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Sample records for neural circuits modeled

  1. An integrated modelling framework for neural circuits with multiple neuromodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Alok; Youssofzadeh, Vahab; Vemana, Vinith; McGinnity, T M; Prasad, Girijesh; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2017-01-01

    Neuromodulators are endogenous neurochemicals that regulate biophysical and biochemical processes, which control brain function and behaviour, and are often the targets of neuropharmacological drugs. Neuromodulator effects are generally complex partly owing to the involvement of broad innervation, co-release of neuromodulators, complex intra- and extrasynaptic mechanism, existence of multiple receptor subtypes and high interconnectivity within the brain. In this work, we propose an efficient yet sufficiently realistic computational neural modelling framework to study some of these complex behaviours. Specifically, we propose a novel dynamical neural circuit model that integrates the effective neuromodulator-induced currents based on various experimental data (e.g. electrophysiology, neuropharmacology and voltammetry). The model can incorporate multiple interacting brain regions, including neuromodulator sources, simulate efficiently and easily extendable to large-scale brain models, e.g. for neuroimaging purposes. As an example, we model a network of mutually interacting neural populations in the lateral hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus, which are major sources of neuromodulator orexin/hypocretin, serotonin and norepinephrine/noradrenaline, respectively, and which play significant roles in regulating many physiological functions. We demonstrate that such a model can provide predictions of systemic drug effects of the popular antidepressants (e.g. reuptake inhibitors), neuromodulator antagonists or their combinations. Finally, we developed user-friendly graphical user interface software for model simulation and visualization for both fundamental sciences and pharmacological studies. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Photovoltaic Pixels for Neural Stimulation: Circuit Models and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinagrov, David; Lei, Xin; Goetz, Georges; Kamins, Theodore I; Mathieson, Keith; Galambos, Ludwig; Harris, James S; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Photovoltaic conversion of pulsed light into pulsed electric current enables optically-activated neural stimulation with miniature wireless implants. In photovoltaic retinal prostheses, patterns of near-infrared light projected from video goggles onto subretinal arrays of photovoltaic pixels are converted into patterns of current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. We describe a model of these devices and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic circuits, including the electrode-electrolyte interface. Characteristics of the electrodes measured in saline with various voltages, pulse durations, and polarities were modeled as voltage-dependent capacitances and Faradaic resistances. The resulting mathematical model of the circuit yielded dynamics of the electric current generated by the photovoltaic pixels illuminated by pulsed light. Voltages measured in saline with a pipette electrode above the pixel closely matched results of the model. Using the circuit model, our pixel design was optimized for maximum charge injection under various lighting conditions and for different stimulation thresholds. To speed discharge of the electrodes between the pulses of light, a shunt resistor was introduced and optimized for high frequency stimulation.

  3. The Vite Model: A Neural Command Circuit for Generating Arm and Articulator Trajectories,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    associative map, looking at an object can activate a TPC of the hand-arm system, as Piaget (1963) noted. Then a VITE circuit can translate this latter TPC...two ways: by comparing trajectories of the neural circuit’s output stage with actual arm trajectories, and by checking for the existence of the...in precentral motor cortex could be analysed as an in vivo analogue of model DV stage neurons. Additional physiological support for the VITE model

  4. A decision-making model based on a spiking neural circuit and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Bu, Yijie; Dai, Dawei

    2017-10-01

    To adapt to the environment and survive, most animals can control their behaviors by making decisions. The process of decision-making and responding according to cues in the environment is stable, sustainable, and learnable. Understanding how behaviors are regulated by neural circuits and the encoding and decoding mechanisms from stimuli to responses are important goals in neuroscience. From results observed in Drosophila experiments, the underlying decision-making process is discussed, and a neural circuit that implements a two-choice decision-making model is proposed to explain and reproduce the observations. Compared with previous two-choice decision making models, our model uses synaptic plasticity to explain changes in decision output given the same environment. Moreover, biological meanings of parameters of our decision-making model are discussed. In this paper, we explain at the micro-level (i.e., neurons and synapses) how observable decision-making behavior at the macro-level is acquired and achieved.

  5. Circuit models and experimental noise measurements of micropipette amplifiers for extracellular neural recordings from live animals.

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    Chen, Chang Hao; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2014-01-01

    Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  6. Circuit Models and Experimental Noise Measurements of Micropipette Amplifiers for Extracellular Neural Recordings from Live Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hao Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glass micropipettes are widely used to record neural activity from single neurons or clusters of neurons extracellularly in live animals. However, to date, there has been no comprehensive study of noise in extracellular recordings with glass micropipettes. The purpose of this work was to assess various noise sources that affect extracellular recordings and to create model systems in which novel micropipette neural amplifier designs can be tested. An equivalent circuit of the glass micropipette and the noise model of this circuit, which accurately describe the various noise sources involved in extracellular recordings, have been developed. Measurement schemes using dead brain tissue as well as extracellular recordings from neurons in the inferior colliculus, an auditory brain nucleus of an anesthetized gerbil, were used to characterize noise performance and amplification efficacy of the proposed micropipette neural amplifier. According to our model, the major noise sources which influence the signal to noise ratio are the intrinsic noise of the neural amplifier and the thermal noise from distributed pipette resistance. These two types of noise were calculated and measured and were shown to be the dominating sources of background noise for in vivo experiments.

  7. Biologically based neural circuit modelling for the study of fear learning and extinction

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    Nair, Satish S.; Paré, Denis; Vicentic, Aleksandra

    2016-11-01

    The neuronal systems that promote protective defensive behaviours have been studied extensively using Pavlovian conditioning. In this paradigm, an initially neutral-conditioned stimulus is paired with an aversive unconditioned stimulus leading the subjects to display behavioural signs of fear. Decades of research into the neural bases of this simple behavioural paradigm uncovered that the amygdala, a complex structure comprised of several interconnected nuclei, is an essential part of the neural circuits required for the acquisition, consolidation and expression of fear memory. However, emerging evidence from the confluence of electrophysiological, tract tracing, imaging, molecular, optogenetic and chemogenetic methodologies, reveals that fear learning is mediated by multiple connections between several amygdala nuclei and their distributed targets, dynamical changes in plasticity in local circuit elements as well as neuromodulatory mechanisms that promote synaptic plasticity. To uncover these complex relations and analyse multi-modal data sets acquired from these studies, we argue that biologically realistic computational modelling, in conjunction with experiments, offers an opportunity to advance our understanding of the neural circuit mechanisms of fear learning and to address how their dysfunction may lead to maladaptive fear responses in mental disorders.

  8. Impaired activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and refinement in autism spectrum disorder genetic models

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    Caleb Andrew Doll

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early-use activity during circuit-specific critical periods refines brain circuitry by the coupled processes of eliminating inappropriate synapses and strengthening maintained synapses. We theorize these activity-dependent developmental processes are specifically impaired in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. ASD genetic models in both mouse and Drosophila have pioneered our insights into normal activity-dependent neural circuit assembly and consolidation, and how these developmental mechanisms go awry in specific genetic conditions. The monogenic Fragile X syndrome (FXS, a common cause of heritable ASD and intellectual disability, has been particularly well linked to defects in activity-dependent critical period processes. The Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP is positively activity-regulated in expression and function, in turn regulates excitability and activity in a negative feedback loop, and appears to be required for the activity-dependent remodeling of synaptic connectivity during early-use critical periods. The Drosophila FXS model has been shown to functionally conserve the roles of human FMRP in synaptogenesis, and has been centrally important in generating our current mechanistic understanding of the FXS disease state. Recent advances in Drosophila optogenetics, transgenic calcium reporters, highly-targeted transgenic drivers for individually-identified neurons, and a vastly improved connectome of the brain are now being combined to provide unparalleled opportunities to both manipulate and monitor activity-dependent processes during critical period brain development in defined neural circuits. The field is now poised to exploit this new Drosophila transgenic toolbox for the systematic dissection of activity-dependent mechanisms in normal versus ASD brain development, particularly utilizing the well-established Drosophila FXS disease model.

  9. Uncertainty-Dependent Extinction of Fear Memory in an Amygdala-mPFC Neural Circuit Model

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    Li, Yuzhe; Nakae, Ken; Ishii, Shin; Naoki, Honda

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty of fear conditioning is crucial for the acquisition and extinction of fear memory. Fear memory acquired through partial pairings of a conditioned stimulus (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) is more resistant to extinction than that acquired through full pairings; this effect is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect (PREE). Although the PREE has been explained by psychological theories, the neural mechanisms underlying the PREE remain largely unclear. Here, we developed a neural circuit model based on three distinct types of neurons (fear, persistent and extinction neurons) in the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). In the model, the fear, persistent and extinction neurons encode predictions of net severity, of unconditioned stimulus (US) intensity, and of net safety, respectively. Our simulation successfully reproduces the PREE. We revealed that unpredictability of the US during extinction was represented by the combined responses of the three types of neurons, which are critical for the PREE. In addition, we extended the model to include amygdala subregions and the mPFC to address a recent finding that the ventral mPFC (vmPFC) is required for consolidating extinction memory but not for memory retrieval. Furthermore, model simulations led us to propose a novel procedure to enhance extinction learning through re-conditioning with a stronger US; strengthened fear memory up-regulates the extinction neuron, which, in turn, further inhibits the fear neuron during re-extinction. Thus, our models increased the understanding of the functional roles of the amygdala and vmPFC in the processing of uncertainty in fear conditioning and extinction. PMID:27617747

  10. A neural circuit model of emotional learning using two pathways with different granularity and speed of information processing.

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    Murakoshi, Kazushi; Saito, Mayuko

    2009-02-01

    We propose a neural circuit model of emotional learning using two pathways with different granularity and speed of information processing. In order to derive a precise time process, we utilized a spiking model neuron proposed by Izhikevich and spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP) of both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the proposed model. We demonstrate some aspects of emotional learning from the perspective of the time process. The agreement of the results with the previous behavioral experiments suggests that the structure and learning process of the proposed model are appropriate.

  11. Dynamical foundations of the neural circuit for bayesian decision making.

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    Morita, Kenji

    2009-07-01

    On the basis of accumulating behavioral and neural evidences, it has recently been proposed that the brain neural circuits of humans and animals are equipped with several specific properties, which ensure that perceptual decision making implemented by the circuits can be nearly optimal in terms of Bayesian inference. Here, I introduce the basic ideas of such a proposal and discuss its implications from the standpoint of biophysical modeling developed in the framework of dynamical systems.

  12. Neural circuit mechanisms of posttraumatic epilepsy

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    Robert F Hunt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI greatly increases the risk for a number of mental health problems and is one of the most common causes of medically intractable epilepsy in humans. Several models of TBI have been developed to investigate the relationship between trauma, seizures, and epilepsy-related changes in neural circuit function. These studies have shown that the brain initiates immediate neuronal and glial responses following an injury, usually leading to significant cell loss in areas of the injured brain. Over time, long-term changes in the organization of neural circuits, particularly in neocortex and hippocampus, lead to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and increased risk for spontaneous seizures. These include alterations to inhibitory interneurons and formation of new, excessive recurrent excitatory synaptic connectivity. Here, we review in vivo models of TBI as well as key cellular mechanisms of synaptic reorganization associated with posttraumatic epilepsy. The potential role of inflammation and increased blood brain barrier permeability in the pathophysiology of posttraumatic epilepsy is also discussed. A better understanding of mechanisms that promote the generation of epileptic activity versus those that promote compensatory brain repair and functional recovery should aid development of successful new therapies for posttraumatic epilepsy.

  13. Astrocytes: Tailored to Support the Demand of Neural Circuits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rune

    2017-01-01

    Anatomy, physiology, proteomics, and genomics reveal the prospect of distinct highly specialized astrocyte subtypes within neural circuits.......Anatomy, physiology, proteomics, and genomics reveal the prospect of distinct highly specialized astrocyte subtypes within neural circuits....

  14. Decision-making neural circuits mediating social behaviors : An attractor network model.

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    Hurtado-López, Julián; Ramirez-Moreno, David F; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2017-06-29

    We propose a mathematical model of a continuous attractor network that controls social behaviors. The model is examined with bifurcation analysis and computer simulations. The results show that the model exhibits stable steady states and thresholds for steady state transitions corresponding to some experimentally observed behaviors, such as aggression control. The performance of the model and the relation with experimental evidence are discussed.

  15. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation

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    Samuel B Snider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly-tunable wing-steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuro-mechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  16. A neural circuit for angular velocity computation.

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    Snider, Samuel B; Yuste, Rafael; Packer, Adam M

    2010-01-01

    In one of the most remarkable feats of motor control in the animal world, some Diptera, such as the housefly, can accurately execute corrective flight maneuvers in tens of milliseconds. These reflexive movements are achieved by the halteres, gyroscopic force sensors, in conjunction with rapidly tunable wing steering muscles. Specifically, the mechanosensory campaniform sensilla located at the base of the halteres transduce and transform rotation-induced gyroscopic forces into information about the angular velocity of the fly's body. But how exactly does the fly's neural architecture generate the angular velocity from the lateral strain forces on the left and right halteres? To explore potential algorithms, we built a neuromechanical model of the rotation detection circuit. We propose a neurobiologically plausible method by which the fly could accurately separate and measure the three-dimensional components of an imposed angular velocity. Our model assumes a single sign-inverting synapse and formally resembles some models of directional selectivity by the retina. Using multidimensional error analysis, we demonstrate the robustness of our model under a variety of input conditions. Our analysis reveals the maximum information available to the fly given its physical architecture and the mathematics governing the rotation-induced forces at the haltere's end knob.

  17. Document analysis with neural net circuits

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    Graf, Hans Peter

    1994-01-01

    Document analysis is one of the main applications of machine vision today and offers great opportunities for neural net circuits. Despite more and more data processing with computers, the number of paper documents is still increasing rapidly. A fast translation of data from paper into electronic format is needed almost everywhere, and when done manually, this is a time consuming process. Markets range from small scanners for personal use to high-volume document analysis systems, such as address readers for the postal service or check processing systems for banks. A major concern with present systems is the accuracy of the automatic interpretation. Today's algorithms fail miserably when noise is present, when print quality is poor, or when the layout is complex. A common approach to circumvent these problems is to restrict the variations of the documents handled by a system. In our laboratory, we had the best luck with circuits implementing basic functions, such as convolutions, that can be used in many different algorithms. To illustrate the flexibility of this approach, three applications of the NET32K circuit are described in this short viewgraph presentation: locating address blocks, cleaning document images by removing noise, and locating areas of interest in personal checks to improve image compression. Several of the ideas realized in this circuit that were inspired by neural nets, such as analog computation with a low resolution, resulted in a chip that is well suited for real-world document analysis applications and that compares favorably with alternative, 'conventional' circuits.

  18. A Modified Izhikevich Model For Circuit Implementation of Spiking Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Arash; Zwolinski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The Izhikevich neuron model reproduces the spiking and bursting behaviour of certain types of cortical neurons. This model has a second order nonlinearity that makes it difficult to implement in hardware. We propose a simplified version of the model that has a piecewise-linear relationship. This modification simplifies the hardware implementation but demonstrates similar dynamic behaviour.

  19. Controlling the elements: an optogenetic approach to understanding the neural circuits of fear.

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    Johansen, Joshua P; Wolff, Steffen B E; Lüthi, Andreas; LeDoux, Joseph E

    2012-06-15

    Neural circuits underlie our ability to interact in the world and to learn adaptively from experience. Understanding neural circuits and how circuit structure gives rise to neural firing patterns or computations is fundamental to our understanding of human experience and behavior. Fear conditioning is a powerful model system in which to study neural circuits and information processing and relate them to learning and behavior. Until recently, technological limitations have made it difficult to study the causal role of specific circuit elements during fear conditioning. However, newly developed optogenetic tools allow researchers to manipulate individual circuit components such as anatomically or molecularly defined cell populations, with high temporal precision. Applying these tools to the study of fear conditioning to control specific neural subpopulations in the fear circuit will facilitate a causal analysis of the role of these circuit elements in fear learning and memory. By combining this approach with in vivo electrophysiological recordings in awake, behaving animals, it will also be possible to determine the functional contribution of specific cell populations to neural processing in the fear circuit. As a result, the application of optogenetics to fear conditioning could shed light on how specific circuit elements contribute to neural coding and to fear learning and memory. Furthermore, this approach may reveal general rules for how circuit structure and neural coding within circuits gives rise to sensory experience and behavior. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neural Circuits for Peristaltic Wave Propagation in Crawling Drosophila Larvae: Analysis and Modeling

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    Julijana eGjorgjieva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila larvae crawl by peristaltic waves of muscle contractions, which propagate along the animal body and involve the simultaneous contraction of the left and right side of each segment. Coordinated propagation of contraction does not require sensory input, suggesting that movement is generated by a central pattern generator (CPG. We characterized crawling behavior of newly hatched Drosophila larvae by quantifying timing and duration of segmental boundary contractions. We developed a CPG network model that recapitulates these patterns based on segmentally repeated units of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations coupled with immediate neighboring segments. A single network with symmetric coupling between neighboring segments succeeded in generating both forward and backward propagation of activity. The CPG network was robust to changes in amplitude and variability of connectivity strength. Introducing sensory feedback via `stretch-sensitive' neurons improved wave propagation properties such as speed of propagation and segmental contraction duration as observed experimentally. Sensory feedback also restored propagating activity patterns when an inappropriately tuned CPG network failed to generate waves. Finally, in a two-sided CPG model we demonstrated that two types of connectivity could synchronize the activity of two independent networks: connections from excitatory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (E to E, and connections from inhibitory neurons on one side to excitatory contralateral neurons (I to E. To our knowledge, such I to E connectivity has not yet been found in any experimental system; however, it provides the most robust mechanism to synchronize activity between contralateral CPGs in our model. Our model provides a general framework for studying the conditions under which a single locally coupled network generates bilaterally synchronized and longitudinally propagating waves in either direction.

  1. Deep brain stimulation improves behavior and modulates neural circuits in a rodent model of schizophrenia.

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    Bikovsky, Lior; Hadar, Ravit; Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Klein, Julia; Weiner, Ina; Desco, Manuel; Pascau, Javier; Winter, Christine; Hamani, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia is a debilitating psychiatric disorder with a significant number of patients not adequately responding to treatment. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a surgical technique currently investigated for medically-refractory psychiatric disorders. Here, we use the poly I:C rat model of schizophrenia to study the effects of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (Nacc) DBS on two behavioral schizophrenia-like deficits, i.e. sensorimotor gating, as reflected by disrupted prepulse inhibition (PPI), and attentional selectivity, as reflected by disrupted latent inhibition (LI). In addition, the neurocircuitry influenced by DBS was studied using FDG PET. We found that mPFC- and Nacc-DBS alleviated PPI and LI abnormalities in poly I:C offspring, whereas Nacc- but not mPFC-DBS disrupted PPI and LI in saline offspring. In saline offspring, mPFC-DBS increased metabolism in the parietal cortex, striatum, ventral hippocampus and Nacc, while reducing it in the brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray. Nacc-DBS, on the other hand, increased activity in the ventral hippocampus and olfactory bulb and reduced it in the septal area, brainstem, periaqueductal gray and hypothalamus. In poly I:C offspring changes in metabolism following mPFC-DBS were similar to those recorded in saline offspring, except for a reduced activity in the brainstem and hypothalamus. In contrast, Nacc-DBS did not induce any statistical changes in brain metabolism in poly I:C offspring. Our study shows that mPFC- or Nacc-DBS delivered to the adult progeny of poly I:C treated dams improves deficits in PPI and LI. Despite common behavioral responses, stimulation in the two targets induced different metabolic effects. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Robust information propagation through noisy neural circuits.

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    Zylberberg, Joel; Pouget, Alexandre; Latham, Peter E; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Sensory neurons give highly variable responses to stimulation, which can limit the amount of stimulus information available to downstream circuits. Much work has investigated the factors that affect the amount of information encoded in these population responses, leading to insights about the role of covariability among neurons, tuning curve shape, etc. However, the informativeness of neural responses is not the only relevant feature of population codes; of potentially equal importance is how robustly that information propagates to downstream structures. For instance, to quantify the retina's performance, one must consider not only the informativeness of the optic nerve responses, but also the amount of information that survives the spike-generating nonlinearity and noise corruption in the next stage of processing, the lateral geniculate nucleus. Our study identifies the set of covariance structures for the upstream cells that optimize the ability of information to propagate through noisy, nonlinear circuits. Within this optimal family are covariances with "differential correlations", which are known to reduce the information encoded in neural population activities. Thus, covariance structures that maximize information in neural population codes, and those that maximize the ability of this information to propagate, can be very different. Moreover, redundancy is neither necessary nor sufficient to make population codes robust against corruption by noise: redundant codes can be very fragile, and synergistic codes can-in some cases-optimize robustness against noise.

  3. Robust information propagation through noisy neural circuits.

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    Joel Zylberberg

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory neurons give highly variable responses to stimulation, which can limit the amount of stimulus information available to downstream circuits. Much work has investigated the factors that affect the amount of information encoded in these population responses, leading to insights about the role of covariability among neurons, tuning curve shape, etc. However, the informativeness of neural responses is not the only relevant feature of population codes; of potentially equal importance is how robustly that information propagates to downstream structures. For instance, to quantify the retina's performance, one must consider not only the informativeness of the optic nerve responses, but also the amount of information that survives the spike-generating nonlinearity and noise corruption in the next stage of processing, the lateral geniculate nucleus. Our study identifies the set of covariance structures for the upstream cells that optimize the ability of information to propagate through noisy, nonlinear circuits. Within this optimal family are covariances with "differential correlations", which are known to reduce the information encoded in neural population activities. Thus, covariance structures that maximize information in neural population codes, and those that maximize the ability of this information to propagate, can be very different. Moreover, redundancy is neither necessary nor sufficient to make population codes robust against corruption by noise: redundant codes can be very fragile, and synergistic codes can-in some cases-optimize robustness against noise.

  4. The neural circuit basis of learning

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    Patrick, Kaifosh William John

    The astounding capacity for learning ranks among the nervous system's most impressive features. This thesis comprises studies employing varied approaches to improve understanding, at the level of neural circuits, of the brain's capacity for learning. The first part of the thesis contains investigations of hippocampal circuitry -- both theoretical work and experimental work in the mouse Mus musculus -- as a model system for declarative memory. To begin, Chapter 2 presents a theory of hippocampal memory storage and retrieval that reflects nonlinear dendritic processing within hippocampal pyramidal neurons. As a prelude to the experimental work that comprises the remainder of this part, Chapter 3 describes an open source software platform that we have developed for analysis of data acquired with in vivo Ca2+ imaging, the main experimental technique used throughout the remainder of this part of the thesis. As a first application of this technique, Chapter 4 characterizes the content of signaling at synapses between GABAergic neurons of the medial septum and interneurons in stratum oriens of hippocampal area CA1. Chapter 5 then combines these techniques with optogenetic, pharmacogenetic, and pharmacological manipulations to uncover inhibitory circuit mechanisms underlying fear learning. The second part of this thesis focuses on the cerebellum-like electrosensory lobe in the weakly electric mormyrid fish Gnathonemus petersii, as a model system for non-declarative memory. In Chapter 6, we study how short-duration EOD motor commands are recoded into a complex temporal basis in the granule cell layer, which can be used to cancel Purkinje-like cell firing to the longer duration and temporally varying EOD-driven sensory responses. In Chapter 7, we consider not only the temporal aspects of the granule cell code, but also the encoding of body position provided from proprioceptive and efference copy sources. Together these studies clarify how the cerebellum-like circuitry of the

  5. Marginalization in neural circuits with divisive normalization

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    Beck, J.M.; Latham, P.E.; Pouget, A.

    2011-01-01

    A wide range of computations performed by the nervous system involves a type of probabilistic inference known as marginalization. This computation comes up in seemingly unrelated tasks, including causal reasoning, odor recognition, motor control, visual tracking, coordinate transformations, visual search, decision making, and object recognition, to name just a few. The question we address here is: how could neural circuits implement such marginalizations? We show that when spike trains exhibit a particular type of statistics – associated with constant Fano factors and gain-invariant tuning curves, as is often reported in vivo – some of the more common marginalizations can be achieved with networks that implement a quadratic nonlinearity and divisive normalization, the latter being a type of nonlinear lateral inhibition that has been widely reported in neural circuits. Previous studies have implicated divisive normalization in contrast gain control and attentional modulation. Our results raise the possibility that it is involved in yet another, highly critical, computation: near optimal marginalization in a remarkably wide range of tasks. PMID:22031877

  6. Developmental plasticity in neural circuits for a learned behavior.

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    Bottjer, S W; Arnold, A P

    1997-01-01

    The neural substrate underlying learned vocal behavior in songbirds provides a textbook illustration of anatomical localization of function for a complex learned behavior in vertebrates. The song-control system has become an important model for studying neural systems related to learning, behavior, and development. The song system of zebra finches is characterized by a heightened capacity for both neural and behavioral change during development and has taught us valuable information regarding sensitive periods, rearrangement of synaptic connections, topographic specificity, cell death and neurogenesis, experience-dependent neural plasticity, and sexual differentiation. The song system differs in some interesting ways from some well-studied mammalian model systems and thus offers fresh perspectives on specific theoretical issues. In this highly selective review, we concentrate on two major questions: What are the developmental changes in the song system responsible for song learning and the restriction of learning to a sensitive period, and what factors explain the highly sexually dimorphic development of this system? We discuss the important role of sex steroid hormones and of neurotrophins in creating a male-typical neural song circuit (which can learn to produce complex vocalizations) instead of a reduced, female-typical song circuit that does not produce learned song.

  7. Explicit logic circuits discriminate neural states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Yoder

    Full Text Available The magnitude and apparent complexity of the brain's connectivity have left explicit networks largely unexplored. As a result, the relationship between the organization of synaptic connections and how the brain processes information is poorly understood. A recently proposed retinal network that produces neural correlates of color vision is refined and extended here to a family of general logic circuits. For any combination of high and low activity in any set of neurons, one of the logic circuits can receive input from the neurons and activate a single output neuron whenever the input neurons have the given activity state. The strength of the output neuron's response is a measure of the difference between the smallest of the high inputs and the largest of the low inputs. The networks generate correlates of known psychophysical phenomena. These results follow directly from the most cost-effective architectures for specific logic circuits and the minimal cellular capabilities of excitation and inhibition. The networks function dynamically, making their operation consistent with the speed of most brain functions. The networks show that well-known psychophysical phenomena do not require extraordinarily complex brain structures, and that a single network architecture can produce apparently disparate phenomena in different sensory systems.

  8. KCNQ potassium channels in sensory system and neural circuits.

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    Wang, Jing-jing; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    M channels, an important regulator of neural excitability, are composed of four subunits of the Kv7 (KCNQ) K(+) channel family. M channels were named as such because their activity was suppressed by stimulation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. These channels are of particular interest because they are activated at the subthreshold membrane potentials. Furthermore, neural KCNQ channels are drug targets for the treatments of epilepsy and a variety of neurological disorders, including chronic and neuropathic pain, deafness, and mental illness. This review will update readers on the roles of KCNQ channels in the sensory system and neural circuits as well as discuss their respective mechanisms and the implications for physiology and medicine. We will also consider future perspectives and the development of additional pharmacological models, such as seizure, stroke, pain and mental illness, which work in combination with drug-design targeting of KCNQ channels. These models will hopefully deepen our understanding of KCNQ channels and provide general therapeutic prospects of related channelopathies.

  9. Altered behavioral performance and live imaging of circuit-specific neural deficiencies in a zebrafish model for psychomotor retardation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zada

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms and treatment of psychomotor retardation, which includes motor and cognitive impairment, are indefinite. The Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome (AHDS is an X-linked psychomotor retardation characterized by delayed development, severe intellectual disability, muscle hypotonia, and spastic paraplegia, in combination with disturbed thyroid hormone (TH parameters. AHDS has been associated with mutations in the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (mct8/slc16a2 gene, which is a TH transporter. In order to determine the pathophysiological mechanisms of AHDS, MCT8 knockout mice were intensively studied. Although these mice faithfully replicated the abnormal serum TH levels, they failed to exhibit the neurological and behavioral symptoms of AHDS patients. Here, we generated an mct8 mutant (mct8-/- zebrafish using zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN-mediated targeted gene editing system. The elimination of MCT8 decreased the expression levels of TH receptors; however, it did not affect the expression of other TH-related genes. Similar to human patients, mct8-/- larvae exhibited neurological and behavioral deficiencies. High-throughput behavioral assays demonstrated that mct8-/- larvae exhibited reduced locomotor activity, altered response to external light and dark transitions and an increase in sleep time. These deficiencies in behavioral performance were associated with altered expression of myelin-related genes and neuron-specific deficiencies in circuit formation. Time-lapse imaging of single-axon arbors and synapses in live mct8-/- larvae revealed a reduction in filopodia dynamics and axon branching in sensory neurons and decreased synaptic density in motor neurons. These phenotypes enable assessment of the therapeutic potential of three TH analogs that can enter the cells in the absence of MCT8. The TH analogs restored the myelin and axon outgrowth deficiencies in mct8-/- larvae. These findings suggest a mechanism by which MCT8 regulates neural circuit

  10. Self-Organizing Neural Circuits for Sensory-Guided Motor Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grossberg, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    The reported projects developed mathematical models to explain how self-organizing neural circuits that operate under continuous or intermittent sensory guidance achieve flexible and accurate control of human movement...

  11. Integrating Neural Circuits Controlling Female Sexual Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Micevych

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is most often associated with innate behaviors such as is hunger, thirst and sex. While the expression of these behaviors important for survival of the individual or the species is nested within the hypothalamus, the desire (i.e., motivation for them is centered within the mesolimbic reward circuitry. In this review, we will use female sexual behavior as a model to examine the interaction of these circuits. We will examine the evidence for a hypothalamic circuit that regulates consummatory aspects of reproductive behavior, i.e., lordosis behavior, a measure of sexual receptivity that involves estradiol membrane-initiated signaling in the arcuate nucleus (ARH, activating β-endorphin projections to the medial preoptic nucleus (MPN, which in turn modulate ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH activity—the common output from the hypothalamus. Estradiol modulates not only a series of neuropeptides, transmitters and receptors but induces dendritic spines that are for estrogenic induction of lordosis behavior. Simultaneously, in the nucleus accumbens of the mesolimbic system, the mating experience produces long term changes in dopamine signaling and structure. Sexual experience sensitizes the response of nucleus accumbens neurons to dopamine signaling through the induction of a long lasting early immediate gene. While estrogen alone increases spines in the ARH, sexual experience increases dendritic spine density in the nucleus accumbens. These two circuits appear to converge onto the medial preoptic area where there is a reciprocal influence of motivational circuits on consummatory behavior and vice versa. While it has not been formally demonstrated in the human, such circuitry is generally highly conserved and thus, understanding the anatomy, neurochemistry and physiology can provide useful insight into the motivation for sexual behavior and other innate behaviors in humans.

  12. Timing matters: Using optogenetics to chronically manipulate neural circuits and rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Sidor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to probe defined neural circuits with both the spatial and temporal resolution imparted by optogenetics has transformed the field of neuroscience. Although much attention has been paid to the advantages of manipulating neural activity at millisecond timescales in order to elicit time-locked neural responses, little consideration has been given to the manipulation of circuit activity at physiologically relevant times of day, across multiple days. Nearly all biological events are governed by the circadian clock and exhibit 24-hour rhythms in activity. Indeed, neural circuit activity itself exhibits a daily rhythm with distinct temporal peaks in activity occurring at specific times of the day. Therefore, experimentally probing circuit function within and across physiologically relevant time windows (minutes to hours in behaving animals is fundamental to understanding the function of any one particular circuit within the intact brain. Furthermore, understanding how circuit function changes with repeated manipulation is important for modeling the circuit-wide disruptions that occur with chronic disease states. Here, we review recent advances in optogenetic technology that allow for chronic, temporally specific, control of circuit activity and provide examples of chronic optogenetic paradigms that have been utilized in the search for the neural circuit basis of behaviors relevant to human neuropsychiatric disease.

  13. The Physics of Decision Making:. Stochastic Differential Equations as Models for Neural Dynamics and Evidence Accumulation in Cortical Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Philip; Eckhoff, Philip; Wong-Lin, K. F.; Bogacz, Rafal; Zacksenhouse, Miriam; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe how drift-diffusion (DD) processes - systems familiar in physics - can be used to model evidence accumulation and decision-making in two-alternative, forced choice tasks. We sketch the derivation of these stochastic differential equations from biophysically-detailed models of spiking neurons. DD processes are also continuum limits of the sequential probability ratio test and are therefore optimal in the sense that they deliver decisions of specified accuracy in the shortest possible time. This leaves open the critical balance of accuracy and speed. Using the DD model, we derive a speed-accuracy tradeoff that optimizes reward rate for a simple perceptual decision task, compare human performance with this benchmark, and discuss possible reasons for prevalent sub-optimality, focussing on the question of uncertain estimates of key parameters. We present an alternative theory of robust decisions that allows for uncertainty, and show that its predictions provide better fits to experimental data than a more prevalent account that emphasises a commitment to accuracy. The article illustrates how mathematical models can illuminate the neural basis of cognitive processes.

  14. Neuronify: An Educational Simulator for Neural Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragly, Svenn-Arne; Hobbi Mobarhan, Milad; Våvang Solbrå, Andreas; Tennøe, Simen; Hafreager, Anders; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders; Fyhn, Marianne; Hafting, Torkel; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2017-01-01

    Educational software (apps) can improve science education by providing an interactive way of learning about complicated topics that are hard to explain with text and static illustrations. However, few educational apps are available for simulation of neural networks. Here, we describe an educational app, Neuronify, allowing the user to easily create and explore neural networks in a plug-and-play simulation environment. The user can pick network elements with adjustable parameters from a menu, i.e., synaptically connected neurons modelled as integrate-and-fire neurons and various stimulators (current sources, spike generators, visual, and touch) and recording devices (voltmeter, spike detector, and loudspeaker). We aim to provide a low entry point to simulation-based neuroscience by allowing students with no programming experience to create and simulate neural networks. To facilitate the use of Neuronify in teaching, a set of premade common network motifs is provided, performing functions such as input summation, gain control by inhibition, and detection of direction of stimulus movement. Neuronify is developed in C++ and QML using the cross-platform application framework Qt and runs on smart phones (Android, iOS) and tablet computers as well personal computers (Windows, Mac, Linux).

  15. Neural Control of Energy Balance: Translating Circuits to Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Gautron, Laurent; Elmquist, Joel K.; Williams, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Recent insights into the neural circuits controlling energy balance and glucose homeostasis have rekindled the hope for development of novel treatments for obesity and diabetes. However, many therapies contribute relatively modest beneficial gains with accompanying side effects, and the mechanisms of action for other interventions remain undefined. This Review summarizes current knowledge linking the neural circuits regulating energy and glucose balance with current and potential pharmacother...

  16. Conflict Resolution as Near-Threshold Decision-Making: A Spiking Neural Circuit Model with Two-Stage Competition for Antisaccadic Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Chuan; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-08-01

    Automatic responses enable us to react quickly and effortlessly, but they often need to be inhibited so that an alternative, voluntary action can take place. To investigate the brain mechanism of controlled behavior, we investigated a biologically-based network model of spiking neurons for inhibitory control. In contrast to a simple race between pro- versus anti-response, our model incorporates a sensorimotor remapping module, and an action-selection module endowed with a "Stop" process through tonic inhibition. Both are under the modulation of rule-dependent control. We tested the model by applying it to the well known antisaccade task in which one must suppress the urge to look toward a visual target that suddenly appears, and shift the gaze diametrically away from the target instead. We found that the two-stage competition is crucial for reproducing the complex behavior and neuronal activity observed in the antisaccade task across multiple brain regions. Notably, our model demonstrates two types of errors: fast and slow. Fast errors result from failing to inhibit the quick automatic responses and therefore exhibit very short response times. Slow errors, in contrast, are due to incorrect decisions in the remapping process and exhibit long response times comparable to those of correct antisaccade responses. The model thus reveals a circuit mechanism for the empirically observed slow errors and broad distributions of erroneous response times in antisaccade. Our work suggests that selecting between competing automatic and voluntary actions in behavioral control can be understood in terms of near-threshold decision-making, sharing a common recurrent (attractor) neural circuit mechanism with discrimination in perception.

  17. Classes of feedforward neural networks and their circuit complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shawe-Taylor, John S.; Anthony, Martin H.G.; Kern, Walter

    1992-01-01

    This paper aims to place neural networks in the context of boolean circuit complexity. We define appropriate classes of feedforward neural networks with specified fan-in, accuracy of computation and depth and using techniques of communication complexity proceed to show that the classes fit into a

  18. Japanese studies on neural circuits and behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakura, Hiroyuki; Tsukada, Yuki; Takagi, Shin; Mori, Ikue

    2013-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an ideal organism for studying neural plasticity and animal behaviors. A total of 302 neurons of a C. elegans hermaphrodite have been classified into 118 neuronal groups. This simple neural circuit provides a solid basis for understanding the mechanisms of the brains of higher animals, including humans. Recent studies that employ modern imaging and manipulation techniques enable researchers to study the dynamic properties of nervous systems with great precision. Behavioral and molecular genetic analyses of this tiny animal have contributed greatly to the advancement of neural circuit research. Here, we will review the recent studies on the neural circuits of C. elegans that have been conducted in Japan. Several laboratories have established unique and clever methods to study the underlying neuronal substrates of behavioral regulation in C. elegans. The technological advances applied to studies of C. elegans have allowed new approaches for the studies of complex neural systems. Through reviewing the studies on the neuronal circuits of C. elegans in Japan, we will analyze and discuss the directions of neural circuit studies. PMID:24348340

  19. Activity-dependent modulation of neural circuit synaptic connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R Tessier

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In many nervous systems, the establishment of neural circuits is known to proceed via a two-stage process; 1 early, activity-independent wiring to produce a rough map characterized by excessive synaptic connections, and 2 subsequent, use-dependent pruning to eliminate inappropriate connections and reinforce maintained synapses. In invertebrates, however, evidence of the activity-dependent phase of synaptic refinement has been elusive, and the dogma has long been that invertebrate circuits are “hard-wired” in a purely activity-independent manner. This conclusion has been challenged recently through the use of new transgenic tools employed in the powerful Drosophila system, which have allowed unprecedented temporal control and single neuron imaging resolution. These recent studies reveal that activity-dependent mechanisms are indeed required to refine circuit maps in Drosophila during precise, restricted windows of late-phase development. Such mechanisms of circuit refinement may be key to understanding a number of human neurological diseases, including developmental disorders such as Fragile X syndrome (FXS and autism, which are hypothesized to result from defects in synaptic connectivity and activity-dependent circuit function. This review focuses on our current understanding of activity-dependent synaptic connectivity in Drosophila, primarily through analyzing the role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP in the Drosophila FXS disease model. The particular emphasis of this review is on the expanding array of new genetically-encoded tools that are allowing cellular events and molecular players to be dissected with ever greater precision and detail.

  20. Complexity and competition in appetitive and aversive neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crista L. Barberini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Decision-making often involves using sensory cues to predict possible rewarding or punishing reinforcement outcomes before selecting a course of action. Recent work has revealed complexity in how the brain learns to predict rewards and punishments. Analysis of neural signaling during and after learning in the amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex, two brain areas that process appetitive and aversive stimuli, reveals a dynamic relationship between appetitive and aversive circuits. Specifically, the relationship between signaling in appetitive and aversive circuits in these areas shifts as a function of learning. Furthermore, although appetitive and aversive circuits may often drive opposite behaviors – approaching or avoiding reinforcement depending upon its valence – these circuits can also drive similar behaviors, such as enhanced arousal or attention; these processes also may influence choice behavior. These data highlight the formidable challenges ahead in dissecting how appetitive and aversive neural circuits interact to produce a complex and nuanced range of behaviors.

  1. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  2. Self-control of chaos in neural circuits with plastic electrical synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhigulin, V. P.; Rabinovich, M. I.

    2004-10-01

    Two kinds of connections are known to exist in neural circuits: electrical (also called gap junctions) and chemical. Whereas chemical synapses are known to be plastic (i. e., modifiable), but slow, electrical transmission through gap junctions is not modifiable, but is very fast. We suggest the new artificial synapse that combines the best properties of both: the fast reaction of a gap junction and the plasticity of a chemical synapse. Such a plastic electrical synapse can be used in hybrid neural circuits and for the development of neural prosthetics, i.e., implanted devices that can interact with the real nervous system. Based on the computer modelling we show that such a plastic electrical synapse regularizes chaos in the minimal neural circuit consisting of two chaotic bursting neurons.

  3. Synchrony and neural coding in cerebellar circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail L Person

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The cerebellum regulates complex movements and is also implicated in cognitive tasks, and cerebellar dysfunction is consequently associated not only with movement disorders, but also with conditions like autism and dyslexia. How information is encoded by specific cerebellar firing patterns remains debated, however. A central question is how the cerebellar cortex transmits its integrated output to the cerebellar nuclei via GABAergic synapses from Purkinje neurons. Possible answers come from accumulating evidence that subsets of Purkinje cells synchronize their firing during behaviors that require the cerebellum. Consistent with models predicting that coherent activity of inhibitory networks has the capacity to dictate firing patterns of target neurons, recent experimental work supports the idea that inhibitory synchrony may regulate the response of cerebellar nuclear cells to Purkinje inputs, owing to the interplay between unusually fast inhibitory synaptic responses and high rates of intrinsic activity. Data from multiple laboratories lead to a working hypothesis that synchronous inhibitory input from Purkinje cells can set the timing and rate of action potentials produced by cerebellar nuclear cells, thereby relaying information out of the cerebellum. If so, then changing spatiotemporal patterns of Purkinje activity would allow different subsets of inhibitory neurons to control cerebellar output at different times. Here we explore the evidence for and against the idea that a synchrony code defines, at least in part, the input-output function between the cerebellar cortex and nuclei. We consider the literature on the existence of simple spike synchrony, convergence of Purkinje neurons onto nuclear neurons, and intrinsic properties of nuclear neurons that contribute to responses to inhibition. Finally, we discuss factors that may disrupt or modulate a synchrony code and describe the potential contributions of inhibitory synchrony to other motor

  4. Neural control of energy balance: translating circuits to therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautron, Laurent; Elmquist, Joel K; Williams, Kevin W

    2015-03-26

    Recent insights into the neural circuits controlling energy balance and glucose homeostasis have rekindled the hope for development of novel treatments for obesity and diabetes. However, many therapies contribute relatively modest beneficial gains with accompanying side effects, and the mechanisms of action for other interventions remain undefined. This Review summarizes current knowledge linking the neural circuits regulating energy and glucose balance with current and potential pharmacotherapeutic and surgical interventions for the treatment of obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Long-Lasting Neural Circuit Dysfunction Following Developmental Ethanol Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Saito

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD is a general diagnosis for those exhibiting long-lasting neurobehavioral and cognitive deficiencies as a result of fetal alcohol exposure. It is among the most common causes of mental deficits today. Those impacted are left to rely on advances in our understanding of the nature of early alcohol-induced disorders toward human therapies. Research findings over the last decade have developed a model where ethanol-induced neurodegeneration impacts early neural circuit development, thereby perpetuating subsequent integration and plasticity in vulnerable brain regions. Here we review our current knowledge of FASD neuropathology based on discoveries of long-lasting neurophysiological effects of acute developmental ethanol exposure in animal models. We discuss the important balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition in normal neural network function, and relate the significance of that balance to human FASD as well as related disease states. Finally, we postulate that excitation/inhibition imbalance caused by early ethanol-induced neurodegeneration results in perturbed local and regional network signaling and therefore neurobehavioral pathology.

  6. Genetic control of active neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Reijmers

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of molecular tools to study the neurobiology of complex behaviors has been hampered by an inability to target the desired changes to relevant groups of neurons. Specific memories and specific sensory representations are sparsely encoded by a small fraction of neurons embedded in a sea of morphologically and functionally similar cells. In this review we discuss genetics techniques that are being developed to address this difficulty. In several studies the use of promoter elements that are responsive to neural activity have been used to drive long lasting genetic alterations into neural ensembles that are activated by natural environmental stimuli. This approach has been used to examine neural activity patterns during learning and retrieval of a memory, to examine the regulation of receptor trafficking following learning and to functionally manipulate a specific memory trace. We suggest that these techniques will provide a general approach to experimentally investigate the link between patterns of environmentally activated neural firing and cognitive processes such as perception and memory.

  7. Adaptive Neurotechnology for Making Neural Circuits Functional .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ranu

    2008-03-01

    Two of the most important trends in recent technological developments are that technology is increasingly integrated with biological systems and that it is increasingly adaptive in its capabilities. Neuroprosthetic systems that provide lost sensorimotor function after a neural disability offer a platform to investigate this interplay between biological and engineered systems. Adaptive neurotechnology (hardware and software) could be designed to be biomimetic, guided by the physical and programmatic constraints observed in biological systems, and allow for real-time learning, stability, and error correction. An example will present biomimetic neural-network hardware that can be interfaced with the isolated spinal cord of a lower vertebrate to allow phase-locked real-time neural control. Another will present adaptive neural network control algorithms for functional electrical stimulation of the peripheral nervous system to provide desired movements of paralyzed limbs in rodents or people. Ultimately, the frontier lies in being able to utilize the adaptive neurotechnology to promote neuroplasticity in the living system on a long-time scale under co-adaptive conditions.

  8. Integrated Circuit For Simulation Of Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Anilkumar P.; Moopenn, Alexander W.; Khanna, Satish K.

    1988-01-01

    Ballast resistors deposited on top of circuit structure. Cascadable, programmable binary connection matrix fabricated in VLSI form as basic building block for assembly of like units into content-addressable electronic memory matrices operating somewhat like networks of neurons. Connections formed during storage of data, and data recalled from memory by prompting matrix with approximate or partly erroneous signals. Redundancy in pattern of connections causes matrix to respond with correct stored data.

  9. Classical Conditioning with Pulsed Integrated Neural Networks: Circuits and System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we investigate on-chip learning for pulsed, integrated neural networks. We discuss the implementational problems the technology imposes on learning systems and we find that abiologically inspired approach using simple circuit structures is most likely to bring success. We develop a ...... chip to solve simple classical conditioning tasks, thus verifying the design methodologies put forward in the paper....

  10. Railway Track Circuit Fault Diagnosis Using Recurrent Neural Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, T.D.; Verbert, K.A.J.; Babuska, R.

    2017-01-01

    Timely detection and identification of faults in railway track circuits are crucial for the safety and availability of railway networks. In this paper, the use of the long-short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network is proposed to accomplish these tasks based on the commonly available

  11. Railway track circuit fault diagnosis using recurrent neural networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, T.D.; Verbert, K.A.J.; Babuska, R.

    2017-01-01

    Timely detection and identification of faults in railway track circuits are crucial for the safety and availability of railway networks. In this paper, the use of the long-short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network is proposed to accomplish these tasks based on the commonly available

  12. Distinct neural circuits subserve interpersonal and non-interpersonal emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Alla; Wang, Zhishun; Russell, James A; Posner, Jonathan; Duan, Yunsuo; Kangarlu, Alayar; Huo, Yuankai; Fallon, Brian A; Peterson, Bradley S

    2013-01-01

    Emotions elicited by interpersonal versus non-interpersonal experiences have different effects on neurobiological functioning in both animals and humans. However, the extent to which the brain circuits underlying interpersonal and non-interpersonal emotions are distinct still remains unclear. The goal of our study was to assess whether different neural circuits are implicated in the processing of arousal and valence of interpersonal versus non-interpersonal emotions. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants imagined themselves in emotion-eliciting interpersonal or non-interpersonal situations and then rated the arousal and valence of emotions they experienced. We identified (1) separate neural circuits that are implicated in the arousal and valence dimensions of interpersonal versus non-interpersonal emotions, (2) circuits that are implicated in arousal and valence for both types of emotion, and (3) circuits that are responsive to the type of emotion, regardless of the valence or arousal level of the emotion. We found extensive recruitment of limbic (for arousal) and temporal-parietal (for valence) systems associated with processing of specifically interpersonal emotions compared to non-interpersonal ones. The neural bases of interpersonal and non-interpersonal emotions may, therefore, be largely distinct.

  13. Distinct Neural Circuits Subserve Interpersonal and Non-interpersonal Emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, Alla; Wang, Zhishun; Russell, James A.; Posner, Jonathan; Duan, Yunsuo; Kangarlu, Alayar; Huo, Yuankai; Fallon, Brian A.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2013-01-01

    Emotions elicited by interpersonal versus non-interpersonal experiences have different effects on neurobiological functioning in both animals and humans. However, the extent to which the brain circuits underlying interpersonal and non-interpersonal emotions are distinct still remains unclear. The goal of our study was to assess whether different neural circuits are implicated in the processing of arousal and valence of interpersonal versus non-interpersonal emotions. During functional magnetic resonance imaging, participants imagined themselves in emotion-eliciting interpersonal or non-interpersonal situations and then rated the arousal and valence of emotions they experienced. We identified (a) separate neural circuits that are implicated in the arousal and valence dimensions of interpersonal versus non-interpersonal emotions, (b) circuits that are implicated in arousal and valence for both types of emotion, and (c) circuits that are responsive to the type of emotion, regardless of the valence or arousal level of the emotion. We found extensive recruitment of limbic (for arousal) and temporal-parietal (for valence) systems associated with processing of specifically interpersonal emotions compared to non-interpersonal ones. The neural bases of interpersonal and non-interpersonal emotions may, therefore, be largely distinct. PMID:24028312

  14. Hox genes: choreographers in neural development, architects of circuit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippidou, Polyxeni; Dasen, Jeremy S

    2013-10-02

    The neural circuits governing vital behaviors, such as respiration and locomotion, are comprised of discrete neuronal populations residing within the brainstem and spinal cord. Work over the past decade has provided a fairly comprehensive understanding of the developmental pathways that determine the identity of major neuronal classes within the neural tube. However, the steps through which neurons acquire the subtype diversities necessary for their incorporation into a particular circuit are still poorly defined. Studies on the specification of motor neurons indicate that the large family of Hox transcription factors has a key role in generating the subtypes required for selective muscle innervation. There is also emerging evidence that Hox genes function in multiple neuronal classes to shape synaptic specificity during development, suggesting a broader role in circuit assembly. This Review highlights the functions and mechanisms of Hox gene networks and their multifaceted roles during neuronal specification and connectivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigating Circadian Rhythmicity in Pain Sensitivity Using a Neural Circuit Model for Spinal Cord Processing of Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crodelle, Jennifer; Piltz, Sofia Helena; Booth, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    the resultant pain signal. The differential equation models describe the average firing rates of excitatory and inhibitory interneuron populations, as well as the wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons whose output correlates with the pain signal. The temporal profile of inputs on the different afferent nerve fibers...

