lymphocytes, EdnrBNCC-/- animals display decreased B-lymphocytes, but an increase in Mature B-lymphocytes. EdnrBNCC-/- spleens are also small and show altered architecture, with decreased red pulp and a paucity of B-lymphocytes in the germinal centers and marginal zone. Taken together, these findings suggest impaired GI mucosal immunity in EdnrBNCC-/- animals, with the spleen as a potential site of the defect. These findings build upon the growing body of literature that suggests that intestinal defects in HSCR are not restricted to

  1. High-level activation of cyclic AMP signaling attenuates bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced sympathoadrenal lineage development and promotes melanogenesis in neural crest cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ming; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-06-01

    The intensity of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling is a differential instructive signal in neural crest (NC) cell specification. By an unknown mechanism, sympathoadrenal lineage specification is suppressed by high-level activation of cAMP signaling. In NC cultures, high-level activation of cAMP signaling mediates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent Rap1-B-Raf-ERK1/2 activation, leading to cytoplasmic accumulation of phospho-Smad1, thus terminating bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced sympathoadrenal cell development. Concurrently, cAMP signaling induces transcription of the melanocyte-determining transcription factor Mitf and melanogenesis. dnACREB and E1A inhibit Mitf expression and melanogenesis, supporting the notion that CREB activation is necessary for melanogenesis. However, constitutively active CREB(DIEDML) without PKA activation is insufficient for Mitf expression and melanogenesis, indicating PKA regulates additional aspects of Mitf transcription. Thus, high-level activation of cAMP signaling plays a dual role in NC cell differentiation: attenuation of BMP2-induced sympathoadrenal cell development and induction of melanogenesis. We conclude the intensity of activation of signal transduction cascades determines cell lineage segregation mechanisms.

  2. Differences in neural crest sensitivity to ethanol account for the infrequency of anterior segment defects in the eye compared with craniofacial anomalies in a zebrafish model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Jessica; Williams, Antionette L; Chawla, Bahaar; Apsey, Christian; Bohnsack, Brenda L

    2017-09-01

    Ethanol (ETOH) exposure during pregnancy is associated with craniofacial and neurologic abnormalities, but infrequently disrupts the anterior segment of the eye. In these studies, we used zebrafish to investigate differences in the teratogenic effect of ETOH on craniofacial, periocular, and ocular neural crest. Zebrafish eye and neural crest development was analyzed by means of live imaging, TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay, immunostaining, detection of reactive oxygen species, and in situ hybridization. Our studies demonstrated that foxd3-positive neural crest cells in the periocular mesenchyme and developing eye were less sensitive to ETOH than sox10-positive craniofacial neural crest cells that form the pharyngeal arches and jaw. ETOH increased apoptosis in the retina, but did not affect survival of periocular and ocular neural crest cells. ETOH also did not increase reactive oxygen species within the eye. In contrast, ETOH increased ventral neural crest apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production in the facial mesenchyme. In the eye and craniofacial region, sod2 showed high levels of expression in the anterior segment and in the setting of Sod2 knockdown, low levels of ETOH decreased migration of foxd3-positive neural crest cells into the developing eye. However, ETOH had minimal effect on the periocular and ocular expression of transcription factors (pitx2 and foxc1) that regulate anterior segment development. Neural crest cells contributing to the anterior segment of the eye exhibit increased ability to withstand ETOH-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. These studies explain the rarity of anterior segment dysgenesis despite the frequent craniofacial abnormalities in fetal alcohol syndrome. Birth Defects Research 109:1212-1227, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Human Neural Crest Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Model Recapitulates Biochemical Abnormalities in GBA1 Mutation Carriers

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    Shi-Yu Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerically the most important risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD is the presence of mutations in the glucocerebrosidase GBA1 gene. In vitro and in vivo studies show that GBA1 mutations reduce glucocerebrosidase (GCase activity and are associated with increased α-synuclein levels, reflecting similar changes seen in idiopathic PD brain. We have developed a neural crest stem cell-derived dopaminergic neuronal model that recapitulates biochemical abnormalities in GBA1 mutation-associated PD. Cells showed reduced GCase protein and activity, impaired macroautophagy, and increased α-synuclein levels. Advantages of this approach include easy access to stem cells, no requirement to reprogram, and retention of the intact host genome. Treatment with a GCase chaperone increased GCase protein levels and activity, rescued the autophagic defects, and decreased α-synuclein levels. These results provide the basis for further investigation of GCase chaperones or similar drugs to slow the progression of PD.

  4. Delamination of neural crest cells requires transient and reversible Wnt inhibition mediated by Dact1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabadán, M Angeles; Herrera, Antonio; Fanlo, Lucia; Usieto, Susana; Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Barriga, Elias H; Mayor, Roberto; Pons, Sebastián; Martí, Elisa

    2016-06-15

    Delamination of neural crest (NC) cells is a bona fide physiological model of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a process that is influenced by Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Using two in vivo models, we show that Wnt/β-catenin signalling is transiently inhibited at the time of NC delamination. In attempting to define the mechanism underlying this inhibition, we found that the scaffold proteins Dact1 and Dact2, which are expressed in pre-migratory NC cells, are required for NC delamination in Xenopus and chick embryos, whereas they do not affect the motile properties of migratory NC cells. Dact1/2 inhibit Wnt/β-catenin signalling upstream of the transcriptional activity of T cell factor (TCF), which is required for EMT to proceed. Dact1/2 regulate the subcellular distribution of β-catenin, preventing β-catenin from acting as a transcriptional co-activator to TCF, yet without affecting its stability. Together, these data identify a novel yet important regulatory element that inhibits β-catenin signalling, which then affects NC delamination. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Sonic hedgehog regulation of Foxf2 promotes cranial neural crest mesenchyme proliferation and is disrupted in cleft lip morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, Joshua L; Fink, Dustin M; Yoon, Joon Won; Leslie, Elizabeth J; Kietzman, Henry W; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J; Chung, Hannah M; Walterhouse, David O; Marazita, Mary L; Lipinski, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Cleft lip is one of the most common human birth defects, yet our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate lip morphogenesis is limited. Here, we show in mice that sonic hedgehog (Shh)-induced proliferation of cranial neural crest cell (cNCC) mesenchyme is required for upper lip closure. Gene expression profiling revealed a subset of Forkhead box (Fox) genes that are regulated by Shh signaling during lip morphogenesis. During cleft pathogenesis, reduced proliferation in the medial nasal process mesenchyme paralleled the domain of reduced Foxf2 and Gli1 expression. SHH ligand induction of Foxf2 expression was dependent upon Shh pathway effectors in cNCCs, while a functional GLI-binding site was identified downstream of Foxf2 Consistent with the cellular mechanism demonstrated for cleft lip pathogenesis, we found that either SHH ligand addition or FOXF2 overexpression is sufficient to induce cNCC proliferation. Finally, analysis of a large multi-ethnic human population with cleft lip identified clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in FOXF2 These data suggest that direct targeting of Foxf2 by Shh signaling drives cNCC mesenchyme proliferation during upper lip morphogenesis, and that disruption of this sequence results in cleft lip. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Adenosine signaling promotes neuronal, catecholaminergic differentiation of primary neural crest cells and CNS-derived CAD cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau, Matthew L; Ji, Ming; Paris, Maryline; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-07-01

    In neural crest (NC) cultures cAMP signaling is an instructive signal in catecholaminergic, sympathoadrenal cell development. However, the extracellular signals activating the cAMP pathway during NC cell development have not been identified. We demonstrate that in avian NC cultures, evidenced by tyrosine hydroxylase expression and catecholamine biosynthesis, adenosine and not adrenergic signaling, together with BMP2, promotes sympathoadrenal cell development. In NC cultures, addition of the adenosine receptor agonist NECA in the presence of BMP2 promotes sympathoadrenal cell development, whereas the antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA) suppresses TH expression. Importantly, NC cells express A2A and A2B receptors which couple with Gsalpha increasing intracellular cAMP. Employing the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line, we also demonstrate that neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal is further enhanced by treatment with IBMX, a cAMP-elevating agent, or the adenosine receptor agonist NECA, acting via cAMP. By contrast, the adenosine receptor antagonist CGS 15943 or the adenosine degrading enzyme ADA inhibits CAD cell neuronal differentiation mediated by serum withdrawal. These results support that adenosine is a physiological signal in neuronal differentiation of the CNS-derived catecholaminergic CAD cell line and suggest that adenosine signaling is involved in NC cell development in vivo.

  7. The Dlx5-FGF10 signaling cascade controls cranial neural crest and myoblast interaction during oropharyngeal patterning and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugii, Hideki; Grimaldi, Alexandre; Li, Jingyuan; Parada, Carolina; Vu-Ho, Thach; Feng, Jifan; Jing, Junjun; Yuan, Yuan; Guo, Yuxing; Maeda, Hidefumi; Chai, Yang

    2017-11-01

    Craniofacial development depends on cell-cell interactions, coordinated cellular movement and differentiation under the control of regulatory gene networks, which include the distal-less (Dlx) gene family. However, the functional significance of Dlx5 in patterning the oropharyngeal region has remained unknown. Here, we show that loss of Dlx5 leads to a shortened soft palate and an absence of the levator veli palatini, palatopharyngeus and palatoglossus muscles that are derived from the 4th pharyngeal arch (PA); however, the tensor veli palatini, derived from the 1st PA, is unaffected. Dlx5-positive cranial neural crest (CNC) cells are in direct contact with myoblasts derived from the pharyngeal mesoderm, and Dlx5 disruption leads to altered proliferation and apoptosis of CNC and muscle progenitor cells. Moreover, the FGF10 pathway is downregulated in Dlx5-/- mice, and activation of FGF10 signaling rescues CNC cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation in these mutant mice. Collectively, our results indicate that Dlx5 plays crucial roles in the patterning of the oropharyngeal region and development of muscles derived from the 4th PA mesoderm in the soft palate, likely via interactions between CNC-derived and myogenic progenitor cells. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Noncanonical transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) signaling in cranial neural crest cells causes tongue muscle developmental defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Ho, Thach-Vu; Chai, Yang

    2013-10-11

    Microglossia is a congenital birth defect in humans and adversely impacts quality of life. In vertebrates, tongue muscle derives from the cranial mesoderm, whereas tendons and connective tissues in the craniofacial region originate from cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Loss of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) type II receptor in CNC cells in mice (Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre) causes microglossia due to a failure of cell-cell communication between cranial mesoderm and CNC cells during tongue development. However, it is still unclear how TGFβ signaling in CNC cells regulates the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts during tongue development. Here we show that activation of the cytoplasmic and nuclear tyrosine kinase 1 (ABL1) cascade in Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice results in a failure of CNC-derived cell differentiation followed by a disruption of TGFβ-mediated induction of growth factors and reduction of myogenic cell proliferation and differentiation activities. Among the affected growth factors, the addition of fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) and neutralizing antibody for follistatin (FST; an antagonist of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)) could most efficiently restore cell proliferation, differentiation, and organization of muscle cells in the tongue of Tgfbr2(fl/fl);Wnt1-Cre mice. Thus, our data indicate that CNC-derived fibroblasts regulate the fate of mesoderm-derived myoblasts through TGFβ-mediated regulation of FGF and BMP signaling during tongue development.

  9. Augmented BMPRIA-mediated BMP signaling in cranial neural crest lineage leads to cleft palate formation and delayed tooth differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available The importance of BMP receptor Ia (BMPRIa mediated signaling in the development of craniofacial organs, including the tooth and palate, has been well illuminated in several mouse models of loss of function, and by its mutations associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome and facial defects in humans. In this study, we took a gain-of-function approach to further address the role of BMPR-IA-mediated signaling in the mesenchymal compartment during tooth and palate development. We generated transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of BmprIa (caBmprIa in cranial neural crest (CNC cells that contributes to the dental and palatal mesenchyme. Mice bearing enhanced BMPRIa-mediated signaling in CNC cells exhibit complete cleft palate and delayed odontogenic differentiation. We showed that the cleft palate defect in the transgenic animals is attributed to an altered cell proliferation rate in the anterior palatal mesenchyme and to the delayed palatal elevation in the posterior portion associated with ectopic cartilage formation. Despite enhanced activity of BMP signaling in the dental mesenchyme, tooth development and patterning in transgenic mice appeared normal except delayed odontogenic differentiation. These data support the hypothesis that a finely tuned level of BMPRIa-mediated signaling is essential for normal palate and tooth development.

  10. Intrastriatal transplantation of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells improves functional outcome in parkinsonian rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Janine; Ossig, Christiana; Greiner, Johannes F W; Hauser, Stefan; Fauser, Mareike; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Storch, Alexander; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is considered the second most frequent and one of the most severe neurodegenerative diseases, with dysfunctions of the motor system and with nonmotor symptoms such as depression and dementia. Compensation for the progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons during PD using current pharmacological treatment strategies is limited and remains challenging. Pluripotent stem cell-based regenerative medicine may offer a promising therapeutic alternative, although the medical application of human embryonic tissue and pluripotent stem cells is still a matter of ethical and practical debate. Addressing these challenges, the present study investigated the potential of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells derived from the inferior turbinate (ITSCs) transplanted into a parkinsonian rat model. Emphasizing their capability to give rise to nervous tissue, ITSCs isolated from the adult human nose efficiently differentiated into functional mature neurons in vitro. Additional successful dopaminergic differentiation of ITSCs was subsequently followed by their transplantation into a unilaterally lesioned 6-hydroxydopamine rat PD model. Transplantation of predifferentiated or undifferentiated ITSCs led to robust restoration of rotational behavior, accompanied by significant recovery of DA neurons within the substantia nigra. ITSCs were further shown to migrate extensively in loose streams primarily toward the posterior direction as far as to the midbrain region, at which point they were able to differentiate into DA neurons within the locus ceruleus. We demonstrate, for the first time, that adult human ITSCs are capable of functionally recovering a PD rat model. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. A case of rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor: ROHHADNET syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Ayhan; Catli, Gonul; Bayram, Erhan; Koroglu, Tolga; Olgun, Hatice Nur; Mutafoglu, Kamer; Hiz, Ayse Semra; Cakmakci, Handan; Bober, Ece

    2013-01-01

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypoventilation, hypothalamic dysfunction, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare disorder that mimics both common obesity and genetic obesity syndromes along with several endocrine disorders during early childhood. We aim to present the clinical features, laboratory and imaging results, and treatment outcomes of a patient with ROHHAD syndrome. In this case report, we describe a 26-month-old boy who was admitted to our emergency department with dyspnea and cyanosis and was suspected to have ROHHAD syndrome due to his rapid-onset obesity and alveolar hypoventilation. A thoracal and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging was performed to demonstrate a possible accompanying neural crest tumor and it provided a yet asymptomatic retroperitoneal ganglioneuroblastoma. Based on these findings, the patient was diagnosed as ROHHADNET syndrome. Because of the high prevalence of cardiorespiratory arrest and probability of accompanying tumors, early recognition of ROHHAD syndrome is important. To prevent presumptive mortality and morbidity, ROHHAD syndrome should be considered in all cases of rapid and early-onset obesity associated with hypothalamic-pituitary endocrine dysfunctions.

  12. Disruption of CXCR4 signaling in pharyngeal neural crest cells causes DiGeorge syndrome-like malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escot, Sophie; Blavet, Cédrine; Faure, Emilie; Zaffran, Stéphane; Duband, Jean-Loup; Fournier-Thibault, Claire

    2016-02-15

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a congenital disease causing cardiac outflow tract anomalies, craniofacial dysmorphogenesis, thymus hypoplasia, and mental disorders. It results from defective development of neural crest cells (NCs) that colonize the pharyngeal arches and contribute to lower jaw, neck and heart tissues. Although TBX1 has been identified as the main gene accounting for the defects observed in human patients and mouse models, the molecular mechanisms underlying DGS etiology are poorly identified. The recent demonstrations that the SDF1/CXCR4 axis is implicated in NC chemotactic guidance and impaired in cortical interneurons of mouse DGS models prompted us to search for genetic interactions between Tbx1, Sdf1 (Cxcl12) and Cxcr4 in pharyngeal NCs and to investigate the effect of altering CXCR4 signaling on the ontogeny of their derivatives, which are affected in DGS. Here, we provide evidence that Cxcr4 and Sdf1 are genetically downstream of Tbx1 during pharyngeal NC development and that reduction of CXCR4 signaling causes misrouting of pharyngeal NCs in chick and dramatic morphological alterations in the mandibular skeleton, thymus and cranial sensory ganglia. Our results therefore support the possibility of a pivotal role for the SDF1/CXCR4 axis in DGS etiology. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Histone deacetylase-4 is required during early cranial neural crest development for generation of the zebrafish palatal skeleton

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    DeLaurier April

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone deacetylase-4 (Hdac4 is a class II histone deacetylase that inhibits the activity of transcription factors. In humans, HDAC4 deficiency is associated with non-syndromic oral clefts and brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR with craniofacial abnormalities. Results We identify hdac4 in zebrafish and characterize its function in craniofacial morphogenesis. The gene is present as a single copy, and the deduced Hdac4 protein sequence shares all known functional domains with human HDAC4. The zebrafish hdac4 transcript is widely present in migratory cranial neural crest (CNC cells of the embryo, including populations migrating around the eye, which previously have been shown to contribute to the formation of the palatal skeleton of the early larva. Embryos injected with hdac4 morpholinos (MO have reduced or absent CNC populations that normally migrate medial to the eye. CNC-derived palatal precursor cells do not recover at the post-migratory stage, and subsequently we found that defects in the developing cartilaginous palatal skeleton correlate with reduction or absence of early CNC cells. Palatal skeletal defects prominently include a shortened, clefted, or missing ethmoid plate, and are associated with a shortening of the face of young larvae. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Hdac4 is a regulator of CNC-derived palatal skeletal precursors during early embryogenesis. Cleft palate resulting from HDAC4 mutations in human patients may result from defects in a homologous CNC progenitor cell population.

  14. Abnormal neural crest innervation in Sox10-Venus mice with all-trans retinoic acid-induced anorectal malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryota; Miyahara, Katsumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Doi, Takashi; Lane, Geoffrey J; Mabuchi, Yo; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-02-01

    Despite technical advances in the surgical/medical care of anorectal malformation (ARM), persistent unsatisfactory postoperative bowel habit has been attributed to histopathologic abnormalities of the distal rectum/pouch (DRP) and hypoplasia of anal sphincter muscles (ASM). We used Sox10-Venus mice with ARM induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) to investigate neural crest cell (NCC) innervation in the DRP and ASM. Pregnant Sox10-Venus mice were administered single doses of 50, 70, or 100 mg/kg of ATRA on embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) then sacrificed on either E16.5 or E19.5. Bowel specimens comprising the anorectum were examined using fluorescence microscopy without immunohistochemical staining (FMIS). Anti-PGP9.5 was used to delineate ganglion cells and anti-SMA for smooth muscles. The appropriate dose of ATRA for inducing ARM was 50 mg/kg. Under FMIS, all ARM embryos (n = 5; all high type; 3 male:2 female) had less NCC innervation with thick Venus-positive nerve fibers in the DRP compared with normal embryos (n = 8); there was abnormal NCC innervation in the DRP and absent ASM in ARM mice. We are the first to delineate abnormal enteric nervous system innervation in the DRP of ARM mice without using immunohistochemical staining techniques thus allowing specimens to be examined without any distortion.

  15. Cranial neural crest-derived mesenchymal proliferation is regulated by Msx1-mediated p19(INK4d) expression during odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Ito, Yoshihiro; Yeo, Jae Yong; Sucov, Henry M; Maas, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2003-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotential progenitors that contribute to various cell and tissue types during embryogenesis. Here, we have investigated the molecular and cellular mechanism by which the fate of neural crest cell is regulated during tooth development. Using a two- component genetic system for indelibly marking the progeny of neural crest cells, we provide in vivo evidence of a deficiency of CNC-derived dental mesenchyme in Msx1 null mutant mouse embryos. The deficiency of the CNC results from an elevated CDK inhibitor p19(INK4d) activity and the disruption of cell proliferation. Interestingly, in the absence of Msx1, the CNC-derived dental mesenchyme misdifferentiates and possesses properties consistent with a neuronal fate, possibly through a default mechanism. Attenuation of p19(INK4d) in Msx1 null mutant mandibular explants restores mitotic activity in the dental mesenchyme, demonstrating the functional significance of Msx1-mediated p19(INK4d) expression in regulating CNC cell proliferation during odontogenesis. Collectively, our results demonstrate that homeobox gene Msx1 regulates the fate of CNC cells by controlling the progression of the cell cycle. Genetic mutation of Msx1 may alternatively instruct the fate of these progenitor cells during craniofacial development.

  16. Regulation of trunk neural crest delamination by δEF1 and Sip1 in the chicken embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumi, Takahiro; Inoue, Masashi; Maruhashi, Mitsuji; Kamachi, Yusuke; Higashi, Yujiro; Kondoh, Hisato; Uchikawa, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    The vertebrate Zfhx1 transcription factor family comprises δEF1 and Sip1, which bind to CACCT-containing sequences and act as transcriptional repressors. It has been a longstanding question whether these transcription factors share the same regulatory functions in vivo. It has been shown that neural crest (NC) delamination depends on the Sip1 activity at the cranial level in mouse and chicken embryos, and it remained unclear how NC delamination is regulated at the trunk level. We observed that the expression of δEF1 and Sip1 overlaps in many tissues in chicken embryos, including NC cells at the trunk level. To clarify the above questions, we separately knocked down δEF1 and Sip1 or in combination in NC cells by electroporation of vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against respective mRNAs on the dorsal side of neural tubes that generate NC cells. In all cases, the migrating NC cell population was significantly reduced, paralleled by the decreased expression of δEF1 or Sip1 targeted by shRNAs. Expression of Sox10, the major transcription factor that regulates NC development, was also decreased by the shRNAs against δEF1 or Sip1. We conclude that the trunk NC delamination is regulated by both δEF1 and Sip1 in an analogous manner, and that these transcription factors can share equivalent regulatory functions in embryonic tissues. © 2015 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  17. Novel migrating mouse neural crest cell assay system utilizing P0-Cre/EGFP fluorescent time-lapse imaging

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    Kawakami Minoru

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural crest cells (NCCs are embryonic, multipotent stem cells. Their long-range and precision-guided migration is one of their most striking characteristics. We previously reported that P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-lacZ double-transgenic mice showed significant lacZ expression in tissues derived from NCCs. Results In this study, by embedding a P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryo at E9.5 in collagen gel inside a culture glass slide, we were able to keep the embryo developing ex vivo for more than 24 hours; this development was with enough NCC fluorescent signal intensity to enable single-cell resolution analysis, with the accompanying NCC migration potential intact and with the appropriate NCC response to the extracellular signal maintained. By implantation of beads with absorbed platelet-derived growth factor-AA (PDGF-AA, we demonstrated that PDGF-AA acts as an NCC-attractant in embryos. We also performed assays with NCCs isolated from P0-Cre/CAG-CAT-EGFP embryos on culture plates. The neuromediator 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT has been known to regulate NCC migration. We newly demonstrated that dopamine, in addition to 5-HT, stimulated NCC migration in vitro. Two NCC populations, with different axial levels of origins, showed unique distribution patterns regarding migration velocity and different dose-response patterns to both 5-HT and dopamine. Conclusions Although avian species predominated over the other species in the NCC study, our novel system should enable us to use mice to assay many different aspects of NCCs in embryos or on culture plates, such as migration, division, differentiation, and apoptosis.

  18. The Effects of Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cells on Local Inflammation Microenvironment in the Defected Sciatic Nerve of Rats

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    Yue Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cell-based therapy is a promising strategy for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries (PNIs. epidermal neural crest stems cells (EPI-NCSCs are thought to be important donor cells for repairing PNI in different animal models. Following PNI, inflammatory response is important to regulate the repair process. However, the effects of EPI-NCSCs on regulation of local inflammation microenviroment have not been investigated extensively. In the present study, these effects were studied by using 10 mm defected sciatic nerve, which was bridged with 15 mm artificial nerve composed of EPI-NCSCs, extracellular matrix (ECM and poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA. Then the expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, polarization of macrophages, regulation of fibroblasts and shwann cells (SCs were assessed by western blot, immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence staining at 1, 3, 7 and 21 days after bridging. The structure and the function of the bridged nerve were determined by observation under light microscope and by examination of right lateral foot retraction time (LFRT, sciatic function index (SFI, gastrocnemius wet weight and electrophysiology at 9 weeks. After bridging with EPI-NCSCs, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-13 was increased, but decreased for pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α compared to the control bridging, which was consistent with increase of M2 macrophages and decrease of M1 macrophages at 7 days after transplantation. Likewise, myelin-formed SCs were significantly increased, but decreased for the activated fibroblasts in their number at 21 days. The recovery of structure and function of nerve bridged with EPI-NCSCs was significantly superior to that of DMEM. These results indicated that EPI-NCSCs could be able to regulate and provide more suitable inflammation microenvironment for the repair of defected sciatic nerve.

  19. Cardiac, mandibular and thymic phenotypical association indicates that cranial neural crest underlies bicuspid aortic valve formation in hamsters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Martínez-Vargas

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is the most prevalent human congenital cardiac malformation. It may appear isolated, associated with other cardiovascular malformations, or forming part of syndromes. Cranial neural crest (NC defects are supposed to be the cause of the spectrum of disorders associated with syndromic BAV. Experimental studies with an inbred hamster model of isolated BAV showed that alterations in the migration or differentiation of the cardiac NC cells in the embryonic cardiac outflow tract are most probably responsible for the development of this congenital valvular defect. We hypothesize that isolated BAV is not the result of local, but of early alterations in the behavior of the NC cells, thus also affecting other cranial NC-derived structures. Therefore, we tested whether morphological variation of the aortic valve is linked to phenotypic variation of the mandible and the thymus in the hamster model of isolated BAV, compared to a control strain. Our results show significant differences in the size and shape of the mandible as well as in the cellular composition of the thymus between the two strains, and in mandible shape regarding the morphology of the aortic valve. Given that both the mandible and the thymus are cranial NC derivatives, and that the cardiac NC belongs to the cephalic domain, we propose that the causal defect leading to isolated BAV during embryonic development is not restricted to local alterations of the cardiac NC cells in the cardiac outflow tract, but it is of pleiotropic or polytopic nature. Our results suggest that isolated BAV may be the forme fruste of a polytopic syndrome involving the cranial NC in the hamster model and in a proportion of affected patients.

  20. Rare and private variations in neural crest, apoptosis and sarcomere genes define the polygenic background of isolated Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Marcel; Dorn, Cornelia; Schueler, Markus; Dunkel, Ilona; Schlesinger, Jenny; Mebus, Siegrun; Alexi-Meskishvili, Vladimir; Perrot, Andreas; Wassilew, Katharina; Timmermann, Bernd; Hetzer, Roland; Berger, Felix; Sperling, Silke R

    2014-06-15

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common cyanotic congenital heart disease. Its genetic basis is demonstrated by an increased recurrence risk in siblings and familial cases. However, the majority of TOF are sporadic, isolated cases of undefined origin and it had been postulated that rare and private autosomal variations in concert define its genetic basis. To elucidate this hypothesis, we performed a multilevel study using targeted re-sequencing and whole-transcriptome profiling. We developed a novel concept based on a gene's mutation frequency to unravel the polygenic origin of TOF. We show that isolated TOF is caused by a combination of deleterious private and rare mutations in genes essential for apoptosis and cell growth, the assembly of the sarcomere as well as for the neural crest and secondary heart field, the cellular basis of the right ventricle and its outflow tract. Affected genes coincide in an interaction network with significant disturbances in expression shared by cases with a mutually affected TOF gene. The majority of genes show continuous expression during adulthood, which opens a new route to understand the diversity in the long-term clinical outcome of TOF cases. Our findings demonstrate that TOF has a polygenic origin and that understanding the genetic basis can lead to novel diagnostic and therapeutic routes. Moreover, the novel concept of the gene mutation frequency is a versatile measure and can be applied to other open genetic disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. [CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Olivier

    2002-05-01

    CREST syndrome has been described as a form of progressive systemic sclerosis in which there is relatively limited involvement of the skin, prominence of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction and telangiectasia. The acronym CREST was coined in 1964 by Winterbauer in the USA but the very first case report was by French physicians Thibierge and Weissenbach in 1910. Antinuclear antibodies recognizing chromosomal centromere proteins are characteristic of CREST syndrome and are present in more than 50% of the cases. The prognosis of CREST syndrome is relatively good with a long lasting disease duration (>10 years). Two complications are seldom associated with CREST syndrome: digital gangrene with finger losses and pulmonary hypertension (3 to 14% of CREST syndrome). Pulmonary hypertension is a very late event and the prognosis is very severe (mortality rate of 50% after 2 years).

  2. CREST Revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapp, Hermann; Parisi, Cristiana; Bridgeman, Alfia

    This report covers the period from 1993 when the CREST project was initiated, to its launch in 1996, and considers the environment that prompted its instigation. The report looks at the massive cooperation of Government, industry and a range of different service providers that all came together......, under the central control of the CREST project team. It proposes five reasons why the CREST project was successful and examines why the CREST system continues to be at the heart of UK settlement, 20 years on....

  3. Smooth Muscle Cells Derived From Second Heart Field and Cardiac Neural Crest Reside in Spatially Distinct Domains in the Media of the Ascending Aorta-Brief Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Hisashi; Rateri, Debra L; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Majesky, Mark W; Daugherty, Alan

    2017-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the proximal thoracic aorta are embryonically derived from the second heart field (SHF) and cardiac neural crest (CNC). However, distributions of these embryonic origins are not fully defined. The regional distribution of SMCs of different origins is speculated to cause region-specific aortopathies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the distribution of SMCs of SHF and CNC origins in the proximal thoracic aorta. Mice with repressed LacZ in the ROSA26 locus were bred to those expressing Cre controlled by either the Wnt1 or Mef2c (myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2c) promoter to trace CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs, respectively. Thoracic aortas were harvested, and activity of β-galactosidase was determined. Aortas from Wnt1- Cre mice had β-galactosidase-positive areas throughout the region from the proximal ascending aorta to just distal of the subclavian arterial branch. Unexpectedly, β-galactosidase-positive areas in Mef2c- Cre mice extended from the aortic root throughout the ascending aorta. This distribution occurred independent of sex and aging. Cross and sagittal aortic sections demonstrated that CNC-derived cells populated the inner medial aspect of the anterior region of the ascending aorta and transmurally in the media of the posterior region. Interestingly, outer medial cells throughout anterior and posterior ascending aortas were derived from the SHF. β-Galactosidase-positive medial cells of both origins colocalized with an SMC marker, α-actin. Both CNC- and SHF-derived SMCs populate the media throughout the ascending aorta. The outer medial cells of the ascending aorta form a sleeve populated by SHF-derived SMCs. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. A 3.7 kb fragment of the mouse Scn10a gene promoter directs neural crest but not placodal lineage EGFP expression in a transgenic animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Van B; Ikeda, Stephen R; Puhl, Henry L

    2015-05-20

    Under physiological conditions, the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.8 is expressed almost exclusively in primary sensory neurons. The mechanism restricting Nav1.8 expression is not entirely clear, but we have previously described a 3.7 kb fragment of the Scn10a promoter capable of recapitulating the tissue-specific expression of Nav1.8 in transfected neurons and cell lines (Puhl and Ikeda, 2008). To validate these studies in vivo, a transgenic mouse encoding EGFP under the control of this putative sensory neuron specific promoter was generated and characterized in this study. Approximately 45% of dorsal root ganglion neurons of transgenic mice were EGFP-positive (mean diameter = 26.5 μm). The majority of EGFP-positive neurons bound isolectin B4, although a small percentage (∼10%) colabeled with markers of A-fiber neurons. EGFP expression correlated well with the presence of Nav1.8 transcript (95%), Nav1.8-immunoreactivity (70%), and TTX-R INa (100%), although not all Nav1.8-expressing neurons expressed EGFP. Several cranial sensory ganglia originating from neurogenic placodes, such as the nodose ganglion, failed to express EGFP, suggesting that additional regulatory elements dictate Scn10a expression in placodal-derived sensory neurons. EGFP was also detected in discrete brain regions of transgenic mice. Quantitative PCR and Nav1.8-immunoreactivity confirmed Nav1.8 expression in the amygdala, brainstem, globus pallidus, lateral and paraventricular hypothalamus, and olfactory tubercle. TTX-R INa recorded from EGFP-positive hypothalamic neurons demonstrate the usefulness of this transgenic line to study novel roles of Nav1.8 beyond sensory neurons. Overall, Scn10a-EGFP transgenic mice recapitulate the majority of the Nav1.8 expression pattern in neural crest-derived sensory neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/358021-14$15.00/0.

  5. Boundary cap neural crest stem cells homotopically implanted to the injured dorsal root transitional zone give rise to different types of neurons and glia in adult rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Trolle, Carl; Abrahamsson, Ninnie; König, Niclas; Vasylovska, Svitlana; Kozlova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The boundary cap is a transient group of neural crest-derived cells located at the presumptive dorsal root transitional zone (DRTZ) when sensory axons enter the spinal cord during development. Later, these cells migrate to dorsal root ganglia and differentiate into subtypes of sensory neurons and glia. After birth when the DRTZ is established, sensory axons are no longer able to enter the spinal cord. Here we explored the fate of mouse bNCSCs implanted to the uninjured DRTZ after dorsal root ...

  6. EIF4A3 deficient human iPSCs and mouse models demonstrate neural crest defects that underlie Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Emily E; Kobayashi, Gerson S; Musso, Camila M; Allen, Miranda; Ishiy, Felipe A A; de Caires, Luiz Carlos; Goulart, Ernesto; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M; Richieri-Costa, Antonio; Bertola, Debora R; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Silver, Debra L

    2017-06-15

    Biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the RNA-binding protein EIF4A3 cause Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome (RCPS), an autosomal recessive condition mainly characterized by craniofacial and limb malformations. However, the pathogenic cellular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome are entirely unknown. Here, we used two complementary approaches, patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and conditional Eif4a3 mouse models, to demonstrate that defective neural crest cell (NCC) development explains RCPS craniofacial abnormalities. RCPS iNCCs have decreased migratory capacity, a distinct phenotype relative to other craniofacial disorders. Eif4a3 haploinsufficient embryos presented altered mandibular process fusion and micrognathia, thus recapitulating the most penetrant phenotypes of the syndrome. These defects were evident in either ubiquitous or NCC-specific Eif4a3 haploinsufficient animals, demonstrating an autonomous requirement of Eif4a3 in NCCs. Notably, RCPS NCC-derived mesenchymal stem-like cells (nMSCs) showed premature bone differentiation, a phenotype paralleled by premature clavicle ossification in Eif4a3 haploinsufficient embryos. Likewise, nMSCs presented compromised in vitro chondrogenesis, and Meckel's cartilage was underdeveloped in vivo. These findings indicate novel and essential requirements of EIF4A3 for NCC migration and osteochondrogenic differentiation during craniofacial development. Altogether, complementary use of iPSCs and mouse models pinpoint unique cellular mechanisms by which EIF4A3 mutation causes RCPS, and provide a paradigm to study craniofacial disorders. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Derivation of mesenchymal stromal cells from pluripotent stem cells through a neural crest lineage using small molecule compounds with defined media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Fukuta

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCCs are an embryonic migratory cell population with the ability to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types that contribute to the craniofacial skeleton, cornea, peripheral nervous system, and skin pigmentation. This ability suggests the promising role of NCCs as a source for cell-based therapy. Although several methods have been used to induce human NCCs (hNCCs from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, further modifications are required to improve the robustness, efficacy, and simplicity of these methods. Chemically defined medium (CDM was used as the basal medium in the induction and maintenance steps. By optimizing the culture conditions, the combination of the GSK3β inhibitor and TGFβ inhibitor with a minimum growth factor (insulin very efficiently induced hNCCs (70-80% from hPSCs. The induced hNCCs expressed cranial NCC-related genes and stably proliferated in CDM supplemented with EGF and FGF2 up to at least 10 passages without changes being observed in the major gene expression profiles. Differentiation properties were confirmed for peripheral neurons, glia, melanocytes, and corneal endothelial cells. In addition, cells with differentiation characteristics similar to multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs were induced from hNCCs using CDM specific for human MSCs. Our simple and robust induction protocol using small molecule compounds with defined media enabled the generation of hNCCs as an intermediate material producing terminally differentiated cells for cell-based innovative medicine.

  8. Adult bone marrow neural crest stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells are not able to replace lost neurons in acute MPTP-lesioned mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Neirinckx

    Full Text Available Adult bone marrow stroma contains multipotent stem cells (BMSC that are a mixed population of mesenchymal and neural-crest derived stem cells. Both cells are endowed with in vitro multi-lineage differentiation abilities, then constituting an attractive and easy-available source of material for cell therapy in neurological disorders. Whereas the in vivo integration and differentiation of BMSC in neurons into the central nervous system is currently matter of debate, we report here that once injected into the striatum of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP-treated mice, pure populations of either bone marrow neural crest stem cells (NCSC or mesenchymal stem cells (MSC survived only transiently into the lesioned brain. Moreover, they do not migrate through the brain tissue, neither modify their initial phenotype, while no recovery of the dopaminergic system integrity was observed. Consequently, we tend to conclude that MSC/NCSC are not able to replace lost neurons in acute MPTP-lesioned dopaminergic system through a suitable integration and/or differentiation process. Altogether with recent data, it appears that neuroprotective, neurotrophic and anti-inflammatory features characterizing BMSC are of greater interest as regards CNS lesions management.

  9. Modeling of genetic regulatory networks in the differentiation of neural crest stem cells to sensory neurons by means of boolean networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Marcelo Aráus Patiño

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we have generated a GRN comprising the process by which neural crest stem cells develop to two types of sensory neurons (Propioceptors and Nocioceptors. We have also been able to fi nd patterns of regulation (motifs that act cooperatively to control such process. Surprisingly, these motifs take place in similar stages during the development of erythrocytes from hematopoietic stem cells. Regarding the complexity of the GRN found, we then used Random Boolean Networks (RBN for this purpose, which showed key components as well as the dynamics of the process through changes in initial conditions. Finally, the motifs were refl ected in the model, suggesting insights for further studies.

  10. Dysregulation of Wnt-Signaling and a Candidate Set of miRNAs Underlie the Effect of Metformin on Neural Crest Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Poulomi; Dutta, Sunit; Pal, Rajarshi

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCC) are a population of epithelial cells that arise from the dorsal tube and undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) eventually generating tissues from peripheral nervous system, melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage, and bone. The antidiabetic drug metformin reportedly inhibits EMT in physiological conditions like cancer and fibrosis. We hypothesize that perturbation of EMT may also contribute to developmental disabilities associated with neural crest (NC) development. To understand the molecular network underlying metformin action during NC formation, we first differentiated murine embryonic stem (ES) cells into NCC and characterized them by demonstrating spatiotemporal regulation of key markers. Metformin treatment prompted a delay in delamination of NCC by inhibiting key markers like Sox-1, Sox-9, HNK-1, and p-75. We then revealed that metformin impedes Wnt axis, a major signaling pathway active during NC formation via DVL-3 inhibition and impairment in nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Concomitantly we identified and tested a candidate set of miRNAs that play a crucial role in NC cell fate determination. Further studies involving loss and gain of function confirmed that NCC specifiers like Sox-1 and Sox-9 are direct targets of miR-200 and miR-145, respectively and that they are essentially modulated by metformin. Our in vitro findings were strongly supported by in vivo studies in zebrafish. Given that metformin is a widely used drug, for the first time we demonstrate that it can induce a delayed onset of developmental EMT during NC formation by interfering with canonical Wnt signaling and mysregulation of miR-145 and miR-200. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  11. GMDH-type neural network approach for modeling the discharge coefficient of rectangular sharp-crested side weirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Ebtehaj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the discharge coefficient using hydraulic and geometrical specifications is one of the influential factors in predicting the discharge passing over a side weir. Taking into account the fact that existing equations are incapable of estimating the discharge coefficient well, artificial intelligence methods are used to predict it. In this study, Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH was used for the purpose of predicting the discharge coefficient in a side weir. The Froude number (F1, weir dimensionless length (b/B, ratios of weir length to depth of upstream flow (b/y1 and weir height to its length (p/y1 were taken as input parameters to express a new model for predicting the discharge coefficient. Two different sets of laboratory data were used to train the artificial network and test the new model. Different statistical indexes were used to evaluate the performance of the GMDH model presented for two states, training and testing. The results indicate that the proposed model predicts the discharge coefficient precisely (MAPE = 5.263 & RMSE = 0.038 and this model is more accurate in predicting than the feed-forward neural network model and existing nonlinear regression equations.

  12. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome. (Turk J Dermatol 2012; 6: 48-50

  13. CREST Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuğçe Köksüz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of CREST syndrome (calsinosis cutis, Raynaud’s phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia with all of the five major symptoms. A 46-year-old woman was admitted to our clinic with the complaint of erythema, rigidity and pain on the plantar surface of the feet. She had had Raynaud’s phenomenon for 20 years and oesophageal reflux for five years. Her face had become masklike and there was prominent telangiectasies on her face and hands. Sclerosis were confined to the fingers (sclerodactyly. Direct X-ray graphy demonstrated calcinosis cutis on the left hand and suprapatellar region. She was treated with nifedipine 30 mg/day, acetylsalicylic acid 100 mg/day for Raynaud’s phenomenon and famotidine 40 mg/day, metoclopramide HCL 30 mg/day for oesophageal dysmotility. Her complaints were partially relieved after the treatment. This case had all of the five major symptoms of CREST syndrome, and we aimed to emphasize the major symptoms and complications of CREST syndrome.

  14. Neural correlates of specific musical anhedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Molina, Noelia; Mas-Herrero, Ernest; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Zatorre, Robert J; Marco-Pallarés, Josep

    2016-11-15

    Although music is ubiquitous in human societies, there are some people for whom music holds no reward value despite normal perceptual ability and preserved reward-related responses in other domains. The study of these individuals with specific musical anhedonia may be crucial to understand better the neural correlates underlying musical reward. Previous neuroimaging studies have shown that musically induced pleasure may arise from the interaction between auditory cortical networks and mesolimbic reward networks. If such interaction is critical for music-induced pleasure to emerge, then those individuals who do not experience it should show alterations in the cortical-mesolimbic response. In the current study, we addressed this question using fMRI in three groups of 15 participants, each with different sensitivity to music reward. We demonstrate that the music anhedonic participants showed selective reduction of activity for music in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), but normal activation levels for a monetary gambling task. Furthermore, this group also exhibited decreased functional connectivity between the right auditory cortex and ventral striatum (including the NAcc). In contrast, individuals with greater than average response to music showed enhanced connectivity between these structures. Thus, our results suggest that specific musical anhedonia may be associated with a reduction in the interplay between the auditory cortex and the subcortical reward network, indicating a pivotal role of this interaction for the enjoyment of music.

  15. Neural Crest Cell Implantation Restores Enteric Nervous System Function and Alters the Gastrointestinal Transcriptome in Human Tissue-Engineered Small Intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieve, Christopher R; Fowler, Kathryn L; Thornton, Matthew; Huang, Sha; Hajjali, Ibrahim; Hou, Xiaogang; Grubbs, Brendan; Spence, Jason R; Grikscheit, Tracy C

    2017-09-12

    Acquired or congenital disruption in enteric nervous system (ENS) development or function can lead to significant mechanical dysmotility. ENS restoration through cellular transplantation may provide a cure for enteric neuropathies. We have previously generated human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived tissue-engineered small intestine (TESI) from human intestinal organoids (HIOs). However, HIO-TESI fails to develop an ENS. The purpose of our study is to restore ENS components derived exclusively from hPSCs in HIO-TESI. hPSC-derived enteric neural crest cell (ENCC) supplementation of HIO-TESI establishes submucosal and myenteric ganglia, repopulates various subclasses of neurons, and restores neuroepithelial connections and neuron-dependent contractility and relaxation in ENCC-HIO-TESI. RNA sequencing identified differentially expressed genes involved in neurogenesis, gliogenesis, gastrointestinal tract development, and differentiated epithelial cell types when ENS elements are restored during in vivo development of HIO-TESI. Our findings validate an effective approach to restoring hPSC-derived ENS components in HIO-TESI and may implicate their potential for the treatment of enteric neuropathies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Decreased proliferative, migrative and neuro-differentiative potential of postnatal rat enteric neural crest-derived cells during culture in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hui [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Pan, Wei-Kang; Zheng, Bai-Jun; Wang, Huai-Jie [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Chen, Xin-Lin; Liu, Yong [Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Gao, Ya, E-mail: ygao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China)

    2016-05-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the potential use of enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs) as a cell replacement therapy for Hirschsprung's disease. Based on previous observations of robust propagation of primary ENCCs, as opposed to their progeny, it is suggested that their therapeutic potential after in vitro expansion may be restricted. We therefore examined the growth and differentiation activities and phenotypic characteristics of continuous ENCC cultures. ENCCs were isolated from the intestines of postnatal rats and were identified using an immunocytochemical approach. During continuous ENCC culture expansion, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and differentiation potentials were monitored. The Cell Counting Kit-8 was used for assessment of ENCC vitality, Transwell inserts for cell migration, immunocytochemistry for cell counts and identification, and flow cytometry for apoptosis. Over six continuous generations, ENCC proliferation potency was reduced and with prolonged culture, the ratio of migratory ENCCs was decreased. The percentage of apoptosis showed an upward trend with prolonged intragenerational culture, but showed a downward trend with prolonged culture of combined generations. Furthermore, the percentage of peripherin{sup +} cells decreased whilst the percentage of GFAP{sup +} cells increased with age. The results demonstrated that alterations in ENCC growth characteristics occur with increased culture time, which may partially account for the poor results of proposed cell therapies. - Highlights: • Differences were identified between primary and daughter ENCCs. • Daughter ENCCs had reduced proliferation, migration and differentiation. • Daughter ENCCs also had increased apoptosis. • These altered characteristics warrant further investigation.

  17. Neural crest cell survival is dependent on Rho kinase and is required for development of the mid face in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Phillips

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC give rise to much of the tissue that forms the vertebrate head and face, including cartilage and bone, cranial ganglia and teeth. In this study we show that conditional expression of a dominant-negative (DN form of Rho kinase (Rock in mouse NCC results in severe hypoplasia of the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, ultimately resulting in reduction of the maxilla and nasal bones and severe craniofacial clefting affecting the nose, palate and lip. These defects resemble frontonasal dysplasia in humans. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to abnormalities in cell-matrix attachment, is seen in the RockDN;Wnt1-cre mutant embryos. This leads to elevated cell death, resulting in NCC deficiency and hypoplastic NCC-derived craniofacial structures. Rock is thus essential for survival of NCC that form the craniofacial region. We propose that reduced NCC numbers in the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, resulting from exacerbated cell death, may be the common mechanism underlying frontonasal dysplasia.

  18. ALK5-mediated transforming growth factor β signaling in neural crest cells controls craniofacial muscle development via tissue-tissue interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Arum; Zhao, Hu; Li, Jingyuan; Pelikan, Richard; Chai, Yang

    2014-08-01

    The development of the craniofacial muscles requires reciprocal interactions with surrounding craniofacial tissues that originate from cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs). However, the molecular mechanism involved in the tissue-tissue interactions between CNCCs and muscle progenitors during craniofacial muscle development is largely unknown. In the current study, we address how CNCCs regulate the development of the tongue and other craniofacial muscles using Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice, in which loss of Alk5 in CNCCs results in severely disrupted muscle formation. We found that Bmp4 is responsible for reduced proliferation of the myogenic progenitor cells in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice during early myogenesis. In addition, Fgf4 and Fgf6 ligands were reduced in Wnt1-Cre; Alk5(fl/fl) mice and are critical for differentiation of the myogenic cells. Addition of Bmp4 or Fgf ligands rescues the proliferation and differentiation defects in the craniofacial muscles of Alk5 mutant mice in vitro. Taken together, our results indicate that CNCCs play critical roles in controlling craniofacial myogenic proliferation and differentiation through tissue-tissue interactions. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Combination of exogenous cell transplantation and 5-HT{sub 4} receptor agonism induce endogenous enteric neural crest-derived cells in a rat hypoganglionosis model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hui [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Zheng, Bai-Jun; Pan, Wei-Kang; Wang, Huai-Jie; Xie, Chong; Zhao, Yu-Ying [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China); Chen, Xin-Lin; Liu, Yong [Institute of Neurobiology, Environment and Genes Related to Diseases Key Laboratory of Chinese Ministry of Education, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 96, Yan Ta Xi Road, Xi’an 710061, Shaanxi (China); Gao, Ya, E-mail: ygao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatric Surgery, the Second Affiliated Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University, No 157, Xi Wu Road, Xi’an 710004, Shaanxi (China)

    2017-02-01

    Enteric neural crest-derived cells (ENCCs) can migrate into endogenous ganglia and differentiate into progeny cells, and have even partially rescued bowel function; however, poor reliability and limited functional recovery after ENCC transplantation have yet to be addressed. Here, we investigated the induction of endogenous ENCCs by combining exogenous ENCC transplantation with a 5-HT{sub 4} receptor agonist mosapride in a rat model of hypoganglionosis, established by benzalkonium chloride treatment. ENCCs, isolated from the gut of newborn rats, were labeled with a lentiviral eGFP reporter. ENCCs and rats were treated with the 5-HT{sub 4} receptor agonist/antagonist. The labeled ENCCs were then transplanted into the muscular layer of benzalkonium chloride-treated colons. At given days post-intervention, colonic tissue samples were removed for histological analysis. ENCCs and neurons were detected by eGFP expression and immunoreactivity to p75{sup NTR} and peripherin, respectively. eGFP-positive ENCCs and neurons could survive and maintain levels of fluorescence after transplantation. With longer times post-intervention, the number of peripherin-positive cells gradually increased in all groups. Significantly more peripherin-positive cells were found following ENCCs plus mosapride treatment, compared with the other groups. These results show that exogenous ENCCs combined with the 5-HT{sub 4} receptor agonist effectively induced endogenous ENCCs proliferation and differentiation in a rat hypoganglionosis model. - Highlights: • Survival and differentiation of exogenous ENCCs in treated colons. • With longer times post-intervention, the number of ENCCs and their progeny cells gradually increased. • Exogenous ENCCs combined with the 5-HT4 receptor agonist ffectively induced ENCCs proliferation and differentiation.

  20. The ectodomain of cadherin-11 binds to erbB2 and stimulates Akt phosphorylation to promote cranial neural crest cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketan Mathavan

    Full Text Available During development, a multi-potent group of cells known as the cranial neural crest (CNC migrate to form craniofacial structures. Proper migration of these cells requires proteolysis of cell adhesion molecules, such as cadherins. In Xenopus laevis, preventing extracellular cleavage of cadherin-11 impairs CNC migration. However, overexpression of the soluble cleavage product (EC1-3 is capable of rescuing this phenotype. The mechanism by which EC1-3 promotes CNC migration has not been investigated until now. Here we show that EC1-3 stimulates phosphorylation of Akt, a target of PI3K, in X.laevis CNC. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we determined that EC1-3 interacts with all ErbB receptors, PDGFRα, and FGFR1. Of these receptors, only ErbB2 was able to produce an increase in Akt phosphorylation upon treatment with a recombinant EC1-3. This increase was abrogated by mubritinib, an inhibitor of ErbB2. We were able to recapitulate this decrease in Akt phosphorylation in vivo by knocking down ErbB2 in CNC cells. Knockdown of the receptor also significantly reduced CNC migration in vivo. We confirmed the importance of ErbB2 and ErbB receptor signaling in CNC migration using mubritinib and canertinib, respectively. Mubritinib and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 significantly decreased cell migration while canertinib nearly prevented it altogether. These data show that ErbB2 and Akt are important for CNC migration and implicate other ErbB receptors and Akt-independent signaling pathways. Our findings provide the first example of a functional interaction between the extracellular domain of a type II classical cadherin and growth factor receptors.

  1. Musculocontractural Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and neurocristopathies: dermatan sulfate is required for Xenopus neural crest cells to migrate and adhere to fibronectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Gouignard

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Of all live births with congenital anomalies, approximately one-third exhibit deformities of the head and face. Most craniofacial disorders are associated with defects in a migratory stem and progenitor cell population, which is designated the neural crest (NC. Musculocontractural Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (MCEDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder with distinct craniofacial features; this syndrome comprises multiple congenital malformations that are caused by dysfunction of dermatan sulfate (DS biosynthetic enzymes, including DS epimerase-1 (DS-epi1; also known as DSE. Studies in mice have extended our understanding of DS-epi1 in connective tissue maintenance; however, its role in fetal development is not understood. We demonstrate that DS-epi1 is important for the generation of isolated iduronic acid residues in chondroitin sulfate (CS/DS proteoglycans in early Xenopus embryos. The knockdown of DS-epi1 does not affect the formation of early NC progenitors; however, it impairs the correct activation of transcription factors involved in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT and reduces the extent of NC cell migration, which leads to a decrease in NC-derived craniofacial skeleton, melanocytes and dorsal fin structures. Transplantation experiments demonstrate a tissue-autonomous role for DS-epi1 in cranial NC cell migration in vivo. Cranial NC explant and single-cell cultures indicate a requirement of DS-epi1 in cell adhesion, spreading and extension of polarized cell processes on fibronectin. Thus, our work indicates a functional link between DS and NC cell migration. We conclude that NC defects in the EMT and cell migration might account for the craniofacial anomalies and other congenital malformations in MCEDS, which might facilitate the diagnosis and development of therapies for this distressing condition. Moreover, the presented correlations between human DS-epi1 expression and gene sets of mesenchymal character, invasion and

  2. The morphology of the sella turcica in velocardiofacial syndrome suggests involvement of a neural crest developmental field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølsted, Kirsten; Boers, Maria; Kjaer, Inger

    2010-01-01

    was to measure the cranial base angles in individuals with VCFS and, if possible, to discover the developmental field that may be involved in the condition. The study included 33 patients with VCFS from the Copenhagen Cleft Palate Center, Denmark. The genotype was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization......, hypothyroidism, and posterior brain abnormality), suggest involvement of a specific developmental field....

  3. Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and neurocristopathies: dermatan sulfate is required for Xenopus neural crest cells to migrate and adhere to fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouignard, Nadège; Maccarana, Marco; Strate, Ina; von Stedingk, Kristoffer; Malmström, Anders; Pera, Edgar M

    2016-06-01

    Of all live births with congenital anomalies, approximately one-third exhibit deformities of the head and face. Most craniofacial disorders are associated with defects in a migratory stem and progenitor cell population, which is designated the neural crest (NC). Musculocontractural Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (MCEDS) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with distinct craniofacial features; this syndrome comprises multiple congenital malformations that are caused by dysfunction of dermatan sulfate (DS) biosynthetic enzymes, including DS epimerase-1 (DS-epi1; also known as DSE). Studies in mice have extended our understanding of DS-epi1 in connective tissue maintenance; however, its role in fetal development is not understood. We demonstrate that DS-epi1 is important for the generation of isolated iduronic acid residues in chondroitin sulfate (CS)/DS proteoglycans in early Xenopus embryos. The knockdown of DS-epi1 does not affect the formation of early NC progenitors; however, it impairs the correct activation of transcription factors involved in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and reduces the extent of NC cell migration, which leads to a decrease in NC-derived craniofacial skeleton, melanocytes and dorsal fin structures. Transplantation experiments demonstrate a tissue-autonomous role for DS-epi1 in cranial NC cell migration in vivo Cranial NC explant and single-cell cultures indicate a requirement of DS-epi1 in cell adhesion, spreading and extension of polarized cell processes on fibronectin. Thus, our work indicates a functional link between DS and NC cell migration. We conclude that NC defects in the EMT and cell migration might account for the craniofacial anomalies and other congenital malformations in MCEDS, which might facilitate the diagnosis and development of therapies for this distressing condition. Moreover, the presented correlations between human DS-epi1 expression and gene sets of mesenchymal character, invasion and metastasis in

  4. Artificial neural network approach for estimation of surface specific ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave sensor MSMR (Multifrequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer) data onboard Oceansat-1 was used for retrieval of monthly averages of near surface specific humidity (a) and air temperature (a) by means of Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The MSMR measures the microwave radiances in 8 channels at ...

  5. Fate Specification of Neural Plate Border by Canonical Wnt Signaling and Grhl3 is Crucial for Neural Tube Closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura-Yoshida, Chiharu; Mochida, Kyoko; Ellwanger, Kristina; Niehrs, Christof; Matsuo, Isao

    2015-06-01

    During primary neurulation, the separation of a single-layered ectodermal sheet into the surface ectoderm (SE) and neural tube specifies SE and neural ectoderm (NE) cell fates. The mechanisms underlying fate specification in conjunction with neural tube closure are poorly understood. Here, by comparing expression profiles between SE and NE lineages, we observed that uncommitted progenitor cells, expressing stem cell markers, are present in the neural plate border/neural fold prior to neural tube closure. Our results also demonstrated that canonical Wnt and its antagonists, DKK1/KREMEN1, progressively specify these progenitors into SE or NE fates in accord with the progress of neural tube closure. Additionally, SE specification of the neural plate border via canonical Wnt signaling is directed by the grainyhead-like 3 (Grhl3) transcription factor. Thus, we propose that the fate specification of uncommitted progenitors in the neural plate border by canonical Wnt signaling and its downstream effector Grhl3 is crucial for neural tube closure. This study implicates that failure in critical genetic factors controlling fate specification of progenitor cells in the neural plate border/neural fold coordinated with neural tube closure may be potential causes of human neural tube defects.

  6. Learning speaker-specific characteristics with a deep neural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Salman, Ahmad

    2011-11-01

    Speech signals convey various yet mixed information ranging from linguistic to speaker-specific information. However, most of acoustic representations characterize all different kinds of information as whole, which could hinder either a speech or a speaker recognition (SR) system from producing a better performance. In this paper, we propose a novel deep neural architecture (DNA) especially for learning speaker-specific characteristics from mel-frequency cepstral coefficients, an acoustic representation commonly used in both speech recognition and SR, which results in a speaker-specific overcomplete representation. In order to learn intrinsic speaker-specific characteristics, we come up with an objective function consisting of contrastive losses in terms of speaker similarity/dissimilarity and data reconstruction losses used as regularization to normalize the interference of non-speaker-related information. Moreover, we employ a hybrid learning strategy for learning parameters of the deep neural networks: i.e., local yet greedy layerwise unsupervised pretraining for initialization and global supervised learning for the ultimate discriminative goal. With four Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) benchmarks and two non-English corpora, we demonstrate that our overcomplete representation is robust in characterizing various speakers, no matter whether their utterances have been used in training our DNA, and highly insensitive to text and languages spoken. Extensive comparative studies suggest that our approach yields favorite results in speaker verification and segmentation. Finally, we discuss several issues concerning our proposed approach.

  7. Upregulation of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair in murine neural crest cells results in a complex phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Karl-F; Nguyen, Chloé M A; Cardinal, Tatiana; Charrier, Baptiste; Silversides, David W; Pilon, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a neurocristopathy characterized by a combination of skin and hair depigmentation, and inner ear defects. In the type 4 form, these defects show comorbidity with Hirschsprung disease, a disorder marked by an absence of neural ganglia in the distal colon, triggering functional intestinal obstruction. Here, we report that the Spot mouse line - obtained through an insertional mutagenesis screen for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC) development - is a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. We found that the Spot insertional mutation causes overexpression of an overlapping gene pair composed of the transcription-factor-encoding Nr2f1 and the antisense long non-coding RNA A830082K12Rik in NCCs through a mechanism involving relief of repression of these genes. Consistent with the previously described role of Nr2f1 in promoting gliogenesis in the central nervous system, we further found that NCC-derived progenitors of the enteric nervous system fail to fully colonize Spot embryonic guts owing to their premature differentiation in glial cells. Taken together, our data thus identify silencer elements of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair as new candidate loci for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Upregulation of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair in murine neural crest cells results in a complex phenotype reminiscent of Waardenburg syndrome type 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-F. Bergeron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a neurocristopathy characterized by a combination of skin and hair depigmentation, and inner ear defects. In the type 4 form, these defects show comorbidity with Hirschsprung disease, a disorder marked by an absence of neural ganglia in the distal colon, triggering functional intestinal obstruction. Here, we report that the Spot mouse line – obtained through an insertional mutagenesis screen for genes involved in neural crest cell (NCC development – is a model for Waardenburg syndrome type 4. We found that the Spot insertional mutation causes overexpression of an overlapping gene pair composed of the transcription-factor-encoding Nr2f1 and the antisense long non-coding RNA A830082K12Rik in NCCs through a mechanism involving relief of repression of these genes. Consistent with the previously described role of Nr2f1 in promoting gliogenesis in the central nervous system, we further found that NCC-derived progenitors of the enteric nervous system fail to fully colonize Spot embryonic guts owing to their premature differentiation in glial cells. Taken together, our data thus identify silencer elements of the Nr2f1-A830082K12Rik gene pair as new candidate loci for Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

  9. Targeted deletion of Hand2 in enteric neural precursor cells affects its functions in neurogenesis, neurotransmitter specification and gangliogenesis, causing functional aganglionosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jun; Howard, Marthe J.

    2011-01-01

    Targeted deletion of the bHLH DNA-binding protein Hand2 in the neural crest, impacts development of the enteric nervous system (ENS), possibly by regulating the transition from neural precursor cell to neuron. We tested this hypothesis by targeting Hand2 deletion in nestin-expressing neural precursor (NEP) cells. The mutant mice showed abnormal ENS development, resulting in lethal neurogenic pseudo-obstruction. Neurogenesis of neurons derived from NEP cells identified a second nestin non-expressing neural precursor (NNEP) cell in the ENS. There was substantial compensation for the loss of neurons derived from the NEP pool by the NNEP pool but this was insufficient to abrogate the negative impact of Hand2 deletion. Hand2-mediated regulation of proliferation affected both neural precursor and neuron numbers. Differentiation of glial cells derived from the NEP cells was significantly decreased with no compensation from the NNEP pool of cells. Our data indicate differential developmental potential of NEPs and NNEPs; NNEPs preferentially differentiate as neurons, whereas NEPs give rise to both neurons and glial cells. Deletion of Hand2 also resulted in complete loss of NOS and VIP and a significant decrease in expression of choline acetyltransferase and calretinin, demonstrating a role for Hand2 in neurotransmitter specification and/or expression. Loss of Hand2 resulted in a marked disruption of the developing neural network, exemplified by lack of a myenteric plexus and extensive overgrowth of fibers. Thus, Hand2 is essential for neurogenesis, neurotransmitter specification and neural network patterning in the developing ENS. PMID:21989918

  10. A specific and rapid neural signature for parental instinct.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten L Kringelbach

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Darwin originally pointed out that there is something about infants which prompts adults to respond to and care for them, in order to increase individual fitness, i.e. reproductive success, via increased survivorship of one's own offspring. Lorenz proposed that it is the specific structure of the infant face that serves to elicit these parental responses, but the biological basis for this remains elusive. Here, we investigated whether adults show specific brain responses to unfamiliar infant faces compared to adult faces, where the infant and adult faces had been carefully matched across the two groups for emotional valence and arousal, as well as size and luminosity. The faces also matched closely in terms of attractiveness. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG in adults, we found that highly specific brain activity occurred within a seventh of a second in response to unfamiliar infant faces but not to adult faces. This activity occurred in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC, an area implicated in reward behaviour, suggesting for the first time a neural basis for this vital evolutionary process. We found a peak in activity first in mOFC and then in the right fusiform face area (FFA. In mOFC the first significant peak (p<0.001 in differences in power between infant and adult faces was found at around 130 ms in the 10-15 Hz band. These early differences were not found in the FFA. In contrast, differences in power were found later, at around 165 ms, in a different band (20-25 Hz in the right FFA, suggesting a feedback effect from mOFC. These findings provide evidence in humans of a potential brain basis for the "innate releasing mechanisms" described by Lorenz for affection and nurturing of young infants. This has potentially important clinical applications in relation to postnatal depression, and could provide opportunities for early identification of families at risk.

  11. Modality-specific axonal regeneration: toward selective regenerative neural interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Parisa; Garde, Kshitija; Chouhan, Amit K; Bengali, Ebrahim; Romero-Ortega, Mario I

    2011-01-01

    Regenerative peripheral nerve interfaces have been proposed as viable alternatives for the natural control of robotic prosthetic devices. However, sensory and motor axons at the neural interface are of mixed sub-modality types, which difficult the specific recording from motor axons and the eliciting of precise sensory modalities through selective stimulation. Here we evaluated the possibility of using type specific neurotrophins to preferentially entice the regeneration of defined axonal populations from transected peripheral nerves into separate compartments. Segregation of mixed sensory fibers from dorsal root ganglion neurons was evaluated in vitro by compartmentalized diffusion delivery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), to preferentially entice the growth of TrkA+ nociceptive and TrkC+ proprioceptive subsets of sensory neurons, respectively. The average axon length in the NGF channel increased 2.5-fold compared to that in saline or NT-3, whereas the number of branches increased threefold in the NT-3 channels. These results were confirmed using a 3D "Y"-shaped in vitro assay showing that the arm containing NGF was able to entice a fivefold increase in axonal length of unbranched fibers. To address if such segregation can be enticed in vivo, a "Y"-shaped tubing was used to allow regeneration of the transected adult rat sciatic nerve into separate compartments filled with either NFG or NT-3. A significant increase in the number of CGRP+ pain fibers were attracted toward the sural nerve, while N-52+ large-diameter axons were observed in the tibial and NT-3 compartments. This study demonstrates the guided enrichment of sensory axons in specific regenerative chambers, and supports the notion that neurotrophic factors can be used to segregate sensory and perhaps motor axons in separate peripheral interfaces.

  12. Dual control of pcdh8l/PCNS expression and function in Xenopus laevis neural crest cells by adam13/33 via the transcription factors tfap2α and arid3a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khedgikar, Vikram; Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Mathavan, Ketan; Szydlo, Hannah; Cousin, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Adam13/33 is a cell surface metalloprotease critical for cranial neural crest (CNC) cell migration. It can cleave multiple substrates including itself, fibronectin, ephrinB, cadherin-11, pcdh8 and pcdh8l (this work). Cleavage of cadherin-11 produces an extracellular fragment that promotes CNC migration. In addition, the adam13 cytoplasmic domain is cleaved by gamma secretase, translocates into the nucleus and regulates multiple genes. Here, we show that adam13 interacts with the arid3a/dril1/Bright transcription factor. This interaction promotes a proteolytic cleavage of arid3a and its translocation to the nucleus where it regulates another transcription factor: tfap2α. Tfap2α in turn activates multiple genes including the protocadherin pcdh8l (PCNS). The proteolytic activity of adam13 is critical for the release of arid3a from the plasma membrane while the cytoplasmic domain appears critical for the cleavage of arid3a. In addition to this transcriptional control of pcdh8l, adam13 cleaves pcdh8l generating an extracellular fragment that also regulates cell migration. PMID:28829038

  13. Creative Copper Crests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knab, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to create an art activity that would link the computer-created business cards of fourth-grade students with an upcoming school-wide medieval event. Creating family crests from copper foil would be a great connection, since they, like business cards, are an individual's way to identify themselves to others.…

  14. Comparison of cranial dysraphism in a breed of crested duck ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dysraphic state in the Dutch crested duck is a breed specific autosomal trait with an incomplete penetrance. We have observed similarities between the lesions found in the head of the normal Dutch crested duck (Hollandse kuifeend) and cases of dysraphism found in calves that have continuously been brought to our ...

  15. Identification of genes required for neural-specific glycosylation using functional genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation plays crucial regulatory roles in various biological processes such as development, immunity, and neural functions. For example, α1,3-fucosylation, the addition of a fucose moiety abundant in Drosophila neural cells, is essential for neural development, function, and behavior. However, it remains largely unknown how neural-specific α1,3-fucosylation is regulated. In the present study, we searched for genes involved in the glycosylation of a neural-specific protein using a Drosophila RNAi library. We obtained 109 genes affecting glycosylation that clustered into nine functional groups. Among them, members of the RNA regulation group were enriched by a secondary screen that identified genes specifically regulating α1,3-fucosylation. Further analyses revealed that an RNA-binding protein, second mitotic wave missing (Swm, upregulates expression of the neural-specific glycosyltransferase FucTA and facilitates its mRNA export from the nucleus. This first large-scale genetic screen for glycosylation-related genes has revealed novel regulation of fucTA mRNA in neural cells.

  16. Co-culture of neural crest stem cells (NCSC and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells results in cadherin junctions and protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anongnad Ngamjariyawat

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Transplantation of pancreatic islets to Type 1 diabetes patients is hampered by inflammatory reactions at the transplantation site leading to dysfunction and death of insulin producing beta-cells. Recently we have shown that co-transplantation of neural crest stem cells (NCSCs together with the islet cells improves transplantation outcome. The aim of the present investigation was to describe in vitro interactions between NCSCs and insulin producing beta-TC6 cells that may mediate protection against cytokine-induced beta-cell death. PROCEDURES: Beta-TC6 and NCSC cells were cultured either alone or together, and either with or without cell culture inserts. The cultures were then exposed to the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IFN-γ for 48 hours followed by analysis of cell death rates (flow cytometry, nitrite production (Griess reagent, protein localization (immunofluorescence and protein phosphorylation (flow cytometry. RESULTS: We observed that beta-TC6 cells co-cultured with NCSCs were protected against cytokine-induced cell death, but not when separated by cell culture inserts. This occurred in parallel with (i augmented production of nitrite from beta-TC6 cells, indicating that increased cell survival allows a sustained production of nitric oxide; (ii NCSC-derived laminin production; (iii decreased phospho-FAK staining in beta-TC6 cell focal adhesions, and (iv decreased beta-TC6 cell phosphorylation of ERK(T202/Y204, FAK(Y397 and FAK(Y576. Furthermore, co-culture also resulted in cadherin and beta-catenin accumulations at the NCSC/beta-TC6 cell junctions. Finally, the gap junction inhibitor carbenoxolone did not affect cytokine-induced beta-cell death during co-culture with NCSCs. CONCLUSION: In summary, direct contacts, but not soluble factors, promote improved beta-TC6 viability when co-cultured with NCSCs. We hypothesize that cadherin junctions between NCSC and beta-TC6 cells promote powerful signals that maintain beta

  17. Correction of Hirschsprung-Associated Mutations in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Via Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/Cas9, Restores Neural Crest Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Frank Pui-Ling; Lau, Sin-Ting; Wong, John Kwong-Leong; Gui, Hongsheng; Wang, Reeson Xu; Zhou, Tingwen; Lai, Wing Hon; Tse, Hung-Fat; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Garcia-Barcelo, Maria-Mercedes; Ngan, Elly Sau-Wai

    2017-07-01

    Hirschsprung disease is caused by failure of enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs) to fully colonize the bowel, leading to bowel obstruction and megacolon. Heterozygous mutations in the coding region of the RET gene cause a severe form of Hirschsprung disease (total colonic aganglionosis). However, 80% of HSCR patients have short-segment Hirschsprung disease (S-HSCR), which has not been associated with genetic factors. We sought to identify mutations associated with S-HSCR, and used the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 gene editing system to determine how mutations affect ENCC function. We created induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines from 1 patient with total colonic aganglionosis (with the G731del mutation in RET) and from 2 patients with S-HSCR (without a RET mutation), as well as RET +/- and RET -/- iPSCs. IMR90-iPSC cells were used as the control cell line. Migration and differentiation capacities of iPSC-derived ENCCs were analyzed in differentiation and migration assays. We searched for mutation(s) associated with S-HSCR by combining genetic and transcriptome data from patient blood- and iPSC-derived ENCCs, respectively. Mutations in the iPSCs were corrected using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. ENCCs derived from all iPSC lines, but not control iPSCs, had defects in migration and neuronal lineage differentiation. RET mutations were associated with differentiation and migration defects of ENCCs in vitro. Genetic and transcriptome analyses associated a mutation in the vinculin gene (VCL M209L) with S-HSCR. CRISPR/Cas9 correction of the RET G731del and VCL M209L mutations in iPSCs restored the differentiation and migration capacities of ENCCs. We identified mutations in VCL associated with S-HSCR. Correction of this mutation in iPSC using CRISPR/Cas9 editing, as well as the RET G731del mutation that causes Hirschsprung disease with total colonic aganglionosis, restored ENCC function. Our study demonstrates how human iPSCs can

  18. Neural crest origin of olfactory ensheating glia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barraud, P; Seferiadis, A.A.; Tyson, L.D.; Zwart, M.F.; Szabo-Rogers, H.L.; Ruhrberg, C; Liu, K.J.; Baker, C.V.

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique class of glial cells with exceptional translational potential because of their ability to support axon regeneration in the central nervous system. Although OECs are similar in many ways to immature and nonmyelinating Schwann cells, and can myelinate

  19. Genetic manipulation of specific neural circuits by use of a viral vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2017-01-05

    To understand the mechanisms underlying higher brain functions, we need to analyze the roles of specific neuronal pathways or cell types forming the complex neural networks. In the neuroscience field, the transgenic approach has provided a useful gene engineering tool for experimental studies of neural functions. The conventional transgenic technique requires the appropriate promoter regions that drive a neuronal type-specific gene expression, but the promoter sequences specifically functioning in each neuronal type are limited. Previously, we developed novel types of lentiviral vectors showing high efficiency of retrograde gene transfer in the central nervous system, termed highly efficient retrograde gene transfer (HiRet) vector and neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer (NeuRet) vector. The HiRet and NeuRet vectors enable genetical manipulation of specific neural pathways in diverse model animals in combination with conditional cell targeting, synaptic transmission silencing, and gene expression systems. These newly developed vectors provide powerful experimental strategies to investigate, more precisely, the machineries exerting various neural functions. In this review, we give an outline of the HiRet and NeuRet vectors and describe recent representative applications of these viral vectors for studies on neural circuits.

  20. Identification and target prediction of miRNAs specifically expressed in rat neural tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tu Kang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation. Several studies have indicated that some miRNAs are specifically expressed in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues. For example, miR-1 and miR-133 are specifically expressed in muscles. Tissue-specific miRNAs may have particular functions. Although previous studies have reported the presence of human, mouse and zebrafish tissue-specific miRNAs, there have been no detailed reports of rat tissue-specific miRNAs. In this study, Home-made rat miRNA microarrays which established in our previous study were used to investigate rat neural tissue-specific miRNAs, and mapped their target genes in rat tissues. This study will provide information for the functional analysis of these miRNAs. Results In order to obtain as complete a picture of specific miRNA expression in rat neural tissues as possible, customized miRNA microarrays with 152 selected miRNAs from miRBase were used to detect miRNA expression in 14 rat tissues. After a general clustering analysis, 14 rat tissues could be clearly classified into neural and non-neural tissues based on the obtained expression profiles with p values Conclusion Our work provides a global view of rat neural tissue-specific miRNA profiles and a target map of miRNAs, which is expected to contribute to future investigations of miRNA regulatory mechanisms in neural systems.

  1. Color selection and location selection in ERPs : differences, similarities and 'neural specificity'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, J.J.; Wijers, A.A.; Mulder, L.J.M.; Mulder, G.

    It was hypothesized that color selection consists of two stages. The first stage represents a feature specific selection in neural populations specialized in processing color. The second stage constitutes feature non-specific selections, related to executive attentional processes and/or motor

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Human Pluripotency and Neural Specification by In-Depth (PhosphoProteomic Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilyas Singec

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Controlled differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can be utilized for precise analysis of cell type identities during early development. We established a highly efficient neural induction strategy and an improved analytical platform, and determined proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of hESCs and their specified multipotent neural stem cell derivatives (hNSCs. This quantitative dataset (nearly 13,000 proteins and 60,000 phosphorylation sites provides unique molecular insights into pluripotency and neural lineage entry. Systems-level comparative analysis of proteins (e.g., transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, kinase families, phosphorylation sites, and numerous biological pathways allowed the identification of distinct signatures in pluripotent and multipotent cells. Furthermore, as predicted by the dataset, we functionally validated an autocrine/paracrine mechanism by demonstrating that the secreted protein midkine is a regulator of neural specification. This resource is freely available to the scientific community, including a searchable website, PluriProt.

  3. Polarity-specific high-level information propagation in neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Nan; Chang, Po-Yen; Hsiao, Pao-Yueh; Lo, Chung-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the connectome of a nervous system provides valuable information about the functions of its subsystems. Although much has been learned about the architectures of neural networks in various organisms by applying analytical tools developed for general networks, two distinct and functionally important properties of neural networks are often overlooked. First, neural networks are endowed with polarity at the circuit level: Information enters a neural network at input neurons, propagates through interneurons, and leaves via output neurons. Second, many functions of nervous systems are implemented by signal propagation through high-level pathways involving multiple and often recurrent connections rather than by the shortest paths between nodes. In the present study, we analyzed two neural networks: the somatic nervous system of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) and the partial central complex network of Drosophila, in light of these properties. Specifically, we quantified high-level propagation in the vertical and horizontal directions: the former characterizes how signals propagate from specific input nodes to specific output nodes and the latter characterizes how a signal from a specific input node is shared by all output nodes. We found that the two neural networks are characterized by very efficient vertical and horizontal propagation. In comparison, classic small-world networks show a trade-off between vertical and horizontal propagation; increasing the rewiring probability improves the efficiency of horizontal propagation but worsens the efficiency of vertical propagation. Our result provides insights into how the complex functions of natural neural networks may arise from a design that allows them to efficiently transform and combine input signals.

  4. Category-Specific Neural Oscillations Predict Recall Organization During Memory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Neal W.; Kahana, Michael J.; Rosenberg, Emily A.; Baltuch, Gordon H.; Litt, Brian; Sharan, Ashwini D.; Sperling, Michael R.; Polyn, Sean M.