  16. Anomalous neural circuit function in schizophrenia during a virtual Morris water task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folley, Bradley S; Astur, Robert; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince D; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2010-02-15

    Previous studies have reported learning and navigation impairments in schizophrenia patients during virtual reality allocentric learning tasks. The neural bases of these deficits have not been explored using functional MRI despite well-explored anatomic characterization of these paradigms in non-human animals. Our objective was to characterize the differential distributed neural circuits involved in virtual Morris water task performance using independent component analysis (ICA) in schizophrenia patients and controls. Additionally, we present behavioral data in order to derive relationships between brain function and performance, and we have included a general linear model-based analysis in order to exemplify the incremental and differential results afforded by ICA. Thirty-four individuals with schizophrenia and twenty-eight healthy controls underwent fMRI scanning during a block design virtual Morris water task using hidden and visible platform conditions. Independent components analysis was used to deconstruct neural contributions to hidden and visible platform conditions for patients and controls. We also examined performance variables, voxel-based morphometry and hippocampal subparcellation, and regional BOLD signal variation. Independent component analysis identified five neural circuits. Mesial temporal lobe regions, including the hippocampus, were consistently task-related across conditions and groups. Frontal, striatal, and parietal circuits were recruited preferentially during the visible condition for patients, while frontal and temporal lobe regions were more saliently recruited by controls during the hidden platform condition. Gray matter concentrations and BOLD signal in hippocampal subregions were associated with task performance in controls but not patients. Patients exhibited impaired performance on the hidden and visible conditions of the task, related to negative symptom severity. While controls showed coupling between neural circuits, regional

  17. Localizing complex neural circuits with MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, P; Ciancetta, L; Pizzella, V; Del Gratta, C; Romani, G L

    2006-03-01

    During cognitive processing, the various cortical areas, with specialized functions, supply for different tasks. In most cases then, the information flows are processed in a parallel way by brain networks which work together integrating the single performances for a common goal. Such a step is generally performed at higher processing levels in the associative areas. The frequency range at which neuronal pools oscillate is generally wider than the one which is detectable by bold changes in fMRI studies. A high time resolution technique like magnetoencephalography or electroencephalography is therefore required as well as new data processing algorithms for detecting different coherent brain areas cooperating for one cognitive task. Our experiments show that no algorithm for the inverse problem solution is immune from bias. We propose therefore, as a possible solution, our software LOCANTO (LOcalization and Coherence ANalysis TOol). This new package features a set of tools for the detection of coherent areas. For such a task, as a default, it employs the algorithm with best performances for the neural landscape to be detected. If the neural landscape under attention involves more than two interacting areas the SLoreta algorithm is used. Our study shows in fact that SLoreta performance is not biased when the correlation among multiple sources is high. On the other hand, the Beamforming algorithm is more precise than SLoreta at localizing single or double sources but it gets a relevant localization bias when the sources are more than three and are highly correlated.

  18. Functional neural circuits that underlie developmental stuttering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Qiao

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify differences in functional and effective brain connectivity between persons who stutter (PWS and typically developing (TD fluent speakers, and to assess whether those differences can serve as biomarkers to distinguish PWS from TD controls. We acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in 44 PWS and 50 TD controls. We then used Independent Component Analysis (ICA together with Hierarchical Partner Matching (HPM to identify networks of robust, functionally connected brain regions that were highly reproducible across participants, and we assessed whether connectivity differed significantly across diagnostic groups. We then used Granger Causality (GC to study the causal interactions (effective connectivity between the regions that ICA and HPM identified. Finally, we used a kernel support vector machine to assess how well these measures of functional connectivity and granger causality discriminate PWS from TD controls. Functional connectivity was stronger in PWS compared with TD controls in the supplementary motor area (SMA and primary motor cortices, but weaker in inferior frontal cortex (IFG, Broca's area, caudate, putamen, and thalamus. Additionally, causal influences were significantly weaker in PWS from the IFG to SMA, and from the basal ganglia to IFG through the thalamus, compared to TD controls. ICA and GC indices together yielded an accuracy of 92.7% in classifying PWS from TD controls. Our findings suggest the presence of dysfunctional circuits that support speech planning and timing cues for the initiation and execution of motor sequences in PWS. Our high accuracy of classification further suggests that these aberrant brain features may serve as robust biomarkers for PWS.

  19. Functional neural circuits that underlie developmental stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guihu; Huo, Yuankai; Herder, Carl L.; Sikora, Chamonix O.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify differences in functional and effective brain connectivity between persons who stutter (PWS) and typically developing (TD) fluent speakers, and to assess whether those differences can serve as biomarkers to distinguish PWS from TD controls. We acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data in 44 PWS and 50 TD controls. We then used Independent Component Analysis (ICA) together with Hierarchical Partner Matching (HPM) to identify networks of robust, functionally connected brain regions that were highly reproducible across participants, and we assessed whether connectivity differed significantly across diagnostic groups. We then used Granger Causality (GC) to study the causal interactions (effective connectivity) between the regions that ICA and HPM identified. Finally, we used a kernel support vector machine to assess how well these measures of functional connectivity and granger causality discriminate PWS from TD controls. Functional connectivity was stronger in PWS compared with TD controls in the supplementary motor area (SMA) and primary motor cortices, but weaker in inferior frontal cortex (IFG, Broca’s area), caudate, putamen, and thalamus. Additionally, causal influences were significantly weaker in PWS from the IFG to SMA, and from the basal ganglia to IFG through the thalamus, compared to TD controls. ICA and GC indices together yielded an accuracy of 92.7% in classifying PWS from TD controls. Our findings suggest the presence of dysfunctional circuits that support speech planning and timing cues for the initiation and execution of motor sequences in PWS. Our high accuracy of classification further suggests that these aberrant brain features may serve as robust biomarkers for PWS. PMID:28759567

  20. Breathtaking Songs: Coordinating the Neural Circuits for Breathing and Singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marc F; Goller, Franz

    2016-11-01

    The vocal behavior of birds is remarkable for its diversity, and songs can feature elaborate characteristics such as long duration, rapid temporal pattern, and broad frequency range. The respiratory system plays a central role in generating the complex song patterns that must be integrated with its life-sustaining functions. Here, we explore how precise coordination between the neural circuits for breathing and singing is fundamental to production of these remarkable behaviors. ©2016 Int. Union Physiol. Sci./Am. Physiol. Soc.

  1. Oxytocin modulation of neural circuits for social behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlin, Bianca J; Froemke, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    Oxytocin is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that has gained attention for the effects on social behavior. Recent findings shed new light on the mechanisms of oxytocin in synaptic plasticity and adaptively modifying neural circuits for social interactions such as conspecific recognition, pair bonding, and maternal care. Here, we review several of these newer studies on oxytocin in the context of previous findings, with an emphasis on social behavior and circuit plasticity in various brain regions shown to be enriched for oxytocin receptors. We provide a framework that highlights current circuit-level mechanisms underlying the widespread action of oxytocin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 169-189, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Neural circuit mechanisms of short-term memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Mark

    Memory over time scales of seconds to tens of seconds is thought to be maintained by neural activity that is triggered by a memorized stimulus and persists long after the stimulus is turned off. This presents a challenge to current models of memory-storing mechanisms, because the typical time scales associated with cellular and synaptic dynamics are two orders of magnitude smaller than this. While such long time scales can easily be achieved by bistable processes that toggle like a flip-flop between a baseline and elevated-activity state, many neuronal systems have been observed experimentally to be capable of maintaining a continuum of stable states. For example, in neural integrator networks involved in the accumulation of evidence for decision making and in motor control, individual neurons have been recorded whose activity reflects the mathematical integral of their inputs; in the absence of input, these neurons sustain activity at a level proportional to the running total of their inputs. This represents an analog form of memory whose dynamics can be conceptualized through an energy landscape with a continuum of lowest-energy states. Such continuous attractor landscapes are structurally non-robust, in seeming violation of the relative robustness of biological memory systems. In this talk, I will present and compare different biologically motivated circuit motifs for the accumulation and storage of signals in short-term memory. Challenges to generating robust memory maintenance will be highlighted and potential mechanisms for ameliorating the sensitivity of memory networks to perturbations will be discussed. Funding for this work was provided by NIH R01 MH065034, NSF IIS-1208218, Simons Foundation 324260, and a UC Davis Ophthalmology Research to Prevent Blindness Grant.

  3. Neural circuit remodeling and structural plasticity in the cortex during chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojin; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2016-01-01

    Damage in the periphery or spinal cord induces maladaptive plastic changes along the somatosensory nervous system from the periphery to the cortex, often leading to chronic pain. Although the role of neural circuit remodeling and structural synaptic plasticity in the 'pain matrix' cortices in chronic pain has been thought as a secondary epiphenomenon to altered nociceptive signaling in the spinal cord, progress in whole brain imaging studies on human patients and animal models has suggested a possibility that plastic changes in cortical neural circuits may actively contribute to chronic pain symptoms. Furthermore, recent development in two-photon microscopy and fluorescence labeling techniques have enabled us to longitudinally trace the structural and functional changes in local circuits, single neurons and even individual synapses in the brain of living animals. These technical advances has started to reveal that cortical structural remodeling following tissue or nerve damage could rapidly occur within days, which are temporally correlated with functional plasticity of cortical circuits as well as the development and maintenance of chronic pain behavior, thereby modifying the previous concept that it takes much longer periods (e.g. months or years). In this review, we discuss the relation of neural circuit plasticity in the 'pain matrix' cortices, such as the anterior cingulate cortex, prefrontal cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, with chronic pain. We also introduce how to apply long-term in vivo two-photon imaging approaches for the study of pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic pain.

  4. The Complexity of Dynamics in Small Neural Circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fasoli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mean-field approximations are a powerful tool for studying large neural networks. However, they do not describe well the behavior of networks composed of a small number of neurons. In this case, major differences between the mean-field approximation and the real behavior of the network can arise. Yet, many interesting problems in neuroscience involve the study of mesoscopic networks composed of a few tens of neurons. Nonetheless, mathematical methods that correctly describe networks of small size are still rare, and this prevents us to make progress in understanding neural dynamics at these intermediate scales. Here we develop a novel systematic analysis of the dynamics of arbitrarily small networks composed of homogeneous populations of excitatory and inhibitory firing-rate neurons. We study the local bifurcations of their neural activity with an approach that is largely analytically tractable, and we numerically determine the global bifurcations. We find that for strong inhibition these networks give rise to very complex dynamics, caused by the formation of multiple branching solutions of the neural dynamics equations that emerge through spontaneous symmetry-breaking. This qualitative change of the neural dynamics is a finite-size effect of the network, that reveals qualitative and previously unexplored differences between mesoscopic cortical circuits and their mean-field approximation. The most important consequence of spontaneous symmetry-breaking is the ability of mesoscopic networks to regulate their degree of functional heterogeneity, which is thought to help reducing the detrimental effect of noise correlations on cortical information processing.

  5. Neural processing of gustatory information in insular circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Arianna; Haley, Melissa; Fontanini, Alfredo

    2012-08-01

    The insular cortex is the primary cortical site devoted to taste processing. A large body of evidence is available for how insular neurons respond to gustatory stimulation in both anesthetized and behaving animals. Most of the reports describe broadly tuned neurons that are involved in processing the chemosensory, physiological and psychological aspects of gustatory experience. However little is known about how these neural responses map onto insular circuits. Particularly mysterious is the functional role of the three subdivisions of the insular cortex: the granular, the dysgranular and the agranular insular cortices. In this article we review data on the organization of the local and long-distance circuits in the three subdivisions. The functional significance of these results is discussed in light of the latest electrophysiological data. A view of the insular cortex as a functionally integrated system devoted to processing gustatory, multimodal, cognitive and affective information is proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Emotion and decision making: multiple modulatory neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Elizabeth A; Lempert, Karolina M; Sokol-Hessner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Although the prevalent view of emotion and decision making is derived from the notion that there are dual systems of emotion and reason, a modulatory relationship more accurately reflects the current research in affective neuroscience and neuroeconomics. Studies show two potential mechanisms for affect's modulation of the computation of subjective value and decisions. Incidental affective states may carry over to the assessment of subjective value and the decision, and emotional reactions to the choice may be incorporated into the value calculation. In addition, this modulatory relationship is reciprocal: Changing emotion can change choices. This research suggests that the neural mechanisms mediating the relation between affect and choice vary depending on which affective component is engaged and which decision variables are assessed. We suggest that a detailed and nuanced understanding of emotion and decision making requires characterizing the multiple modulatory neural circuits underlying the different means by which emotion and affect can influence choices.

  7. Pulse coded biologically motivated neural-type MOS circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This project has two aspects, one for ONR and one for AFOSR. The ONR portion is devoted to obtaining hardware implementations for the physiological representations used in the program SYNETSIM developed by the neurophysiologist Dr. D. Hartline of Bekesy Laboratories. The AFOSR portion is for evaluation capabilities of the pulse code philosophy of neural networks. On the ONR portion of the research, several chips have been fabricated for SYNETSIM pools and a neural arithmetic unit based upon the pools. Also, a number of modifications have been made to SYNETSIM to make it a much more user-friendly program. Several papers have been presented at international conferences and the DRIVER module is under continued investigation for VLSI realization. The means to implement long term potentiation are also under continued investigation. On the AFOSR portion, a means of realizing any Hopfield-type network via pulse coded circuits was obtained.

  8. Generating three-qubit quantum circuits with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaddle, Michael; Noakes, Lyle; Smallbone, Harry; Salter, Liam; Wang, Jingbo

    2017-10-01

    A new method for compiling quantum algorithms is proposed and tested for a three qubit system. The proposed method is to decompose a unitary matrix U, into a product of simpler Uj via a neural network. These Uj can then be decomposed into product of known quantum gates. Key to the effectiveness of this approach is the restriction of the set of training data generated to paths which approximate minimal normal subRiemannian geodesics, as this removes unnecessary redundancy and ensures the products are unique. The two neural networks are shown to work effectively, each individually returning low loss values on validation data after relatively short training periods. The two networks are able to return coefficients that are sufficiently close to the true coefficient values to validate this method as an approach for generating quantum circuits. There is scope for more work in scaling this approach for larger quantum systems.

  9. PCSIM: A Parallel Simulation Environment for Neural Circuits Fully Integrated with Python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecevski, Dejan; Natschläger, Thomas; Schuch, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The Parallel Circuit SIMulator (PCSIM) is a software package for simulation of neural circuits. It is primarily designed for distributed simulation of large scale networks of spiking point neurons. Although its computational core is written in C++, PCSIM's primary interface is implemented in the Python programming language, which is a powerful programming environment and allows the user to easily integrate the neural circuit simulator with data analysis and visualization tools to manage the full neural modeling life cycle. The main focus of this paper is to describe PCSIM's full integration into Python and the benefits thereof. In particular we will investigate how the automatically generated bidirectional interface and PCSIM's object-oriented modular framework enable the user to adopt a hybrid modeling approach: using and extending PCSIM's functionality either employing pure Python or C++ and thus combining the advantages of both worlds. Furthermore, we describe several supplementary PCSIM packages written in pure Python and tailored towards setting up and analyzing neural simulations. PMID:19543450

  10. A breathing circuit alarm system based on neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, J A; Westenskow, D R

    1994-03-01

    The objectives of our study were (1) to implement intelligent respiratory alarms with a neural network; and (2) to increase alarm specificity and decrease false-alarm rates compared with current alarms. We trained a neural network to recognize 13 faults in an anesthesia breathing circuit. The system extracted 30 breath-to-breath features from the airway CO2, flow, and pressure signals. We created training data for the network by introducing 13 faults repeatedly in 5 dogs (616 total faults). We used the data to train the neural network using the backward error propagation algorithm. In animals, the trained network reported the alarms correctly for 95.0% of the faults when tested during controlled ventilation, and for 86.9% of the faults during spontaneous breathing. When tested in the operating room, the system found and correctly reported 54 of 57 faults that occurred during 43.6 hr of use. The alarm system produced a total of 74 false alarms during 43.6 hr of monitoring. Neural networks may be useful in creating intelligent anesthesia alarm systems.

  11. Developing a Domain Model for Relay Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxthausen, Anne Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we stepwise develop a domain model for relay circuits as used in railway control systems. First we provide an abstract, property-oriented model of networks consisting of components that can be glued together with connectors. This model is strongly inspired by a network model...... for railways madeby Bjørner et.al., however our model is more general: the components can be of any kind and can later be refined to e.g. railway components or circuit components. Then we show how the abstract network model can be refined into an explicit model for relay circuits. The circuit model describes...... the statics as well as the dynamics of relay circuits, i.e. how a relay circuit can be composed legally from electrical components as well as how the components may change state over time. Finally the circuit model is transformed into an executable model, and we show how a concrete circuit can be defined...

  12. Shared neural circuits for mentalizing about the self and others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Michael V; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Bullmore, Edward T; Wheelwright, Sally J; Sadek, Susan A; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2010-07-01

    Although many examples exist for shared neural representations of self and other, it is unknown how such shared representations interact with the rest of the brain. Furthermore, do high-level inference-based shared mentalizing representations interact with lower level embodied/simulation-based shared representations? We used functional neuroimaging (fMRI) and a functional connectivity approach to assess these questions during high-level inference-based mentalizing. Shared mentalizing representations in ventromedial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) all exhibited identical functional connectivity patterns during mentalizing of both self and other. Connectivity patterns were distributed across low-level embodied neural systems such as the frontal operculum/ventral premotor cortex, the anterior insula, the primary sensorimotor cortex, and the presupplementary motor area. These results demonstrate that identical neural circuits are implementing processes involved in mentalizing of both self and other and that the nature of such processes may be the integration of low-level embodied processes within higher level inference-based mentalizing.

  13. Dynamical systems, attractors, and neural circuits [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Miller

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Biology is the study of dynamical systems. Yet most of us working in biology have limited pedagogical training in the theory of dynamical systems, an unfortunate historical fact that can be remedied for future generations of life scientists. In my particular field of systems neuroscience, neural circuits are rife with nonlinearities at all levels of description, rendering simple methodologies and our own intuition unreliable. Therefore, our ideas are likely to be wrong unless informed by good models. These models should be based on the mathematical theories of dynamical systems since functioning neurons are dynamic—they change their membrane potential and firing rates with time. Thus, selecting the appropriate type of dynamical system upon which to base a model is an important first step in the modeling process. This step all too easily goes awry, in part because there are many frameworks to choose from, in part because the sparsely sampled data can be consistent with a variety of dynamical processes, and in part because each modeler has a preferred modeling approach that is difficult to move away from. This brief review summarizes some of the main dynamical paradigms that can arise in neural circuits, with comments on what they can achieve computationally and what signatures might reveal their presence within empirical data. I provide examples of different dynamical systems using simple circuits of two or three cells, emphasizing that any one connectivity pattern is compatible with multiple, diverse functions.

  14. Neural circuits mediating olfactory-driven behavior in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermen, Florence; Franco, Luis M.; Wyatt, Cameron; Yaksi, Emre

    2013-01-01

    The fish olfactory system processes odor signals and mediates behaviors that are crucial for survival such as foraging, courtship, and alarm response. Although the upstream olfactory brain areas (olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb) are well-studied, less is known about their target brain areas and the role they play in generating odor-driven behaviors. Here we review a broad range of literature on the anatomy, physiology, and behavioral output of the olfactory system and its target areas in a wide range of teleost fish. Additionally, we discuss how applying recent technological advancements to the zebrafish (Danio rerio) could help in understanding the function of these target areas. We hope to provide a framework for elucidating the neural circuit computations underlying the odor-driven behaviors in this small, transparent, and genetically amenable vertebrate. PMID:23596397

  15. Two multichannel integrated circuits for neural recording and signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeid, Iyad; Morizio, James C; Moxon, Karen A; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Wolf, Patrick D

    2003-02-01

    We have developed, manufactured, and tested two analog CMOS integrated circuit "neurochips" for recording from arrays of densely packed neural electrodes. Device A is a 16-channel buffer consisting of parallel noninverting amplifiers with a gain of 2 V/V. Device B is a 16-channel two-stage analog signal processor with differential amplification and high-pass filtering. It features selectable gains of 250 and 500 V/V as well as reference channel selection. The resulting amplifiers on Device A had a mean gain of 1.99 V/V with an equivalent input noise of 10 microV(rms). Those on Device B had mean gains of 53.4 and 47.4 dB with a high-pass filter pole at 211 Hz and an equivalent input noise of 4.4 microV(rms). Both devices were tested in vivo with electrode arrays implanted in the somatosensory cortex.

  16. Neural learning circuits utilizing nano-crystalline silicon transistors and memristors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Kurtis D; Subramaniam, Anand; Stiegler, Harvey J; Chapman, Richard A; Vogel, Eric M

    2012-04-01

    Properties of neural circuits are demonstrated via SPICE simulations and their applications are discussed. The neuron and synapse subcircuits include ambipolar nano-crystalline silicon transistor and memristor device models based on measured data. Neuron circuit characteristics and the Hebbian synaptic learning rule are shown to be similar to biology. Changes in the average firing rate learning rule depending on various circuit parameters are also presented. The subcircuits are then connected into larger neural networks that demonstrate fundamental properties including associative learning and pulse coincidence detection. Learned extraction of a fundamental frequency component from noisy inputs is demonstrated. It is then shown that if the fundamental sinusoid of one neuron input is out of phase with the rest, its synaptic connection changes differently than the others. Such behavior indicates that the system can learn to detect which signals are important in the general population, and that there is a spike-timing-dependent component of the learning mechanism. Finally, future circuit design and considerations are discussed, including requirements for the memristive device.

  17. Acute Stress Influences Neural Circuits of Reward Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony John Porcelli

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available People often make decisions under aversive conditions such as acute stress. Yet, less is known about the process in which acute stress can influence decision-making. A growing body of research has established that reward-related information associated with the outcomes of decisions exerts a powerful influence over the choices people make and that an extensive network of brain regions, prominently featuring the striatum, is involved in the processing of this reward-related information. Thus, an important step in research on the nature of acute stress’ influence over decision-making is to examine how it may modulate responses to rewards and punishments within reward-processing neural circuitry. In the current experiment, we employed a simple reward processing paradigm – where participants received monetary rewards and punishments – known to evoke robust striatal responses. Immediately prior to performing each of two task runs, participants were exposed to acute stress (i.e., cold pressor or a no stress control procedure in a between-subjects fashion. No stress group participants exhibited a pattern of activity within the dorsal striatum and orbitofrontal cortex consistent with past research on outcome processing – specifically, differential responses for monetary rewards over punishments. In contrast, acute stress group participants’ dorsal striatum and orbitofrontal cortex demonstrated decreased sensitivity to monetary outcomes and a lack of differential activity. These findings provide insight into how neural circuits may process rewards and punishments associated with simple decisions under acutely stressful conditions.

  18. Neural circuit dynamics underlying accumulation of time-varying evidence during perceptual decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong-Fatt Wong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available How do neurons in a decision circuit integrate time-varying signals, in favor of or against alternative choice options? To address this question, we used a recurrent neural circuit model to simulate an experiment in which monkeys performed a direction-discrimination task on a visual motion stimulus. In a recent study, it was found that brief pulses of motion perturbed neural activity in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP, and exerted corresponding effects on the monkey's choices and response times. Our model reproduces the behavioral observations and replicates LIP activity which, depending on whether the direction of the pulse is the same or opposite to that of a preferred motion stimulus, increases or decreases persistently over a few hundred milliseconds. Furthermore, our model accounts for the observation that the pulse exerts a weaker influence on LIP neuronal responses when the pulse is late relative to motion stimulus onset. We show that this violation of time-shift invariance (TSI is consistent with a recurrent circuit mechanism of time integration. We further examine time integration using two consecutive pulses of the same or opposite motion directions. The induced changes in the performance are not additive, and the second of the paired pulses is less effective than its standalone impact, a prediction that is experimentally testable. Taken together, these findings lend further support for an attractor network model of time integration in perceptual decision making.

  19. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borton, David A; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile patient use, have the potential for wider diagnosis of

  20. Implementing a Bayes Filter in a Neural Circuit: The Case of Unknown Stimulus Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Sacha

    2017-09-01

    In order to interact intelligently with objects in the world, animals must first transform neural population responses into estimates of the dynamic, unknown stimuli that caused them. The Bayesian solution to this problem is known as a Bayes filter, which applies Bayes' rule to combine population responses with the predictions of an internal model. The internal model of the Bayes filter is based on the true stimulus dynamics, and in this note, we present a method for training a theoretical neural circuit to approximately implement a Bayes filter when the stimulus dynamics are unknown. To do this we use the inferential properties of linear probabilistic population codes to compute Bayes' rule and train a neural network to compute approximate predictions by the method of maximum likelihood. In particular, we perform stochastic gradient descent on the negative log-likelihood of the neural network parameters with a novel approximation of the gradient. We demonstrate our methods on a finite-state, a linear, and a nonlinear filtering problem and show how the hidden layer of the neural network develops tuning curves consistent with findings in experimental neuroscience.

  1. A neural circuit covarying with social hierarchy in macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MaryAnn P Noonan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite widespread interest in social dominance, little is known of its neural correlates in primates. We hypothesized that social status in primates might be related to individual variation in subcortical brain regions implicated in other aspects of social and emotional behavior in other mammals. To examine this possibility we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which affords the taking of quantitative measurements noninvasively, both of brain structure and of brain function, across many regions simultaneously. We carried out a series of tests of structural and functional MRI (fMRI data in 25 group-living macaques. First, a deformation-based morphometric (DBM approach was used to show that gray matter in the amygdala, brainstem in the vicinity of the raphe nucleus, and reticular formation, hypothalamus, and septum/striatum of the left hemisphere was correlated with social status. Second, similar correlations were found in the same areas in the other hemisphere. Third, similar correlations were found in a second data set acquired several months later from a subset of the same animals. Fourth, the strength of coupling between fMRI-measured activity in the same areas was correlated with social status. The network of subcortical areas, however, had no relationship with the sizes of individuals' social networks, suggesting the areas had a simple and direct relationship with social status. By contrast a second circuit in cortex, comprising the midsuperior temporal sulcus and anterior and dorsal prefrontal cortex, covaried with both individuals' social statuses and the social network sizes they experienced. This cortical circuit may be linked to the social cognitive processes that are taxed by life in more complex social networks and that must also be used if an animal is to achieve a high social status.

  2. Clustered Protocadherins Are Required for Building Functional Neural Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Sonoko; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Kumagai, Makiko; Nishimaru, Hiroshi; Tarusawa, Etsuko; Kanda, Hiro; Sanbo, Makoto; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Yagi, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal identity is generated by the cell-surface expression of clustered protocadherin (Pcdh) isoforms. In mice, 58 isoforms from three gene clusters, Pcdhα, Pcdhβ, and Pcdhγ, are differentially expressed in neurons. Since cis-heteromeric Pcdh oligomers on the cell surface interact homophilically with that in other neurons in trans, it has been thought that the Pcdh isoform repertoire determines the binding specificity of synapses. We previously described the cooperative functions of isoforms from all three Pcdh gene clusters in neuronal survival and synapse formation in the spinal cord. However, the neuronal loss and the following neonatal lethality prevented an analysis of the postnatal development and characteristics of the clustered-Pcdh-null (Δαβγ) neural circuits. Here, we used two methods, one to generate the chimeric mice that have transplanted Δαβγ neurons into mouse embryos, and the other to generate double mutant mice harboring null alleles of both the Pcdh gene and the proapoptotic gene Bax to prevent neuronal loss. First, our results showed that the surviving chimeric mice that had a high contribution of Δαβγ cells exhibited paralysis and died in the postnatal period. An analysis of neuronal survival in postnatally developing brain regions of chimeric mice clarified that many Δαβγ neurons in the forebrain were spared from apoptosis, unlike those in the reticular formation of the brainstem. Second, in Δαβγ/Bax null double mutants, the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion failed to create a left-right alternating pattern even in the absence of neurodegeneraton. Third, calcium imaging of cultured hippocampal neurons showed that the network activity of Δαβγ neurons tended to be more synchronized and lost the variability in the number of simultaneously active neurons observed in the control network. Lastly, a comparative analysis for trans-homophilic interactions of the exogenously introduced single Pcdh-γA3 isoforms

  3. Clustered Protocadherins Are Required for Building Functional Neural Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yagi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal identity is generated by the cell-surface expression of clustered protocadherin (Pcdh isoforms. In mice, 58 isoforms from three gene clusters, Pcdhα, Pcdhβ, and Pcdhγ, are differentially expressed in neurons. Since cis-heteromeric Pcdh oligomers on the cell surface interact homophilically with that in other neurons in trans, it has been thought that the Pcdh isoform repertoire determines the binding specificity of synapses. We previously described the cooperative functions of isoforms from all three Pcdh gene clusters in neuronal survival and synapse formation in the spinal cord. However, the neuronal loss and the following neonatal lethality prevented an analysis of the postnatal development and characteristics of the clustered-Pcdh-null (Δαβγ neural circuits. Here, we used two methods, one to generate the chimeric mice that have transplanted Δαβγ neurons into mouse embryos, and the other to generate double mutant mice harboring null alleles of both the Pcdh gene and the proapoptotic gene Bax to prevent neuronal loss. First, our results showed that the surviving chimeric mice that had a high contribution of Δαβγ cells exhibited paralysis and died in the postnatal period. An analysis of neuronal survival in postnatally developing brain regions of chimeric mice clarified that many Δαβγ neurons in the forebrain were spared from apoptosis, unlike those in the reticular formation of the brainstem. Second, in Δαβγ/Bax null double mutants, the central pattern generator (CPG for locomotion failed to create a left-right alternating pattern even in the absence of neurodegeneraton. Third, calcium imaging of cultured hippocampal neurons showed that the network activity of Δαβγ neurons tended to be more synchronized and lost the variability in the number of simultaneously active neurons observed in the control network. Lastly, a comparative analysis for trans-homophilic interactions of the exogenously introduced single

  4. Artificial neural network modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Samarasinghe, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    This book covers theoretical aspects as well as recent innovative applications of Artificial Neural networks (ANNs) in natural, environmental, biological, social, industrial and automated systems. It presents recent results of ANNs in modelling small, large and complex systems under three categories, namely, 1) Networks, Structure Optimisation, Robustness and Stochasticity 2) Advances in Modelling Biological and Environmental Systems and 3) Advances in Modelling Social and Economic Systems. The book aims at serving undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers in ANN computational modelling. .

  5. Acute genetic manipulation of neuronal activity for the functional dissection of neural circuits-a dream come true for the pioneers of behavioral genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Moto; Ito, Kei

    2012-03-01

    Abstract: This review summarizes technical development of the functional manipulation of specific neural circuits through genetic techniques in Drosophila. Long after pioneers' efforts for the genetic dissection of behavior using this organism as a model, analyses with acute activation of specific neural circuits have finally become feasible using transgenic Drosophila that expresses light-, heat-, or cold-activatable cation channels by xxx/upstream activation sequence (Gal4/UAS)-based induction system. This methodology opened a new avenue to dissect functions of neural circuits to make dreams of the pioneers into reality.

  6. Genetic manipulation of specific neural circuits by use of a viral vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kenta; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2017-01-05

    To understand the mechanisms underlying higher brain functions, we need to analyze the roles of specific neuronal pathways or cell types forming the complex neural networks. In the neuroscience field, the transgenic approach has provided a useful gene engineering tool for experimental studies of neural functions. The conventional transgenic technique requires the appropriate promoter regions that drive a neuronal type-specific gene expression, but the promoter sequences specifically functioning in each neuronal type are limited. Previously, we developed novel types of lentiviral vectors showing high efficiency of retrograde gene transfer in the central nervous system, termed highly efficient retrograde gene transfer (HiRet) vector and neuron-specific retrograde gene transfer (NeuRet) vector. The HiRet and NeuRet vectors enable genetical manipulation of specific neural pathways in diverse model animals in combination with conditional cell targeting, synaptic transmission silencing, and gene expression systems. These newly developed vectors provide powerful experimental strategies to investigate, more precisely, the machineries exerting various neural functions. In this review, we give an outline of the HiRet and NeuRet vectors and describe recent representative applications of these viral vectors for studies on neural circuits.

  7. Spiking neural circuits with dendritic stimulus processors : encoding, decoding, and identification in reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B

    2015-02-01

    We present a multi-input multi-output neural circuit architecture for nonlinear processing and encoding of stimuli in the spike domain. In this architecture a bank of dendritic stimulus processors implements nonlinear transformations of multiple temporal or spatio-temporal signals such as spike trains or auditory and visual stimuli in the analog domain. Dendritic stimulus processors may act on both individual stimuli and on groups of stimuli, thereby executing complex computations that arise as a result of interactions between concurrently received signals. The results of the analog-domain computations are then encoded into a multi-dimensional spike train by a population of spiking neurons modeled as nonlinear dynamical systems. We investigate general conditions under which such circuits faithfully represent stimuli and demonstrate algorithms for (i) stimulus recovery, or decoding, and (ii) identification of dendritic stimulus processors from the observed spikes. Taken together, our results demonstrate a fundamental duality between the identification of the dendritic stimulus processor of a single neuron and the decoding of stimuli encoded by a population of neurons with a bank of dendritic stimulus processors. This duality result enabled us to derive lower bounds on the number of experiments to be performed and the total number of spikes that need to be recorded for identifying a neural circuit.

  8. Computer model of a reverberant and parallel circuit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalil, Camila de Andrade; de Castro, Maria Clícia Stelling; Cortez, Célia Martins

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to deepen the knowledge about the functioning of the neural circuits by implementing a signal transmission model using the Graph Theory in a small network of neurons composed of an interconnected reverberant and parallel circuit, in order to investigate the processing of the signals in each of them and the effects on the output of the network. For this, a program was developed in C language and simulations were done using neurophysiological data obtained in the literature.

  9. Rapid neural circuit switching mediated by synaptic plasticity during neural morphallactic regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lybrand, Zane R; Zoran, Mark J

    2012-09-01

    The aquatic oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus (Lumbriculidae), undergoes a rapid regenerative transformation of its neural circuits following body fragmentation. This type of nervous system plasticity, called neural morphallaxis, involves the remodeling of the giant fiber pathways that mediate rapid head and tail withdrawal behaviors. Extra- and intracellular electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that changes in cellular properties and synaptic connections underlie neurobehavioral plasticity during morphallaxis. Sensory-to-giant interneuron connections, undetectable prior to body injury, emerged within hours of segment amputation. The appearance of functional synaptic transmission was followed by interneuron activation, coupling of giant fiber spiking to motor outputs and overt segmental shortening. The onset of morphallactic plasticity varied along the body axis and emerged more rapidly in segments closer to regions of sensory field overlap between the two giant fiber pathways. The medial and lateral giant fibers were simultaneously activated during a transient phase of network remodeling. Thus, synaptic plasticity at sensory-to-giant interneuron connections mediates escape circuit morphallaxis in this regenerating annelid worm. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Optogenetic manipulation of neural circuits in awake marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Matthew; Nummela, Samuel U; Coop, Shanna; Disney, Anita; Mitchell, Jude F; Miller, Cory T

    2016-09-01

    Optogenetics has revolutionized the study of functional neuronal circuitry (Boyden ES, Zhang F, Bamberg E, Nagel G, Deisseroth K. Nat Neurosci 8: 1263-1268, 2005; Deisseroth K. Nat Methods 8: 26-29, 2011). Although these techniques have been most successfully implemented in rodent models, they have the potential to be similarly impactful in studies of nonhuman primate brains. Common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) have recently emerged as a candidate primate model for gene editing, providing a potentially powerful model for studies of neural circuitry and disease in primates. The application of viral transduction methods in marmosets for identifying and manipulating neuronal circuitry is a crucial step in developing this species for neuroscience research. In the present study we developed a novel, chronic method to successfully induce rapid photostimulation in individual cortical neurons transduced by adeno-associated virus to express channelrhodopsin (ChR2) in awake marmosets. We found that large proportions of neurons could be effectively photoactivated following viral transduction and that this procedure could be repeated for several months. These data suggest that techniques for viral transduction and optical manipulation of neuronal populations are suitable for marmosets and can be combined with existing behavioral preparations in the species to elucidate the functional neural circuitry underlying perceptual and cognitive processes. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Ultra low-power integrated circuit design for wireless neural interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Holleman, Jeremy; Otis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Presenting results from real prototype systems, this volume provides an overview of ultra low-power integrated circuits and systems for neural signal processing and wireless communication. Topics include analog, radio, and signal processing theory and design for ultra low-power circuits.

  12. Circuit modeling for electromagnetic compatibility

    CERN Document Server

    Darney, Ian B

    2013-01-01

    Very simply, electromagnetic interference (EMI) costs money, reduces profits, and generally wreaks havoc for circuit designers in all industries. This book shows how the analytic tools of circuit theory can be used to simulate the coupling of interference into, and out of, any signal link in the system being reviewed. The technique is simple, systematic and accurate. It enables the design of any equipment to be tailored to meet EMC requirements. Every electronic system consists of a number of functional modules interconnected by signal links and power supply lines. Electromagnetic interference

  13. Neural Circuits via Which Single Prolonged Stress Exposure Leads to Fear Extinction Retention Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Dayan; Stanfield, Briana R.; Staib, Jennifer M.; David, Nina P.; Keller, Samantha M.; DePietro, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Single prolonged stress (SPS) has been used to examine mechanisms via which stress exposure leads to post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. SPS induces fear extinction retention deficits, but neural circuits critical for mediating these deficits are unknown. To address this gap, we examined the effect of SPS on neural activity in brain regions…

  14. Demonstration of a neural circuit critical for imprinting behavior in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sato, Katsushige; Atoji, Yasuro; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2010-03-24

    Imprinting behavior in birds is elicited by visual and/or auditory cues. It has been demonstrated previously that visual cues are recognized and processed in the visual Wulst (VW), and imprinting memory is stored in the intermediate medial mesopallium (IMM) of the telencephalon. Alteration of neural responses in these two regions according to imprinting has been reported, yet direct evidence of the neural circuit linking these two regions is lacking. Thus, it remains unclear how memory is formed and expressed in this circuit. Here, we present anatomical as well as physiological evidence of the neural circuit connecting the VW and IMM and show that imprinting training during the critical period strengthens and refines this circuit. A functional connection established by imprint training resulted in an imprinting behavior. After the closure of the critical period, training could not activate this circuit nor induce the imprinting behavior. Glutamatergic neurons in the ventroposterior region of the VW, the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), sent their axons to the periventricular part of the HD, just dorsal and afferent to the IMM. We found that the HDCo is important in imprinting behavior. The refinement and/or enhancement of this neural circuit are attributed to increased activity of HDCo cells, and the activity depended on NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. These findings show a neural connection in the telencephalon in Aves and demonstrate that NR2B function is indispensable for the plasticity of HDCo cells, which are key mediators of imprinting.

  15. An implantable wireless neural interface for recording cortical circuit dynamics in moving primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borton, David A.; Yin, Ming; Aceros, Juan; Nurmikko, Arto

    2013-04-01

    Objective. Neural interface technology suitable for clinical translation has the potential to significantly impact the lives of amputees, spinal cord injury victims and those living with severe neuromotor disease. Such systems must be chronically safe, durable and effective. Approach. We have designed and implemented a neural interface microsystem, housed in a compact, subcutaneous and hermetically sealed titanium enclosure. The implanted device interfaces the brain with a 510k-approved, 100-element silicon-based microelectrode array via a custom hermetic feedthrough design. Full spectrum neural signals were amplified (0.1 Hz to 7.8 kHz, 200× gain) and multiplexed by a custom application specific integrated circuit, digitized and then packaged for transmission. The neural data (24 Mbps) were transmitted by a wireless data link carried on a frequency-shift-key-modulated signal at 3.2 and 3.8 GHz to a receiver 1 m away by design as a point-to-point communication link for human clinical use. The system was powered by an embedded medical grade rechargeable Li-ion battery for 7 h continuous operation between recharge via an inductive transcutaneous wireless power link at 2 MHz. Main results. Device verification and early validation were performed in both swine and non-human primate freely-moving animal models and showed that the wireless implant was electrically stable, effective in capturing and delivering broadband neural data, and safe for over one year of testing. In addition, we have used the multichannel data from these mobile animal models to demonstrate the ability to decode neural population dynamics associated with motor activity. Significance. We have developed an implanted wireless broadband neural recording device evaluated in non-human primate and swine. The use of this new implantable neural interface technology can provide insight into how to advance human neuroprostheses beyond the present early clinical trials. Further, such tools enable mobile

  16. An Implantable Mixed Analog/Digital Neural Stimulator Circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudnason, Gunnar; Bruun, Erik; Haugland, Morten

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes a chip for a multichannel neural stimulator for functional electrical stimulation. The chip performs all the signal processing required in an implanted neural stimulator. The power and signal transmission to the stimulator is carried out via an inductive link. From the signals...

  17. Inter digital transducer modelling through Mason equivalent circuit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Dipti; Singh, Abhishek; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The frequency reliance of inter-digital transducer is analyzed with the help of MASON's Equivalent circuit which is based on Smith's Equivalent circuit which is further based on Foster's Network. An inter-digital transducer has been demonstrated as a RLC network. The circuit is simulated by Simul......The frequency reliance of inter-digital transducer is analyzed with the help of MASON's Equivalent circuit which is based on Smith's Equivalent circuit which is further based on Foster's Network. An inter-digital transducer has been demonstrated as a RLC network. The circuit is simulated...... by Simulation program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (HSPICE), a well-liked electronic path simulator. The acoustic wave devices are not suitable to simulation through circuit simulator. In this paper, an electrical model of Mason's Equivalent electrical circuit for an inter-digital transducer (IDT...

  18. A Simple Memristor Model for Circuit Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Farrah-Amoy; Joe, Aaleyah; Gergel-Hackett, Nadine; Department of Chemistry; Physics Team

    This work describes the development of a model for the memristor, a novel nanoelectronic technology. The model was designed to replicate the real-world electrical characteristics of previously fabricated memristor devices, but was constructed with basic circuit elements using a free widely available circuit simulator, LT Spice. The modeled memrsistors were then used to construct a circuit that performs material implication. Material implication is a digital logic that can be used to perform all of the same basic functions as traditional CMOS gates, but with fewer nanoelectronic devices. This memristor-based digital logic could enable memristors' use in new paradigms of computer architecture with advantages in size, speed, and power over traditional computing circuits. Additionally, the ability to model the real-world electrical characteristics of memristors in a free circuit simulator using its standard library of elements could enable not only the development of memristor material implication, but also the development of a virtually unlimited array of other memristor-based circuits.

  19. Nonlinear resonances and multi-stability in simple neural circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Leandro M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a numerical procedure designed to tune the parameters of periodically driven dynamical systems to a state in which they exhibit rich dynamical behavior. This is achieved by maximizing the diversity of subharmonic solutions available to the system within a range of the parameters that define the driving. The procedure is applied to a problem of interest in computational neuroscience: a circuit composed of two interacting populations of neurons under external periodic forcing. Depending on the parameters that define the circuit, such as the weights of the connections between the populations, the response of the circuit to the driving can be strikingly rich and diverse. The procedure is employed to find circuits that, when driven by external input, exhibit multiple stable patterns of periodic activity organized in complex tuning diagrams and signatures of low dimensional chaos.

  20. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  1. In search of the neural circuits of intrinsic motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Kaplan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Children seem to acquire new know-how in a continuous and open-ended manner. In this paper, we hypothesize that an intrinsic motivation to progress in learning is at the origins of the remarkable structure of children's developmental trajectories. In this view, children engage in exploratory and playful activities for their own sake, not as steps toward other extrinsic goals. The central hypothesis of this paper is that intrinsically motivating activities correspond to expected decrease in prediction error. This motivation system pushes the infant to avoid both predictable and unpredictable situations in order to focus on the ones that are expected to maximize progress in learning. Based on a computational model and a series of robotic experiments, we show how this principle can lead to organized sequences of behavior of increasing complexity characteristic of several behavioral and developmental patterns observed in humans. We then discuss the putative circuitry underlying such an intrinsic motivation system in the brain and formulate two novel hypotheses. The first one is that tonic dopamine acts as a learning progress signal. The second is that this progress signal is directly computed through a hierarchy of microcortical circuits that act both as prediction and metaprediction systems.

  2. The neural circuits and sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Kang, Lijun; Piggott, Beverly J; Feng, Zhaoyang; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2011-01-01

    Most animals can distinguish two distinct types of touch stimuli: gentle (innocuous) and harsh (noxious/painful) touch, however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Caenorhabditis elegans is a useful model for the study of gentle touch sensation. However, little is known about harsh touch sensation in this organism. Here we characterize harsh touch sensation in C. elegans. We show that C. elegans exhibits differential behavioural responses to harsh touch and gentle touch. Laser ablations identify distinct sets of sensory neurons and interneurons required for harsh touch sensation at different body segments. Optogenetic stimulation of the circuitry can drive behaviour. Patch-clamp recordings reveal that TRP family and amiloride-sensitive Na(+) channels mediate touch-evoked currents in different sensory neurons. Our work identifies the neural circuits and characterizes the sensory channels mediating harsh touch sensation in C. elegans, establishing it as a genetic model for studying this sensory modality.

  3. Advanced models of neural networks nonlinear dynamics and stochasticity in biological neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a complete study on neural structures exhibiting nonlinear and stochastic dynamics, elaborating on neural dynamics by introducing advanced models of neural networks. It overviews the main findings in the modelling of neural dynamics in terms of electrical circuits and examines their stability properties with the use of dynamical systems theory. It is suitable for researchers and postgraduate students engaged with neural networks and dynamical systems theory.

  4. Modeling digital switching circuits with linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Mitchell A

    2014-01-01

    Modeling Digital Switching Circuits with Linear Algebra describes an approach for modeling digital information and circuitry that is an alternative to Boolean algebra. While the Boolean algebraic model has been wildly successful and is responsible for many advances in modern information technology, the approach described in this book offers new insight and different ways of solving problems. Modeling the bit as a vector instead of a scalar value in the set {0, 1} allows digital circuits to be characterized with transfer functions in the form of a linear transformation matrix. The use of transf

  5. The neurobiology of sound-specific auditory plasticity: a core neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Yonghai; Yan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Auditory learning or experience induces large-scale neural plasticity in not only the auditory cortex but also in the auditory thalamus and midbrain. Such plasticity is guided by acquired sound (sound-specific auditory plasticity). The mechanisms involved in this process have been studied from various approaches and support the presence of a core neural circuit consisting of a subcortico-cortico-subcortical tonotopic loop supplemented by neuromodulatory (e.g., cholinergic) inputs. This circuit has three key functions essential for establishing large-scale and sound-specific plasticity in the auditory cortex, auditory thalamus and auditory midbrain. They include the presence of sound information for guiding the plasticity, the communication between the cortex, thalamus and midbrain for coordinating the plastic changes and the adjustment of the circuit status for augmenting the plasticity. This review begins with an overview of sound-specific auditory plasticity in the central auditory system. It then introduces the core neural circuit which plays an essential role in inducing sound-specific auditory plasticity. Finally, the core neural circuit and its relationship to auditory learning and experience are discussed.

  6. Distributed dynamical computation in neural circuits with propagating coherent activity patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulin Gong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity in neural circuits is spatiotemporally organized. Its spatial organization consists of multiple, localized coherent patterns, or patchy clusters. These patterns propagate across the circuits over time. This type of collective behavior has ubiquitously been observed, both in spontaneous activity and evoked responses; its function, however, has remained unclear. We construct a spatially extended, spiking neural circuit that generates emergent spatiotemporal activity patterns, thereby capturing some of the complexities of the patterns observed empirically. We elucidate what kind of fundamental function these patterns can serve by showing how they process information. As self-sustained objects, localized coherent patterns can signal information by propagating across the neural circuit. Computational operations occur when these emergent patterns interact, or collide with each other. The ongoing behaviors of these patterns naturally embody both distributed, parallel computation and cascaded logical operations. Such distributed computations enable the system to work in an inherently flexible and efficient way. Our work leads us to propose that propagating coherent activity patterns are the underlying primitives with which neural circuits carry out distributed dynamical computation.

  7. Implantable neurotechnologies: bidirectional neural interfaces--applications and VLSI circuit implementations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Elliot; Masters, Matthew R; Thakor, Nitish V

    2016-01-01

    A bidirectional neural interface is a device that transfers information into and out of the nervous system. This class of devices has potential to improve treatment and therapy in several patient populations. Progress in very large-scale integration has advanced the design of complex integrated circuits. System-on-chip devices are capable of recording neural electrical activity and altering natural activity with electrical stimulation. Often, these devices include wireless powering and telemetry functions. This review presents the state of the art of bidirectional circuits as applied to neuroprosthetic, neurorepair, and neurotherapeutic systems.

  8. Resonant circuit model for efficient metamaterial absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Alexandre; Teperik, Tatiana V; de Lustrac, André

    2013-11-04

    The resonant absorption in a planar metamaterial is studied theoretically. We present a simple physical model describing this phenomenon in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. We discuss the role of radiative and dissipative damping of resonant mode supported by a metamaterial in the formation of absorption spectra. We show that the results of rigorous calculations of Maxwell equations can be fully retrieved with simple model describing the system in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. This simple model allows us to explain the total absorption effect observed in the system on a common physical ground by referring it to the impedance matching condition at the resonance.

  9. Can modular psychological concepts like affect and emotion be assigned to a distinct subset of regional neural circuits?. Comment on "The quartet theory of human emotions: An integrative and neurofunctional model" by S. Koelsch et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, Thorsten; Herrmann, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    The proposed Quartet Theory of Human Emotions by Koelsch and co-workers [11] adumbrates evidence from various scientific sources to integrate and assign the psychological concepts of 'affect' and 'emotion' to four brain circuits or to four neuronal core systems for affect-processing in the brain. The authors differentiate between affect and emotion and assign several facultative, or to say modular, psychological domains and principles of information processing, such as learning and memory, antecedents of affective activity, emotion satiation, cognitive complexity, subjective quality feelings, degree of conscious appraisal, to different affect systems. Furthermore, they relate orbito-frontal brain structures to moral affects as uniquely human, and the hippocampus to attachment-related affects. An additional feature of the theory describes 'emotional effector-systems' for motor-related processes (e.g., emotion-related actions), physiological arousal, attention and memory that are assumed to be cross-linked with the four proposed affect systems. Thus, higher principles of emotional information processing, but also modular affect-related issues, such as moral and attachment related affects, are thought to be handled by these four different physiological sub-systems that are on the other side assumed to be highly interwoven at both physiological and functional levels. The authors also state that the proposed sub-systems have many features in common, such as the selection and modulation of biological processes related to behaviour, perception, attention and memory. The latter aspect challenges an ongoing discussion about the mind-body problem: To which degree do the proposed sub-systems 'sufficiently' cover the processing of complex modular or facultative emotional/affective and/or cognitive phenomena? There are current models and scientific positions that almost completely reject the idea that modular psychological phenomena are handled by a distinct selection of

  10. Inter Digital Transducer Modelling through Mason Equivalent Circuit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Dipti; Singh, Abhishek; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The frequency reliance of inter-digital transducer is analyzed with the help of MASON’s Equivalent circuit which is based on Smith’s Equivalent circuit which is further based on Foster’sNetwork. An inter-digital transducer has been demonstratedas a RLC network. The circuit is simulated by Simulat......The frequency reliance of inter-digital transducer is analyzed with the help of MASON’s Equivalent circuit which is based on Smith’s Equivalent circuit which is further based on Foster’sNetwork. An inter-digital transducer has been demonstratedas a RLC network. The circuit is simulated...... by Simulation program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (HSPICE), a well-liked electronic path simulator. The acoustic wave devices are not suitable to simulation through circuit simulator.In this paper, an electrical model of Mason’s Equivalent electricalcircuit for an inter-digital transducer (IDT...

  11. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  12. Deconstruction and Control of Neural Circuits in Posttraumatic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Holden and Frances Cho –received awards that allowed them to present their work at multiple national and international conferences. These awards...Stephanie Holden and Frances Cho – whose work focuses on this DoD-funded project, received multiple awards that allowed them to present their work at...epileptogenesis. Stephanie and Frances presented their work at multiple conferences: 8. Holden S, Paz JT (2017) Deconstruction of thalamic circuits in a mouse

  13. An Integrated Circuit for Simultaneous Extracellular Electrophysiology Recording and Optogenetic Neural Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang Hao; McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Pun, Sio Hang; Mak, Peng Un; Vai, Mang I; Mak, Pui In; Klug, Achim; Lei, Tim C

    2017-03-01

    The ability to record and to control action potential firing in neuronal circuits is critical to understand how the brain functions. The objective of this study is to develop a monolithic integrated circuit (IC) to record action potentials and simultaneously control action potential firing using optogenetics. A low-noise and high input impedance (or low input capacitance) neural recording amplifier is combined with a high current laser/light-emitting diode (LED) driver in a single IC. The low input capacitance of the amplifier (9.7 pF) was achieved by adding a dedicated unity gain stage optimized for high impedance metal electrodes. The input referred noise of the amplifier is [Formula: see text], which is lower than the estimated thermal noise of the metal electrode. Thus, the action potentials originating from a single neuron can be recorded with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 6.6. The LED/laser current driver delivers a maximum current of 330 mA, which is adequate for optogenetic control. The functionality of the IC was tested with an anesthetized Mongolian gerbil and auditory stimulated action potentials were recorded from the inferior colliculus. Spontaneous firings of fifth (trigeminal) nerve fibers were also inhibited using the optogenetic protein Halorhodopsin. Moreover, a noise model of the system was derived to guide the design. A single IC to measure and control action potentials using optogenetic proteins is realized so that more complicated behavioral neuroscience research and the translational neural disorder treatments become possible in the future.

  14. Accurate Electromagnetic Modeling Methods for Integrated Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheng, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The present development of modern integrated circuits (IC’s) is characterized by a number of critical factors that make their design and verification considerably more difficult than before. This dissertation addresses the important questions of modeling all electromagnetic behavior of features on

  15. The generation effect: activating broad neural circuits during memory encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Zachary A; Elman, Jeremy A; Shimamura, Arthur P

    2013-01-01

    The generation effect is a robust memory phenomenon in which actively producing material during encoding acts to improve later memory performance. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analysis, we explored the neural basis of this effect. During encoding, participants generated synonyms from word-fragment cues (e.g., GARBAGE-W_ST_) or read other synonym pairs (e.g., GARBAGE-WASTE). Compared to simply reading target words, generating target words significantly improved later recognition memory performance. During encoding, this benefit was associated with a broad neural network that involved both prefrontal (inferior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus) and posterior cortex (inferior temporal gyrus, lateral occipital cortex, parahippocampal gyrus, ventral posterior parietal cortex). These findings define the prefrontal-posterior cortical dynamics associated with the mnemonic benefits underlying the generation effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantum Computation Beyond the Circuit Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Stephen P.

    2008-01-01

    The quantum circuit model is the most widely used model of quantum computation. It provides both a framework for formulating quantum algorithms and an architecture for the physical construction of quantum computers. However, several other models of quantum computation exist which provide useful alternative frameworks for both discovering new quantum algorithms and devising new physical implementations of quantum computers. In this thesis, I first present necessary background material for a ge...

  17. Priming Neural Circuits to Modulate Spinal Reflex Excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Estes, Stephen P.; Iddings, Jennifer A.; Field-Fote, Edelle C.

    2017-01-01

    While priming is most often thought of as a strategy for modulating neural excitability to facilitate voluntary motor control, priming stimulation can also be utilized to target spinal reflex excitability. In this application, priming can be used to modulate the involuntary motor output that often follows central nervous system injury. Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) often experience spasticity, for which antispasmodic medications are the most common treatment. Physical therapeutic/...

  18. Energy efficient neural stimulation: coupling circuit design and membrane biophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foutz, Thomas J; Ackermann, D Michael; Kilgore, Kevin L; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2012-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic levels of electrical current to neural tissue is a well-established treatment for numerous indications such as Parkinson's disease and chronic pain. While the neuromodulation medical device industry has experienced steady clinical growth over the last two decades, much of the core technology underlying implanted pulse generators remain unchanged. In this study we propose some new methods for achieving increased energy-efficiency during neural stimulation. The first method exploits the biophysical features of excitable tissue through the use of a centered-triangular stimulation waveform. Neural activation with this waveform is achieved with a statistically significant reduction in energy compared to traditional rectangular waveforms. The second method demonstrates energy savings that could be achieved by advanced circuitry design. We show that the traditional practice of using a fixed compliance voltage for constant-current stimulation results in substantial energy loss. A portion of this energy can be recuperated by adjusting the compliance voltage to real-time requirements. Lastly, we demonstrate the potential impact of axon fiber diameter on defining the energy-optimal pulse-width for stimulation. When designing implantable pulse generators for energy efficiency, we propose that the future combination of a variable compliance system, a centered-triangular stimulus waveform, and an axon diameter specific stimulation pulse-width has great potential to reduce energy consumption and prolong battery life in neuromodulation devices.

  19. Monitoring activity in neural circuits with genetically encoded indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Joseph Broussard

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in genetically encoded indicators of neural activity (GINAs have greatly advanced the field of systems neuroscience. As they are encoded by DNA, GINAs can be targeted to genetically defined cellular populations. Combined with fluorescence microscopy, most notably multi-photon imaging, GINAs allow chronic simultaneous optical recordings from large populations of neurons or glial cells in awake, behaving mammals, particularly rodents. This large-scale recording of neural activity at multiple temporal and spatial scales has greatly advanced our understanding of the dynamics of neural circuitry underlying behavior—a critical first step toward understanding the complexities of brain function, such as sensorimotor integration and learning.Here, we summarize the recent development and applications of the major classes of GINAs. In particular, we take an in-depth look at the design of available GINA families with a particular focus on genetically encoded calcium indicators, sensors probing synaptic activity, and genetically encoded voltage indicators. Using the family of the genetically encoded calcium indicator GCaMP as an example, we review established sensor optimization pipelines. We also discuss practical considerations for end users of GINAs about experimental methods including approaches for gene delivery, imaging system requirements, and data analysis techniques. With the growing toolbox of GINAs and with new microscopy techniques pushing beyond their current limits, the age of light can finally achieve the goal of broad and dense sampling of neuronal activity across time and brain structures to obtain a dynamic picture of brain function.

  20. A neural space vector fault location for parallel double-circuit distribution lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa Martins, L.; Martins, J.F.; Fernao Pires, V. [Politecnico de Setubal (Portugal). Escola Sup. Tecnol.; Alegria, C.M. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2005-03-01

    A new approach to fault location for parallel double-circuit distribution power lines is presented. This approach uses the Clark-Concordia transformation and an artificial neural network based learning algorithm. The {alpha}, {beta}, 0 components of double line currents resulting from the Clarke-Concordia transformation are used to characterize different states of the system. The neural network is trained to map the non-linear relationship existing between fault location and characteristic eigenvalue. The proposed approach is able to identify and to locate different types of faults such as: phase-to-earth, phase-to-phase, two-phase-to-earth and three-phase. Using the eigenvalue as neural network inputs the proposed algorithm locates the fault distance. Results are presented which show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm for a correct fault location on a parallel double-circuit distribution line. (author)

  1. Application of viral vectors to the study of neural connectivities and neural circuits in the marmoset brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watakabe, Akiya; Sadakane, Osamu; Hata, Katsusuke; Ohtsuka, Masanari; Takaji, Masafumi; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    It is important to study the neural connectivities and functions in primates. For this purpose, it is critical to be able to transfer genes to certain neurons in the primate brain so that we can image the neuronal signals and analyze the function of the transferred gene. Toward this end, our team has been developing gene transfer systems using viral vectors. In this review, we summarize our current achievements as follows. 1) We compared the features of gene transfer using five different AAV serotypes in combination with three different promoters, namely, CMV, mouse CaMKII (CaMKII), and human synapsin 1 (hSyn1), in the marmoset cortex with those in the mouse and macaque cortices. 2) We used target-specific double-infection techniques in combination with TET-ON and TET-OFF using lentiviral retrograde vectors for enhanced visualization of neural connections. 3) We used an AAV-mediated gene transfer method to study the transcriptional control for amplifying fluorescent signals using the TET/TRE system in the primate neocortex. We also established systems for shRNA mediated gene targeting in a neocortical region where a gene is significantly expressed and for expressing the gene using the CMV promoter for an unexpressed neocortical area in the primate cortex using AAV vectors to understand the regulation of downstream genes. Our findings have demonstrated the feasibility of using viral vector mediated gene transfer systems for the study of primate cortical circuits using the marmoset as an animal model. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 354-372, 2017. © 2016 The Authors. Developmental Neurobiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Information processing in micro and meso-scale neural circuits during normal and disease states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, Francisco

    Neural computation can occur at multiple spatial and temporal timescales. The sum total of all of these processes is to guide optimal behaviors within the context of the constraints imposed by the physical world. How the circuits of the brain achieves this goal represents a central question in systems neuroscience. Here I explore the many ways in which the circuits of the brain can process information at both the micro and meso scale. Understanding the way information is represented and processed in the brain could shed light on the neuropathology underlying complex neuropsychiatric diseases such as autism and schizophrenia. Chapter 2 establishes an experimental paradigm for assaying patterns of microcircuit activity and examines the role of dopaminergic modulation on prefrontal microcircuits. We find that dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor activation results in an increase in spontaneous activity while dopamine type 1 (D1) activation does not. Chapter 3 of this dissertation presents a study that illustrates how cholingergic activation normally produces what has been suggested as a neural substrate of attention; pairwise decorrelation in microcircuit activity. This study also shows that in two etiologicall distinct mouse models of autism, FMR1 knockout mice and Valproic Acid exposed mice, this ability to decorrelate in the presence of cholinergic activation is lost. This represents a putative microcircuit level biomarker of autism. Chapter 4 examines the structure/function relationship within the prefrontal microcircuit. Spontaneous activity in prefrontal microcircuits is shown to be organized according to a small world architecture. Interestingly, this architecture is important for one concrete function of neuronal microcircuits; the ability to produce temporally stereotyped patterns of activation. In the final chapter, we identify subnetworks in chronic intracranial electrocorticographic (ECoG) recordings using pairwise electrode coherence and dimensionality reduction

  3. Antagonistic Serotonergic and Octopaminergic Neural Circuits Mediate Food-Dependent Locomotory Behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgin, Matthew A; McCloskey, Richard J; Peters, Emily; Fang-Yen, Christopher

    2017-08-16

    locomotion behaviors associated with feeding and fasting in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans We identified neural circuits through which these signals work to govern behavior. Understanding the molecular pathways through which biogenic amines function in model organisms may improve our understanding of dysfunctions of appetite and behavior found in mammals, including humans. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/377811-13$15.00/0.

  4. Ontogeny of neural circuits underlying spatial memory in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Alexander Ainge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Spatial memory is a well characterised psychological function in both humans and rodents. The combined computations of a network of systems including place cells in the hippocampus, grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex and head direction cells found in numerous structures in the brain have been suggested to form the neural instantiation of the cognitive map as first described by Tolman in 1948. However, while our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying spatial representations in adults is relatively sophisticated, we know substantially less about how this network develops in young animals. In this article we review studies examining the developmental timescale that these systems follow. Electrophysiological recordings from very young rats show that directional information is at adult levels at the outset of navigational experience. The systems supporting allocentric memory, however, take longer to mature. This is consistent with behavioural studies of young rats which show that spatial memory based on head direction develops very early but that allocentric spatial memory takes longer to mature. We go on to report new data demonstrating that memory for associations between objects and their spatial locations is slower to develop than memory for objects alone. This is again consistent with previous reports suggesting that adult like spatial representations have a protracted development in rats and also suggests that the systems involved in processing non-spatial stimuli come online earlier.

  5. Spatiotemporal imaging of glutamate-induced biophotonic activities and transmission in neural circuits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rendong Tang

    Full Text Available The processing of neural information in neural circuits plays key roles in neural functions. Biophotons, also called ultra-weak photon emissions (UPE, may play potential roles in neural signal transmission, contributing to the understanding of the high functions of nervous system such as vision, learning and memory, cognition and consciousness. However, the experimental analysis of biophotonic activities (emissions in neural circuits has been hampered due to technical limitations. Here by developing and optimizing an in vitro biophoton imaging method, we characterize the spatiotemporal biophotonic activities and transmission in mouse brain slices. We show that the long-lasting application of glutamate to coronal brain slices produces a gradual and significant increase of biophotonic activities and achieves the maximal effect within approximately 90 min, which then lasts for a relatively long time (>200 min. The initiation and/or maintenance of biophotonic activities by glutamate can be significantly blocked by oxygen and glucose deprivation, together with the application of a cytochrome c oxidase inhibitor (sodium azide, but only partly by an action potential inhibitor (TTX, an anesthetic (procaine, or the removal of intracellular and extracellular Ca(2+. We also show that the detected biophotonic activities in the corpus callosum and thalamus in sagittal brain slices mostly originate from axons or axonal terminals of cortical projection neurons, and that the hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau leads to a significant decrease of biophotonic activities in these two areas. Furthermore, the application of glutamate in the hippocampal dentate gyrus results in increased biophotonic activities in its intrahippocampal projection areas. These results suggest that the glutamate-induced biophotonic activities reflect biophotonic transmission along the axons and in neural circuits, which may be a new mechanism for the processing of

  6. Dynamic Circuit Model for Spintronic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Alawein, Meshal

    2017-01-09

    In this work we propose a finite-difference scheme based circuit model of a general spintronic device and benchmark it with other models proposed for spintronic switching devices. Our model is based on the four-component spin circuit theory and utilizes the widely used coupled stochastic magnetization dynamics/spin transport framework. In addition to the steady-state analysis, this work offers a transient analysis of carrier transport. By discretizing the temporal and spatial derivatives to generate a linear system of equations, we derive new and simple finite-difference conductance matrices that can, to the first order, capture both static and dynamic behaviors of a spintronic device. We also discuss an extension of the spin modified nodal analysis (SMNA) for time-dependent situations based on the proposed scheme.

  7. How Do Efficient Coding Strategies Depend on Origins of Noise in Neural Circuits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Braden A W; Weber, Alison I; Rieke, Fred; Shea-Brown, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Neural circuits reliably encode and transmit signals despite the presence of noise at multiple stages of processing. The efficient coding hypothesis, a guiding principle in computational neuroscience, suggests that a neuron or population of neurons allocates its limited range of responses as efficiently as possible to best encode inputs while mitigating the effects of noise. Previous work on this question relies on specific assumptions about where noise enters a circuit, limiting the generality of the resulting conclusions. Here we systematically investigate how noise introduced at different stages of neural processing impacts optimal coding strategies. Using simulations and a flexible analytical approach, we show how these strategies depend on the strength of each noise source, revealing under what conditions the different noise sources have competing or complementary effects. We draw two primary conclusions: (1) differences in encoding strategies between sensory systems-or even adaptational changes in encoding properties within a given system-may be produced by changes in the structure or location of neural noise, and (2) characterization of both circuit nonlinearities as well as noise are necessary to evaluate whether a circuit is performing efficiently.

  8. How Do Efficient Coding Strategies Depend on Origins of Noise in Neural Circuits?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braden A W Brinkman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Neural circuits reliably encode and transmit signals despite the presence of noise at multiple stages of processing. The efficient coding hypothesis, a guiding principle in computational neuroscience, suggests that a neuron or population of neurons allocates its limited range of responses as efficiently as possible to best encode inputs while mitigating the effects of noise. Previous work on this question relies on specific assumptions about where noise enters a circuit, limiting the generality of the resulting conclusions. Here we systematically investigate how noise introduced at different stages of neural processing impacts optimal coding strategies. Using simulations and a flexible analytical approach, we show how these strategies depend on the strength of each noise source, revealing under what conditions the different noise sources have competing or complementary effects. We draw two primary conclusions: (1 differences in encoding strategies between sensory systems-or even adaptational changes in encoding properties within a given system-may be produced by changes in the structure or location of neural noise, and (2 characterization of both circuit nonlinearities as well as noise are necessary to evaluate whether a circuit is performing efficiently.

  9. DISSECTING OCD CIRCUITS: FROM ANIMAL MODELS TO TARGETED TREATMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmari, Susanne E; Dougherty, Darin D

    2015-08-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, severe mental illness with up to 2-3% prevalence worldwide. In fact, OCD has been classified as one of the world's 10 leading causes of illness-related disability according to the World Health Organization, largely because of the chronic nature of disabling symptoms.([1]) Despite the severity and high prevalence of this chronic and disabling disorder, there is still relatively limited understanding of its pathophysiology. However, this is now rapidly changing due to development of powerful technologies that can be used to dissect the neural circuits underlying pathologic behaviors. In this article, we describe recent technical advances that have allowed neuroscientists to start identifying the circuits underlying complex repetitive behaviors using animal model systems. In addition, we review current surgical and stimulation-based treatments for OCD that target circuit dysfunction. Finally, we discuss how findings from animal models may be applied in the clinical arena to help inform and refine targeted brain stimulation-based treatment approaches. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A simple structure wavelet transform circuit employing function link neural networks and SI filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Li; Yigang, He

    2016-12-01

    Signal processing by means of analog circuits offers advantages from a power consumption viewpoint. Implementing wavelet transform (WT) using analog circuits is of great interest when low-power consumption becomes an important issue. In this article, a novel simple structure WT circuit in analog domain is presented by employing functional link neural network (FLNN) and switched-current (SI) filters. First, the wavelet base is approximated using FLNN algorithms for giving a filter transfer function that is suitable for simple structure WT circuit implementation. Next, the WT circuit is constructed with the wavelet filter bank, whose impulse response is the approximated wavelet and its dilations. The filter design that follows is based on a follow-the-leader feedback (FLF) structure with multiple output bilinear SI integrators and current mirrors as the main building blocks. SI filter is well suited for this application since the dilation constant across different scales of the transform can be precisely implemented and controlled by the clock frequency of the circuit with the same system architecture. Finally, to illustrate the design procedure, a seventh-order FLNN-approximated Gaussian wavelet is implemented as an example. Simulations have successfully verified that the designed simple structure WT circuit has low sensitivity, low-power consumption and litter effect to the imperfections.

  11. Refinement and Pattern Formation in Neural Circuits by the Interaction of Traveling Waves with Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, James E. M.; Bair, Wyeth

    2015-01-01

    Traveling waves in the developing brain are a prominent source of highly correlated spiking activity that may instruct the refinement of neural circuits. A candidate mechanism for mediating such refinement is spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), which translates correlated activity patterns into changes in synaptic strength. To assess the potential of these phenomena to build useful structure in developing neural circuits, we examined the interaction of wave activity with STDP rules in simple, biologically plausible models of spiking neurons. We derive an expression for the synaptic strength dynamics showing that, by mapping the time dependence of STDP into spatial interactions, traveling waves can build periodic synaptic connectivity patterns into feedforward circuits with a broad class of experimentally observed STDP rules. The spatial scale of the connectivity patterns increases with wave speed and STDP time constants. We verify these results with simulations and demonstrate their robustness to likely sources of noise. We show how this pattern formation ability, which is analogous to solutions of reaction-diffusion systems that have been widely applied to biological pattern formation, can be harnessed to instruct the refinement of postsynaptic receptive fields. Our results hold for rich, complex wave patterns in two dimensions and over several orders of magnitude in wave speeds and STDP time constants, and they provide predictions that can be tested under existing experimental paradigms. Our model generalizes across brain areas and STDP rules, allowing broad application to the ubiquitous occurrence of traveling waves and to wave-like activity patterns induced by moving stimuli. PMID:26308406

  12. Massively parallel neural circuits for stereoscopic color vision: encoding, decoding and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Slutskiy, Yevgeniy B; Zhou, Yiyin

    2015-03-01

    Past work demonstrated how monochromatic visual stimuli could be faithfully encoded and decoded under Nyquist-type rate conditions. Color visual stimuli were then traditionally encoded and decoded in multiple separate monochromatic channels. The brain, however, appears to mix information about color channels at the earliest stages of the visual system, including the retina itself. If information about color is mixed and encoded by a common pool of neurons, how can colors be demixed and perceived? We present Color Video Time Encoding Machines (Color Video TEMs) for encoding color visual stimuli that take into account a variety of color representations within a single neural circuit. We then derive a Color Video Time Decoding Machine (Color Video TDM) algorithm for color demixing and reconstruction of color visual scenes from spikes produced by a population of visual neurons. In addition, we formulate Color Video Channel Identification Machines (Color Video CIMs) for functionally identifying color visual processing performed by a spiking neural circuit. Furthermore, we derive a duality between TDMs and CIMs that unifies the two and leads to a general theory of neural information representation for stereoscopic color vision. We provide examples demonstrating that a massively parallel color visual neural circuit can be first identified with arbitrary precision and its spike trains can be subsequently used to reconstruct the encoded stimuli. We argue that evaluation of the functional identification methodology can be effectively and intuitively performed in the stimulus space. In this space, a signal reconstructed from spike trains generated by the identified neural circuit can be compared to the original stimulus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multidisciplinary Modelling Tools for Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad

    This thesis presents multidisciplinary modelling techniques in a Design For Reliability (DFR) approach for power electronic circuits. With increasing penetration of renewable energy systems, the demand for reliable power conversion systems is becoming critical. Since a large part of electricity...... for expensive computation facilities in DFR approach. Therefore, in this thesis focus is placed on the generation of accurate, simple and generic models to study and assess thermal and electrical behavior of power electronic circuits (especially power modules). In this thesis, different power electronic...... is processed through power electronics, highly efficient, sustainable, reliable and cost-effective power electronic devices are needed. Reliability of a product is defined as the ability to perform within its predefined functions under given conditions in a specific time. Because power electronic devices...

  14. Spike Neural Models Part II: Abstract Neural Models

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Melissa G.; Chartier, Sylvain

    2018-01-01

    Neurons are complex cells that require a lot of time and resources to model completely. In spiking neural networks (SNN) though, not all that complexity is required. Therefore simple, abstract models are often used. These models save time, use less computer resources, and are easier to understand. This tutorial presents two such models: Izhikevich's model, which is biologically realistic in the resulting spike trains but not in the parameters, and the Leaky Integrate and Fire (LIF) model whic...

  15. A neural network model of causative actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Hand, Jeremy; Knott, Alistair

    2015-01-01

    A common idea in models of action representation is that actions are represented in terms of their perceptual effects (see e.g., Prinz, 1997; Hommel et al., 2001; Sahin et al., 2007; Umiltà et al., 2008; Hommel, 2013). In this paper we extend existing models of effect-based action representations to account for a novel distinction. Some actions bring about effects that are independent events in their own right: for instance, if John smashes a cup, he brings about the event of the cup smashing. Other actions do not bring about such effects. For instance, if John grabs a cup, this action does not cause the cup to "do" anything: a grab action has well-defined perceptual effects, but these are not registered by the perceptual system that detects independent events involving external objects in the world. In our model, effect-based actions are implemented in several distinct neural circuits, which are organized into a hierarchy based on the complexity of their associated perceptual effects. The circuit at the top of this hierarchy is responsible for actions that bring about independently perceivable events. This circuit receives input from the perceptual module that recognizes arbitrary events taking place in the world, and learns movements that reliably cause such events. We assess our model against existing experimental observations about effect-based motor representations, and make some novel experimental predictions. We also consider the possibility that the "causative actions" circuit in our model can be identified with a motor pathway reported in other work, specializing in "functional" actions on manipulable tools (Bub et al., 2008; Binkofski and Buxbaum, 2013).

  16. Neural circuits involved in the renewal of extinguished fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weihai; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaqing; Li, Hong

    2017-07-01

    The last 10 years have witnessed a substantial progress in understanding the neural mechanisms for the renewal of the extinguished fear memory. Based on the theory of fear extinction, exposure therapy has been developed as a typical cognitive behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder. Although the fear memory can be extinguished by repeated presentation of conditioned stimulus without unconditioned stimulus, the fear memory is not erased and tends to relapse outside of extinction context, which is referred to as renewal. Therefore, the renewal is regarded as a great obstruction interfering with the effect of exposure therapy. In recent years, there has been a great deal of studies in understanding the neurobiological underpinnings of fear renewal. These offer a foundation upon which novel therapeutic interventions for the renewal may be built. This review focuses on behavioral, anatomical and electrophysiological studies that interpret roles of the hippocampus, prelimbic cortex and amygdala as well as the connections between them for the renewal of the extinguished fear. Additionally, this review suggests the possible pathways for the renewal: (1) the prelimbic cortex may integrate contextual information from hippocampal inputs and project to the basolateral amygdala to mediate the renewal of extinguished fear memory; the ventral hippocampus may innervate the activities of the basolateral amygdala or the central amygdala directly for the renewal. © 2017 IUBMB Life, 69(7):470-478, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Nanowire electrodes for high-density stimulation and measurement of neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Robinson

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs that can precisely monitor and control neural activity will likely require new hardware with improved resolution and specificity. New nanofabricated electrodes with feature sizes and densities comparable to neural circuits may lead to such improvements. In this perspective, we review the recent development of vertical nanowire (NW electrodes that could provide highly parallel single-cell recording and stimulation for future BMIs. We compare the advantages of these devices and discuss some of the technical challenges that must be overcome for this technology to become a platform for next-generation closed-loop BMIs.

  18. Electrophysiological Data and the Biophysical Modelling of Local Cortical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitris Pinotsis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how recordings of gamma oscillations – under different experimental conditions or from different subjects – can be combined with a class of population models called neural fields and dynamic causal modeling (DCM to distinguish among alternative hypotheses regarding cortical structure and function. This approach exploits inter-subject variability and trial-specific effects associated with modulations in the peak frequency of gamma oscillations. It draws on the computational power of Bayesian model inversion, when applied to neural field models of cortical dynamics. Bayesian model comparison allows one to adjudicate among different mechanistic hypotheses about cortical excitability, synaptic kinetics and the cardinal topographic features of local cortical circuits. It also provides optimal parameter estimates that quantify neuromodulation and the spatial dispersion of axonal connections or summation of receptive fields in the visual cortex. This paper provides an overview of a family of neural field models that have been recently implemented using the DCM toolbox of the academic freeware Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM. The SPM software is a popular platform for analyzing neuroimaging data, used by several neuroscience communities worldwide. DCM allows for a formal (Bayesian statistical analysis of cortical network connectivity, based upon realistic biophysical models of brain responses. It is this particular feature of DCM – the unique combination of generative models with optimization techniques based upon (variational Bayesian principles – that furnishes a novel way to characterize functional brain architectures. In particular, it provides answers to questions about how the brain is wired and how it responds to different experimental manipulations. For a review of the general role of neural fields in SPM the reader can consult e.g. see [1]. Neural fields have a long and illustrious history in mathematical

  19. Bio-Inspired Neural Model for Learning Dynamic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tuan; Duong, Vu; Suri, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    A neural-network mathematical model that, relative to prior such models, places greater emphasis on some of the temporal aspects of real neural physical processes, has been proposed as a basis for massively parallel, distributed algorithms that learn dynamic models of possibly complex external processes by means of learning rules that are local in space and time. The algorithms could be made to perform such functions as recognition and prediction of words in speech and of objects depicted in video images. The approach embodied in this model is said to be "hardware-friendly" in the following sense: The algorithms would be amenable to execution by special-purpose computers implemented as very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuits that would operate at relatively high speeds and low power demands.

  20. Neuromodulation of the neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Parag N; Roy, Roland R; Zhong, Hui; Gerasimenko, Yury P; Taccola, Giuliano; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2016-11-01

    The inability to control timely bladder emptying is one of the most serious challenges among the many functional deficits that occur after a spinal cord injury. We previously demonstrated that electrodes placed epidurally on the dorsum of the spinal cord can be used in animals and humans to recover postural and locomotor function after complete paralysis and can be used to enable voiding in spinal rats. In the present study, we examined the neuromodulation of lower urinary tract function associated with acute epidural spinal cord stimulation, locomotion, and peripheral nerve stimulation in adult rats. Herein we demonstrate that electrically evoked potentials in the hindlimb muscles and external urethral sphincter are modulated uniquely when the rat is stepping bipedally and not voiding, immediately pre-voiding, or when voiding. We also show that spinal cord stimulation can effectively neuromodulate the lower urinary tract via frequency-dependent stimulation patterns and that neural peripheral nerve stimulation can activate the external urethral sphincter both directly and via relays in the spinal cord. The data demonstrate that the sensorimotor networks controlling bladder and locomotion are highly integrated neurophysiologically and behaviorally and demonstrate how these two functions are modulated by sensory input from the tibial and pudental nerves. A more detailed understanding of the high level of interaction between these networks could lead to the integration of multiple neurophysiological strategies to improve bladder function. These data suggest that the development of strategies to improve bladder function should simultaneously engage these highly integrated networks in an activity-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. [Progress in activity-dependent structural plasticity of neural circuits in cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Fu-Qiang

    2012-10-01

    Neural circuits of mammalian cerebral cortex have exhibited amazing abilities of structural and functional plasticity in development, learning and memory, neurological and psychiatric diseases. With the new imaging techniques and the application of molecular biology methods, observation neural circuits' structural dynamics within the cortex in vivo at the cellular and synaptic level was possible, so there were many great progresses in the field of the activity-dependent structural plasticity over the past decade. This paper reviewed some of the aspects of the experimental results, focused on the characteristics of dendritic structural plasticity in individual growth and development, rich environment, sensory deprivation, and pathological conditions, as well as learning and memory, especially the dynamics of dendritic spines on morphology and quantity; after that, we introduced axonal structural plasticity, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of structural plasticity, and proposed some future problems to be solved at last.

  2. Automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation of neural circuits in neonatal brain tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Hayes, John A; Picardo, Maria Cristina D; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of neurodegenerative disease is the pathological loss of neurons that participate in generating behaviour. To investigate network properties of neural circuits and provide a complementary tool to study neurodegeneration in vitro or in situ, we developed an automated cell-specific laser detection and ablation system. The instrument consists of a two-photon and visible-wavelength confocal imaging setup, controlled by executive software, that identifies neurons in preparations based on genetically encoded fluorescent proteins or Ca2+ imaging, and then sequentially ablates cell targets while monitoring network function concurrently. Pathological changes in network function can be directly attributed to ablated cells, which are logged in real time. Here, we investigated brainstem respiratory circuits to demonstrate single-cell precision in ablation during physiological network activity, but the technique could be applied to interrogate network properties in neural systems that retain network functionality in reduced preparations in vitro or in situ. PMID:23440965

  3. Engagement of neural circuits underlying 2D spatial navigation in a rodent virtual reality system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronov, Dmitriy; Tank, David W

    2014-10-22

    Virtual reality (VR) enables precise control of an animal's environment and otherwise impossible experimental manipulations. Neural activity in rodents has been studied on virtual 1D tracks. However, 2D navigation imposes additional requirements, such as the processing of head direction and environment boundaries, and it is unknown whether the neural circuits underlying 2D representations can be sufficiently engaged in VR. We implemented a VR setup for rats, including software and large-scale electrophysiology, that supports 2D navigation by allowing rotation and walking in any direction. The entorhinal-hippocampal circuit, including place, head direction, and grid cells, showed 2D activity patterns similar to those in the real world. Furthermore, border cells were observed, and hippocampal remapping was driven by environment shape, suggesting functional processing of virtual boundaries. These results illustrate that 2D spatial representations can be engaged by visual and rotational vestibular stimuli alone and suggest a novel VR tool for studying rat navigation.

  4. Homology and homoplasy of swimming behaviors and neural circuits in the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, James M.; Sakurai, Akira; Lillvis, Joshua L.; Gunaratne, Charuni A.; Katz, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    How neural circuit evolution relates to behavioral evolution is not well understood. Here the relationship between neural circuits and behavior is explored with respect to the swimming behaviors of the Nudipleura (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Opithobranchia). Nudipleura is a diverse monophyletic clade of sea slugs among which only a small percentage of species can swim. Swimming falls into a limited number of categories, the most prevalent of which are rhythmic left–right body flexions (LR) and rhythmic dorsal–ventral body flexions (DV). The phylogenetic distribution of these behaviors suggests a high degree of homoplasy. The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying DV swimming has been well characterized in Tritonia diomedea and in Pleurobranchaea californica. The CPG for LR swimming has been elucidated in Melibe leonina and Dendronotus iris, which are more closely related. The CPGs for the categorically distinct DV and LR swimming behaviors consist of nonoverlapping sets of homologous identified neurons, whereas the categorically similar behaviors share some homologous identified neurons, although the exact composition of neurons and synapses in the neural circuits differ. The roles played by homologous identified neurons in categorically distinct behaviors differ. However, homologous identified neurons also play different roles even in the swim CPGs of the two LR swimming species. Individual neurons can be multifunctional within a species. Some of those functions are shared across species, whereas others are not. The pattern of use and reuse of homologous neurons in various forms of swimming and other behaviors further demonstrates that the composition of neural circuits influences the evolution of behaviors. PMID:22723353

  5. SpikingLab: modelling agents controlled by Spiking Neural Networks in Netlogo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Romero, Cristian; Johnson, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    The scientific interest attracted by Spiking Neural Networks (SNN) has lead to the development of tools for the simulation and study of neuronal dynamics ranging from phenomenological models to the more sophisticated and biologically accurate Hodgkin-and-Huxley-based and multi-compartmental models. However, despite the multiple features offered by neural modelling tools, their integration with environments for the simulation of robots and agents can be challenging and time consuming. The implementation of artificial neural circuits to control robots generally involves the following tasks: (1) understanding the simulation tools, (2) creating the neural circuit in the neural simulator, (3) linking the simulated neural circuit with the environment of the agent and (4) programming the appropriate interface in the robot or agent to use the neural controller. The accomplishment of the above-mentioned tasks can be challenging, especially for undergraduate students or novice researchers. This paper presents an alternative tool which facilitates the simulation of simple SNN circuits using the multi-agent simulation and the programming environment Netlogo (educational software that simplifies the study and experimentation of complex systems). The engine proposed and implemented in Netlogo for the simulation of a functional model of SNN is a simplification of integrate and fire (I&F) models. The characteristics of the engine (including neuronal dynamics, STDP learning and synaptic delay) are demonstrated through the implementation of an agent representing an artificial insect controlled by a simple neural circuit. The setup of the experiment and its outcomes are described in this work.

  6. Priming Neural Circuits to Modulate Spinal Reflex Excitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Stephen P.; Iddings, Jennifer A.; Field-Fote, Edelle C.

    2017-01-01

    While priming is most often thought of as a strategy for modulating neural excitability to facilitate voluntary motor control, priming stimulation can also be utilized to target spinal reflex excitability. In this application, priming can be used to modulate the involuntary motor output that often follows central nervous system injury. Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) often experience spasticity, for which antispasmodic medications are the most common treatment. Physical therapeutic/electroceutic interventions offer an alternative treatment for spasticity, without the deleterious side effects that can accompany pharmacological interventions. While studies of physical therapeutic/electroceutic interventions have been published, a systematic comparison of these approaches has not been performed. The purpose of this study was to compare four non-pharmacological interventions to a sham-control intervention to assess their efficacy for spasticity reduction. Participants were individuals (n = 10) with chronic SCI (≥1 year) who exhibited stretch-induced quadriceps spasticity. Spasticity was quantified using the pendulum test before and at two time points after (immediate, 45 min delayed) each of four different physical therapeutic/electroceutic interventions, plus a sham-control intervention. Interventions included stretching, cyclic passive movement (CPM), transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tcSCS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). The sham-control intervention consisted of a brief ramp-up and ramp-down of knee and ankle stimulation while reclined with legs extended. The order of interventions was randomized, and each was tested on a separate day with at least 48 h between sessions. Compared to the sham-control intervention, stretching, CPM, and tcSCS were associated with a significantly greater reduction in spasticity immediately after treatment. While the immediate effect was largest for stretching, the reduction persisted

  7. Large scale neural circuit mapping data analysis accelerated with the graphical processing unit (GPU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yulin; Veidenbaum, Alexander V.; Nicolau, Alex; Xu, Xiangmin

    2014-01-01

    Background Modern neuroscience research demands computing power. Neural circuit mapping studies such as those using laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) produce large amounts of data and require intensive computation for post-hoc processing and analysis. New Method Here we report on the design and implementation of a cost-effective desktop computer system for accelerated experimental data processing with recent GPU computing technology. A new version of Matlab software with GPU enabled functions is used to develop programs that run on Nvidia GPUs to harness their parallel computing power. Results We evaluated both the central processing unit (CPU) and GPU-enabled computational performance of our system in benchmark testing and practical applications. The experimental results show that the GPU-CPU co-processing of simulated data and actual LSPS experimental data clearly outperformed the multi-core CPU with up to a 22x speedup, depending on computational tasks. Further, we present a comparison of numerical accuracy between GPU and CPU computation to verify the precision of GPU computation. In addition, we show how GPUs can be effectively adapted to improve the performance of commercial image processing software such as Adobe Photoshop. Comparison with Existing Method(s) To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GPU application in neural circuit mapping and electrophysiology-based data processing. Conclusions Together, GPU enabled computation enhances our ability to process large-scale data sets derived from neural circuit mapping studies, allowing for increased processing speeds while retaining data precision. PMID:25277633

  8. Large-scale neural circuit mapping data analysis accelerated with the graphical processing unit (GPU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yulin; Veidenbaum, Alexander V; Nicolau, Alex; Xu, Xiangmin

    2015-01-15

    Modern neuroscience research demands computing power. Neural circuit mapping studies such as those using laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) produce large amounts of data and require intensive computation for post hoc processing and analysis. Here we report on the design and implementation of a cost-effective desktop computer system for accelerated experimental data processing with recent GPU computing technology. A new version of Matlab software with GPU enabled functions is used to develop programs that run on Nvidia GPUs to harness their parallel computing power. We evaluated both the central processing unit (CPU) and GPU-enabled computational performance of our system in benchmark testing and practical applications. The experimental results show that the GPU-CPU co-processing of simulated data and actual LSPS experimental data clearly outperformed the multi-core CPU with up to a 22× speedup, depending on computational tasks. Further, we present a comparison of numerical accuracy between GPU and CPU computation to verify the precision of GPU computation. In addition, we show how GPUs can be effectively adapted to improve the performance of commercial image processing software such as Adobe Photoshop. To our best knowledge, this is the first demonstration of GPU application in neural circuit mapping and electrophysiology-based data processing. Together, GPU enabled computation enhances our ability to process large-scale data sets derived from neural circuit mapping studies, allowing for increased processing speeds while retaining data precision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The malleable brain: plasticity of neural circuits and behavior - a review from students to students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Natascha; Rotermund, Carola; Blumrich, Eva-Maria; Lourenco, Mychael V; Joshi, Pooja; Hegemann, Regina U; Jamwal, Sumit; Ali, Nilufar; García Romero, Ezra Michelet; Sharma, Sorabh; Ghosh, Shampa; Sinha, Jitendra K; Loke, Hannah; Jain, Vishal; Lepeta, Katarzyna; Salamian, Ahmad; Sharma, Mahima; Golpich, Mojtaba; Nawrotek, Katarzyna; Paidi, Ramesh K; Shahidzadeh, Sheila M; Piermartiri, Tetsade; Amini, Elham; Pastor, Veronica; Wilson, Yvette; Adeniyi, Philip A; Datusalia, Ashok K; Vafadari, Benham; Saini, Vedangana; Suárez-Pozos, Edna; Kushwah, Neetu; Fontanet, Paula; Turner, Anthony J

    2017-06-20

    One of the most intriguing features of the brain is its ability to be malleable, allowing it to adapt continually to changes in the environment. Specific neuronal activity patterns drive long-lasting increases or decreases in the strength of synaptic connections, referred to as long-term potentiation and long-term depression, respectively. Such phenomena have been described in a variety of model organisms, which are used to study molecular, structural, and functional aspects of synaptic plasticity. This review originated from the first International Society for Neurochemistry (ISN) and Journal of Neurochemistry (JNC) Flagship School held in Alpbach, Austria (Sep 2016), and will use its curriculum and discussions as a framework to review some of the current knowledge in the field of synaptic plasticity. First, we describe the role of plasticity during development and the persistent changes of neural circuitry occurring when sensory input is altered during critical developmental stages. We then outline the signaling cascades resulting in the synthesis of new plasticity-related proteins, which ultimately enable sustained changes in synaptic strength. Going beyond the traditional understanding of synaptic plasticity conceptualized by long-term potentiation and long-term depression, we discuss system-wide modifications and recently unveiled homeostatic mechanisms, such as synaptic scaling. Finally, we describe the neural circuits and synaptic plasticity mechanisms driving associative memory and motor learning. Evidence summarized in this review provides a current view of synaptic plasticity in its various forms, offers new insights into the underlying mechanisms and behavioral relevance, and provides directions for future research in the field of synaptic plasticity. Read the Editorial Highlight for this article on doi: 10.1111/jnc.14102. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Impact of adolescent social experiences on behavior and neural circuits implicated in mental illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Andrew R; McCormick, Cheryl M; Pellis, Sergio M; Lukkes, Jodi L

    2017-05-01

    Negative social experiences during adolescence are central features for several stress-related mental illnesses. Social play fighting behavior in rats peaks during early adolescence and is essential for the final maturation of brain and behavior. Manipulation of the rat adolescent social experience alters many neurobehavioral measurements implicated in anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. In this review, we will highlight the importance of social play and the use of three separate social stress models (isolation-rearing, social defeat, and social instability stress) to disrupt the acquisition of this adaptive behavior. Social stress during adolescence leads to the development of anxiety and depressive behavior as well as escalated drug use in adulthood. Furthermore, sex- and age-dependent effects on the hormonal stress response following adolescent social stress are also observed. Finally, manipulation of the social experience during adolescence alters stress-related neural circuits and monoaminergic systems. Overall, positive social experiences among age-matched conspecifics during rat adolescence are critical for healthy neurobehavioral maturation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in the spinal neural circuits are dependent on the movement speed of the visuomotor task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji eKubota

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have shown that spinal neural circuits are modulated by motor skill training. However, the effects of task movement speed on changes in spinal neural circuits have not been clarified. The aim of this research was to investigate whether spinal neural circuits were affected by task movement speed. Thirty-eight healthy subjects participated in this study. In experiment 1, the effects of task movement speed on the spinal neural circuits were examined. 18 subjects performed a visuomotor task involving ankle muscle slow (9 subjects or fast (9 subjects movement speed. Another 9 subjects performed a non-visuomotor task (controls in fast movement speed. The motor task training lasted for 20 min. The amounts of D1 inhibition and reciprocal Ia inhibition were measured using H-relfex condition-test paradigm and recorded before, and at 5, 15, and 30 min after the training session. In experiment 2, using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS, the effects of corticospinal descending inputs on the presynaptic inhibitory pathway were examined before and after performing either a visuomotor (8 subjects or a control task (8 subjects. All measurements were taken under resting conditions. The amount of D1 inhibition increased after the visuomotor task irrespective of movement speed (P < 0.01. The amount of reciprocal Ia inhibition increased with fast movement speed conditioning (P < 0.01, but was unchanged by slow movement speed conditioning. These changes lasted up to 15 min in D1 inhibition and 5 min in reciprocal Ia inhibition after the training session. The control task did not induce changes in D1 inhibition and reciprocal Ia inhibition. The TMS conditioned inhibitory effects of presynaptic inhibitory pathways decreased following visuomotor tasks (P < 0.01. The size of test H-reflex was almost the same size throughout experiments. The results suggest that supraspinal descending inputs for controlling joint movement are responsible for changes

  12. The Emergence of a Circuit Model for Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüscher, Christian

    2016-07-08

    Addiction is a disease of altered behavior. Addicts use drugs compulsively and will continue to do so despite negative consequences. Even after prolonged periods of abstinence, addicts are at risk of relapse, particularly when cues evoke memories that are associated with drug use. Rodent models mimic many of the core components of addiction, from the initial drug reinforcement to cue-associated relapse and continued drug intake despite negative consequences. Rodent models have also enabled unprecedented mechanistic insight into addiction, revealing plasticity of glutamatergic synaptic transmission evoked by the strong activation of mesolimbic dopamine-a defining feature of all addictive drugs-as a neural substrate for these drug-adaptive behaviors. Cell type-specific optogenetic manipulations have allowed both identification of the relevant circuits and design of protocols to reverse drug-evoked plasticity and to establish links of causality with drug-adaptive behaviors. The emergence of a circuit model for addiction will open the door for novel therapies, such as deep brain stimulation.

  13. A neuroplasticity-inspired neural circuit for acoustic navigation with obstacle avoidance that learns smooth motion paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2018-01-01

    avoiding obstacles. We have reported earlier on a neural circuit for acoustic navigation, inspired by neuroplasticity mechanisms, which learned stable robot motion paths for a simulated mobile robot. The circuit realised a reactive behaviour-based navigation architecture where a phonotaxis behaviour...

  14. Numerical analysis of modeling based on improved Elman neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Shao; Li, Wang; WeiSong, Zhao; YaQin, Zhong; Malekian, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A modeling based on the improved Elman neural network (IENN) is proposed to analyze the nonlinear circuits with the memory effect. The hidden layer neurons are activated by a group of Chebyshev orthogonal basis functions instead of sigmoid functions in this model. The error curves of the sum of squared error (SSE) varying with the number of hidden neurons and the iteration step are studied to determine the number of the hidden layer neurons. Simulation results of the half-bridge class-D power amplifier (CDPA) with two-tone signal and broadband signals as input have shown that the proposed behavioral modeling can reconstruct the system of CDPAs accurately and depict the memory effect of CDPAs well. Compared with Volterra-Laguerre (VL) model, Chebyshev neural network (CNN) model, and basic Elman neural network (BENN) model, the proposed model has better performance.

  15. Numerical Analysis of Modeling Based on Improved Elman Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao Jie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modeling based on the improved Elman neural network (IENN is proposed to analyze the nonlinear circuits with the memory effect. The hidden layer neurons are activated by a group of Chebyshev orthogonal basis functions instead of sigmoid functions in this model. The error curves of the sum of squared error (SSE varying with the number of hidden neurons and the iteration step are studied to determine the number of the hidden layer neurons. Simulation results of the half-bridge class-D power amplifier (CDPA with two-tone signal and broadband signals as input have shown that the proposed behavioral modeling can reconstruct the system of CDPAs accurately and depict the memory effect of CDPAs well. Compared with Volterra-Laguerre (VL model, Chebyshev neural network (CNN model, and basic Elman neural network (BENN model, the proposed model has better performance.

  16. Changed Synaptic Plasticity in Neural Circuits of Depressive-Like and Escitalopram-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Xu, Hua; Wu, Di; Gong, Wei-Gang; Geng, Lei-Yu; Wu, Fang-Fang; Tang, Hao; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-04-21

    Although progress has been made in the detection and characterization of neural plasticity in depression, it has not been fully understood in individual synaptic changes in the neural circuits under chronic stress and antidepressant treatment. Using electron microscopy and Western-blot analyses, the present study quantitatively examined the changes in the Gray's Type I synaptic ultrastructures and the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the key brain regions of rats' depressive-related neural circuit after chronic unpredicted mild stress and/or escitalopram administration. Meanwhile, their depressive behaviors were also determined by several tests. The Type I synapses underwent considerable remodeling after chronic unpredicted mild stress, which resulted in the changed width of the synaptic cleft, length of the active zone, postsynaptic density thickness, and/or synaptic curvature in the subregions of medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of the amygdala, accompanied by changed expression of several synapse-associated proteins. Chronic escitalopram administration significantly changed the above alternations in the chronic unpredicted mild stress rats but had little effect on normal controls. Also, there was a positive correlation between the locomotor activity and the maximal synaptic postsynaptic density thickness in the stratum radiatum of the Cornu Ammonis 1 region and a negative correlation between the sucrose preference and the length of the active zone in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus region in chronic unpredicted mild stress rats. These findings strongly indicate that chronic stress and escitalopram can alter synaptic plasticity in the neural circuits, and the remodeled synaptic ultrastructure was correlated with the rats' depressive behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic target for further exploration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  17. Changed Synaptic Plasticity in Neural Circuits of Depressive-Like and Escitalopram-Treated Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Xu, Hua; Wu, Di; Gong, Wei-Gang; Geng, Lei-Yu; Wu, Fang-Fang; Tang, Hao; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although progress has been made in the detection and characterization of neural plasticity in depression, it has not been fully understood in individual synaptic changes in the neural circuits under chronic stress and antidepressant treatment. Methods: Using electron microscopy and Western-blot analyses, the present study quantitatively examined the changes in the Gray’s Type I synaptic ultrastructures and the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the key brain regions of rats’ depressive-related neural circuit after chronic unpredicted mild stress and/or escitalopram administration. Meanwhile, their depressive behaviors were also determined by several tests. Results: The Type I synapses underwent considerable remodeling after chronic unpredicted mild stress, which resulted in the changed width of the synaptic cleft, length of the active zone, postsynaptic density thickness, and/or synaptic curvature in the subregions of medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of the amygdala, accompanied by changed expression of several synapse-associated proteins. Chronic escitalopram administration significantly changed the above alternations in the chronic unpredicted mild stress rats but had little effect on normal controls. Also, there was a positive correlation between the locomotor activity and the maximal synaptic postsynaptic density thickness in the stratum radiatum of the Cornu Ammonis 1 region and a negative correlation between the sucrose preference and the length of the active zone in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus region in chronic unpredicted mild stress rats. Conclusion: These findings strongly indicate that chronic stress and escitalopram can alter synaptic plasticity in the neural circuits, and the remodeled synaptic ultrastructure was correlated with the rats’ depressive behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic target for further exploration. PMID:25899067

  18. Model Order Reduction for Electronic Circuits:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.; Shontz, Suzanne

    Electronic circuits are ubiquitous; they are used in numerous industries including: the semiconductor, communication, robotics, auto, and music industries (among many others). As products become more and more complicated, their electronic circuits also grow in size and complexity. This increased...

  19. A Circuit-Based Neural Network with Hybrid Learning of Backpropagation and Random Weight Change Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Changju; Kim, Hyongsuk; Adhikari, Shyam Prasad; Chua, Leon O.

    2016-01-01

    A hybrid learning method of a software-based backpropagation learning and a hardware-based RWC learning is proposed for the development of circuit-based neural networks. The backpropagation is known as one of the most efficient learning algorithms. A weak point is that its hardware implementation is extremely difficult. The RWC algorithm, which is very easy to implement with respect to its hardware circuits, takes too many iterations for learning. The proposed learning algorithm is a hybrid one of these two. The main learning is performed with a software version of the BP algorithm, firstly, and then, learned weights are transplanted on a hardware version of a neural circuit. At the time of the weight transplantation, a significant amount of output error would occur due to the characteristic difference between the software and the hardware. In the proposed method, such error is reduced via a complementary learning of the RWC algorithm, which is implemented in a simple hardware. The usefulness of the proposed hybrid learning system is verified via simulations upon several classical learning problems. PMID:28025566

  20. Generalization performance of regularized neural network models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1994-01-01

    Architecture optimization is a fundamental problem of neural network modeling. The optimal architecture is defined as the one which minimizes the generalization error. This paper addresses estimation of the generalization performance of regularized, complete neural network models. Regularization...

  1. Plant Growth Models Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubenheim, David

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we descrive our motivation and approach to devloping models and the neural network architecture. Initial use of the artificial neural network for modeling the single plant process of transpiration is presented.

  2. [Robustness analysis of adaptive neural network model based on spike timing-dependent plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunzhi; Xu, Guizhi; Zhou, Qian; Guo, Miaomiao; Guo, Lei; Wan, Xiaowei

    2015-02-01

    To explore the self-organization robustness of the biological neural network, and thus to provide new ideas and methods for the electromagnetic bionic protection, we studied both the information transmission mechanism of neural network and spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) mechanism, and then investigated the relationship between synaptic plastic and adaptive characteristic of biology. Then a feedforward neural network with the Izhikevich model and the STDP mechanism was constructed, and the adaptive robust capacity of the network was analyzed. Simulation results showed that the neural network based on STDP mechanism had good rubustness capacity, and this characteristics is closely related to the STDP mechanisms. Based on this simulation work, the cell circuit with neurons and synaptic circuit which can simulate the information processing mechanisms of biological nervous system will be further built, then the electronic circuits with adaptive robustness will be designed based on the cell circuit.