    2013-01-01

    Retrieved-context models of human memory propose that as material is studied, retrieval cues are constructed that allow one to target particular aspects of past experience. We examined the neural predictions of these models by using electrocorticographic/depth recordings and scalp electroencephalography (EEG) to characterize category-specific oscillatory activity, while participants studied and recalled items from distinct, neurally discriminable categories. During study, these category-specific patterns predict whether a studied item will be recalled. In the scalp EEG experiment, category-specific activity during study also predicts whether a given item will be recalled adjacent to other same-category items, consistent with the proposal that a category-specific retrieval cue is used to guide memory search. Retrieved-context models suggest that integrative neural circuitry is involved in the construction and maintenance of the retrieval cue. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe category-specific patterns that rise in strength as multiple same-category items are studied sequentially, and find that individual differences in this category-specific neural integration during study predict the degree to which a participant will use category information to organize memory search. Finally, we track the deployment of this retrieval cue during memory search: Category-specific patterns are stronger when participants organize their responses according to the category of the studied material. PMID:22875859

  5. A dual-pathway neural architecture for specific temporal prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartze, Michael; Kotz, Sonja A

    2013-12-01

    Efficient behavior depends in part on the ability to predict the type and the timing of events in the environment. Specific temporal predictions require an internal representation of the temporal structure of events. Here we propose that temporal prediction recruits adaptive and non-adaptive oscillatory mechanisms involved in establishing such an internal representation. Partial structural and functional convergence of the underlying mechanisms allows speculation about an extended subcortico-cortical network. This network develops around a dual-pathway architecture, which establishes the basis for preparing the organism for perceptual integration, for the generation of specific temporal predictions, and for optimizing the brain's allocation of its limited resources. Key to these functions is rapid cerebellar transmission of an adaptively-filtered, event-based representation of temporal structure. Rapid cerebellar transmission engages a pathway comprising connections from early sensory processing stages to the cerebellum and from there to the thalamus, effectively bypassing more central stages of classical sensory pathways. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Equation-oriented specification of neural models for simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eStimberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Simulating biological neuronal networks is a core method of research in computational neuroscience. A full specification of such a network model includes a description of the dynamics and state changes of neurons and synapses, as well as the synaptic connectivity patterns and the initial values of all parameters. A standard approach in neuronal modelling software is to build models based on a library of pre-defined models and mechanisms; if a model component does not yet exist, it has to be defined in a special-purpose or general low-level language and potentially be compiled and linked with the simulator. Here we propose an alternative approach that allows flexible definition of models by writing textual descriptions based on mathematical notation. We demonstrate that this approach allows the definition of a wide range of models with minimal syntax. Furthermore, such explicit model descriptions allow the generation of executable code for various target languages and devices, since the description is not tied to an implementation. Finally, this approach also has advantages for readability and reproducibility, because the model description is fully explicit, and because it can be automatically parsed and transformed into formatted descriptions.The presented approach has been implemented in the Brian2 simulator.

  7. The neurobiology of sound-specific auditory plasticity: a core neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Yonghai; Yan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Auditory learning or experience induces large-scale neural plasticity in not only the auditory cortex but also in the auditory thalamus and midbrain. Such plasticity is guided by acquired sound (sound-specific auditory plasticity). The mechanisms involved in this process have been studied from various approaches and support the presence of a core neural circuit consisting of a subcortico-cortico-subcortical tonotopic loop supplemented by neuromodulatory (e.g., cholinergic) inputs. This circuit has three key functions essential for establishing large-scale and sound-specific plasticity in the auditory cortex, auditory thalamus and auditory midbrain. They include the presence of sound information for guiding the plasticity, the communication between the cortex, thalamus and midbrain for coordinating the plastic changes and the adjustment of the circuit status for augmenting the plasticity. This review begins with an overview of sound-specific auditory plasticity in the central auditory system. It then introduces the core neural circuit which plays an essential role in inducing sound-specific auditory plasticity. Finally, the core neural circuit and its relationship to auditory learning and experience are discussed.

  8. Specific and Nonspecific Neural Activity during Selective Processing of Visual Representations in Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwamee; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this fMRI study, we investigated prefrontal cortex (PFC) and visual association regions during selective information processing. We recorded behavioral responses and neural activity during a delayed recognition task with a cue presented during the delay period. A specific cue ("Face" or "Scene") was used to indicate which one of the two…

  9. Neural correlates of side-specific odour memory in mushroom body output neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube-Bloss, Martin F; Nawrot, Martin P; Menzel, Randolf

    2016-12-14

    Humans and other mammals as well as honeybees learn a unilateral association between an olfactory stimulus presented to one side and a reward. In all of them, the learned association can be behaviourally retrieved via contralateral stimulation, suggesting inter-hemispheric communication. However, the underlying neuronal circuits are largely unknown and neural correlates of across-brain-side plasticity have yet not been demonstrated. We report neural plasticity that reflects lateral integration after side-specific odour reward conditioning. Mushroom body output neurons that did not respond initially to contralateral olfactory stimulation developed a unique and stable representation of the rewarded compound stimulus (side and odour) predicting its value during memory retention. The encoding of the reward-associated compound stimulus is delayed by about 40 ms compared with unrewarded neural activity, indicating an increased computation time for the read-out after lateral integration. © 2016 The Author(s).

  10. The role of microRNAs in human neural stem cells, neuronal differentiation and subtype specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappert, Laura; Roese-Koerner, Beate; Brüstle, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The impressive neuronal diversity found within the nervous system emerges from a limited pool of neural progenitor cells that proceed through different gene expression programs to acquire distinct cell fates. Here, we review recent evidence indicating that microRNAs (miRNAs) are critically involved in conferring neural cell identities during neural induction, neuronal differentiation and subtype specification. Several studies have shown that miRNAs act in concert with other gene regulatory factors and genetic switches to regulate the spatial and temporal expression profiles of important cell fate determinants. So far, most studies addressing the role of miRNAs during neurogenesis were conducted using animal models. With the advent of human pluripotent stem cells and the possibility to differentiate these into neural stem cells, we now have the opportunity to study miRNAs in a human context. More insight into the impact of miRNA-based regulation during neural fate choice could in the end be exploited to develop new strategies for the generation of distinct human neuronal cell types.

  11. An Application Specific Instruction Set Processor (ASIP) for Adaptive Filters in Neural Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yao; Li, Will X Y; Zhang, Zhaorui; Cheung, Ray C C; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    Neural coding is an essential process for neuroprosthetic design, in which adaptive filters have been widely utilized. In a practical application, it is needed to switch between different filters, which could be based on continuous observations or point process, when the neuron models, conditions, or system requirements have changed. As candidates of coding chip for neural prostheses, low-power general purpose processors are not computationally efficient especially for large scale neural population coding. Application specific integrated circuits (ASICs) do not have flexibility to switch between different adaptive filters while the cost for design and fabrication is formidable. In this research work, we explore an application specific instruction set processor (ASIP) for adaptive filters in neural decoding activity. The proposed architecture focuses on efficient computation for the most time-consuming matrix/vector operations among commonly used adaptive filters, being able to provide both flexibility and throughput. Evaluation and implementation results are provided to demonstrate that the proposed ASIP design is area-efficient while being competitive to commercial CPUs in computational performance.

  12. Training-specific functional, neural, and hypertrophic adaptations to explosive- vs. sustained-contraction strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balshaw, Thomas G; Massey, Garry J; Maden-Wilkinson, Thomas M; Tillin, Neale A; Folland, Jonathan P

    2016-06-01

    Training specificity is considered important for strength training, although the functional and underpinning physiological adaptations to different types of training, including brief explosive contractions, are poorly understood. This study compared the effects of 12 wk of explosive-contraction (ECT, n = 13) vs. sustained-contraction (SCT, n = 16) strength training vs. control (n = 14) on the functional, neural, hypertrophic, and intrinsic contractile characteristics of healthy young men. Training involved 40 isometric knee extension repetitions (3 times/wk): contracting as fast and hard as possible for ∼1 s (ECT) or gradually increasing to 75% of maximum voluntary torque (MVT) before holding for 3 s (SCT). Torque and electromyography during maximum and explosive contractions, torque during evoked octet contractions, and total quadriceps muscle volume (QUADSVOL) were quantified pre and post training. MVT increased more after SCT than ECT [23 vs. 17%; effect size (ES) = 0.69], with similar increases in neural drive, but greater QUADSVOL changes after SCT (8.1 vs. 2.6%; ES = 0.74). ECT improved explosive torque at all time points (17-34%; 0.54 ≤ ES ≤ 0.76) because of increased neural drive (17-28%), whereas only late-phase explosive torque (150 ms, 12%; ES = 1.48) and corresponding neural drive (18%) increased after SCT. Changes in evoked torque indicated slowing of the contractile properties of the muscle-tendon unit after both training interventions. These results showed training-specific functional changes that appeared to be due to distinct neural and hypertrophic adaptations. ECT produced a wider range of functional adaptations than SCT, and given the lesser demands of ECT, this type of training provides a highly efficient means of increasing function. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Blueprints for behavior: genetic specification of neural circuitry for innate behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Devanand S; Meissner, Geoffrey W; Baker, Bruce S

    2006-08-01

    Innate behaviors offer a unique opportunity to use genetic analysis to dissect and characterize the neural substrates of complex behavioral programs. Courtship in Drosophila involves a complex series of stereotyped behaviors that include numerous exchanges of multimodal sensory information over time. As we will discuss in this review, recent work has demonstrated that male-specific expression of Fruitless transcription factors (Fru(M) proteins) is necessary and sufficient to confer the potential for male courtship behaviors. Fru(M) factors program neurons of the male central and peripheral nervous systems whose function is dedicated to sexual behaviors. This circuitry seems to integrate sensory information to define behavioral states and regulate conserved neural elements for sex-specific behavioral output. The principles that govern the circuitry specified by Fru(M) expression might also operate in subcortical networks that govern innate behaviors in mammals.

  14. [Autoimmune hepatitis and CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo Mandag, N; Van Gossum, M; Rickaert, F; Golstein, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the case of an autoimmune hepatitis in a 59-year old woman who was referred for a progressive jaundice. The patient had an history of CREST syndrome. The particularity of this case report is the rare association between these two autoimmune diseases.

  15. Lim homeobox genes in the Ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi: the evolution of neural cell type specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmons David K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous systems are thought to be important to the evolutionary success and diversification of metazoans, yet little is known about the origin of simple nervous systems at the base of the animal tree. Recent data suggest that ctenophores, a group of macroscopic pelagic marine invertebrates, are the most ancient group of animals that possess a definitive nervous system consisting of a distributed nerve net and an apical statocyst. This study reports on details of the evolution of the neural cell type specifying transcription factor family of LIM homeobox containing genes (Lhx, which have highly conserved functions in neural specification in bilaterian animals. Results Using next generation sequencing, the first draft of the genome of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi has been generated. The Lhx genes in all animals are represented by seven subfamilies (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, Islet, Lhx2/9, Lhx6/8, and LMO of which four were found to be represented in the ctenophore lineage (Lhx1/5, Lhx3/4, Lmx, and Islet. Interestingly, the ctenophore Lhx gene complement is more similar to the sponge complement (sponges do not possess neurons than to either the cnidarian-bilaterian or placozoan Lhx complements. Using whole mount in situ hybridization, the Lhx gene expression patterns were examined and found to be expressed around the blastopore and in cells that give rise to the apical organ and putative neural sensory cells. Conclusion This research gives us a first look at neural cell type specification in the ctenophore M. leidyi. Within M. leidyi, Lhx genes are expressed in overlapping domains within proposed neural cellular and sensory cell territories. These data suggest that Lhx genes likely played a conserved role in the patterning of sensory cells in the ancestor of sponges and ctenophores, and may provide a link to the expression of Lhx orthologs in sponge larval photoreceptive cells. Lhx genes were later co-opted into patterning more

  16. A new training algorithm using artificial neural networks to classify gender-specific dynamic gait patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Andre; Costa, Marcelo; Paolucci, Leopoldo; Braga, Antônio; Pires, Flavio; Ugrinowitsch, Herbert; Menzel, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a new training algorithm using artificial neural networks called multi-objective least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (MOBJ-LASSO) applied to the classification of dynamic gait patterns. The movement pattern is identified by 20 characteristics from the three components of the ground reaction force which are used as input information for the neural networks in gender-specific gait classification. The classification performance between MOBJ-LASSO (97.4%) and multi-objective algorithm (MOBJ) (97.1%) is similar, but the MOBJ-LASSO algorithm achieved more improved results than the MOBJ because it is able to eliminate the inputs and automatically select the parameters of the neural network. Thus, it is an effective tool for data mining using neural networks. From 20 inputs used for training, MOBJ-LASSO selected the first and second peaks of the vertical force and the force peak in the antero-posterior direction as the variables that classify the gait patterns of the different genders.

  17. Automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation of neural circuits in neonatal brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Hayes, John A; Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of neurodegenerative disease is the pathological loss of neurons that participate in generating behaviour. To investigate network properties of neural circuits and provide a complementary tool to study neurodegeneration in vitro or in situ, we developed an automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation system. The instrument consists of a two-photon and visible-wavelength confocal imaging setup, controlled by executive software, that identifies neurons in preparations based on genetically encoded fluorescent proteins or Ca2+ imaging, and then sequentially ablates cell targets while monitoring network function concurrently. Pathological changes in network function can be directly attributed to ablated cells, which are logged in real time. Here, we investigated brainstem respiratory circuits to demonstrate single-cell precision in ablation during physiological network activity, but the technique could be applied to interrogate network properties in neural systems that retain network functionality in reduced preparations in vitro or in situ. PMID:23440965

  18. Cross-Cultural Differences in the Neural Correlates of Specific and General Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Laura E.; Ksander, John C.; Johndro, Hunter A.; Gutchess, Angela H.

    2017-01-01

    Research suggests that culture influences how people perceive the world, which extends to memory specificity, or how much perceptual detail is remembered. The present study investigated cross-cultural differences (Americans vs. East Asians) at the time of encoding in the neural correlates of specific vs. general memory formation. Participants encoded photos of everyday items in the scanner and 48 hours later completed a surprise recognition test. The recognition test consisted of same (i.e., previously seen in scanner), similar (i.e., same name, different features), or new photos (i.e., items not previously seen in scanner). For Americans compared to East Asians, we predicted greater activation in the hippocampus and right fusiform for specific memory at recognition, as these regions were implicated previously in encoding perceptual details. Results revealed that East Asians activated the left fusiform and left hippocampus more than Americans for specific vs. general memory. Follow-up analyses ruled out alternative explanations of retrieval difficulty and familiarity for this pattern of cross-cultural differences at encoding. Results overall suggest that culture should be considered as another individual difference that affects memory specificity and modulates neural regions underlying these processes. PMID:28256199

  19. Social cognitive conflict resolution: Contributions of domain general and domain specific neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Jamil; Hennigan, Kelly; Weber, Jochen; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive control mechanisms allow individuals to behave adaptively in the face of complex and sometimes conflicting information. While the neural bases of these control mechanisms have been examined in many contexts, almost no attention has been paid to their role in resolving conflicts between competing social cues, which is surprising, given that cognitive conflicts are part of many social interactions. Evidence about the neural processing of social information suggests that two systems—the mirror neuron system (MNS) and mental state attribution system (MSAS)—are specialized for processing nonverbal and contextual social cues, respectively. This could support a model of social cognitive conflict resolution in which competition between social cues would recruit domain-general cognitive control mechanisms, which in turn would bias processing towards the MNS or MSAS. Such biasing could also alter social behaviors, such as inferences made about the internal states of others. We tested this model by scanning participants using fMRI while they drew inferences about social targets' emotional states based on congruent or incongruent nonverbal and contextual social cues. Conflicts between social cues recruited the anterior cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortex, brain areas associated with domain-general control processes. This activation was accompanied by biasing of neural activity towards areas in the MNS or MSAS, which tracked, respectively, with perceivers' behavioral reliance on nonverbal or contextual cues when drawing inferences about targets' emotions. Together, these data provide evidence about both domain general and domain specific mechanisms involved in resolving social cognitive conflicts. PMID:20573895

  20. Neural substrates of defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Hilbert, Kevin; Stolyar, Veronika; Maslowski, Nina I; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Depending on threat proximity, different defensive behaviours are mediated by a descending neural network involving forebrain (distal threat) vs midbrain areas (proximal threat). Compared to healthy subjects, it can be assumed that phobics are characterized by shortened defensive distances on a behavioural and neural level. This study aimed at characterizing defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia [snake (SP) and dental phobics (DP)]. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), n = 39 subjects (13 healthy controls, HC; 13 SP; 13 DP) underwent an event-related fMRI task employing an anticipation (5-10 s) and immediate perception phase (phobic pictures and matched neutral stimuli; 1250 ms) to modulate defensive distance. Although no differential brain activity in any comparisons was observed in DP, areas associated with defensive behaviours (e.g. amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain) were activated in SP. Decreasing defensive distance in SP was characterized by a shift to midbrain activity. Present findings substantiate differences between phobia types in their physiological and neural organization that can be expanded to early stages of defensive behaviours. Findings may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamic organization of defensive reactivity in different types of phobic fear. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Regional Specific Neural Precursors in Chemically Defined Medium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erceg, Slaven; Laínez, Sergio; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojkovic, Petra; Pérez-Aragó, Maria Amparo; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Moreno-Palanques, Rubén; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Stojkovic, Miodrag

    2008-01-01

    Background Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. Methodology and Principal Findings The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA) or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF) and caudalizing (RA) signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages. PMID:18461168

  2. Differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to regional specific neural precursors in chemically defined medium conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaven Erceg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human embryonic stem cells (hESC provide a unique model to study early events in human development. The hESC-derived cells can potentially be used to replace or restore different tissues including neuronal that have been damaged by disease or injury. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The cells of two different hESC lines were converted to neural rosettes using adherent and chemically defined conditions. The progenitor cells were exposed to retinoic acid (RA or to human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF in the late phase of the rosette formation. Exposing the progenitor cells to RA suppressed differentiation to rostral forebrain dopamine neural lineage and promoted that of spinal neural tissue including motor neurons. The functional characteristics of these differentiated neuronal precursors under both, rostral (bFGF and caudalizing (RA signals were confirmed by patch clamp analysis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that our differentiation protocol has the capacity to generate region-specific and electrophysiologically active neurons under in vitro conditions without embryoid body formation, co-culture with stromal cells and without presence of cells of mesodermal or endodermal lineages.

  3. Pattern of neural responses to verbal fluency shows diagnostic specificity for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walshe Muriel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairments in executive function and language processing are characteristic of both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Their functional neuroanatomy demonstrate features that are shared as well as specific to each disorder. Determining the distinct pattern of neural responses in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may provide biomarkers for their diagnoses. Methods 104 participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI scans while performing a phonological verbal fluency task. Subjects were 32 patients with schizophrenia in remission, 32 patients with bipolar disorder in an euthymic state, and 40 healthy volunteers. Neural responses to verbal fluency were examined in each group, and the diagnostic potential of the pattern of the neural responses was assessed with machine learning analysis. Results During the verbal fluency task, both patient groups showed increased activation in the anterior cingulate, left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and right putamen as compared to healthy controls, as well as reduced deactivation of precuneus and posterior cingulate. The magnitude of activation was greatest in patients with schizophrenia, followed by patients with bipolar disorder and then healthy individuals. Additional recruitment in the right inferior frontal and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortices was observed in schizophrenia relative to both bipolar disorder and healthy subjects. The pattern of neural responses correctly identified individual patients with schizophrenia with an accuracy of 92%, and those with bipolar disorder with an accuracy of 79% in which mis-classification was typically of bipolar subjects as healthy controls. Conclusions In summary, both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are associated with altered function in prefrontal, striatal and default mode networks, but the magnitude of this dysfunction is particularly marked in schizophrenia. The pattern of response to verbal fluency is highly

  4. Differential neural activity during search of specific and general autobiographical memories elicited by musical cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S

    2011-07-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies that have examined autobiographical memory specificity have utilized retrieval cues associated with prior searches of the event, potentially changing the retrieval processes being investigated. In the current study, musical cues were used to naturally elicit memories from multiple levels of specificity (i.e., lifetime period, general event, and event-specific). Sixteen young adults participated in a neuroimaging study in which they retrieved autobiographical memories associated with musical cues. These musical cues led to the retrieval of highly emotional memories that had low levels of prior retrieval. Retrieval of all autobiographical memory levels was associated with activity in regions in the autobiographical memory network, specifically the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate, and right medial temporal lobe. Owing to the use of music, memories from varying levels of specificity were retrieved, allowing for comparison of event memory and abstract personal knowledge, as well as comparison of specific and general event memory. Dorsolateral and dorsomedial prefrontal regions were engaged during event retrieval relative to personal knowledge retrieval, and retrieval of specific event memories was associated with increased activity in the bilateral medial temporal lobe and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex relative to retrieval of general event memories. These results suggest that the initial search processes for memories of different specificity levels preferentially engage different components of the autobiographical memory network. The potential underlying causes of these neural differences are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Juxtafoveolar telangiectasis associated with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerva, Valentin; Sánchez, M Carmen

    2008-01-01

    To report a case of CREST syndrome associated with juxtafoveolar telangiectasias (JT). Case report. Observational case report. A 64-year-old woman affected with CREST syndrome developed bilateral visual loss. Capillary dilatation and permeability changes in the outer retina were noticed during an angiographic study. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) showed thickening with loss of the foveal depression and inner lamellar cyst. The patient was diagnosed as stage 3, group 2A JT associated with CREST syndrome. Finding JT in association with CREST syndrome suggests a common pathophysiologic process.

  6. Sequence-specific bias correction for RNA-seq data using recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao-Zhong; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2017-01-25

    The recent success of deep learning techniques in machine learning and artificial intelligence has stimulated a great deal of interest among bioinformaticians, who now wish to bring the power of deep learning to bare on a host of bioinformatical problems. Deep learning is ideally suited for biological problems that require automatic or hierarchical feature representation for biological data when prior knowledge is limited. In this work, we address the sequence-specific bias correction problem for RNA-seq data redusing Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) to model nucleotide sequences without pre-determining sequence structures. The sequence-specific bias of a read is then calculated based on the sequence probabilities estimated by RNNs, and used in the estimation of gene abundance. We explore the application of two popular RNN recurrent units for this task and demonstrate that RNN-based approaches provide a flexible way to model nucleotide sequences without knowledge of predetermined sequence structures. Our experiments show that training a RNN-based nucleotide sequence model is efficient and RNN-based bias correction methods compare well with the-state-of-the-art sequence-specific bias correction method on the commonly used MAQC-III data set. RNNs provides an alternative and flexible way to calculate sequence-specific bias without explicitly pre-determining sequence structures.

  7. The Crest Wing Wave Energy Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of a continuation of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC), in the following referred to as ‘Phase 2'. The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave...

  8. Morbidity from iliac crest bone harvesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalk, WWI; Raghoebar, GM; Jansma, J; Boering, G

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The iliac crest is the most common donor site for autogenous bone grafting in maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the morbidity of bone harvesting from the inner table of the anterior iliac crest. Patients and Methods: Sixty-five patients were

  9. Is Neural Activity Detected by ERP-Based Brain-Computer Interfaces Task Specific?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus A Wenzel

    Full Text Available Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs that are based on event-related potentials (ERPs can estimate to which stimulus a user pays particular attention. In typical BCIs, the user silently counts the selected stimulus (which is repeatedly presented among other stimuli in order to focus the attention. The stimulus of interest is then inferred from the electroencephalogram (EEG. Detecting attention allocation implicitly could be also beneficial for human-computer interaction (HCI, because it would allow software to adapt to the user's interest. However, a counting task would be inappropriate for the envisaged implicit application in HCI. Therefore, the question was addressed if the detectable neural activity is specific for silent counting, or if it can be evoked also by other tasks that direct the attention to certain stimuli.Thirteen people performed a silent counting, an arithmetic and a memory task. The tasks required the subjects to pay particular attention to target stimuli of a random color. The stimulus presentation was the same in all three tasks, which allowed a direct comparison of the experimental conditions.Classifiers that were trained to detect the targets in one task, according to patterns present in the EEG signal, could detect targets in all other tasks (irrespective of some task-related differences in the EEG.The neural activity detected by the classifiers is not strictly task specific but can be generalized over tasks and is presumably a result of the attention allocation or of the augmented workload. The results may hold promise for the transfer of classification algorithms from BCI research to implicit relevance detection in HCI.

  10. Bottle-neck type of neural network as a mapping device towards food specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novic, Marjana; Groselj, Neva

    2009-09-01

    A novel methodology is proposed for food specifications associated with the origin of food. The methodology was tested on honey samples collected within the TRACE EU project. The data were sampled in various regions in Europe and analysed for the trace elements content. The sampling sites were characterized by different geological origins, such as limestone, shale, or magmatic. We have chosen 14 elements, B, Na, Mg, A, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Ba, due to their influence on the separation of samples regarding the geology of the sampling sites. A special architecture of an error back-propagation neural network, so called bottle-neck type of neural network was used to project the data into a 2D plane. The data were fed into the 14-nodes input layer and then transferred through the 2-nodes hidden layer (compared to a bottle-neck) to the 14-nodes output layer. The two hidden nodes representing the two coordinates of the projection plane enable us to map the samples used for training of the bottle-neck network. With the knowledge about the classes of individual samples we determine the clusters in the projection plane and consequently obtain the coordinates of the centroid (gravity point) of a particular cluster. The clusters are characterized with an ellipse shape borders spanning the length of up to 3sigma in each dimension. Since the data were classified as regard to the geology, three main clusters were sought: (i) limestone, (ii) shale/mudstone/clay/loess, and (iii) acid-magmatic origin of honey samples. The novel methodology proposed for food specifications was demonstrated on a reduced set of samples, which shows good clustering of all three classes in the projection plane, and on the third class of the original data set.

  11. Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides using artificial neural network and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiun-Ching

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides (oligos is a computationally-intensive task and is a requirement for designing microarray probes, primers, and siRNAs. An artificial neural network (ANN is a machine learning technique that can effectively process complex and high noise data. Here, ANNs are applied to process the unique subsequence distribution for prediction of specific oligos. Results We present a novel and efficient algorithm, named the integration of ANN and BLAST (IAB algorithm, to identify specific oligos. We establish the unique marker database for human and rat gene index databases using the hash table algorithm. We then create the input vectors, via the unique marker database, to train and test the ANN. The trained ANN predicted the specific oligos with high efficiency, and these oligos were subsequently verified by BLAST. To improve the prediction performance, the ANN over-fitting issue was avoided by early stopping with the best observed error and a k-fold validation was also applied. The performance of the IAB algorithm was about 5.2, 7.1, and 6.7 times faster than the BLAST search without ANN for experimental results of 70-mer, 50-mer, and 25-mer specific oligos, respectively. In addition, the results of polymerase chain reactions showed that the primers predicted by the IAB algorithm could specifically amplify the corresponding genes. The IAB algorithm has been integrated into a previously published comprehensive web server to support microarray analysis and genome-wide iterative enrichment analysis, through which users can identify a group of desired genes and then discover the specific oligos of these genes. Conclusion The IAB algorithm has been developed to construct SpecificDB, a web server that provides a specific and valid oligo database of the probe, siRNA, and primer design for the human genome. We also demonstrate the ability of the IAB algorithm to predict specific oligos through

  12. Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides using artificial neural network and computational genomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Chi; Lin, Chin-Chung; Li, Ker-Chau; Chen, Wen-Shyen E; Chen, Jiun-Ching; Yang, Ming-Te; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chang, Pei-Chun; Chen, Jeremy J W

    2007-05-22

    Genome-wide identification of specific oligonucleotides (oligos) is a computationally-intensive task and is a requirement for designing microarray probes, primers, and siRNAs. An artificial neural network (ANN) is a machine learning technique that can effectively process complex and high noise data. Here, ANNs are applied to process the unique subsequence distribution for prediction of specific oligos. We present a novel and efficient algorithm, named the integration of ANN and BLAST (IAB) algorithm, to identify specific oligos. We establish the unique marker database for human and rat gene index databases using the hash table algorithm. We then create the input vectors, via the unique marker database, to train and test the ANN. The trained ANN predicted the specific oligos with high efficiency, and these oligos were subsequently verified by BLAST. To improve the prediction performance, the ANN over-fitting issue was avoided by early stopping with the best observed error and a k-fold validation was also applied. The performance of the IAB algorithm was about 5.2, 7.1, and 6.7 times faster than the BLAST search without ANN for experimental results of 70-mer, 50-mer, and 25-mer specific oligos, respectively. In addition, the results of polymerase chain reactions showed that the primers predicted by the IAB algorithm could specifically amplify the corresponding genes. The IAB algorithm has been integrated into a previously published comprehensive web server to support microarray analysis and genome-wide iterative enrichment analysis, through which users can identify a group of desired genes and then discover the specific oligos of these genes. The IAB algorithm has been developed to construct SpecificDB, a web server that provides a specific and valid oligo database of the probe, siRNA, and primer design for the human genome. We also demonstrate the ability of the IAB algorithm to predict specific oligos through polymerase chain reaction experiments. Specific

  13. Brain plasticity, cognitive functions and neural stem cells: a pivotal role for the brain-specific neural master gene |-SRGAP2-FAM72-|.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Kutzner, Arne; Heese, Klaus

    2017-12-20

    Due to an aging society with an increased dementia-induced threat to higher cognitive functions, it has become imperative to understand the molecular and cellular events controlling the memory and learning processes in the brain. Here, we suggest that the novel master gene pair |-SRGAP2-FAM72-| (SLIT-ROBO Rho GTPase activating the protein 2, family with sequence similarity to 72) reveals a new dogma for the regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) gene expression and is a distinctive player in the control of human brain plasticity. Insight into the specific regulation of the brain-specific neural master gene |-SRGAP2-FAM72-| may essentially contribute to novel therapeutic approaches to restore or improve higher cognitive functions.

  14. Geminin loss causes neural tube defects through disrupted progenitor specification and neuronal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ES, Patterson; LE, Waller; KL, Kroll

    2014-01-01

    Geminin is a nucleoprotein that can directly bind chromatin regulatory complexes to modulate gene expression during development. Geminin knockout mouse embryos are preimplantation lethal by the 32-cell stage, precluding in vivo study of Geminin's role in neural development. Therefore, here we used a conditional Geminin allele in combination with several Cre-driver lines to define an essential role for Geminin during mammalian neural tube (NT) formation and patterning. Geminin was required in the NT within a critical developmental time window (embryonic day 8.5–10.5), when NT patterning and closure occurs. Geminin excision at these stages resulted in strongly diminished expression of genes that mark and promote dorsal NT identities and decreased differentiation of ventral motor neurons, resulting in completely penetrant NT defects, while excision after embryonic day 10.5 did not result in NT defects. When Geminin was deleted specifically in the spinal NT, both NT defects and axial skeleton defects were observed, but neither defect occurred when Geminin was excised in paraxial mesenchyme, indicating a tissue autonomous requirement for Geminin in developing neuroectoderm. Despite a potential role for Geminin in cell cycle control, we found no evidence of proliferation defects or altered apoptosis. Comparisons of gene expression in the NT of Geminin mutant versus wild-type siblings at embryonic day 10.5 revealed decreased expression of key regulators of neurogenesis, including neurogenic bHLH transcription factors and dorsal interneuron progenitor markers. Together, these data demonstrate a requirement for Geminin for NT patterning and neuronal differentiation during mammalian neurulation in vivo. PMID:24995796

  15. Imaging a cognitive model of apraxia: the neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigneux, Philippe; Van der Linden, Martial; Garraux, Gaetan; Laureys, Steven; Degueldre, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Del Fiore, Guy; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, Andre; Salmon, Eric

    2004-03-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using H2 15O PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis of the visual analysis of gestures. First, we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture imitation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;33:63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to-be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Intracranial aneurysms in patients with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Ryuta; Idei, Masaru; Kumano, Kiyoshi; Okita, Shinji; Yamane, Kanji

    2009-09-01

    CREST syndrome is a variant of scleroderma characterized by calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal hypomotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia, and is a collagen vascular disease characterized by inflammation and fibrosis of multiple organs/tissues. Neurological and cerebrovascular abnormalities are uncommon in CREST syndrome. Here, we report two patients with CREST syndrome harboring intracranial aneurysms. A 53-year-old woman with a 6-month history of CREST syndrome had multiple intracranial aneurysms that arose from the right middle cerebral artery, the left middle cerebral artery, the choroidal segment of the left internal carotid artery, and the left anterior cerebral artery. A 64-year-old woman with a 2-year history of CREST syndrome had a fusiform aneurysm located on the insular segment of the left middle cerebral artery. These patients were treated surgically and good outcome was achieved in both cases. The pathogenesis of cerebral aneurysms associated with collagen diseases, including CREST syndrome, remains unclear. Early treatment of CREST syndrome and other collagen diseases may prevent arteritis from progressing to affect the intracranial arteries and thus reduce the occurrence of aneurysms. The prognosis for patients with collagen diseases after rupture of cerebral aneurysm seems to be poor because the multiplicity, atypical morphology, and atypical location of their aneurysms make treatment difficult. Thus, early detection and treatment are important to improve the prognosis.

  17. Task-specific codes for face recognition: how they shape the neural representation of features for detection and individuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Adrian; Vettel, Jean M; Tarr, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    The variety of ways in which faces are categorized makes face recognition challenging for both synthetic and biological vision systems. Here we focus on two face processing tasks, detection and individuation, and explore whether differences in task demands lead to differences both in the features most effective for automatic recognition and in the featural codes recruited by neural processing. Our study appeals to a computational framework characterizing the features representing object categories as sets of overlapping image fragments. Within this framework, we assess the extent to which task-relevant information differs across image fragments. Based on objective differences we find among task-specific representations, we test the sensitivity of the human visual system to these different face descriptions independently of one another. Both behavior and functional magnetic resonance imaging reveal effects elicited by objective task-specific levels of information. Behaviorally, recognition performance with image fragments improves with increasing task-specific information carried by different face fragments. Neurally, this sensitivity to the two tasks manifests as differential localization of neural responses across the ventral visual pathway. Fragments diagnostic for detection evoke larger neural responses than non-diagnostic ones in the right posterior fusiform gyrus and bilaterally in the inferior occipital gyrus. In contrast, fragments diagnostic for individuation evoke larger responses than non-diagnostic ones in the anterior inferior temporal gyrus. Finally, for individuation only, pattern analysis reveals sensitivity to task-specific information within the right "fusiform face area". OUR RESULTS DEMONSTRATE: 1) information diagnostic for face detection and individuation is roughly separable; 2) the human visual system is independently sensitive to both types of information; 3) neural responses differ according to the type of task-relevant information

  18. Primary biliary cirrhosis accompanied by CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouraklis, Gregory; Glinavou, Andromahi; Karatzas, Gabriel

    2002-09-01

    CREST syndrome, a relatively benign, slowly progressive variant of systemic scleroderma consists of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia. Although the association of this syndrome with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is recognized in women, it has never been described in a man. We report the rare case of a male patient with CREST syndrome accompanied by PBC, manifested by acute cholecystitis and mild jaundice. The association of the two conditions is clinically and etiologically important. Clinicians must be aware of this association, sincethe clinical features of CREST syndrome may be mild and may be thought to be complications of the underlying liver disease.

  19. Using domain-specific basic functions for the analysis of supervised artificial neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    Since the early development of artificial neural networks, researchers have tried to analyze trained neural networks in order to gain insight into their behavior. For certain applications and in certain problem domains this has been successful, for example by the development of so-called rule

  20. Preschool externalizing behavior predicts gender-specific variation in adolescent neural structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Z K Caldwell

    Full Text Available Dysfunction in the prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus is believed to underlie the development of much psychopathology. However, to date only limited longitudinal data relate early behavior with neural structure later in life. Our objective was to examine the relationship of early life externalizing behavior with adolescent brain structure. We report here the first longitudinal study linking externalizing behavior during preschool to brain structure during adolescence. We examined the relationship of preschool externalizing behavior with amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex volumes at age 15 years in a community sample of 76 adolescents followed longitudinally since their mothers' pregnancy. A significant gender by externalizing behavior interaction revealed that males-but not females-with greater early childhood externalizing behavior had smaller amygdala volumes at adolescence (t = 2.33, p = .023. No significant results were found for the hippocampus or the prefrontal cortex. Greater early externalizing behavior also related to smaller volume of a cluster including the angular gyrus and tempoparietal junction across genders. Results were not attributable to the impact of preschool anxiety, preschool maternal stress, school-age internalizing or externalizing behaviors, or adolescent substance use. These findings demonstrate a novel, gender-specific relationship between early-childhood externalizing behavior and adolescent amygdala volume, as well as a cross-gender result for the angular gyrus and tempoparietal junction.

  1. Stability of Low-Crested Breakwaters in Shallow Water Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede; Burcharth, Hans Falk

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents results of 3D laboratory experiments on low-crested breakwaters. Two typical structural layouts were tested at model scale in a wave basin at Aalborg University, Denmark, to identify and quantify the influence of various hydrodynamic conditions (obliquity of short crested waves......, wave hight and wave steepness) and structural geometries (crest width and freeboard) on the stability of low-crested breakwaters. Results are given in terms of recommendations for design guidelines for structure stability. Damage parameters for the trunk and the roundhead are proposed based on analysis...

  2. Design Guidelines for Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Lamberti, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The European Union within the Fifth Framework Programme 1998-2002 Energy, Environment andmSustainable Development sponsored the research project: Enviromnental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS), with participation of 18 European organisations.......The European Union within the Fifth Framework Programme 1998-2002 Energy, Environment andmSustainable Development sponsored the research project: Enviromnental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS), with participation of 18 European organisations....

  3. Specific aspects of cognitive and language proficiency account for variability in neural indices of semantic and syntactic processing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton Wray, Amanda; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2013-07-01

    The neural activity mediating language processing in young children is characterized by large individual variability that is likely related in part to individual strengths and weakness across various cognitive abilities. The current study addresses the following question: How does proficiency in specific cognitive and language functions impact neural indices mediating language processing in children? Thirty typically developing seven- and eight-year-olds were divided into high-normal and low-normal proficiency groups based on performance on nonverbal IQ, auditory word recall, and grammatical morphology tests. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were elicited by semantic anomalies and phrase structure violations in naturally spoken sentences. The proficiency for each of the specific cognitive and language tasks uniquely contributed to specific aspects (e.g., timing and/or resource allocation) of neural indices underlying semantic (N400) and syntactic (P600) processing. These results suggest that distinct aptitudes within broader domains of cognition and language, even within the normal range, influence the neural signatures of semantic and syntactic processing. Furthermore, the current findings have important implications for the design and interpretation of developmental studies of ERPs indexing language processing, and they highlight the need to take into account cognitive abilities both within and outside the classic language domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. eLoom and Flatland: specification, simulation and visualization engines for the study of arbitrary hierarchical neural architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, Thomas P; Xiao, Yunhai; Healy, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    eLoom is an open source graph simulation software tool, developed at the University of New Mexico (UNM), that enables users to specify and simulate neural network models. Its specification language and libraries enables users to construct and simulate arbitrary, potentially hierarchical network structures on serial and parallel processing systems. In addition, eLoom is integrated with UNM's Flatland, an open source virtual environments development tool to provide real-time visualizations of the network structure and activity. Visualization is a useful method for understanding both learning and computation in artificial neural networks. Through 3D animated pictorially representations of the state and flow of information in the network, a better understanding of network functionality is achieved. ART-1, LAPART-II, MLP, and SOM neural networks are presented to illustrate eLoom and Flatland's capabilities.

  5. MR imaging findings of medial tibial crest friction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klontzas, Michail E., E-mail: miklontzas@gmail.com; Akoumianakis, Ioannis D., E-mail: ioannis.akoumianakis@gmail.com; Vagios, Ilias, E-mail: iliasvagios@gmail.com; Karantanas, Apostolos H., E-mail: akarantanas@gmail.com

    2013-11-01

    Objective: Medial tibial condyle bone marrow edema (BME), associated with soft tissue edema (STe) surrounding the medial collateral ligament, was incidentally observed in MRI examinations of young and athletic individuals. The aim of the present study was to 1. Prospectively investigate the association between these findings and coexistence of localized pain, and 2. Explore the possible contribution of the tibial morphology to its pathogenesis. Methods: The medial tibial condyle crest was evaluated in 632 knee MRI examinations. The angle and depth were measured by two separate evaluators. The presence of STe and BME was recorded. A third evaluator blindly assessed the presence of pain at this site. Results: BME associated with STe was found in 24 patients (with no history of previous trauma, osteoarthritis, tumor or pes anserine bursitis). The mean crest angle was 151.3° (95%CI 147.4–155.3°) compared to 159.4° (95%CI 158.8–160°) in controls (Mann–Whitney test, P < 0.0001). MRI findings were highly predictive of localized pain (sensitivity 92% specificity 99%, Fisher's exact test, P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Friction at the medial tibial condyle crest is a painful syndrome. MRI is a highly specific and sensitive imaging modality for its diagnosis.