  3. Neural network modeling of emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Daniel S.

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the history and development of computational neural network modeling of cognitive and behavioral processes that involve emotion. The exposition starts with models of classical conditioning dating from the early 1970s. Then it proceeds toward models of interactions between emotion and attention. Then models of emotional influences on decision making are reviewed, including some speculative (not and not yet simulated) models of the evolution of decision rules. Through the late 1980s, the neural networks developed to model emotional processes were mainly embodiments of significant functional principles motivated by psychological data. In the last two decades, network models of these processes have become much more detailed in their incorporation of known physiological properties of specific brain regions, while preserving many of the psychological principles from the earlier models. Most network models of emotional processes so far have dealt with positive and negative emotion in general, rather than specific emotions such as fear, joy, sadness, and anger. But a later section of this article reviews a few models relevant to specific emotions: one family of models of auditory fear conditioning in rats, and one model of induced pleasure enhancing creativity in humans. Then models of emotional disorders are reviewed. The article concludes with philosophical statements about the essential contributions of emotion to intelligent behavior and the importance of quantitative theories and models to the interdisciplinary enterprise of understanding the interactions of emotion, cognition, and behavior.

  4. Cell biology in neuroscience: Architects in neural circuit design: glia control neuron numbers and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corty, Megan M; Freeman, Marc R

    2013-11-11

    Glia serve many important functions in the mature nervous system. In addition, these diverse cells have emerged as essential participants in nearly all aspects of neural development. Improved techniques to study neurons in the absence of glia, and to visualize and manipulate glia in vivo, have greatly expanded our knowledge of glial biology and neuron-glia interactions during development. Exciting studies in the last decade have begun to identify the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which glia exert control over neuronal circuit formation. Recent findings illustrate the importance of glial cells in shaping the nervous system by controlling the number and connectivity of neurons.

  5. Mathematical modelling of fractional order circuit elements and bioimpedance applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreles, Miguel Angel; Lainez, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    In this work a classical derivation of fractional order circuits models is presented. Generalised constitutive equations in terms of fractional Riemann-Liouville derivatives are introduced in the Maxwell's equations for each circuit element. Next the Kirchhoff voltage law is applied in a RCL circuit configuration. It is shown that from basic properties of Fractional Calculus, a fractional differential equation model with Caputo derivatives is obtained. Thus standard initial conditions apply. Finally, models for bioimpedance are revisited.

  6. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Donna J.; Marzluff, John M.; Palmquist, Ila; Minoshima, Satoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Miyaoka, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing—learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination—required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers. PMID:23825209

  7. Distinct neural circuits underlie assessment of a diversity of natural dangers by American crows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Donna J; Marzluff, John M; Palmquist, Ila; Minoshima, Satoshi; Shimizu, Toru; Miyaoka, Robert

    2013-08-22

    Social animals encountering natural dangers face decisions such as whether to freeze, flee or harass the threat. The American crow, Corvus brachyrhynchos, conspicuously mobs dangers. We used positron emission tomography to test the hypothesis that distinct neuronal substrates underlie the crow's consistent behavioural response to different dangers. We found that crows activated brain regions associated with attention and arousal (nucleus isthmo-opticus/locus coeruleus), and with motor response (arcopallium), as they fixed their gaze on a threat. However, despite this consistent behavioural and neural response, the sight of a person who previously captured the crow, a person holding a dead crow and a taxidermy-mounted hawk activated distinct forebrain regions (amygdala, hippocampus and portion of the caudal nidopallium, respectively). We suggest that aspects of mobbing behaviour are guided by unique neural circuits that respond to differences in mental processing-learning, memory formation and multisensory discrimination-required to appropriately nuance a risky behaviour to specific dangers.

  8. Small-signal neural models and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Arindam

    2012-02-01

    This paper introduces the use of the concept of small-signal analysis, commonly used in circuit design, for understanding neural models. We show that neural models, varying in complexity from Hodgkin-Huxley to integrate and fire have similar small-signal models when their corresponding differential equations are close to the same bifurcation with respect to input current. Three applications of small-signal neural models are shown. First, some of the properties of cortical neurons described by Izhikevich are explained intuitively through small-signal analysis. Second, we use small-signal models for deriving parameters for a simple neural model (such as resonate and fire) from a more complicated but biophysically relevant one like Morris-Lecar. We show similarity in the subthreshold behavior of the simple and complicated model when they are close to a Hopf bifurcation and a saddle-node bifurcation. Hence, this is useful to correctly tune simple neural models for large-scale cortical simulations. Finaly, the biasing regime of a silicon ion channel is derived by comparing its small-signal model with a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model.

  9. Effects of intranasal oxytocin on neural processing within a socially relevant neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Fiza; Nunag, Jason; Muldoon, Glennis; Cadenhead, Kristin S; Pineda, Jaime A; Feifel, David

    2016-03-01

    Dysregulation of the Mirror Neuron System (MNS) in schizophrenia (SCZ) may underlie the cognitive and behavioral manifestations of social dysfunction associated with that disorder. In healthy subjects intranasal (IN) oxytocin (OT) improves neural processing in the MNS and is associated with improved social cognition. OT's brain effects can be measured through its modulation of the MNS by suppressing EEG mu-band electrical activity (8-13Hz) in response to motion perception. Although IN OT's effects on social cognition have been tested in SCZ, OT's impact on the MNS has not been evaluated to date. Therefore, we designed a study to investigate the effects of two different OT doses on biological motion-induced mu suppression in SCZ and healthy subjects. EEG recordings were taken after each subject received a single IN administration of placebo, OT-24IU and OT-48IU in randomized order in a double-blind crossover design. The results provide support for OT's regulation of the MNS in both healthy and SCZ subjects, with the optimal dose dependent on diagnostic group and sex of subject. A statistically significant response was seen in SCZ males only, indicating a heightened sensitivity to those effects, although sex hormone related effects cannot be ruled out. In general, OT appears to have positive effects on neural circuitry that supports social cognition and socially adaptive behaviors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Circuit Model of Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Simovski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hybridized decaying oscillations in a nanosystem of two coupled elements—a quantum emitter and a plasmonic nanoantenna—are considered as a classical effect. The circuit model of the nanosystem extends beyond the assumption of inductive or elastic coupling and implies the near-field dipole-dipole interaction. Its results fit those of the previously developed classical model of Rabi splitting, however going much farther. Using this model, we show that the hybridized oscillations depending on the relationships between design parameters of the nanosystem correspond to several characteristic regimes of spontaneous emission. These regimes were previously revealed in the literature and explained involving semiclassical theory. Our original classical model is much simpler: it results in a closed-form solution for the emission spectra. It allows fast prediction of the regime for different distances and locations of the emitter with respect to the nanoantenna (of a given geometry if the dipole moment of the emitter optical transition and its field coupling constant are known.

  11. Synaptic plasticity, neural circuits, and the emerging role of altered short-term information processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Gregg W; Gogos, Joseph A

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity alters the strength of information flow between presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons and thus modifies the likelihood that action potentials in a presynaptic neuron will lead to an action potential in a postsynaptic neuron. As such, synaptic plasticity and pathological changes in synaptic plasticity impact the synaptic computation which controls the information flow through the neural microcircuits responsible for the complex information processing necessary to drive adaptive behaviors. As current theories of neuropsychiatric disease suggest that distinct dysfunctions in neural circuit performance may critically underlie the unique symptoms of these diseases, pathological alterations in synaptic plasticity mechanisms may be fundamental to the disease process. Here we consider mechanisms of both short-term and long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission and their possible roles in information processing by neural microcircuits in both health and disease. As paradigms of neuropsychiatric diseases with strongly implicated risk genes, we discuss the findings in schizophrenia and autism and consider the alterations in synaptic plasticity and network function observed in both human studies and genetic mouse models of these diseases. Together these studies have begun to point toward a likely dominant role of short-term synaptic plasticity alterations in schizophrenia while dysfunction in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) may be due to a combination of both short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity alterations.

  12. An effective thermal circuit model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ming-C.; Zhang, Kun

    2011-08-01

    A physics-based thermal circuit model is developed for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog circuits. The circuit model integrates a non-isothermal device thermal circuit with interconnect thermal networks and is validated with high accuracy against finite element simulations in different layout structures. The non-isothermal circuit model is implemented in BSIMSOI to account for self-heating effect (SHE) in a Spice simulator, and applied to electro-thermal simulation of an SOI cascode current mirror constructed using different layouts. Effects of layout design on electric and thermal behaviors are investigated in detail. Influences of BOX thickness are also examined. It has been shown that the proposed non-isothermal approach is able to effectively account for influences of layout design, self-heating, high temperature gradients along the islands, interconnect temperature distributions, thermal coupling, and heat losses via BOX and interconnects, etc., in SOI current mirror structures. The model provides basic concepts and thermal circuits that can be extended to develop an effective model for electro-thermal simulation of SOI analog ICs.

  13. Effects of ion channel noise on neural circuits: an application to the respiratory pattern generator to investigate breathing variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haitao; Dhingra, Rishi R; Dick, Thomas E; Galán, Roberto F

    2017-01-01

    Neural activity generally displays irregular firing patterns even in circuits with apparently regular outputs, such as motor pattern generators, in which the output frequency fluctuates randomly around a mean value. This "circuit noise" is inherited from the random firing of single neurons, which emerges from stochastic ion channel gating (channel noise), spontaneous neurotransmitter release, and its diffusion and binding to synaptic receptors. Here we demonstrate how to expand conductance-based network models that are originally deterministic to include realistic, physiological noise, focusing on stochastic ion channel gating. We illustrate this procedure with a well-established conductance-based model of the respiratory pattern generator, which allows us to investigate how channel noise affects neural dynamics at the circuit level and, in particular, to understand the relationship between the respiratory pattern and its breath-to-breath variability. We show that as the channel number increases, the duration of inspiration and expiration varies, and so does the coefficient of variation of the breath-to-breath interval, which attains a minimum when the mean duration of expiration slightly exceeds that of inspiration. For small channel numbers, the variability of the expiratory phase dominates over that of the inspiratory phase, and vice versa for large channel numbers. Among the four different cell types in the respiratory pattern generator, pacemaker cells exhibit the highest sensitivity to channel noise. The model shows that suppressing input from the pons leads to longer inspiratory phases, a reduction in breathing frequency, and larger breath-to-breath variability, whereas enhanced input from the raphe nucleus increases breathing frequency without changing its pattern. A major source of noise in neuronal circuits is the "flickering" of ion currents passing through the neurons' membranes (channel noise), which cannot be suppressed experimentally. Computational

  14. The Influence of Vacuum Circuit Breakers and Different Motor Models on Switching Overvoltages in Motor Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cat S. M.; Snider, L. A.; Lo, Edward W. C.; Chung, T. S.

    Switching of induction motors with vacuum circuit breakers continues to be a concern. In this paper the influence on statistical overvoltages of the stochastic characteristics of vacuum circuit breakers, high frequency models of motors and transformers, and network characteristics, including cable lengths and network topology are evaluated and a general view of the overvoltages phenomena is presented. Finally, a real case study on the statistical voltage levels and risk-of-failure resulting from switching of a vacuum circuit breaker in an industrial installation in Hong Kong is presented.

  15. Short-Circuit Modeling of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. The short-circuit behavior will be presented. Both the simplified models and detailed models are used in the simulations and both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are discussed.

  16. A Neural Circuit for Acoustic Navigation combining Heterosynaptic and Non-synaptic Plasticity that learns Stable Trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Manoonpong, Poramate

    2017-01-01

    Reactive spatial robot navigation in goal-directed tasks such as phonotaxis requires generating consistent and stable trajectories towards an acoustic target while avoiding obstacles. High-level goal-directed steering behaviour can steer a robot towards the target by mapping sound direction...... controllers be resolved in a manner that generates consistent and stable robot trajectories? We propose a neural circuit that minimises this conflict by learning sensorimotor mappings as neuronal transfer functions between the perceived sound direction and wheel velocities of a simulated non-holonomic mobile...... robot. These mappings constitute the high-level goal-directed steering behaviour. Sound direction information is obtained from a model of the lizard peripheral auditory system. The parameters of the transfer functions are learned via an online unsupervised correlation learning algorithm through...

  17. Computer modeling of batteries from nonlinear circuit elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaben, S.; Moskowitz, I.; Federico, J.; Dyer, C. K.

    1985-06-01

    Circuit analogs for a single battery cell have previously been composed of resistors, capacitors, and inductors. This work introduces a nonlinear circuit model for cell behavior. The circuit is configured around the PIN junction diode, whose charge-storage behavior has features similar to those of electrochemical cells. A user-friendly integrated circuit simulation computer program has reproduced a variety of complex cell responses including electrical isolation effects causing capacity loss, as well as potentiodynamic peaks and discharge phenomena hitherto thought to be thermodynamic in origin. However, in this work, they are shown to be simply due to spatial distribution of stored charge within a practical electrode.

  18. Modelling of boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the flue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equations (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for the relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verification is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  19. Application of Circuit Model for Photovoltaic Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Pandiarajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Circuit model of photovoltaic (PV module is presented in this paper that can be used as a common platform by material scientists and power electronic circuit designers to develop better PV power plant. Detailed modeling procedure for the circuit model with numerical dimensions is presented using power system blockset of MATLAB/Simulink. The developed model is integrated with DC-DC boost converter with closed-loop control of maximum power point tracking (MPPT algorithm. Simulation results are validated with the experimental setup.

  20. High Resolution PV Power Modeling for Distribution Circuit Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, B. L.; Dise, J. H.

    2013-09-01

    NREL has contracted with Clean Power Research to provide 1-minute simulation datasets of PV systems located at three high penetration distribution feeders in the service territory of Southern California Edison (SCE): Porterville, Palmdale, and Fontana, California. The resulting PV simulations will be used to separately model the electrical circuits to determine the impacts of PV on circuit operations.

  1. Emerging Carbon Nanotube Electronic Circuits, Modeling, and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Yao Xu; Ashok Srivastava; Sharma, Ashwani K.

    2010-01-01

    Current transport and dynamic models of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are presented. A model of single-walled carbon nanotube as interconnect is also presented and extended in modeling of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles. These models are applied in studying the performances of circuits such as the complementary carbon nanotube inverter pair and carbon nanotube as interconnect. Cadence/Spectre simulations show that carbon nanotube field-effect transistor circuits can operate a...

  2. Cross-talk between the epigenome and neural circuits in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mews, Philipp; Calipari, Erin S

    2017-01-01

    Drug addiction is a behavioral disorder characterized by dysregulated learning about drugs and associated cues that result in compulsive drug seeking and relapse. Learning about drug rewards and predictive cues is a complex process controlled by a computational network of neural connections interacting with transcriptional and molecular mechanisms within each cell to precisely guide behavior. The interplay between rapid, temporally specific neuronal activation, and longer-term changes in transcription is of critical importance in the expression of appropriate, or in the case of drug addiction, inappropriate behaviors. Thus, these factors and their interactions must be considered together, especially in the context of treatment. Understanding the complex interplay between epigenetic gene regulation and circuit connectivity will allow us to formulate novel therapies to normalize maladaptive reward behaviors, with a goal of modulating addictive behaviors, while leaving natural reward-associated behavior unaffected. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Multiple conserved cell adhesion protein interactions mediate neural wiring of a sensory circuit in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byunghyuk; Emmons, Scott W

    2017-09-13

    Nervous system function relies on precise synaptic connections. A number of widely-conserved cell adhesion proteins are implicated in cell recognition between synaptic partners, but how these proteins act as a group to specify a complex neural network is poorly understood. Taking advantage of known connectivity in C. elegans, we identified and studied cell adhesion genes expressed in three interacting neurons in the mating circuits of the adult male. Two interacting pairs of cell surface proteins independently promote fasciculation between sensory neuron HOA and its postsynaptic target interneuron AVG: BAM-2/neurexin-related in HOA binds to CASY-1/calsyntenin in AVG; SAX-7/L1CAM in sensory neuron PHC binds to RIG-6/contactin in AVG. A third, basal pathway results in considerable HOA-AVG fasciculation and synapse formation in the absence of the other two. The features of this multiplexed mechanism help to explain how complex connectivity is encoded and robustly established during nervous system development.

  4. Sequential neural models with stochastic layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fraccaro, Marco; Sønderby, Søren Kaae; Paquet, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    How can we efficiently propagate uncertainty in a latent state representation with recurrent neural networks? This paper introduces stochastic recurrent neural networks which glue a deterministic recurrent neural network and a state space model together to form a stochastic and sequential neural ...... the uncertainty in a latent path, like a state space model, we improve the state of the art results on the Blizzard and TIMIT speech modeling data sets by a large margin, while achieving comparable performances to competing methods on polyphonic music modeling....

  5. Equivalent Circuit Parameters Estimation for PEM Fuel Cell Using RBF Neural Network and Enhanced Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Yeau Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an equivalent circuit parameters measurement and estimation method for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The parameters measurement method is based on current loading technique; in current loading test a no load PEMFC is suddenly turned on to obtain the waveform of the transient terminal voltage. After the equivalent circuit parameters were measured, a hybrid method that combines a radial basis function (RBF neural network and enhanced particle swarm optimization (EPSO algorithm is further employed for the equivalent circuit parameters estimation. The RBF neural network is adopted such that the estimation problem can be effectively processed when the considered data have different features and ranges. In the hybrid method, EPSO algorithm is used to tune the connection weights, the centers, and the widths of RBF neural network. Together with the current loading technique, the proposed hybrid estimation method can effectively estimate the equivalent circuit parameters of PEMFC. To verify the proposed approach, experiments were conducted to demonstrate the equivalent circuit parameters estimation of PEMFC. A practical PEMFC stack was purposely created to produce the common current loading activities of PEMFC for the experiments. The practical results of the proposed method were studied in accordance with the conditions for different loading conditions.

  6. Estimation of Effectivty Connectivity via Data-Driven Neural Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Robert Freestone

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research introduces a new method for functional brain imaging via a process of model inversion. By estimating parameters of a computational model, we are able to track effective connectivity and mean membrane potential dynamics that cannot be directly measured using electrophysiological measurements alone. The ability to track the hidden aspects of neurophysiology will have a profound impact on the way we understand and treat epilepsy. For example, under the assumption the model captures the key features of the cortical circuits of interest, the framework will provide insights into seizure initiation and termination on a patient-specific basis. It will enable investigation into the effect a particular drug has on specific neural populations and connectivity structures using minimally invasive measurements. The method is based on approximating brain networks using an interconnected neural population model. The neural population model is based on a neural mass model that describes the functional activity of the brain, capturing the mesoscopic biophysics and anatomical structure. The model is made subject-specific by estimating the strength of intra-cortical connections within a region and inter-cortical connections between regions using a novel Kalman filtering method. We demonstrate through simulation how the framework can be used the track the mechanisms involved in seizure initiation and termination.

  7. New Canonical State Models of Chua's Circuit Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Horska-Kreuzigerova

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Two new modified types of canonical state models simulating chaotic phenomena in piecewise-linear dynamical systems are derived. Both are topologically conjugate to Class C similarly as Chua's circuit family. Their state matrix equations and corresponding integrator-based circuit models are proposed including their relations with the first elementary canonical state model. As an example the phase portraits of typical chaotic attractor are shown.

  8. Estimating neural background input with controlled and fast perturbations: A bandwidth comparison between inhibitory opsins and neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eriksson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To test the importance of a certain cell type or brain area it is common to make a lack of function experiment in which the neuronal population of interest is inhibited. Here we review physiological and methodological constraints for making controlled perturbations using the corticothalamic circuit as an example. The brain with its many types of cells and rich interconnectivity offers many paths through which a perturbation can spread within a short time. To understand the side effects of the perturbation one should record from those paths. We find that ephaptic effects, gap-junctions, and fast chemical synapses are so fast that they can react to the perturbation during the few milliseconds it takes for an opsin to change the membrane potential. The slow chemical synapses, astrocytes, extracellular ions and vascular signals, will continue to give their physiological input for around 20 milliseconds before they also react to the perturbation. Although we show that some pathways can react within milliseconds the strength/speed reported in this review should be seen as an upper bound since we have omitted how polysynaptic signals are attenuated. Thus the number of additional recordings that has to be made to control for the perturbation side effects is expected to be fewer than proposed here. To summarize, the reviewed literature not only suggests that it is possible to make controlled lack of function experiments, but, it also suggests that such a lack of function experiment can be used to measure the context of local neural computations.

  9. Analgesic Neural Circuits Are Activated by Electroacupuncture at Two Sets of Acupoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-Li Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate analgesic neural circuits activated by electroacupuncture (EA at different sets of acupoints in the brain, goats were stimulated by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints or set of Housanli acupoints for 30 min. The pain threshold was measured using the potassium iontophoresis method. The levels of c-Fos were determined with Streptavidin-Biotin Complex immunohistochemistry. The results showed pain threshold induced by EA at set of Baihui-Santai acupoints was 44.74%±4.56% higher than that by EA at set of Housanli acupoints (32.64%±5.04%. Compared with blank control, EA at two sets of acupoints increased c-Fos expression in the medial septal nucleus (MSN, the arcuate nucleus (ARC, the nucleus amygdala basalis (AB, the lateral habenula nucleus (HL, the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG, the locus coeruleus (LC, the nucleus raphe magnus (NRM, the pituitary gland, and spinal cord dorsal horn (SDH. Compared with EA at set of Housanli points, EA at set of Baihui-Santai points induced increased c-Fos expression in AB but decrease in MSN, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, HL, and SDH. It suggests that ARC-PAG-NRM/LC-SDH and the hypothalamus-pituitary may be the common activated neural pathways taking part in EA-induced analgesia at the two sets of acupoints.

  10. A feed-forward spinal cord glycinergic neural circuit gates mechanical allodynia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Dong, Hailong; Gao, Yandong; Gong, Yuanyuan; Ren, Yingna; Gu, Nan; Zhou, Shudi; Xia, Nan; Sun, Yan-Yan; Ji, Ru-Rong; Xiong, Lize

    2013-09-01

    Neuropathic pain is characterized by mechanical allodynia induced by low-threshold myelinated Aβ-fiber activation. The original gate theory of pain proposes that inhibitory interneurons in the lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn (DH) act as "gate control" units for preventing the interaction between innocuous and nociceptive signals. However, our understanding of the neuronal circuits underlying pain signaling and modulation in the spinal DH is incomplete. Using a rat model, we have shown that the convergence of glycinergic inhibitory and excitatory Aβ-fiber inputs onto PKCγ+ neurons in the superficial DH forms a feed-forward inhibitory circuit that prevents Aβ input from activating the nociceptive pathway. This feed-forward inhibition was suppressed following peripheral nerve injury or glycine blockage, leading to inappropriate induction of action potential outputs in the nociceptive pathway by Aβ-fiber stimulation. Furthermore, spinal blockage of glycinergic synaptic transmission in vivo induced marked mechanical allodynia. Our findings identify a glycinergic feed-forward inhibitory circuit that functions as a gate control to separate the innocuous mechanoreceptive pathway and the nociceptive pathway in the spinal DH. Disruption of this glycinergic inhibitory circuit after peripheral nerve injury has the potential to elicit mechanical allodynia, a cardinal symptom of neuropathic pain.

  11. Logistic Regression Modeling of Diminishing Manufacturing Sources for Integrated Circuits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gravier, Michael

    1999-01-01

    .... This thesis draws on available data from the electronics integrated circuit industry to attempt to assess whether statistical modeling offers a viable method for predicting the presence of DMSMS...

  12. A neural network model of attention-modulated neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yuqiao; Liljenström, Hans

    2007-12-01

    Visual attention appears to modulate cortical neurodynamics and synchronization through various cholinergic mechanisms. In order to study these mechanisms, we have developed a neural network model of visual cortex area V4, based on psychophysical, anatomical and physiological data. With this model, we want to link selective visual information processing to neural circuits within V4, bottom-up sensory input pathways, top-down attention input pathways, and to cholinergic modulation from the prefrontal lobe. We investigate cellular and network mechanisms underlying some recent analytical results from visual attention experimental data. Our model can reproduce the experimental findings that attention to a stimulus causes increased gamma-frequency synchronization in the superficial layers. Computer simulations and STA power analysis also demonstrate different effects of the different cholinergic attention modulation action mechanisms.

  13. Combining BMI stimulation and mathematical modeling for acute stroke recovery and neural repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Gonzalez Andino

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Rehabilitation is a neural plasticity-exploiting approach that forces undamaged neural circuits to undertake the functionality of other circuits damaged by stroke. It aims to partial restoration of the neural functions by circuit remodeling rather than by the regeneration of damaged circuits. The core hypothesis of the present paper is that - in stroke - Brain Machine Interfaces can be designed to target neural repair instead of rehabilitation. To support this hypothesis we first review existing evidence on the role of endogenous or externally applied electric fields on all processes involved in CNS repair. We then describe our own results to illustrate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative effects of BMI- electrical stimulation on sensory deprivation-related degenerative processes of the CNS. Finally, we discuss three of the crucial issues involved in the design of neural repair-oriented BMIs: when to stimulate, where to stimulate and - the particularly important but unsolved issue of - how to stimulate. We argue that optimal parameters for the electrical stimulation can be determined from studying and modeling the dynamics of the electric fields that naturally emerge at the central and peripheral nervous system during spontaneous healing in both, experimental animals and human patients. We conclude that a closed-loop BMI that defines the optimal stimulation parameters from a priori developed experimental models of the dynamics of spontaneous repair and the on-line monitoring of neural activity might place BMIs as an alternative or complement to stem-cell transplantation or pharmacological approaches, intensively pursued nowadays.

  14. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Pedernales, J S; DiCarlo, L; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2014-12-15

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into digital steps. Furthermore, we show the emergence of the Dirac equation dynamics from the quantum Rabi model when the mode frequency vanishes. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of this proposal under realistic superconducting circuit scenarios.

  15. Circuit oriented electromagnetic modeling using the PEEC techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Ruehli, Albert; Jiang, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    This book provides intuitive solutions to electromagnetic problems by using the Partial Eelement Eequivalent Ccircuit (PEEC) method. This book begins with an introduction to circuit analysis techniques, laws, and frequency and time domain analyses. The authors also treat Maxwell's equations, capacitance computations, and inductance computations through the lens of the PEEC method. Next, readers learn to build PEEC models in various forms: equivalent circuit models, non orthogonal PEEC models, skin-effect models, PEEC models for dielectrics, incident and radiate field models, and scattering PEEC models. The book concludes by considering issues like such as stability and passivity, and includes five appendices some with formulas for partial elements.

  16. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the ue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level uctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level uctuations in the drum....

  17. Modelling, simulating and optimizing boiler heating surfaces and evaporator circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.; Condra, T.; Houbak, Niels

    2003-01-01

    for the optimization a dynamic model for the boiler is applied. Furthermore a function for the value of the dynamic performance is included in the model. The dynamic models for simulating boiler performance consists of a model for the flue gas side, a model for the evaporator circuit and a model for the drum....... The dynamic model has been developed for the purpose of determining boiler material temperatures and heat transfer from the flue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate the circulation in the evaporator circuit and hereby the water level fluctuations in the drum. The dynamic model has been...... transfer, circulation in the evaporator circuit and water level fluctuations in the drum....

  18. Computer modeling of batteries from non-linear circuit elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaben, S.; Federico, J.; Moskowitz, I.

    1983-08-01

    A simple non-linear circuit model for battery behavior is given. It is based on time-dependent features of the well-known PIN change storage diode, whose behavior is described by equations similar to those associated with electrochemical cells. The circuit simulation computer program ADVICE was used to predict non-linear response from a topological description of the battery analog built from advice components. By a reasonable choice of one set of parameters, the circuit accurately simulates a wide spectrum of measured non-linear battery responses to within a few millivolts.

  19. NEURAL CORRELATES FOR APATHY: FRONTAL - PREFRONTAL AND PARIETAL CORTICAL - SUBCORTICAL CIRCUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Moretti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Apathy is an uncertain nosographical entity, which includes reduced motivation, abulia, decreased empathy, and lack of emotional invovlement; it is an important and heavy-burden clinical condition which strongly impacts in every day life events, affects the common daily living abilities, reduced the inner goal directed behavior, and gives the heaviest burden on caregivers. Is a quite common comorbidity of many neurological disease, However, there is no definite consensus on the role of apathy in clinical practice, no definite data on anatomical circuits involved in its development, and no definite instrument to detect it at bedside. As a general observation, the occurrence of apathy is connected to damage of prefrontal cortex (PFC and basal ganglia; emotional affective apathy may be related to the orbitomedial PFC and ventral striatum; cognitive apathy may be associated with dysfunction of lateral PFC and dorsal caudate nuclei; deficit of autoactivation may be due to bilateral lesions of the internal portion of globus pallidus, bilateral paramedian thalamic lesions, or the dorsomedial portion of PFC. On the other hand, apathy severity has been connected to neurofibrillary tangles density in the anterior cingulate gyrus and to grey matter atrophy in the anterior cingulate (ACC and in the left medial frontal cortex, confirmed by functional imaging studies. These neural networks are linked to projects, judjing and planning, execution and selection common actions, and through the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens projects to the frontostriatal and to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore, an alteration of these circuitry caused a lack of insight, a reduction of decision-making strategies and a reduced speedness in action decsion, major resposnible for apathy. Emergent role concerns also the parietal cortex, with its direct action motivation control.We will discuss the importance of these circuits in different pathologies

  20. Neural Correlates for Apathy: Frontal-Prefrontal and Parietal Cortical- Subcortical Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rita; Signori, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Apathy is an uncertain nosographical entity, which includes reduced motivation, abulia, decreased empathy, and lack of emotional involvement; it is an important and heavy-burden clinical condition which strongly impacts in everyday life events, affects the common daily living abilities, reduced the inner goal directed behavior, and gives the heaviest burden on caregivers. Is a quite common comorbidity of many neurological disease, However, there is no definite consensus on the role of apathy in clinical practice, no definite data on anatomical circuits involved in its development, and no definite instrument to detect it at bedside. As a general observation, the occurrence of apathy is connected to damage of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and basal ganglia; “emotional affective” apathy may be related to the orbitomedial PFC and ventral striatum; “cognitive apathy” may be associated with dysfunction of lateral PFC and dorsal caudate nuclei; deficit of “autoactivation” may be due to bilateral lesions of the internal portion of globus pallidus, bilateral paramedian thalamic lesions, or the dorsomedial portion of PFC. On the other hand, apathy severity has been connected to neurofibrillary tangles density in the anterior cingulate gyrus and to gray matter atrophy in the anterior cingulate (ACC) and in the left medial frontal cortex, confirmed by functional imaging studies. These neural networks are linked to projects, judjing and planning, execution and selection common actions, and through the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens projects to the frontostriatal and to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Therefore, an alteration of these circuitry caused a lack of insight, a reduction of decision-making strategies, and a reduced speedness in action decision, major responsible for apathy. Emergent role concerns also the parietal cortex, with its direct action motivation control. We will discuss the importance of these circuits in different pathologies

  1. Navigating Monogamy: Nonapeptide Sensitivity in a Memory Neural Circuit May Shape Social Behavior and Mating Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Ophir

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of memory in mating systems is often neglected despite the fact that most mating systems are defined in part by how animals use space. Monogamy, for example, is usually characterized by affiliative (e.g., pairbonding and defensive (e.g., mate guarding behaviors, but a high degree of spatial overlap in home range use is the easiest defining feature of monogamous animals in the wild. The nonapeptides vasopressin and oxytocin have been the focus of much attention for their importance in modulating social behavior, however this work has largely overshadowed their roles in learning and memory. To date, the understanding of memory systems and mechanisms governing social behavior have progressed relatively independently. Bridging these two areas will provide a deeper appreciation for understanding behavior, and in particular the mechanisms that mediate reproductive decision-making. Here, I argue that the ability to mate effectively as monogamous individuals is linked to the ability to track conspecifics in space. I discuss the connectivity across some well-known social and spatial memory nuclei, and propose that the nonapeptide receptors within these structures form a putative “socio-spatial memory neural circuit.” This purported circuit may function to integrate social and spatial information to shape mating decisions in a context-dependent fashion. The lateral septum and/or the nucleus accumbens, and neuromodulation therein, may act as an intermediary to relate socio-spatial information with social behavior. Identifying mechanisms responsible for relating information about the social world with mechanisms mediating mating tactics is crucial to fully appreciate the suite of factors driving reproductive decisions and social decision-making.

  2. The neural circuits recruited for the production of signs and fingerspelled words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmorey, Karen; Mehta, Sonya; McCullough, Stephen; Grabowski, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    Signing differs from typical non-linguistic hand actions because movements are not visually guided, finger movements are complex (particularly for fingerspelling), and signs are not produced as holistic gestures. We used positron emission tomography to investigate the neural circuits involved in the production of American Sign Language (ASL). Different types of signs (one-handed (articulated in neutral space), two-handed (neutral space), and one-handed body-anchored signs) were elicited by asking deaf native signers to produce sign translations of English words. Participants also fingerspelled (one-handed) printed English words. For the baseline task, participants indicated whether a word contained a descending letter. Fingerspelling engaged ipsilateral motor cortex and cerebellar cortex in contrast to both one-handed signs and the descender baseline task, which may reflect greater timing demands and complexity of handshape sequences required for fingerspelling. Greater activation in the visual word form area was also observed for fingerspelled words compared to one-handed signs. Body-anchored signs engaged bilateral superior parietal cortex to a greater extent than the descender baseline task and neutral space signs, reflecting the motor control and proprioceptive monitoring required to direct the hand toward a specific location on the body. Less activation in parts of the motor circuit was observed for two-handed signs compared to one-handed signs, possibly because, for half of the signs, handshape and movement goals were spread across the two limbs. Finally, the conjunction analysis comparing each sign type with the descender baseline task revealed common activation in the supramarginal gyrus bilaterally, which we interpret as reflecting phonological retrieval and encoding processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Navigating Monogamy: Nonapeptide Sensitivity in a Memory Neural Circuit May Shape Social Behavior and Mating Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Alexander G

    2017-01-01

    The role of memory in mating systems is often neglected despite the fact that most mating systems are defined in part by how animals use space. Monogamy, for example, is usually characterized by affiliative (e.g., pairbonding) and defensive (e.g., mate guarding) behaviors, but a high degree of spatial overlap in home range use is the easiest defining feature of monogamous animals in the wild. The nonapeptides vasopressin and oxytocin have been the focus of much attention for their importance in modulating social behavior, however this work has largely overshadowed their roles in learning and memory. To date, the understanding of memory systems and mechanisms governing social behavior have progressed relatively independently. Bridging these two areas will provide a deeper appreciation for understanding behavior, and in particular the mechanisms that mediate reproductive decision-making. Here, I argue that the ability to mate effectively as monogamous individuals is linked to the ability to track conspecifics in space. I discuss the connectivity across some well-known social and spatial memory nuclei, and propose that the nonapeptide receptors within these structures form a putative "socio-spatial memory neural circuit." This purported circuit may function to integrate social and spatial information to shape mating decisions in a context-dependent fashion. The lateral septum and/or the nucleus accumbens, and neuromodulation therein, may act as an intermediary to relate socio-spatial information with social behavior. Identifying mechanisms responsible for relating information about the social world with mechanisms mediating mating tactics is crucial to fully appreciate the suite of factors driving reproductive decisions and social decision-making.

  4. Structural basis for cholinergic regulation of neural circuits in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Masakazu; Kiyokage, Emi; Sohn, Jaerin; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Harada, Tamotsu; Toida, Kazunori

    2017-02-15

    Odor information is regulated by olfactory inputs, bulbar interneurons, and centrifugal inputs in the olfactory bulb (OB). Cholinergic neurons projecting from the nucleus of the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca and the magnocellular preoptic nucleus are one of the primary centrifugal inputs to the OB. In this study, we focused on cholinergic regulation of the OB and analyzed neural morphology with a particular emphasis on the projection pathways of cholinergic neurons. Single-cell imaging of a specific neuron within dense fibers is critical to evaluate the structure and function of the neural circuits. We labeled cholinergic neurons by infection with virus vector and then reconstructed them three-dimensionally. We also examined the ultramicrostructure of synapses by electron microscopy tomography. To further clarify the function of cholinergic neurons, we performed confocal laser scanning microscopy to investigate whether other neurotransmitters are present within cholinergic axons in the OB. Our results showed the first visualization of complete cholinergic neurons, including axons projecting to the OB, and also revealed frequent axonal branching within the OB where it innervated multiple glomeruli in different areas. Furthermore, electron tomography demonstrated that cholinergic axons formed asymmetrical synapses with a morphological variety of thicknesses of the postsynaptic density. Although we have not yet detected the presence of other neurotransmitters, the range of synaptic morphology suggests multiple modes of transmission. The present study elucidates the ways that cholinergic neurons could contribute to the elaborate mechanisms involved in olfactory processing in the OB. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:574-591, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spiking modular neural networks: A neural network modeling approach for hydrological processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamban Parasuraman; Amin Elshorbagy; Sean K. Carey

    2006-01-01

    .... In this study, a novel neural network model called the spiking modular neural networks (SMNNs) is proposed. An SMNN consists of an input layer, a spiking layer, and an associator neural network layer...

  6. Rules and mechanisms for efficient two-stage learning in neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teşileanu, Tiberiu; Ölveczky, Bence; Balasubramanian, Vijay

    2017-04-04

    Trial-and-error learning requires evaluating variable actions and reinforcing successful variants. In songbirds, vocal exploration is induced by LMAN, the output of a basal ganglia-related circuit that also contributes a corrective bias to the vocal output. This bias is gradually consolidated in RA, a motor cortex analogue downstream of LMAN. We develop a new model of such two-stage learning. Using stochastic gradient descent, we derive how the activity in 'tutor' circuits ( e.g., LMAN) should match plasticity mechanisms in 'student' circuits ( e.g., RA) to achieve efficient learning. We further describe a reinforcement learning framework through which the tutor can build its teaching signal. We show that mismatches between the tutor signal and the plasticity mechanism can impair learning. Applied to birdsong, our results predict the temporal structure of the corrective bias from LMAN given a plasticity rule in RA. Our framework can be applied predictively to other paired brain areas showing two-stage learning.

  7. Evolution and analysis of minimal neural circuits for klinotaxis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Eduardo J; Lockery, Shawn R

    2010-09-29

    Chemotaxis during sinusoidal locomotion in nematodes captures in simplified form the general problem of how dynamical interactions between the nervous system, body, and environment are exploited in the generation of adaptive behavior. We used an evolutionary algorithm to generate neural networks that exhibit klinotaxis, a common form of chemotaxis in which the direction of locomotion in a chemical gradient closely follows the line of steepest ascent. Sensory inputs and motor outputs of the model networks were constrained to match the inputs and outputs of the Caenorhabditis elegans klinotaxis network. We found that a minimalistic neural network, comprised of an ON-OFF pair of chemosensory neurons and a pair of neck muscle motor neurons, is sufficient to generate realistic klinotaxis behavior. Importantly, emergent properties of model networks reproduced two key experimental observations that they were not designed to fit, suggesting that the model may be operating according to principles similar to those of the biological network. A dynamical systems analysis of 77 evolved networks revealed a novel neural mechanism for spatial orientation behavior. This mechanism provides a testable hypothesis that is likely to accelerate the discovery and analysis of the biological circuitry for chemotaxis in C. elegans.

  8. Neural reuse of action perception circuits for language, concepts and communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2018-01-01

    Neurocognitive and neurolinguistics theories make explicit statements relating specialized cognitive and linguistic processes to specific brain loci. These linking hypotheses are in need of neurobiological justification and explanation. Recent mathematical models of human language mechanisms constrained by fundamental neuroscience principles and established knowledge about comparative neuroanatomy offer explanations for where, when and how language is processed in the human brain. In these models, network structure and connectivity along with action- and perception-induced correlation of neuronal activity co-determine neurocognitive mechanisms. Language learning leads to the formation of action perception circuits (APCs) with specific distributions across cortical areas. Cognitive and linguistic processes such as speech production, comprehension, verbal working memory and prediction are modelled by activity dynamics in these APCs, and combinatorial and communicative-interactive knowledge is organized in the dynamics within, and connections between APCs. The network models and, in particular, the concept of distributionally-specific circuits, can account for some previously not well understood facts about the cortical 'hubs' for semantic processing and the motor system's role in language understanding and speech sound recognition. A review of experimental data evaluates predictions of the APC model and alternative theories, also providing detailed discussion of some seemingly contradictory findings. Throughout, recent disputes about the role of mirror neurons and grounded cognition in language and communication are assessed critically. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...... by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations...

  10. Hybrid Spintronic-CMOS Spiking Neural Network with On-Chip Learning: Devices, Circuits, and Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Banerjee, Aparajita; Roy, Kaushik

    2016-12-01

    Over the past decade, spiking neural networks (SNNs) have emerged as one of the popular architectures to emulate the brain. In SNNs, information is temporally encoded and communication between neurons is accomplished by means of spikes. In such networks, spike-timing-dependent plasticity mechanisms require the online programing of synapses based on the temporal information of spikes transmitted by spiking neurons. In this work, we propose a spintronic synapse with decoupled spike-transmission and programing-current paths. The spintronic synapse consists of a ferromagnet-heavy-metal heterostructure where the programing current through the heavy metal generates spin-orbit torque to modulate the device conductance. Low programing energy and fast programing times demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed device as a nanoelectronic synapse. We perform a simulation study based on an experimentally benchmarked device-simulation framework to demonstrate the interfacing of such spintronic synapses with CMOS neurons and learning circuits operating in the transistor subthreshold region to form a network of spiking neurons that can be utilized for pattern-recognition problems.

  11. Segregated and overlapping neural circuits exist for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Kristina A.; Coombes, Stephen A.; Planetta, Peggy J.; Vaillancourt, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A central topic in sensorimotor neuroscience is the static-dynamic dichotomy that exists throughout the nervous system. Previous work examining motor unit synchronization reports that the activation strategy and timing of motor units differ for static and dynamic tasks. However, it remains unclear whether segregated or overlapping blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity exists in the brain for static and dynamic motor control. This study compared the neural circuits associated with the production of static force to those associated with the production of dynamic force pulses. To that end, healthy young adults (n = 17) completed static and dynamic precision grip force tasks during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both tasks activated core regions within the visuomotor network, including primary and sensory motor cortices, premotor cortices, multiple visual areas, putamen, and cerebellum. Static force was associated with unique activity in a right-lateralized cortical network including inferior parietal lobe, ventral premotor cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, dynamic force was associated with unique activity in left-lateralized and midline cortical regions, including supplementary motor area, superior parietal lobe, fusiform gyrus, and visual area V3. These findings provide the first neuroimaging evidence supporting a lateralized pattern of brain activity for the production of static and dynamic precision grip force. PMID:22109998

  12. The primary visual cortex in the neural circuit for visual orienting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoping, Li

    The primary visual cortex (V1) is traditionally viewed as remote from influencing brain's motor outputs. However, V1 provides the most abundant cortical inputs directly to the sensory layers of superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure to command visual orienting such as shifting gaze and turning heads. I will show physiological, anatomical, and behavioral data suggesting that V1 transforms visual input into a saliency map to guide a class of visual orienting that is reflexive or involuntary. In particular, V1 receives a retinotopic map of visual features, such as orientation, color, and motion direction of local visual inputs; local interactions between V1 neurons perform a local-to-global computation to arrive at a saliency map that highlights conspicuous visual locations by higher V1 responses. The conspicuous location are usually, but not always, where visual input statistics changes. The population V1 outputs to SC, which is also retinotopic, enables SC to locate, by lateral inhibition between SC neurons, the most salient location as the saccadic target. Experimental tests of this hypothesis will be shown. Variations of the neural circuit for visual orienting across animal species, with more or less V1 involvement, will be discussed. Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation.

  13. The Neuropsychiatry of Hyperkinetic Movement Disorders: Insights from Neuroimaging into the Neural Circuit Bases of Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradleigh D. Hayhow

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Movement disorders, particularly those associated with basal ganglia disease, have a high rate of comorbid neuropsychiatric illness.Methods: We consider the pathophysiological basis of the comorbidity between movement disorders and neuropsychiatric illness by 1 reviewing the epidemiology of neuropsychiatric illness in a range of hyperkinetic movement disorders, and 2 correlating findings to evidence from studies that have utilized modern neuroimaging techniques to investigate these disorders. In addition to diseases classically associated with basal ganglia pathology, such as Huntington disease, Wilson disease, the neuroacanthocytoses, and diseases of brain iron accumulation, we include diseases associated with pathology of subcortical white matter tracts, brain stem nuclei, and the cerebellum, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy, dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy, and the spinocerebellar ataxias.Conclusions: Neuropsychiatric symptoms are integral to a thorough phenomenological account of hyperkinetic movement disorders. Drawing on modern theories of cortico-subcortical circuits, we argue that these disorders can be conceptualized as disorders of complex subcortical networks with distinct functional architectures. Damage to any component of these complex information-processing networks can have variable and often profound consequences for the function of more remote neural structures, creating a diverse but nonetheless rational pattern of clinical symptomatology.

  14. Modelling of Boiler Heating Surfaces and Evaporator Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph; Houbak, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic models for simulating boiler performance have been developed. Models for the ue gas side and for the evaporator circuit have been developed for the purpose of determining material temperatures and heat transfer from the ue gas side to the water-/steam side in order to simulate...... the circulation in the evaporator circuit. The models have been developed as Differential-Algebraic-Equation systems (DAE) and MATLAB has been applied for the integration of the models. In general MATLAB has proved to be very stable for these relatively stiff equation systems. Experimental verication is planned...... at a full scale plant equipped with instrumentation to verify heat transfer and circulation in the evaporator circuit....

  15. Bias-dependent hybrid PKI empirical-neural model of microwave FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinković, Zlatica; Pronić-Rančić, Olivera; Marković, Vera

    2011-10-01

    Empirical models of microwave transistors based on an equivalent circuit are valid for only one bias point. Bias-dependent analysis requires repeated extractions of the model parameters for each bias point. In order to make model bias-dependent, a new hybrid empirical-neural model of microwave field-effect transistors is proposed in this article. The model is a combination of an equivalent circuit model including noise developed for one bias point and two prior knowledge input artificial neural networks (PKI ANNs) aimed at introducing bias dependency of scattering (S) and noise parameters, respectively. The prior knowledge of the proposed ANNs involves the values of the S- and noise parameters obtained by the empirical model. The proposed hybrid model is valid in the whole range of bias conditions. Moreover, the proposed model provides better accuracy than the empirical model, which is illustrated by an appropriate modelling example of a pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistor device.

  16. Statistical modeling implicates neuroanatomical circuit mediating stress relief by 'comfort' food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Christiansen, Anne M; Wang, Xia; Song, Seongho; Herman, James P

    2016-07-01

    A history of eating highly palatable foods reduces physiological and emotional responses to stress. For instance, we have previously shown that limited sucrose intake (4 ml of 30 % sucrose twice daily for 14 days) reduces hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis responses to stress. However, the neural mechanisms underlying stress relief by such 'comfort' foods are unclear, and could reveal an endogenous brain pathway for stress mitigation. As such, the present work assessed the expression of several proteins related to neuronal activation and/or plasticity in multiple stress- and reward-regulatory brain regions of rats after limited sucrose (vs. water control) intake. These data were then subjected to a series of statistical analyses, including Bayesian modeling, to identify the most likely neurocircuit mediating stress relief by sucrose. The analyses suggest that sucrose reduces HPA activation by dampening an excitatory basolateral amygdala-medial amygdala circuit, while also potentiating an inhibitory bed nucleus of the stria terminalis principle subdivision-mediated circuit, resulting in reduced HPA activation after stress. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that sucrose limits stress responses via plastic changes to the structure and function of stress-regulatory neural circuits. The work also illustrates that advanced statistical methods are useful approaches to identify potentially novel and important underlying relationships in biological datasets.

  17. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of a Rotary Piezoelectric Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El, Ghouti N.; Helbo, Jan

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced equivalent circuit model of a rotary traveling wave piezoelectric ultrasonic motor "shinsei type USR60" is derived. The modeling is performed on the basis of an empirical approach combined with the electrical network method and some simplification assumptions about...

  18. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of a Rotary Piezoelectric Motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El, Ghouti N.; Helbo, Jan

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, an enhanced equivalent circuit model of a rotary traveling wave piezoelectric ultrasonic motor "shinsei type USR60" is derived. The modeling is performed on the basis of an empirical approach combined with the electrical network method and some simplification assumptions about the ...

  19. Theory and Circuit Model for Lossy Coaxial Transmission Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genoni, T. C.; Anderson, C. N.; Clark, R. E.; Gansz-Torres, J.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, Dale Robert

    2017-04-01

    The theory of signal propagation in lossy coaxial transmission lines is revisited and new approximate analytic formulas for the line impedance and attenuation are derived. The accuracy of these formulas from DC to 100 GHz is demonstrated by comparison to numerical solutions of the exact field equations. Based on this analysis, a new circuit model is described which accurately reproduces the line response over the entire frequency range. Circuit model calculations are in excellent agreement with the numerical and analytic results, and with finite-difference-time-domain simulations which resolve the skindepths of the conducting walls.

  20. A Pruning Neural Network Model in Credit Classification Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajiao Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, credit classification models are widely applied because they can help financial decision-makers to handle credit classification issues. Among them, artificial neural networks (ANNs have been widely accepted as the convincing methods in the credit industry. In this paper, we propose a pruning neural network (PNN and apply it to solve credit classification problem by adopting the well-known Australian and Japanese credit datasets. The model is inspired by synaptic nonlinearity of a dendritic tree in a biological neural model. And it is trained by an error back-propagation algorithm. The model is capable of realizing a neuronal pruning function by removing the superfluous synapses and useless dendrites and forms a tidy dendritic morphology at the end of learning. Furthermore, we utilize logic circuits (LCs to simulate the dendritic structures successfully which makes PNN be implemented on the hardware effectively. The statistical results of our experiments have verified that PNN obtains superior performance in comparison with other classical algorithms in terms of accuracy and computational efficiency.

  1. Optimal Decision Making in Neural Inhibition Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; van der Maas, Han L. J.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2012-01-01

    In their influential "Psychological Review" article, Bogacz, Brown, Moehlis, Holmes, and Cohen (2006) discussed optimal decision making as accomplished by the drift diffusion model (DDM). The authors showed that neural inhibition models, such as the leaky competing accumulator model (LCA) and the feedforward inhibition model (FFI), can mimic the…

  2. Analysis of bilinear noise models in circuits and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willsky, A. S.; Marcus, S. I.

    1976-01-01

    There are a number of applications in which linear noise models are inappropriate. In the paper, the use of bilinear noise models in circuits and devices is considered. Several physical problems are studied in this framework. These include circuits involving varying parameters (such as variable resistance circuits constructed using field-effect transistors), the effect of switching jitter on sampled data system performance and communication systems involving voltage-controlled oscillators and phase-lock loops. In addition, several types of analytical techniques for stochastic bilinear systems are considered. Specifically, the moment equations of Brockett for bilinear systems driven by white noise are discussed, and closed-form expressions for certain bilinear systems (those that evolve an Abelian or solvable Lie groups) driven by white or colored noise are derived. In addition, an approximate statistical technique involving the use of harmonic expansions is described.

  3. A perturbation-based model for rectifier circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin B. Vats

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A perturbation-theoretic analysis of rectifier circuits is presented. The governing differential equation of the half-wave rectifier with capacitor filter is analyzed by expanding the output voltage as a Taylor series with respect to an artificially introduced parameter in the nonlinearity of the diode characteristic as is done in quantum theory. The perturbation parameter introduced in the analysis is independent of the circuit components as compared to the method presented by multiple scales. The various terms appearing in the perturbation series are then modeled in the form of an equivalent circuit. This model is subsequently used in the analysis of full-wave rectifier. Matlab simulation results are included which confirm the validity of the theoretical formulations. Perturbation analysis acts a helpful tool in analyzing time-varying systems and chaotic systems.

  4. Modulatory effects of modafinil on neural circuits regulating emotion and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetti, Roberta; Mattay, Venkata S; Stankevich, Beth; Skjei, Kelsey; Blasi, Giuseppe; Sambataro, Fabio; Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel C; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-09-01

    Modafinil differs from other arousal-enhancing agents in chemical structure, neurochemical profile, and behavioral effects. Most functional neuroimaging studies to date examined the effect of modafinil only on information processing underlying executive cognition, but cognitive enhancers in general have been shown to have pronounced effects on emotional behavior, too. We examined the effect of modafinil on neural circuits underlying affective processing and cognitive functions. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial (100 mg/day for 7 days). They underwent BOLD fMRI while performing an emotion information-processing task that activates the amygdala and two prefrontally dependent cognitive tasks-a working memory (WM) task and a variable attentional control (VAC) task. A clinical assessment that included measurement of blood pressure, heart rate, the Hamilton anxiety scale, and the profile of mood state (POMS) questionnaire was also performed on each test day. BOLD fMRI revealed significantly decreased amygdala reactivity to fearful stimuli on modafinil compared with the placebo condition. During executive cognition tasks, a WM task and a VAC task, modafinil reduced BOLD signal in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate. Although not statistically significant, there were trends for reduced anxiety, for decreased fatigue-inertia and increased vigor-activity, as well as decreased anger-hostility on modafinil. Modafinil in low doses has a unique physiologic profile compared with stimulant drugs: it enhances the efficiency of prefrontal cortical cognitive information processing, while dampening reactivity to threatening stimuli in the amygdala, a brain region implicated in anxiety.

  5. Modulatory Effects of Modafinil on Neural Circuits Regulating Emotion and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasetti, Roberta; Mattay, Venkata S; Stankevich, Beth; Skjei, Kelsey; Blasi, Giuseppe; Sambataro, Fabio; Arrillaga-Romany, Isabel C; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Apud, José A; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Modafinil differs from other arousal-enhancing agents in chemical structure, neurochemical profile, and behavioral effects. Most functional neuroimaging studies to date examined the effect of modafinil only on information processing underlying executive cognition, but cognitive enhancers in general have been shown to have pronounced effects on emotional behavior, too. We examined the effect of modafinil on neural circuits underlying affective processing and cognitive functions. Healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blinded placebo-controlled trial (100 mg/day for 7 days). They underwent BOLD fMRI while performing an emotion information-processing task that activates the amygdala and two prefrontally dependent cognitive tasks—a working memory (WM) task and a variable attentional control (VAC) task. A clinical assessment that included measurement of blood pressure, heart rate, the Hamilton anxiety scale, and the profile of mood state (POMS) questionnaire was also performed on each test day. BOLD fMRI revealed significantly decreased amygdala reactivity to fearful stimuli on modafinil compared with the placebo condition. During executive cognition tasks, a WM task and a VAC task, modafinil reduced BOLD signal in the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate. Although not statistically significant, there were trends for reduced anxiety, for decreased fatigue-inertia and increased vigor-activity, as well as decreased anger-hostility on modafinil. Modafinil in low doses has a unique physiologic profile compared with stimulant drugs: it enhances the efficiency of prefrontal cortical cognitive information processing, while dampening reactivity to threatening stimuli in the amygdala, a brain region implicated in anxiety. PMID:20555311

  6. Magnetic Circuit Model combined with Play Model Obtained from Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ichinokura, O.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel magnetic circuit model considering magnetic hysteresis behavior, in which dc hysteresis is expressed by a play model while classical and anomalous eddy current losses are calculated by magnetic circuit elements. We describe an efficient method for obtaining the play model from the minimum measured B-H loops. It is proved that the proposed magnetic circuit model can calculate hysteresis loops under Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) excitation with high accuracy in a short time.

  7. Modelling and analysis of local field potentials for studying the function of cortical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einevoll, Gaute T; Kayser, Christoph; Logothetis, Nikos K; Panzeri, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    The past decade has witnessed a renewed interest in cortical local field potentials (LFPs)--that is, extracellularly recorded potentials with frequencies of up to ~500 Hz. This is due to both the advent of multielectrodes, which has enabled recording of LFPs at tens to hundreds of sites simultaneously, and the insight that LFPs offer a unique window into key integrative synaptic processes in cortical populations. However, owing to its numerous potential neural sources, the LFP is more difficult to interpret than are spikes. Careful mathematical modelling and analysis are needed to take full advantage of the opportunities that this signal offers in understanding signal processing in cortical circuits and, ultimately, the neural basis of perception and cognition.

  8. Neural networks as models of psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakerlund, L; Hemmingsen, R

    1998-04-01

    Neural network modeling is situated between neurobiology, cognitive science, and neuropsychology. The structural and functional resemblance with biological computation has made artificial neural networks (ANN) useful for exploring the relationship between neurobiology and computational performance, i.e., cognition and behavior. This review provides an introduction to the theory of ANN and how they have linked theories from neurobiology and psychopathology in schizophrenia, affective disorders, and dementia.

  9. Neural network approaches for noisy language modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ouazzane, Karim; Kazemian, Hassan B; Afzal, Muhammad Sajid

    2013-11-01

    Text entry from people is not only grammatical and distinct, but also noisy. For example, a user's typing stream contains all the information about the user's interaction with computer using a QWERTY keyboard, which may include the user's typing mistakes as well as specific vocabulary, typing habit, and typing performance. In particular, these features are obvious in disabled users' typing streams. This paper proposes a new concept called noisy language modeling by further developing information theory and applies neural networks to one of its specific application-typing stream. This paper experimentally uses a neural network approach to analyze the disabled users' typing streams both in general and specific ways to identify their typing behaviors and subsequently, to make typing predictions and typing corrections. In this paper, a focused time-delay neural network (FTDNN) language model, a time gap model, a prediction model based on time gap, and a probabilistic neural network model (PNN) are developed. A 38% first hitting rate (HR) and a 53% first three HR in symbol prediction are obtained based on the analysis of a user's typing history through the FTDNN language modeling, while the modeling results using the time gap prediction model and the PNN model demonstrate that the correction rates lie predominantly in between 65% and 90% with the current testing samples, and 70% of all test scores above basic correction rates, respectively. The modeling process demonstrates that a neural network is a suitable and robust language modeling tool to analyze the noisy language stream. The research also paves the way for practical application development in areas such as informational analysis, text prediction, and error correction by providing a theoretical basis of neural network approaches for noisy language modeling.

  10. Modelling a river catchment using an electrical circuit analogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. G. Collier

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrical circuit analogue of a river catchment is described from which is derived an hydrological model of river flow called the River Electrical Water Analogue Research and Development (REWARD model. The model is based upon an analytic solution to the equation governing the flow of electricity in an inductance-capacitance-resistance (LCR circuit. An interpretation of L, C and R in terms of catchment parameters and physical processes is proposed, and tested for the River Irwell catchment in northwest England. Hydrograph characteristics evaluated using the model are compared with observed hydrographs, confirming that the modelling approach does provide a reliable framework within which to investigate the impact of variations in model input data.

  11. Real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system based on a spiking neural network model of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xiao, Na; Zhai, Xiaolong; Kwan Chan, Pak; Tin, Chung

    2018-02-01

    Damage to the brain, as a result of various medical conditions, impacts the everyday life of patients and there is still no complete cure to neurological disorders. Neuroprostheses that can functionally replace the damaged neural circuit have recently emerged as a possible solution to these problems. Here we describe the development of a real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system to substitute neural function in cerebellar circuitry for learning delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC). The system was empowered by a biologically realistic spiking neural network (SNN) model of the cerebellar neural circuit, which considers the neuronal population and anatomical connectivity of the network. The model simulated synaptic plasticity critical for learning DEC. This SNN model was carefully implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform for real-time simulation. This hardware system was interfaced in in vivo experiments with anesthetized rats and it used neural spikes recorded online from the animal to learn and trigger conditioned eyeblink in the animal during training. This rat-FPGA hybrid system was able to process neuronal spikes in real-time with an embedded cerebellum model of ~10 000 neurons and reproduce learning of DEC with different inter-stimulus intervals. Our results validated that the system performance is physiologically relevant at both the neural (firing pattern) and behavioral (eyeblink pattern) levels. This integrated system provides the sufficient computation power for mimicking the cerebellar circuit in real-time. The system interacts with the biological system naturally at the spike level and can be generalized for including other neural components (neuron types and plasticity) and neural functions for potential neuroprosthetic applications.

  12. Real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system based on a spiking neural network model of motor learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xiao, Na; Zhai, Xiaolong; Chan, Pak Kwan; Tin, Chung

    2018-02-01

    Objective. Damage to the brain, as a result of various medical conditions, impacts the everyday life of patients and there is still no complete cure to neurological disorders. Neuroprostheses that can functionally replace the damaged neural circuit have recently emerged as a possible solution to these problems. Here we describe the development of a real-time cerebellar neuroprosthetic system to substitute neural function in cerebellar circuitry for learning delay eyeblink conditioning (DEC). Approach. The system was empowered by a biologically realistic spiking neural network (SNN) model of the cerebellar neural circuit, which considers the neuronal population and anatomical connectivity of the network. The model simulated synaptic plasticity critical for learning DEC. This SNN model was carefully implemented on a field programmable gate array (FPGA) platform for real-time simulation. This hardware system was interfaced in in vivo experiments with anesthetized rats and it used neural spikes recorded online from the animal to learn and trigger conditioned eyeblink in the animal during training. Main results. This rat-FPGA hybrid system was able to process neuronal spikes in real-time with an embedded cerebellum model of ~10 000 neurons and reproduce learning of DEC with different inter-stimulus intervals. Our results validated that the system performance is physiologically relevant at both the neural (firing pattern) and behavioral (eyeblink pattern) levels. Significance. This integrated system provides the sufficient computation power for mimicking the cerebellar circuit in real-time. The system interacts with the biological system naturally at the spike level and can be generalized for including other neural components (neuron types and plasticity) and neural functions for potential neuroprosthetic applications.

  13. Modelling of optoelectronic circuits based on resonant tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rei, João. F. M.; Foot, James A.; Rodrigues, Gil C.; Figueiredo, José M. L.

    2017-08-01

    Resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) are the fastest pure electronic semiconductor devices at room temperature. When integrated with optoelectronic devices they can give rise to new devices with novel functionalities due to their highly nonlinear properties and electrical gain, with potential applications in future ultra-wide-band communication systems (see e.g. EU H2020 iBROW Project). The recent coverage on these devices led to the need to have appropriated simulation tools. In this work, we present RTD based optoelectronic circuits simulation packages to provide circuit signal level analysis such as transient and frequency responses. We will present and discuss the models, and evaluate the simulation packages.

  14. Using Hydraulic Network Models to Teach Electric Circuit Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Irvin; EERC (Engineering Education Research Center) Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Unlike other engineering disciplines, teaching electric circuit principles is difficult for some students because there isn't a visual context to rely on. So concepts such as electric potential, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance have little meaning outside of their definition and the derived mathematical relationships. As a work in progress, we are developing a tool to support teaching, learning, and research of electric circuits. The tool will allow the user to design, build, and operate electric circuits in the form of hydraulic networks. We believe that this system will promote greater learning of electric circuit principles by visually realizing the conceptual and abstract concepts of electric circuits. Furthermore, as a teaching and learning tool, the hydraulic network system can be used to teach and improve comprehension of electrical principles in K through 12 classrooms and in cross-disciplinary environments such as Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Aeronautical Engineering. As a research tool, the hydraulic network can model and simulate micro/nano bio-electro-chemical systems. Organization within the Swanson School of Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh.

  15. Modeling of multilayer piezoelectric transducers for echegraphic applications equivalent circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, A.; Riera, E.; San Emeterio, J.L.; Sanz, P.T.

    1988-09-01

    In this paper, the main equivalent circuits of pulse-echo, single element, multilayer piezoelectric transducers, are analyzed. The analogy of matching layers with lossless transmission lines is described. Finally, using the KLM model, the effects of backing and matching layers on the bandwidth and impulse response is analyzed.

  16. Advanced Breakdown Modeling for Solid-State Circuit Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milovanovi?, V.

    2010-01-01

    Modeling of the effects occurring outside the usual region of application of semiconductor devices is becoming more important with increasing demands set upon electronic systems for simultaneous speed and output power. Analog integrated circuit designers are forced to enter regimes of transistor

  17. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Pedernales, J.S.; Di Carlo, L.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into

  18. An accurate SPICE-compatible circuit model for power FLYMOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galadi, A.; Morancho, F.; Benhida, K.; Hassani, M. M.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, a new SPICE-compatible circuit model for low voltage, low on-resistance power FLYMOSFETs is presented for the first time. In this new structure, the improvement of the on-resistance has been obtained by inserting floating islands in the lowly doped layer. Our modelling is based on device physics, analytical study and on experimental characterization. The inter-electrode capacitances are modelled accurately as nonlinear functions, and good agreement between simulation and measurements is found.

  19. Novel Parametric Circuit Modeling for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of their simplicity and dynamic response, current pulse series are often used to extract parameters for equivalent electrical circuit modeling of Li-ion batteries. These models are then applied for performance simulation, state estimation, and thermal analysis in electric vehicles. However, these methods have two problems: The assumption of linear dependence of the matrix columns and negative parameters estimated from discrete-time equations and least-squares methods. In this paper, continuous-time equations are exploited to construct a linearly independent data matrix and parameterize the circuit model by the combination of non-negative least squares and genetic algorithm, which constrains the model parameters to be positive. Trigonometric functions are then developed to fit the parameter curves. The developed model parameterization methodology was applied and assessed by a standard driving cycle.

  20. PREDIKSI FOREX MENGGUNAKAN MODEL NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hadapiningradja Kusumodestoni

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Prediksi adalah salah satu teknik yang paling penting dalam menjalankan bisnis forex. Keputusan dalam memprediksi adalah sangatlah penting, karena dengan prediksi dapat membantu mengetahui nilai forex di waktu tertentu kedepan sehingga dapat mengurangi resiko kerugian. Tujuan dari penelitian ini dimaksudkan memprediksi bisnis fores menggunakan model neural network dengan data time series per 1 menit untuk mengetahui nilai akurasi prediksi sehingga dapat mengurangi resiko dalam menjalankan bisnis forex. Metode penelitian pada penelitian ini meliputi metode pengumpulan data kemudian dilanjutkan ke metode training, learning, testing menggunakan neural network. Setelah di evaluasi hasil penelitian ini menunjukan bahwa penerapan algoritma Neural Network mampu untuk memprediksi forex dengan tingkat akurasi prediksi 0.431 +/- 0.096 sehingga dengan prediksi ini dapat membantu mengurangi resiko dalam menjalankan bisnis forex. Kata kunci: prediksi, forex, neural network.

  1. Modeling Switched Circuit Network Systems Using PLANITU

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    seen from ITU-D (from [10]) .........33 Figure 5.1. Funcional block diagram showing FcMetro data processing and results generated (from [1...seen from Figure 2.1 input variables consist of a general traffic forecast, traffic patterns, technical constraints, and cost models. 4 Figure 2.1...scenario • Design, dimensioning, location and costing • Optimization • Sensitivity analysis to uncertain variables • Plan selection and

  2. Computational models of the neural control of breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Rubin, Jonathan E; Rybak, Ilya A; Smith, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-01

    The ongoing process of breathing underlies the gas exchange essential for mammalian life. Each respiratory cycle ensues from the activity of rhythmic neural circuits in the brainstem, shaped by various modulatory signals, including mechanoreceptor feedback sensitive to lung inflation and chemoreceptor feedback dependent on gas composition in blood and tissues. This paper reviews a variety of computational models designed to reproduce experimental findings related to the neural control of breathing and generate predictions for future experimental testing. The review starts from the description of the core respiratory network in the brainstem, representing the central pattern generator (CPG) responsible for producing rhythmic respiratory activity, and progresses to encompass additional complexities needed to simulate different metabolic challenges, closed-loop feedback control including the lungs, and interactions between the respiratory and autonomic nervous systems. The integrated models considered in this review share a common framework including a distributed CPG core network responsible for generating the baseline three-phase pattern of rhythmic neural activity underlying normal breathing. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2017, 9:e1371. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1371 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Empirical generalization assessment of neural network models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Hansen, Lars Kai

    1995-01-01

    This paper addresses the assessment of generalization performance of neural network models by use of empirical techniques. We suggest to use the cross-validation scheme combined with a resampling technique to obtain an estimate of the generalization performance distribution of a specific model...

  4. A quantum-implementable neural network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jialin; Wang, Lingli; Charbon, Edoardo

    2017-10-01

    A quantum-implementable neural network, namely quantum probability neural network (QPNN) model, is proposed in this paper. QPNN can use quantum parallelism to trace all possible network states to improve the result. Due to its unique quantum nature, this model is robust to several quantum noises under certain conditions, which can be efficiently implemented by the qubus quantum computer. Another advantage is that QPNN can be used as memory to retrieve the most relevant data and even to generate new data. The MATLAB experimental results of Iris data classification and MNIST handwriting recognition show that much less neuron resources are required in QPNN to obtain a good result than the classical feedforward neural network. The proposed QPNN model indicates that quantum effects are useful for real-life classification tasks.

  5. The Use of Modular, Electronic Neuron Simulators for Neural Circuit Construction Produces Learning Gains in an Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petto, Andrew; Fredin, Zachary; Burdo, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    During the spring of 2016 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, we implemented a novel educational technology designed to teach undergraduates about the nervous system while allowing them to physically construct their own neural circuits. Modular, electronic neuron simulators called NeuroBytes were used by the students in BIOSCI202 Anatomy and Physiology I, a four-credit course consisting of three hours per week each of lecture and laboratory time. 162 students participated in the laboratory sessions that covered reflexes; 83 in the experimental sections used the NeuroBytes to build a model of the patellar tendon reflex, while 79 in the control sections participated in alternate reflex curricula. To address the question of whether or not the NeuroBytes-based patellar tendon reflex simulation brought about learning gains, the control and experimental group students underwent pre/post testing before and after their laboratory sections. We found that for several of the neuroscience and physiology concepts assessed on the test, the experimental group students had significantly greater declarative learning gains between the pre- and post-test as compared to the control group students. While there are numerous virtual neuroscience education tools available to undergraduate educators, there are relatively few designed to engage students in the basics of electrophysiology and neural circuitry using physical manipulatives, and none to our knowledge that allow them to build circuits from functioning hand-held "neurons."

  6. Modeling brain resonance phenomena using a neural mass model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Spiegler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Stimulation with rhythmic light flicker (photic driving plays an important role in the diagnosis of schizophrenia, mood disorder, migraine, and epilepsy. In particular, the adjustment of spontaneous brain rhythms to the stimulus frequency (entrainment is used to assess the functional flexibility of the brain. We aim to gain deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying this technique and to predict the effects of stimulus frequency and intensity. For this purpose, a modified Jansen and Rit neural mass model (NMM of a cortical circuit is used. This mean field model has been designed to strike a balance between mathematical simplicity and biological plausibility. We reproduced the entrainment phenomenon observed in EEG during a photic driving experiment. More generally, we demonstrate that such a single area model can already yield very complex dynamics, including chaos, for biologically plausible parameter ranges. We chart the entire parameter space by means of characteristic Lyapunov spectra and Kaplan-Yorke dimension as well as time series and power spectra. Rhythmic and chaotic brain states were found virtually next to each other, such that small parameter changes can give rise to switching from one to another. Strikingly, this characteristic pattern of unpredictability generated by the model was matched to the experimental data with reasonable accuracy. These findings confirm that the NMM is a useful model of brain dynamics during photic driving. In this context, it can be used to study the mechanisms of, for example, perception and epileptic seizure generation. In particular, it enabled us to make predictions regarding the stimulus amplitude in further experiments for improving the entrainment effect.

  7. Development of circuit model for arcing on solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Bhoomi K.; Deshpande, S. P.; Mukherjee, S.; Gupta, S. B.; Ranjan, M.; Rane, R.; Vaghela, N.; Acharya, V.; Sudhakar, M.; Sankaran, M.; Suresh, E. P.

    2010-02-01

    The increased requirements of payload capacity of the satellites have resulted in much higher power requirements of the satellites. In order to minimize the energy loss during power transmission due to cable loss, use of high voltage solar panels becomes necessary. When a satellite encounters space plasma it floats negatively with respect to the surrounding space plasma environment. At high voltage, charging and discharging on solar panels causes the power system breakdown. Once a solar panel surface is charged and potential difference between surface insulator and conductor exceeds certain value, electrostatic discharge (ESD) may occur. This ESD may trigger a secondary arc that can destroy the solar panel circuit. ESD is also called as primary or minor arc and secondary is called major arc. The energy of minor arc is supplied by the charge stored in the coverglass of solar array and is a pulse of typically several 100 ns to several 100 μs duration. The damage caused by minor arc is less compared to major arcs, but it is observed that the minor arc is cause of major arc. Therefore it is important to develop an understanding of minor arc and mitigation techniques. In this paper we present a linear circuit analysis for minor arcs on solar panels. To study arcing event, a ground experimental facility to simulate space plasma environment has been developed at Facilitation Centre for Industrial Plasma Technologies (Institute for Plasma Research) in collaboration with Indian Space Research Organization's ISRO Satellite Technology Centre (ISAC). A linear circuit model has been developed to explain the experimental results by representing the coverglass, solar cell interconnect and wiring by an LCR circuit and the primary arc by an equivalent LR circuit. The aim of the circuit analysis is to predict the arc current which flows through the arc plasma. It is established from the model that the current depends on various parameters like potential difference between insulator

  8. A Voltage Mode Memristor Bridge Synaptic Circuit with Memristor Emulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Chua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A memristor bridge neural circuit which is able to perform signed synaptic weighting was proposed in our previous study, where the synaptic operation was verified via software simulation of the mathematical model of the HP memristor. This study is an extension of the previous work advancing toward the circuit implementation where the architecture of the memristor bridge synapse is built with memristor emulator circuits. In addition, a simple neural network which performs both synaptic weighting and summation is built by combining memristor emulators-based synapses and differential amplifier circuits. The feasibility of the memristor bridge neural circuit is verified via SPICE simulations.

  9. Weather forecasting based on hybrid neural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Tanzila; Rehman, Amjad; AlGhamdi, Jarallah S.

    2017-02-01

    Making deductions and expectations about climate has been a challenge all through mankind's history. Challenges with exact meteorological directions assist to foresee and handle problems well in time. Different strategies have been investigated using various machine learning techniques in reported forecasting systems. Current research investigates climate as a major challenge for machine information mining and deduction. Accordingly, this paper presents a hybrid neural model (MLP and RBF) to enhance the accuracy of weather forecasting. Proposed hybrid model ensure precise forecasting due to the specialty of climate anticipating frameworks. The study concentrates on the data representing Saudi Arabia weather forecasting. The main input features employed to train individual and hybrid neural networks that include average dew point, minimum temperature, maximum temperature, mean temperature, average relative moistness, precipitation, normal wind speed, high wind speed and average cloudiness. The output layer composed of two neurons to represent rainy and dry weathers. Moreover, trial and error approach is adopted to select an appropriate number of inputs to the hybrid neural network. Correlation coefficient, RMSE and scatter index are the standard yard sticks adopted for forecast accuracy measurement. On individual standing MLP forecasting results are better than RBF, however, the proposed simplified hybrid neural model comes out with better forecasting accuracy as compared to both individual networks. Additionally, results are better than reported in the state of art, using a simple neural structure that reduces training time and complexity.

  10. Weather forecasting based on hybrid neural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Tanzila; Rehman, Amjad; AlGhamdi, Jarallah S.

    2017-11-01

    Making deductions and expectations about climate has been a challenge all through mankind's history. Challenges with exact meteorological directions assist to foresee and handle problems well in time. Different strategies have been investigated using various machine learning techniques in reported forecasting systems. Current research investigates climate as a major challenge for machine information mining and deduction. Accordingly, this paper presents a hybrid neural model (MLP and RBF) to enhance the accuracy of weather forecasting. Proposed hybrid model ensure precise forecasting due to the specialty of climate anticipating frameworks. The study concentrates on the data representing Saudi Arabia weather forecasting. The main input features employed to train individual and hybrid neural networks that include average dew point, minimum temperature, maximum temperature, mean temperature, average relative moistness, precipitation, normal wind speed, high wind speed and average cloudiness. The output layer composed of two neurons to represent rainy and dry weathers. Moreover, trial and error approach is adopted to select an appropriate number of inputs to the hybrid neural network. Correlation coefficient, RMSE and scatter index are the standard yard sticks adopted for forecast accuracy measurement. On individual standing MLP forecasting results are better than RBF, however, the proposed simplified hybrid neural model comes out with better forecasting accuracy as compared to both individual networks. Additionally, results are better than reported in the state of art, using a simple neural structure that reduces training time and complexity.

  11. An Efficient Neural Network Based Modeling Method for Automotive EMC Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Florian; Weigel, Robert

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a newly developed methodology for VHDL-AMS model integration into SPICE-based EMC simulations. To this end the VHDL-AMS model, which is available in a compiled version only, is characterized under typical loading conditions, and afterwards a neural network based technique is applied to convert characteristic voltage and current data into an equivalent circuit in SPICE syntax. After the explanation of the whole method and the presentation of a newly developed switched state space dynamic neural network model, the entire analysis process is demonstrated using a typical application from automotive industry.

  12. Modification of tenascin-R expression following unilateral labyrinthectomy in rats indicates its possible role in neural plasticity of the vestibular neural circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaal, Botond; Jóhannesson, Einar Örn; Dattani, Amit; Magyar, Agnes; Wéber, Ildikó; Matesz, Clara

    2015-09-01

    We have previously found that unilateral labyrinthectomy is accompanied by modification of hyaluronan and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan staining in the lateral vestibular nucleus of rats and the time course of subsequent reorganization of extracellular matrix assembly correlates to the restoration of impaired vestibular function. The tenascin-R has repelling effect on pathfinding during axonal growth/regrowth, and thus inhibits neural circuit repair. By using immunohistochemical method, we studied the modification of tenascin-R expression in the superior, medial, lateral, and descending vestibular nuclei of the rat following unilateral labyrinthectomy. On postoperative day 1, tenascin-R reaction in the perineuronal nets disappeared on the side of labyrinthectomy in the superior, lateral, medial, and rostral part of the descending vestibular nuclei. On survival day 3, the staining intensity of tenascin-R reaction in perineuronal nets recovered on the operated side of the medial vestibular nucleus, whereas it was restored by the time of postoperative day 7 in the superior, lateral and rostral part of the descending vestibular nuclei. The staining intensity of tenascin-R reaction remained unchanged in the caudal part of the descending vestibular nucleus bilaterally. Regional differences in the modification of tenascin-R expression presented here may be associated with different roles of individual vestibular nuclei in the compensatory processes. The decreased expression of the tenascin-R may suggest the extracellular facilitation of plastic modifications in the vestibular neural circuit after lesion of the labyrinthine receptors.

  13. Altered neural connectivity in excitatory and inhibitory cortical circuits in autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basilis eZikopoulos

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Converging evidence from diverse studies suggests that atypical brain connectivity in autism affects in distinct ways short- and long-range cortical pathways, disrupting neural communication and the balance of excitation and inhibition. This hypothesis is based mostly on functional non-invasive studies that show atypical synchronization and connectivity patterns between cortical areas in children and adults with autism. Indirect methods to study the course and integrity of major brain pathways at low resolution show changes in fractional anisotropy or diffusivity of the white matter in autism. Findings in post-mortem brains of adults with autism provide evidence of changes in the fine structure of axons below prefrontal cortices, which communicate over short- or long-range pathways with other cortices and subcortical structures. Here we focus on evidence of cellular and axon features that likely underlie the changes in short- and long-range communication in autism. We review recent findings of changes in the shape, thickness, and volume of brain areas, cytoarchitecture, neuronal morphology, cellular elements, and structural and neurochemical features of individual axons in the white matter, where pathology is evident even in gross images. We relate cellular and molecular features to imaging and genetic studies that highlight a variety of polymorphisms and epigenetic factors that primarily affect neurite growth and synapse formation and function in autism. We report preliminary findings of changes in autism in the ratio of distinct types of inhibitory neurons in prefrontal cortex, known to shape network dynamics and the balance of excitation and inhibition. Finally we present a model that synthesizes diverse findings by relating them to developmental events, with a goal to identify common processes that perturb development in autism and affect neural communication, reflected in altered patterns of attention, social interactions, and language.

  14. Arbitrary modeling of TSVs for 3D integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Salah, Khaled; El-Rouby, Alaa

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a wide-band and technology independent, SPICE-compatible RLC model for through-silicon vias (TSVs) in 3D integrated circuits. This model accounts for a variety of effects, including skin effect, depletion capacitance and nearby contact effects. Readers will benefit from in-depth coverage of concepts and technology such as 3D integration, Macro modeling, dimensional analysis and compact modeling, as well as closed form equations for the through silicon via parasitics. Concepts covered are demonstrated by using TSVs in applications such as a spiral inductor?and inductive-based

  15. Computational modeling of stuttering caused by impairments in a basal ganglia thalamo-cortical circuit involved in syllable selection and initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civier, Oren; Bullock, Daniel; Max, Ludo; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    A typical white-matter integrity and elevated dopamine levels have been reported for individuals who stutter. We investigated how such abnormalities may lead to speech dysfluencies due to their effects on a syllable-sequencing circuit that consists of basal ganglia (BG), thalamus, and left ventral premotor cortex (vPMC). “Neurally impaired” versions of the neurocomputational speech production model GODIVA were utilized to test two hypotheses: (1) that white-matter abnormalities disturb the circuit via corticostriatal projections carrying copies of executed motor commands, and (2) that dopaminergic abnormalities disturb the circuit via the striatum. Simulation results support both hypotheses: in both scenarios, the neural abnormalities delay readout of the next syllable’s motor program, leading to dysfluency. The results also account for brain imaging findings during dysfluent speech. It is concluded that each of the two abnormality types can cause stuttering moments, probably by affecting the same BG-thalamus-vPMC circuit. PMID:23872286

  16. A corticothalamic circuit model for sound identification in complex scenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo H Otazu

    Full Text Available The identification of the sound sources present in the environment is essential for the survival of many animals. However, these sounds are not presented in isolation, as natural scenes consist of a superposition of sounds originating from multiple sources. The identification of a source under these circumstances is a complex computational problem that is readily solved by most animals. We present a model of the thalamocortical circuit that performs level-invariant recognition of auditory objects in complex auditory scenes. The circuit identifies the objects present from a large dictionary of possible elements and operates reliably for real sound signals with multiple concurrently active sources. The key model assumption is that the activities of some cortical neurons encode the difference between the observed signal and an internal estimate. Reanalysis of awake auditory cortex recordings revealed neurons with patterns of activity corresponding to such an error signal.

  17. Mathematical Modelling and Simulation of Electrical Circuits and Semiconductor Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Merten, K; Bulirsch, R

    1990-01-01

    Numerical simulation and modelling of electric circuits and semiconductor devices are of primal interest in today's high technology industries. At the Oberwolfach Conference more than forty scientists from around the world, in­ cluding applied mathematicians and electrical engineers from industry and universities, presented new results in this area of growing importance. The contributions to this conference are presented in these proceedings. They include contributions on special topics of current interest in circuit and device simulation, as well as contributions that present an overview of the field. In the semiconductor area special lectures were given on mixed finite element methods and iterative procedures for the solution of large linear systems. For three dimensional models new discretization procedures including software packages were presented. Con­ nections between semiconductor equations and the Boltzmann equation were shown as well as relations to the quantum transport equation. Other issues dis...

  18. Model Comparison Exercise Circuit Training Game and Circuit Ladder Drills to Improve Agility and Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susilaturochman Hendrawan Koestanto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare: (1 the effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill for the agility; (2 the effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill on speed; (3 the difference effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill for the speed (4 the difference effect of circuit training game and circuit ladder drill on agility. The type of this research was quantitative with quasi-experimental methods. The design of this research was Factorial Design, with analysing data using ANOVA. The process of data collection was done by using 30 meters sprint speed test and shuttle run test during the pretest and posttest. Furthermore, the data was analyzed by using SPSS 22.0 series. Result: The circuit training game exercise program and circuit ladder drill were significant to increase agility and speed (sig 0.000 < α = 0.005 Group I, II, III had significant differences (sig 0.000 < α = 0.005. The mean of increase in speed of group I = 0.20 seconds, group II = 0.31 seconds, and group III = 0.11 seconds. The average increase agility to group I = 0.34 seconds group II = 0.60 seconds, group III = 0.13 seconds. Based on the analysis above, it could be concluded that there was an increase in the speed and agility of each group after being given a training.

  19. Mathematical model of an integrated circuit cooling through cylindrical rods

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán-Prieto, Luis Antonio; Beltrán-Prieto, Juan Carlos; Komínková Oplatková, Zuzana

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges in integrated circuits development is to propose alternatives to handle the extreme heat generated by high frequency of electrons moving in a reduced space that cause overheating and reduce the lifespan of the device. The use of cooling fins offers an alternative to enhance the heat transfer using combined a conduction-convection systems. Mathematical model of such process is important for parametric design and also to gain information about temperature distribution...

  20. Artificial neural network cardiopulmonary modeling and diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Keller, Paul E.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of diagnosing a cardiopulmonary condition in an individual by comparing data from a progressive multi-stage test for the individual to a non-linear multi-variate model, preferably a recurrent artificial neural network having sensor fusion. The present invention relies on a cardiovascular model developed from physiological measurements of an individual. Any differences between the modeled parameters and the parameters of an individual at a given time are used for diagnosis.

  1. Neural modeling of prefrontal executive function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levine, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Brain executive function is based in a distributed system whereby prefrontal cortex is interconnected with other cortical. and subcortical loci. Executive function is divided roughly into three interacting parts: affective guidance of responses; linkage among working memory representations; and forming complex behavioral schemata. Neural network models of each of these parts are reviewed and fit into a preliminary theoretical framework.

  2. Remediation of Childhood Math Anxiety and Associated Neural Circuits through Cognitive Tutoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuculano, Teresa; Chen, Lang

    2015-01-01

    Math anxiety is a negative emotional reaction that is characterized by feelings of stress and anxiety in situations involving mathematical problem solving. High math-anxious individuals tend to avoid situations involving mathematics and are less likely to pursue science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers than those with low math anxiety. Math anxiety during childhood, in particular, has adverse long-term consequences for academic and professional success. Identifying cognitive interventions and brain mechanisms by which math anxiety can be ameliorated in children is therefore critical. Here we investigate whether an intensive 8 week one-to-one cognitive tutoring program designed to improve mathematical skills reduces childhood math anxiety, and we identify the neurobiological mechanisms by which math anxiety can be reduced in affected children. Forty-six children in grade 3, a critical early-onset period for math anxiety, participated in the cognitive tutoring program. High math-anxious children showed a significant reduction in math anxiety after tutoring. Remarkably, tutoring remediated aberrant functional responses and connectivity in emotion-related circuits anchored in the basolateral amygdala. Crucially, children with greater tutoring-induced decreases in amygdala reactivity had larger reductions in math anxiety. Our study demonstrates that sustained exposure to mathematical stimuli can reduce math anxiety and highlights the key role of the amygdala in this process. Our findings are consistent with models of exposure-based therapy for anxiety disorders and have the potential to inform the early treatment of a disability that, if left untreated in childhood, can lead to significant lifelong educational and socioeconomic consequences in affected individuals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Math anxiety during early childhood has adverse long-term consequences for academic and professional success. It is therefore important to identify ways to alleviate

  3. Remediation of Childhood Math Anxiety and Associated Neural Circuits through Cognitive Tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Iuculano, Teresa; Chen, Lang; Menon, Vinod

    2015-09-09

    Math anxiety is a negative emotional reaction that is characterized by feelings of stress and anxiety in situations involving mathematical problem solving. High math-anxious individuals tend to avoid situations involving mathematics and are less likely to pursue science, technology, engineering, and math-related careers than those with low math anxiety. Math anxiety during childhood, in particular, has adverse long-term consequences for academic and professional success. Identifying cognitive interventions and brain mechanisms by which math anxiety can be ameliorated in children is therefore critical. Here we investigate whether an intensive 8 week one-to-one cognitive tutoring program designed to improve mathematical skills reduces childhood math anxiety, and we identify the neurobiological mechanisms by which math anxiety can be reduced in affected children. Forty-six children in grade 3, a critical early-onset period for math anxiety, participated in the cognitive tutoring program. High math-anxious children showed a significant reduction in math anxiety after tutoring. Remarkably, tutoring remediated aberrant functional responses and connectivity in emotion-related circuits anchored in the basolateral amygdala. Crucially, children with greater tutoring-induced decreases in amygdala reactivity had larger reductions in math anxiety. Our study demonstrates that sustained exposure to mathematical stimuli can reduce math anxiety and highlights the key role of the amygdala in this process. Our findings are consistent with models of exposure-based therapy for anxiety disorders and have the potential to inform the early treatment of a disability that, if left untreated in childhood, can lead to significant lifelong educational and socioeconomic consequences in affected individuals. Significance statement: Math anxiety during early childhood has adverse long-term consequences for academic and professional success. It is therefore important to identify ways to alleviate

  4. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-20

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the repetitive behaviors of the ASD mouse models and variations found in their neural mechanisms including molecular and electrophysiological features. We also propose potential neuronal mechanisms underlying these repetitive behaviors, focusing on the role of the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits and brain regions associated with both social and repetitive behaviors. Further understanding of molecular and circuitry mechanisms of the repetitive behaviors associated with ASD is necessary to aid the development of effective treatments for these disorders.

  5. Electronic circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dachuan; Yuvarajan, S.

    The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is being investigated as an alternate power source for various applications like transportation and emergency power supplies. The paper presents a novel circuit model for a PEM fuel cell that can be used to design and analyze fuel cell power systems. The PSPICE-based model uses bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and LC elements available in the PSPICE library with some modification. The model includes the phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The static and dynamic characteristics obtained through simulation are compared with experimental results obtained on a commercial fuel cell module.

  6. Modeling of Nonlinear Marine Cooling Systems with Closed Circuit Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael; Stoustrup, Jakob; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing a mathematical model for a specific type of marine cooling system. The system in question is used for cooling the main engine and main engine auxiliary components, such as diesel generators, turbo chargers and main engine air coolers for certain classes...... of container ships. The purpose of the model is to describe the important dynamics of the system, such as nonlinearities, transport delays and closed circuit flow dynamics to enable the model to be used for control design and simulation. The control challenge is related to the highly non-standard type of step...

  7. Modeling and Experimental Demonstration of a Hopfield Network Analog-to-Digital Converter with Hybrid CMOS/Memristor Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xinjie; Merrikh-Bayat, Farnood; Gao, Ligang; Hoskins, Brian D; Alibart, Fabien; Linares-Barranco, Bernabe; Theogarajan, Luke; Teuscher, Christof; Strukov, Dmitri B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of building recurrent artificial neural networks with hybrid complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)/memristor circuits. To do so, we modeled a Hopfield network implementing an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with up to 8 bits of precision. Major shortcomings affecting the ADC's precision, such as the non-ideal behavior of CMOS circuitry and the specific limitations of memristors, were investigated and an effective solution was proposed, capitalizing on the in-field programmability of memristors. The theoretical work was validated experimentally by demonstrating the successful operation of a 4-bit ADC circuit implemented with discrete Pt/TiO2- x /Pt memristors and CMOS integrated circuit components.

  8. A neural model of hierarchical reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Daniel; Voelker, Aaron; Eliasmith, Chris

    2017-01-01

    We develop a novel, biologically detailed neural model of reinforcement learning (RL) processes in the brain. This model incorporates a broad range of biological features that pose challenges to neural RL, such as temporally extended action sequences, continuous environments involving unknown time delays, and noisy/imprecise computations. Most significantly, we expand the model into the realm of hierarchical reinforcement learning (HRL), which divides the RL process into a hierarchy of actions at different levels of abstraction. Here we implement all the major components of HRL in a neural model that captures a variety of known anatomical and physiological properties of the brain. We demonstrate the performance of the model in a range of different environments, in order to emphasize the aim of understanding the brain's general reinforcement learning ability. These results show that the model compares well to previous modelling work and demonstrates improved performance as a result of its hierarchical ability. We also show that the model's behaviour is consistent with available data on human hierarchical RL, and generate several novel predictions.

  9. A NEURAL OSCILLATOR-NETWORK MODEL OF TEMPORAL PATTERN GENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, Lambert

    Most contemporary neural network models deal with essentially static, perceptual problems of classification and transformation. Models such as multi-layer feedforward perceptrons generally do not incorporate time as an essential dimension, whereas biological neural networks are inherently temporal

  10. Lightning Modelling: From 3D to Circuit Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, H.; Abdi, M.; Issac, F.; Prost, D.

    2012-05-01

    The topic of this study is electromagnetic environment and electromagnetic interferences (EMI) effects, specifically the modelling of lightning indirect effects [1] on aircraft electrical systems present on deported and highly exposed equipments, such as nose landing gear (NLG) and nacelle, through a circuit approach. The main goal of the presented work, funded by a French national project: PREFACE, is to propose a simple equivalent electrical circuit to represent a geometrical structure, taking into account mutual, self inductances, and resistances, which play a fundamental role in the lightning current distribution. Then this model is intended to be coupled to a functional one, describing a power train chain composed of: a converter, a shielded power harness and a motor or a set of resistors used as a load for the converter. The novelty here, is to provide a pre-sizing qualitative approach allowing playing on integration in pre-design phases. This tool intends to offer a user-friendly way for replying rapidly to calls for tender, taking into account the lightning constraints. Two cases are analysed: first, a NLG that is composed of tubular pieces that can be easily approximated by equivalent cylindrical straight conductors. Therefore, passive R, L, M elements of the structure can be extracted through analytical engineer formulas such as those implemented in the partial element equivalent circuit (PEEC) [2] technique. Second, the same approach is intended to be applied on an electrical de-icing nacelle sub-system.

  11. Two-photon quantum Rabi model with superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felicetti, S.; Rossatto, D. Z.; Rico, E.; Solano, E.; Forn-Díaz, P.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting circuit to implement a two-photon quantum Rabi model in a solid-state device, where a qubit and a resonator are coupled by a two-photon interaction. We analyze the input-output relations for this circuit in the strong-coupling regime and find that fundamental quantum-optical phenomena are qualitatively modified. For instance, two-photon interactions are shown to yield a single- or two-photon blockade when a pumping field is either applied to the cavity mode or to the qubit, respectively. In addition, we derive an effective Hamiltonian for perturbative ultrastrong two-photon couplings in the dispersive regime, where two-photon interactions introduce a qubit-state-dependent Kerr term. Finally, we analyze the spectral collapse of the multiqubit two-photon quantum Rabi model and find a scaling of the critical coupling with the number of qubits. Using realistic parameters with the circuit proposed, three qubits are sufficient to reach the collapse point.

  12. An integrated multichannel neural recording analog front-end ASIC with area-efficient driven right leg circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao Tang; Wang Ling Goh; Lei Yao; Jia Hao Cheong; Yuan Gao

    2017-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated multichannel neural recording analog front end (AFE) with a novel area-efficient driven right leg (DRL) circuit to improve the system common mode rejection ratio (CMRR). The proposed AFE consists of an AC-coupled low-noise programmable-gain amplifier, an area-efficient DRL block and a 10-bit SAR ADC. Compared to conventional DRL circuit, the proposed capacitor-less DRL design achieves 90% chip area reduction with enhanced CMRR performance, making it ideal for multichannel biomedical recording applications. The AFE circuit has been designed in a standard 0.18-μm CMOS process. Post-layout simulation results show that the AFE provides two gain settings of 54dB/60dB while consuming 1 μA per channel under a supply voltage of 1 V. The input-referred noise of the AFE integrated from 1 Hz to 10k Hz is only 4 μVrms and the CMRR is 110 dB.

  13. UAV Trajectory Modeling Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min

    2017-01-01

    Massive small unmanned aerial vehicles are envisioned to operate in the near future. While there are lots of research problems need to be addressed before dense operations can happen, trajectory modeling remains as one of the keys to understand and develop policies, regulations, and requirements for safe and efficient unmanned aerial vehicle operations. The fidelity requirement of a small unmanned vehicle trajectory model is high because these vehicles are sensitive to winds due to their small size and low operational altitude. Both vehicle control systems and dynamic models are needed for trajectory modeling, which makes the modeling a great challenge, especially considering the fact that manufactures are not willing to share their control systems. This work proposed to use a neural network approach for modelling small unmanned vehicle's trajectory without knowing its control system and bypassing exhaustive efforts for aerodynamic parameter identification. As a proof of concept, instead of collecting data from flight tests, this work used the trajectory data generated by a mathematical vehicle model for training and testing the neural network. The results showed great promise because the trained neural network can predict 4D trajectories accurately, and prediction errors were less than 2:0 meters in both temporal and spatial dimensions.

  14. With a little help from my friends: androgens tap BDNF signaling pathways to alter neural circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottem, E N; Bailey, D J; Jordan, C L; Breedlove, S M

    2013-06-03

    Gonadal androgens are critical for the development and maintenance of sexually dimorphic regions of the male nervous system, which is critical for male-specific behavior and physiological functioning. In rodents, the motoneurons of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB) provide a useful example of a neural system dependent on androgen. Unless rescued by perinatal androgens, the SNB motoneurons will undergo apoptotic cell death. In adulthood, SNB motoneurons remain dependent on androgen, as castration leads to somal atrophy and dendritic retraction. In a second vertebrate model, the zebra finch, androgens are critical for the development of several brain nuclei involved in song production in males. Androgen deprivation during a critical period during postnatal development disrupts song acquisition and dimorphic size-associated nuclei. Mechanisms by which androgens exert masculinizing effects in each model system remain elusive. Recent studies suggest that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may play a role in androgen-dependent masculinization and maintenance of both SNB motoneurons and song nuclei of birds. This review aims to summarize studies demonstrating that BDNF signaling via its tyrosine receptor kinase (TrkB) receptor may work cooperatively with androgens to maintain somal and dendritic morphology of SNB motoneurons. We further describe studies that suggest the cellular origin of BDNF is of particular importance in androgen-dependent regulation of SNB motoneurons. We review evidence that androgens and BDNF may synergistically influence song development and plasticity in bird species. Finally, we provide hypothetical models of mechanisms that may underlie androgen- and BDNF-dependent signaling pathways. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ising model for neural data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roudi, Yasser; Tyrcha, Joanna; Hertz, John

    2009-01-01

    (dansk abstrakt findes ikke) We study pairwise Ising models for describing the statistics of multi-neuron spike trains, using data from a simulated cortical network. We explore efficient ways of finding the optimal couplings in these models and examine their statistical properties. To do this, we...

  16. Improved quantum circuit modelling based on Heisenberg representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Khalil-Hani, M.; Marsono, M. N.

    2018-02-01

    Heisenberg model allows a more compact representation of certain quantum states and enables efficient modelling of stabilizer gates operation and single-qubit measurement in computational basis on classical computers. Since generic quantum circuit modelling appears intractable on classical computers, the Heisenberg representation that makes the modelling process at least practical for certain circuits is crucial. This paper proposes efficient algorithms to facilitate accurate global phase maintenance for both stabilizer and non-stabilizer gates application that play a vital role in the stabilizer frames data structure, which is based on the Heisenberg representation. The proposed algorithms are critical as maintaining global phase involves compute-intensive operations that are necessary for the modelling of each quantum gate. In addition, the proposed work overcomes the limitations of prior work where the phase factors due to non-stabilizer gates application was not taken into consideration. The verification of the proposed algorithms is made against the golden reference model that is constructed based on the conventional state vector approach.

  17. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of an Inverse Fluidized Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The application of neural networks to model a laboratory scale inverse fluidized bed reactor has been studied. A Radial Basis Function neural network has been successfully employed for the modeling of the inverse fluidized bed reactor. In the proposed model, the trained neural network represents the kinetics of biological ...

  18. A Circuit Model of Real Time Human Body Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asogwa, Clement Ogugua; Teshome, Assefa K; Collins, Stephen F; Lai, Daniel T H

    2016-06-01

    Changes in human body hydration leading to excess fluid losses or overload affects the body fluid's ability to provide the necessary support for healthy living. We propose a time-dependent circuit model of real-time human body hydration, which models the human body tissue as a signal transmission medium. The circuit model predicts the attenuation of a propagating electrical signal. Hydration rates are modeled by a time constant τ, which characterizes the individual specific metabolic function of the body part measured. We define a surrogate human body anthropometric parameter θ by the muscle-fat ratio and comparing it with the body mass index (BMI), we find theoretically, the rate of hydration varying from 1.73 dB/min, for high θ and low τ to 0.05 dB/min for low θ and high τ. We compare these theoretical values with empirical measurements and show that real-time changes in human body hydration can be observed by measuring signal attenuation. We took empirical measurements using a vector network analyzer and obtained different hydration rates for various BMI, ranging from 0.6 dB/min for 22.7 [Formula: see text] down to 0.04 dB/min for 41.2 [Formula: see text]. We conclude that the galvanic coupling circuit model can predict changes in the volume of the body fluid, which are essential in diagnosing and monitoring treatment of body fluid disorder. Individuals with high BMI would have higher time-dependent biological characteristic, lower metabolic rate, and lower rate of hydration.

  19. Neural circuits of disgust induced by sexual stimuli in homosexual and heterosexual men: An fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Minming [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Hu Shaohua [Department of Mental Health, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qing Chun Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310003 (China); Xu Lijuan [National Laboratory of Pattern Recognition, Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang Qidong [Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Xu Xiaojun [Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Wei Erqing [College of Pharmacology, Zhejiang University (China); Yan Leqin [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Virginia Harris Cockrell Cancer Research Center, University of Texas, Austin (United States); Hu Jianbo; Wei Ning; Zhou Weihua; Huang Manli [Department of Mental Health, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qing Chun Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310003 (China); Xu Yi, E-mail: xuyi61@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Mental Health, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 79 Qing Chun Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province 310003 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Few studies demonstrated neural circuits related to disgust were influenced by internal sexual orientation in male. Here we used fMRI to study the neural responses to disgust in homosexual and heterosexual men to investigate that issue. Thirty-two healthy male volunteers (sixteen homosexual and sixteen heterosexual) were scanned while viewing alternating blocks of three types of erotic film: heterosexual couples (F-M), male homosexual couples (M-M), and female homosexual couples (F-F) engaged in sexual activity. All the participants rated their level of disgust and sexual arousal as well. The F-F and M-M stimuli induced disgust in homosexual and heterosexual men, respectively. The common activations related to disgusting stimuli included: bilateral frontal gyrus and occipital gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right cerebellum, and right thalamus. Homosexual men had greater neural responses in the left medial frontal gyrus than did heterosexual men to the sexual disgusting stimuli; in contrast, heterosexual men showed significantly greater activation than homosexual men in the left cuneus. ROI analysis showed that negative correlation were found between the magnitude of MRI signals in the left medial frontal gyrus and scores of disgust in homosexual subjects (p < 0.05). This study indicated that there were regions in common as well as regions specific for each type of erotic stimuli during disgust of homosexual and heterosexual men.