  6. Focal adhesion kinase protein regulates Wnt3a gene expression to control cell fate specification in the developing neural plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonar, Yuri; Gutkovich, Yoni E.; Root, Heather; Malyarova, Anastasia; Aamar, Emil; Golubovskaya, Vita M.; Elias, Sarah; Elkouby, Yaniv M.; Frank, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase protein localized to regions called focal adhesions, which are contact points between cells and the extracellular matrix. FAK protein acts as a scaffold to transfer adhesion-dependent and growth factor signals into the cell. Increased FAK expression is linked to aggressive metastatic and invasive tumors. However, little is known about its normal embryonic function. FAK protein knockdown during early Xenopus laevis development anteriorizes the embryo. Morphant embryos express increased levels of anterior neural markers, with reciprocally reduced posterior neural marker expression. Posterior neural plate folding and convergence-extension is also inhibited. This anteriorized phenotype resembles that of embryos knocked down zygotically for canonical Wnt signaling. FAK and Wnt3a genes are both expressed in the neural plate, and Wnt3a expression is FAK dependent. Ectopic Wnt expression rescues this FAK morphant anteriorized phenotype. Wnt3a thus acts downstream of FAK to balance anterior–posterior cell fate specification in the developing neural plate. Wnt3a gene expression is also FAK dependent in human breast cancer cells, suggesting that this FAK–Wnt linkage is highly conserved. This unique observation connects the FAK- and Wnt-signaling pathways, both of which act to promote cancer when aberrantly activated in mammalian cells. PMID:21551070

  7. Neural stem cells as a novel platform for tumor-specific delivery of therapeutic antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T Frank

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant monoclonal antibodies have emerged as important tools for cancer therapy. Despite the promise shown by antibody-based therapies, the large molecular size of antibodies limits their ability to efficiently penetrate solid tumors and precludes efficient crossing of the blood-brain-barrier into the central nervous system (CNS. Consequently, poorly vascularized solid tumors and CNS metastases cannot be effectively treated by intravenously-injected antibodies. The inherent tumor-tropic properties of human neural stem cells (NSCs can potentially be harnessed to overcome these obstacles and significantly improve cancer immunotherapy. Intravenously-delivered NSCs preferentially migrate to primary and metastatic tumor sites within and outside the CNS. Therefore, we hypothesized that NSCs could serve as an ideal cellular delivery platform for targeting antibodies to malignant tumors. METHODS AND FINDINGS: As proof-of-concept, we selected Herceptin (trastuzumab, a monoclonal antibody widely used to treat HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. HER2 overexpression in breast cancer is highly correlated with CNS metastases, which are inaccessible to trastuzumab therapy. Therefore, NSC-mediated delivery of trastuzumab may improve its therapeutic efficacy. Here we report, for the first time, that human NSCs can be genetically modified to secrete anti-HER2 immunoglobulin molecules. These NSC-secreted antibodies assemble properly, possess tumor cell-binding affinity and specificity, and can effectively inhibit the proliferation of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells in vitro. We also demonstrate that immunoglobulin-secreting NSCs exhibit preferential tropism to tumor cells in vivo, and can deliver antibodies to human breast cancer xenografts in mice. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, these results suggest that NSCs modified to secrete HER2-targeting antibodies constitute a promising novel platform for targeted cancer immunotherapy. Specifically

  8. Sex Differences in the Neural Correlates of Specific and General Autobiographical Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compère, Laurie; Sperduti, Marco; Gallarda, Thierry; Anssens, Adèle; Lion, Stéphanie; Delhommeau, Marion; Martinelli, Pénélope; Devauchelle, Anne-Dominique; Oppenheim, Catherine; Piolino, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Autobiographical memory (AM) underlies the formation and temporal continuity over time of personal identity. The few studies on sex-related differences in AM suggest that men and women adopt different cognitive or emotional strategies when retrieving AMs. However, none of the previous works has taken into account the distinction between episodic autobiographical memory (EAM), consisting in the retrieval of specific events by means of mental time travel, and semantic autobiographical memory (SAM), which stores general personal events. Thus, it remains unclear whether differences in these strategies depend on the nature of the memory content to be retrieved. In the present study we employed functional MRI to examine brain activity underlying potential sex differences in EAM and SAM retrieval focusing on the differences in strategies related to the emotional aspects of memories while controlling for basic cognitive strategies. On the behavioral level, there was no significant sex difference in memory performances or subjective feature ratings of either type of AM. Activations common to men and women during AM retrieval were observed in a typical bilateral network comprising medial and lateral temporal regions, precuneus, occipital cortex as well as prefrontal cortex. Contrast analyses revealed that there was no difference between men and women in the EAM condition. In the SAM condition, women showed an increased activity, compared to men, in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, inferior parietal and precentral gyrus. Overall, these findings suggest that differential neural activations reflect sex-specific strategies related to emotional aspects of AMs, particularly regarding SAM. We propose that this pattern of activation during SAM retrieval reflects the cognitive cost linked to emotion regulation strategies recruited by women compared to men. These sex-related differences have interesting implications for understanding psychiatric disorders with differential sex

  9. CREST Calcinosis Affecting the Lumbar and Cervical Spine and the Use of Minimally-Invasive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Kassem; Perez-Cruet, Kristin; Perez-Cruet, Mick

    2017-04-08

    Calcinosis in CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome can affect the spinal and paraspinal areas. We present the first case to our knowledge where a CREST syndrome patient required surgery for spinal calcinosis in both the cervical and lumbar areas. A 66-year-old female with a history of CREST syndrome presented with right-sided lower extremity radicular pain. A computed tomography (CT) scan showed bilateral lumbar masses (5.8 cm on the right, 3.8 cm on the left) that projected into the foramina and into the spinal canal. The patient underwent minimally invasive bilateral surgical resection of the paraspinal masses, posterior decompressive laminectomy, posterior interbody, and posterolateral fusion. The specimen was consistent with the calcinosis of CREST syndrome. The patient's lumbar symptoms were relieved, however, two years later she presented with right radicular arm pain. A CT scan revealed a large lobulated benign tumor-like lesion on the left at C6-C7 encroaching upon the neural foramen and a large right lobulated lesion encroaching into the neural foramen with severe compression of the neural foramen at the C7-T1 level and extension into the canal, with anterior and posterior subluxation present throughout the cervical spine. Surgery was performed, which involved cervical mass resections, posterior spinal cord decompression, reconstruction, and fusion. The patient did well and has been symptom-free since her surgery. Calcinosis of the spine is a known entity that can cause morbidity in patients with CREST syndrome. Minimal invasive surgical approaches are effective and can be considered for some of these patients.

  10. Deep convolutional neural networks for pan-specific peptide-MHC class I binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngmahn; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    Computational scanning of peptide candidates that bind to a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can speed up the peptide-based vaccine development process and therefore various methods are being actively developed. Recently, machine-learning-based methods have generated successful results by training large amounts of experimental data. However, many machine learning-based methods are generally less sensitive in recognizing locally-clustered interactions, which can synergistically stabilize peptide binding. Deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is a deep learning method inspired by visual recognition process of animal brain and it is known to be able to capture meaningful local patterns from 2D images. Once the peptide-MHC interactions can be encoded into image-like array(ILA) data, DCNN can be employed to build a predictive model for peptide-MHC binding prediction. In this study, we demonstrated that DCNN is able to not only reliably predict peptide-MHC binding, but also sensitively detect locally-clustered interactions. Nonapeptide-HLA-A and -B binding data were encoded into ILA data. A DCNN, as a pan-specific prediction model, was trained on the ILA data. The DCNN showed higher performance than other prediction tools for the latest benchmark datasets, which consist of 43 datasets for 15 HLA-A alleles and 25 datasets for 10 HLA-B alleles. In particular, the DCNN outperformed other tools for alleles belonging to the HLA-A3 supertype. The F1 scores of the DCNN were 0.86, 0.94, and 0.67 for HLA-A*31:01, HLA-A*03:01, and HLA-A*68:01 alleles, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other tools. We found that the DCNN was able to recognize locally-clustered interactions that could synergistically stabilize peptide binding. We developed ConvMHC, a web server to provide user-friendly web interfaces for peptide-MHC class I binding predictions using the DCNN. ConvMHC web server can be accessible via http://jumong.kaist.ac.kr:8080/convmhc

  11. Polygenic risk for five psychiatric disorders and cross-disorder and disorder-specific neural connectivity in two independent populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianqi Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Major psychiatric disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, autism (AUT, bipolar disorder (BD, major depressive disorder (MDD, and schizophrenia (SZ, are highly heritable and polygenic. Evidence suggests that these five disorders have both shared and distinct genetic risks and neural connectivity abnormalities. To measure aggregate genetic risks, the polygenic risk score (PGRS was computed. Two independent general populations (N = 360 and N = 323 were separately examined to investigate whether the cross-disorder PGRS and PGRS for a specific disorder were associated with individual variability in functional connectivity. Consistent altered functional connectivity was found with the bilateral insula: for the left supplementary motor area and the left superior temporal gyrus with the cross-disorder PGRS, for the left insula and right middle and superior temporal lobe associated with the PGRS for autism, for the bilateral midbrain, posterior cingulate, cuneus, and precuneus associated with the PGRS for BD, and for the left angular gyrus and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex associated with the PGRS for schizophrenia. No significant functional connectivity was found associated with the PGRS for ADHD and MDD. Our findings indicated that genetic effects on the cross-disorder and disorder-specific neural connectivity of common genetic risk loci are detectable in the general population. Our findings also indicated that polygenic risk contributes to the main neurobiological phenotypes of psychiatric disorders and that identifying cross-disorder and specific functional connectivity related to polygenic risks may elucidate the neural pathways for these disorders.

  12. Material-Specific Neural Correlates of Recollection: Objects, Words, and Faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Giulia; Otten, Leun J.

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear how neural correlates of episodic memory retrieval differ depending on the type of material that is retrieved. Here, we used a source memory task to compare electrical brain activity for the recollection of three types of stimulus material. At study, healthy adults judged how well visually presented objects, words, and faces fitted…

  13. Methylmercury exposure during early Xenopus laevis development affects cell proliferation and death but not neural progenitor specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huyck, Ryan W; Nagarkar, Maitreyi; Olsen, Nina; Clamons, Samuel E; Saha, Margaret S

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widespread environmental toxin that preferentially and adversely affects developing organisms. To investigate the impact of MeHg toxicity on the formation of the vertebrate nervous system at physiologically relevant concentrations, we designed a graded phenotype scale for evaluating Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to MeHg in solution. Embryos displayed a range of abnormalities in response to MeHg, particularly in brain development, which is influenced by both MeHg concentration and the number of embryos per ml of exposure solution. A TC50 of ~50μg/l and LC50 of ~100μg/l were found when maintaining embryos at a density of one per ml, and both increased with increasing embryo density. In situ hybridization and microarray analysis showed no significant change in expression of early neural patterning genes including sox2, en2, or delta; however a noticeable decrease was observed in the terminal neural differentiation genes GAD and xGAT, but not xVGlut. PCNA, a marker for proliferating cells, was negatively correlated with MeHg dose, with a significant reduction in cell number in the forebrain and spinal cord of exposed embryos by tadpole stages. Conversely, the number of apoptotic cells in neural regions detected by a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay was significantly increased. These results provide evidence that disruption of embryonic neural development by MeHg may not be directly due to a loss of neural progenitor specification and gene transcription, but to a more general decrease in cell proliferation and increase in cell death throughout the developing nervous system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  15. Design Guidelines for Low Crested Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Lamberti, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the design guidelines for low crested structures (LCS's) to be applied in coastal protection schemes. The design guidelines are formulated as a part of the research project: Environmental Design of Low Crested Coastal Defence Structures (DELOS) within the EC 5FP...... 1998-2002. The Guidelines comprise engineering aspects related to morphological impact and structure stability, biological aspects related to ecological impact, and socio-economical aspects related to the implementation of LCS-schemes. The guidelines are limited to submerged and regularly overtopped...

  16. Mandibular segmental reconstruction with iliac crest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiechina, A E; Ogunlade, S O; Fasola, A O; Arotiba, J T

    2003-01-01

    Twenty patients consisting of 14 males and 6 females with benign destructive lesions of the mandible were reconstructed using free nonvascularised iliac crest. Harvested bone was contoured and secured with 0.5 mm stainless steel wire and reinforced with maxillo-mandibular fixation. Five patients has hemimandibulectomy with immediate reconstruction. The other 15 patients had 1 to 3 segments of the mandible reconstructed. There was only one failure. Mouth opening and closure were centric except in the patients that had hemimandibulectomy without condylar reconstruction. Mastication and facial appearance were satisfactory. In conclusion, the iliac crest is recommended for reconstruction of hemimandible as well as long contiguous segments of the mandible.

  17. Sporadic hemiplegic migraine and CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Martin Pablo; Pieroni, Miguel; Otero, Marcela; Ferreiro, Jorge Luis; Figuerola, María de Lourdes

    2010-04-01

    Hemiplegic migraines are characterised by attacks of migraine with aura accompanied by transient motor weakness. There are both familial and sporadic subtypes, which are now recognised as separate entities by the International Classification of Headache Disorders, edition II (ICHD-II). The sporadic subtype has been associated with other medical conditions, particularly rheumatological diseases. We report the case of a woman with sporadic hemiplegic migraine associated with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia). Since there is a close relationship between migraine and Raynaud's phenomenon, it could be speculated that the sporadic hemiplegic migraines in our patient might be secondary to CREST syndrome.

  18. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Brault

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV, can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4. We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  19. Body-specific motor imagery of hand actions: neural evidence from right- and left-handers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roel M Willems

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available If motor imagery uses neural structures involved in action execution, then the neural correlates of imagining an action should differ between individuals who tend to execute the action differently. Here we report fMRI data showing that motor imagery is influenced by the way people habitually perform motor actions with their particular bodies; that is, motor imagery is ‘body-specific’ (Casasanto, 2009. During mental imagery for complex hand actions, activation of cortical areas involved in motor planning and execution was left-lateralized in right-handers but right-lateralized in left-handers. We conclude that motor imagery involves the generation of an action plan that is grounded in the participant’s motor habits, not just an abstract representation at the level of the action’s goal. People with different patterns of motor experience form correspondingly different neurocognitive representations of imagined actions.

  20. Taurine enhances the growth of neural precursors derived from fetal human brain and promotes neuronal specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Benítez, Reyna; Vangipuram, Sharada D; Ramos-Mandujano, Gerardo; Lyman, William D; Pasantes-Morales, Herminia

    2013-01-01

    Taurine is present at high concentrations in the fetal brain and is required for optimal brain development. Recent studies have reported that taurine causes increased proliferation of neural stem/progenitor neural cells (neural precursor cells, NPCs) obtained from embryonic and adult rodent brain. The present study is the first to show that taurine markedly increases cell numbers in cultures and neuronal generation from human NPCs (hNPCs). hNPCs obtained from 3 fetal brains (14-15 weeks of gestation) were cultured and expanded as neurospheres, which contained 76.3% nestin-positive cells. Taurine (5-20 mM) increased the number of hNPCs in culture, with maximal effect found at 10 mM and 4 days of culture. The taurine-induced increase ranged from 57 to 188% in the 3 brains examined. Taurine significantly enhanced the percentage of neurons formed from hNPCs under differentiating conditions, with increases ranging from 172 to 480% over controls without taurine. Taurine also increased the cell number and neuronal generation in cultures of the immortalized human cell line ReNcell VM. These results suggest that taurine has a positive influence on hNPC growth and neuronal formation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Mandibular segmental reconstruction with iliac crest | Obiechina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty patients consisting of 14 males and 6 females with benign destructive lesions of the mandible were reconstructed using free nonvascularised iliac crest. Harvested bone was contoured and secured with 0.5mm stainless steel wire and reinforced with maxillo-mandibular fixation. Five patients has ...

  2. Structural Stability of Low-Crested Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    A more and more widespread way to protect the coast against ongoing erosion is to build so called Low Crested Structures (LCS’s). Despite a large number of coast parallel LCS’s exist, the structural performance of these structures are not fully clarified. The LCS’s dealt with are coast parallel...

  3. Iliac crest histomorphometry and skeletal heterogeneity in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Tong

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: This study reveals heterogeneity in cortical microarchitecture between the external and internal iliac crest cortices, as well as between the iliac crest, the femoral neck and the subtrochanteric femoral shaft. Standard iliac crest biopsy does not reflect accurately cortical microarchitecture of other skeletal sites.

  4. Low-level neural auditory discrimination dysfunctions in specific language impairment-A review on mismatch negativity findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujala, Teija; Leminen, Miika

    2017-12-01

    In specific language impairment (SLI), there is a delay in the child's oral language skills when compared with nonverbal cognitive abilities. The problems typically relate to phonological and morphological processing and word learning. This article reviews studies which have used mismatch negativity (MMN) in investigating low-level neural auditory dysfunctions in this disorder. With MMN, it is possible to tap the accuracy of neural sound discrimination and sensory memory functions. These studies have found smaller response amplitudes and longer latencies for speech and non-speech sound changes in children with SLI than in typically developing children, suggesting impaired and slow auditory discrimination in SLI. Furthermore, they suggest shortened sensory memory duration and vulnerability of the sensory memory to masking effects. Importantly, some studies reported associations between MMN parameters and language test measures. In addition, it was found that language intervention can influence the abnormal MMN in children with SLI, enhancing its amplitude. These results suggest that the MMN can shed light on the neural basis of various auditory and memory impairments in SLI, which are likely to influence speech perception. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Sall1 regulates cortical neurogenesis and laminar fate specification in mice: implications for neural abnormalities in Townes-Brocks syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Susan J; Nishinakamura, Ryuichi; Jones, Kevin R; Monaghan, A Paula

    2012-05-01

    Progenitor cells in the cerebral cortex undergo dynamic cellular and molecular changes during development. Sall1 is a putative transcription factor that is highly expressed in progenitor cells during development. In humans, the autosomal dominant developmental disorder Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is associated with mutations of the SALL1 gene. TBS is characterized by renal, anal, limb and auditory abnormalities. Although neural deficits have not been recognized as a diagnostic characteristic of the disease, ~10% of patients exhibit neural or behavioral abnormalities. We demonstrate that, in addition to being expressed in peripheral organs, Sall1 is robustly expressed in progenitor cells of the central nervous system in mice. Both classical- and conditional-knockout mouse studies indicate that the cerebral cortex is particularly sensitive to loss of Sall1. In the absence of Sall1, both the surface area and depth of the cerebral cortex were decreased at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5). These deficiencies are associated with changes in progenitor cell properties during development. In early cortical progenitor cells, Sall1 promotes proliferative over neurogenic division, whereas, at later developmental stages, Sall1 regulates the production and differentiation of intermediate progenitor cells. Furthermore, Sall1 influences the temporal specification of cortical laminae. These findings present novel insights into the function of Sall1 in the developing mouse cortex and provide avenues for future research into potential neural deficits in individuals with TBS.

  6. A tissue-specific role for intraflagellar transport genes during craniofacial development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N Schock

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are nearly ubiquitous, cellular projections that function to transduce molecular signals during development. Loss of functional primary cilia has a particularly profound effect on the developing craniofacial complex, causing several anomalies including craniosynostosis, micrognathia, midfacial dysplasia, cleft lip/palate and oral/dental defects. Development of the craniofacial complex is an intricate process that requires interactions between several different tissues including neural crest cells, neuroectoderm and surface ectoderm. To understand the tissue-specific requirements for primary cilia during craniofacial development we conditionally deleted three separate intraflagellar transport genes, Kif3a, Ift88 and Ttc21b with three distinct drivers, Wnt1-Cre, Crect and AP2-Cre which drive recombination in neural crest, surface ectoderm alone, and neural crest, surface ectoderm and neuroectoderm, respectively. We found that tissue-specific conditional loss of ciliary genes with different functions produces profoundly different facial phenotypes. Furthermore, analysis of basic cellular behaviors in these mutants suggests that loss of primary cilia in a distinct tissue has unique effects on development of adjacent tissues. Together, these data suggest specific spatiotemporal roles for intraflagellar transport genes and the primary cilium during craniofacial development.

  7. Concordance between vocal and genetic diversity in crested gibbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roos Christian

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gibbons or small apes are, next to great apes, our closest living relatives, and form the most diverse group of contemporary hominoids. A characteristic trait of gibbons is their species-specific song structure, which, however, exhibits a certain amount of inter- and intra-individual variation. Although differences in gibbon song structure are routinely applied as taxonomic tool to identify subspecies and species, it remains unclear to which degree acoustic and phylogenetic differences are correlated. To trace this issue, we comparatively analyse song recordings and mitochondrial cytochrome b gene sequence data from 22 gibbon populations representing six of the seven crested gibbon species (genus Nomascus. In addition, we address whether song similarity and geographic distribution can support a recent hypothesis about the biogeographic history of crested gibbons. Results The acoustic analysis of 92 gibbon duets confirms the hypothesised concordance between song structure and phylogeny. Based on features of male and female songs, we can not only distinguish between N. nasutus, N. concolor and the four southern species (N. leucogenys, N. siki, N. annamensis, N. gabriellae, but also between the latter by applying more detailed analysis. In addition to the significant correlation between song structure and genetic similarity, we find a similar high correlation between song similarity and geographic distance. Conclusions The results show that the structure of crested gibbon songs is not only a reliable tool to verify phylogenetic relatedness, but also to unravel geographic origins. As vocal production in other nonhuman primate species appears to be evolutionarily based, it is likely that loud calls produced by other species can serve as characters to elucidate phylogenetic relationships.

  8. Decreased N-TAF1 expression in X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism patient-specific neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Ito

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available X-linked dystonia-parkinsonism (XDP is a hereditary neurodegenerative disorder involving a progressive loss of striatal medium spiny neurons. The mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration are not known, in part because there have been few cellular models available for studying the disease. The XDP haplotype consists of multiple sequence variations in a region of the X chromosome containing TAF1, a large gene with at least 38 exons, and a multiple transcript system (MTS composed of five unconventional exons. A previous study identified an XDP-specific insertion of a SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA-type retrotransposon in intron 32 of TAF1, as well as a neural-specific TAF1 isoform, N-TAF1, which showed decreased expression in post-mortem XDP brain compared with control tissue. Here, we generated XDP patient and control fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in order to further probe cellular defects associated with this disease. As initial validation of the model, we compared expression of TAF1 and MTS transcripts in XDP versus control fibroblasts and iPSC-derived neural stem cells (NSCs. Compared with control cells, XDP fibroblasts exhibited decreased expression of TAF1 transcript fragments derived from exons 32-36, a region spanning the SVA insertion site. N-TAF1, which incorporates an alternative exon (exon 34′, was not expressed in fibroblasts, but was detectable in iPSC-differentiated NSCs at levels that were ∼threefold lower in XDP cells than in controls. These results support the previous findings that N-TAF1 expression is impaired in XDP, but additionally indicate that this aberrant transcription might occur in neural cells at relatively early stages of development that precede neurodegeneration.

  9. Hydraulics of flow over broad-crested weirs; Abfluss ueber breitkronige Wehre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro-Orgaz, Oscar [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Cordoba (Spain). Inst. de Agricultura Sostenible; Pfister, Michael [ETH Zuerich (CH). Versuchsanstalt fuer Wasserbau, Hydrologie und Glaziologie (VAW)

    2010-07-01

    Weir flow is known to be subject to streamline curvature effects since the 18{sup th} century, when Boussinesq conducted his pioneer developments. A number of investigations have focused on the development of related theoretical models. However, hydraulic practice is often based on model test research, e.g. for weir flow features where the standard hydraulic theory based on the specific energy equation fails. In this paper, a hydraulic theory is presented describing flows over broad-crested weirs allowing both for streamline curvature effects and the so-called scale effect, originated by the boundary layer development on the weir crest. The theoretical results are compared to model test data, resulting in an excellent agreement. Further, it is shown that based on the hydraulic theory the features of broad-crested weir flow may be explained, and the contradictions coming from a standard hydraulic approach are overcome. (orig.)

  10. Solar Simulation for the CREST Preflight Thermal-Vacuum Test at B-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2011, the multi-university sponsored Cosmic Ray Electron Synchrotron Telescope (CREST) has undergone thermal-vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the B- 2 Space Propulsion Facility vacuum chamber. The CREST was later flown over the Antarctic region as the payload of a stratospheric balloon. Solar simulation was provided by a system of planar infrared lamp arrays specifically designed for CREST. The lamp arrays, in conjunction with a liquid-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud, achieved the required thermal conditions for the qualification tests. This report focuses on the design and analysis of the planar arrays based on first principles. Computational spreadsheets are included in the report.

  11. Commonalities and differences in the neural substrates of threat predictability in panic disorder and specific phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Luisa Klahn

    2017-01-01

    Group independent neural activity in the right dlPFC increased with decreasing threat predictability. PD patients showed a sustained hyperactivation of the vmPFC under threat and safety conditions. The magnitude of hyperactivation was inversely correlated with PDs subjective arousal and anxiety sensitivity. Both PD and SP patients revealed decreased parietal processing of affective stimuli. Findings indicate overgeneralization between threat and safety conditions and increased need for emotion regulation via the vmPFC in PD, but not SP patients. Both anxiety disorders showed decreased activation in parietal networks possibly indicating attentional avoidance of affective stimuli. Present results complement findings from fear conditioning studies and underline overgeneralization of fear, particularly in PD.

  12. Gender-specific strategy use and neural correlates in a spatial perspective taking task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stefan; Walther, Stephan; Nennig, Ernst; Kronmüller, Klaus; Mundt, Christoph; Weisbrod, Matthias; Stippich, Christoph; Vogeley, Kai

    2008-08-01

    In the context of the present study spatial perspective taking refers to the ability to translocate one's own egocentric viewpoint to somebody else's viewpoint in space. We adopted a spatial perspective taking paradigm and performed a functional magnetic resonance imaging study to assess gender differences of neural activity during perspective taking. 24 healthy subjects (12 male/12 female) were asked to systematically either take their own (first-person-perspective, 1PP) or another person's perspective (third-person-perspective, 3PP). Presented stimuli consisted of a virtual scenery with an avatar and red balls around him that had to be counted, if visible, from 1PP or 3PP. Reaction time was increased and correctness scores were decreased during the cognitively more effortful 3PP condition. Correctness scores showed a trend towards a more pronounced decline of performance during 3PP as compared to 1PP in female subjects. Female subjects correctness scores declined by 6.7% from 1PP to 3PP, while in male subjects this performance decline was only 2.7%. Debriefings after the experiment, reaction times depending on angle of rotation and error rates suggest that males are more likely to employ an object-based strategy in contrast to a consistently employed egocentric perspective transformation in females. In the whole group, neural activity was increased in the parieto-occipital, right inferior frontal and supplementary motor areas, confirming previous studies. With respect to gender, male subjects showed stronger activation in the precuneus and the right inferior frontal gyrus than female subjects in a region-of-interest approach. In a subgroup of male subjects whose strategy reports suggest object-based strategies these differences seem to be more pronounced. In conclusion, the differential recruitment of brain regions most likely reflects different strategies in solving this spatial perspective taking task.

  13. Program Specificity for Ptf1a in Pancreas versus Neural Tube Development Correlates with Distinct Collaborating Cofactors and Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, David M.; Borromeo, Mark D.; Deering, Tye G.; Casey, Bradford H.; Savage, Trisha K.; Mayer, Paul R.; Hoang, Chinh; Tung, Kuang-Chi; Kumar, Manonmani; Shen, Chengcheng; Swift, Galvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is a critical driver for development of both the pancreas and nervous system. How one transcription factor controls diverse programs of gene expression is a fundamental question in developmental biology. To uncover molecular strategies for the program-specific functions of Ptf1a, we identified bound genomic regions in vivo during development of both tissues. Most regions bound by Ptf1a are specific to each tissue, lie near genes needed for proper formation of each tissue, and coincide with regions of open chromatin. The specificity of Ptf1a binding is encoded in the DNA surrounding the Ptf1a-bound sites, because these regions are sufficient to direct tissue-restricted reporter expression in transgenic mice. Fox and Sox factors were identified as potential lineage-specific modifiers of Ptf1a binding, since binding motifs for these factors are enriched in Ptf1a-bound regions in pancreas and neural tube, respectively. Of the Fox factors expressed during pancreatic development, Foxa2 plays a major role. Indeed, Ptf1a and Foxa2 colocalize in embryonic pancreatic chromatin and can act synergistically in cell transfection assays. Together, these findings indicate that lineage-specific chromatin landscapes likely constrain the DNA binding of Ptf1a, and they identify Fox and Sox gene families as part of this process. PMID:23754747

  14. A category-specific top-down attentional set can affect the neural responses outside the current focus of attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Wu, Xia; Gao, Xiaorong

    2017-10-17

    A top-down set can guide attention to enhance the processing of task-relevant objects. Many studies have found that the top-down set can be tuned to a category level. However, it is unclear whether the category-specific top-down set involving a central search task can exist outside the current area of attentional focus. To directly probe the neural responses inside and outside the current focus of attention, we recorded continuous EEG to measure the contralateral ERP components for central targets and the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP) oscillations associated with a flickering checkerboard placed on the visual periphery. The relationship of color categories between targets and non-targets was manipulated to investigate the effect of category-specific top-down set. Results showed that when the color categories of targets and non-targets in the central search arrays were the same, larger SSVEP oscillations were evoked by target color peripheral checkerboards relative to the non-target color ones outside the current attentional focus. However, when the color categories of targets and non-targets were different, the peripheral checkerboards in two different colors of the same category evoked similar SSVEP oscillations, indicating the effects of category-specific top-down set. These results firstly demonstrate that the category-specific top-down set can affect the neural responses of peripheral distractors. The results could support the idea of a global selection account and challenge the attentional window account in selective attention. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Crew Escape Technologies (CREST) Mission Area Requirements Study Current and Future Crew Escape Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    anthropometry and the type and location of the equipment worn by the test suboect. Based upon the data taken In the early nineteen sixties it was...3.1.1 of the CREST Specification describes the system as having -Flow stagnation fence to reduce windblast Induced loads on the head, torso and upper

  16. Compound-specific effects of diverse neurodevelopmental toxicants on global gene expression in the neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theunissen, P.T., E-mail: Peter.Theunissen@rivm.nl [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Robinson, J.F. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pennings, J.L.A. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Herwijnen, M.H. van [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Kleinjans, J.C.S. [Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Piersma, A.H. [Laboratory for Health Protection Research, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven (Netherlands); Netherlands Toxicogenomics Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing are needed to reduce animal use in regulatory toxicology. The in vitro murine neural embryonic stem cell test (ESTn) was designed as an alternative for neurodevelopmental toxicity testing. The integration of toxicogenomic-based approaches may further increase predictivity as well as provide insight into underlying mechanisms of developmental toxicity. In the present study, we investigated concentration-dependent effects of six mechanistically diverse compounds, acetaldehyde (ACE), carbamazepine (CBZ), flusilazole (FLU), monoethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), penicillin G (PENG) and phenytoin (PHE), on the transcriptome and neural differentiation in the ESTn. All compounds with the exception of PENG altered ESTn morphology (cytotoxicity and neural differentiation) in a concentration-dependent manner. Compound induced gene expression changes and corresponding enriched gene ontology biological processes (GO–BP) were identified after 24 h exposure at equipotent differentiation-inhibiting concentrations of the compounds. Both compound-specific and common gene expression changes were observed between subsets of tested compounds, in terms of significance, magnitude of regulation and functionality. For example, ACE, CBZ and FLU induced robust changes in number of significantly altered genes (≥ 687 genes) as well as a variety of GO–BP, as compared to MEHP, PHE and PENG (≤ 55 genes with no significant changes in GO–BP observed). Genes associated with developmentally related processes (embryonic morphogenesis, neuron differentiation, and Wnt signaling) showed diverse regulation after exposure to ACE, CBZ and FLU. In addition, gene expression and GO–BP enrichment showed concentration dependence, allowing discrimination of non-toxic versus toxic concentrations on the basis of transcriptomics. This information may be used to define adaptive versus toxic responses at the transcriptome level.

  17. Adolescent-specific patterns of behavior and neural activity during social reinforcement learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca M.; Somerville, Leah H.; Li, Jian; Ruberry, Erika J.; Powers, Alisa; Mehta, Natasha; Dyke, Jonathan; Casey, BJ

    2014-01-01

    Humans are sophisticated social beings. Social cues from others are exceptionally salient, particularly during adolescence. Understanding how adolescents interpret and learn from variable social signals can provide insight into the observed shift in social sensitivity during this period. The current study tested 120 participants between the ages of 8 and 25 years on a social reinforcement learning task where the probability of receiving positive social feedback was parametrically manipulated. Seventy-eight of these participants completed the task during fMRI scanning. Modeling trial-by-trial learning, children and adults showed higher positive learning rates than adolescents, suggesting that adolescents demonstrated less differentiation in their reaction times for peers who provided more positive feedback. Forming expectations about receiving positive social reinforcement correlated with neural activity within the medial prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum across age. Adolescents, unlike children and adults, showed greater insular activity during positive prediction error learning and increased activity in the supplementary motor cortex and the putamen when receiving positive social feedback regardless of the expected outcome, suggesting that peer approval may motivate adolescents towards action. While different amounts of positive social reinforcement enhanced learning in children and adults, all positive social reinforcement equally motivated adolescents. Together, these findings indicate that sensitivity to peer approval during adolescence goes beyond simple reinforcement theory accounts and suggests possible explanations for how peers may motivate adolescent behavior. PMID:24550063

  18. Tract-specific white matter hyperintensities disrupt neural network function in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Alexander N W; Kambeitz-Ilankovic, Lana; Gesierich, Benno; Simon-Vermot, Lee; Franzmeier, Nicolai; Araque Caballero, Miguel Á; Müller, Sophia; Hesheng, Liu; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Bürger, Katharina; Weiner, Michael W; Dichgans, Martin; Duering, Marco; Ewers, Michael

    2017-03-01

    White matter hyperintensities (WMHs) increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whether WMHs are associated with the decline of functional neural networks in AD is debated. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and WMH were assessed in 78 subjects with increased amyloid levels on AV-45 positron emission tomography (PET) in different clinical stages of AD. We tested the association between WMH volume in major atlas-based fiber tract regions of interest (ROIs) and changes in functional connectivity (FC) between the tracts' projection areas within the default mode network (DMN). WMH volume within the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFOF) was the highest among all tract ROIs and associated with reduced FC in IFOF-connected DMN areas, independently of global AV-45 PET. Higher AV-45 PET contributed to reduced FC in IFOF-connected, temporal, and parietal DMN areas. High fiber tract WMH burden is associated with reduced FC in connected areas, thus adding to the effects of amyloid pathology on neuronal network function. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Generation of Integration-free and Region-Specific Neural Progenitors from Primate Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Lu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal and adult human and monkey fibroblasts were infected with Sendai virus containing the Yamanaka factors for 24 hr, then they were cultured in a chemically defined medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, transforming growth factor (TGF-β inhibitor SB431542, and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3β inhibitor CHIR99021 at 39°C for inactivation of the virus. Induced neural progenitor (iNP colonies appeared as early as day 13 and can be expanded for >20 passages. Under the same defined condition, no induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC colonies formed at either 37°C or 39°C. The iNPs predominantly express hindbrain genes and differentiate into hindbrain neurons, and when caudalized, they produced an enriched population of spinal motor neurons. Following transplantation into the forebrain, the iNP-derived cells retained the hindbrain identity. The ability to generate defined, integration-free iNPs from adult primate fibroblasts under a defined condition with predictable fate choices will facilitate disease modeling and therapeutic development.

  20. Neural correlates of conflict between gestures and words: A domain-specific role for a temporal-parietal complex

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J Adam Noah; Swethasri Dravida; Xian Zhang; Shaul Yahil; Joy Hirsch

    2017-01-01

    .... To gain insight into these underlying neural processes, we compared neural responses in a traditional color/word conflict task and to a gesture/word conflict task to test hypotheses of domain-general...

  1. Differential Neural Activity during Search of Specific and General Autobiographical Memories Elicited by Musical Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jaclyn Hennessey; Addis, Donna Rose; Giovanello, Kelly S.

    2011-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies that have examined autobiographical memory specificity have utilized retrieval cues associated with prior searches of the event, potentially changing the retrieval processes being investigated. In the current study, musical cues were used to naturally elicit memories from multiple levels of specificity (i.e., lifetime…

  2. Cell delamination in the mesencephalic neural fold and its implication for the origin of ectomesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakaya, Yukiko; Sheng, Guojun; Trainor, Paul A.; Weston, James A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure unique to vertebrate embryos that gives rise to multiple lineages along the rostrocaudal axis. In cranial regions, neural crest cells are thought to differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes, pericytes and stromal cells, which are collectively termed ectomesenchyme derivatives, as well as pigment and neuronal derivatives. There is still no consensus as to whether the neural crest can be classified as a homogenous multipotent population of cells. This unresolved controversy has important implications for the formation of ectomesenchyme and for confirmation of whether the neural fold is compartmentalized into distinct domains, each with a different repertoire of derivatives. Here we report in mouse and chicken that cells in the neural fold delaminate over an extended period from different regions of the cranial neural fold to give rise to cells with distinct fates. Importantly, cells that give rise to ectomesenchyme undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition from a lateral neural fold domain that does not express definitive neural markers, such as Sox1 and N-cadherin. Additionally, the inference that cells originating from the cranial neural ectoderm have a common origin and cell fate with trunk neural crest cells prompted us to revisit the issue of what defines the neural crest and the origin of the ectomesenchyme. PMID:24198279

  3. The specificity of neural responses to music and their relation to voice processing: an fMRI-adaptation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armony, Jorge L; Aubé, William; Angulo-Perkins, Arafat; Peretz, Isabelle; Concha, Luis

    2015-04-23

    Several studies have identified, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a region within the superior temporal gyrus that preferentially responds to musical stimuli. However, in most cases, significant responses to other complex stimuli, particularly human voice, were also observed. Thus, it remains unknown if the same neurons respond to both stimulus types, albeit with different strengths, or whether the responses observed with fMRI are generated by distinct, overlapping neural populations. To address this question, we conducted an fMRI experiment in which short music excerpts and human vocalizations were presented in a pseudo-random order. Critically, we performed an adaptation-based analysis in which responses to the stimuli were analyzed taking into account the category of the preceding stimulus. Our results confirm the presence of a region in the anterior STG that responds more strongly to music than voice. Moreover, we found a music-specific adaptation effect in this area, consistent with the existence of music-preferred neurons. Lack of differences between musicians and non-musicians argues against an expertise effect. These findings provide further support for neural separability between music and speech within the temporal lobe. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Common and disorder-specific neural responses to emotional faces in generalised anxiety, social anxiety and panic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonzo, Gregory A.; Ramsawh, Holly J.; Flagan, Taru M.; Sullivan, Sarah G.; Letamendi, Andrea; Simmons, Alan N.; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although evidence exists for abnormal brain function across various anxiety disorders, direct comparison of neural function across diagnoses is needed to elicit abnormalities common across disorders and those distinct to a particular diagnosis. Aims To delineate common and distinct abnormalities within generalised anxiety (GAD), panic and social anxiety disorder (SAD) during affective processing. Method Fifty-nine adults (15 with GAD, 15 with panic disorder, 14 with SAD, and 15 healthy controls) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing a facial emotion matching task with fearful, angry and happy faces. Results Greater differential right amygdala activation to matching fearful v. happy facial expressions related to greater negative affectivity (i.e. trait anxiety) and was heightened across all anxiety disorder groups compared with controls. Collapsing across emotional face types, participants with panic disorder uniquely displayed greater posterior insula activation. Conclusions These preliminary results highlight a common neural basis for clinical anxiety in these diagnoses and also suggest the presence of disorder-specific dysfunction. PMID:25573399

  5. Prokaryotic expression, purification, and production of glutathione S-transferase-tagged neural stem cell specific peptides from phage display screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lei; Zhao, Wenxiu; Ma, Lan

    2013-02-01

    Combining stem cell with phage display to discover novel biomarkers is a new field in stem cell studies. Novel peptides obtained through phage display panning have been functionally identified and involved into initial applications as cell culture support or cell label. In the present study, we designed a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-tagged peptide complex to construct an easy and efficient prokaryotic expression and purification platform for peptides obtained from phage display panning. The purified GST-peptide protein could specifically bind to neural stem (NS) cells and could be flexibly used for GST pull down assay or NS cell labeling in future studies. The results of the present study would be useful for cell labeling and future investigations of special receptors on stem cell surface.

  6. Neural-specific deletion of Htra2 causes cerebellar neurodegeneration and defective processing of mitochondrial OPA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Victoria L; Zullo, Alfred J; Koenig, Claire; Stoessel, Sean; Jo, Hakryul; Liu, Xinran; Han, Jinah; Choi, Murim; DeWan, Andrew T; Thomas, Jean-Leon; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Hoh, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    HTRA2, a serine protease in the intermembrane space, has important functions in mitochondrial stress signaling while its abnormal activity may contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease. Mice with a missense or null mutation of Htra2 fail to thrive, suffer striatal neuronal loss, and a parkinsonian phenotype that leads to death at 30-40 days of age. While informative, these mouse models cannot separate neural contributions from systemic effects due to the complex phenotypes of HTRA2 deficiency. Hence, we developed mice carrying a Htra2-floxed allele to query the consequences of tissue-specific HTRA2 deficiency. We found that mice with neural-specific deletion of Htra2 exhibited atrophy of the thymus and spleen, cessation to gain weight past postnatal (P) day 18, neurological symptoms including ataxia and complete penetrance of premature death by P40. Histologically, increased apoptosis was detected in the cerebellum, and to a lesser degree in the striatum and the entorhinal cortex, from P25. Even earlier at P20, mitochondria in the cerebella already exhibited abnormal morphology, including swelling, vesiculation, and fragmentation of the cristae. Furthermore, the onset of these structural anomalies was accompanied by defective processing of OPA1, a key molecule for mitochondrial fusion and cristae remodeling, leading to depletion of the L-isoform. Together, these findings suggest that HTRA2 is essential for maintenance of the mitochondrial integrity in neurons. Without functional HTRA2, a lifespan as short as 40 days accumulates a large quantity of dysfunctional mitochondria that contributes to the demise of mutant mice.

  7. Neural-specific deletion of Htra2 causes cerebellar neurodegeneration and defective processing of mitochondrial OPA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Patterson

    Full Text Available HTRA2, a serine protease in the intermembrane space, has important functions in mitochondrial stress signaling while its abnormal activity may contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease. Mice with a missense or null mutation of Htra2 fail to thrive, suffer striatal neuronal loss, and a parkinsonian phenotype that leads to death at 30-40 days of age. While informative, these mouse models cannot separate neural contributions from systemic effects due to the complex phenotypes of HTRA2 deficiency. Hence, we developed mice carrying a Htra2-floxed allele to query the consequences of tissue-specific HTRA2 deficiency. We found that mice with neural-specific deletion of Htra2 exhibited atrophy of the thymus and spleen, cessation to gain weight past postnatal (P day 18, neurological symptoms including ataxia and complete penetrance of premature death by P40. Histologically, increased apoptosis was detected in the cerebellum, and to a lesser degree in the striatum and the entorhinal cortex, from P25. Even earlier at P20, mitochondria in the cerebella already exhibited abnormal morphology, including swelling, vesiculation, and fragmentation of the cristae. Furthermore, the onset of these structural anomalies was accompanied by defective processing of OPA1, a key molecule for mitochondrial fusion and cristae remodeling, leading to depletion of the L-isoform. Together, these findings suggest that HTRA2 is essential for maintenance of the mitochondrial integrity in neurons. Without functional HTRA2, a lifespan as short as 40 days accumulates a large quantity of dysfunctional mitochondria that contributes to the demise of mutant mice.

  8. Sensitive and specific peak detection for SELDI-TOF mass spectrometry using a wavelet/neural-network based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent A Emanuele

    Full Text Available SELDI-TOF mass spectrometer's compact size and automated, high throughput design have been attractive to clinical researchers, and the platform has seen steady-use in biomarker studies. Despite new algorithms and preprocessing pipelines that have been developed to address reproducibility issues, visual inspection of the results of SELDI spectra preprocessing by the best algorithms still shows miscalled peaks and systematic sources of error. This suggests that there continues to be problems with SELDI preprocessing. In this work, we study the preprocessing of SELDI in detail and introduce improvements. While many algorithms, including the vendor supplied software, can identify peak clusters of specific mass (or m/z in groups of spectra with high specificity and low false discover rate (FDR, the algorithms tend to underperform estimating the exact prevalence and intensity of peaks in those clusters. Thus group differences that at first appear very strong are shown, after careful and laborious hand inspection of the spectra, to be less than significant. Here we introduce a wavelet/neural network based algorithm which mimics what a team of expert, human users would call for peaks in each of several hundred spectra in a typical SELDI clinical study. The wavelet denoising part of the algorithm optimally smoothes the signal in each spectrum according to an improved suite of signal processing algorithms previously reported (the LibSELDI toolbox under development. The neural network part of the algorithm combines those results with the raw signal and a training dataset of expertly called peaks, to call peaks in a test set of spectra with approximately 95% accuracy. The new method was applied to data collected from a study of cervical mucus for the early detection of cervical cancer in HPV infected women. The method shows promise in addressing the ongoing SELDI reproducibility issues.

  9. The diagnostic quandary of hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia vs. CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J B; Ben-Aviv, D; Covello, S P

    2001-10-01

    The distribution and clinical appearance of the telangiectasia in the CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia) and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) are very similar. Several previously reported cases of the CREST syndrome simulating HHT illustrate this diagnostic quandary. We report a patient who met the diagnostic criteria for both the CREST syndrome and HHT, and discuss the distinguishing features of the two diseases, including the distinctive histopathological findings of telangiectasia in HHT.

  10. Lessons learned from the EU project T-CREST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoeberl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A three year EU project, such a T-CREST, with partners from all over Europe and with backgrounds from different domains is a challenging endeavor. Successful execution of such a project depends on more factors than simply performing excellent research. Within the three-year project T-CREST eight...... enabled the successful completion of the T-CREST project. The T-CREST platform is now available, with most components in open source, to be used for future real-time systems and as a platform for further research....

  11. Short-crested waves in the surf zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhangping; Dalrymple, Robert A.; Xu, Munan; Garnier, Roland; Derakhti, Morteza

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates short-crested waves in the surf zone by using the mesh-free Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics model, GPUSPH. The short-crested waves are created by generating intersecting wave trains in a numerical wave basin with a beach. We first validate the numerical model for short-crested waves by comparison with large-scale laboratory measurements. Then short-crested wave breaking over a planar beach is studied comprehensively. We observe rip currents as discussed in Dalrymple (1975) and undertow created by synchronous intersecting waves. The wave breaking of the short-crested wavefield created by the nonlinear superposition of intersecting waves and wave-current interaction result in the formation of isolated breakers at the ends of breaking wave crests. Wave amplitude diffraction at these isolated breakers gives rise to an increase in the alongshore wave number in the inner surf zone. Moreover, 3-D vortices and multiple circulation cells with a rotation frequency much lower than the incident wave frequency are observed across the outer surf zone to the beach. Finally, we investigate vertical vorticity generation under short-crested wave breaking and find that breaking of short-crested waves generates vorticity as pointed out by Peregrine (1998). Vorticity generation is not only observed under short-crested waves with a limited number of wave components but also under directional wave spectra.

  12. A crested theropod dinosaur from antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, W R; Hickerson, W J

    1994-05-06

    Jurassic fossil vertebrates collected from the Falla Formation in the Central Transantarctic Mountains included a partial skull and postcranial elements of a crested theropod, Cryolophosaurus ellioti gen. nov. sp. nov. The theropod bears some resemblance to the large tetanurans of the Middle to Late Jurassic but also has primitive ceratosaurian features. Elements from a prosauropod, teeth from scavenging theropods, a pterosaur humerus, and a tritylodont molar were also recovered. The presence of this fauna suggests that a mild climate existed at high paleolatitude in this area of Gondwana during the Early Jurassic.

  13. Bronchiectasis in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Frédéric; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Coutaux, Anne; Koeger, Anne-Claude; Bourgeois, Pierre; Fautrel, Bruno

    2002-10-01

    Bronchiectasis is an uncommon pulmonary manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We report the case of a 70-year-old woman with CREST syndrome and vasculitis who developed multifocal symptomatic bronchiectasis. The bronchiectasis and immunosuppressive therapy precipitated severe lower respiratory tract infection, which was fatal within a few months. The concomitant occurrence of bronchiectasis and SSc raises the possibility of a pathophysiological relationship. Several hypotheses can be put forward to explain the occurrence of bronchial wall damage leading to bronchiectasis. Whatever the mechanism, cases of bronchiectasis in patients with SSc should be reported to make physicians aware of the substantial risk associated with this combination.

  14. Effects of category-specific costs on neural systems for perceptual decision-making

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, Stephen M; Whiteley, Louise Emma; Hulme, Oliver James

    2010-01-01

    Perceptual judgments are often biased by prospective losses, leading to changes in decision criteria. Little is known about how and where sensory evidence and cost information interact in the brain to influence perceptual categorization. Here we show that prospective losses systematically bias...... the perception of noisy face-house images. Asymmetries in category-specific cost were associated with enhanced blood-oxygen-level-dependent signal in a frontoparietal network. We observed selective activation of parahippocampal gyrus for changes in category-specific cost in keeping with the hypothesis that loss...... functions enact a particular task set that is communicated to visual regions. Across subjects, greater shifts in decision criteria were associated with greater activation of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Our results support a hypothesis that costs bias an intermediate representation between...

  15. CREST: Center for Renewable Energy Science and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billo, Richard E. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Rajeshwar, Krishnan [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2012-03-20

    The DOE project addressed an approach to the hydrogen economy by researching hydrogen generation from low cost domestic fossil fuel sources. Specifically, the CREST research team developed new processes for extracting hydrogen from southwestern lignite for the production of clean synthetic fuels such as synthetic crude oil that is free of sulfur, carbon dioxide and other pollutants that can be shipped to nearby Texas refineries and power plants for development of transportation fuels and power generation. Research was also undertaken to convert any potential by-products of this process such as CO2 to useful chemicals and gases which may be recycled and used as feedstock to the synthetic fuel process. Finally, to ensure the proposed process is functional beyond bench scale, a detailed design of a pilot plant was completed. The overall project was divided into five tasks including a management task as outlined below.

  16. Environmental Design Guidelines for Low Crested Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Hawkins, Stephen J.; Zanuttigh, Barbara

    The effect of human activities is primarily local but can extend far away from the location of intervention. This underlines the importance of establishing coastal zone management plans covering large stretches of coastlines. The interaction of wave climate, beach erosion, beach defence, habitat...... changes and beach value, which clearly exists based on EC research experiences and particularly on results obtained by DELOS Project (www.delos.unibo.it) for Low Crested Structures (LCSs), suggests the necessity of integrated approaches and thus the relevance of design guidelines covering: structure...... stability and construction problems, hydro and morphodynamic effects, environmental effects (colonisation of the structure and water quality), societal and economic impacts (recreational benefits, swimming safety, beach quality). The present guidelines are specifically dedicated to LCSs to provide...

  17. Neural correlates of conflict between gestures and words: A domain-specific role for a temporal-parietal complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Adam Noah

    Full Text Available The interpretation of social cues is a fundamental function of human social behavior, and resolution of inconsistencies between spoken and gestural cues plays an important role in successful interactions. To gain insight into these underlying neural processes, we compared neural responses in a traditional color/word conflict task and to a gesture/word conflict task to test hypotheses of domain-general and domain-specific conflict resolution. In the gesture task, recorded spoken words ("yes" and "no" were presented simultaneously with video recordings of actors performing one of the following affirmative or negative gestures: thumbs up, thumbs down, head nodding (up and down, or head shaking (side-to-side, thereby generating congruent and incongruent communication stimuli between gesture and words. Participants identified the communicative intent of the gestures as either positive or negative. In the color task, participants were presented the words "red" and "green" in either red or green font and were asked to identify the color of the letters. We observed a classic "Stroop" behavioral interference effect, with participants showing increased response time for incongruent trials relative to congruent ones for both the gesture and color tasks. Hemodynamic signals acquired using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS were increased in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC for incongruent trials relative to congruent trials for both tasks consistent with a common, domain-general mechanism for detecting conflict. However, activity in the left DLPFC and frontal eye fields and the right temporal-parietal junction (TPJ, superior temporal gyrus (STG, supramarginal gyrus (SMG, and primary and auditory association cortices was greater for the gesture task than the color task. Thus, in addition to domain-general conflict processing mechanisms, as suggested by common engagement of right DLPFC, socially specialized neural modules localized to

  18. Using c-Jun to identify fear extinction learning-specific patterns of neural activity that are affected by single prolonged stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Stanfield, Briana R; Staib, Jennifer M; David, Nina P; DePietro, Thomas; Chamness, Marisa; Schneider, Elizabeth K; Keller, Samantha M; Lawless, Caroline

    2017-12-29

    Neural circuits via which stress leads to disruptions in fear extinction is often explored in animal stress models. Using the single prolonged stress (SPS) model of post traumatic stress disorder and the immediate early gene (IEG) c-Fos as a measure of neural activity, we previously identified patterns of neural activity through which SPS disrupts extinction retention. However, none of these stress effects were specific to fear or extinction learning and memory. C-Jun is another IEG that is sometimes regulated in a different manner to c-Fos and could be used to identify emotional learning/memory specific patterns of neural activity that are sensitive to SPS. Animals were either fear conditioned (CS-fear) or presented with CSs only (CS-only) then subjected to extinction training and testing. C-Jun was then assayed within neural substrates critical for extinction memory. Inhibited c-Jun levels in the hippocampus (Hipp) and enhanced functional connectivity between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and basolateral amygdala (BLA) during extinction training was disrupted by SPS in the CS-fear group only. As a result, these effects were specific to emotional learning/memory. SPS also disrupted inhibited Hipp c-Jun levels, enhanced BLA c-Jun levels, and altered functional connectivity among the vmPFC, BLA, and Hipp during extinction testing in SPS rats in the CS-fear and CS-only groups. As a result, these effects were not specific to emotional learning/memory. Our findings suggest that SPS disrupts neural activity specific to extinction memory, but may also disrupt the retention of fear extinction by mechanisms that do not involve emotional learning/memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A realistic neural mass model of the cortex with laminar-specific connections and synaptic plasticity - evaluation with auditory habituation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available In this work we propose a biologically realistic local cortical circuit model (LCCM, based on neural masses, that incorporates important aspects of the functional organization of the brain that have not been covered by previous models: (1 activity dependent plasticity of excitatory synaptic couplings via depleting and recycling of neurotransmitters and (2 realistic inter-laminar dynamics via laminar-specific distribution of and connections between neural populations. The potential of the LCCM was demonstrated by accounting for the process of auditory habituation. The model parameters were specified using Bayesian inference. It was found that: (1 besides the major serial excitatory information pathway (layer 4 to layer 2/3 to layer 5/6, there exists a parallel "short-cut" pathway (layer 4 to layer 5/6, (2 the excitatory signal flow from the pyramidal cells to the inhibitory interneurons seems to be more intra-laminar while, in contrast, the inhibitory signal flow from inhibitory interneurons to the pyramidal cells seems to be both intra- and inter-laminar, and (3 the habituation rates of the connections are unsymmetrical: forward connections (from layer 4 to layer 2/3 are more strongly habituated than backward connections (from Layer 5/6 to layer 4. Our evaluation demonstrates that the novel features of the LCCM are of crucial importance for mechanistic explanations of brain function. The incorporation of these features into a mass model makes them applicable to modeling based on macroscopic data (like EEG or MEG, which are usually available in human experiments. Our LCCM is therefore a valuable building block for future realistic models of human cognitive function.

  20. Creating Patient-Specific Neural Cells for the In Vitro Study of Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen J. Brennand

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a group, we met to discuss the current challenges for creating meaningful patient-specific in vitro models to study brain disorders. Although the convergence of findings between laboratories and patient cohorts provided us confidence and optimism that hiPSC-based platforms will inform future drug discovery efforts, a number of critical technical challenges remain. This opinion piece outlines our collective views on the current state of hiPSC-based disease modeling and discusses what we see to be the critical objectives that must be addressed collectively as a field.

  1. Common and disorder-specific neural responses to emotional faces in generalised anxiety, social anxiety and panic disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fonzo, Gregory A; Ramsawh, Holly J; Flagan, Taru M; Sullivan, Sarah G; Letamendi, Andrea; Simmons, Alan N; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2015-01-01

    Although evidence exists for abnormal brain function across various anxiety disorders, direct comparison of neural function across diagnoses is needed to elicit abnormalities common across disorders...

  2. Cell-specific deletion of glucosylceramide synthase in brain leads to severe neural defects after birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennemann, Richard; Sandhoff, Roger; Wang, Shijun; Kiss, Eva; Gretz, Norbert; Zuliani, Cecilia; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Jäger, Richard; Schorle, Hubert; Kenzelmann, Marc; Bonrouhi, Mahnaz; Wiegandt, Herbert; Gröne, Hermann-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Sialic acid-containing glycosphingolipids, i.e., gangliosides, constitute a major component of neuronal cells and are thought to be essential for brain function. UDP-glucose:ceramide glucosyltransferase (Ugcg) catalyzes the initial step of glycosphingolipid (GSL) biosynthesis. To gain insight into the role of GSLs in brain development and function, a cell-specific disruption of Ugcg was performed as indicated by the absence of virtually all glucosylceramide-based GSLs. Shortly after birth, mice showed dysfunction of cerebellum and peripheral nerves, associated with structural defects. Axon branching of Purkinje cells was significantly reduced. In primary cultures of neurons, dendritic complexity was clearly diminished, and pruning occurred early. Myelin sheaths of peripheral nerves were broadened and focally severely disorganized. GSL deficiency also led to a down-regulation of gene expression sets involved in brain development and homeostasis. Mice died ≈3 weeks after birth. These results imply that GSLs are essential for brain maturation. PMID:16109770

  3. Incorporating deep learning with convolutional neural networks and position specific scoring matrices for identifying electron transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nguyen-Quoc-Khanh; Ho, Quang-Thai; Ou, Yu-Yen

    2017-09-05

    In several years, deep learning is a modern machine learning technique using in a variety of fields with state-of-the-art performance. Therefore, utilization of deep learning to enhance performance is also an important solution for current bioinformatics field. In this study, we try to use deep learning via convolutional neural networks and position specific scoring matrices to identify electron transport proteins, which is an important molecular function in transmembrane proteins. Our deep learning method can approach a precise model for identifying of electron transport proteins with achieved sensitivity of 80.3%, specificity of 94.4%, and accuracy of 92.3%, with MCC of 0.71 for independent dataset. The proposed technique can serve as a powerful tool for identifying electron transport proteins and can help biologists understand the function of the electron transport proteins. Moreover, this study provides a basis for further research that can enrich a field of applying deep learning in bioinformatics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1) at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Athanasios; Elkouris, Maximilianos; Politis, Panagiotis K

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation vs. differentiation decisions of neural stem cells (NSCs), promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibiting astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs), differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  5. 36 CFR 212.21 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGRICULTURE TRAVEL MANAGEMENT Administration of the Forest Transportation System § 212.21 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. The Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail as defined by the National Trails Systems... necessary to meet emergencies or to enable landowners or land users to have reasonable access to their lands...

  6. 36 CFR 261.20 - Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Trail. 261.20 Section 261.20 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROHIBITIONS General Prohibitions § 261.20 Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail. It is prohibited to use a motorized vehicle on the Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail without a special-use...

  7. Lumbar Herniation of Kidney following Iliac Crest Bone Harvest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Justin Willcox

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The iliac crest is a popular source for autogenous bone harvesting, but the process is rife with complications. This case report presents a patient that experienced incisional lumbar herniation of her kidney following an iliac crest bone harvesting procedure. A discussion is included on the underappreciated complications of this procedure and recommendations for improving outcomes with more thorough evaluation and documentation.

  8. Surveys of great crested grebes Podiceps cristatus and other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Given the small size of this isolated population, the future of great crested grebes in Uganda is highly uncertain. We recorded 30 waterbird species on these lakes; in addition to Great Crested Grebes, other species of conservation interest included White-Backed Duck Thalassornis leuconotus and Giant Kingfisher Ceryle ...

  9. Clinical, serological and genetic study in patients with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Y; Tanaka, M; Takeishi, M; Adachi, D; Mimori, A; Suzuki, T

    2000-06-01

    To assess the clinical, serological and genetic features of Japanese patients with CREST syndrome. Clinical features, autoantibodies and human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing were studied in thirty patients with CREST syndrome, including 29 females and one male, with a mean age of 59.0 years (ranging from 40 to 76 years). Interstitial pneumonia on chest X-ray and renal involvement were rare. Mitral regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation were present in 56.7% and 76.7%, respectively. Sjören's syndrome (SS) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) were highly associated, however the positivity of the marker antibodies to those syndromes, such as anti-SSA, anti-SSB, anti-mitochondrial (AMA) and anti-smooth muscle autoantibodies were less frequent than that of primary SS and PBC without the other autoimmune diseases. The histological findings of PBC were all early stages in Scheuer's classification. HLA-Cw6 were associated with CREST-PBC overlap syndrome (pCREST syndrome, and the frequency of HLA-DR2 between CREST syndrome with or without PBC was significantly different (pCREST syndrome alone and CREST-PBC overlap syndrome and there were differences (the positivity of AMA and the severity of bile duct lesion) between PBC and CREST-PBC overlap syndrome.

  10. Facilitation of Memory Encoding in Primate Hippocampus by a Neuroprosthesis that Promotes Task Specific Neural Firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas M.; Shin, Dae C.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Memory accuracy is a major problem in human disease and is the primary factor that defines Alzheimer’s’, aging and dementia resulting from impaired hippocampal function in medial temporal lobe. Development of a hippocampal memory neuroprosthesis that facilitates normal memory encoding in nonhuman primates (NHPs) could provide the basis for improving memory in human disease states. Approach NHPs trained to perform a short-term delayed match to sample (DMS) memory task were examined with multi-neuron recordings from synaptically connected hippocampal cell fields, CA1 and CA3. Recordings were analyzed utilizing a previously developed nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) neuroprosthetic model, capable of extracting CA3-to-CA1 spatiotemporal firing patterns during DMS performance. Main Results The MIMO model verified that specific CA3-to-CA1 firing patterns were critical for successful encoding of Sample phase information on more difficult DMS trials. This was validated by delivery of successful MIMO-derived encoding patterns via electrical stimulation to the same CA1 recording locations during the Sample phase which facilitated task performance in the subsequent delayed Match phase on difficult trials that required more precise encoding of Sample information. Significance These findings provide the first successful application of a neuroprosthesis designed to enhance and/or repair memory encoding in primate brain. PMID:24216292

  11. Electrophysiological evidence for a specific neural correlate of musical violation expectation in primary-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Clara E; Cereghetti, Donato M; Roullet Tribes, Elodie; Oechslin, Mathias S

    2015-01-01

    The majority of studies on music processing in children used simple musical stimuli. Here, primary schoolchildren judged the appropriateness of musical closure in expressive polyphone music, while high-density electroencephalography was recorded. Stimuli ended either regularly or contained refined in-key harmonic transgressions at closure. The children discriminated the transgressions well above chance. Regular and transgressed endings evoked opposite scalp voltage configurations peaking around 400ms after stimulus onset with bilateral frontal negativity for regular and centro-posterior negativity (CPN) for transgressed endings. A positive correlation could be established between strength of the CPN response and rater sensitivity (d-prime). We also investigated whether the capacity to discriminate the transgressions was supported by auditory domain specific or general cognitive mechanisms, and found that working memory capacity predicted transgression discrimination. Latency and distribution of the CPN are reminiscent of the N400, typically observed in response to semantic incongruities in language. Therefore our observation is intriguing, as the CPN occurred here within an intra-musical context, without any symbols referring to the external world. Moreover, the harmonic in-key transgressions that we implemented may be considered syntactical as they transgress structural rules. Such structural incongruities in music are typically followed by an early right anterior negativity (ERAN) and an N5, but not so here. Putative contributive sources of the CPN were localized in left pre-motor, mid-posterior cingulate and superior parietal regions of the brain that can be linked to integration processing. These results suggest that, at least in children, processing of syntax and meaning may coincide in complex intra-musical contexts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Multiple cerebral aneurysms in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Jun; Murao, Kenichi; Nagata, Izumi; Iihara, Koji

    2010-08-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) associated with cerebral aneurysm is rare. We describe a patient with multiple cerebral aneurysms with the calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia (CREST) variant of SSc. A 61-year-old woman with a 20-year history of CREST syndrome was incidentally found to have four cerebral aneurysms located at the C2, C3 and C5 segments of the right internal carotid artery (ICA) and the C2 segment of the left ICA. The bilateral C2 segment aneurysms were successfully clipped using 2-stage surgery. To date, intracranial aneurysms have been reported in only two other patients with CREST syndrome. We hypothesize that the pathogenesis of the aneurysm is related to CREST syndrome. Elucidating the true incidence of cerebral aneurysms associated with CREST syndrome would help to clarify the relationship between SSc-related autoantibodies and aneurysm formation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Unique Preservation of Neural Cells in Hutchinson- Gilford Progeria Syndrome Is Due to the Expression of the Neural-Specific miR-9 MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Nissan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available One puzzling observation in patients affected with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS, who overall exhibit systemic and dramatic premature aging, is the absence of any conspicuous cognitive impairment. Recent studies based on induced pluripotent stem cells derived from HGPS patient cells have revealed a lack of expression in neural derivatives of lamin A, a major isoform of LMNA that is initially produced as a precursor called prelamin A. In HGPS, defective maturation of a mutated prelamin A induces the accumulation of toxic progerin in patient cells. Here, we show that a microRNA, miR-9, negatively controls lamin A and progerin expression in neural cells. This may bear major functional correlates, as alleviation of nuclear blebbing is observed in nonneural cells after miR-9 overexpression. Our results support the hypothesis, recently proposed from analyses in mice, that protection of neural cells from progerin accumulation in HGPS is due to the physiologically restricted expression of miR-9 to that cell lineage.

  14. Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP expands neural progenitors and regulates Pax3 expression in the neural plate border zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T Gee

    Full Text Available Yes-associated protein 65 (YAP contains multiple protein-protein interaction domains and functions as both a transcriptional co-activator and as a scaffolding protein. Mouse embryos lacking YAP did not survive past embryonic day 8.5 and showed signs of defective yolk sac vasculogenesis, chorioallantoic fusion, and anterior-posterior (A-P axis elongation. Given that the YAP knockout mouse defects might be due in part to nutritional deficiencies, we sought to better characterize a role for YAP during early development using embryos that develop externally. YAP morpholino (MO-mediated loss-of-function in both frog and fish resulted in incomplete epiboly at gastrulation and impaired axis formation, similar to the mouse phenotype. In frog, germ layer specific genes were expressed, but they were temporally delayed. YAP MO-mediated partial knockdown in frog allowed a shortened axis to form. YAP gain-of-function in Xenopus expanded the progenitor populations in the neural plate (sox2(+ and neural plate border zone (pax3(+, while inhibiting the expression of later markers of tissues derived from the neural plate border zone (neural crest, pre-placodal ectoderm, hatching gland, as well as epidermis and somitic muscle. YAP directly regulates pax3 expression via association with TEAD1 (N-TEF at a highly conserved, previously undescribed, TEAD-binding site within the 5' regulatory region of pax3. Structure/function analyses revealed that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP contributes to the inhibition of epidermal and somitic muscle differentiation, but a complete, intact YAP protein is required for expansion of the neural plate and neural plate border zone progenitor pools. These results provide a thorough analysis of YAP mediated gene expression changes in loss- and gain-of-function experiments. Furthermore, this is the first report to use YAP structure-function analyzes to determine which portion of YAP is involved in specific gene expression changes and the

  15. Wireless hippocampal neural recording via a multiple input RF receiver to construct place-specific firing fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Bae; Manns, Joseph R; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports scientifically meaningful in vivo experiments using a 32-channel wireless neural recording system (WINeR). The WINeR system is divided into transmitter (Tx) and receiver (Rx) parts. On the Tx side, we had WINeR-6, a system-on-a-chip (SoC) that operated based on time division multiplexing (TDM) of pulse width modulated (PWM) samples. The chip was fabricated in a 0.5-µm CMOS process, occupying 4.9 × 3.3 mm(2) and consuming 15 mW from ±1.5V supplies. The Rx used two antennas with separate pathways to down-convert the RF signal from a large area. A time-to-digital converter (TDC) in an FPGA converted the PWM pulses into digitized samples. In order to further increase the wireless coverage area and eliminate blind spots within a large experimental arena, two receivers were synchronized. The WINeR system was used to record epileptic activities from a rat that was injected with tetanus toxin (TT) in the dorsal hippocampus. In a different in vivo experiment, place-specific firing fields of place cells, which are parts of the hippocampal-dependent memory, were mapped from a series of behavioral experiments from a rat running in a circular track. Results from the same animal were compared against a commercial hard-wired recording system to evaluate the quality of the wireless recordings.

  16. Structural Basis for Partial Redundancy in a Class of Transcription Factors, the LIM Homeodomain Proteins, in Neural Cell Type Specification*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadd, Morgan S.; Bhati, Mugdha; Jeffries, Cy M.; Langley, David B.; Trewhella, Jill; Guss, J. Mitchell; Matthews, Jacqueline M.

    2011-01-01

    Combinations of LIM homeodomain proteins form a transcriptional “LIM code” to direct the specification of neural cell types. Two paralogous pairs of LIM homeodomain proteins, LIM homeobox protein 3/4 (Lhx3/Lhx4) and Islet-1/2 (Isl1/Isl2), are expressed in developing ventral motor neurons. Lhx3 and Isl1 interact within a well characterized transcriptional complex that triggers motor neuron development, but it was not known whether Lhx4 and Isl2 could participate in equivalent complexes. We have identified an Lhx3-binding domain (LBD) in Isl2 based on sequence homology with the Isl1LBD and show that both Isl2LBD and Isl1LBD can bind each of Lhx3 and Lhx4. X-ray crystal- and small-angle x-ray scattering-derived solution structures of an Lhx4·Isl2 complex exhibit many similarities with that of Lhx3·Isl1; however, structural differences supported by mutagenic studies reveal differences in the mechanisms of binding. Differences in binding have implications for the mode of exchange of protein partners in transcriptional complexes and indicate a divergence in functions of Lhx3/4 and Isl1/2. The formation of weaker Lhx·Isl complexes would likely be masked by the availability of the other Lhx·Isl complexes in postmitotic motor neurons. PMID:22025611

  17. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droms, K; Sueoka, N

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP. This indicates that conversion of RT4-AC to the derivative cell types is also a branch point for the regulation of cell-type-specific properties whose expression is responsive to cAMP. Thus, the potential for maturation in response to increased cAMP is a property that segregates in a cell-type-specific manner and is activated at the determinational level in this system. Images PMID:3029777

  18. Acute stress evokes sexually dimorphic, stressor-specific patterns of neural activation across multiple limbic brain regions in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ankit; Chaudhari, Karina; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2018-03-01

    Stress enhances the risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Stress responses vary across sex and may underlie the heightened vulnerability to psychopathology in females. Here, we examined the influence of acute immobilization stress (AIS) and a two-day short-term forced swim stress (FS) on neural activation in multiple cortical and subcortical brain regions, implicated as targets of stress and in the regulation of neuroendocrine stress responses, in male and female rats using Fos as a neural activity marker. AIS evoked a sex-dependent pattern of neural activation within the cingulate and infralimbic subdivisions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), lateral septum (LS), habenula, and hippocampal subfields. The degree of neural activation in the mPFC, LS, and habenula was higher in males. Female rats exhibited reduced Fos positive cell numbers in the dentate gyrus hippocampal subfield, an effect not observed in males. We addressed whether the sexually dimorphic neural activation pattern noted following AIS was also observed with the short-term stress of FS. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the amygdala, FS similar to AIS resulted in robust increases in neural activation in both sexes. The pattern of neural activation evoked by FS was distinct across sexes, with a heightened neural activation noted in the prelimbic mPFC subdivision and hippocampal subfields in females and differed from the pattern noted with AIS. This indicates that the sex differences in neural activation patterns observed within stress-responsive brain regions are dependent on the nature of stressor experience.

  19. Menstrual cycle-dependent neural plasticity in the adult human brain is hormone, task, and region specific.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, G.S.E.; Weis, S.; Stoffel-Wagner, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Reuber, M.; Beyenburg, S.; Klaver, P.; Fell, J.; Greiff, A. de; Ruhlmann, J.; Reul, J.; Elger, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    In rodents, cyclically fluctuating levels of gonadal steroid hormones modulate neural plasticity by altering synaptic transmission and synaptogenesis. Alterations of mood and cognition observed during the menstrual cycle suggest that steroid-related plasticity also occurs in humans. Cycle

  20. Chronic Restraint Stress Induces an Isoform-Specific Regulation on the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touyarot, K.; Sandi, C.

    2002-01-01

    Existing evidence indicates that 21-days exposure of rats to restraint stress induces dendritic atrophy in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus. This phenomenon has been related to altered performance in hippocampal-dependent learning tasks. Prior studies have shown that hippocampal expression of cell adhesion molecules is modified by such stress treatment, with the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) decreasing and L1 increasing, their expression, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Given that NCAM comprises several isoforms, we investigated here whether chronic stress might differentially affect the expression of the three major isoforms (NCAM-120, NCAM-140, NCAM-180) in the hippocampus. In addition, as glucocorticoids have been implicated in the deleterious effects induced by chronic stress, we also evaluated plasma corticosterone levels and the hippocampal expression of the corticosteroid mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The results showed that the protein concentration of the NCAM-140 isoform decreased in the hippoampus of stressed rats. This effect was isoform-specific, because NCAM-120 and NCAM-180 levels were not significantly modified. In addition, whereas basal levels of plasma corticosterone tended to be increased, MR and GR concentrations were not significantly altered. Although possible changes in NCAM-120, NCAM-180 and corticosteroid receptors at earlier time points of the stress period cannot be ignored; this study suggests that a down-regulation of NCAM-140 might be implicated in the structural alterations consistently shown to be induced in the hippocampus by chronic stress exposure. As NCAM-140 is involved in cell-cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth, these findings suggest that this molecule might be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in the complex interactions among neurodegeneration-related events. PMID:12757368

  1. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Rebecca L; Berianu, Florentina; Ginsburg, William W; Klein, Christopher J; Englestad, Janean K; Kennelly, Kathleen D

    2014-10-01

    Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis is a rare entity. Although it has been reported in diffuse systemic sclerosis, it has not been reported in calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome. We report a patient with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis with CREST syndrome who did not have typical clinical features of vasculitis. This 58-year-old woman presented with mild generalized weakness and a diagnosis of CREST syndrome, which included Raynaud's syndrome, dysphagia and telangiectasias. She was positive for serum cryoglobulins, which led to a sural nerve biopsy. The biopsy results were consistent with cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. Cryoglobulinemic vasculitis has not been previously reported in CREST syndrome to our knowledge. Additionally, the patient also had limited clinical symptoms. Our patient displays the importance of checking for cryoglobulins and obtaining a nerve biopsy when the serum is positive. Both of these diagnostic tests were integral for directing appropriate treatment for this patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Altered behavioral performance and live imaging of circuit-specific neural deficiencies in a zebrafish model for psychomotor retardation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zada

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms and treatment of psychomotor retardation, which includes motor and cognitive impairment, are indefinite. The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS is an X-linked psychomotor retardation characterized by delayed development, severe intellectual disability, muscle hypotonia, and spastic paraplegia, in combination with disturbed thyroid hormone (TH parameters. AHDS has been associated with mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (mct8/slc16a2 gene, which is a TH transporter. In order to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms of AHDS, MCT8 knockout mice were intensively studied. Although these mice faithfully replicated the abnormal serum TH levels, they failed to exhibit the neurological and behavioral symptoms of AHDS patients. Here, we generated an mct8 mutant (mct8-/- zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN-mediated targeted gene editing system. The elimination of MCT8 decreased the expression levels of TH receptors; however, it did not affect the expression of other TH-related genes. Similar to human patients, mct8-/- larvae exhibited neurological and behavioral deficiencies. High-throughput behavioral assays demonstrated that mct8-/- larvae exhibited reduced locomotor activity, altered response to external light and dark transitions and an increase in sleep time. These deficiencies in behavioral performance were associated with altered expression of myelin-related genes and neuron-specific deficiencies in circuit formation. Time-lapse imaging of single-axon arbors and synapses in live mct8-/- larvae revealed a reduction in filopodia dynamics and axon branching in sensory neurons and decreased synaptic density in motor neurons. These phenotypes enable assessment of the therapeutic potential of three TH analogs that can enter the cells in the absence of MCT8. The TH analogs restored the myelin and axon outgrowth deficiencies in mct8-/- larvae. These findings suggest a mechanism by which MCT8 regulates neural circuit

  3. QRI, a retina-specific gene, encodes an extracellular matrix protein exclusively expressed during neural retina differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, F J; Pouponnot, C; Jeanny, J C; Lecoq, O; Calothy, G; Pierani, A

    1996-02-01

    Neural retina development results from growth arrest of neuroectodermal precursors and differentiation of postmitotic cells. The QRI gene is specifically expressed in Müller retinal glial cells. Its expression coincides with the stage of withdrawal from the cell cycle and establishment of differentiation and is repressed upon induction of retinal cell proliferation by the v-src gene product. In this report, we show that the QR1 gene encodes several glycosylated proteins that are secreted and can either associate with the extracellular matrix or remain diffusible in the medium. By using pulse-chase experiments, the 100-103 kDa forms seem to appear first and are specifically incorporated into the extracellular matrix, whereas the 108 and 60 kDa polypeptides appear later and are detected as soluble forms in the culture medium. We also report that expression of the QR1 gene is developmentally regulated in the chicken. Its mRNA is first detectable at embryonic day 10, reaches a maximal level at embryonic day 15 and is no longer detected at embryonic day 18. Immunolocalization of the QR1 protein in chicken retina sections during development shows that expression of the protein parallels the differentiation pattern of post-miotic cells (in particular Müller cells and rods), corresponding to the two differentiation gradients in the retina: from the ganglion cell layer to the inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer, and from the optic nerve to the iris. At embryonic day 10, expression of the QR1 protein(s) is restricted to the optic nerve region and the inner nuclear layer, colocalizing with Müller cell bodies. As development proceeds, QR1 protein localization spreads towards the iris and towards the outer nuclear layer, following Müller cell elongations towards the photoreceptors. Between embryonic days 16 and 18, the QR1 protein is no longer detectable in the optic nerve region and is concentrated around the basal segment of the photoreceptors in the peripheral

  4. Dungpat Microenvironmental Effects on Germination and Establishment of Crested Wheatgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Akbar, Ghulam

    1994-01-01

    Complementary greenhouse and field studies investigated the effects of ambient environmental conditions on cattle dungpat moisture, temperature, nutrient concentration, and crust formation dynamics, which in turn influence seed germination and seedling establishment in dungpats. 'Hycrest' crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fisch. ex Link) X A. cristatum (L.) Gaert.] was used as a representative revegetation species. After collecting feces from Holstein steers that had been fed crest...