  20. Temporal-pattern learning in neural models

    CERN Document Server

    Genís, Carme Torras

    1985-01-01

    While the ability of animals to learn rhythms is an unquestionable fact, the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms are still no more than conjectures. This monograph explores the requirements of such mechanisms, reviews those previously proposed and postulates a new one based on a direct electric coding of stimulation frequencies. Experi­ mental support for the option taken is provided both at the single neuron and neural network levels. More specifically, the material presented divides naturally into four parts: a description of the experimental and theoretical framework where this work becomes meaningful (Chapter 2), a detailed specifica­ tion of the pacemaker neuron model proposed together with its valida­ tion through simulation (Chapter 3), an analytic study of the behavior of this model when submitted to rhythmic stimulation (Chapter 4) and a description of the neural network model proposed for learning, together with an analysis of the simulation results obtained when varying seve­ ral factors r...

  1. DC, frequency characterization of Dual Gated Graphene FET (GFET) Compact Model and its Circuit Application - Doubler Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala Tripura Sundari, B.; Arya Raj, K.

    2017-08-01

    A Graphene FET(GFET) based on computational closed form expressions termed as compact model using quasi ballistic approach for circuit simulation is developed. The Verilog - A dual gated GFET model is developed for a channel length of 90 nm and a width of 1 μm and is found to have a better equivalent current and a higher Ion/Ioff ratio has been attained than the single gated model. It demonstrates the effect of body bias on the conductivity characteristics, as shown by the shift of the Dirac point. Also the frequency characterization of the model is obtained and verified by development of frequency multiplier circuits - doubler; the performance has been compared to have maintained in terms of spectral purity but having a better output amplitude validating the DC characteristics of the dual gated VS model used in the doubler circuit.

  2. DQ reference frame modeling and control of single-phase active power decoupling circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Yi; Qin, Zian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2015-01-01

    . This paper presents the dq synchronous reference frame modeling of single-phase power decoupling circuits and a complete model describing the dynamics of dc-link ripple voltage is presented. The proposed model is universal and valid for both inductive and capacitive decoupling circuits, and the input...... of decoupling circuits can be either dependent or independent of its front-end converters. Based on this model, a dq synchronous reference frame controller is designed which allows the decoupling circuit to operate in two different modes because of the circuit symmetry. Simulation and experimental results...... are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed modeling and control method....

  3. Optimizing neural network models: motivation and case studies

    OpenAIRE

    Harp, S A; T. Samad

    2012-01-01

    Practical successes have been achieved  with neural network models in a variety of domains, including energy-related industry. The large, complex design space presented by neural networks is only minimally explored in current practice. The satisfactory results that nevertheless have been obtained testify that neural networks are a robust modeling technology; at the same time, however, the lack of a systematic design approach implies that the best neural network models generally  rem...

  4. Hierarchical Stochastic Simulation Algorithm for SBML Models of Genetic Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro eWatanabe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hierarchical stochastic simulation algorithm which has been implemented within iBioSim, a tool used to model, analyze, and visualize genetic circuits. Many biological analysis tools flatten out hierarchy before simulation, but there are many disadvantages associated with this approach. First, the memory required to represent the model can quickly expand in the process. Second, the flattening process is computationally expensive. Finally, when modeling a dynamic cellular population within iBioSim, inlining the hierarchy of the model is inefficient since models must grow dynamically over time. This paper discusses a new approach to handle hierarchy on the fly to make the tool faster and more memory-efficient. This approach yields significant performance improvements as compared to the former flat analysis method.

  5. Analysis of the function and intracellular signal transduction mechanism of secreted semaphorins during neural circuit development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunput, R.F.

    2011-01-01

    Our ability to perceive, to act and to remember is a reflection of the elaborate synaptic connections and neuronal circuits that make up the brain. The formation of these connections relies on a series of developmental events including axon growth and guidance, synapse formation and cell death. The

  6. Artificial Neural Network Model for Predicting Compressive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim T. Yousif

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Compressive strength of concrete is a commonly used criterion in evaluating concrete. Although testing of the compressive strength of concrete specimens is done routinely, it is performed on the 28th day after concrete placement. Therefore, strength estimation of concrete at early time is highly desirable. This study presents the effort in applying neural network-based system identification techniques to predict the compressive strength of concrete based on concrete mix proportions, maximum aggregate size (MAS, and slump of fresh concrete. Back-propagation neural networks model is successively developed, trained, and tested using actual data sets of concrete mix proportions gathered from literature.    The test of the model by un-used data within the range of input parameters shows that the maximum absolute error for model is about 20% and 88% of the output results has absolute errors less than 10%. The parametric study shows that water/cement ratio (w/c is the most significant factor  affecting the output of the model.     The results showed that neural networks has strong potential as a feasible tool for predicting compressive strength of concrete.

  7. A neural circuit transforming temporal periodicity information into a rate-based representation in the mammalian auditory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dicke, Ulrike; Ewert, Stephan D.; Dau, Torsten

    2007-01-01

    to previous modeling studies, the present circuit does not employ a continuously changing temporal parameter to obtain different best modulation frequencies BMFs of the IC bandpass units. Instead, different BMFs are yielded from varying the number of input units projecting onto different bandpass units...

  8. UAV Trajectory Modeling Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min

    2017-01-01

    Large amount of small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (sUAVs) are projected to operate in the near future. Potential sUAV applications include, but not limited to, search and rescue, inspection and surveillance, aerial photography and video, precision agriculture, and parcel delivery. sUAVs are expected to operate in the uncontrolled Class G airspace, which is at or below 500 feet above ground level (AGL), where many static and dynamic constraints exist, such as ground properties and terrains, restricted areas, various winds, manned helicopters, and conflict avoidance among sUAVs. How to enable safe, efficient, and massive sUAV operations at the low altitude airspace remains a great challenge. NASA's Unmanned aircraft system Traffic Management (UTM) research initiative works on establishing infrastructure and developing policies, requirement, and rules to enable safe and efficient sUAVs' operations. To achieve this goal, it is important to gain insights of future UTM traffic operations through simulations, where the accurate trajectory model plays an extremely important role. On the other hand, like what happens in current aviation development, trajectory modeling should also serve as the foundation for any advanced concepts and tools in UTM. Accurate models of sUAV dynamics and control systems are very important considering the requirement of the meter level precision in UTM operations. The vehicle dynamics are relatively easy to derive and model, however, vehicle control systems remain unknown as they are usually kept by manufactures as a part of intellectual properties. That brings challenges to trajectory modeling for sUAVs. How to model the vehicle's trajectories with unknown control system? This work proposes to use a neural network to model a vehicle's trajectory. The neural network is first trained to learn the vehicle's responses at numerous conditions. Once being fully trained, given current vehicle states, winds, and desired future trajectory, the neural

  9. Graphene-based THz modulator analyzed by equivalent circuit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Binggang; Chen, Jing; Xie, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    A terahertz (THz) modulator based on graphene is proposed and analysed by use of equivalent transmission line of a homogeneous mediumand the local anisotropic model of the graphene conductivity. The result calculated by the equivalent circuit is consistent with that obtained byFresnel transfer...... matrices. For the modulator proposed here, when the frequency of carrier wave is 0.6 THz, the theoretical analysis indicatesthat the modulation bandwidth is 55.5 kHz and the modulation depth is 81.3% for voltage change from 0 to 50 V...

  10. Magnetic Coupled Circuits Modeling of Induction Machines Oriented to Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek AROUI

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a transient model of the faulty machine is developed. The model is referred to a three phase stator winding, while the rotor has been represented by all the meshes allowing for the representation of various faults. The model is based on coupled magnetic circuit theory by considering that the current in each bar is an independent variable. The model incorporates non-sinusoidal air-gap magneto motive force (MMF produced by both stator and rotor, therefore it will include all the space harmonics in the machine. Simulations and experimental results were then used to study rotor faults cause-effect relationships in the stator current and the frequency signature.

  11. Deep Modeling: Circuit Characterization Using Theory Based Models in a Data Driven Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolme, David S [ORNL; Mikkilineni, Aravind K [ORNL; Rose, Derek C [ORNL; Yoginath, Srikanth B [ORNL; Holleman, Jeremy [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Judy, Mohsen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

    2017-01-01

    Analog computational circuits have been demonstrated to provide substantial improvements in power and speed relative to digital circuits, especially for applications requiring extreme parallelism but only modest precision. Deep machine learning is one such area and stands to benefit greatly from analog and mixed-signal implementations. However, even at modest precisions, offsets and non-linearity can degrade system performance. Furthermore, in all but the simplest systems, it is impossible to directly measure the intermediate outputs of all sub-circuits. The result is that circuit designers are unable to accurately evaluate the non-idealities of computational circuits in-situ and are therefore unable to fully utilize measurement results to improve future designs. In this paper we present a technique to use deep learning frameworks to model physical systems. Recently developed libraries like TensorFlow make it possible to use back propagation to learn parameters in the context of modeling circuit behavior. Offsets and scaling errors can be discovered even for sub-circuits that are deeply embedded in a computational system and not directly observable. The learned parameters can be used to refine simulation methods or to identify appropriate compensation strategies. We demonstrate the framework using a mixed-signal convolution operator as an example circuit.

  12. Data Mining Approaches for Modeling Complex Electronic Circuit Design Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Yongjin [Ajou University, Suwon, South Korea; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Wang, Gi-Nam [Ajou University, Suwon, South Korea

    2008-01-01

    A printed circuit board (PCB) is an essential part of modern electronic circuits. It is made of a flat panel of insulating materials with patterned copper foils that act as electric pathways for various components such as ICs, diodes, capacitors, resistors, and coils. The size of PCBs has been shrinking over the years, while the number of components mounted on these boards has increased considerably. This trend makes the design and fabrication of PCBs ever more difficult. At the beginning of design cycles, it is important to estimate the time to complete the steps required accurately, based on many factors such as the required parts, approximate board size and shape, and a rough sketch of schematics. Current approach uses multiple linear regression (MLR) technique for time and cost estimations. However, the need for accurate predictive models continues to grow as the technology becomes more advanced. In this paper, we analyze a large volume of historical PCB design data, extract some important variables, and develop predictive models based on the extracted variables using a data mining approach. The data mining approach uses an adaptive support vector regression (ASVR) technique; the benchmark model used is the MLR technique currently being used in the industry. The strengths of SVR for this data include its ability to represent data in high-dimensional space through kernel functions. The computational results show that a data mining approach is a better prediction technique for this data. Our approach reduces computation time and enhances the practical applications of the SVR technique.

  13. Ionospheric potential variability in global electric circuit models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareev, E.; Volodin, E. M.; Kalinin, A.; Sllyunyaev, N.

    2013-12-01

    The ionospheric potential (IP) represents the electric voltage between the Earth's surface and the lower ionosphere and may be measured with a sufficient accuracy using the balloon soundings over the lowest 15-20 km. This parameter can serve as a global index relating the state of the global electric circuit (GEC) to the planetary climate. Exploring the GEC as a diagnostic tool for climate studies requires an accurate modeling of the IP stationary state and its dynamics, while a question of secular trend of the IP is still under discussion (Markson, 2007; Williams, 2009; Williams and Mareev, 2013). This paper addresses a possibility of correct calculation of the IP in 3D models of the GEC and its adequate parameterization to be used in General Circulation Models (GCM). Our approach is based on the use the integral representation for the contribution of charging currents, supporting the generators (in particular, electrified clouds) in the GEC, into the ionospheric potential (Kalinin et al., 2011; Mareeva et al., 2011). Simple enough analytical expressions for IP induced by the charging electric currents are suggested, including the contribution of the Austausch generator. We have developed also the spherical numerical model of the GEC and applied it for IP calculation for different-type cloud contribution into the circuit. A suggested IP parameterization is appropriate for the use in climate-model simulations (Mareev and Volodin, 2011). We use a high-resolution GCM of the atmosphere and ocean INMCM4.0 for the modeling the GEC. The main characteristics of the model are: atmosphere - 2x1.5 degrees in longitude and latitude, 21 levels; ocean - 1x0.5 degrees in longitude and latitude, 40 levels. We have taken into account quasi-stationary currents of electrified clouds as principal contributors into the DC global circuit. One of the most important aspects of this approach is an account for all the electrified clouds- both thunderstorms and electrified shower cloud. The

  14. Next-generation transgenic mice for optogenetic analysis of neural circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent eAsrican

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we characterize several new lines of transgenic mice useful for optogenetic analysis of brain circuit function. These mice express optogenetic probes, such as enhanced halorhodopsin or several different versions of channelrhodopsins, behind various neuron-specific promoters. These mice permit photoinhibition or photostimulation both in vitro and in vivo. Our results also reveal the important influence of fluorescent tags on optogenetic probe expression and function in transgenic mice.

  15. Fluorescence-based monitoring of in vivo neural activity using a circuit-tracing pseudorabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Granstedt

    Full Text Available The study of coordinated activity in neuronal circuits has been challenging without a method to simultaneously report activity and connectivity. Here we present the first use of pseudorabies virus (PRV, which spreads through synaptically connected neurons, to express a fluorescent calcium indicator protein and monitor neuronal activity in a living animal. Fluorescence signals were proportional to action potential number and could reliably detect single action potentials in vitro. With two-photon imaging in vivo, we observed both spontaneous and stimulated activity in neurons of infected murine peripheral autonomic submandibular ganglia (SMG. We optically recorded the SMG response in the salivary circuit to direct electrical stimulation of the presynaptic axons and to physiologically relevant sensory stimulation of the oral cavity. During a time window of 48 hours after inoculation, few spontaneous transients occurred. By 72 hours, we identified more frequent and prolonged spontaneous calcium transients, suggestive of neuronal or tissue responses to infection that influence calcium signaling. Our work establishes in vivo investigation of physiological neuronal circuit activity and subsequent effects of infection with single cell resolution.

  16. A Leptin Analog Locally Produced in the Brain Acts via a Conserved Neural Circuit to Modulate Obesity-Linked Behaviors in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshel, Jennifer; Dubnau, Josh; Zhong, Yi

    2017-01-10

    Leptin, a typically adipose-derived "satiety hormone," has a well-established role in weight regulation. Here we describe a functionally conserved model of genetically induced obesity in Drosophila by manipulating the fly leptin analog unpaired 1 (upd1). Unexpectedly, cell-type-specific knockdown reveals upd1 in the brain, not the adipose tissue, mediates obesity-related traits. Disrupting brain-derived upd1 in flies leads to all the hallmarks of mammalian obesity: increased attraction to food cues, increased food intake, and increased weight. These effects are mediated by domeless receptors on neurons expressing Drosophila neuropeptide F, the orexigenic mammalian neuropeptide Y homolog. In vivo two-photon imaging reveals upd1 and domeless inhibit this hedonic signal in fed animals. Manipulations along this central circuit also create hypersensitivity to obesogenic conditions, emphasizing the critical interplay between biological predisposition and environment in overweight and obesity prevalence. We propose adipose- and brain-derived upd/leptin may control differing features of weight regulation through distinct neural circuits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Sites of Plasticity in the Neural Circuit Mediating Tentacle Withdrawal in the Snail Helix aspersa: Implications for Behavioral Change and Learning Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Steven A.; Chase, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    The tentacle withdrawal reflex of the snail Helix aspersa exhibits a complex combination of habituation and sensitization consistent with the dual-process theory of plasticity. Habituation, sensitization, or a combination of both were elicited by varying stimulation parameters and lesion condition. Analysis of response plasticity shows that the late phase of the response is selectively enhanced by sensitization, whereas all phases are decreased by habituation. Previous data have shown that tentacle withdrawal is mediated conjointly by parallel monosynaptic and polysynaptic pathways. The former mediates the early phase, whereas the latter mediates the late phase of the response. Plastic loci were identified by stimulating and recording at different points within the neural circuit, in combination with selective lesions. Results indicate that depression occurs at an upstream locus, before circuit divergence, and is therefore expressed in all pathways, whereas facilitation requires downstream facilitatory neurons and is selectively expressed in polysynaptic pathways. Differential expression of plasticity between pathways helps explain the behavioral manifestation of depression and facilitation. A simple mathematical model is used to show how serial positioning of depression and facilitation can explain the kinetics of dual-process learning. These results illustrate how the position of cellular plasticity in the network affects behavioral change and how forms of plasticity can interact to determine the kinetics of the net changes. PMID:10509707

  18. Neural Network Program Package for Prosody Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Santarius

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes the programme for one part of theautomatic Text-to-Speech (TTS synthesis. Some experiments (for example[14] documented the considerable improvement of the naturalness ofsynthetic speech, but this approach requires completing the inputfeature values by hand. This completing takes a lot of time for bigfiles. We need to improve the prosody by other approaches which useonly automatically classified features (input parameters. Theartificial neural network (ANN approach is used for the modeling ofprosody parameters. The program package contains all modules necessaryfor the text and speech signal pre-processing, neural network training,sensitivity analysis, result processing and a module for the creationof the input data protocol for Czech speech synthesizer ARTIC [1].

  19. Modeling of Circuits with Strongly Temperature Dependent Thermal Conductivities for Cryogenic CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Hamlet, J.; Eng, K.; Gurrieri, T.; Levy, J; Carroll, M

    2010-01-01

    When designing and studying circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures understanding local heating within the circuits is critical due to the temperature dependence of transistor and noise behavior. We have investigated local heating effects of a CMOS ring oscillator and current comparator at T=4.2K. In two cases, the temperature near the circuit was measured with an integrated thermometer. A lumped element equivalent electrical circuit SPICE model that accounts for the strongly temperature...

  20. Synaptic augmentation in a cortical circuit model reproduces serial dependence in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliss, Daniel P; D'Esposito, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has established that visual working memory is subject to serial dependence: current information in memory blends with that from the recent past as a function of their similarity. This tuned temporal smoothing likely promotes the stability of memory in the face of noise and occlusion. Serial dependence accumulates over several seconds in memory and deteriorates with increased separation between trials. While this phenomenon has been extensively characterized in behavior, its neural mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we investigate the circuit-level origins of serial dependence in a biophysical model of cortex. We explore two distinct kinds of mechanisms: stable persistent activity during the memory delay period and dynamic "activity-silent" synaptic plasticity. We find that networks endowed with both strong reverberation to support persistent activity and dynamic synapses can closely reproduce behavioral serial dependence. Specifically, elevated activity drives synaptic augmentation, which biases activity on the subsequent trial, giving rise to a spatiotemporally tuned shift in the population response. Our hybrid neural model is a theoretical advance beyond abstract mathematical characterizations, offers testable hypotheses for physiological research, and demonstrates the power of biological insights to provide a quantitative explanation of human behavior.

  1. Trading speed and accuracy by coding time: a coupled-circuit cortical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Standage

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Our actions take place in space and time, but despite the role of time in decision theory and the growing acknowledgement that the encoding of time is crucial to behaviour, few studies have considered the interactions between neural codes for objects in space and for elapsed time during perceptual decisions. The speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT provides a window into spatiotemporal interactions. Our hypothesis is that temporal coding determines the rate at which spatial evidence is integrated, controlling the SAT by gain modulation. Here, we propose that local cortical circuits are inherently suited to the relevant spatial and temporal coding. In simulations of an interval estimation task, we use a generic local-circuit model to encode time by 'climbing' activity, seen in cortex during tasks with a timing requirement. The model is a network of simulated pyramidal cells and inhibitory interneurons, connected by conductance synapses. A simple learning rule enables the network to quickly produce new interval estimates, which show signature characteristics of estimates by experimental subjects. Analysis of network dynamics formally characterizes this generic, local-circuit timing mechanism. In simulations of a perceptual decision task, we couple two such networks. Network function is determined only by spatial selectivity and NMDA receptor conductance strength; all other parameters are identical. To trade speed and accuracy, the timing network simply learns longer or shorter intervals, driving the rate of downstream decision processing by spatially non-selective input, an established form of gain modulation. Like the timing network's interval estimates, decision times show signature characteristics of those by experimental subjects. Overall, we propose, demonstrate and analyse a generic mechanism for timing, a generic mechanism for modulation of decision processing by temporal codes, and we make predictions for experimental verification.

  2. A multichannel integrated circuit for electrical recording of neural activity, with independent channel programmability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora Lopez, Carolina; Prodanov, Dimiter; Braeken, Dries; Gligorijevic, Ivan; Eberle, Wolfgang; Bartic, Carmen; Puers, Robert; Gielen, Georges

    2012-04-01

    Since a few decades, micro-fabricated neural probes are being used, together with microelectronic interfaces, to get more insight in the activity of neuronal networks. The need for higher temporal and spatial recording resolutions imposes new challenges on the design of integrated neural interfaces with respect to power consumption, data handling and versatility. In this paper, we present an integrated acquisition system for in vitro and in vivo recording of neural activity. The ASIC consists of 16 low-noise, fully-differential input channels with independent programmability of its amplification (from 100 to 6000 V/V) and filtering (1-6000 Hz range) capabilities. Each channel is AC-coupled and implements a fourth-order band-pass filter in order to steeply attenuate out-of-band noise and DC input offsets. The system achieves an input-referred noise density of 37 nV/√Hz, a NEF of 5.1, a CMRR > 60 dB, a THD noise ratios.

  3. Fuse Modeling for Reliability Study of Power Electronic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a comprehensive modeling approach on reliability of fuses used in power electronic circuits. When fuses are subjected to current pulses, cyclic temperature stress is introduced to the fuse element and will wear out the component. Furthermore, the fuse may be used in a large...... variation of ambient temperature, e.g. in deserts and the accumulated damage in the fuse elements is gradually increasing due to thermo-mechanical stress that results in resistance increase and further unexpected failures. Consequently, the electrical characteristics of the fuse like I2t, breaking capacity......-electrical models of fuses are presented by FEM simulations in order to identify the important factors affecting the performance of fuses at different ambient temperatures and cycling operation....

  4. Digital Quantum Simulation of Spin Models with Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Salathé

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems of interacting quantum spins show a rich spectrum of quantum phases and display interesting many-body dynamics. Computing characteristics of even small systems on conventional computers poses significant challenges. A quantum simulator has the potential to outperform standard computers in calculating the evolution of complex quantum systems. Here, we perform a digital quantum simulation of the paradigmatic Heisenberg and Ising interacting spin models using a two transmon-qubit circuit quantum electrodynamics setup. We make use of the exchange interaction naturally present in the simulator to construct a digital decomposition of the model-specific evolution and extract its full dynamics. This approach is universal and efficient, employing only resources that are polynomial in the number of spins, and indicates a path towards the controlled simulation of general spin dynamics in superconducting qubit platforms.

  5. Flood routing modelling with Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peters

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available For the modelling of the flood routing in the lower reaches of the Freiberger Mulde river and its tributaries the one-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling system HEC-RAS has been applied. Furthermore, this model was used to generate a database to train multilayer feedforward networks. To guarantee numerical stability for the hydrodynamic modelling of some 60 km of streamcourse an adequate resolution in space requires very small calculation time steps, which are some two orders of magnitude smaller than the input data resolution. This leads to quite high computation requirements seriously restricting the application – especially when dealing with real time operations such as online flood forecasting. In order to solve this problem we tested the application of Artificial Neural Networks (ANN. First studies show the ability of adequately trained multilayer feedforward networks (MLFN to reproduce the model performance.

  6. Modeling Broadband Microwave Structures by Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Otevrel

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the exploitation of feed-forward neural networksand recurrent neural networks for replacing full-wave numerical modelsof microwave structures in complex microwave design tools. Building aneural model, attention is turned to the modeling accuracy and to theefficiency of building a model. Dealing with the accuracy, we describea method of increasing it by successive completing a training set.Neural models are mutually compared in order to highlight theiradvantages and disadvantages. As a reference model for comparisons,approximations based on standard cubic splines are used. Neural modelsare used to replace both the time-domain numeric models and thefrequency-domain ones.

  7. Neural circuits underlying mother's voice perception predict social communication abilities in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Daniel A; Chen, Tianwen; Odriozola, Paola; Cheng, Katherine M; Baker, Amanda E; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Ryali, Srikanth; Kochalka, John; Feinstein, Carl; Menon, Vinod

    2016-05-31

    The human voice is a critical social cue, and listeners are extremely sensitive to the voices in their environment. One of the most salient voices in a child's life is mother's voice: Infants discriminate their mother's voice from the first days of life, and this stimulus is associated with guiding emotional and social function during development. Little is known regarding the functional circuits that are selectively engaged in children by biologically salient voices such as mother's voice or whether this brain activity is related to children's social communication abilities. We used functional MRI to measure brain activity in 24 healthy children (mean age, 10.2 y) while they attended to brief (social function. Compared to female control voices, mother's voice elicited greater activity in primary auditory regions in the midbrain and cortex; voice-selective superior temporal sulcus (STS); the amygdala, which is crucial for processing of affect; nucleus accumbens and orbitofrontal cortex of the reward circuit; anterior insula and cingulate of the salience network; and a subregion of fusiform gyrus associated with face perception. The strength of brain connectivity between voice-selective STS and reward, affective, salience, memory, and face-processing regions during mother's voice perception predicted social communication skills. Our findings provide a novel neurobiological template for investigation of typical social development as well as clinical disorders, such as autism, in which perception of biologically and socially salient voices may be impaired.

  8. Normalization of Intrinsic Neural Circuits Governing Tourette's Syndrome Using Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianping; Weng, Shenhong; Wang, Pengwei; Long, Jun; Wang, Zhishun

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the normalization of the intrinsic functional activity and connectivity of TS adolescents before and after the cranial electrotherapy stimulation (CES) with alpha stim device. We performed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging on eight adolescents before and after CES with mean age of about nine-years old who had Tourette's syndrome with moderate to severe tics symptom. Independent component analysis (ICA) with hierarchical partner matching method was used to examine the functional connectivity between regions within cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuit. Granger causality was used to investigate effective connectivity among these regions detected by ICA. We then performed pattern classification on independent components with significant group differences that served as endophenotype markers to distinguish the adolescents between TS and the normalized ones after CES. Results showed that TS adolescents after CES treatment had stronger functional activity and connectivity in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate and posterior cingulate cortex while had weaker activity in supplementary motor area within the motor pathway compared with TS before CES. The results suggest that the functional activity and connectivity in motor pathway was suppressed while activities in the control portions within CSTC loop including ACC and caudate were increased in TS adolescents after CES compared with adolescents before CES. The normalization of the balance between motor and control portions of the CSTC circuit may result in the recovery of TS adolescents.

  9. A low-power, low-noise neural-signal amplifier circuit in 90-nm CMOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarifi, M H; Frounchi, J; Farshchi, S; Judy, J W

    2008-01-01

    A fully-differential low-power low-noise preamplifier for biopotential and neural-recording applications is presented. This design, which has been simulated in a standard 90-nm CMOS process, consumes 30 microW from a 3-V power supply. The simulated integrated input-referred noise is 2.3 microV over 0.1 Hz to 20 kHz. The amplifier also provides an output swing of +/- 0.9 V with a THD of less than 0.1%

  10. Circuit modeling of graphene absorber in terahertz band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghvaee, Hamid Reza; Nasari, Hadiseh; Abrishamian, Mohammad Sadegh

    2017-01-01

    Here we develop and extend a transmission line method (TLM) to analyze the performance of graphene assisted metamaterial (GM) devices working in the terahertz (THz) band. We demonstrate that a circuit model can be presented for different parts of the device including graphene and also the patterned metallic sheet by analyzing the distribution of surface induced current. In pursuit of evaluating the efficiency and accuracy of our proposed method, we compare its results, obtained from an easy to implement MATLAB code for a typical GM absorber with those obtained from full wave simulations. The excellence of the proposed method in terms of computation time (showing more than 3 orders of magnitude reduction in run time) and memory resource besides producing results with acceptable agreement with the results of full wave simulation (with an error less than 5%) versus incident angle, dielectric thickness and chemical potential, nominates it as a promising approach to simulate other graphene-based devices.

  11. A new equivalent circuit model for micro electroporation systems

    KAUST Repository

    Shagoshtasbi, Hooman

    2011-02-01

    Electroporation (EP) is a unique biotechnique in which intense electric pulses are applied on the cell membrane to temporarily generate nanoscale electropores and to increase the membrane permeability for the delivery of exogenous biomolecules or drugs. We propose a new equivalent circuit model with 8 electric components to predict the electrodynamic response of a micro EP system. As the permeability of the cell membrane increases, the membrane resistance decreases. The numerical simulations of the transmembrane current responses to different applied voltages (1∼6V) are consistent with the experimental results using HeLa cells. Besides, the transmembrane voltage as a function of applied voltages is determined as well. These transmembrane current and voltage responses can be extremely useful for the design of new generation of micro EP systems for transfection of large DNA molecules in the future. © 2011 IEEE.

  12. Neural Network Model of memory retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eRecanatesi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human memory can store large amount of information. Nevertheless, recalling is often achallenging task. In a classical free recall paradigm, where participants are asked to repeat abriefly presented list of words, people make mistakes for lists as short as 5 words. We present amodel for memory retrieval based on a Hopfield neural network where transition between itemsare determined by similarities in their long-term memory representations. Meanfield analysis ofthe model reveals stable states of the network corresponding (1 to single memory representationsand (2 intersection between memory representations. We show that oscillating feedback inhibitionin the presence of noise induces transitions between these states triggering the retrieval ofdifferent memories. The network dynamics qualitatively predicts the distribution of time intervalsrequired to recall new memory items observed in experiments. It shows that items having largernumber of neurons in their representation are statistically easier to recall and reveals possiblebottlenecks in our ability of retrieving memories. Overall, we propose a neural network model ofinformation retrieval broadly compatible with experimental observations and is consistent with ourrecent graphical model (Romani et al., 2013.

  13. Automated Modeling of Microwave Structures by Enhanced Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Raida

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the methodology of the automated creation of neural models of microwave structures. During the creation process, artificial neural networks are trained using the combination of the particle swarm optimization and the quasi-Newton method to avoid critical training problems of the conventional neural nets. In the paper, neural networks are used to approximate the behavior of a planar microwave filter (moment method, Zeland IE3D. In order to evaluate the efficiency of neural modeling, global optimizations are performed using numerical models and neural ones. Both approaches are compared from the viewpoint of CPU-time demands and the accuracy. Considering conclusions, methodological recommendations for including neural networks to the microwave design are formulated.

  14. Negative emotional distraction on neural circuits for working memory in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing-na; Xiong, Kun-lining; Qiu, Ming-guo; Zhang, Ye; Xie, Bing; Wang, Jian; Li, Min; Chen, Han; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jia-jia

    2013-09-19

    To study the neural mechanism for the impact of negative emotional distraction on working memory in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) resulting from exposure to motor vehicle accidents. Twenty PTSD patients and 20 healthy subjects were recruited. Event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the effects of negative and neutral distractors on a delayed-response working memory task. All experiments were performed on a 3.0T MRI scanner, and the functional imaging data were analyzed using SPM8 software. The PTSD group showed poorer performance than the control group when the negative distractors were presented during the delay phase of working memory. The functional imaging indicated that, in the presence of negative relative to neutral distractors, the PTSD group showed higher activation in the emotion processing regions, including amygdala, precuneus and fusiform gyrus, but lower activation in the inferior frontal cortex, insula and left supramarginal gyrus than the control group. Based on the results that activation in the PTSD patients in the presence of negative distractors increased in the emotion-related brain regions but decreased in the working memory-related brain regions, we may conclude that the neural basis of working memory is impaired by negative emotion in PTSD patients. © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Neural circuits in anxiety and stress disorders: a focused review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duval ER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth R Duval, Arash Javanbakht, Israel LiberzonDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Anxiety and stress disorders are among the most prevalent neuropsychiatric disorders. In recent years, multiple studies have examined brain regions and networks involved in anxiety symptomatology in an effort to better understand the mechanisms involved and to develop more effective treatments. However, much remains unknown regarding the specific abnormalities and interactions between networks of regions underlying anxiety disorder presentations. We examined recent neuroimaging literature that aims to identify neural mechanisms underlying anxiety, searching for patterns of neural dysfunction that might be specific to different anxiety disorder categories. Across different anxiety and stress disorders, patterns of hyperactivation in emotion-generating regions and hypoactivation in prefrontal/regulatory regions are common in the literature. Interestingly, evidence of differential patterns is also emerging, such that within a spectrum of disorders ranging from more fear-based to more anxiety-based, greater involvement of emotion-generating regions is reported in panic disorder and specific phobia, and greater involvement of prefrontal regions is reported in generalized anxiety disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. We summarize the pertinent literature and suggest areas for continued investigation.Keywords: fear, anxiety, neuroimaging

  16. PDF-1 neuropeptide signaling modulates a neural circuit for mate-searching behavior in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Arantza; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Fang, Chunhui; Emmons, Scott W; Barr, Maureen M

    2012-12-01

    Appetitive behaviors require complex decision making that involves the integration of environmental stimuli and physiological needs. C. elegans mate searching is a male-specific exploratory behavior regulated by two competing needs: food and reproductive appetite. We found that the pigment dispersing factor receptor (PDFR-1) modulates the circuit that encodes the male reproductive drive that promotes male exploration following mate deprivation. PDFR-1 and its ligand, PDF-1, stimulated mate searching in the male, but not in the hermaphrodite. pdf-1 was required in the gender-shared interneuron AIM, and the receptor acted in internal and external environment-sensing neurons of the shared nervous system (URY, PQR and PHA) to produce mate-searching behavior. Thus, the pdf-1 and pdfr-1 pathway functions in non-sex-specific neurons to produce a male-specific, goal-oriented exploratory behavior. Our results indicate that secretin neuropeptidergic signaling is involved in regulating motivational internal states.

  17. SEMICONDUCTOR INTEGRATED CIRCUITS: A four-channel microelectronic system for neural signal regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushan, Xie; Zhigong, Wang; Xiaoying, Lü; Wenyuan, Li; Haixian, Pan

    2009-12-01

    This paper presents a microelectronic system which is capable of making a signal record and functional electric stimulation of an injured spinal cord. As a requirement of implantable engineering for the regeneration microelectronic system, the system is of low noise, low power, small size and high performance. A front-end circuit and two high performance OPAs (operational amplifiers) have been designed for the system with different functions, and the two OPAs are a low-noise low-power two-stage OPA and a constant-gm RTR input and output OPA. The system has been realized in CSMC 0.5-μm CMOS technology. The test results show that the system satisfies the demands of neuron signal regeneration.

  18. Changes in University Students' Explanation Models of DC Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkonen, Tommi; Mäntylä, Terhi

    2017-04-01

    One well-known learning obstacle is that students rarely use the concepts in the way that scientists use them. Rather, students mix up closely related concepts and are inclined towards matter-based conceptualisations. Furthermore, some researchers have argued that certain difficulties are rooted in the student's limited repertoire of causal schemes. These two aspects are conveniently represented in the recent proposal of the systemic view of concept learning. We applied this framework in our analyses of university students' explanations of DC circuits and their use of concepts such as voltage, current and resistance. Our data consist of transcribed group interviews, which we analysed with content analysis. The results of our analysis are represented with directed graphs. Our results show that students had a rather refined ontological knowledge of the concepts. However, students relied on rather simple explanation models, but few students were able to modify their explanations during the interview. Based on the analysis, we identified three processes of change: model switch, model refinement and model elaboration. This emphasises the importance of relevant relational knowledge at a later stage of learning. This demonstrates how concept individuation and learning of relational structures occurs (and in which order) and sets forth interesting research questions for future research.

  19. A neural network model for texture discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, J; Gerstein, G L

    1993-01-01

    A model of texture discrimination in visual cortex was built using a feedforward network with lateral interactions among relatively realistic spiking neural elements. The elements have various membrane currents, equilibrium potentials and time constants, with action potentials and synapses. The model is derived from the modified programs of MacGregor (1987). Gabor-like filters are applied to overlapping regions in the original image; the neural network with lateral excitatory and inhibitory interactions then compares and adjusts the Gabor amplitudes in order to produce the actual texture discrimination. Finally, a combination layer selects and groups various representations in the output of the network to form the final transformed image material. We show that both texture segmentation and detection of texture boundaries can be represented in the firing activity of such a network for a wide variety of synthetic to natural images. Performance details depend most strongly on the global balance of strengths of the excitatory and inhibitory lateral interconnections. The spatial distribution of lateral connective strengths has relatively little effect. Detailed temporal firing activities of single elements in the lateral connected network were examined under various stimulus conditions. Results show (as in area 17 of cortex) that a single element's response to image features local to its receptive field can be altered by changes in the global context.

  20. Neural circuits in the brain that are activated when mitigating criminal sentences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Makiko; Camerer, Colin F; Fujie, Saori; Kato, Motoichiro; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Takano, Harumasa; Ito, Hiroshi; Suhara, Tetsuya; Takahashi, Hidehiko

    2012-03-27

    In sentencing guilty defendants, jurors and judges weigh 'mitigating circumstances', which create sympathy for a defendant. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure neural activity in ordinary citizens who are potential jurors, as they decide on mitigation of punishment for murder. We found that sympathy activated regions associated with mentalising and moral conflict (dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, precuneus and temporo-parietal junction). Sentencing also activated precuneus and anterior cingulate cortex, suggesting that mitigation is based on negative affective responses to murder, sympathy for mitigating circumstances and cognitive control to choose numerical punishments. Individual differences on the inclination to mitigate, the sentence reduction per unit of judged sympathy, correlated with activity in the right middle insula, an area known to represent interoception of visceral states. These results could help the legal system understand how potential jurors actually decide, and contribute to growing knowledge about whether emotion and cognition are integrated sensibly in difficult judgments.

  1. Primary circuit iodine model addition to IMPAIR-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osetek, D.J.; Louie, D.L.Y. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guntay, S.; Cripps, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    As part of a continuing effort to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Reactor Severe Accident Program (ARSAP) with complete iodine analysis capability, a task was undertaken to expand the modeling of IMPAIR-3, an iodine chemistry code. The expanded code will enable the DOE to include detailed iodine behavior in the assessment of severe accident source terms used in the licensing of U.S. Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs). IMPAIR-3 was developed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland, and has been used by ARSAP for the past two years to analyze containment iodine chemistry for ALWR source term analyses. IMPAIR-3 is primarily a containment code but the iodine chemistry inside the primary circuit (the Reactor Coolant System or RCS) may influence the iodine species released into the the containment; therefore, a RCS iodine chemistry model must be implemented in IMPAIR-3 to ensure thorough source term analysis. The ARSAP source term team and the PSI IMPAIR-3 developers are working together to accomplish this task. This cooperation is divided into two phases. Phase I, taking place in 1996, involves developing a stand-alone RCS iodine chemistry program called IMPRCS (IMPAIR -Reactor Coolant System). This program models a number of the chemical and physical processes of iodine that are thought to be important at conditions of high temperature and pressure in the RCS. In Phase II, which is tentatively scheduled for 1997, IMPRCS will be implemented as a subroutine in IMPAIR-3. To ensure an efficient calculation, an interface/tracking system will be developed to control the use of the RCS model from the containment model. These two models will be interfaced in such a way that once the iodine is released from the RCS, it will no longer be tracked by the RCS model but will be tracked by the containment model. All RCS thermal-hydraulic parameters will be provided by other codes. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  2. Neural circuit of verbal humor comprehension in schizophrenia - an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Adamczyk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit problems with understanding the figurative meaning of language. This study evaluates neural correlates of diminished humor comprehension observed in schizophrenia. The study included chronic schizophrenia (SCH outpatients (n = 20, and sex, age and education level matched healthy controls (n = 20. The fMRI punchline based humor comprehension task consisted of 60 stories of which 20 had funny, 20 nonsensical and 20 neutral (not funny punchlines. After the punchlines were presented, the participants were asked to indicate whether the story was comprehensible and how funny it was. Three contrasts were analyzed in both groups reflecting stages of humor processing: abstract vs neutral stories - incongruity detection; funny vs abstract - incongruity resolution and elaboration; and funny vs neutral – complete humor processing. Additionally, parametric modulation analysis was performed using both subjective ratings separately. Between-group comparisons revealed that the SCH subjects had attenuated activation in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (BA 41 in case of irresolvable incongruity processing of nonsensical puns; in the left dorsomedial middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8/9 in case of incongruity resolution and elaboration processing of funny puns; and in the interhemispheric dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24 in case of complete processing of funny puns. Additionally, during comprehensibility ratings the SCH group showed a suppressed activity in the left dorsomedial middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8/9 and revealed weaker activation during funniness ratings in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24. Interestingly, these differences in the SCH group were accompanied behaviorally by a protraction of time in both types of rating responses and by indicating funny punchlines less comprehensible. Summarizing, our results indicate neural substrates of humor comprehension

  3. Neural circuit of verbal humor comprehension in schizophrenia - an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Przemysław; Wyczesany, Miroslaw; Domagalik, Aleksandra; Daren, Artur; Cepuch, Kamil; Błądziński, Piotr; Cechnicki, Andrzej; Marek, Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia exhibit problems with understanding the figurative meaning of language. This study evaluates neural correlates of diminished humor comprehension observed in schizophrenia. The study included chronic schizophrenia (SCH) outpatients (n = 20), and sex, age and education level matched healthy controls (n = 20). The fMRI punchline based humor comprehension task consisted of 60 stories of which 20 had funny, 20 nonsensical and 20 neutral (not funny) punchlines. After the punchlines were presented, the participants were asked to indicate whether the story was comprehensible and how funny it was. Three contrasts were analyzed in both groups reflecting stages of humor processing: abstract vs neutral stories - incongruity detection; funny vs abstract - incongruity resolution and elaboration; and funny vs neutral - complete humor processing. Additionally, parametric modulation analysis was performed using both subjective ratings separately. Between-group comparisons revealed that the SCH subjects had attenuated activation in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (BA 41) in case of irresolvable incongruity processing of nonsensical puns; in the left dorsomedial middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8/9) in case of incongruity resolution and elaboration processing of funny puns; and in the interhemispheric dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24) in case of complete processing of funny puns. Additionally, during comprehensibility ratings the SCH group showed a suppressed activity in the left dorsomedial middle and superior frontal gyri (BA 8/9) and revealed weaker activation during funniness ratings in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (BA 24). Interestingly, these differences in the SCH group were accompanied behaviorally by a protraction of time in both types of rating responses and by indicating funny punchlines less comprehensible. Summarizing, our results indicate neural substrates of humor comprehension processing

  4. Modeling a verification test system for mixed-signal circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    San Segundo Bello, D.; Tangelder, R.J.W.T.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    In contrast to the large number of logic gates and storage circuits encountered in digital networks, purely analog networks usually have relatively few circuit primitives (operational amplifiers and so on). The complexity lies not in the number of building blocks but in the complexity of each block

  5. Magnetic equivalent circuit model for unipolar hybrid excitation synchronous machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupiec Emil

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lately, there has been increased interest in hybrid excitation electrical machines. Hybrid excitation is a construction that combines permanent magnet excitation with wound field excitation. Within the general classification, these machines can be classified as modified synchronous machines or inductor machines. These machines may be applied as motors and generators. The complexity of electromagnetic phenomena which occur as a result of coupling of magnetic fluxes of separate excitation systems with perpendicular magnetic axis is a motivation to formulate various mathematical models of these machines. The presented paper discusses the construction of a unipolar hybrid excitation synchronous machine. The magnetic equivalent circuit model including nonlinear magnetization curves is presented. Based on this model, it is possible to determine the multi-parameter relationships between the induced voltage and magnetomotive force in the excitation winding. Particular attention has been paid to the analysis of the impact of additional stator and rotor yokes on above relationship. Induced voltage determines the remaining operating parameters of the machine, both in the motor and generator mode of operation. The analysis of chosen correlations results in an identification of the effective control range of electromotive force of the machine.

  6. Novel mathematical neural models for visual attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Kang

    Visual attention has been extensively studied in psychology, but some fundamental questions remain controversial. We focus on two questions in this study. First, we investigate how a neuron in visual cortex responds to multiple stimuli inside the receptive eld, described by either a response...... for the visual attention theories and spiking neuron models for single spike trains. Statistical inference and model selection are performed and various numerical methods are explored. The designed methods also give a framework for neural coding under visual attention theories. We conduct both analysis on real...... system, supported by simulation study. Finally, we present the decoding of multiple temporal stimuli under these visual attention theories, also in a realistic biophysical situation with simulations....

  7. Neural Model for Left-Handed CPW Bandpass Filter Loaded Split Ring Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiwen; Wang, Shuxin; Tan, Mingtao; Zhang, Qijun

    2010-02-01

    Compact left-handed coplanar waveguide (CPW) bandpass filter loaded split ring resonator (SRR) is presented in this paper. The proposed filter exhibits a quasi-elliptic function response and its circuit size occupies only 12 × 11.8 mm2 (≈0.21 λg × 0.20 λg). Also, a simple circuit model is given and the parametric study of this filter is discussed. Then, with the aid of NeuroModeler software, a five-layer feed-forward perceptron neural networks model is built up to optimize the proposed filter design fast and accurately. Finally, this newly left-handed CPW bandpass filter was fabricated and measured. A good agreement between simulations and measurement verifies the proposed left-handed filter and the validity of design methodology.

  8. Disrupted insula-based neural circuit organization and conflict interference in trauma-exposed youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary A. Marusak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Childhood trauma exposure is a potent risk factor for psychopathology. Emerging research suggests that aberrant saliency processing underlies the link between early trauma exposure and later cognitive and socioemotional deficits that are hallmark of several psychiatric disorders. Here, we examine brain and behavioral responses during a face categorization conflict task, and relate these to intrinsic connectivity of the salience network (SN. The results demonstrate a unique pattern of SN dysfunction in youth exposed to trauma (n = 14 relative to comparison youth (n = 19 matched on age, sex, IQ, and sociodemographic risk. We find that trauma-exposed youth are more susceptible to conflict interference and this correlates with higher fronto-insular responses during conflict. Resting-state functional connectivity data collected in the same participants reveal increased connectivity of the insula to SN seed regions that is associated with diminished reward sensitivity, a critical risk/resilience trait following stress. In addition to altered intrinsic connectivity of the SN, we observed altered connectivity between the SN and default mode network (DMN in trauma-exposed youth. These data uncover network-level disruptions in brain organization following one of the strongest predictors of illness, early life trauma, and demonstrate the relevance of observed neural effects for behavior and specific symptom dimensions. SN dysfunction may serve as a diathesis that contributes to illness and negative outcomes following childhood trauma.

  9. Neural bases of food-seeking: affect, arousal and reward in corticostriatolimbic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balleine, Bernard W

    2005-12-15

    Recent studies suggest that there are multiple 'reward' or 'reward-like' systems that control food seeking; evidence points to two distinct learning processes and four modulatory processes that contribute to the performance of food-related instrumental actions. The learning processes subserve the acquisition of goal-directed and habitual actions and involve the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum, respectively. Access to food can function both to reinforce habits and as a reward or goal for actions. Encoding and retrieving the value of a goal appears to be mediated by distinct processes that, contrary to the somatic marker hypothesis, do not appear to depend on a common mechanism but on emotional and more abstract evaluative processes, respectively. The anticipation of reward on the basis of environmental events exerts a further modulatory influence on food seeking that can be dissociated from that of reward itself; earning a reward and anticipating a reward appear to be distinct processes and have been doubly dissociated at the level of the nucleus accumbens. Furthermore, the excitatory influence of reward-related cues can be both quite specific, based on the identity of the reward anticipated, or more general based on its motivational significance. The influence of these two processes on instrumental actions has also been doubly dissociated at the level of the amygdala. Although the complexity of food seeking provides a hurdle for the treatment of eating disorders, the suggestion that these apparently disparate determinants are functionally integrated within larger neural systems may provide novel approaches to these problems.

  10. Stress-protective neural circuits: not all roads lead through the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, John P; Greenwood, Benjamin N

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to an uncontrollable stressor elicits a constellation of physiological and behavioral sequel in laboratory rats that often reflect aspects of anxiety and other emotional disruptions. We review evidence suggesting that plasticity within the serotonergic dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is critical to the expression of uncontrollable stressor-induced anxiety. Specifically, after uncontrollable stressor exposure subsequent anxiogenic stimuli evoke greater 5-HT release in DRN terminal regions including the amygdala and striatum; and pharmacological blockade of postsynaptic 5-HT(2C) receptors in these regions prevents expression of stressor-induced anxiety. Importantly, the controllability of stress, the presence of safety signals, and a history of exercise mitigate the expression of stressor-induced anxiety. These stress-protective factors appear to involve distinct neural substrates; with stressor controllability requiring the medial prefrontal cortex, safety signals the insular cortex and exercise affecting the 5-HT system directly. Knowledge of the distinct yet converging mechanisms underlying these stress-protective factors could provide insight into novel strategies for the treatment and prevention of stress-related psychiatric disorders.

  11. Two stage neural network modelling for robust model predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patan, Krzysztof

    2017-11-02

    The paper proposes a novel robust model predictive control scheme realized by means of artificial neural networks. The neural networks are used twofold: to design the so-called fundamental model of a plant and to catch uncertainty associated with the plant model. In order to simplify the optimization process carried out within the framework of predictive control an instantaneous linearization is applied which renders it possible to define the optimization problem in the form of constrained quadratic programming. Stability of the proposed control system is also investigated by showing that a cost function is monotonically decreasing with respect to time. Derived robust model predictive control is tested and validated on the example of a pneumatic servomechanism working at different operating regimes. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimized Second-Order Dynamical Systems and Their RLC Circuit Models with PWL Controlled Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brzobohaty

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Complementary active RLC circuit models with a voltage-controlledvoltage source (VCVS and a current-controlled current source (CCCSfor the second-order autonomous dynamical system realization areproposed. The main advantage of these equivalent circuits is the simplerelation between the state model parameters and their correspondingcircuit parameters, which leads also to simple design formulas.

  13. Nitric oxide in the flocculus works the inhibitory neural circuits after unilateral labyrinthectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, T; Takeda, N; Kubo, T; Kiyama, H

    1999-01-09

    We previously reported that nitric oxide (NO) production in the unipolar brush (UB) cells is involved in vestibular compensation [T. Kitahara, N. Takeda, P.C. Emson, T. Kubo, H. Kiyama, Changes in nitric oxide synthase-like immunoreactivities in unipolar brush cells in the rat cerebellar flocculus after unilateral labyrinthectomy, Brain Res. 765 (1997) 1-6]. To further elucidate the role of NO-mediated signaling in flocculus after unilateral labyrinthectomy (UL), we examined UL-induced Fos expression, a marker of neural activity, in vestibular brainstem with continuous floccular infusions of Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS). After UL with floccular l-NAME infusions, Fos expression appeared in bilateral medial vestibular (MVe) and prepositus hypoglossal (PrH) nuclei. After UL with floccular saline infusions, however, Fos expression was observed only in the ipsi-MVe and contra-PrH. Furthermore, it has been revealed that UL with l-NAME infusions caused more severe vestibulo-ocular disturbances than UL with saline infusions at the initial stage [Kitahara et al. Brain Res. 765 (1997) 1-6]. Therefore, it is suggested that UL with floccular l-NAME infusions activates the contra-MVe and ipsi-PrH neurons and causes more severe imbalance between intervestibular nuclear activities at the initial stage. NO-mediated signaling in flocculus could be a possible driving force of the flocculus-mediated inhibition on the contra-MVe and ipsi-PrH at the initial stage of vestibular compensation. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  14. Enabling functional neural circuit simulations with distributed computing of neuromodulated plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke ePotjans

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A major puzzle in the field of computational neuroscience is how to relate system-level learning in higher organisms to synaptic plasticity. Recently, plasticity rules depending not only on pre- and post-synaptic activity but also on a third, non-local neuromodulatory signal have emerged as key candidates to bridge the gap between the macroscopic and the microscopic level of learning. Crucial insights into this topic are expected to be gained from simulations of neural systems, as these allow the simultaneous study of the multiple spatial and temporal scales that are involved in the problem. In particular, synaptic plasticity can be studied during the whole learning process, i.e. on a time scale of minutes to hours and across multiple brain areas. Implementing neuromodulated plasticity in large-scale network simulations where the neuromodulatory signal is dynamically generated by the network itself is challenging, because the network structure is commonly defined purely by the connectivity graph without explicit reference to the embedding of the nodes in physical space. Furthermore, the simulation of networks with realistic connectivity entails the use of distributed computing. A neuromodulated synapse must therefore be informed in an efficient way about the neuromodulatory signal, which is typically generated by a population of neurons located on different machines than either the pre- or post-synaptic neuron. Here, we develop a general framework to solve the problem of implementing neuromodulated plasticity in a time-driven distributed simulation, without reference to a particular implementation language, neuromodulator or neuromodulated plasticity mechanism. We implement our framework in the simulator NEST and demonstrate excellent scaling up to 1024 processors for simulations of a recurrent network incorporating neuromodulated spike-timing dependent plasticity.

  15. Accurate dynamic power estimation for CMOS combinational logic circuits with real gate delay model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omnia S. Fadl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic power estimation is essential in designing VLSI circuits where many parameters are involved but the only circuit parameter that is related to the circuit operation is the nodes’ toggle rate. This paper discusses a deterministic and fast method to estimate the dynamic power consumption for CMOS combinational logic circuits using gate-level descriptions based on the Logic Pictures concept to obtain the circuit nodes’ toggle rate. The delay model for the logic gates is the real-delay model. To validate the results, the method is applied to several circuits and compared against exhaustive, as well as Monte Carlo, simulations. The proposed technique was shown to save up to 96% processing time compared to exhaustive simulation.

  16. Accurate dynamic power estimation for CMOS combinational logic circuits with real gate delay model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadl, Omnia S; Abu-Elyazeed, Mohamed F; Abdelhalim, Mohamed B; Amer, Hassanein H; Madian, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic power estimation is essential in designing VLSI circuits where many parameters are involved but the only circuit parameter that is related to the circuit operation is the nodes' toggle rate. This paper discusses a deterministic and fast method to estimate the dynamic power consumption for CMOS combinational logic circuits using gate-level descriptions based on the Logic Pictures concept to obtain the circuit nodes' toggle rate. The delay model for the logic gates is the real-delay model. To validate the results, the method is applied to several circuits and compared against exhaustive, as well as Monte Carlo, simulations. The proposed technique was shown to save up to 96% processing time compared to exhaustive simulation.

  17. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer, E-mail: umermian@gmail.com; Khir, M. H. Md.; Tang, T. B. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Dennis, John Ojur [Department of Fundamental & Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid [Faculty of Electronics Engineering, GIK Institute of Engineering Sciences and Technology, Topi, Khyber Pakhtunkhaw (Pakistan); Bazaz, Shafaat A. [Department of Computer Science, Center for Advance Studies in Engineering, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2015-07-22

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  18. MEMS 3-DoF gyroscope design, modeling and simulation through equivalent circuit lumped parameter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Muhammad Umer; Dennis, John Ojur; Khir, M. H. Md.; Riaz, Kashif; Iqbal, Abid; Bazaz, Shafaat A.; Tang, T. B.

    2015-07-01

    Pre-fabrication, behavioural and performance analysis with computer aided design (CAD) tools is a common and fabrication cost effective practice. In light of this we present a simulation methodology for a dual-mass oscillator based 3 Degree of Freedom (3-DoF) MEMS gyroscope. 3-DoF Gyroscope is modeled through lumped parameter models using equivalent circuit elements. These equivalent circuits consist of elementary components which are counterpart of their respective mechanical components, used to design and fabricate 3-DoF MEMS gyroscope. Complete designing of equivalent circuit model, mathematical modeling and simulation are being presented in this paper. Behaviors of the equivalent lumped models derived for the proposed device design are simulated in MEMSPRO T-SPICE software. Simulations are carried out with the design specifications following design rules of the MetalMUMPS fabrication process. Drive mass resonant frequencies simulated by this technique are 1.59 kHz and 2.05 kHz respectively, which are close to the resonant frequencies found by the analytical formulation of the gyroscope. The lumped equivalent circuit modeling technique proved to be a time efficient modeling technique for the analysis of complex MEMS devices like 3-DoF gyroscopes. The technique proves to be an alternative approach to the complex and time consuming couple field analysis Finite Element Analysis (FEA) previously used.

  19. Comparison of Germanium Bipolar Junction Transistor Models for Real-Time Circuit Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Ben; Holters, Martin; van Walstijn, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The Ebers-Moll model has been widely used to represent Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) in Virtual Analogue (VA) circuits. An investigation into the validity of this model is presented in which the Ebers-Moll model is compared to BJT models of higher complexity , introducing the Gummel-Poon model to the VA field. A comparison is performed using two complementary approaches: on fit to measurements taken directly from BJTs, and on application to physical circuit models. Targeted parameter ex...

  20. Backpropagation Neural Network Modeling for Fault Location in Transmission Line 150 kV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azriyenni Narwan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this topic research was provided about the backpropagation neural network to detect fault location in transmission line 150 kV between substation to substation. The distance relay is one of the good protective device and safety devices that often used on transmission line 150 kV. The disturbances in power system are used distance relay protection equipment in the transmission line. However, it needs more increasing large load and network systems are increasing complex. The protection system use the digital control, in order to avoid the error calculation of the distance relay impedance settings and spent time will be more efficient. Then backpropagation neural network is a computational model that uses the training process that can be used to solve the problem of work limitations of distance protection relays. The backpropagation neural network does not have limitations cause of the impedance range setting. If the output gives the wrong result, so the correct of the weights can be minimized and also the response of galat, the backpropagation neural network is expected to be closer to the correct value. In the end, backpropagation neural network modeling is expected to detect the fault location and identify operational output current circuit breaker was tripped it. The tests are performance with interconnected system 150 kV of Riau Region.

  1. Assessment of neural networks performance in modeling rainfall ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the evaluation of performance of Neural Network (NN) model in predicting the behavioral pattern of rainfall depths of some locations in the North Central zones of Nigeria. The input to the model is the consecutive rainfall depths data obtained from the Nigerian Meteorological (NiMET) Agency. The neural ...

  2. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of an Inverse Fluidized Bed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    modeling of the inverse fluidized bed reactor. In the proposed model, the trained neural network represents the kinetics of biological decomposition of pollutants in the reactor. The neural network has been trained with experimental data obtained from an inverse fluidized bed reactor treating the starch industry wastewater.

  3. A Bayesian framework for simultaneously modeling neural and behavioral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon M; Forstmann, Birte U; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Brown, Scott D; Sederberg, Per B; Steyvers, Mark

    2013-05-15

    Scientists who study cognition infer underlying processes either by observing behavior (e.g., response times, percentage correct) or by observing neural activity (e.g., the BOLD response). These two types of observations have traditionally supported two separate lines of study. The first is led by cognitive modelers, who rely on behavior alone to support their computational theories. The second is led by cognitive neuroimagers, who rely on statistical models to link patterns of neural activity to experimental manipulations, often without any attempt to make a direct connection to an explicit computational theory. Here we present a flexible Bayesian framework for combining neural and cognitive models. Joining neuroimaging and computational modeling in a single hierarchical framework allows the neural data to influence the parameters of the cognitive model and allows behavioral data, even in the absence of neural data, to constrain the neural model. Critically, our Bayesian approach can reveal interactions between behavioral and neural parameters, and hence between neural activity and cognitive mechanisms. We demonstrate the utility of our approach with applications to simulated fMRI data with a recognition model and to diffusion-weighted imaging data with a response time model of perceptual choice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Bayesian framework for simultaneously modeling neural and behavioral data✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brandon M.; Forstmann, Birte U.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Brown, Scott D.; Sederberg, Per B.; Steyvers, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Scientists who study cognition infer underlying processes either by observing behavior (e.g., response times, percentage correct) or by observing neural activity (e.g., the BOLD response). These two types of observations have traditionally supported two separate lines of study. The first is led by cognitive modelers, who rely on behavior alone to support their computational theories. The second is led by cognitive neuroimagers, who rely on statistical models to link patterns of neural activity to experimental manipulations, often without any attempt to make a direct connection to an explicit computational theory. Here we present a flexible Bayesian framework for combining neural and cognitive models. Joining neuroimaging and computational modeling in a single hierarchical framework allows the neural data to influence the parameters of the cognitive model and allows behavioral data, even in the absence of neural data, to constrain the neural model. Critically, our Bayesian approach can reveal interactions between behavioral and neural parameters, and hence between neural activity and cognitive mechanisms. We demonstrate the utility of our approach with applications to simulated fMRI data with a recognition model and to diffusion-weighted imaging data with a response time model of perceptual choice. PMID:23370060

  5. Hybrid neural network bushing model for vehicle dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Jeong Hyun [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Kyu [Hyosung Corporation, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Wan Suk [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Although the linear model was widely used for the bushing model in vehicle suspension systems, it could not express the nonlinear characteristics of bushing in terms of the amplitude and the frequency. An artificial neural network model was suggested to consider the hysteretic responses of bushings. This model, however, often diverges due to the uncertainties of the neural network under the unexpected excitation inputs. In this paper, a hybrid neural network bushing model combining linear and neural network is suggested. A linear model was employed to represent linear stiffness and damping effects, and the artificial neural network algorithm was adopted to take into account the hysteretic responses. A rubber test was performed to capture bushing characteristics, where sine excitation with different frequencies and amplitudes is applied. Random test results were used to update the weighting factors of the neural network model. It is proven that the proposed model has more robust characteristics than a simple neural network model under step excitation input. A full car simulation was carried out to verify the proposed bushing models. It was shown that the hybrid model results are almost identical to the linear model under several maneuvers

  6. Mathematical model of an integrated circuit cooling through cylindrical rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beltrán-Prieto Luis Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main challenges in integrated circuits development is to propose alternatives to handle the extreme heat generated by high frequency of electrons moving in a reduced space that cause overheating and reduce the lifespan of the device. The use of cooling fins offers an alternative to enhance the heat transfer using combined a conduction-convection systems. Mathematical model of such process is important for parametric design and also to gain information about temperature distribution along the surface of the transistor. In this paper, we aim to obtain the equations for heat transfer along the chip and the fin by performing energy balance and heat transfer by conduction from the chip to the rod, followed by dissipation to the surrounding by convection. Newton's law of cooling and Fourier law were used to obtain the equations that describe the profile temperature in the rod and the surface of the chip. Ordinary differential equations were obtained and the respective analytical solutions were derived after consideration of boundary conditions. The temperature along the rod decreased considerably from the initial temperature (in contatct with the chip surface. This indicates the benefit of using a cilindrical rod to distribute the heat generated in the chip.

  7. ELECTRONIC CIRCUIT BOARDS NON-UNIFORM COOLING SYSTEM MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Yevdulov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The paper considers a mathematical model of non-uniform cooling of electronic circuit boards. The block diagram of the system implementing this approach, the method of calculation of the electronic board temperature field, as well as the principle of its thermal performance optimizing are presented. In the considered scheme the main heat elimination from electronic board is produced by the radiator system, and additional cooling of the most temperature-sensitive components is produced by thermoelectric batteries. Are given the two-dimensional temperature fields of the electronic board during its uniform and non-uniform cooling, is carried out their comparison. As follows from the calculations results, when using a uniform overall cooling of electronic unit there is a waste of energy for the cooling 0f electronic board parts which temperature is within acceptable temperature range without the cooling system. This approach leads to the increase in the cooling capacity of used thermoelectric batteries in comparison with the desired values. This largely reduces the efficiency of heat elimination system. The use for electronic boards cooling of non-uniform local heat elimination removes this disadvantage. The obtained dependences show that in this case, the energy required to create a given temperature is smaller than when using a common uniform cooling. In this approach the temperature field of the electronic board is more uniform and the cooling is more efficient. 

  8. Bayesian Recurrent Neural Network for Language Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Jen-Tzung; Ku, Yuan-Chu

    2016-02-01

    A language model (LM) is calculated as the probability of a word sequence that provides the solution to word prediction for a variety of information systems. A recurrent neural network (RNN) is powerful to learn the large-span dynamics of a word sequence in the continuous space. However, the training of the RNN-LM is an ill-posed problem because of too many parameters from a large dictionary size and a high-dimensional hidden layer. This paper presents a Bayesian approach to regularize the RNN-LM and apply it for continuous speech recognition. We aim to penalize the too complicated RNN-LM by compensating for the uncertainty of the estimated model parameters, which is represented by a Gaussian prior. The objective function in a Bayesian classification network is formed as the regularized cross-entropy error function. The regularized model is constructed not only by calculating the regularized parameters according to the maximum a posteriori criterion but also by estimating the Gaussian hyperparameter by maximizing the marginal likelihood. A rapid approximation to a Hessian matrix is developed to implement the Bayesian RNN-LM (BRNN-LM) by selecting a small set of salient outer-products. The proposed BRNN-LM achieves a sparser model than the RNN-LM. Experiments on different corpora show the robustness of system performance by applying the rapid BRNN-LM under different conditions.

  9. Runoff Modelling in Urban Storm Drainage by Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Brorsen, Michael; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    A neural network is used to simulate folw and water levels in a sewer system. The calibration of th neural network is based on a few measured events and the network is validated against measureed events as well as flow simulated with the MOUSE model (Lindberg and Joergensen, 1986). The neural...... network is used to compute flow or water level at selected points in the sewer system, and to forecast the flow from a small residential area. The main advantages of the neural network are the build-in self calibration procedure and high speed performance, but the neural network cannot be used to extract...... knowledge of the runoff process. The neural network was found to simulate 150 times faster than e.g. the MOUSE model....

  10. An Equivalent Electrical Circuit Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Mathematical Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh An Nguyen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Many of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC models proposed in the literature consist of mathematical equations. However, they are not adequately practical for simulating power systems. The proposed model takes into account phenomena such as activation polarization, ohmic polarization, double layer capacitance and mass transport effects present in a PEM fuel cell. Using electrical analogies and a mathematical modeling of PEMFC, the circuit model is established. To evaluate the effectiveness of the circuit model, its static and dynamic performances under load step changes are simulated and compared to the numerical results obtained by solving the mathematical model. Finally, the applicability of our model is demonstrated by simulating a practical system.

  11. Nano-scale CMOS analog circuits models and CAD techniques for high-level design

    CERN Document Server

    Pandit, Soumya; Patra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Reliability concerns and the limitations of process technology can sometimes restrict the innovation process involved in designing nano-scale analog circuits. The success of nano-scale analog circuit design requires repeat experimentation, correct analysis of the device physics, process technology, and adequate use of the knowledge database.Starting with the basics, Nano-Scale CMOS Analog Circuits: Models and CAD Techniques for High-Level Design introduces the essential fundamental concepts for designing analog circuits with optimal performances. This book explains the links between the physic

  12. A neural circuit for robust time-to-contact estimation based on primate MST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, N Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Time-to-contact (TTC) estimation is beneficial for visual navigation. It can be estimated from an image projection, either in a camera or on the retina, by looking at the rate of expansion of an object. When expansion rate (E) is properly defined, TTC = 1/E. Primate dorsal MST cells have receptive field structures suited to the estimation of expansion and TTC. However, the role of MST cells in TTC estimation has been discounted because of large receptive fields, the fact that neither they nor preceding brain areas appear to decompose the motion field to estimate divergence, and a lack of experimental data. This letter demonstrates mathematically that template models of dorsal MST cells can be constructed such that the output of the template match provides an accurate and robust estimate of TTC. The template match extracts the relevant components of the motion field and scales them such that the output of each component of the template match is an estimate of expansion. It then combines these component estimates to provide a mean estimate of expansion across the object. The output of model MST provides a direct measure of TTC. The ViSTARS model of primate visual navigation was updated to incorporate the modified templates. In ViSTARS and in primates, speed is represented as a population code in V1 and MT. A population code for speed complicates TTC estimation from a template match. Results presented in this letter demonstrate that the updated template model of MST accurately codes TTC across a population of model MST cells. We conclude that the updated template model of dorsal MST simultaneously and accurately codes TTC and heading regardless of receptive field size, object size, or motion representation. It is possible that a subpopulation of MST cells in primates represents expansion in this way.

  13. Ocean wave prediction using numerical and neural network models

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mandal, S.; Prabaharan, N.

    This paper presents an overview of the development of the numerical wave prediction models and recently used neural networks for ocean wave hindcasting and forecasting. The numerical wave models express the physical concepts of the phenomena...

  14. Role of Amygdala and Hippocampus in the Neural Circuit Subserving Conditioned Defeat in Syrian Hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Chris M.; Taylor, Stacie L.; Huhman, Kim L.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the roles of the amygdala and hippocampus in the formation of emotionally relevant memories using an ethological model of conditioned fear termed conditioned defeat (CD). Temporary inactivation of the ventral, but not dorsal hippocampus (VH, DH, respectively) using muscimol disrupted the acquisition of CD, whereas pretraining VH…

  15. Is the Medial Amygdala Part of the Neural Circuit Modulating Conditioned Defeat in Syrian Hamsters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Chris M.; Huhman, Kim L.

    2008-01-01

    Conditioned defeat is a model wherein hamsters that have previously experienced a single social defeat subsequently exhibit heightened levels of avoidance and submission in response to a smaller, non-aggressive intruder. While we have previously demonstrated the critical involvement of the basolateral and central nuclei of the amygdala in the…

  16. Neural and Neural Gray-Box Modeling for Entry Temperature Prediction in a Hot Strip Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, José Angel; Torres-Alvarado, Miguel; Cavazos, Alberto; Leduc, Luis

    2011-10-01

    In hot strip mills, initial controller set points have to be calculated before the steel bar enters the mill. Calculations rely on the good knowledge of rolling variables. Measurements are available only after the bar has entered the mill, and therefore they have to be estimated. Estimation of process variables, particularly that of temperature, is of crucial importance for the bar front section to fulfill quality requirements, and the same must be performed in the shortest possible time to preserve heat. Currently, temperature estimation is performed by physical modeling; however, it is highly affected by measurement uncertainties, variations in the incoming bar conditions, and final product changes. In order to overcome these problems, artificial intelligence techniques such as artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic have been proposed. In this article, neural network-based systems, including neural-based Gray-Box models, are applied to estimate scale breaker entry temperature, given its importance, and their performance is compared to that of the physical model used in plant. Several neural systems and several neural-based Gray-Box models are designed and tested with real data. Taking advantage of the flexibility of neural networks for input incorporation, several factors which are believed to have influence on the process are also tested. The systems proposed in this study were proven to have better performance indexes and hence better prediction capabilities than the physical models currently used in plant.

  17. Neural network models: Insights and prescriptions from practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samad, T. [Honeywell Technology Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Neural networks are no longer just a research topic; numerous applications are now testament to their practical utility. In the course of developing these applications, researchers and practitioners have been faced with a variety of issues. This paper briefly discusses several of these, noting in particular the rich connections between neural networks and other, more conventional technologies. A more comprehensive version of this paper is under preparation that will include illustrations on real examples. Neural networks are being applied in several different ways. Our focus here is on neural networks as modeling technology. However, much of the discussion is also relevant to other types of applications such as classification, control, and optimization.

  18. Computational modeling of neural plasticity for self-organization of neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrol-Cannon, Joseph; Jin, Yaochu

    2014-11-01

    Self-organization in biological nervous systems during the lifetime is known to largely occur through a process of plasticity that is dependent upon the spike-timing activity in connected neurons. In the field of computational neuroscience, much effort has been dedicated to building up computational models of neural plasticity to replicate experimental data. Most recently, increasing attention has been paid to understanding the role of neural plasticity in functional and structural neural self-organization, as well as its influence on the learning performance of neural networks for accomplishing machine learning tasks such as classification and regression. Although many ideas and hypothesis have been suggested, the relationship between the structure, dynamics and learning performance of neural networks remains elusive. The purpose of this article is to review the most important computational models for neural plasticity and discuss various ideas about neural plasticity's role. Finally, we suggest a few promising research directions, in particular those along the line that combines findings in computational neuroscience and systems biology, and their synergetic roles in understanding learning, memory and cognition, thereby bridging the gap between computational neuroscience, systems biology and computational intelligence. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. GABAergic circuit dysfunction in the Drosophila Fragile X syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatto, Cheryl L; Pereira, Daniel; Broadie, Kendal

    2014-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), caused by loss of FMR1 gene function, is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The FMR1 protein (FMRP) translational regulator mediates activity-dependent control of synapses. In addition to the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) hyperexcitation FXS theory, the GABA theory postulates that hypoinhibition is causative for disease state symptoms. Here, we use the Drosophila FXS model to assay central brain GABAergic circuitry, especially within the Mushroom Body (MB) learning center. All 3 GABAA receptor (GABAAR) subunits are reportedly downregulated in dfmr1 null brains. We demonstrate parallel downregulation of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the rate-limiting GABA synthesis enzyme, although GABAergic cell numbers appear unaffected. Mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker (MARCM) single-cell clonal studies show that dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons innervating the MB calyx display altered architectural development, with early underdevelopment followed by later overelaboration. In addition, a new class of extra-calyx terminating GABAergic neurons is shown to include MB intrinsic α/β Kenyon Cells (KCs), revealing a novel level of MB inhibitory regulation. Functionally, dfmr1 null GABAergic neurons exhibit elevated calcium signaling and altered kinetics in response to acute depolarization. To test the role of these GABAergic changes, we attempted to pharmacologically restore GABAergic signaling and assay effects on the compromised MB-dependent olfactory learning in dfmr1 mutants, but found no improvement. Our results show that GABAergic circuit structure and function are impaired in the FXS disease state, but that correction of hypoinhibition alone is not sufficient to rescue a behavioral learning impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A neural population model incorporating dopaminergic neurotransmission during complex voluntary behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fürtinger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Assessing brain activity during complex voluntary motor behaviors that require the recruitment of multiple neural sites is a field of active research. Our current knowledge is primarily based on human brain imaging studies that have clear limitations in terms of temporal and spatial resolution. We developed a physiologically informed non-linear multi-compartment stochastic neural model to simulate functional brain activity coupled with neurotransmitter release during complex voluntary behavior, such as speech production. Due to its state-dependent modulation of neural firing, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a key role in the organization of functional brain circuits controlling speech and language and thus has been incorporated in our neural population model. A rigorous mathematical proof establishing existence and uniqueness of solutions to the proposed model as well as a computationally efficient strategy to numerically approximate these solutions are presented. Simulated brain activity during the resting state and sentence production was analyzed using functional network connectivity, and graph theoretical techniques were employed to highlight differences between the two conditions. We demonstrate that our model successfully reproduces characteristic changes seen in empirical data between the resting state and speech production, and dopaminergic neurotransmission evokes pronounced changes in modeled functional connectivity by acting on the underlying biological stochastic neural model. Specifically, model and data networks in both speech and rest conditions share task-specific network features: both the simulated and empirical functional connectivity networks show an increase in nodal influence and segregation in speech over the resting state. These commonalities confirm that dopamine is a key neuromodulator of the functional connectome of speech control. Based on reproducible characteristic aspects of empirical data, we suggest a number

  1. Forecasting volatility with neural regression: a contribution to model adequacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refenes, A N; Holt, W T

    2001-01-01

    Neural nets' usefulness for forecasting is limited by problems of overfitting and the lack of rigorous procedures for model identification, selection and adequacy testing. This paper describes a methodology for neural model misspecification testing. We introduce a generalization of the Durbin-Watson statistic for neural regression and discuss the general issues of misspecification testing using residual analysis. We derive a generalized influence matrix for neural estimators which enables us to evaluate the distribution of the statistic. We deploy Monte Carlo simulation to compare the power of the test for neural and linear regressors. While residual testing is not a sufficient condition for model adequacy, it is nevertheless a necessary condition to demonstrate that the model is a good approximation to the data generating process, particularly as neural-network estimation procedures are susceptible to partial convergence. The work is also an important step toward developing rigorous procedures for neural model identification, selection and adequacy testing which have started to appear in the literature. We demonstrate its applicability in the nontrivial problem of forecasting implied volatility innovations using high-frequency stock index options. Each step of the model building process is validated using statistical tests to verify variable significance and model adequacy with the results confirming the presence of nonlinear relationships in implied volatility innovations.

  2. Spike neural models (part I: The Hodgkin-Huxley model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson, Melissa G.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks, or ANNs, have grown a lot since their inception back in the 1940s. But no matter the changes, one of the most important components of neural networks is still the node, which represents the neuron. Within spiking neural networks, the node is especially important because it contains the functions and properties of neurons that are necessary for their network. One important aspect of neurons is the ionic flow which produces action potentials, or spikes. Forces of diffusion and electrostatic pressure work together with the physical properties of the cell to move ions around changing the cell membrane potential which ultimately produces the action potential. This tutorial reviews the Hodkgin-Huxley model and shows how it simulates the ionic flow of the giant squid axon via four differential equations. The model is implemented in Matlab using Euler's Method to approximate the differential equations. By using Euler's method, an extra parameter is created, the time step. This new parameter needs to be carefully considered or the results of the node may be impaired.

  3. Detection of Internal Short Circuit in Lithium Ion Battery Using Model-Based Switching Model Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhwan Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of an internal short circuit (ISCr in a Li-ion battery can prevent it from undergoing thermal runaway, and thereby ensure battery safety. In this paper, a model-based switching model method (SMM is proposed to detect the ISCr in the Li-ion battery. The SMM updates the model of the Li-ion battery with ISCr to improve the accuracy of ISCr resistance R I S C f estimates. The open circuit voltage (OCV and the state of charge (SOC are estimated by applying the equivalent circuit model, and by using the recursive least squares algorithm and the relation between OCV and SOC. As a fault index, the R I S C f is estimated from the estimated OCVs and SOCs to detect the ISCr, and used to update the model; this process yields accurate estimates of OCV and R I S C f . Then the next R I S C f is estimated and used to update the model iteratively. Simulation data from a MATLAB/Simulink model and experimental data verify that this algorithm shows high accuracy of R I S C f estimates to detect the ISCr, thereby helping the battery management system to fulfill early detection of the ISCr.

  4. Modelling, analysis, and acceleration of a printed circuit board ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    reviewed for their correctness, then contact films are developed from the circuit films. These contact films are used in fabrication process. If the documents are not suitable for fabrication, it is returned back to the customer. 2.2 Panel cutting. Copper clads with thin layer of copper on both sides are used for fabrication of double.

  5. Neural decision model of business capitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Pokorný

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this article is focused on problems related to enterprise financial supervising. In the concrete, the situation of enterprise investment policy evaluation is described here. In this case, as a convenient tool for decision support, the approach of artificial intelligence was selected, particularly the model of neuron network. For the purpose of enterprise economic state evaluation, we use four input variables which describe the economic state. Three main variables are selected and the fourth one is the additional. The coding of main variables is chosen with the respect to the possible states of the enterprise. The multilayer neuron network was used for evaluation.The neural network can solve problems, which are hardly solvable for a manager because there can exist a lot of factors affecting the final decision. We have to take into account the fact that sometimes the situation is too complex. In this case, when the system gives incorrect result, it is possible to extend the current learning set and add adequate patterns which will help the system to recognize states of the enterprise.

  6. Testing Neural Models of the Development of Infant Visual Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, John E.; Hunter, Sharon K.

    2002-01-01

    Several models of the development of infant visual attention have used information about neural development. Most of these models have been based on nonhuman animal studies and have relied on indirect measures of neural development in human infants. This article discusses methods for studying a “neurodevelopmental” model of infant visual attention using indirect and direct measures of cortical activity. We concentrate on the effect of attention on eye movement control and show how animal-base...

  7. HBT and Schottky diode table-based nonlinear models for microwave integrated circuits design

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Testera, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Accurate active device nonlinear models are key elements in the design of Microwave Integrated Circuits (MICs) with Circuit Aided Design (CAD) tools. There is a large diversity of nonlinear models proposals, each one with their own formulation and characteristics. The most popular ones are empirical, in the sense that model parameters are extracted from electrical measurements, and they could be classified in analytical/compact and black-box (both, table-based and behavioral). Analytical ...

  8. A Gustatory Neural Circuit of Caenorhabditis elegans Generates Memory-Dependent Behaviors in Na(+) Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lifang; Sato, Hirofumi; Satoh, Yohsuke; Tomioka, Masahiro; Kunitomo, Hirofumi; Iino, Yuichi

    2017-02-22

    Animals show various behaviors in response to environmental chemicals. These behaviors are often plastic depending on previous experiences. Caenorhabditis elegans, which has highly developed chemosensory system with a limited number of sensory neurons, is an ideal model for analyzing the role of each neuron in innate and learned behaviors. Here, we report a new type of memory-dependent behavioral plasticity in Na(+) chemotaxis generated by the left member of bilateral gustatory neuron pair ASE (ASEL neuron). When worms were cultivated in the presence of Na(+), they showed positive chemotaxis toward Na(+), but when cultivated under Na(+)-free conditions, they showed no preference regarding Na(+) concentration. Both channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) activation with blue light and up-steps of Na(+) concentration activated ASEL only after cultivation with Na(+), as judged by increase in intracellular Ca(2+) Under cultivation conditions with Na(+), photoactivation of ASEL caused activation of its downstream interneurons AIY and AIA, which stimulate forward locomotion, and inhibition of its downstream interneuron AIB, which inhibits the turning/reversal behavior, and overall drove worms toward higher Na(+) concentrations. We also found that the Gq signaling pathway and the neurotransmitter glutamate are both involved in the behavioral response generated by ASEL.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Animals have acquired various types of behavioral plasticity during their long evolutionary history. Caenorhabditis elegans prefers odors associated with food, but plastically changes its behavioral response according to previous experience. Here, we report a new type of behavioral response generated by a single gustatory sensory neuron, the ASE-left (ASEL) neuron. ASEL did not respond to photostimulation or upsteps of Na(+) concentration when worms were cultivated in Na(+)-free conditions; however, when worms were cultivated with Na(+), ASEL responded and inhibited AIB to avoid turning and

  9. A computational neural model of orientation detection based on multiple guesses: comparison of geometrical and algebraic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hui; Ren, Yuan; Wang, Zi Yan

    2013-10-01

    The implementation of Hubel-Wiesel hypothesis that orientation selectivity of a simple cell is based on ordered arrangement of its afferent cells has some difficulties. It requires the receptive fields (RFs) of those ganglion cells (GCs) and LGN cells to be similar in size and sub-structure and highly arranged in a perfect order. It also requires an adequate number of regularly distributed simple cells to match ubiquitous edges. However, the anatomical and electrophysiological evidence is not strong enough to support this geometry-based model. These strict regularities also make the model very uneconomical in both evolution and neural computation. We propose a new neural model based on an algebraic method to estimate orientations. This approach synthesizes the guesses made by multiple GCs or LGN cells and calculates local orientation information subject to a group of constraints. This algebraic model need not obey the constraints of Hubel-Wiesel hypothesis, and is easily implemented with a neural network. By using the idea of a satisfiability problem with constraints, we also prove that the precision and efficiency of this model are mathematically practicable. The proposed model makes clear several major questions which Hubel-Wiesel model does not account for. Image-rebuilding experiments are conducted to check whether this model misses any important boundary in the visual field because of the estimation strategy. This study is significant in terms of explaining the neural mechanism of orientation detection, and finding the circuit structure and computational route in neural networks. For engineering applications, our model can be used in orientation detection and as a simulation platform for cell-to-cell communications to develop bio-inspired eye chips.

  10. Artificial neural network modeling of dissolved oxygen in reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Bo; Liu, Wen-Cheng

    2014-02-01

    The water quality of reservoirs is one of the key factors in the operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Dissolved oxygen (DO) in water column is essential for microorganisms and a significant indicator of the state of aquatic ecosystems. In this study, two artificial neural network (ANN) models including back propagation neural network (BPNN) and adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) approaches and multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to estimate the DO concentration in the Feitsui Reservoir of northern Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network are determined as water temperature, pH, conductivity, turbidity, suspended solids, total hardness, total alkalinity, and ammonium nitrogen. The performance of the ANN models and MLR model was assessed through the mean absolute error, root mean square error, and correlation coefficient computed from the measured and model-simulated DO values. The results reveal that ANN estimation performances were superior to those of MLR. Comparing to the BPNN and ANFIS models through the performance criteria, the ANFIS model is better than the BPNN model for predicting the DO values. Study results show that the neural network particularly using ANFIS model is able to predict the DO concentrations with reasonable accuracy, suggesting that the neural network is a valuable tool for reservoir management in Taiwan.

  11. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  12. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  13. Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after exercise training in a rat model of bilateral parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    in decreases in rCBF in the medial prefrontal cortex (cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic. Our results in this PD rat model uniquely highlight the breadth of functional reorganizations in motor and limbic circuits following lesion and long-term, aerobic exercise, and provide a framework for understanding the neural substrates underlying exercise-based neurorehabilitation.

  14. Functional Reorganization of Motor and Limbic Circuits after Exercise Training in a Rat Model of Bilateral Parkinsonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Myers, Kalisa G.; Guo, Yumei; Ocampo, Marco A.; Pang, Raina D.; Jakowec, Michael W.; Holschneider, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    in rCBF in the medial prefrontal cortex (cingulate, prelimbic, infralimbic). Our results in this PD rat model uniquely highlight the breadth of functional reorganizations in motor and limbic circuits following lesion and long-term, aerobic exercise, and provide a framework for understanding the neural substrates underlying exercise-based neurorehabilitation. PMID:24278239

  15. Electrical circuit modeling and analysis of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Zheng, Qian; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-05-01

    Numerical study of microwave imaging and microwave-induced thermoacoustic imaging utilizes finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis for simulation of microwave and acoustic interaction with biological tissues, which is time consuming due to complex grid-segmentation and numerous calculations, not straightforward due to no analytical solution and physical explanation, and incompatible with hardware development requiring circuit simulator such as SPICE. In this paper, instead of conventional FDTD numerical simulation, an equivalent electrical circuit model is proposed to model the microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissues for fast simulation and quantitative analysis in both one and two dimensions (2D). The equivalent circuit of ideal point-like tissue for microwave-acoustic interaction is proposed including transmission line, voltage-controlled current source, envelop detector, and resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) network, to model the microwave scattering, thermal expansion, and acoustic generation. Based on which, two-port network of the point-like tissue is built and characterized using pseudo S-parameters and transducer gain. Two dimensional circuit network including acoustic scatterer and acoustic channel is also constructed to model the 2D spatial information and acoustic scattering effect in heterogeneous medium. Both FDTD simulation, circuit simulation, and experimental measurement are performed to compare the results in terms of time domain, frequency domain, and pseudo S-parameters characterization. 2D circuit network simulation is also performed under different scenarios including different sizes of tumors and the effect of acoustic scatterer. The proposed circuit model of microwave acoustic interaction with biological tissue could give good agreement with FDTD simulated and experimental measured results. The pseudo S-parameters and characteristic gain could globally evaluate the performance of tumor detection. The 2D circuit network

  16. FPGA implementation of a biological neural network based on the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghini Bonabi, Safa; Asgharian, Hassan; Safari, Saeed; Nili Ahmadabadi, Majid

    2014-01-01

    A set of techniques for efficient implementation of Hodgkin-Huxley-based (H-H) model of a neural network on FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) is presented. The central implementation challenge is H-H model complexity that puts limits on the network size and on the execution speed. However, basics of the original model cannot be compromised when effect of synaptic specifications on the network behavior is the subject of study. To solve the problem, we used computational techniques such as CORDIC (Coordinate Rotation Digital Computer) algorithm and step-by-step integration in the implementation of arithmetic circuits. In addition, we employed different techniques such as sharing resources to preserve the details of model as well as increasing the network size in addition to keeping the network execution speed close to real time while having high precision. Implementation of a two mini-columns network with 120/30 excitatory/inhibitory neurons is provided to investigate the characteristic of our method in practice. The implementation techniques provide an opportunity to construct large FPGA-based network models to investigate the effect of different neurophysiological mechanisms, like voltage-gated channels and synaptic activities, on the behavior of a neural network in an appropriate execution time. Additional to inherent properties of FPGA, like parallelism and re-configurability, our approach makes the FPGA-based system a proper candidate for study on neural control of cognitive robots and systems as well.

  17. Stochastic Differential Equations and Markov Processes in the Modeling of Electrical Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rezaeyan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic differential equations(SDEs, arise from physical systems that possess inherent noise and certainty. We derive a SDE for electrical circuits. In this paper, we will explore the close relationship between the SDE and autoregressive(AR model. We will solve SDE related to RC circuit with using of AR(1 model (Markov process and however with Euler-Maruyama(EM method. Then, we will compare this solutions. Numerical simulations in MATLAB are obtained.

  18. A computational model of gene expression in an inducible synthetic circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Ceroni, F.; Furini, S; Cavalcanti, S

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to the rational design of gene circuits with predictable behaviours. Great efforts have been done so far to introduce in the field mathematical models that could facilitate the design of synthetic networks. Here we present a mathematical model of a synthetic gene-circuit with a negative feedback. The closed loop configuration allows the control of transcription by an inducer molecule (IPTG). Escherichia coli bacterial cells were transformed and expression of a fluoresce...

  19. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    movements, (2) distributed (at each leg) recurrent neural network based adaptive forward models with efference copies as internal models for sensory predictions and instantaneous state estimations, and (3) searching and elevation control for adapting the movement of an individual leg to deal with different...... conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain...... a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present...

  20. TRANSIENTS MODELING IN TRANSFORMERS ON THE BASIS OF MAGNETOELECTRIC EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Tykhovod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The mathematical model of numerical calculation of transients in electromagnetic devices with complicated load on the basis of nonlinear magneto-electric equivalent circuits of any complexity is developed. On the basis of the developed mathematical model, the method of state variables with application of the equations according to currents and voltages of Kirchhoff’s rules obtained by topological way is used. Thus uniformity for automatic drawing up of the condition equations of magneto-electric equivalent circuits is obtained. Convenience of application of the controlled sources of voltage and current which are widely used in magneto-electric equivalent circuits at the description of interaction of electric currents and magnetic fluxes is also reached. It is offered to use «magnetic currents» and «magnetic condensers» with a differential capacity in magnetic circuits models. On the basis of mathematical model the program complex Colo is developed. This complex provides modeling of the magneto-electric circuits containing greater than 300 elements and it has the increased speed of calculations in comparison with the existing program complexes and gives the steady solution with a less error. The mathematical model is executed so that the results of calculation are time dependences of currents (magnetic fluxes and voltage drops for all elements of circuit for any configuration

  1. Mechanisms of Left-Right Coordination in Mammalian Locomotor Pattern Generation Circuits: A Mathematical Modeling View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpalar, Adolfo E.; Rybak, Ilya A.

    2015-01-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized “hopping” pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left–right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  2. Epigenomic Landscapes of hESC-Derived Neural Rosettes: Modeling Neural Tube Formation and Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valensisi, Cristina; Andrus, Colin; Buckberry, Sam; Doni Jayavelu, Naresh; Lund, Riikka J; Lister, Ryan; Hawkins, R David

    2017-08-08

    We currently lack a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying neural tube formation and their contributions to neural tube defects (NTDs). Developing a model to study such a complex morphogenetic process, especially one that models human-specific aspects, is critical. Three-dimensional, human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neural rosettes (NRs) provide a powerful resource for in vitro modeling of human neural tube formation. Epigenomic maps reveal enhancer elements unique to NRs relative to 2D systems. A master regulatory network illustrates that key NR properties are related to their epigenomic landscapes. We found that folate-associated DNA methylation changes were enriched within NR regulatory elements near genes involved in neural tube formation and metabolism. Our comprehensive regulatory maps offer insights into the mechanisms by which folate may prevent NTDs. Lastly, our distal regulatory maps provide a better understanding of the potential role of neurological-disorder-associated SNPs. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Electric Circuit Model Analogy for Equilibrium Lattice Relaxation in Semiconductor Heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujofsa, Tedi; Ayers, John E.

    2018-01-01

    The design and analysis of semiconductor strained-layer device structures require an understanding of the equilibrium profiles of strain and dislocations associated with mismatched epitaxy. Although it has been shown that the equilibrium configuration for a general semiconductor strained-layer structure may be found numerically by energy minimization using an appropriate partitioning of the structure into sublayers, such an approach is computationally intense and non-intuitive. We have therefore developed a simple electric circuit model approach for the equilibrium analysis of these structures. In it, each sublayer of an epitaxial stack may be represented by an analogous circuit configuration involving an independent current source, a resistor, an independent voltage source, and an ideal diode. A multilayered structure may be built up by the connection of the appropriate number of these building blocks, and the node voltages in the analogous electric circuit correspond to the equilibrium strains in the original epitaxial structure. This enables analysis using widely accessible circuit simulators, and an intuitive understanding of electric circuits can easily be extended to the relaxation of strained-layer structures. Furthermore, the electrical circuit model may be extended to continuously-graded epitaxial layers by considering the limit as the individual sublayer thicknesses are diminished to zero. In this paper, we describe the mathematical foundation of the electrical circuit model, demonstrate its application to several representative structures involving In x Ga1- x As strained layers on GaAs (001) substrates, and develop its extension to continuously-graded layers. This extension allows the development of analytical expressions for the strain, misfit dislocation density, critical layer thickness and widths of misfit dislocation free zones for a continuously-graded layer having an arbitrary compositional profile. It is similar to the transition from circuit

  4. The shared circuits model (SCM): how control, mirroring, and simulation can enable imitation, deliberation, and mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Susan

    2008-02-01

    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring, and simulation. It is cast at a middle, functional level of description, that is, between the level of neural implementation and the level of conscious perceptions and intentional actions. The SCM connects shared informational dynamics for perception and action with shared informational dynamics for self and other, while also showing how the action/perception, self/other, and actual/possible distinctions can be overlaid on these shared informational dynamics. It avoids the common conception of perception and action as separate and peripheral to central cognition. Rather, it contributes to the situated cognition movement by showing how mechanisms for perceiving action can be built on those for active perception.;>;>The SCM is developed heuristically, in five layers that can be combined in various ways to frame specific ontogenetic or phylogenetic hypotheses. The starting point is dynamic online motor control, whereby an organism is closely attuned to its embedding environment through sensorimotor feedback. Onto this are layered functions of prediction and simulation of feedback, mirroring, simulation of mirroring, monitored inhibition of motor output, and monitored simulation of input. Finally, monitored simulation of input specifying possible actions plus inhibited mirroring of such possible actions can generate information about the possible as opposed to actual instrumental actions of others, and the

  5. Neural network models of learning and categorization in multigame experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide eMarchiori

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that regret-driven neural networks predict behavior in repeated completely mixed games remarkably well, substantially equating the performance of the most accurate established models of learning. This result prompts the question of what is the added value of modeling learning through neural networks. We submit that this modeling approach allows for models that are able to distinguish among and respond differently to different payoff structures. Moreover, the process of categorization of a game is implicitly carried out by these models, thus without the need of any external explicit theory of similarity between games. To validate our claims, we designed and ran two multigame experiments in which subjects faced, in random sequence, different instances of two completely mixed 2x2 games. Then, we tested on our experimental data two regret-driven neural network models, and compared their performance with that of other established models of learning and Nash equilibrium.

  6. On a fractal LC-electric circuit modeled by local fractional calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Machado, J. A. Tenreiro; Cattani, Carlo; Gao, Feng

    2017-06-01

    A non-differentiable model of the LC-electric circuit described by a local fractional differential equation of fractal dimensional order is addressed in this article. From the fractal electrodynamics point of view, the relaxation oscillator, defined on Cantor sets in LC-electric circuit, and its exact solution using the local fractional Laplace transform are obtained. Comparative results among local fractional derivative, Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative and conventional derivative are discussed. Local fractional calculus is proposed as a new tool suitable for the study of a large class of electric circuits.

  7. New equivalent-electrical circuit model and a practical measurement method for human body impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinen, Koyu; Kinjo, Ichiko; Zamami, Aki; Irei, Kotoyo; Nagayama, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Human body impedance analysis is an effective tool to extract electrical information from tissues in the human body. This paper presents a new measurement method of impedance using armpit electrode and a new equivalent circuit model for the human body. The lowest impedance was measured by using an LCR meter and six electrodes including armpit electrodes. The electrical equivalent circuit model for the cell consists of resistance R and capacitance C. The R represents electrical resistance of the liquid of the inside and outside of the cell, and the C represents high frequency conductance of the cell membrane. We propose an equivalent circuit model which consists of five parallel high frequency-passing CR circuits. The proposed equivalent circuit represents alpha distribution in the impedance measured at a lower frequency range due to ion current of the outside of the cell, and beta distribution at a high frequency range due to the cell membrane and the liquid inside cell. The calculated values by using the proposed equivalent circuit model were consistent with the measured values for the human body impedance.

  8. Sub-millimeter-Wave Equivalent Circuit Model for External Parasitics in Double-Finger HEMT Topologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karisan, Yasir; Caglayan, Cosan; Sertel, Kubilay

    2018-02-01

    We present a novel distributed equivalent circuit that incorporates a three-way-coupled transmission line to accurately capture the external parasitics of double-finger high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) topologies up to 750 GHz. A six-step systematic parameter extraction procedure is used to determine the equivalent circuit elements for a representative device layout. The accuracy of the proposed approach is validated in the 90-750 GHz band through comparisons between measured data (via non-contact probing) and full-wave simulations, as well as the equivalent circuit response. Subsequently, a semi-distributed active device model is incorporated into the proposed parasitic circuit to demonstrate that the three-way-coupled transmission line model effectively predicts the adverse effect of parasitic components on the sub-mmW performance in an amplifier setting.

  9. General Voltage Feedback Circuit Model in the Two-Dimensional Networked Resistive Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianFeng Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the feature of the two-dimensional networked resistive sensor array, we firstly proposed a general model of voltage feedback circuits (VFCs such as the voltage feedback non-scanned-electrode circuit, the voltage feedback non-scanned-sampling-electrode circuit, and the voltage feedback non-scanned-sampling-electrode circuit. By analyzing the general model, we then gave a general mathematical expression of the effective equivalent resistor of the element being tested in VFCs. Finally, we evaluated the features of VFCs with simulation and test experiment. The results show that the expression is applicable to analyze the VFCs’ performance of parameters such as the multiplexers’ switch resistors, the nonscanned elements, and array size.

  10. ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK FOR MODELS OF HUMAN OPERATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ruzek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new approach to mental functions modeling with the use of artificial neural networks. The artificial neural networks seems to be a promising method for the modeling of a human operator because the architecture of the ANN is directly inspired by the biological neuron. On the other hand, the classical paradigms of artificial neural networks are not suitable because they simplify too much the real processes in biological neural network. The search for a compromise between the complexity of biological neural network and the practical feasibility of the artificial network led to a new learning algorithm. This algorithm is based on the classical multilayered neural network; however, the learning rule is different. The neurons are updating their parameters in a way that is similar to real biological processes. The basic idea is that the neurons are competing for resources and the criterion to decide which neuron will survive is the usefulness of the neuron to the whole neural network. The neuron is not using "teacher" or any kind of superior system, the neuron receives only the information that is present in the biological system. The learning process can be seen as searching of some equilibrium point that is equal to a state with maximal importance of the neuron for the neural network. This position can change if the environment changes. The name of this type of learning, the homeostatic artificial neural network, originates from this idea, as it is similar to the process of homeostasis known in any living cell. The simulation results suggest that this type of learning can be useful also in other tasks of artificial learning and recognition.

  11. Neural Networks and Their Application to Air Force Personnel Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    breadth of techniques provides fertile ground against which to compare the results obtained with neural networks. ", Most of the models in reenlistment or...Specialties (MOSs) receiving SRBs were taken from the 1980 and 1981 Enlisted Master Files ( EMFs ). These 98 MOSs were then aggregated into 15 Career Management... mechanisms , and architectures. Neural Networks, 1(1), 17-62. Hagiwara, M. (1990). Accelerated backpropagation using unlearning based on a Hebb rule

  12. Stimulus-dependent maximum entropy models of neural population codes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Granot-Atedgi

    Full Text Available Neural populations encode information about their stimulus in a collective fashion, by joint activity patterns of spiking and silence. A full account of this mapping from stimulus to neural activity is given by the conditional probability distribution over neural codewords given the sensory input. For large populations, direct sampling of these distributions is impossible, and so we must rely on constructing appropriate models. We show here that in a population of 100 retinal ganglion cells in the salamander retina responding to temporal white-noise stimuli, dependencies between cells play an important encoding role. We introduce the stimulus-dependent maximum entropy (SDME model-a minimal extension of the canonical linear-nonlinear model of a single neuron, to a pairwise-coupled neural population. We find that the SDME model gives a more accurate account of single cell responses and in particular significantly outperforms uncoupled models in reproducing the distributions of population codewords emitted in response to a stimulus. We show how the SDME model, in conjunction with static maximum entropy models of population vocabulary, can be used to estimate information-theoretic quantities like average surprise and information transmission in a neural population.

  13. Superconducting high current magnetic Circuit: Design and Parameter Estimation of a Simulation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kiefer, Alexander; Reich, Werner Dr

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) utilizes superconducting main dipole magnets that bend the trajectory of the particle beams. In order to adjust the not completely homogeneous magnetic feld of the main dipole magnets, amongst others, sextupole correctcorrector magnets are used. In one of the 16 corrector magnet circuits placed in the LHC, 154 of these sextupole corrector magnets (MCS) are connected in series. This circuit extends on a 3.35 km tunnel section of the LHC. In 2015, at one of the 16 circuits a fault was detected. The simulation of this circuit is helpful for fnding the fault by applying alternating current at different frequencies. Within this Thesis a PSpice model for the simulation of the superconducting corrector magnet circuit was designed. The physical properties of the circuit and its elements were analyzed and implemented. For the magnets and bus-bars, sub-circuits were created which reflect the parasitic effects of electrodynamics and electrostats. The inductance values and capacitance valu...

  14. Quasi-linear vacancy dynamics modeling and circuit analysis of the bipolar memristor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Abraham

    Full Text Available The quasi-linear transport equation is investigated for modeling the bipolar memory resistor. The solution accommodates vacancy and circuit level perspectives on memristance. For the first time in literature the component resistors that constitute the contemporary dual variable resistor circuit model are quantified using vacancy parameters and derived from a governing partial differential equation. The model describes known memristor dynamics even as it generates new insight about vacancy migration, bottlenecks to switching speed and elucidates subtle relationships between switching resistance range and device parameters. The model is shown to comply with Chua's generalized equations for the memristor. Independent experimental results are used throughout, to validate the insights obtained from the model. The paper concludes by implementing a memristor-capacitor filter and compares its performance to a reference resistor-capacitor filter to demonstrate that the model is usable for practical circuit analysis.

  15. Constitutive Modelling of INCONEL 718 using Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiriand Bhekisipho Twala, Olufunminiyi

    2017-08-01

    Artificial neural network is used to model INCONEL 718 in this paper. The model accounts for precipitate hardening in the alloy. The input variables for the neural network model are strain, strain rate, temperature and microstructure state. The output variable is the flow stress. The early stopping technique is combined with Bayesian regularization process in training the network. Sample and non-sample measurement data were taken from the literature. The model predictions of flow stress of the alloy are in good agreement with experimental measurements.