  5. Flow structure in front of the broad-crested weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachoval Zbyněk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with research focused on description of flow structure in front of broad-crested weir. Based on experimental measurement, the flow structure in front of the weir (the recirculation zone of flow and tornado vortices and flow structure on the weir crest has been described. The determined flow character has been simulated using numerical model and based on comparing results the suitable model of turbulence has been recommended.

  6. Neural Activation During Cognitive Emotion Regulation in Previously Depressed Compared to Healthy Children: Evidence of Specific Alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, Andy C; Pagliaccio, David; Murphy, Eric R; Luby, Joan L; Barch, Deanna M

    2015-09-01

    Impairments in cognitive emotion regulation (CER) have been linked to functional neural abnormalities and the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD). Few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have investigated the neural underpinnings of CER in samples with depression. As CER develops in childhood, understanding dysfunctional CER-related alterations in brain function during this period could advance knowledge of the developmental psychopathology of MDD. This study tested whether neural activity in brain regions known to support cognitive reappraisal differed between healthy 7- to 15-year-old children and same-age peers with a history of MDD (MDD-ever). A total of 64 children participated in this event-related fMRI study, which used a developmentally appropriate and validated fMRI reappraisal task. Children were instructed to passively view sad or neutral images and to decrease negative emotions using cognitive reappraisal. MDD-ever and healthy children showed similar patterns of cortical activation during reappraisal, but with a significant difference found in 1 key CER region, the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG). In addition, individual differences in CER were associated with left IFG activity during reappraisal. Alterations in the neurocircuitry of reappraisal are evident in children with a depression history compared to healthy controls. The finding that MDD-ever children showed reappraisal-related neural responses in many regions similar to healthy controls has clinical implications. Findings suggest that identification of alterations in reappraisal in children with remitted depression, for whom much, although not all, of the neural circuitry remains intact, may be an important window of opportunity for intervention. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Low-level neural auditory discrimination dysfunctions in specific language impairment—A review on mismatch negativity findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Kujala

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In specific language impairment (SLI, there is a delay in the child’s oral language skills when compared with nonverbal cognitive abilities. The problems typically relate to phonological and morphological processing and word learning. This article reviews studies which have used mismatch negativity (MMN in investigating low-level neural auditory dysfunctions in this disorder. With MMN, it is possible to tap the accuracy of neural sound discrimination and sensory memory functions. These studies have found smaller response amplitudes and longer latencies for speech and non-speech sound changes in children with SLI than in typically developing children, suggesting impaired and slow auditory discrimination in SLI. Furthermore, they suggest shortened sensory memory duration and vulnerability of the sensory memory to masking effects. Importantly, some studies reported associations between MMN parameters and language test measures. In addition, it was found that language intervention can influence the abnormal MMN in children with SLI, enhancing its amplitude. These results suggest that the MMN can shed light on the neural basis of various auditory and memory impairments in SLI, which are likely to influence speech perception. Keywords: Specific language impairment, Auditory processing, Mismatch negativity (MMN

  8. CREST--classification resources for environmental sequence tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Lanzén

    Full Text Available Sequencing of taxonomic or phylogenetic markers is becoming a fast and efficient method for studying environmental microbial communities. This has resulted in a steadily growing collection of marker sequences, most notably of the small-subunit (SSU ribosomal RNA gene, and an increased understanding of microbial phylogeny, diversity and community composition patterns. However, to utilize these large datasets together with new sequencing technologies, a reliable and flexible system for taxonomic classification is critical. We developed CREST (Classification Resources for Environmental Sequence Tags, a set of resources and tools for generating and utilizing custom taxonomies and reference datasets for classification of environmental sequences. CREST uses an alignment-based classification method with the lowest common ancestor algorithm. It also uses explicit rank similarity criteria to reduce false positives and identify novel taxa. We implemented this method in a web server, a command line tool and the graphical user interfaced program MEGAN. Further, we provide the SSU rRNA reference database and taxonomy SilvaMod, derived from the publicly available SILVA SSURef, for classification of sequences from bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Using cross-validation and environmental datasets, we compared the performance of CREST and SilvaMod to the RDP Classifier. We also utilized Greengenes as a reference database, both with CREST and the RDP Classifier. These analyses indicate that CREST performs better than alignment-free methods with higher recall rate (sensitivity as well as precision, and with the ability to accurately identify most sequences from novel taxa. Classification using SilvaMod performed better than with Greengenes, particularly when applied to environmental sequences. CREST is freely available under a GNU General Public License (v3 from http://apps.cbu.uib.no/crest and http://lcaclassifier.googlecode.com.

  9. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  10. HoxB8 in noradrenergic specification and differentiation of the autonomic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Leslie; Ferdin, Marius; Holzmann, Julia; Stubbusch, Jutta; Rohrer, Hermann

    2012-03-01

    Different prespecification of mesencephalic and trunk neural crest cells determines their response to environmental differentiation signals and contributes to the generation of different autonomic neuron subtypes, parasympathetic ciliary neurons in the head and trunk noradrenergic sympathetic neurons. The differentiation of ciliary and sympathetic neurons shares many features, including the initial BMP-induced expression of noradrenergic characteristics that is, however, subsequently lost in ciliary but maintained in sympathetic neurons. The molecular basis of specific prespecification and differentiation patterns has remained unclear. We show here that HoxB gene expression in trunk neural crest is maintained in sympathetic neurons. Ectopic expression of a single HoxB gene, HoxB8, in mesencephalic neural crest results in a strongly increased expression of sympathetic neuron characteristics like the transcription factor Hand2, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) in ciliary neurons. Other subtype-specific properties like RGS4 and RCad are not induced. HoxB8 has only minor effects in postmitotic ciliary neurons and is unable to induce TH and DBH in the enteric nervous system. Thus, we conclude that HoxB8 acts by maintaining noradrenergic properties transiently expressed in ciliary neuron progenitors during normal development. HoxC8, HoxB9, HoxB1 and HoxD10 elicit either small and transient or no effects on noradrenergic differentiation, suggesting a selective effect of HoxB8. These results implicate that Hox genes contribute to the differential development of autonomic neuron precursors by maintaining noradrenergic properties in the trunk sympathetic neuron lineage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Flow characteristics at trapezoidal broad-crested side weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Říha Jaromír

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Broad-crested side weirs have been the subject of numerous hydraulic studies; however, the flow field at the weir crest and in front of the weir in the approach channel still has not been fully described. Also, the discharge coefficient of broad-crested side weirs, whether slightly inclined towards the stream or lateral, still has yet to be clearly determined. Experimental research was carried out to describe the flow characteristics at low Froude numbers in the approach flow channel for various combinations of in- and overflow discharges. Three side weir types with different oblique angles were studied. Their flow characteristics and discharge coefficients were analyzed and assessed based on the results obtained from extensive measurements performed on a hydraulic model. The empirical relation between the angle of side weir obliqueness, Froude numbers in the up- and downstream channels, and the coefficient of obliqueness was derived.

  12. [Granulomatous uveitis and CREST syndrome: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtade, M; Gicquel, J J; Mercie, M; Vabres, B; Dighiero, P

    2004-10-01

    To report a case of recurrent granulomatous panuveitis associated with CREST syndrome. A 74-year-old patient with CREST syndrome presented with unilateral granulomatous panuveitis in a pseudophakic eye. She had undergone cataract surgery 6 months before. The patient reported a vision loss that had been evolving for 1 month. Visual acuity was noted at 20/400. The initial clinical examination highlighted retrodescemetic precipitates and granulomatous precipitates on the IOL. A vitreous tyndall was noted. Funduscopic examination revealed papillary edema and cystoid macular edema, confirmed by fluorescein angiography. Topical treatment consisting in corticosteroid eye drops associated with mydriatics controlled uveitis in a few weeks. Visual recovery was 20/30. No granulomatous uveitis etiology could be highlighted. The diagnosis of chronic endophthalmitis was also ruled out. The diagnosis retained was uveitis associated with CREST syndrome. To our knowledge, this association has only been reported twice in the literature.

  13. Observations of highly localized oscillons with multiple crests and troughs

    CERN Document Server

    LI, Xiaochen; Liao, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Stable, highly localized Faraday's resonant standing waves with multiple crests and troughs were observed in the alcoholic solution partly filled in a Hele-Shaw cell vertically oscillated with a single frequency. Two types of oscillons were observed. The influence of the experimental parameters (such as the concentration of alcoholic solution, the water depth, the frequency and acceleration amplitude of oscillation) on these oscillons were investigated in details. In the same experimental parameters, all of these oscillons have the almost same wave height but rather irregular crest-to-crest distances. Our experiments highly suggest that the complicated oscillons can be regarded as combination of the two elementary oscillons discovered by Rajchenbach et al. (Physical Review Letters, 107, 2011).

  14. CREST - a large and diverse superfamily of putative transmembrane hydrolases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Eric N

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of membrane-spanning proteins possess enzymatic activity and catalyze important reactions involving proteins, lipids or other substrates located within or near lipid bilayers. Alkaline ceramidases are seven-transmembrane proteins that hydrolyze the amide bond in ceramide to form sphingosine. Recently, a group of putative transmembrane receptors called progestin and adipoQ receptors (PAQRs were found to be distantly related to alkaline ceramidases, raising the possibility that they may also function as membrane enzymes. Results Using sensitive similarity search methods, we identified statistically significant sequence similarities among several transmembrane protein families including alkaline ceramidases and PAQRs. They were unified into a large and diverse superfamily of putative membrane-bound hydrolases called CREST (alkaline ceramidase, PAQR receptor, Per1, SID-1 and TMEM8. The CREST superfamily embraces a plethora of cellular functions and biochemical activities, including putative lipid-modifying enzymes such as ceramidases and the Per1 family of putative phospholipases involved in lipid remodeling of GPI-anchored proteins, putative hormone receptors, bacterial hemolysins, the TMEM8 family of putative tumor suppressors, and the SID-1 family of putative double-stranded RNA transporters involved in RNA interference. Extensive similarity searches and clustering analysis also revealed several groups of proteins with unknown function in the CREST superfamily. Members of the CREST superfamily share seven predicted core transmembrane segments with several conserved sequence motifs. Conclusions Universal conservation of a set of histidine and aspartate residues across all groups in the CREST superfamily, coupled with independent discoveries of hydrolase activities in alkaline ceramidases and the Per1 family as well as results from previous mutational studies of Per1, suggests that the majority of CREST members are

  15. High-sensitivity and specificity of laser-induced autofluorescence spectra for detection of colorectal cancer with an artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwek, L. C.; Fu, Sheng; Chia, T. C.; Diong, C. H.; Tang, C. L.; Krishnan, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) has been used in various clinical research for the prediction and classification of data in cancer disease. Previous research in this direction focused on the correlation between various input parameters such as age, antigen, and size of tumor growth. Recently, laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) techniques have been shown to be a useful noninvasive early diagnostic tool for various cancer diseases. We report on a successful application of ANN to in vitro LIAF spectra. We show that classification of tumor samples with ANN can be done with high sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Thus a combination of LIAF techniques and ANN can provide a robust method for clinical diagnosis.

  16. Small lymphocytic lymphoma in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William, Basem M; Harbert, Tracey; Ganti, Apar K; Bierman, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 61-year-old man with a history of CREST syndrome (calcinosis cutis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) who presented for evaluation of thrombocytopenia. He had evident cervical adenopathy and lymph node biopsy showed small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) with evident systemic adenopathy and bone marrow involvement. The patient achieved a complete remission with FCR (fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab) chemotherapy. About 30 cases of lymphomas are reported in the literature in association with systemic sclerosis. To our knowledge, there are no reports of a small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL) in association with limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis with classic features of the CREST syndrome.

  17. [Comparison of the Latissimus dorsi insertions on the iliac crest in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and in man].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, C; Ben Hadj Yahia, S; Braun, M; Journeau, P

    2014-03-01

    Comparing to other primates, one of the most important specificities of the human anatomy are consequences of bipedalism. Although bone consequences are well known (lumbar lordosis, horizontal position of the foramen magnum, lengthening of the lower limbs, reduction of the pelvis, specialization of the foot), consequences of our locomotion on the Latissimus dorsi are still unclear. One dissection of a chimpanzee Latissimus dorsi (Pan troglodytes) has been performed and compared to 30 human Latissimus dorsi dissections (10 fresh cadavers and 20 formoled cadavers). In each dissection, the existence of direct muscular insertions on the iliac crest has been investigated and the constitution of the thoracolumbar fascia has been described. In chimpanzee dissection, a muscular direct insertion of the Latissimus dorsi was present on the iliac crest of 9 cm long. The TLF was made of the superficial and the deep fascias of the Latissimus dorsi and the superficial fascia of the erector spinae muscles which was deeper. In man, there was no direct muscular insertion of the Latissimus dorsi in 90 % of cases, the TLF was constituted the same way. This study suggests that the Latissimus dorsi has been separated from the iliac crest in man during the evolution because of the permanent bipedalism and that it stayed inserted on the iliac crest in chimpanzee because of the brachiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparative Experimental Study of Wave Forces on a Vertical Cylinder in Long-Crested and Short-Crested Seas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Peter; Burcharth, Hans F.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study is carried out to investigate the wave forces on a slender cylinder. Special attention is given to the wave forces in the surface zone and correlation of forces along the cylinder. The experiments consider the effects of both long and short-crested irregular waves.......An experimental study is carried out to investigate the wave forces on a slender cylinder. Special attention is given to the wave forces in the surface zone and correlation of forces along the cylinder. The experiments consider the effects of both long and short-crested irregular waves....

  19. Neural network-based crop growth model to predict processing tomato yield on a site-specific basis using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Michal

    Remote sensing is one of the major data acquisition tools available to rapidly acquire soil and plant related information over a wide area for use in precision agriculture. Green canopy has very specific reflectance characteristics distinguishing it from other materials such as soil and dry vegetative matter. Reflectance values in red (R) and near infra-red (NIR) spectral bands have been widely used for calculating normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Many researchers have related NDVI values to plant vigor, water stress, leaf area index (LAI) and/or yield. However, vegetative indices such as NDVI are usually sensitive to background reflectance characteristics. Often soil adjusted vegetation indices (SAVI) are used to minimize the background effect. In this study we have developed a relationship between the processing tomato yield and SAVI based on the R and NIR reflectance. Eight three band (R, NIR and green) aerial images were obtained at approximately two-week intervals during the 2000 processing tomato growing season. These images were analyzed to obtain SAVI values which were in turn related to LAI using regression techniques. A tuned neural network was developed to predict daily LAI values based on the biweekly experimental LAI values derived from aerial images. The coefficients of multiple determination between the actual LAI and neural network predicted LAI values were greater than 0.96 for all 56 grid points. The LAI values were numerically integrated over the whole growing season to obtain cumulative leaf area index days (CLAID). The CLAID values predicted from the neural network correlated very well with experimentally derived CLAID values (coefficient of determination, r2 = 0.83) indicating that the neural network model simulated processing tomato growth well. A crop growth model that was capable of predicting crop yield based on neural network predicted LAI values and CIMIS weather data was developed. Although predicted yield tended to be low

  20. Silencer-delimited transgenesis: NRSE/RE1 sequences promote neural-specific transgene expression in a NRSF/REST-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xiayang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have investigated a simple strategy for enhancing transgene expression specificity by leveraging genetic silencer elements. The approach serves to restrict transgene expression to a tissue of interest - the nervous system in the example provided here - thereby promoting specific/exclusive targeting of discrete cellular subtypes. Recent innovations are bringing us closer to understanding how the brain is organized, how neural circuits function, and how neurons can be regenerated. Fluorescent proteins enable mapping of the 'connectome', optogenetic tools allow excitable cells to be short-circuited or hyperactivated, and targeted ablation of neuronal subtypes facilitates investigations of circuit function and neuronal regeneration. Optimally, such toolsets need to be expressed solely within the cell types of interest as off-site expression makes establishing causal relationships difficult. To address this, we have exploited a gene 'silencing' system that promotes neuronal specificity by repressing expression in non-neural tissues. This methodology solves non-specific background issues that plague large-scale enhancer trap efforts and may provide a means of leveraging promoters/enhancers that otherwise express too broadly to be of value for in vivo manipulations. Results We show that a conserved neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE can function to restrict transgene expression to the nervous system. The neuron-restrictive silencing factor/repressor element 1 silencing transcription factor (NRSF/REST transcriptional repressor binds NRSE/repressor element 1 (RE1 sites and silences gene expression in non-neuronal cells. Inserting NRSE sites into transgenes strongly biased expression to neural tissues. NRSE sequences were effective in restricting expression of bipartite Gal4-based 'driver' transgenes within the context of an enhancer trap and when associated with a defined promoter and enhancer. However, NRSE sequences did

  1. Livedo reticularis and bowel ischemia after carbon dioxide arteriography in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Philip L; Neperud, Julie; Arnold, Jill; Thomas, James

    2011-03-01

    For 30 years, CO(2) gas has been used as a safe alternative to iodinated contrast agents for angiography in patients with renal insufficiency or allergy to iodine. CO(2) angiography is well tolerated when performed properly, and serious complications are rare. However, severe complications may occur if the physical properties of CO(2) and the specific pathophysiology of an individual patient are not carefully considered. The present report describes a case in which diffuse livedo reticularis, bowel ischemia, and renal insufficiency developed following CO(2) angiography in a patient with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia). Copyright © 2011 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Bare bone graft with vascularised iliac crest for mandibular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarukawa, Shunji; Noguchi, Tadahide; Oh-iwa, Ichiro; Sunaga, Ataru; Uda, Hirokazu; Kusama, Mikio; Sugawara, Yasushi

    2012-01-01

    "Bare bone graft" with a vascularised iliac crest is a procedure involving no soft tissue for intraoral lining, and the intraoral defect is covered with epithelial cells through secondary healing of the exposed bone. A vascularised iliac crest flap is transferred to a segmental mandibular defect intraorally in the position of the osteotomized stump upwardly. Granulation tissue is usually observed on the stump of the bone graft about 1 week after surgery. When sufficient granulation is observed after approximately 4 weeks, "resurfacing" is performed to prevent interference of hypergranulation tissue with epithelization. Resurfacing involves wiping the granulation tissue from the surface of the bone and covering with a plastic prosthesis fitted to the alveolus. A total of 11 patients underwent bare bone graft with a vascularised iliac crest. Resurfacing was performed at an average of 2.1 times for each patient. All wounds in the oral cavity were completely epithelialized from 2 weeks to 3 months after surgery. Complications with the recipient side occurred in four patients. Bare bone graft with the iliac crest is one favourable option for mandibular reconstruction utilising the particular shape of the bone without the attached soft tissue. Copyright © 2011 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-throated flumes and broad-crested weirs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, M.G.

    1985-01-01

    Vital for water management are structures that can measure the flow in a wide variety of channels. Chapter 1 introduces the long-throated flume and the broad-crested weir; it explains why this family of structures can meet the boundary conditions and hydraulic demands of most measuring

  4. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 96; Issue 2. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard, Calotes ... These two lineages are separated by mountain ranges, which play an important role as natural barriers blocking gene flow. Our finding reveal at least two cryptic lineages represented in C.

  5. Migration flyway of the Mediterranean breeding Lesser Crested Tern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Lesser Crested Tern Thalasseus bengalensis emigratus breeding population in the Mediterranean is found exclusively in Libya, on the two coastal islands of Gara and Elba and one wetland on the mainland coast at Benghazi. In order to improve knowledge of the species migration to wintering quarters in West Africa, ...

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of blue-crested lizard ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Weerachai Saijuntha

    2017-06-19

    Jun 19, 2017 ... Abstract. The blue-crested lizard, Calotes mystaceus Duméril & Bibron, 1837, is listed as a protected wild animal in Thailand. Its population is likely to be dramatically reduced due to massive hunting in several areas in this country. Basic information on its population genetics is therefore needed to facilitate ...

  7. Innovative concept overtopping dike : Crest Drainage Dike, Theoretical Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Nieuwenhuis, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    The ComCoast concept involves measures in seaward and landward direction. One of the options in landward direction is an overtopping dike. In this concept the crest and/or inner slope of the dike is strengthened so that more overtopping of the dike can be allowed. Advantage is that heightening of

  8. 76 FR 15971 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project; Eagle Crest Energy... Eagle Crest Energy as part of its on-going Section 7 Endangered Species Act consultation efforts. e. All... Eagle Crest Energy, via e-mail at: [email protected] ; or via telephone at: 503-697-1478. All...

  9. 76 FR 22699 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Teleconference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy... Eagle Crest Energy as part of its on-going Section 7 Endangered Species Act consultation efforts. e. All... Eagle Crest Energy, via e-mail at: [email protected] ; or via telephone at: 503-697-1478. All...

  10. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  11. Mandibular defect reconstruction with nonvascularized iliac crest bone graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoje, V N; Obimakinde, O S; Arotiba, J T; Fasola, A O; Ogunlade, S O; Obiechina, A E

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of mandibular defect is a challenge to the head and neck surgeon because of associated functional and esthetic problems. Our experience with the use of nonvascularized iliac crest bone graft is hereby reported. The aim was to report our experience with the use of nonvascularized iliac crest bone for mandibular defect reconstruction at University College Hospital, Ibadan. Nigeria. A retrospective descriptive study was performed. Cases of mandibular reconstruction with iliac crest bone graft between January 2001 and December 2007 were included in this study. Grafts were secured with either a stainless steel wire or a titanium plate. Preoperative diagnosis, postoperative follow-up records including investigations, diagnosis of graft infection and subsequent treatment modalities were extracted from the available records. Descriptive variables were analyzed with SPSS version 14. A total of 47 patients had mandibular defect reconstruction with nonvascularized iliac crest block bone during the study period. Thirty-eight patients had graft secured with transosseous wire [NVIBw] while 9 had a titanium plate [NVIBp]. The male:female ratio was 26:21 while the mean age of the patients was 24.6±4.25 years. Ten patients (21.3%) developed persistent graft infection during the postoperative period. All cases of infection occurred in patients who had transosseous wiring and analysis showed that 60% of the infected grafts revealed mixed microbial isolates containing Klebsiela spp, Pseudomonas Aeurogenosa, and E coli. Six (60%) of the infected grafts were removed as a result of unabated infection while 4 (40%) were successfully treated by exploration and pus drainage. Nonvascularized iliac crest bone graft provides an affordable and less technical choice for mandibular reconstruction with minimal complications in a resource-limited economy.

  12. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  13. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), a novel physicochemical source, induces neural differentiation through cross-talk between the specific RONS cascade and Trk/Ras/ERK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ja-Young; Hong, Young June; Lim, Junsup; Choi, Jin Sung; Choi, Eun Ha; Kang, Seongman; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2018-02-01

    Plasma, formed by ionization of gas molecules or atoms, is the most abundant form of matter and consists of highly reactive physicochemical species. In the physics and chemistry fields, plasma has been extensively studied; however, the exact action mechanisms of plasma on biological systems, including cells and humans, are not well known. Recent evidence suggests that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), which refers to plasma used in the biomedical field, may regulate diverse cellular processes, including neural differentiation. However, the mechanism by which these physicochemical signals, elicited by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), are transmitted to biological system remains elusive. In this study, we elucidated the physicochemical and biological (PCB) connection between the CAP cascade and Trk/Ras/ERK signaling pathway, which resulted in neural differentiation. Excited atomic oxygen in the plasma phase led to the formation of RONS in the PCB network, which then interacted with reactive atoms in the extracellular liquid phase to form nitric oxide (NO). Production of large amounts of superoxide radical (O2-) in the mitochondria of cells exposed to CAP demonstrated that extracellular NO induced the reversible inhibition of mitochondrial complex IV. We also demonstrated that cytosolic hydrogen peroxide, formed by O2- dismutation, act as an intracellular messenger to specifically activate the Trk/Ras/ERK signaling pathway. This study is the first to elucidate the mechanism linking physicochemical signals from the CAP cascade to the intracellular neural differentiation signaling pathway, providing physical, chemical and biological insights into the development of therapeutic techniques to treat neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sex-specific neural activity when resolving cognitive interference in individuals with or without prior internalizing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhishun; Jacobs, Rachel H; Marsh, Rachel; Horga, Guillermo; Qiao, Jianping; Warner, Virginia; Weissman, Myrna M; Peterson, Bradley S

    2016-03-30

    The processing of cognitive interference is a self-regulatory capacity that is impaired in persons with internalizing disorders. This investigation was to assess sex differences in the neural correlates of cognitive interference in individuals with and without an illness history of an internalizing disorder. We compared functional magnetic resonance imaging blood-oxygenation-level-dependent responses in both males (n=63) and females (n=80) with and without this illness history during performance of the Simon task. Females deactivated superior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobe, and posterior cingulate cortex to a greater extent than males. Females with a prior history of internalizing disorder also deactivated these regions more compared to males with that history, and they additionally demonstrated greater activation of right inferior frontal gyrus. These group differences were represented in a significant sex-by-illness interaction in these regions. These deactivated regions compose a task-negative or default mode network, whereas the inferior frontal gyrus usually activates when performing an attention-demanding task and is a key component of a task-positive network. Our findings suggest that a prior history of internalizing disorders disproportionately influences functioning of the default mode network and is associated with an accompanying activation of the task-positive network in females during the resolution of cognitive interference. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Mapping the brain's orchestration during speech comprehension: task-specific facilitation of regional synchrony in neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keil Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How does the brain convert sounds and phonemes into comprehensible speech? In the present magnetoencephalographic study we examined the hypothesis that the coherence of electromagnetic oscillatory activity within and across brain areas indicates neurophysiological processes linked to speech comprehension. Results Amplitude-modulated (sinusoidal 41.5 Hz auditory verbal and nonverbal stimuli served to drive steady-state oscillations in neural networks involved in speech comprehension. Stimuli were presented to 12 subjects in the following conditions (a an incomprehensible string of words, (b the same string of words after being introduced as a comprehensible sentence by proper articulation, and (c nonverbal stimulations that included a 600-Hz tone, a scale, and a melody. Coherence, defined as correlated activation of magnetic steady state fields across brain areas and measured as simultaneous activation of current dipoles in source space (Minimum-Norm-Estimates, increased within left- temporal-posterior areas when the sound string was perceived as a comprehensible sentence. Intra-hemispheric coherence was larger within the left than the right hemisphere for the sentence (condition (b relative to all other conditions, and tended to be larger within the right than the left hemisphere for nonverbal stimuli (condition (c, tone and melody relative to the other conditions, leading to a more pronounced hemispheric asymmetry for nonverbal than verbal material. Conclusions We conclude that coherent neuronal network activity may index encoding of verbal information on the sentence level and can be used as a tool to investigate auditory speech comprehension.

  16. Parallel neural pathways in higher visual centers of the Drosophila brain that mediate wavelength-specific behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo eOtsuna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared with connections between the retinae and primary visual centers, relatively less is known in both mammals and insects about the functional segregation of neural pathways connecting primary and higher centers of the visual processing cascade. Here, using the Drosophila visual system as a model, we demonstrate two levels of parallel computation in the pathways that connect primary visual centers of the optic lobe to computational circuits embedded within deeper centers in the central brain. We show that a seemingly simple achromatic behavior, namely phototaxis, is under the control of several independent pathways, each of which is responsible for navigation towards unique wavelengths. Silencing just one pathway is enough to disturb phototaxis towards one characteristic monochromatic source, whereas phototactic behavior towards white light is not affected. The response spectrum of each demonstrable pathway is different from that of individual photoreceptors, suggesting subtractive computations. A choice assay between two colors showed that these pathways are responsible for navigation towards, but not for the detection itself of, the monochromatic light. The present study provides novel insights about how visual information is separated and processed in parallel to achieve robust control of an innate behavior.

  17. Ectopic expression of the immune adaptor protein CD3zeta in neural stem/progenitor cells disrupts cell-fate specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angibaud, Julie; Baudouin, Stéphane J; Louveau, Antoine; Nerrière-Daguin, Véronique; Bonnamain, Virginie; Csaba, Zsolt; Dournaud, Pascal; Naveilhan, Philippe; Noraz, Nelly; Pellier-Monnin, Véronique; Boudin, Hélène

    2012-02-01

    Immune signaling and neuroinflammatory mediators have recently emerged as influential variables that regulate neural precursor/stem cell (NPC) behavior and function. In this study, we investigated whether the signaling adaptor protein CD3ζ, a transmembrane protein involved in T cell differentiation and function and recently shown to regulate neuronal development in the central nervous system (CNS), may have a role in NPC differentiation. We analyzed the expression profile of CD3ζ in embryonic rat brain during neurogenic periods and in neurosphere-derived neural cells, and we investigated the action of CD3ζ on cell differentiation. We found that CD3ζ expression coincided with neuronal commitment, but its forced expression in NPCs prevented the production of neurons and oligodendrocytes, but not astroglial cells. This blockade of neuronal differentiation was operated through an ITAM-independent mechanism, but required the Asp36 of the CD3ζ transmembrane domain involved in membrane receptor interaction. Together, our findings show that ectopic CD3ζ expression in NPCs impaired their normal cell-fate specification and suggest that variations of CD3ζ expression in the developing CNS might result in neurodevelopmental anomalies.

  18. Alpha male replacements and delayed dispersal in crested macaques (Macaca nigra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2015-01-01

    In species with a high male reproductive skew, competition between males for the top dominant position is high and escalated fights are common between competitors. As a consequence, challenges incur potentially high costs. Selection should favor males who time an alpha male challenge to maximize chances of a successful outcome minimizing costs. Despite the importance of alpha male replacements for individual males, we know little about the timing of challenges and the condition of the challenger. We investigated the timing and process of alpha male replacements in a species living in multi‐male groups with high male reproductive skew, the crested macaque. We studied four wild groups over 6 years in the Tangkoko Reserve, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, during which 16 alpha male replacements occurred. Although unusual for cercopithecines, male crested macaques delayed their natal dispersal until they attained maximum body mass and therefore fighting ability whereupon they emigrated and challenged the alpha male in another group. Accordingly, all observed alpha male replacements were from outside males. Ours is the first report of such a pattern in a primate species living in multi‐male groups. Although the majority of alpha male replacements occurred through direct male‐male challenges, many also took place opportunistically (i.e., after the alpha male had already been injured or had left the group). Furthermore, alpha male tenures were very short (averaging ca. 12 months). We hypothesize that this unusual pattern of alpha male replacements in crested macaques is related to the species‐specific combination of high male reproductive skew with a large number of males per group. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22448, 2017. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26194621

  19. Alpha male replacements and delayed dispersal in crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Pascal R; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2017-07-01

    In species with a high male reproductive skew, competition between males for the top dominant position is high and escalated fights are common between competitors. As a consequence, challenges incur potentially high costs. Selection should favor males who time an alpha male challenge to maximize chances of a successful outcome minimizing costs. Despite the importance of alpha male replacements for individual males, we know little about the timing of challenges and the condition of the challenger. We investigated the timing and process of alpha male replacements in a species living in multi-male groups with high male reproductive skew, the crested macaque. We studied four wild groups over 6 years in the Tangkoko Reserve, North Sulawesi, Indonesia, during which 16 alpha male replacements occurred. Although unusual for cercopithecines, male crested macaques delayed their natal dispersal until they attained maximum body mass and therefore fighting ability whereupon they emigrated and challenged the alpha male in another group. Accordingly, all observed alpha male replacements were from outside males. Ours is the first report of such a pattern in a primate species living in multi-male groups. Although the majority of alpha male replacements occurred through direct male-male challenges, many also took place opportunistically (i.e., after the alpha male had already been injured or had left the group). Furthermore, alpha male tenures were very short (averaging ca. 12 months). We hypothesize that this unusual pattern of alpha male replacements in crested macaques is related to the species-specific combination of high male reproductive skew with a large number of males per group. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22448, 2017. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Primatology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Neural simulation of actions: effector- versus action-specific motor maps within the human premotor and posterior parietal area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorey, Britta; Naumann, Tim; Pilgramm, Sebastian; Petermann, Carmen; Bischoff, Matthias; Zentgraf, Karen; Stark, Rudolf; Vaitl, Dieter; Munzert, Jörn

    2014-04-01

    This study addresses the controversy over how motor maps are organized during action simulation by examining whether action simulation states, that is, motor imagery and action observation, run on either effector-specific and/or action-specific motor maps. Subjects had to observe or imagine three types of movements effected by the right hand or the right foot with different action goals. The functional magnetic resonance imaging results showed an action-specific organization within premotor and posterior parietal areas of both hemispheres during action simulation, especially during action observation. There were also less pronounced effector-specific activation sites during both simulation processes. It is concluded that the premotor and parietal areas contain multiple motor maps rather than a single, continuous map of the body. The forms of simulation (observation, imagery), the task contexts (movements related to an object, with usual/unusual effector), and the underlying reason for performing the simulation (rate your subjective success afterwards) lead to the specific use of different representational motor maps within both regions. In our experimental setting, action-specific maps are dominant especially, during action observation, whereas effector-specific maps are recruited to only a lesser degree. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Increased prevalence of anti-third generation cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, R; Shovman, O; Zhang, Y; Gilburd, B; Zandman-Goddard, G; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence of anti-third generation cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP3) in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases, we assembled a training set consisting of 115 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 52 with Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 21 with scleroderma, 20 with ankylosing spondylitis, 18 with reactive arthritis, 25 with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 51 with osteoarthritis, 26 with mixed connective tissue disease, 23 with primary Sjogren's syndrome, 74 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 49 with Polymyalgia rheumatica, and 39 with polymyositis/dermatomyositis. The commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect anti-CCP antibodies, including anti-CCP2 (regular, second generation of CCP antigen) and anti-CCP3 (third generation of CCP antigen) in disease-related specimens and normal controls. These serum samples were also evaluated for anti-centomere antibodies by anti-centromere ELISA kit. The higher frequencies of anti-CCP3 and anti-CCP2 were detected in 75.6 and 70.4% patients with RA, respectively. At the same time, anti-CCP3 (not anti-CCP2) was significantly increased in samples isolated from patients with CREST syndrome. The clinical sensitivity of IgG anti-CCP3 for the patients with CREST syndrome was 29% (15 of 52) and the specificity was 96% (384 of 397), with the exception of the RA group. The anti-centromere antibodies were significantly higher in patients with CREST only. The results of our study suggest that compared to anti-CCP2 assay, the new anti-CCP3 assay can enhance the clinical sensitivity for diagnosis of RA and, as an associate marker combined with anticentromere, can distinguish CREST syndrome from other systemic connective tissue diseases, especially RA. The clinical specificity of anti-CCP3 was lower than anti-CCP2 assay in diagnosis of RA because of the crossreaction to the patients

  2. Remote sensing of harmful algal events in optically complex waters using regionally specific neural network-based algorithms for MERIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Vilas, L.; Castro Fernandez, M.; Spyrakos, E.; Torres Palenzuela, J.

    2013-08-01

    In typical case 2 waters an accurate remote sensing retrieval of chlorophyll a (chla) is still challenging. There is a widespread understanding that universally applicable water constituent retrieval algorithms are currently not feasible, shifting the research focus to regionally specific implementations of powerful inversion methods. This study takes advantage of regionally specific chlorophyll a (chla) algorithms, which were developed by the authors of this abstract in previous works, and the characteristics of Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) in order to study harmful algal events in the optically complex waters of the Galician Rias (NW). Harmful algal events are a frequent phenomenon in this area with direct and indirect impacts to the mussel production that constitute a very important economic activity for the local community. More than 240 106 kg of mussel per year are produced in these highly primary productive upwelling systems. A MERIS archive from nine years (2003-2012) was analysed using regionally specific chla algorithms. The latter were developed based on Multilayer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural networks and fuzzy c-mean clustering techniques (FCM). FCM specifies zones (based on water leaving reflectances) where the retrieval algorithms normally provide more reliable results. Monthly chla anomalies and other statistics were calculated for the nine years MERIS archive. These results were then related to upwelling indices and other associated measurements to determine the driver forces for specific phytoplankton blooms. The distribution and changes of chla are also discussed.

  3. Stability of Cubipod Armoured Roundheads in Short Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Medina, Josep R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a comparison of the stability of concrete cube armour and Cubipod armour in a breakwater roundhead with slope 1:1.5, exposed to both 2-D (long-crested) and 3-D (short-crested) waves. The model tests were performed at the Hydraulics and Coastal Engineering Laboratory at Aalborg...... University, Denmark. The model tests showed that Cubipod armour is more stable than cube armour when exposed to longer waves (steepness approx. 0.025) and has equal stability to cubes in shorter waves. The Cubipod armour layer contained due to its high porosity approximately 6-17% less concrete than the cube...... armour layer. Therefore, it was concluded that per used volume of concrete the Cubipods perform better than the cubes....

  4. Hydraulic Evaluation of the Crest Wing Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Antonishen, Michael Patrick

    This report presents the results of an experimental study of the wave energy converting abilities of the Crest Wing wave energy converter (WEC). The Crest Wing is a WEC that uses its movement in matching the shape of an oncoming wave to generate power. Model tests have been performed using a scale...... model (length scale 1:30), provided by WaveEnergyFyn, in regular and irregular wave states that can be found in Assessment of Wave Energy Devices. Best Practice as used in Denmark (Frigaard et al., 2008). The tests were carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg (Frigaard et al., 2008......). The tests were carried out at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU) in the 3D deep water wave tank. The displacement and force applied to a power take off system, provided by WaveEnergyFyn, were measured and used to calculate total power take off....

  5. [CREST syndrome and pulmonary hypertension: a dark prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ana C; Barbosa, Isabel P; Chaves, F Carneiro

    2004-01-01

    The CREST syndrome initially described as a limited, more indolent form of diffuse scleroderma, is characterized by calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. Subsequent studies showed that visceral abnormalities were not uncommon. Pulmonary abnormalities are frequent especially pulmonary hypertension, this one being a major cause of this syndrome's mortality. The authors present the case of white woman, 61 years old , with dyspnoea, cyanosis and peripheral edema with 12 months of evolution. She was admitted for pulmonary thromboembolism suspicion. After investigation the diagnosis of CREST syndrome was made, associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. The patient was treated with varfarina, nicorandil, nifedipine, furosemide and home oxygen. She died 3 months after. The authors discuss the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  6. The CREST Simulation Development Process: Training the Next Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Robert M

    2017-04-01

    The challenges of training and assessing endourologic skill have driven the development of new training systems. The Center for Research in Education and Simulation Technologies (CREST) has developed a team and a methodology to facilitate this development process. Backwards design principles were applied. A panel of experts first defined desired clinical and educational outcomes. Outcomes were subsequently linked to learning objectives. Gross task deconstruction was performed, and the primary domain was classified as primarily involving decision-making, psychomotor skill, or communication. A more detailed cognitive task analysis was performed to elicit and prioritize relevant anatomy/tissues, metrics, and errors. Reference anatomy was created using a digital anatomist and clinician working off of a clinical data set. Three dimensional printing can facilitate this process. When possible, synthetic or virtual tissue behavior and textures were recreated using data derived from human tissue. Embedded sensors/markers and/or computer-based systems were used to facilitate the collection of objective metrics. A learning Verification and validation occurred throughout the engineering development process. Nine endourology-relevant training systems were created by CREST with this approach. Systems include basic laparoscopic skills (BLUS), vesicourethral anastomosis, pyeloplasty, cystoscopic procedures, stent placement, rigid and flexible ureteroscopy, GreenLight PVP (GL Sim), Percutaneous access with C-arm (CAT), Nephrolithotomy (NLM), and a vascular injury model. Mixed modalities have been used, including "smart" physical models, virtual reality, augmented reality, and video. Substantial validity evidence for training and assessment has been collected on systems. An open source manikin-based modular platform is under development by CREST with the Department of Defense that will unify these and other commercial task trainers through the common physiology engine, learning

  7. Scleroderma and CREST syndrome: a case report in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritano, D; Bussolati, A; Baldoni, M; Leonida, A

    2011-09-01

    CREST syndrome is part of the heterogeneous scleroderma group of autoimmune diseases that cause thickening, hardening and tightening of the connective tissue in different parts of the body, and it may lead to complex disorders. CREST syndrome is characterized by the coexistence of calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal hypomotility, sclerodactily and telangectasia. A 72-year-old caucasian woman is referred to the S. Gerardo Hospital of Monza, with a chief complaint of oral pain and difficulties in deglutition and eating, associated with denture instability and difficulties to fit it. She had been previously diagnosed with Raynaud's phenomenon, and afterwards with CREST syndrome. Extra-oral examination underlined taut, thickened and rigid skin, pallid-red irregular maculae all over the face, telangiectasias and acrocyanosis. Intra-oral examination showed no alteration of the mucosa, but we can observe tongue rigidity and some speckled red alternating with white spots on the hard palate and in the vestibule. We undermitted the patient the dental treatment of Sjogren's syndrome. The management of the Sjogren's syndrome is symptomatic and empirical, and involves the use of saliva secretion stimulators, salivary substitutes and coadjuvants. Dental treatment and prophylaxis are important to prevent the consequences of xerostomia, such as rampant caries, based on the administration of topical fluoride in toothpastes and rinses, and supplemented by fluoride gels and varnishes. Instruction and reinforcement of oral hygiene, along with frequent dental assessment and management by the dentist are essential measures to preserve the oral health of those affected with CREST syndrome in progression to SS, complicated with Sjogren's syndrome.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension with limited cutaneous scleroderma (CREST syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, J C; Dompeling, E C; van der Star, J G; Hoorntje, J C

    2000-12-01

    A patient is described with a typical manifestation of pulmonary hypertension associated with limited cutaneous scleroderma, also known as CREST syndrome. The patient was treated with a calcium antagonist, oral anticoagulation and, because of evidence for parenchymal inflammation of the lung, with low-dose prednisone and cyclophosphamide. This treatment resulted in initial improvement of diffusion capacity and exercise tolerance, however, 1 year after diagnosis the patient died of progressive pulmonary hypertension.

  9. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt, A.; Marty, PR; Hodges, JK

    2016-01-01

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after anoth...

  10. Anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein polyneuropathy coexistent with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreadou, E; Zouvelou, V; Karandreas, N; Kilidireas, C

    2012-01-01

    Clinical involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the calcinosis cutis, raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dismotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST) variant of systemic sclerosis occurs infrequently and is characterized by axonal degeneration due to necrotizing vasculitis. We report a female patient with a known history of CREST syndrome, which developed a slowly progressive, distal symmetric demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy (PN), with tremor and ataxia as prominent features, compatible with anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) PN. The diagnosis of PN was established by the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin M anti-MAG antibodies (Thin-Layer Chromatography, Western Blot and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay). Given the evidence that in CREST activation of T-helper cells is observed and that anti-MAG antibodies, despite the fact that they are T-cell-independent, may be influenced by an increase in T-helper function, the coexistence of these two rare autoimmune disorders in the same patient may not be incidental but related to the underlying immunological mechanisms involved.

  11. Large vessel occlusive disease associated with CREST syndrome and scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, P; Englert, H; Bertouch, J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To report the cases of three patients with CREST syndrome and one patient with diffuse scleroderma who had severe macrovascular disease and only minimal vascular risk factors. METHODS--The medical histories, physical examinations, and results of clinical investigations were reviewed in four patients. RESULTS--These four patients had severe morbidity from macrovascular disease of the arms and legs in the presence of minimal underlying vascular risk factors. These patients represent 11% of the women with scleroderma seen at our hospital since 1974. This is a greater than threefold increase above the expected proportion of symptomatic vascular disease seen in population studies. In the patients with CREST syndrome, large vessel disease was first seen more than 10 years after the onset of Raynaud's phenomenon, which was the first manifestation of the disease. A pathological specimen of the ulnar artery from one patient showed severe luminal narrowing by an acellular material with no evidence of atheroma. CONCLUSIONS--These cases suggest an association of both the CREST syndrome and scleroderma with macrovascular disease. PMID:8323401

  12. Anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein polyneuropathy coexistent with CREST syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Andreadou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical involvement of the peripheral nervous system in the calcinosis cutis, raynaud′s phenomenon, esophageal dismotility, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST variant of systemic sclerosis occurs infrequently and is characterized by axonal degeneration due to necrotizing vasculitis. We report a female patient with a known history of CREST syndrome, which developed a slowly progressive, distal symmetric demyelinating sensorimotor polyneuropathy (PN, with tremor and ataxia as prominent features, compatible with anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG PN. The diagnosis of PN was established by the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin M anti-MAG antibodies (Thin-Layer Chromatography, Western Blot and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Given the evidence that in CREST activation of T-helper cells is observed and that anti-MAG antibodies, despite the fact that they are T-cell-independent, may be influenced by an increase in T-helper function, the coexistence of these two rare autoimmune disorders in the same patient may not be incidental but related to the underlying immunological mechanisms involved.

  13. Layer-specific entrainment of gamma-band neural activity by the alpha rhythm in monkey visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaak, E.; Bonnefond, M.; Maier, A.; Leopold, D.A.; Jensen, O.

    2012-01-01

    Although the mammalian neocortex has a clear laminar organization, layer-specific neuronal computations remain to be uncovered. Several studies suggest that gamma band activity in primary visual cortex (V1) is produced in granular and superficial layers and is associated with the processing of

  14. On the crest of a wave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkegaard, Jesper; Davidsen, Jesper Rømhild; Paulsen, Maja Skov

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Symptoms, mortality, and costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) concentrate among patients who have been hospitalised with the disease. Nevertheless, no solid estimates exist of trends in the prevalence of this condition. This study aimed to investigate age- and sex......-specific trends in the prevalence of hospitalisation-required COPD. METHOD: Using national registers, a cohort trend study was conducted covering the entire Danish population (5.4 million citizens) from 1994 to 2009. Subjects were classified as prevalent in the period between first COPD hospitalisation and either...... death, migration, or the end of an individual 8-year period with no COPD hospitalisations. RESULTS: In 2009 in Denmark the prevalence of hospitalisation-required COPD was: For males 45-59 years 0.36%, 60-74 years 1.37%, 75-84 years 4.13%, 85+ years 4.33%, and for females: 45-59 years: 0.49%, 60-74 years...

  15. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Long Interspersed Nucleotide Element-1 of Homo Sapiens (L1Hs) During Human Embryogenesis and Roles in Neural Tube Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Chang, S; Guan, J; Shangguan, S; Lu, X; Wang, Z; Wu, L; Zou, J; Zhao, H; Bao, Y; Qiu, Z; Niu, B; Zhang, T

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposition events plays crucial roles during early development. Previously we showed that LINE-1 hypomethylation in neuronal tissues is associated with pathogenesis of neural tube defect (NTD). Herein, we further evaluated LINE-1 Homo sapiens (L1Hs) methylation in tissues derived from three germ layers of stillborn NTD fetuses, to define patterns of tissue specific methylation and site-specific hypomethylation at CpG sites within an L1Hs promoter region. Stable, tissue-specific L1Hs methylation patterns throughout three germ layer lineages of the fetus, placenta, and maternal peripheral blood were observed. Samples from maternal peripheral blood exhibited the highest level of L1Hs methylation (64.95%) and that from placenta showed the lowest (26.82%). Between samples from NTDs and controls, decrease in L1Hs methylation was only significant in NTD-affected brain tissue at 7.35%, especially in females (8.98%). L1Hs hypomethylation in NTDs was also associated with a significant increase in expression level of an L1Hs-encoded transcript in females (r = -0.846, p = 0.004). This could be due to genomic DNA instability and alternation in chromatins accessibility resulted from abnormal L1Hs hypomethylation, as showed in this study with HCT-15 cells treated with methylation inhibitor 5-Aza.

  16. Bupivacaine for pain reduction after iliac crest bone graft harvest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Kevin R; Lockney, Dennis T; Bible, Jesse E; Crosby, Colin G; Devin, Clinton J

    2014-05-01

    Iliac crest bone graft remains the gold standard in achieving spinal arthrodesis, but chronic pain from graft harvest occurs in up to 39% of patients. Studies have shown that a single administration of local anesthetic reduces short-term pain, but they have not adequately investigated possible longer-term benefits. The goal of this study was to determine whether local administration of bupivacaine after iliac crest bone graft harvesting reduces pain and improves patient-reported outcomes. In this prospective, randomized, controlled, and blinded clinical study, 40 patients were identified who underwent posterior spine fusion with iliac crest bone graft and were randomized to receive either bupivacaine (treatment group, n=20) or saline (control group, n=20) at the iliac crest bone graft site. Pain at the harvest site was determined by a series of 12 visual and numeric pain scale assessments. Short Form-12 mental and physical component scores, EuroQol-5D, and Oswestry Disability Index assessments were made, along with determination of patient satisfaction and self-reported outcome of surgery. Baseline pain and outcome assessments were statistically similar (P>.05). Average pain scores were lower for all 12 assessments in the treatment group at mean follow-up of 5 weeks (significant differences in 6 assessments) and 20 weeks (significant differences in 2 assessments). No significant differences were found in Short Form-12 and EuroQol-5D scores. For patients who underwent lumbar fusion, the treatment group had significantly improved Oswestry Disability Index scores (mean±SD=10.8±7.1 vs 18.7±5.9, P=.012). Significantly more patients in the treatment group reported that surgery met all expectations (90% vs 50%, P=.016). This study is the 1st to show that a single administration of bupivacaine at the iliac crest bone graft harvest site during posterior spine fusion surgery can result in improved outcomes and reduced pain far beyond the anesthetic duration of activity

  17. Electrosensory processing in Apteronotus albifrons: implications for general and specific neural coding strategies across wave-type weakly electric fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Diana; Metzen, Michael G; Chacron, Maurice J

    2016-12-01

    Understanding how the brain processes sensory input to generate behavior remains an important problem in neuroscience. Towards this end, it is useful to compare results obtained across multiple species to gain understanding as to the general principles of neural coding. Here we investigated hindbrain pyramidal cell activity in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus albifrons We found strong heterogeneities when looking at baseline activity. Additionally, ON- and OFF-type cells responded to increases and decreases of sinusoidal and noise stimuli, respectively. While both cell types displayed band-pass tuning, OFF-type cells were more broadly tuned than their ON-type counterparts. The observed heterogeneities in baseline activity as well as the greater broadband tuning of OFF-type cells were both similar to those previously reported in other weakly electric fish species, suggesting that they constitute general features of sensory processing. However, we found that peak tuning occurred at frequencies ∼15 Hz in A. albifrons, which is much lower than values reported in the closely related species Apteronotus leptorhynchus and the more distantly related species Eigenmannia virescens In response to stimuli with time-varying amplitude (i.e., envelope), ON- and OFF-type cells displayed similar high-pass tuning curves characteristic of fractional differentiation and possibly indicate optimized coding. These tuning curves were qualitatively similar to those of pyramidal cells in the closely related species A. leptorhynchus In conclusion, comparison between our and previous results reveals general and species-specific neural coding strategies. We hypothesize that differences in coding strategies, when observed, result from different stimulus distributions in the natural/social environment. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. In a non-human primate model, aging disrupts the neural control of intestinal smooth muscle contractility in a region-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, L; Greenwood-Van Meerveld, B

    2014-03-01

    Incidences of gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorders increase with age. However, there is a paucity of knowledge about the aging mechanisms leading to GI dysmotility. Motility in the GI tract is a function of smooth muscle contractility, which is modulated in part by the enteric nervous system (ENS). Evidence suggests that aging impairs the ENS, thus we tested the hypothesis that senescence in the GI tract precipitates abnormalities in smooth muscle and neurally mediated contractility in a region-specific manner. Jejunal and colonic circular muscle strips were isolated from young (4-10 years) and old (18+ years) baboons. Myogenic responses were investigated using potassium chloride (KCl) and carbachol (CCh). Neurally mediated contractile responses were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS) and were recorded in the absence and presence of atropine (1 μM) or NG-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; 100 μM). The myogenic responses to KCl in the jejunum and colon were unaffected by age. In the colon, but not the jejunum, CCh-induced contractile responses were reduced in aged animals. Compared to young baboons, there was enhanced EFS-induced contractility of old baboon jejunal smooth muscle in contrast to the reduced contractility in the colon. The effect of atropine on the EFS response was lower in aged colonic tissue, suggesting reduced participation of acetylcholine. In aged jejunal tissue, higher contractile responses to EFS were found to be due to reduced nitregic inhibition. These findings provide key evidence for the importance of intestinal smooth muscle and ENS senescence in age-associated GI motility disorders. © 2014 The Authors. Neurogastroenterology & Motility published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation.

    OpenAIRE

    Droms, K; Sueoka, N

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of...

  20. Misexpression of BRE gene in the developing chick neural tube affects neurulation and somitogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Chuai, Manli; Yeuk-Hon Chan, John; Lei, Jian; Münsterberg, Andrea; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-03-01

    The brain and reproductive expression (BRE) gene is expressed in numerous adult tissues and especially in the nervous and reproductive systems. However, little is known about BRE expression in the developing embryo or about its role in embryonic development. In this study, we used in situ hybridization to reveal the spatiotemporal expression pattern for BRE in chick embryo during development. To determine the importance of BRE in neurogenesis, we overexpressed BRE and also silenced BRE expression specifically in the neural tube. We established that overexpressing BRE in the neural tube indirectly accelerated Pax7(+) somite development and directly increased HNK-1(+) neural crest cell (NCC) migration and TuJ-1(+) neurite outgrowth. These altered morphogenetic processes were associated with changes in the cell cycle of NCCs and neural tube cells. The inverse effect was obtained when BRE expression was silenced in the neural tube. We also determined that BMP4 and Shh expression in the neural tube was affected by misexpression of BRE. This provides a possible mechanism for how altering BRE expression was able to affect somitogenesis, neurogenesis, and NCC migration. In summary, our results demonstrate that BRE plays an important role in regulating neurogenesis and indirectly somite differentiation during early chick embryo development. © 2015 Wang, Li, Wang, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Prospero-related homeobox 1 (Prox1 at the crossroads of diverse pathways during adult neural fate specification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios eStergiopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, adult neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS has emerged as a fundamental process underlying physiology and disease. Recent evidence indicates that the homeobox transcription factor Prox1 is a critical intrinsic regulator of neurogenesis in the embryonic CNS and adult dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, acting in multiple ways and instructed by extrinsic cues and intrinsic factors. In the embryonic CNS, Prox1 is mechanistically involved in the regulation of proliferation versus differentiation decisions of NSCs, promoting cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation, while inhibits astrogliogenesis. During the complex differentiation events in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, Prox1 is required for maintenance of intermediate progenitors (IPs, differentiation and maturation of glutamatergic interneurons, as well as specification of DG cell identity over CA3 pyramidal fate. The mechanism by which Prox1 exerts multiple functions involves distinct signaling pathways currently not fully highlighted. In this mini-review, we thoroughly discuss the Prox1-dependent phenotypes and molecular pathways in adult neurogenesis in relation to different upstream signaling cues and cell fate determinants. In addition, we discuss the possibility that Prox1 may act as a cross-talk point between diverse signaling cascades to achieve specific outcomes during adult neurogenesis.

  2. Novel insights into the role of NF-κB p50 in astrocyte-mediated fate specification of adult neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Bortolotto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the CNS nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB transcription factors are involved in a wide range of functions both in homeostasis and in pathology. Over the years, our and other groups produced a vast array of information on the complex involvement of NF-κB proteins in different aspects of postnatal neurogenesis. In particular, several extracellular signals and membrane receptors have been identified as being able to affect neural progenitor cells (NPC and their progeny via NF-κB activation. A crucial role in the regulation of neuronal fate specification in adult hippocampal NPC is played by the NF-κB p50 subunit. NF-κB p50KO mice display a remarkable reduction in adult hippocampal neurogenesis which correlates with a selective defect in hippocampal-dependent short-term memory. Moreover absence of NF-κB p50 can profoundly affect the in vitro proneurogenic response of adult hippocampal NPC (ahNPC to several endogenous signals and drugs. Herein we briefly review the current knowledge on the pivotal role of NF-κB p50 in the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In addition we discuss more recent data that further extend the relevance of NF-κB p50 to novel astroglia-derived signals which can influence neuronal specification of ahNPC and to astrocyte-NPC cross-talk.

  3. Evaluation of specific neural marker GAP-43 and TH combined with Masson-trichrome staining for forensic autopsy cases with old myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian-Shui; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Bai, Ru-Feng; Zhao, Rui; Guan, Da-Wei

    2018-01-01

    It has been a puzzling forensic task to determine the cause of death as a result of old myocardial infarction (OMI) in the absence of recognizable acute myocardial infarction. Recent studies indicated that the heterogeneous cardiac nerve sprouting and sympathetic hyperinnervation at border zones of the infarcted site played important roles in sudden cardiac death (SCD). So, the present study explored the value of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) as objective and specific neural biomarkers combined with Masson-trichrome staining for forensic autopsy cases. Myocardium of left ventricle of 58 medicolegal autopsy cases, 12 OMI cases, 12 acute/OMI cases, and 34 control cases, were immunostained with anti-GAP-43 and anti-TH antibodies. Immunoreactivity of GAP-43 and TH identified nerve fibers and vascular wall in OMI cases and acute/OMI cases. Specifically, TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant at border zones of the infarcted site. There were a few GAP-43 and TH expressions in the control cases. With Masson-trichrome staining, collagen fibers were blue and cardiac muscle fibers were pink in marked contrast with the surrounding tissue, which improved the location of nerve fibers. Thus, these findings suggest that immunohistochemical detection of GAP-43 and TH combined with Masson-trichrome staining can provide the evidence for the medicolegal expertise of SCD due to OMI, and further demonstrate a close relationship between sympathetic hyperinnervation and SCD.

  4. Facilitation of memory encoding in primate hippocampus by a neuroprosthesis that promotes task-specific neural firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E.; Song, Dong; Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas M.; Shin, Dae C.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis Z.; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Memory accuracy is a major problem in human disease and is the primary factor that defines Alzheimer’s, ageing and dementia resulting from impaired hippocampal function in the medial temporal lobe. Development of a hippocampal memory neuroprosthesis that facilitates normal memory encoding in nonhuman primates (NHPs) could provide the basis for improving memory in human disease states. Approach. NHPs trained to perform a short-term delayed match-to-sample (DMS) memory task were examined with multi-neuron recordings from synaptically connected hippocampal cell fields, CA1 and CA3. Recordings were analyzed utilizing a previously developed nonlinear multi-input multi-output (MIMO) neuroprosthetic model, capable of extracting CA3-to-CA1 spatiotemporal firing patterns during DMS performance. Main results. The MIMO model verified that specific CA3-to-CA1 firing patterns were critical for the successful encoding of sample phase information on more difficult DMS trials. This was validated by the delivery of successful MIMO-derived encoding patterns via electrical stimulation to the same CA1 recording locations during the sample phase which facilitated task performance in the subsequent, delayed match phase, on difficult trials that required more precise encoding of sample information. Significance. These findings provide the first successful application of a neuroprosthesis designed to enhance and/or repair memory encoding in primate brain.

  5. Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn-specific neural firing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Robert E.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Marmarelis, Vasilis; Song, Dong; Opris, Ioan; Santos, Lucas; Berger, Theodore W.; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2012-10-01

    Objective. Maintenance of cognitive control is a major concern for many human disease conditions; therefore, a major goal of human neuroprosthetics is to facilitate and/or recover the cognitive function when such circumstances impair appropriate decision making. Approach. Minicolumnar activity from the prefrontal cortex (PFC) was recorded from nonhuman primates trained to perform a delayed match to sample (DMS), via custom-designed conformal multielectrode arrays that provided inter-laminar recordings from neurons in the PFC layer 2/3 and layer 5. Such recordings were analyzed via a previously demonstrated nonlinear multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) neuroprosthesis in rodents, which extracted and characterized multicolumnar firing patterns during DMS performance. Main results. The MIMO model verified that the conformal recorded individual PFC minicolumns responded to entrained target selections in patterns critical for successful DMS performance. This allowed the substitution of task-related layer 5 neuron firing patterns with electrical stimulation in the same recording regions during columnar transmission from layer 2/3 at the time of target selection. Such stimulation improved normal task performance, but more importantly, recovered performance when applied as a neuroprosthesis following the pharmacological disruption of decision making in the same task. Significance. These findings provide the first successful application of neuroprosthesis in the primate brain designed specifically to restore or repair the disrupted cognitive function.

  6. Hydraulic evaluation of the Crest Wing wave energy converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofoed, J.P.; Antonishen, M.

    2008-09-15

    The Crest Wing Wave Energy Converter is currently being developed by Henning Pilgaard, of WaveEnergyFyn, Denmark. It is meant to act like a carpet on the water, conforming to the shape of each wave and using that movement to generate power. The thought of making a WEC that acts like a carpet on top of the waves is not new; ongoing or past projects such as the Pelamis and Cockerel Raft were designed with this thought in mind. The real difference with the Crest Wing is that it has skirt drafts, that extend down into the water and create suction; this increases the effective mass of the WEC while minimizing the material use. Special attention was given to the design of the first and last floaters as they are meant to act as a smooth transition between wave and machine. Their purpose is to make sure that no air gets under the two middle floaters so that suction is not broken and the device continues to function well. In summary the Crest Wing functions and is able to produce power with a good overall efficiency. The configuration with relative reference PTO (Power Take Off) is superior. It has not been proven that the idea of mounting skirts on the floaters is leading to a better performance. Thus, the study leads to the conclusion that the idea of making a simple hinged raft type device is good, and it is likely that the construction cost for a device of this type can be kept down. However, the study also leaves the chance that some limited draft of skirts in combination with inlet/outlet devices, could prove beneficial. In case of further testing on this device, an effort should be made to design and construct a more easily and accurately controlled PTO model in the test setup. This could greatly improve the quality of the output of such tests. (ln)

  7. Aerosolized iloprost in CREST syndrome related pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, D; Hachulla, E; Hatron, P Y; Goullard, L; Onimus, T; Robin, S; Fauchais, A L; Queyrel, V; Michon-Pasturel, U; Hebbar, M; Saulnier, F; Devulder, B

    2001-10-01

    To assess the outcome of patients with CREST syndrome associated severe pulmonary hypertension treated by aerosolized iloprost in a noncomparative study. Five patients with CREST syndrome associated severe pulmonary hypertension were treated with 100 microg/day of aerosolized iloprost. New York Heart Association functional class and exercise tolerance (6 min walk test) were assessed at baseline, after one month, and then every 6 months. A right heart catheterization was performed at baseline in all but one patient. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) was measured with Doppler echocardiography after one month and every 6 months. The mean followup was 13.2 +/- 8.8 months (median 6, range 6-24). Subjective quality of life improved in all patients. NYHA functional class decreased from Class III to II in 3 patients, from Class III to I in one patient, and from Class IV to III in one patient. At 6 months, the distance walked in 6 min had increased from 352 +/- 48 to 437 +/- 56 m (p = 0.06). At one month the mean systolic PAP was 58 +/- 13 vs 81 +/- 9 mm Hg at baseline (p = 0.04). At 6 months the mean systolic PAP was 57 +/- 13 mm Hg (p = 0.06). The improvement of both clinical and hemodynamic status was maintained in the 2 patients treated for 2 years. Neither adverse effects nor need to increase the daily dose of iloprost were observed. One patient died of right heart failure and one patient did not experience any improvement of exercise tolerance and hemodynamics. Aerosolized iloprost might be potentially useful as treatment for CREST syndrome associated pulmonary hypertension. However, patients who could benefit from this treatment will probably have to undergo careful criteria selection.

  8. Visual motion imagery neurofeedback based on the hMT+/V5 complex: evidence for a feedback-specific neural circuit involving neocortical and cerebellar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banca, Paula; Sousa, Teresa; Catarina Duarte, Isabel; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Current approaches in neurofeedback/brain-computer interface research often focus on identifying, on a subject-by-subject basis, the neural regions that are best suited for self-driven modulation. It is known that the hMT+/V5 complex, an early visual cortical region, is recruited during explicit and implicit motion imagery, in addition to real motion perception. This study tests the feasibility of training healthy volunteers to regulate the level of activation in their hMT+/V5 complex using real-time fMRI neurofeedback and visual motion imagery strategies. Approach. We functionally localized the hMT+/V5 complex to further use as a target region for neurofeedback. An uniform strategy based on motion imagery was used to guide subjects to neuromodulate hMT+/V5. Main results. We found that 15/20 participants achieved successful neurofeedback. This modulation led to the recruitment of a specific network as further assessed by psychophysiological interaction analysis. This specific circuit, including hMT+/V5, putative V6 and medial cerebellum was activated for successful neurofeedback runs. The putamen and anterior insula were recruited for both successful and non-successful runs. Significance. Our findings indicate that hMT+/V5 is a region that can be modulated by focused imagery and that a specific cortico-cerebellar circuit is recruited during visual motion imagery leading to successful neurofeedback. These findings contribute to the debate on the relative potential of extrinsic (sensory) versus intrinsic (default-mode) brain regions in the clinical application of neurofeedback paradigms. This novel circuit might be a good target for future neurofeedback approaches that aim, for example, the training of focused attention in disorders such as ADHD.

  9. Clinical and histological characterization of hair coat and glandular tissue of Chinese crested dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Dominique J; Gurtner, Corinne; Panakova, Lucia; Mausberg, Theresa-Bernadette; Müller, Eliane J; Drögemüller, Cord; Leeb, Tosso; Welle, Monika M

    2013-04-01

    Two varieties exist in the Chinese crested dog breed, namely hairless Chinese crested dogs presenting with hypotrichosis and dentition abnormalities, and the coated powderpuffs. Hairless Chinese crested dogs are obligate heterozygotes for a FOXI3 mutation, and this phenotype is classified as a form of canine ectodermal dysplasia. We provide a detailed histological description of hair follicles and their density for the three subphenotypes (true hairless, semi-coated and powderpuffs) of Chinese crested dogs. Apocrine and exocrine glands of the skin and other tissues were compared with findings reported from dogs with X-linked ectodermal dysplasia. Skin biopsies were collected from 22 Chinese crested dogs. Additionally, the glands of the skin and other tissues were examined from another two dogs available for postmortem examination. Skin biopsies and tissues were processed, stained and evaluated in a blinded fashion. Hair follicular anomalies decreased with increasing number of hairs in the different phenotypes. The FOXI3 mutants had only simple primary hair follicles, whereas the nonmutant powderpuffs had compound follicles identical to other dog breeds. All Chinese crested dogs had an anagen-dominated hair cycle. Furthermore, apocrine glands in the skin and respiratory mucous glands of the mutant Chinese crested dogs were present and normal. We have identified striking histopathological differences between the three subphenotypes of Chinese crested dogs. We clearly demonstrated distinct differences between the canine ectodermal dysplasia in Chinese crested dogs and dogs with X-linked ectodermal dysplasia. © 2013 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology © 2013 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Coronary artery abnormalities in CREST syndrome revealed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrogeni, Sophie; Bratis, Costas; Manoussakis, Menelaos

    2011-01-01

    CREST syndrome represents a subset of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Five patients with CREST syndrome and 5 with SSc without cardiac symptoms and with normal routine cardiac examination were investigated by cardiovascular magnetic resonance. All CREST patients had ectatic coronary arteries, and in 1 of them, an inferior, transmural myocardial infarction was identified. Furthermore, patchy fibrosis was identified in all the patients with SSc, although their coronary arteries were normal. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance can be a useful, noninvasive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of asymptomatic CREST and SSc patients. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Taxane-induced morphea in a patient with CREST syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Michele Bouchard

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, are microtubule stabilizing chemotherapeutic agents that have demonstrated antineoplastic effects in a variety of solid tumors. They have been linked to the development of localized cutaneous sclerosis in some patients. We present a case of docetaxel-induced cutaneous sclerosis of the lower extremities in a patient with pre-existing CREST syndrome. We propose that patients with a history of limited or diffuse systemic sclerosis should be given taxane chemotherapy with caution, as these patients may have an immunological predisposition for the development of drug-induced morphea.

  12. European Experience of Low Crested Structures for Coastal Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims to describe selected study sites monitored and analyzed during the DELOS project. All the selected sites are protected by Low Crested Structures (LCSs) under various environmental conditions. In the first part of the paper the characteristics of the European structures are presented...... parts, such as gaps and roundheads, where strong currents are responsible for erosion. Emergent LCSs show the formation of salients (Altafulla) or tombolos (Lønstrup) depending on the shoreline distances. In macro-tidal beaches (Elmer) tidal currents can control the salient development and the overall...

  13. Taxane-induced morphea in a patient with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Susan M; Mohr, Melinda R; Pariser, Robert J

    2010-01-18

    The taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, are microtubule stabilizing chemotherapeutic agents that have demonstrated antineoplastic effects in a variety of solid tumors. They have been linked to the development of localized cutaneous sclerosis in some patients. We present a case of docetaxel-induced cutaneous sclerosis of the lower extremities in a patient with pre-existing CREST syndrome. We propose that patients with a history of limited or diffuse systemic sclerosis should be given taxane chemotherapy with caution, as these patients may have an immunological predisposition for the development of drug-induced morphea.

  14. Tinea Incognita in a Patient with Crest Syndrome: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgievska-Sukarovska, Biljana; Skerlev, Mihael; Žele-Starčević, Lidija

    2015-01-01

    Tinea incognita is a dermatophytic infection that is difficult to diagnose, usually modified by inappropriate topical or systemic corticosteroid therapy. We report an extensive case of tinea incognita caused by the zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton mentagrophytes (var. granulosa) in a 49-year-old female patient with CREST (Calcinosis; Raynaud phenomenon; Esophageal involvement; Sclerodactyly; Teleangiectasia) syndrome. Immunocompromised patients, as well as patients with keratinization disorders, seem to be especially susceptible to dermatophytic infections with atypical clinical presentation that is sometimes bizarre and difficult to recognize. Therefore, close monitoring and mycological skin examination is recommended in order to avoid misdiagnosis and to give the patient the best chance of recovery.

  15. Conducting Polymers for Neural Prosthetic and Neural Interface Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Neural interfacing devices are an artificial mechanism for restoring or supplementing the function of the nervous system lost as a result of injury or disease. Conducting polymers (CPs) are gaining significant attention due to their capacity to meet the performance criteria of a number of neuronal therapies including recording and stimulating neural activity, the regeneration of neural tissue and the delivery of bioactive molecules for mediating device-tissue interactions. CPs form a flexible platform technology that enables the development of tailored materials for a range of neuronal diagnostic and treatment therapies. In this review the application of CPs for neural prostheses and other neural interfacing devices are discussed, with a specific focus on neural recording, neural stimulation, neural regeneration, and therapeutic drug delivery. PMID:26414302

  16. RNA-Seq analysis of gene expression for floral development in crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fangqin; Biligetu, Bill; Coulman, Bruce; Schellenberg, Michael P; Fu, Yong-Bi

    2017-01-01

    Crested wheatgrass [Agropyron cristatum L. (Gaertn.)] is widely used for early spring grazing in western Canada and the development of late maturing cultivars which maintain forage quality for a longer period is desired. However, it is difficult to manipulate the timing of floral transition, as little is known about molecular mechanism of plant maturity in this species. In this study, RNA-Seq and differential gene expression analysis were performed to investigate gene expression for floral initiation and development in crested wheatgrass. Three cDNA libraries were generated and sequenced to represent three successive growth stages by sampling leaves at the stem elongation stage, spikes at boot and anthesis stages. The sequencing generated 25,568,846; 25,144,688 and 25,714,194 qualified Illumina reads for the three successive stages, respectively. De novo assembly of all the reads generated 311,671 transcripts with a mean length of 487 bp, and 152,849 genes with an average sequence length of 669 bp. A total of 48,574 (31.8%) and 105,222 (68.8%) genes were annotated in the Swiss-Prot and NCBI non-redundant (nr) protein databases, respectively. Based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG) pathway database, 9,723 annotated sequences were mapped onto 298 pathways, including plant circadian clock pathway. Specifically, 113 flowering time-associated genes, 123 MADS-box genes and 22 CONSTANS-LIKE (COL) genes were identified. A COL homolog DN52048-c0-g4 which was clustered with the flowering time genes AtCO and OsHd1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.), respectively, showed specific expression in leaves and could be a CONSTANS (CO) candidate gene. Taken together, this study has generated a new set of genomic resources for identifying and characterizing genes and pathways involved in floral transition and development in crested wheatgrass. These findings are significant for further understanding of the molecular basis for late

  17. RNA-Seq analysis of gene expression for floral development in crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqin Zeng

    Full Text Available Crested wheatgrass [Agropyron cristatum L. (Gaertn.] is widely used for early spring grazing in western Canada and the development of late maturing cultivars which maintain forage quality for a longer period is desired. However, it is difficult to manipulate the timing of floral transition, as little is known about molecular mechanism of plant maturity in this species. In this study, RNA-Seq and differential gene expression analysis were performed to investigate gene expression for floral initiation and development in crested wheatgrass. Three cDNA libraries were generated and sequenced to represent three successive growth stages by sampling leaves at the stem elongation stage, spikes at boot and anthesis stages. The sequencing generated 25,568,846; 25,144,688 and 25,714,194 qualified Illumina reads for the three successive stages, respectively. De novo assembly of all the reads generated 311,671 transcripts with a mean length of 487 bp, and 152,849 genes with an average sequence length of 669 bp. A total of 48,574 (31.8% and 105,222 (68.8% genes were annotated in the Swiss-Prot and NCBI non-redundant (nr protein databases, respectively. Based on the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome (KEGG pathway database, 9,723 annotated sequences were mapped onto 298 pathways, including plant circadian clock pathway. Specifically, 113 flowering time-associated genes, 123 MADS-box genes and 22 CONSTANS-LIKE (COL genes were identified. A COL homolog DN52048-c0-g4 which was clustered with the flowering time genes AtCO and OsHd1 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana L. and rice (Oryza sativa L., respectively, showed specific expression in leaves and could be a CONSTANS (CO candidate gene. Taken together, this study has generated a new set of genomic resources for identifying and characterizing genes and pathways involved in floral transition and development in crested wheatgrass. These findings are significant for further understanding of the molecular basis

  18. Personality of Wild Male Crested Macaques (Macaca nigra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Christof; Agil, Muhammad; Widdig, Anja; Engelhardt, Antje

    2013-01-01

    Animal personalities, i.e. consistent differences in behavior across time and/or context, have received increased attention of behavioral biologists over the last years. Recent research shows that personalities represent traits on which natural and sexual selection work and which can have substantial fitness consequences. The aim of this study is to establish the personality structure of crested macaque (Macaca nigra) males as foundation for future studies on its adaptive value. We collected behavioral data through focal animal sampling and additionally conducted two sets of playback experiments. Results of a factor analysis on the behavioral data revealed a four factor structure with components we labeled Anxiety, Sociability, Connectedness and Aggressiveness. Results from the experiments revealed an additional and independent Boldness factor but the absence of Neophilia. Overall, this structure resembles other macaque and animal species with the exception of Connectedness, which might be a consequence of the species' tolerant social style. Our results thus not only form the basis for future studies on the adaptive value of personality in crested macaques but also contribute an important data point for investigating the evolution of personality structure from a comparative perspective by refining, for example, which personality factors characterized the last common ancestor of hominids and macaques. PMID:23940517

  19. Surgical management of digital calcinosis in CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlino, Giorgio; Germano, Silvia; Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-12-01

    As a limited form of sclerodermy, CREST syndrome is characterized by calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia, which determine the acronym CREST. Calcinosis is a particularly difficult entity to treat given the paucity of effective options described in the literature. Treatment of finger calcinosis has a wide range of possibilities depending on the extent of calcifications and the involvement of deep structures. From a surgical point of view, whereas simple removal is adequate in minor outpatient cases, a radical debridement in the major and more painful cases seems required. A cover flap is needed particularly in the thumb due to its great functional importance, also if the fingertip is not involved. The authors recommend the kite flap for the dimensions, the tissue quality, and the possibility of giving sensation to the reconstructed area. With this surgical option, the transferred skin is soft, sensate, and the right fit. Usually, no further operations are needed for flap remodeling. The time required for sensory integration is about 2 years, often related to the age of the patient. Debridement and flap reconstruction usually give total resolution of pain, with complete recovery of thumb motion and the thumb-index finger grip.

  20. Determinants of immigration strategies in male crested macaques (Macaca nigra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Pascal R; Hodges, Keith; Agil, Muhammad; Engelhardt, Antje

    2016-08-18

    Immigration into a new group can produce substantial costs due to resistance from residents, but also reproductive benefits. Whether or not individuals base their immigration strategy on prospective cost-benefit ratios remains unknown. We investigated individual immigration decisions in crested macaques, a primate species with a high reproductive skew in favour of high-ranking males. We found two different strategies. Males who achieved low rank in the new group usually immigrated after another male had immigrated within the previous 25 days and achieved high rank. They never got injured but also had low prospective reproductive success. We assume that these males benefitted from immigrating into a destabilized male hierarchy. Males who achieved high rank in the new group usually immigrated independent of previous immigrations. They recieved injuries more frequently and therefore bore immigration costs. They, however, also had higher reproductive success prospects. We conclude that male crested macaques base their immigration strategy on relative fighting ability and thus potential rank in the new group i.e. potential reproductive benefits, as well as potential costs of injury.

  1. Concentration profiling of minerals in iliac crest bone tissue of opium addicted humans using inductively coupled plasma and discriminant analysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Jamshidi, Mahbobeh; Yeganeh, Ali; Mahmoudi, Mani

    2016-02-20

    Opium addiction is one of the main health problems in developing countries and induces serious defects on the human body. In this work, the concentrations of 32 minerals including alkaline, heavy and toxic metals have been determined in the iliac crest bone tissue of 22 opium addicted individuals using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The bone tissues of 30 humans with no physiological and metabolomic diseases were used as the control group. For subsequent analyses, the linear and quadratic discriminant analysis techniques have been used for classification of the data into "addicted" and "non-addicted" groups. Moreover, the counter-propagation artificial neural network (CPANN) has been used for clustering of the data. The results revealed that the CPANN is a robust model and thoroughly classifies the data. The area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic curve for this model was more than 0.91. Investigation of the results revealed that the opium consumption causes a deficiency in the level of Calcium, Phosphate, Potassium and Sodium in iliac crest bone tissue. Moreover, this type of addiction induces an increment in the level of toxic and heavy metals such as Co, Cr, Mo and Ni in iliac crest tissue. The correlation analysis revealed that there were no significant dependencies between the age of the samples and the mineral content of their iliac crest, in this study. The results of this work suggest that the opium addicted individuals need thorough and restricted dietary and medical care programs after recovery phases, in order to have healthy bones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dual labeling of neural crest cells and blood vessels within chicken embryos using chick

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); N. Thapar (Nikhil); A.J. Burns (Alan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAll developing organs need to be connected to both the nervous system (for sensory and motor control) as well as the vascular system (for gas exchange, fluid and nutrient supply). Consequently both the nervous and vascular systems develop alongside each other and share striking

  3. Neural crest-derived dental stem cells--where we are and where we are going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Vera; Sawatari, Yoh; Huang, C-Y Charles; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin

    2014-09-01

    There are five types of post-natal human dental stem cells that have been identified, isolated and characterized. Here, we review the information available on dental stem cells as well as their potential applications in dentistry, regenerative medicine and the development of other therapeutic approaches. Data pertinent to dental stem cells and their applications, published in peer-reviewed journals from 1982 to 2013 in English were reviewed. Sources were retrieved from PubMed databases as well as related references that the electronic search yielded. Manuscripts describing the origin, retrieval, characterization and application of dental stem cells were obtained and reviewed. Dental stem cell populations present properties similar to those of mesenchymal stem cells, such as the ability to self-renew and the potential for multilineage differentiation. While they have greater capacity to give rise to odontogenic cells and regenerate dental pulp and periodontal tissue, they have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ line cells, proving that a population of pluripotent stem cells exists in the dental tissues. Dental stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into endoderm, mesoderm and ectoderm tissues. Consequently they do not only have applications in dentistry, but also neurodegenerative and ischemic diseases, diabetes research, bone repair, and other applications in the field of tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Kissing naevus arising from neural crest cells presenting as upper and the lower lid mass

    OpenAIRE

    Gian Chand Rajput; Deepti Mahajan; Kulbhushan Prakash Chaudhary; Deewana, V.

    2015-01-01

    A kissing nevus is a type of congenital compound nevus that affects equal portions of the upper and lower eyelid, and it extends to the lid margins. Congenital divided nevi of the eyelids are a rare melanocytic lesion. Only 30 patients are reported in the literature. We report a 40-year-old female of rural background who presented with a large painless enlarging pigmented mass, involving both upper and lower left eyelid since the past 20 years. Complete excision of the lesion was done, and th...

  5. The Development of a Primary Neural Crest Assay for Neuroblastoma Oncogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    CRISPR -­‐ CAS9  technology  we  are  going  introduced  silencing  mutations  in  the  various   gene...screening  for  oncogenic  drivers.    We  are  nearly  completed  on  generating   CRISPR -­‐ Cas9  guide  RNAs  that...determined  that  silencing  of  ARID1A  either  by  using  shRNA  (Figure  4A  and  B)  or  

  6. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Hair Follicle Bulge Neural Crest Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ma, Ming-San; Czepiel, Marcin; Krause, Tina; Schaefer, Karl-Herbert; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2014-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are promising candidates for the study of disease models as well as for tissue engineering purposes. Part of a strategy to develop safe reprogramming technique is reducing the number of exogenous reprogramming factors. Some cells types are more prone to

  7. CHD7, the gene mutated in CHARGE syndrome, regulates genes involved in neural crest cell guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulz, Yvonne; Wehner, Peter; Opitz, Lennart; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bongers, Ernie M. H. F.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Wincent, Josephine; Schoumans, Jacqueline; Kohlhase, Juergen; Borchers, Annette; Pauli, Silke

    Heterozygous loss of function mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7) lead to CHARGE syndrome, a complex developmental disorder affecting craniofacial structures, cranial nerves and several organ systems. Recently, it was demonstrated that CHD7 is essential for the formation

  8. 75 FR 3217 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental... filed: June 23, 2009. d. Applicant: Eagle Crest Energy Company. e. Name of Project: Eagle Mountain... Eagle Mountain Mine in Riverside County, California, near the Town of Desert Center, California, and...

  9. Conditional Second Order Short-crested Water Waves Applied to Extreme Wave Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    A derivation of the mean second order short-crested wave pattern and associated wave kinematics, conditional on a given magnitude of the wave crest, is presented. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean finite water wave theory. A comparison with a measured extreme wave profile...

  10. Real-Time Audio Processing on the T-CREST Multicore Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ausin, Daniel Sanz; Pezzarossa, Luca; Schoeberl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    of the audio signal. This paper presents a real-time multicore audio processing system based on the T-CREST platform. T-CREST is a time-predictable multicore processor for real-time embedded systems. Multiple audio effect tasks have been implemented, which can be connected together in different configurations...

  11. [Neural repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Masaaki; Dezawa, Mari

    2008-05-01

    Recent progress of stem cell biology gives us the hope for neural repair. We have established methods to specifically induce functional Schwann cells and neurons from bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs). The effectiveness of these induced cells was evaluated by grafting them either into peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, or Parkinson' s disease animal models. MSCs-derived Schwann cells supported axonal regeneration and re-constructed myelin to facilitate the functional recovery in peripheral and spinal cord injury. MSCs-derived dopaminergic neurons integrated into host striatum and contributed to behavioral repair. In this review, we introduce the differentiation potential of MSCs and finally discuss about their benefits and drawbacks of these induction systems for cell-based therapy in neuro-traumatic and neuro-degenerative diseases.

  12. Restricted spontaneous in vitro differentiation and region-specific migration of long-term expanded fetal human neural precursor cells after transplantation into the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw; Singec, Ilyas; Maciaczyk, Donata; Klein, Alexander; Nikkhah, Guido

    2009-09-01

    Human fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) are investigated for their potential as a cell source for cell-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the limited availability of fetal tissue and insufficient understanding of the lineage-dependent pattern of survival, migration, and differentiation following engraftment are still unresolved issues. In the current study hNSCs derived from different brain regions were long-term expanded in vitro to yield proliferating neurospheres giving rise to neurons, astro-, and oligodendroglial cells and assessed for their potential for migration, differentiation, and anatomical integration following intracerebral grafting into rats. hNSCs isolated from neocortex, striatum, midbrain, and spinal cord (SC) proliferated following in vitro differentiation, and showed a significant decrease of newly formed neurons along the rostrocaudal axis of the developing central nervous system (CNS). Most of the mature neurons were positive for the neurotransmitter GABA. In vivo all cell types survived up to 9 weeks posttransplantation. Intrastriatally grafted hNSCs migrated extensively along white matter tracts reaching both rostral (forceps minor) and caudal (midbrain, cerebral peduncle) brain regions. The majority of migratory cells expressed the stem cell marker, nestin. A fraction of grafted cells acquired a neuronal phenotype expressing doublecortin, beta-III-tubulin, or GABA. These data demonstrate efficient in vitro propagation, region-specific long-term survival, long-distance migration, and neuronal differentiation of hNSCs after transplantation into the adult rat brain. The availability of a large pool of in vitro expanded nestin-positive cells offers the possibility for further ex vivo manipulations and the recruitment of different neuronal phenotypes for cell replacement strategies for CNS disorders.

  13. Rapid generation of sub-type, region-specific neurons and neural networks from human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynun N. Begum

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based neuronal differentiation has provided a unique opportunity for disease modeling and regenerative medicine. Neurospheres are the most commonly used neuroprogenitors for neuronal differentiation, but they often clump in culture, which has always represented a challenge for neurodifferentiation. In this study, we report a novel method and defined culture conditions for generating sub-type or region-specific neurons from human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells derived neurosphere without any genetic manipulation. Round and bright-edged neurospheres were generated in a supplemented knockout serum replacement medium (SKSRM with 10% CO2, which doubled the expression of the NESTIN, PAX6 and FOXG1 genes compared with those cultured with 5% CO2. Furthermore, an additional step (AdSTEP was introduced to fragment the neurospheres and facilitate the formation of a neuroepithelial-type monolayer that we termed the “neurosphederm”. The large neural tube-type rosette (NTTR structure formed from the neurosphederm, and the NTTR expressed higher levels of the PAX6, SOX2 and NESTIN genes compared with the neuroectoderm-derived neuroprogenitors. Different layers of cortical, pyramidal, GABAergic, glutamatergic, cholinergic neurons appeared within 27 days using the neurosphederm, which is a shorter period than in traditional neurodifferentiation-protocols (42–60 days. With additional supplements and timeline dopaminergic and Purkinje neurons were also generated in culture too. Furthermore, our in vivo results indicated that the fragmented neurospheres facilitated significantly better neurogenesis in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse brains compared with the non-fragmented neurospheres. Therefore, this neurosphere-based neurodifferentiation protocol is a valuable tool for studies of neurodifferentiation, neuronal transplantation and high throughput screening assays.

  14. Medical image of the week: CREST plus ILD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliva I

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A 60 year old female with a history of fibromyalgia presented with dyspnea and skin changes, predominantly on the hands. Physical exam and imaging showed classic findings of limited cutaneous systemic sclerosis (scleroderma CREST syndrome. Calcinosis cutis (Figure 1A, Raynaud’s (not shown but endorsed by the patient, Esophageal dysmotility (Figure 1B, dilated esophagus, Sclerodactyly (Figure 1C, and Teleganectasias (Figure 1D were all present. Ground glass opacities were seen predominantly in the bilateral lower lung zones, associated with increased reticular markings (Figure 2A, and traction bronchiectasis (Figure 2B. Pulmonary involvement is noted in the majority of scleroderma patients. Interstitial lung disease (ILD is common and often portends a poor prognosis.

  15. Neural Manifolds for the Control of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, Juan A; Perich, Matthew G; Miller, Lee E; Solla, Sara A

    2017-06-07

    The analysis of neural dynamics in several brain cortices has consistently uncovered low-dimensional manifolds that capture a significant fraction of neural variability. These neural manifolds are spanned by specific patterns of correlated neural activity, the "neural modes." We discuss a model for neural control of movement in which the time-dependent activation of these neural modes is the generator of motor behavior. This manifold-based view of motor cortex may lead to a better understanding of how the brain controls movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hycrest crested wheatgrass accelerates the degradation of pentachlorophenol in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, A. M.; Sims, R. C.; Bugbee, B.

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of vegetation on the fate of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in soil using a novel high-flow sealed test system. Pentachlorophenol has been widely used as a wood preservative, and this highly toxic biocide contaminates soil and ground water at many sites. Although plants are known to accelerate the rates of degradation of certain soil contaminants, this approach has not been thoroughly investigated for PCP. The fate of [14C]PCP, added to soil at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, was compared in three unplanted and three planted systems. The plant used was Hycrest, a perennial, drought-tolerant cultivar of crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fischer ex Link) Schultes]. The flow-through test system allowed us to maintain a budget for 14C-label as well as monitor mineralization (breakdown to 14CO2) and volatilization of the test compound in a 155-d trial. In the unplanted systems, an average of 88% of the total radiolabel remained in the soil and leachate and only 6% was mineralized. In the planted system, 33% of the radiolabel remained in the soil plus leachate, 22% was mineralized, and 36% was associated with plant tissue (21% with the root fraction and 15% with shoots). Mineralization rates were 23.1 mg PCP mineralized kg-1 soil in 20 wk in the planted system, and for the unplanted system 6.6 mg PCP kg-1 soil for the same time period. Similar amounts of volatile organic material were generated in the two systems (1.5%). Results indicated that establishing crested wheatgrass on PCP-contaminated surface soils may accelerate the removal of the contaminant.

  17. 76 FR 5580 - Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Applicant-Proposed Water Pipeline Route for the Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Crest Energy Company; Notice of Applicant-Proposed Water Pipeline... January 21, 2011. On June 22, 2009, Eagle Crest Energy Company (Eagle Crest or applicant) filed an...

  18. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison between implants inserted into piezo split and unsplit alveolar crests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Matteo; Guidi, Riccardo; Carinci, Francesco

    2009-11-01

    Piezoelectric surgery (PES) uses a modulated ultrasonic frequency that permits highly precise and safe hard tissue cutting. A retrospective study on a series of spiral family implants inserted with or without PES split crest was performed to verify if implants inserted into crests split using PES have a comparable outcome to those inserted into unsplit bone. In the period from May 2004 to November 2007, 86 patients (55 women and 31 men, median age 53 yrs) were operated on and 234 spiral family implants were inserted. Among these, 21 were inserted into PES split crest. Mean follow-up was 13 months (3 to 35 months). The Kaplan-Meier algorithm was used to compare the 2 groups in survival and clinical success (ie, decreased bone resorption around implant neck). Only 9 of 234 implants were lost (ie, survival rate 96.2%), all of which belonged to the unsplit group but no statistical difference was demonstrated. To detect if PES split crest produces a better clinical outcome in comparison with fixtures inserted into unsplit alveolar ridges, crestal bone loss was compared in the remaining loaded implants (234--9 lost--5 not prosthetized = 220). No statistical significant difference was detected by comparing implants inserted into PES split crests with untreated alveolar ridges, although a better trend was visible for fixtures inserted into PES split crests. PES split crests provide several advantages and clinical outcomes that are not worse in terms of bone remodeling, if compared with standard procedures.

  20. Mean alveolar bone crest height decrement in subjects with an osteoporosis risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effrianto, H. P. S.; Priminiarti, M.; Makes, B. N.

    2017-08-01

    People 40-75 years of age have an osteoporosis risk that may be signaled by a decrease in alveolar bone crest height. Thus, this measure can be used as an indicator of osteoporosis risk. This study was conducted to provide a database of decreased alveolar bone crest heights in ages at risk of osteoporosis by using intraoral radiographs. Forty periapical radiographs of the posterior region of tooth 36 (or 46) were measured twice at different times by two different observers. The interproximal decrease in alveolar bone crest height was measured from the alveolar bone crest to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ) for each tooth on the mesial and distal sides using a ruler (mm). The mean decrease in alveolar bone crest height in at-risk ages for osteoporosis was 3.50±1.085 mm, with a mean of 3.15±0.864 mm for those 45-59 years of age, and 3.90±1.156 mm for those aged 60-75 years. The mean decrease in alveolar bone crest height in people 60-75 years of age was larger than in people 45-59 years of age. There was a medium correlation between age and decreased alveolar bone crest height.

  1. Hidden neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anders Stærmose; Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1999-01-01

    A general framework for hybrids of hidden Markov models (HMMs) and neural networks (NNs) called hidden neural networks (HNNs) is described. The article begins by reviewing standard HMMs and estimation by conditional maximum likelihood, which is used by the HNN. In the HNN, the usual HMM probability...... parameters are replaced by the outputs of state-specific neural networks. As opposed to many other hybrids, the HNN is normalized globally and therefore has a valid probabilistic interpretation. All parameters in the HNN are estimated simultaneously according to the discriminative conditional maximum...... likelihood criterion. The HNN can be viewed as an undirected probabilistic independence network (a graphical model), where the neural networks provide a compact representation of the clique functions. An evaluation of the HNN on the task of recognizing broad phoneme classes in the TIMIT database shows clear...

  2. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T W

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and recently nodular hyperplasia of the liver has been reported in patients with early stage PBC. We present a case of NRHL with CREST syndrome and serological and biochemical features of PBC, a newly recognised overlap syndrome. Images Figure PMID:2583572

  3. Analysis of Overtopping Flow on Sea Dikes in Oblique and Short-Crested Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Jørgen Harck; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.

    2013-01-01

    in a shallow water basin at Aalborg University to cover the so far unknown 3D effects from oblique long-crested and short-crested waves. Based on results from the laboratory tests, expansions are proposed to the existing 2D formulae so as to cover oblique and short-crested waves. The wave obliquity is seen......Dike resilience against wave overtopping has gained more and more attention in recent years due to the effect of expected future climate changes. The overtopping flow velocities and flow depths on dikes have recently been studied in 2D small-scale experiments. This has led to semi...

  4. A retrospective study of iliac crest bone grafting techniques with allograft reconstruction: do patients even know which iliac crest was harvested? Clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirris, Stephen M; Nottmeier, Eric W; Kimes, Sherri; O'Brien, Michael; Rahmathulla, Gazanfar

    2014-10-01

    Considerable biological research has been performed to aid bone healing in conjunction with lumbar fusion surgery. Iliac crest autograft is often considered the gold standard because it has the vital properties of being osteoconductive, osteoinductive, and osteogenic. However, graft site pain has been widely reported as the most common donor site morbidity. Autograft site pain has led many companies to develop an abundance of bone graft extenders, which have limited proof of efficacy. During the surgical consent process, many patients ask surgeons to avoid harvesting autograft because of the reported pain complications. The authors sought to study postoperative graft site pain by simply asking patients whether they knew which iliac crest was grafted when a single skin incision was made for the fusion operation. Twenty-five patients underwent iliac crest autografting with allograft reconstruction during instrumented lumbar fusion surgery. In all patients the autograft was harvested through the same skin incision but with a separate fascial incision. At various points postoperatively, the patients were asked if they could tell which iliac crest had been harvested, and if so, how much pain did it cause (10-point Numeric Rating Scale). Most patients (64%) could not correctly determine which iliac crest had been harvested. Of the 9 patients who correctly identified the side of the autograft, 7 were only able to guess. The 2 patients who confidently identified the side of grafting had no pain at rest and mild pain with activity. One patient who incorrectly guessed the side of autografting did have significant sacroiliac joint degenerative pain bilaterally. Results of this study indicate the inability of patients to clearly define their graft site after iliac crest autograft harvest with allograft reconstruction of the bony defect unless they have a separate skin incision. This simple, easily reproducible pilot study can be expanded into a larger, multiinstitutional

  5. First report and breeding record of the Chinese Crested Tern Thalasseus bernsteini on the Korean Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Kyu Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Chinese Crested Tern Thalasseus bernsteini is a critically endangered species (as designated by the IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. This report expands the known breeding grounds of these birds eastward. An individual of the Chinese Crested Tern was first observed at an uninhabited island of Jeollanam-do in Korea on April 28, 2016. On May 9, 2016 five Chinese Crested Terns (consisting of 2 breeding pairs and a single bird were observed. Nests from the breeding pairs were found, at a distance of 0.6 m from each other; each pair was observed incubating one egg in the nest. To our knowledge, this is the easternmost record of breeding grounds for the Chinese Crested Tern.

  6. 76 FR 22393 - Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy; Notice of Cancellation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project, Eagle Crest Energy... and Wildlife Service for the proposed Eagle Mountain Pumped Storage Hydroelectric Project. This...

  7. Biology of nesting crested, least, and whiskered auklets at Buldir Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During avifaunal investigations at Buldir Island 1974-1976, some aspects of the biology of Crested, Least, and Whiskered Auklets were investigated in a colony where...

  8. [Artificial neural networks in Neurosciences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras Chavarino, Carmen; Salinas Martínez de Lecea, José María

    2011-11-01

    This article shows that artificial neural networks are used for confirming the relationships between physiological and cognitive changes. Specifically, we explore the influence of a decrease of neurotransmitters on the behaviour of old people in recognition tasks. This artificial neural network recognizes learned patterns. When we change the threshold of activation in some units, the artificial neural network simulates the experimental results of old people in recognition tasks. However, the main contributions of this paper are the design of an artificial neural network and its operation inspired by the nervous system and the way the inputs are coded and the process of orthogonalization of patterns.

  9. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD Associated Neural Defects: Complex Mechanisms and Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Marrs

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD, caused by prenatal alcohol exposure, can result in craniofacial dysmorphism, cognitive impairment, sensory and motor disabilities among other defects. FASD incidences are as high as 2% to 5 % children born in the US, and prevalence is higher in low socioeconomic populations. Despite various mechanisms being proposed to explain the etiology of FASD, the molecular targets of ethanol toxicity during development are unknown. Proposed mechanisms include cell death, cell signaling defects and gene expression changes. More recently, the involvement of several other molecular pathways was explored, including non-coding RNA, epigenetic changes and specific vitamin deficiencies. These various pathways may interact, producing a wide spectrum of consequences. Detailed understanding of these various pathways and their interactions will facilitate the therapeutic target identification, leading to new clinical intervention, which may reduce the incidence and severity of these highly prevalent preventable birth defects. This review discusses manifestations of alcohol exposure on the developing central nervous system, including the neural crest cells and sensory neural placodes, focusing on molecular neurodevelopmental pathways as possible therapeutic targets for prevention or protection.

  10. Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver, CREST syndrome and primary biliary cirrhosis: an overlap syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    McMahon, R F; Babbs, C; Warnes, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    Nodular regenerative hyperplasia of the liver (NRHL) has been found in association with collagen vascular diseases, after drug therapy, with autoimmune disease, and with a variety of haematological disorders. The association of NRHL with the syndrome of Calcinosis cutis, Raynaud's phenomenon, oesophageal dysfunction, sclerodactyly and telangiectasia (CREST syndrome) has only been reported on two previous occasions. The liver disease usually associated with CREST syndrome is primary biliary ci...

  11. Immediate implant placement: the fate of the buccal crest. A retrospective cone beam computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendijk, E; Staas, T A; Graauwmans, F E J; Bronkhorst, E; Verhamme, L; Maal, T; Meijer, G J

    2017-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to analyse the fate of the buccal crest after immediate implant placement (IIP) through the use of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). In 16 consecutive patients, an implant was placed in a more palatal position after extraction, thereby creating a gap of at least 2mm between the implant and the buccal crest. Subsequently, this gap was filled with a bone substitute. Preoperatively, immediate postoperatively, and late postoperatively, a CBCT was made to measure the thickness of the buccal crest. After application of the bone substitute, the buccal crest increased in thickness from 0.9mm to 2.4mm (mean). At a mean of 103 weeks after IIP, late postoperative CBCT scans showed that the thickness of the buccal crest was compacted to 1.8mm. In the same period, the height of the buccal crest increased by 1.6mm (mean) to, on average, 1.2mm above the implant shoulder. The aesthetic outcome was analysed using the White and Pink Esthetic Score (WES and PES). Both scored high: 8.4 and 11.8, respectively. Within the limitations of this study, the results of this IIP protocol are promising. Long-term prospective research on this topic on a large number of patients is necessary. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Expression of sympathetic nervous system genes in Lamprey suggests their recruitment for specification of a new vertebrate feature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Häming

    Full Text Available The sea lamprey is a basal, jawless vertebrate that possesses many neural crest derivatives, but lacks jaws and sympathetic ganglia. This raises the possibility that the factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation were either a gnathostome innovation or already present in lamprey, but serving different purposes. To distinguish between these possibilities, we isolated lamprey homologues of transcription factors associated with peripheral ganglion formation and examined their deployment in lamprey embryos. We further performed DiI labeling of the neural tube combined with neuronal markers to test if neural crest-derived cells migrate to and differentiate in sites colonized by sympathetic ganglia in jawed vertebrates. Consistent with previous anatomical data in adults, our results in lamprey embryos reveal that neural crest cells fail to migrate ventrally to form sympathetic ganglia, though they do form dorsal root ganglia adjacent to the neural tube. Interestingly, however, paralogs of the battery of transcription factors that mediate sympathetic neuron differentiation (dHand, Ascl1 and Phox2b are present in the lamprey genome and expressed in various sites in the embryo, but fail to overlap in any ganglionic structures. This raises the intriguing possibility that they may have been recruited during gnathostome evolution to a new function in a neural crest derivative.

  13. Expression of Sympathetic Nervous System Genes in Lamprey Suggests Their Recruitment for Specification of a New Vertebrate Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uy, Benjamin; Valencia, Jonathan; Sauka-Spengler, Tatjana; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    The sea lamprey is a basal, jawless vertebrate that possesses many neural crest derivatives, but lacks jaws and sympathetic ganglia. This raises the possibility that the factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation were either a gnathostome innovation or already present in lamprey, but serving different purposes. To distinguish between these possibilities, we isolated lamprey homologues of transcription factors associated with peripheral ganglion formation and examined their deployment in lamprey embryos. We further performed DiI labeling of the neural tube combined with neuronal markers to test if neural crest-derived cells migrate to and differentiate in sites colonized by sympathetic ganglia in jawed vertebrates. Consistent with previous anatomical data in adults, our results in lamprey embryos reveal that neural crest cells fail to migrate ventrally to form sympathetic ganglia, though they do form dorsal root ganglia adjacent to the neural tube. Interestingly, however, paralogs of the battery of transcription factors that mediate sympathetic neuron differentiation (dHand, Ascl1 and Phox2b) are present in the lamprey genome and expressed in various sites in the embryo, but fail to overlap in any ganglionic structures. This raises the intriguing possibility that they may have been recruited during gnathostome evolution to a new function in a neural crest derivative. PMID:22046306

  14. Marek’s disease in the holland white crested chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spalević Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marek’s disease is a viral lymphoproliferative disease of poultry characterized by the creation of lymphoma in muscle, skin, eye or internal organs. Virus maturing into infective forms in follicular epithelium from where enters in the external environment where long time remains infectious. Poultry are infected by dust and remains the holder of the virus throughout their lives. The virus is transmitted vertically. The disease can occur in three forms: nervous, visceral and skin. Affected poultry may have any shape or combination of these. The aim of this study was to determine the cause of the disorder the health status in the flock of holland white crested chickens. Flock had 25 chickens whose ages ranged from 4-16 weeks. Observation, we noticed that the chickens are cachectic, showing signs of sporadic diarrhea and died 3 hens and 2 roosters. Pathoanatomical examination is ascertained changes in certain internal organs. The liver was enlarged with lymphoid proliferate on the surface and in the parenchyma, spleen increased several times and marbled, glandular stomach (proventriculus dilated with petechial hemorrhages on mucose. Changed organs was examination histopathological. In the liver were observed multifocal lymphoid infiltration with subsequent atrophy of the parenchyma, in addition to spleen lymphoid proliferation heterophyllus and histiocytic infiltrates, in proventriculus lymphoblastic infiltration with congestion of capillaries and small haemorrhages. In samples pathologically altered organs PCR method proved the genome of Marek’s disease virus serotype 1 . Based on these results we concluded that the livestock were sick from Marek’s disease, which is expressed in visceral form.

  15. RBFOX1 and RBFOX2 are dispensable in iPSCs and iPSC-derived neurons and do not contribute to neural-specific paternal UBE3A silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pin-Fang; Hsiao, Jack S.; Sirois, Carissa L.; Chamberlain, Stormy J.

    2016-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss of function of the maternally inherited copy of UBE3A, an imprinted gene expressed biallelically in most tissues, but expressed exclusively from the maternal allele in neurons. Active transcription of the neuron-specific long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), UBE3A-ATS, has been shown to silence paternal UBE3A. We hypothesized that alternative splicing factors RBFOX2 and RBFOX1 might mediate splicing changes and result in the transcription of UBE3A-ATS in neurons. We found that RBFOX2 and RBFOX1 both bind to UBE3A-ATS transcript in neurons, but are not required for gene expression and/or neuron-specific processing in the SNURF/SNRPN-UBE3A region. However, we found that depletion of RBFOX2 causes a proliferation phenotype in immature neural cultures, suggesting that RBFOX2 is involved in division versus differentiation decisions in iPSC-derived neural progenitors. Absence of RBFOX2 also altered the expression of some genes that are important for glutamatergic neocortical development and Wnt-Frizzled signalling in mature neuronal cultures. Our data show that while RBFOX1 and RBFOX2 do not mediate neuron-specific processing of UBE3A-ATS, these proteins play important roles in developing neurons and are not completely functionally redundant. PMID:27146458

  16. [Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in a patient with scleroderma and the CREST syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Arne K; Jahnsen, Frode L; Andersen, Rune; Haga, Hans-Jacob

    2003-12-04

    Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease is a rare and poorly understood condition that affects the postcapillary pulmonary vasculature, posing diagnostic problems and treatment dilemmas. We present a patient with veno-occlusive disease and give a short review on the disease. The patient was a 54-year-old female with a history of the CREST variant of scleroderma. Admitted with dyspnoea, she was treated with epoprostenol in addition to oxygen, diuretics and warfarin. Epoprostenol improved her condition initially; her symptoms grew worse during further medical escalation. With an attempt to stop epoprostenol, however, she became even more dyspnoeic and tolerated best an intermediate dose. She died after three months of treatment with signs of progressive right heart failure. Veno-occlusive disease may be difficult to diagnose and treat. Clinical signs of pulmonary hypertension without evidence of left ventricular failure may give rise to suspicion of the disease, and high-resolution CT of the lungs with relatively specific findings can be helpful. The prognosis is poor and lung transplantation is the only form of effective treatment. Vasodilators as a bridge to transplantation must be used with caution because of the risk of intolerance and development of pulmonary oedema.

  17. Data mining methods in the prediction of Dementia: A real-data comparison of the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of linear discriminant analysis, logistic regression, neural networks, support vector machines, classification trees and random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroco, João; Silva, Dina; Rodrigues, Ana; Guerreiro, Manuela; Santana, Isabel; de Mendonça, Alexandre

    2011-08-17

    Dementia and cognitive impairment associated with aging are a major medical and social concern. Neuropsychological testing is a key element in the diagnostic procedures of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), but has presently a limited value in the prediction of progression to dementia. We advance the hypothesis that newer statistical classification methods derived from data mining and machine learning methods like Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines and Random Forests can improve accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of predictions obtained from neuropsychological testing. Seven non parametric classifiers derived from data mining methods (Multilayer Perceptrons Neural Networks, Radial Basis Function Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, CART, CHAID and QUEST Classification Trees and Random Forests) were compared to three traditional classifiers (Linear Discriminant Analysis, Quadratic Discriminant Analysis and Logistic Regression) in terms of overall classification accuracy, specificity, sensitivity, Area under the ROC curve and Press'Q. Model predictors were 10 neuropsychological tests currently used in the diagnosis of dementia. Statistical distributions of classification parameters obtained from a 5-fold cross-validation were compared using the Friedman's nonparametric test. Press' Q test showed that all classifiers performed better than chance alone (p classification accuracy (Median (Me) = 0.76) an area under the ROC (Me = 0.90). However this method showed high specificity (Me = 1.0) but low sensitivity (Me = 0.3). Random Forest ranked second in overall accuracy (Me = 0.73) with high area under the ROC (Me = 0.73) specificity (Me = 0.73) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). Linear Discriminant Analysis also showed acceptable overall accuracy (Me = 0.66), with acceptable area under the ROC (Me = 0.72) specificity (Me = 0.66) and sensitivity (Me = 0.64). The remaining classifiers showed overall classification accuracy above a median value of 0.63, but for most

  18. The Investigation of EM Scattering from the Time-Varying Overturning Wave Crest Model by the IEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the electromagnetic (EM scattering of time-varying overturning wave crests is a worthwhile endeavor. Overturning wave crest is one of the reasons of sea spike generation, which increases the probability of false radar alarms and reduces the performance of multitarget detection in the environment. A three-dimensional (3D time-varying overturning wave crest model is presented in this paper; this 3D model is an improvement of the traditional two-dimensional (2D time-varying overturning wave crest model. The integral equation method (IEM was employed to investigate backward scattering radar cross sections (RCS at various incident angles of the 3D overturning wave crest model. The super phenomenon, where the intensity of horizontal polarization scattering is greater than that of vertical polarization scattering, is an important feature of sea spikes. Simulation results demonstrate that super phenomena may occur in some time samples as variations in the overturning wave crest.

  19. The accuracy of computer-assisted primary mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps: iliac crest bone flap versus osteomyocutaneous fibula flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modabber, Ali; Ayoub, Nassim; Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Loberg, Christina; Lethaus, Bernd; Ghassemi, Alireza; Hölzle, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The intention of mandibular reconstruction is to restore the complex anatomy with maximum possible functionality and high accuracy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted surgery in primary mandibular reconstruction with an iliac crest bone flap compared with an osteomyocutaneous fibula flap. Preoperative computed tomography data of the mandible and the iliac crest or fibula donor site were imported into a specific surgical planning software program. Surgical guides were manufactured using a rapid prototyping technique for translating the virtual plan, including information on the transplant dimensions and shape, into real-time surgery. Using postoperative computed tomography scans and an automatic surface-comparison algorithm, the actual postoperative situation was compared with the preoperative virtual simulation. The actual flap position showed a mean difference from the virtual plan of 2.43 mm (standard deviation [SD] ±1.26) and a surface deviation of 39% virtual plan of 1.25 mm (SD ±1.31) and a surface deviation of 82% Virtual surgical planning is an effective method for mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps, and can help to restore the anatomy of the mandible with high accuracy in position and shape. It seems that primary mandibular reconstruction with the osteomyocutaneous fibula flap is more accurate compared with the vascularized iliac crest bone flap.

  20. Evolvable synthetic neural system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Steven A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An evolvable synthetic neural system includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to at least one neural basis function. Each neural basis function includes an evolvable neural interface operably coupled to a heuristic neural system to perform high-level functions and an autonomic neural system to perform low-level functions. In some embodiments, the evolvable synthetic neural system is operably coupled to one or more evolvable synthetic neural systems in a hierarchy.

  1. What lies beneath? An evaluation of lower molar trigonid crest patterns based on both dentine and enamel expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Shara E; Skinner, Matthew M; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2011-08-01

    The nearly ubiquitous presence of a continuous crest connecting the protoconid and metaconid of the lower molars (often referred to as the middle trigonid crest), is one of several dental traits that distinguish Homo neanderthalensis from Homo sapiens. This study examined variation in trigonid crest patterns on the enamel and dentine surfaces to (1) evaluate the concordance between the morphology of trigonid crests at the inner dentine and the outer enamel surfaces; (2) examine their developmental origin(s); and (3) examine trait polarity through comparison with Australopithecus africanus and Pan. The sample included 73 H. neanderthalensis, 67 contemporary H. sapiens, 5 A. africanus, and 24 Pan lower molars. Results indicate general agreement in the morphology observed on the dentine and enamel surfaces. All but one H. neanderthalensis molar shows some trigonid crest development, whereas trigonid crests occur in low frequency in contemporary humans. Pan and A. africanus both also show high frequencies of a continuous trigonid crest. However, the origin of the trigonid crest differs among groups. H. neanderthalensis uniquely possesses a 'middle' trigonid crest that originates from the mesial accessory ridge of one or both cusps. Based on our results we suggest that presence of a continuous middle trigonid crest at the dentine surface is primitive and the lack of any trigonid crest is derived. Genetic drift may explain the high frequency of trigonid crests in H.neanderthalensis. However, H. neanderthalensis still appears to be derived relative to Pan and A. africanus in its high frequency of the mesial-mesial trigonid crestconfiguration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. A new fossil dolphin Dilophodelphis fordycei provides insight into the evolution of supraorbital crests in Platanistoidea (Mammalia, Cetacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Alexandra T.; McCurry, Matthew R.; Pyenson, Nicholas D.

    2017-05-01

    Many odontocete groups have developed enlarged facial crests, although these crests differ in topography, composition and function. The most elaborate crests occur in the South Asian river dolphin (Platanista gangetica), in which they rise dorsally as delicate, pneumatized wings anterior of the facial bones. Their position wrapping around the melon suggests their involvement in sound propagation for echolocation. To better understand the origin of crests in this lineage, we examined facial crests among fossil and living Platanistoidea, including a new taxon, Dilophodelphis fordycei, nov. gen. and sp., described herein, from the Early Miocene Astoria Formation of Oregon, USA. We measured the physical extent and thickness of platanistoid crests, categorized their relative position and used computed tomography scans to examine their internal morphology and relative bone density. Integrating these traits in a phylogenetic context, we determined that the onset of crest elaboration or enlargement and the evolution of crest pneumatization among the platanistoids were separate events, with crest enlargement beginning in the Oligocene. However, we find no evidence for pneumatization until possibly the Early Miocene, although certainly by the Middle Miocene. Such an evolutionary context, including data from the fossil record, should inform modelling efforts that seek to understand the diversity of sound generation morphology in Odontoceti.

  3. Assessing bone thickness in the infrazygomatic crest area aiming the orthodontic miniplates positioning: a tomographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Aline Rode; Castellucci, Marcelo; Crusoé-Rebello, Iêda Margarida; Sobral, Márcio Costa

    2017-01-01

    Due to the increasing use of miniplates for anchorage purposes in orthodontics, it is very important to know more about infrazigomatic crest anatomy (thickness), in adult patients. Evaluate the infrazygomatic crest region thickness, in adult (male and female) patients. Cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) images from 40 patients were used to assess cross-sectional measurements of the infrazygomatic crest region. Measurement 1 considered thickness 2 mm above the distobuccal root of the permanent maxillary first molar, while measurement 2 was taken 2 mm above the first measurement. The mean thickness of the infrazygomatic crest in males was 3.55 mm for measurement 1 and 2.84 mm for measurement 2, while in females these were 2.37 mm and 2.24 mm, respectively. The authors concluded that the overall mean thickness of the infrazygomatic crest was 2.49 mm with respect to measurement 1, and 2.29 mm for measurement 2, with no statistically significant differences between gender.

  4. Assessing bone thickness in the infrazygomatic crest area aiming the orthodontic miniplates positioning: a tomographic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Rode Santos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Due to the increasing use of miniplates for anchorage purposes in orthodontics, it is very important to know more about infrazigomatic crest anatomy (thickness, in adult patients. Objectives: Evaluate the infrazygomatic crest region thickness, in adult (male and female patients. Methods: Cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT images from 40 patients were used to assess cross-sectional measurements of the infrazygomatic crest region. Measurement 1 considered thickness 2 mm above the distobuccal root of the permanent maxillary first molar, while measurement 2 was taken 2 mm above the first measurement. Results: The mean thickness of the infrazygomatic crest in males was 3.55 mm for measurement 1 and 2.84 mm for measurement 2, while in females these were 2.37 mm and 2.24 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The authors concluded that the overall mean thickness of the infrazygomatic crest was 2.49 mm with respect to measurement 1, and 2.29 mm for measurement 2, with no statistically significant differences between gender.

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a man with CREST syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulos, Georgios; Marinis, Athanasios; Konstantinidis, Christos; Theodosopoulos, Theodosios; Fragulidis, Georgios; Vassiliou, Ioannis

    2008-10-01

    CREST (Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysmotility, Sclerodactyly and Telangiectasias) syndrome has been rarely associated with other malignancies (lung, esophagus). This is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. A 54-year-old male patient with CREST syndrome presented with colicky postprandial pain of the upper abdomen, diminished food uptake and a 6-Kg-body weight loss during the previous 2 months. An ulcerative lesion in the third portion of the duodenum was revealed during duodenoscopy, with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma on biopsy specimen histology. The patient underwent a partial pancreatoduodenectomy. No adjuvant therapy was instituted and follow-up is negative for local recurrence or metastases 21 months postoperatively. CREST syndrome has been associated with colon cancer, gastric polyps, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) syndrome and Crohn's disease; however, this is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. However, any etiologic relationship remains to be further investigated.

  6. Adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a man with CREST syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragulidis Georgios

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CREST (Calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, Esophageal dysmotility, Sclerodactyly and Telangiectasias syndrome has been rarely associated with other malignancies (lung, esophagus.This is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the third portion of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. Case presentation A 54-year-old male patient with CREST syndrome presented with colicky postprandial pain of the upper abdomen, diminished food uptake and a 6-Kg-body weight loss during the previous 2 months. An ulcerative lesion in the third portion of the duodenum was revealed during duodenoscopy, with a diagnosis of adenocarcinoma on biopsy specimen histology. The patient underwent a partial pancreatoduodenectomy. No adjuvant therapy was instituted and follow-up is negative for local recurrence or metastases 21 months postoperatively. Conclusion CREST syndrome has been associated with colon cancer, gastric polyps, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP syndrome and Crohn's disease; however, this is the first report of a primary adenocarcinoma of the duodenum in a patient with CREST syndrome. However, any etiologic relationship remains to be further investigated.

  7. Corresponding mitochondrial DNA and niche divergence for crested