  16. An ART neural network model of discrimination shift learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raijmakers, M.E.J.; Coffey, E.; Stevenson, C.; Winkel, J.; Berkeljon, A.; Taatgen, N.; van Rijn, H.

    2009-01-01

    We present an ART-based neural network model (adapted from [2]) of the development of discrimination-shift learning that models the trial-by-trial learning process in great detail. In agreement with the results of human participants (4-20 years of age) in [1] the model revealed two distinct learning

  17. Modelling Framework of a Neural Object Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswathy K S

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In many industrial, medical and scientific image processing applications, various feature and pattern recognition techniques are used to match specific features in an image with a known template. Despite the capabilities of these techniques, some applications require simultaneous analysis of multiple, complex, and irregular features within an image as in semiconductor wafer inspection. In wafer inspection discovered defects are often complex and irregular and demand more human-like inspection techniques to recognize irregularities. By incorporating neural network techniques such image processing systems with much number of images can be trained until the system eventually learns to recognize irregularities. The aim of this project is to develop a framework of a machine-learning system that can classify objects of different category. The framework utilizes the toolboxes in the Matlab such as Computer Vision Toolbox, Neural Network Toolbox etc.

  18. Water Quality Modeling in Reservoirs Using Multivariate Linear Regression and Two Neural Network Models

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Bo Chen; Wen-Cheng Liu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, two artificial neural network models (i.e., a radial basis function neural network, RBFN, and an adaptive neurofuzzy inference system approach, ANFIS) and a multilinear regression (MLR) model were developed to simulate the DO, TP, Chl a, and SD in the Mingder Reservoir of central Taiwan. The input variables of the neural network and the MLR models were determined using linear regression. The performances were evaluated using the RBFN, ANFIS, and MLR models based on statistical ...

  19. Development of a computational model on the neural activity patterns of a visual working memory in a hierarchical feedforward Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Soyoung; Choi, Woochul; Paik, Se-Bum

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism of information processing in the human brain remains a unique challenge because the nonlinear interactions between the neurons in the network are extremely complex and because controlling every relevant parameter during an experiment is difficult. Therefore, a simulation using simplified computational models may be an effective approach. In the present study, we developed a general model of neural networks that can simulate nonlinear activity patterns in the hierarchical structure of a neural network system. To test our model, we first examined whether our simulation could match the previously-observed nonlinear features of neural activity patterns. Next, we performed a psychophysics experiment for a simple visual working memory task to evaluate whether the model could predict the performance of human subjects. Our studies show that the model is capable of reproducing the relationship between memory load and performance and may contribute, in part, to our understanding of how the structure of neural circuits can determine the nonlinear neural activity patterns in the human brain.

  20. Forecast of consumer behaviour based on neural networks models comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Štencl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is comparison of accuracy level of forecasted values of several artificial neural network models. The comparison is performed on datasets of Czech household consumption values. Several statistical models often resolve this task with more or fewer restrictions. In previous work where models’ input conditions were not so strict and model with missing data was used (the time series didn’t contain many values we have obtained comparably good results with artificial neural networks. Two views – practical and theoretical, motivate the purpose of this study. Forecasting models for medium term prognosis of the main trends of Czech household consumption is part of the faculty research design grant MSM 6215648904/03/02 (Sub-task 5.3 which defines the practical purpose. Testing of nonlinear autoregressive artificial neural network model compared with feed-forward neural network and radial basis function neural network defines the theoretical purpose. The performance metrics of the models were evaluated using a combination of common error metrics, namely Correlation Coefficient and Mean Square Error, together with the number of epochs and/or main prediction error.

  1. Artificial neural networks modeling gene-environment interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Frauke

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene-environment interactions play an important role in the etiological pathway of complex diseases. An appropriate statistical method for handling a wide variety of complex situations involving interactions between variables is still lacking, especially when continuous variables are involved. The aim of this paper is to explore the ability of neural networks to model different structures of gene-environment interactions. A simulation study is set up to compare neural networks with standard logistic regression models. Eight different structures of gene-environment interactions are investigated. These structures are characterized by penetrance functions that are based on sigmoid functions or on combinations of linear and non-linear effects of a continuous environmental factor and a genetic factor with main effect or with a masking effect only. Results In our simulation study, neural networks are more successful in modeling gene-environment interactions than logistic regression models. This outperfomance is especially pronounced when modeling sigmoid penetrance functions, when distinguishing between linear and nonlinear components, and when modeling masking effects of the genetic factor. Conclusion Our study shows that neural networks are a promising approach for analyzing gene-environment interactions. Especially, if no prior knowledge of the correct nature of the relationship between co-variables and response variable is present, neural networks provide a valuable alternative to regression methods that are limited to the analysis of linearly separable data.

  2. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  3. Equivalent circuit model of an ultra-thin polarization-independent triple band metamaterial absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somak Bhattacharyya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents equivalent circuit modeling of an ultra-thin polarization-independent metamaterial microwave absorber consisting of three concentric closed ring resonators (CRR. The unit cell size as well as the other geometrical dimensions like radii and widths of the rings are optimized so that absorptions take place at three distinct frequencies near to the middle of the FCC defined radar spectrum eg., at 5.50 GHz, 9.52 GHz and 13.80 GHz with peak absorptivities of 94.1%, 99.6% and 99.4% respectively. The equivalent circuit model of the triple band absorber has been developed sequentially considering the single band and double band absorber models. The circuit simulation of the final model agrees well with the full-wave simulation, thus validating the modeling technique. The structure is also fabricated and experimental absorption peaks are found close to the simulated values.

  4. Equivalent circuit model of an ultra-thin polarization-independent triple band metamaterial absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Somak; Ghosh, Saptarshi; Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents equivalent circuit modeling of an ultra-thin polarization-independent metamaterial microwave absorber consisting of three concentric closed ring resonators (CRR). The unit cell size as well as the other geometrical dimensions like radii and widths of the rings are optimized so that absorptions take place at three distinct frequencies near to the middle of the FCC defined radar spectrum eg., at 5.50 GHz, 9.52 GHz and 13.80 GHz with peak absorptivities of 94.1%, 99.6% and 99.4% respectively. The equivalent circuit model of the triple band absorber has been developed sequentially considering the single band and double band absorber models. The circuit simulation of the final model agrees well with the full-wave simulation, thus validating the modeling technique. The structure is also fabricated and experimental absorption peaks are found close to the simulated values.

  5. Modular, rule-based modeling for the design of eukaryotic synthetic gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchisio, Mario Andrea; Colaiacovo, Moreno; Whitehead, Ellis; Stelling, Jörg

    2013-05-27

    The modular design of synthetic gene circuits via composable parts (DNA segments) and pools of signal carriers (molecules such as RNA polymerases and ribosomes) has been successfully applied to bacterial systems. However, eukaryotic cells are becoming a preferential host for new synthetic biology applications. Therefore, an accurate description of the intricate network of reactions that take place inside eukaryotic parts and pools is necessary. Rule-based modeling approaches are increasingly used to obtain compact representations of reaction networks in biological systems. However, this approach is intrinsically non-modular and not suitable per se for the description of composable genetic modules. In contrast, the Model Description Language (MDL) adopted by the modeling tool ProMoT is highly modular and it enables a faithful representation of biological parts and pools. We developed a computational framework for the design of complex (eukaryotic) gene circuits by generating dynamic models of parts and pools via the joint usage of the BioNetGen rule-based modeling approach and MDL. The framework converts the specification of a part (or pool) structure into rules that serve as inputs for BioNetGen to calculate the part's species and reactions. The BioNetGen output is translated into an MDL file that gives a complete description of all the reactions that take place inside the part (or pool) together with a proper interface to connect it to other modules in the circuit. In proof-of-principle applications to eukaryotic Boolean circuits with more than ten genes and more than one thousand reactions, our framework yielded proper representations of the circuits' truth tables. For the model-based design of increasingly complex gene circuits, it is critical to achieve exact and systematic representations of the biological processes with minimal effort. Our computational framework provides such a detailed and intuitive way to design new and complex synthetic gene circuits.

  6. Multi-array silicon probes with integrated optical fibers: light-assisted perturbation and recording of local neural circuits in the behaving animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Sébastien; Zemelman, Boris V; Barbic, Mladen; Losonczy, Attila; Buzsáki, György; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2010-06-01

    Recordings of large neuronal ensembles and neural stimulation of high spatial and temporal precision are important requisites for studying the real-time dynamics of neural networks. Multiple-shank silicon probes enable large-scale monitoring of individual neurons. Optical stimulation of genetically targeted neurons expressing light-sensitive channels or other fast (milliseconds) actuators offers the means for controlled perturbation of local circuits. Here we describe a method to equip the shanks of silicon probes with micron-scale light guides for allowing the simultaneous use of the two approaches. We then show illustrative examples of how these compact hybrid electrodes can be used in probing local circuits in behaving rats and mice. A key advantage of these devices is the enhanced spatial precision of stimulation that is achieved by delivering light close to the recording sites of the probe. When paired with the expression of light-sensitive actuators within genetically specified neuronal populations, these devices allow the relatively straightforward and interpretable manipulation of network activity.

  7. Circuit-Level Model of Phase-Locked Spin-Torque Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sora; Lim, Hyein; Kim, Miryeon; Shin, Hyungsoon; Lee, Seungjun

    2013-04-01

    Spin-torque oscillators (STOs) are new oscillating devices based on spintronics technology with many advantageous features, i.e., nanoscale size, high tunability, and compatibility with standard silicon processing. Recent research has shown that two electrically connected STOs may operate as a single device when specific conditions are met. To overcome the limitation of the small output power of STOs, the phase-locking behavior of multiple STOs is hereby extensively investigated. In this paper, we present a circuit-level model of two coupled STOs considering the interaction between them such that it can represent the phase-locking behavior of multiple STOs. In our model, the characteristics of each STO are defined first as functions of applied DC current and external magnetic field. Then, the phase-locking condition is examined to determine the properties of the two coupled STOs on the basis of a theoretical model. The analytic model of two coupled STOs is written in Verilog-A hardware description language. The behavior of the proposed model is verified by circuit-level simulation using HSPICE with CMOS circuits including a current-mirror circuit and differential amplifiers. Simulation results with various CMOS circuits have confirmed the effectiveness of our model.

  8. Modeling of Multimodal Effects in Two-port Ring-Resonator Circuits for Sensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; Stoffer, Remco

    2007-01-01

    Multimodal effects in two-port ring-resonator circuits for sensing applications were modeled using a transfer matrix method and previously published rigorous 3-D modeling tools. Device parameters which are relevant for evaluating sensing performance are numerically deduced from the model. Some

  9. SCYNet. Testing supersymmetric models at the LHC with neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtle, Philip; Belkner, Sebastian; Hamer, Matthias [Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Dercks, Daniel [Universitaet Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Keller, Tim; Kraemer, Michael; Sarrazin, Bjoern; Schuette-Engel, Jan; Tattersall, Jamie [RWTH Aachen University, Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    SCYNet (SUSY Calculating Yield Net) is a tool for testing supersymmetric models against LHC data. It uses neural network regression for a fast evaluation of the profile likelihood ratio. Two neural network approaches have been developed: one network has been trained using the parameters of the 11-dimensional phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM-11) as an input and evaluates the corresponding profile likelihood ratio within milliseconds. It can thus be used in global pMSSM-11 fits without time penalty. In the second approach, the neural network has been trained using model-independent signature-related objects, such as energies and particle multiplicities, which were estimated from the parameters of a given new physics model. (orig.)

  10. SCYNet: testing supersymmetric models at the LHC with neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtle, Philip; Belkner, Sebastian; Dercks, Daniel; Hamer, Matthias; Keller, Tim; Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn; Schütte-Engel, Jan; Tattersall, Jamie

    2017-10-01

    SCYNet (SUSY Calculating Yield Net) is a tool for testing supersymmetric models against LHC data. It uses neural network regression for a fast evaluation of the profile likelihood ratio. Two neural network approaches have been developed: one network has been trained using the parameters of the 11-dimensional phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM-11) as an input and evaluates the corresponding profile likelihood ratio within milliseconds. It can thus be used in global pMSSM-11 fits without time penalty. In the second approach, the neural network has been trained using model-independent signature-related objects, such as energies and particle multiplicities, which were estimated from the parameters of a given new physics model.

  11. A Neural Model of Distance-Dependent Percept of Object Size Constancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiehui Qian

    Full Text Available Size constancy is one of the well-known visual phenomena that demonstrates perceptual stability to account for the effect of viewing distance on retinal image size. Although theories involving distance scaling to achieve size constancy have flourished based on psychophysical studies, its underlying neural mechanisms remain unknown. Single cell recordings show that distance-dependent size tuned cells are common along the ventral stream, originating from V1, V2, and V4 leading to IT. In addition, recent research employing fMRI demonstrates that an object's perceived size, associated with its perceived egocentric distance, modulates its retinotopic representation in V1. These results suggest that V1 contributes to size constancy, and its activity is possibly regulated by feedback of distance information from other brain areas. Here, we propose a neural model based on these findings. First, we construct an egocentric distance map in LIP by integrating horizontal disparity and vergence through gain-modulated MT neurons. Second, LIP neurons send modulatory feedback of distance information to size tuned cells in V1, resulting in a spread of V1 cortical activity. This process provides V1 with distance-dependent size representations. The model supports that size constancy is preserved by scaling retinal image size to compensate for changes in perceived distance, and suggests a possible neural circuit capable of implementing this process.

  12. Modeling of corrosion product migration in the secondary circuit of nuclear power plants with WWER-1200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritskii, V. G.; Berezina, I. G.; Gavrilov, A. V.; Motkova, E. A.; Zelenina, E. V.; Prokhorov, N. A.; Gorbatenko, S. P.; Tsitser, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    Models of corrosion and mass transfer of corrosion products in the pipes of the condensate-feeding and steam paths of the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 are presented. The mass transfer and distribution of corrosion products over the currents of the working medium of the secondary circuit were calculated using the physicochemical model of mass transfer of corrosion products in which the secondary circuit is regarded as a cyclic system consisting of a number of interrelated elements. The circuit was divided into calculated regions in which the change in the parameters (flow rate, temperature, and pressure) was traced and the rates of corrosion and corrosion products entrainment, high-temperature pH, and iron concentration were calculated. The models were verified according to the results of chemical analyses at Kalinin NPP and iron corrosion product concentrations in the feed water at different NPPs depending on pH at 25°C (pH25) for service times τ ≥ 5000 h. The calculated pH values at a coolant temperature t (pH t ) in the secondary circuit of NPPs with WWER-1200 were presented. The calculation of the distribution of pH t and ethanolamine and ammonia concentrations over the condensate feed (CFC) and steam circuits is given. The models are designed for developing the calculation codes. The project solutions of ATOMPROEKT satisfy the safety and reliability requirements for power plants with WWER-1200. The calculated corrosion and corrosion product mass transfer parameters showed that the model allows the designer to choose between the increase of the correcting reagent concentration, the use of steel with higher chromium contents, and intermittent washing of the steam generator from sediments as the best solution for definite regions of the circuit.

  13. Neural Networks for Modeling and Control of Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelen, A. L.; Biedron, S. G.; Chase, B. E.; Edstrom, D.; Milton, S. V.; Stabile, P.

    2016-04-01

    Particle accelerators are host to myriad nonlinear and complex physical phenomena. They often involve a multitude of interacting systems, are subject to tight performance demands, and should be able to run for extended periods of time with minimal interruptions. Often times, traditional control techniques cannot fully meet these requirements. One promising avenue is to introduce machine learning and sophisticated control techniques inspired by artificial intelligence, particularly in light of recent theoretical and practical advances in these fields. Within machine learning and artificial intelligence, neural networks are particularly well-suited to modeling, control, and diagnostic analysis of complex, nonlinear, and time-varying systems, as well as systems with large parameter spaces. Consequently, the use of neural network-based modeling and control techniques could be of significant benefit to particle accelerators. For the same reasons, particle accelerators are also ideal test-beds for these techniques. Many early attempts to apply neural networks to particle accelerators yielded mixed results due to the relative immaturity of the technology for such tasks. The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce neural networks to the particle accelerator community and report on some work in neural network control that is being conducted as part of a dedicated collaboration between Fermilab and Colorado State University (CSU). We describe some of the challenges of particle accelerator control, highlight recent advances in neural network techniques, discuss some promising avenues for incorporating neural networks into particle accelerator control systems, and describe a neural network-based control system that is being developed for resonance control of an RF electron gun at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility, including initial experimental results from a benchmark controller.

  14. Modelling of word usage frequency dynamics using artificial neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Voloskov, D. S.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the method for modelling of word usage frequency time series is proposed. An artificial feedforward neural network was used to predict word usage frequencies. The neural network was trained using the maximum likelihood criterion. The Google Books Ngram corpus was used for the analysis. This database provides a large amount of data on frequency of specific word forms for 7 languages. Statistical modelling of word usage frequency time series allows finding optimal fitting and filtering algorithm for subsequent lexicographic analysis and verification of frequency trend models.

  15. Using circuit theory to model connectivity in ecology, evolution, and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Brad H; Dickson, Brett G; Keitt, Timothy H; Shah, Viral B

    2008-10-01

    Connectivity among populations and habitats is important for a wide range of ecological processes. Understanding, preserving, and restoring connectivity in complex landscapes requires connectivity models and metrics that are reliable, efficient, and process based. We introduce a new class of ecological connectivity models based in electrical circuit theory. Although they have been applied in other disciplines, circuit-theoretic connectivity models are new to ecology. They offer distinct advantages over common analytic connectivity models, including a theoretical basis in random walk theory and an ability to evaluate contributions of multiple dispersal pathways. Resistance, current, and voltage calculated across graphs or raster grids can be related to ecological processes (such as individual movement and gene flow) that occur across large population networks or landscapes. Efficient algorithms can quickly solve networks with millions of nodes, or landscapes with millions of raster cells. Here we review basic circuit theory, discuss relationships between circuit and random walk theories, and describe applications in ecology, evolution, and conservation. We provide examples of how circuit models can be used to predict movement patterns and fates of random walkers in complex landscapes and to identify important habitat patches and movement corridors for conservation planning.

  16. The interaction of bayesian priors and sensory data and its neural circuit implementation in visually guided movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Lee, Joonyeol; Lisberger, Stephen G

    2012-12-05

    Sensory-motor behavior results from a complex interaction of noisy sensory data with priors based on recent experience. By varying the stimulus form and contrast for the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements in monkeys, we show that visual motion inputs compete with two independent priors: one prior biases eye speed toward zero; the other prior attracts eye direction according to the past several days' history of target directions. The priors bias the speed and direction of the initiation of pursuit for the weak sensory data provided by the motion of a low-contrast sine wave grating. However, the priors have relatively little effect on pursuit speed and direction when the visual stimulus arises from the coherent motion of a high-contrast patch of dots. For any given stimulus form, the mean and variance of eye speed covary in the initiation of pursuit, as expected for signal-dependent noise. This relationship suggests that pursuit implements a trade-off between movement accuracy and variation, reducing both when the sensory signals are noisy. The tradeoff is implemented as a competition of sensory data and priors that follows the rules of Bayesian estimation. Computer simulations show that the priors can be understood as direction-specific control of the strength of visual-motor transmission, and can be implemented in a neural-network model that makes testable predictions about the population response in the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields.

  17. The interaction of Bayesian priors and sensory data and its neural circuit implementation in visually-guided movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Lee, Joonyeol; Lisberger, Stephen G.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory-motor behavior results from a complex interaction of noisy sensory data with priors based on recent experience. By varying the stimulus form and contrast for the initiation of smooth pursuit eye movements in monkeys, we show that visual motion inputs compete with two independent priors: one prior biases eye speed toward zero; the other prior attracts eye direction according to the past several days’ history of target directions. The priors bias the speed and direction of the initiation of pursuit for the weak sensory data provided by the motion of a low-contrast sine wave grating. However, the priors have relatively little effect on pursuit speed and direction when the visual stimulus arises from the coherent motion of a high-contrast patch of dots. For any given stimulus form, the mean and variance of eye speed co-vary in the initiation of pursuit, as expected for signal-dependent noise. This relationship suggests that pursuit implements a trade-off between movement accuracy and variation, reducing both when the sensory signals are noisy. The tradeoff is implemented as a competition of sensory data and priors that follows the rules of Bayesian estimation. Computer simulations show that the priors can be understood as direction specific control of the strength of visual-motor transmission, and can be implemented in a neural-network model that makes testable predictions about the population response in the smooth eye movement region of the frontal eye fields. PMID:23223286

  18. Data Driven Broiler Weight Forecasting using Dynamic Neural Network Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Simon Vestergaard; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon; Riisgaard-Jensen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the dynamic influence of environmental broiler house conditions and broiler growth is investigated. Dynamic neural network forecasting models have been trained on farm-scale broiler batch production data from 12 batches from the same house. The model forecasts future broiler weight...

  19. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of ... in construction, purpose and design and already in use are used. The fast RT model is able to ... porates measurements from various instruments in comparison with other ...

  20. Discriminative training of self-structuring hidden control neural models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Hartmann, Uwe; Hunnerup, Preben

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new training algorithm for self-structuring hidden control neural (SHC) models. The SHC models were trained non-discriminatively for speech recognition applications. Better recognition performance can generally be achieved, if discriminative training is applied instead. Thus...

  1. Artificial Neural Networks for Modeling Knowing and Learning in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2000-01-01

    Advocates artificial neural networks as models for cognition and development. Provides an example of how such models work in the context of a well-known Piagetian developmental task and school science activity: balance beam problems. (Contains 59 references.) (Author/WRM)

  2. Role of neural network models for developing speech systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These prosody models are further examined for applications such as text to speech synthesis, speech recognition, speaker recognition and language identification. Neural network models in voice conversion system are explored for capturing the mapping functions between source and target speakers at source, system and ...

  3. Verification of the predictive capabilities of the 4C code cryogenic circuit model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanino, R.; Bonifetto, R.; Hoa, C.; Richard, L. Savoldi

    2014-01-01

    The 4C code was developed to model thermal-hydraulics in superconducting magnet systems and related cryogenic circuits. It consists of three coupled modules: a quasi-3D thermal-hydraulic model of the winding; a quasi-3D model of heat conduction in the magnet structures; an object-oriented a-causal model of the cryogenic circuit. In the last couple of years the code and its different modules have undergone a series of validation exercises against experimental data, including also data coming from the supercritical He loop HELIOS at CEA Grenoble. However, all this analysis work was done each time after the experiments had been performed. In this paper a first demonstration is given of the predictive capabilities of the 4C code cryogenic circuit module. To do that, a set of ad-hoc experimental scenarios have been designed, including different heating and control strategies. Simulations with the cryogenic circuit module of 4C have then been performed before the experiment. The comparison presented here between the code predictions and the results of the HELIOS measurements gives the first proof of the excellent predictive capability of the 4C code cryogenic circuit module.

  4. Data-driven inference of network connectivity for modeling the dynamics of neural codes in the insect antennal lobe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli eShlizerman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The antennal lobe (AL, olfactory processing center in insects, is able to process stimuli into distinct neural activity patterns, called olfactory neural codes. To model their dynamics we perform multichannel recordings from the projection neurons in the AL driven by different odorants. We then derive a dynamic neuronal network from the electrophysiological data. The network consists of lateral-inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons (modeled as firing-rate units, and is capable of producing unique olfactory neural codes for the tested odorants. To construct the network, we (i design a projection, an odor space, for the neural recording from the AL, which discriminates between distinct odorants trajectories (ii characterize scent recognition, i.e., decision-making based on olfactory signals and (iii infer the wiring of the neural circuit, the connectome of the AL. We show that the constructed model is consistent with biological observations, such as contrast enhancement and robustness to noise. The study suggests a data-driven approach to answer a key biological question in identifying how lateral inhibitory neurons can be wired to excitatory neurons to permit robust activity patterns.

  5. Data-driven inference of network connectivity for modeling the dynamics of neural codes in the insect antennal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlizerman, Eli; Riffell, Jeffrey A; Kutz, J Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL), olfactory processing center in insects, is able to process stimuli into distinct neural activity patterns, called olfactory neural codes. To model their dynamics we perform multichannel recordings from the projection neurons in the AL driven by different odorants. We then derive a dynamic neuronal network from the electrophysiological data. The network consists of lateral-inhibitory neurons and excitatory neurons (modeled as firing-rate units), and is capable of producing unique olfactory neural codes for the tested odorants. To construct the network, we (1) design a projection, an odor space, for the neural recording from the AL, which discriminates between distinct odorants trajectories (2) characterize scent recognition, i.e., decision-making based on olfactory signals and (3) infer the wiring of the neural circuit, the connectome of the AL. We show that the constructed model is consistent with biological observations, such as contrast enhancement and robustness to noise. The study suggests a data-driven approach to answer a key biological question in identifying how lateral inhibitory neurons can be wired to excitatory neurons to permit robust activity patterns.

  6. SPICE Modeling of Body Bias Effect in 4H-SiC Integrated Circuit Resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2017-01-01

    The DC electrical behavior of n-type 4H-SiC resistors used for realizing 500C durable integrated circuits (ICs) is studied as a function of substrate bias and temperature. Improved fidelity electrical simulation is described using SPICE NMOS model to simulate resistor substrate body bias effect that is absent from the SPICE semiconductor resistor model.

  7. Space Mapping Optimization of Microwave Circuits Exploiting Surrogate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakr, M. H.; Bandler, J. W.; Madsen, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    is a convex combination of a mapped coarse model and a linearized fine model. It exploits, in a novel way, a linear frequency-sensitive mapping. During the optimization iterates, the coarse and fine models are simulated at different sets of frequencies. This approach is shown to be especially powerful......A powerful new space-mapping (SM) optimization algorithm is presented in this paper. It draws upon recent developments in both surrogate model-based optimization and modeling of microwave devices, SM optimization is formulated as a general optimization problem of a surrogate model. This model...

  8. Parameter Identification for a New Circuit Model Aimed to Predict Body Water Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GHEORGHE, A.-G.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular and extracellular water volumes in the human body have been computed using a sequence of models starting with a linear first order RC circuit (Cole model and finishing with the De Lorenzo model. This last model employs a fractional order impedance whose parameters are identified using the frequency characteristics of the impedance module and phase, the latter being not unique. While the Cole model has a two octaves frequency validity range, the De Lorenzo model can be used for three decades. A new linear RC model, valid for a three decades frequency range, is proposed. This circuit can be viewed as an extension of the Cole model for a larger frequency interval, unlike similar models proposed by the same authors.

  9. Engineering a thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuit on SpiNNaker: a preliminary study toward modeling sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Basabdatta S; Patterson, Cameron; Galluppi, Francesco; Durrant, Simon J; Furber, Steve

    2014-01-01

    We present a preliminary study of a thalamo-cortico-thalamic (TCT) implementation on SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network architecture), a brain inspired hardware platform designed to incorporate the inherent biological properties of parallelism, fault tolerance and energy efficiency. These attributes make SpiNNaker an ideal platform for simulating biologically plausible computational models. Our focus in this work is to design a TCT framework that can be simulated on SpiNNaker to mimic dynamical behavior similar to Electroencephalogram (EEG) time and power-spectra signatures in sleep-wake transition. The scale of the model is minimized for simplicity in this proof-of-concept study; thus the total number of spiking neurons is ≈1000 and represents a "mini-column" of the thalamocortical tissue. All data on model structure, synaptic layout and parameters is inspired from previous studies and abstracted at a level that is appropriate to the aims of the current study as well as computationally suitable for model simulation on a small 4-chip SpiNNaker system. The initial results from selective deletion of synaptic connectivity parameters in the model show similarity with EEG power spectra characteristics of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide a positive perspective and a basis for future implementation of a very large scale biologically plausible model of thalamo-cortico-thalamic interactivity-the essential brain circuit that regulates the biological sleep-wake cycle and associated EEG rhythms.

  10. Engineering a thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuit on SpiNNaker: a preliminary study towards modelling sleep and wakefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a preliminary study of a thalamo-cortico-thalamic (TCT implementation on SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network architecture, a brain inspired hardware platform designed to incorporate the inherent biological properties of parallelism, fault tolerance and energy efficiency. These attributes make SpiNNaker an ideal platform for simulating biologically plausible computational models. Our focus in this work is to design a TCT framework that can be simulated on SpiNNaker to mimic dynamical behaviour similar to Electroencephalogram (EEG time and power-spectra signatures in sleep-wake transition. The scale of the model is minimised for simplicity in this proof-of-concept study; thus the total number of spiking neurons is approximately 1000 and represents a `mini-column' of the thalamocortical tissue. All data on model structure, synaptic layout and parameters is inspired from previous studies and abstracted at a level that is appropriate to the aims of the current study as well as computationally suitable for model simulation on a small 4-chip SpiNNaker system. The initial results from selective deletion of synaptic connectivity parameters in the model show similarity with EEG time series characteristics of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide a positive perspective and a basis for future implementation of a very large scale biologically plausible model of thalamo-cortico-thalamic interactivity---the essential brain circuit that regulates the biological sleep-wake cycle and associated EEG rhythms.

  11. Comprehensive Equivalent Circuit Based Modeling and Model Based Management of Aged Lithium ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shijie

    Energy storage is one of society's grand challenges for the 21st century. Lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are widely used in mobile devices, transportation, and stationary energy storages due to lowering cost combined with excellent power/energy density as well as cycle durability. The need for a battery management system (BMS) arises from a demand to improve cycle life, assure safety, and optimize the full pack performance. In this work, we proposed a model based battery on-line state of charge (SoC) and state of health (SoH) estimator for LIBs. The estimator incorporates a comprehensive Equivalent Circuit Model (ECM) as reference, an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) as state observer, a Recursive Least Square (RLS) algorithm as parameter identifier, and Parameter Varying Approach (PVA) based optimization algorithms for the parameter function regressions. The developed adaptive estimator was applied to a 10kW smart grid energy storage application using retired electric vehicle batteries. The estimator exhibits a high numerical efficiency as well as an excellent accuracy in estimating SoC and SoH. The estimator also provides a novel method to optimize the correlation between battery open circuit voltage (OCV) and SoC, which further improves states estimation accuracy.

  12. On the nature, modeling, and neural bases of social ties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winden, Frans; Stallen, Mirre; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2008-01-01

    This chapter addresses the nature, formalization, and neural bases of (affective) social ties and discusses the relevance of ties for health economics. A social tie is defined as an affective weight attached by an individual to the well-being of another individual ('utility interdependence'). Ties can be positive or negative, and symmetric or asymmetric between individuals. Characteristic of a social tie, as conceived of here, is that it develops over time under the influence of interaction, in contrast with a trait like altruism. Moreover, a tie is not related to strategic behavior such as reputation formation but seen as generated by affective responses. A formalization is presented together with some supportive evidence from behavioral experiments. This is followed by a discussion of related psychological constructs and the presentation of suggestive existing neural findings. To help prepare the grounds for a model-based neural analysis some speculations on the neural networks involved are provided, together with suggestions for future research. Social ties are not only found to be important from an economic viewpoint, it is also shown that they can be modeled and related to neural substrates. By providing an overview of the economic research on social ties and connecting it with the broader behavioral and neuroeconomics literature, the chapter may contribute to the development of a neuroeconomics of social ties.

  13. Research on the equivalent circuit model of a circular flexural-vibration-research on the equivalent circuit model of a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer with moderate thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wenjin; Wang, Qinglei; Su, Xujian

    2013-07-01

    The equivalent circuit model of a piezoelectric transformer is useful in designing and optimizing the related driving circuits. Based on previous work, an equivalent circuit model for a circular flexural-vibration-mode piezoelectric transformer with moderate thickness is proposed and validated by finite element analysis. The input impedance, voltage gain, and efficiency of the transformer are determined through computation. The basic behaviors of the transformer are shown by numerical results.

  14. Research on the modeling of the impedance match bond at station track circuit in Chinese high-speed railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwu Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-shift keying audio jointless track circuit is used in high-speed railway in China. However, within the station, track circuit with mechanical insulation is applied. In complex circuit network of electrified railway station, impedance match bond is designed to ensure the normal operation of the track circuit and the protection of strong traction current interference. As a combination of strong and weak electricity components of track circuit, impedance match bond is both the part of the loop of the traction current and the part of the transmission line of track circuit, playing a very critical role in the electrified railway. The structure of impedance match bond is more complex than traditional impedance transformer, including the transformer with larger air-gap, LC resonance circuit for power frequency filtering, and components to enhance the signal frequency. Modeling on impedance match bond and study about the four-terminal network parameters of impedance match bond are in favor of the following two aspects: modeling of the overall traction current and calculation of track circuit working condition. By applying the transformer equivalent circuit model and combination of testing and calculation, the accurate model of impedance match bond is constructed and verified. Finally, for ease of track circuit calculation, four-terminal network model of impedance match bond under different signal carrier frequencies is presented.

  15. Modeling of the Voltage Waves in the LHC Main Dipole Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, E; Formenti, F; Steckert, J; Thiesen, H; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    When a fast power abort is triggered in the LHC main dipole chain, voltage transients are generated at the output of the power converter and across the energy-extraction switches. The voltage waves propagate through the chain of 154 superconducting dipoles and can have undesired effects leading to spurious triggering of the quench protection system and firing of the quench heaters. The phase velocity of the waves travelling along the chain changes due to the inhomogeneous AC behavior of the dipoles. Furthermore, complex phenomena of reflection and superposition are present in the circuit. For these reasons analytical calculations are not sufficient for properly analyzing the circuit behavior after a fast power abort. The transients following the switch-off of the power converter and the opening of the switches are analyzed by means of a complete electrical model, developed with the Cadence© suite (PSpice© based). The model comprises all the electrical components of the circuit, additional components simula...

  16. Modified Hyperspheres Algorithm to Trace Homotopy Curves of Nonlinear Circuits Composed by Piecewise Linear Modelled Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vazquez-Leal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a homotopy continuation method (HCM for finding multiple operating points of nonlinear circuits composed of devices modelled by using piecewise linear (PWL representations. We propose an adaptation of the modified spheres path tracking algorithm to trace the homotopy trajectories of PWL circuits. In order to assess the benefits of this proposal, four nonlinear circuits composed of piecewise linear modelled devices are analysed to determine their multiple operating points. The results show that HCM can find multiple solutions within a single homotopy trajectory. Furthermore, we take advantage of the fact that homotopy trajectories are PWL curves meant to replace the multidimensional interpolation and fine tuning stages of the path tracking algorithm with a simple and highly accurate procedure based on the parametric straight line equation.

  17. Linear Circuit Model of the Three-phase Insulated Core Transformer Power Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Yang, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of the terminal characteristics of the three-phase multi-winding insulated core transformer (ICT) requires a precise physical model. A linear equivalent electrical circuit model is proposed and constructed to facilitate the ICT design based on the principle of duality. It is composed by leakage inductances between adjacent windings, leakage inductances introduced mainly by the discrete insulation gaps, as well as ideal transformers. The value of each leakage inductance depends on the geometrical dimensions of the core, gaps or windings and the property of magnetic materials. Both short circuit simulations and self and mutual inductance matrix of transformer windings are employed to determine precisely each inductance. To validate the equivalent circuit, the magnetic flux leakage in a three-stage three-dimensional (3D) ICT is quantitatively analyzed.

  18. Diagnosis of Short Circuit Faults in Stator Winding of Motor based on Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hisahide; Mizuno, Yukio; Suzuki, Tatsuya

    This paper proposes a new diagnosis method for short circuit faults in stator winding of motor based on Hidden Markov Model. Short circuit fault of a motor is one of the most probable faults in motor drive systems. When the fault occurs, the current waveform running in the motor is no longer sinusoidal which is observed in the healthy motor. The variation of the waveform in the faulty case depends on the location and degree of short circuit fault in the winding. In this paper, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM), which is widely used in the field of speech recognition, is exploited to capture and recognize the variation in the faulty current waveform. Thanks to the similarity between the speech signal and the current waveform, the HMM is highly expected to work as a robust fault diagnoser. Finally, the usefulness of the proposed diagnosis method is verified through some experiments using real faulty current waveforms.

  19. Common circuit defect of excitatory-inhibitory balance in mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolla, Nadine; Leblanc, Jocelyn J; Quast, Kathleen B; Südhof, Thomas C; Fagiolini, Michela; Hensch, Takao K

    2009-06-01

    One unifying explanation for the complexity of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) may lie in the disruption of excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) circuit balance during critical periods of development. We examined whether Parvalbumin (PV)-positive inhibitory neurons, which normally drive experience-dependent circuit refinement (Hensch Nat Rev Neurosci 6:877-888, 1), are disrupted across heterogeneous ASD mouse models. We performed a meta-analysis of PV expression in previously published ASD mouse models and analyzed two additional models, reflecting an embryonic chemical insult (prenatal valproate, VPA) or single-gene mutation identified in human patients (Neuroligin-3, NL-3 R451C). PV-cells were reduced in the neocortex across multiple ASD mouse models. In striking contrast to controls, both VPA and NL-3 mouse models exhibited an asymmetric PV-cell reduction across hemispheres in parietal and occipital cortices (but not the underlying area CA1). ASD mouse models may share a PV-circuit disruption, providing new insight into circuit development and potential prevention by treatment of autism. The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11689-009-9023-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  20. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Fan, Ming; Wang, Suojin; Gao, Xin

    2013-07-01

    Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. A framework for scalable parameter estimation of gene circuit models using structural information

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-21

    Motivation: Systematic and scalable parameter estimation is a key to construct complex gene regulatory models and to ultimately facilitate an integrative systems biology approach to quantitatively understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning gene regulation. Results: Here, we report a novel framework for efficient and scalable parameter estimation that focuses specifically on modeling of gene circuits. Exploiting the structure commonly found in gene circuit models, this framework decomposes a system of coupled rate equations into individual ones and efficiently integrates them separately to reconstruct the mean time evolution of the gene products. The accuracy of the parameter estimates is refined by iteratively increasing the accuracy of numerical integration using the model structure. As a case study, we applied our framework to four gene circuit models with complex dynamics based on three synthetic datasets and one time series microarray data set. We compared our framework to three state-of-the-art parameter estimation methods and found that our approach consistently generated higher quality parameter solutions efficiently. Although many general-purpose parameter estimation methods have been applied for modeling of gene circuits, our results suggest that the use of more tailored approaches to use domain-specific information may be a key to reverse engineering of complex biological systems. The Author 2013.

  2. Proposal for combined conducted and radiated emission modelling for Integrated Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Serpaud, Sébastien; Ghfiri, C.; Boyer, Alexandre; Durier, A

    2017-01-01

    International audience; This paper describes a methodology to build a combined conducted and radiated emission model for integrated circuits. The development of emission models of a FPGA extracted from two different approaches is presented and discussed. The first approach allows to build a predictable model from FPGA implementation and some passive measurement on FPGA device. The second approach allows to build a model from only the near field measurement. In conclusion, the accuracy of both...

  3. Working Memory and Decision-Making in a Frontoparietal Circuit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, John D; Jaramillo, Jorge; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2017-12-13

    Working memory (WM) and decision-making (DM) are fundamental cognitive functions involving a distributed interacting network of brain areas, with the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) at the core. However, the shared and distinct roles of these areas and the nature of their coordination in cognitive function remain poorly understood. Biophysically based computational models of cortical circuits have provided insights into the mechanisms supporting these functions, yet they have primarily focused on the local microcircuit level, raising questions about the principles for distributed cognitive computation in multiregional networks. To examine these issues, we developed a distributed circuit model of two reciprocally interacting modules representing PPC and PFC circuits. The circuit architecture includes hierarchical differences in local recurrent structure and implements reciprocal long-range projections. This parsimonious model captures a range of behavioral and neuronal features of frontoparietal circuits across multiple WM and DM paradigms. In the context of WM, both areas exhibit persistent activity, but, in response to intervening distractors, PPC transiently encodes distractors while PFC filters distractors and supports WM robustness. With regard to DM, the PPC module generates graded representations of accumulated evidence supporting target selection, while the PFC module generates more categorical responses related to action or choice. These findings suggest computational principles for distributed, hierarchical processing in cortex during cognitive function and provide a framework for extension to multiregional models.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Working memory and decision-making are fundamental "building blocks" of cognition, and deficits in these functions are associated with neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. These cognitive functions engage distributed networks with prefrontal cortex (PFC) and posterior parietal cortex

  4. Modeling of methane emissions using artificial neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Lidija J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a model for forecasting CH4 emissions at the national level, using Artificial Neural Networks (ANN with broadly available sustainability, economical and industrial indicators as their inputs. ANN modeling was performed using two different types of architecture; a Backpropagation Neural Network (BPNN and a General Regression Neural Network (GRNN. A conventional multiple linear regression (MLR model was also developed in order to compare model performance and assess which model provides the best results. ANN and MLR models were developed and tested using the same annual data for 20 European countries. The ANN model demonstrated very good performance, significantly better than the MLR model. It was shown that a forecast of CH4 emissions at the national level using the ANN model can be made successfully and accurately for a future period of up to two years, thereby opening the possibility to apply such a modeling technique which can be used to support the implementation of sustainable development strategies and environmental management policies. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172007

  5. Models of Acetylcholine and Dopamine Signals Differentially Improve Neural Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holca-Lamarre, Raphaël; Lücke, Jörg; Obermayer, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Biological and artificial neural networks (ANNs) represent input signals as patterns of neural activity. In biology, neuromodulators can trigger important reorganizations of these neural representations. For instance, pairing a stimulus with the release of either acetylcholine (ACh) or dopamine (DA) evokes long lasting increases in the responses of neurons to the paired stimulus. The functional roles of ACh and DA in rearranging representations remain largely unknown. Here, we address this question using a Hebbian-learning neural network model. Our aim is both to gain a functional understanding of ACh and DA transmission in shaping biological representations and to explore neuromodulator-inspired learning rules for ANNs. We model the effects of ACh and DA on synaptic plasticity and confirm that stimuli coinciding with greater neuromodulator activation are over represented in the network. We then simulate the physiological release schedules of ACh and DA. We measure the impact of neuromodulator release on the network's representation and on its performance on a classification task. We find that ACh and DA trigger distinct changes in neural representations that both improve performance. The putative ACh signal redistributes neural preferences so that more neurons encode stimulus classes that are challenging for the network. The putative DA signal adapts synaptic weights so that they better match the classes of the task at hand. Our model thus offers a functional explanation for the effects of ACh and DA on cortical representations. Additionally, our learning algorithm yields performances comparable to those of state-of-the-art optimisation methods in multi-layer perceptrons while requiring weaker supervision signals and interacting with synaptically-local weight updates. PMID:28690509

  6. A hybrid analytical model for open-circuit field calculation of multilayer interior permanent magnet machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhen [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xia, Changliang [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Electric Machine System Design and Control, Tianjin 300387 (China); Yan, Yan, E-mail: yanyan@tju.edu.cn [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Geng, Qiang [Tianjin Engineering Center of Electric Machine System Design and Control, Tianjin 300387 (China); Shi, Tingna [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid analytical model is developed for field calculation of multilayer IPM machines. • The rotor magnetic field is calculated by the magnetic equivalent circuit method. • The field in the stator and air-gap is calculated by subdomain technique. • The magnetic scalar potential on rotor surface is modeled as trapezoidal distribution. - Abstract: Due to the complicated rotor structure and nonlinear saturation of rotor bridges, it is difficult to build a fast and accurate analytical field calculation model for multilayer interior permanent magnet (IPM) machines. In this paper, a hybrid analytical model suitable for the open-circuit field calculation of multilayer IPM machines is proposed by coupling the magnetic equivalent circuit (MEC) method and the subdomain technique. In the proposed analytical model, the rotor magnetic field is calculated by the MEC method based on the Kirchhoff’s law, while the field in the stator slot, slot opening and air-gap is calculated by subdomain technique based on the Maxwell’s equation. To solve the whole field distribution of the multilayer IPM machines, the coupled boundary conditions on the rotor surface are deduced for the coupling of the rotor MEC and the analytical field distribution of the stator slot, slot opening and air-gap. The hybrid analytical model can be used to calculate the open-circuit air-gap field distribution, back electromotive force (EMF) and cogging torque of multilayer IPM machines. Compared with finite element analysis (FEA), it has the advantages of faster modeling, less computation source occupying and shorter time consuming, and meanwhile achieves the approximate accuracy. The analytical model is helpful and applicable for the open-circuit field calculation of multilayer IPM machines with any size and pole/slot number combination.

  7. Aplication of artificial neural network model in aviation specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Висиль Миколайович Казак

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the application of artificial neural network (ANN model in aviation specialist training. The ANN model is based on the dependence of residual knowledge of subjects of study on their individual abilities. The residual knowledge is the skills acquired by the subject before he is going for an occupation.  The presented ANN model gives the possibility to predict the level of professional training of the specialists with high accuracy

  8. Modelling, analysis, and acceleration of a printed circuit board ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is a representative PCB fabrication company involving multiple, concurrent fabrication works with contention for human/technical resources. Our model seeks to capture faithfully the flow of the fabrication process in this company and such other organisations, using queueing networks. Using the model developed, we ...

  9. THE USE OF NEURAL NETWORK TECHNOLOGY TO MODEL SWIMMING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António José Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were: to identify the factors which are able to explain the performance in the 200 meters individual medley and 400 meters front crawl events in young swimmers, to model the performance in those events using non-linear mathematic methods through artificial neural networks (multi-layer perceptrons and to assess the neural network models precision to predict the performance. A sample of 138 young swimmers (65 males and 73 females of national level was submitted to a test battery comprising four different domains: kinanthropometric evaluation, dry land functional evaluation (strength and flexibility, swimming functional evaluation (hydrodynamics, hydrostatic and bioenergetics characteristics and swimming technique evaluation. To establish a profile of the young swimmer non-linear combinations between preponderant variables for each gender and swim performance in the 200 meters medley and 400 meters font crawl events were developed. For this purpose a feed forward neural network was used (Multilayer Perceptron with three neurons in a single hidden layer. The prognosis precision of the model (error lower than 0.8% between true and estimated performances is supported by recent evidence. Therefore, we consider that the neural network tool can be a good approach in the resolution of complex problems such as performance modeling and the talent identification in swimming and, possibly, in a wide variety of sports

  10. A hyperstable neural network for the modelling and control of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A multivariable hyperstable robust adaptive decoupling control algorithm based on a neural network is presented for the control of nonlinear multivariable coupled systems with unknown parameters and structure. The Popov theorem is used in the design of the controller. The modelling errors, coupling action and other ...

  11. A Constructive Neural-Network Approach to Modeling Psychological Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews a particular computational modeling approach to the study of psychological development--that of constructive neural networks. This approach is applied to a variety of developmental domains and issues, including Piagetian tasks, shift learning, language acquisition, number comparison, habituation of visual attention, concept…

  12. Introducing Artificial Neural Networks through a Spreadsheet Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienzo, Thomas F.; Athappilly, Kuriakose K.

    2012-01-01

    Business students taking data mining classes are often introduced to artificial neural networks (ANN) through point and click navigation exercises in application software. Even if correct outcomes are obtained, students frequently do not obtain a thorough understanding of ANN processes. This spreadsheet model was created to illuminate the roles of…

  13. Bilingual Lexical Interactions in an Unsupervised Neural Network Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaowei; Li, Ping

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present an unsupervised neural network model of bilingual lexical development and interaction. We focus on how the representational structures of the bilingual lexicons can emerge, develop, and interact with each other as a function of the learning history. The results show that: (1) distinct representations for the two lexicons…

  14. An artificial neural network based fast radiative transfer model for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, a fast radiative transfer model using neural networks is proposed to simulate radiances corresponding to the wavenumbers of INSAT-3D. Realistic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles have been used for training the network. Spectral response functions of GOES-13, a satellite similar in ...

  15. Pragmatic Bootstrapping: A Neural Network Model of Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caza, Gregory A.; Knott, Alistair

    2012-01-01

    The social-pragmatic theory of language acquisition proposes that children only become efficient at learning the meanings of words once they acquire the ability to understand the intentions of other agents, in particular the intention to communicate (Akhtar & Tomasello, 2000). In this paper we present a neural network model of word learning which…

  16. Particle swarm optimization of a neural network model in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sets of cutting conditions and noting the root mean square (RMS) value of spindle motor current as well as ... A multi- objective optimization of hard turning using neural network modelling and swarm intelligence ... being used in this study), and these activated values in turn become the starting signals for the next adjacent ...

  17. A Neural Network Model for Dynamics Simulation | Bholoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University of Mauritius Research Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 1 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. A Neural Network Model for Dynamics Simulation. Ajeevsing ...

  18. Improved neural network modeling of inverse lens distortion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, JP

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inverse lens distortion modelling allows one to find the pixel in a distorted image which corresponds to a known point in object space, such as may be produced by a RADAR. This paper extends recent work using neural networks as a compromise between...

  19. Dynamic causal models of neural system dynamics: current state ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-09-28

    Sep 28, 2006 ... Keywords. Dynamic causal modelling; EEG; effective connectivity; event-related potentials; fMRI; neural system ... In this article, we review the conceptual and mathematical basis of DCM and its implementation for functional magnetic resonance imaging data and event-related potentials. After introducing ...

  20. A model of interval timing by neural integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simen, Patrick; Balci, Fuat; deSouza, Laura; Cohen, Jonathan D.; Holmes, Philip

    2011-01-01

    We show that simple assumptions about neural processing lead to a model of interval timing as a temporal integration process, in which a noisy firing-rate representation of time rises linearly on average toward a response threshold over the course of an interval. Our assumptions include: that neural spike trains are approximately independent Poisson processes; that correlations among them can be largely cancelled by balancing excitation and inhibition; that neural populations can act as integrators; and that the objective of timed behavior is maximal accuracy and minimal variance. The model accounts for a variety of physiological and behavioral findings in rodents, monkeys and humans, including ramping firing rates between the onset of reward-predicting cues and the receipt of delayed rewards, and universally scale-invariant response time distributions in interval timing tasks. It furthermore makes specific, well-supported predictions about the skewness of these distributions, a feature of timing data that is usually ignored. The model also incorporates a rapid (potentially one-shot) duration-learning procedure. Human behavioral data support the learning rule’s predictions regarding learning speed in sequences of timed responses. These results suggest that simple, integration-based models should play as prominent a role in interval timing theory as they do in theories of perceptual decision making, and that a common neural mechanism may underlie both types of behavior. PMID:21697374

  1. Comparison of ARIMA and Artificial Neural Networks Models for Stock Price Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Ariyo Adebiyi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the forecasting performance of ARIMA and artificial neural networks model with published stock data obtained from New York Stock Exchange. The empirical results obtained reveal the superiority of neural networks model over ARIMA model. The findings further resolve and clarify contradictory opinions reported in literature over the superiority of neural networks and ARIMA model and vice versa.

  2. HIV lipodystrophy case definition using artificial neural network modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, John P A; Trikalinos, Thomas A; Law, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A case definition of HIV lipodystrophy has recently been developed from a combination of clinical, metabolic and imaging/body composition variables using logistic regression methods. We aimed to evaluate whether artificial neural networks could improve the diagnostic accuracy. METHODS......: The database of the case-control Lipodystrophy Case Definition Study was split into 504 subjects (265 with and 239 without lipodystrophy) used for training and 284 independent subjects (152 with and 132 without lipodystrophy) used for validation. Back-propagation neural networks with one or two middle layers...... were trained and validated. Results were compared against logistic regression models using the same information. RESULTS: Neural networks using clinical variables only (41 items) achieved consistently superior performance than logistic regression in terms of specificity, overall accuracy and area under...

  3. Product Cost Management Structures: a review and neural network modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jha

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the growth of approaches in product costing and draws synergies with information management and resource planning systems, to investigate potential application of state of the art modelling techniques of neural networks. Increasing demands on costing systems to serve multiple decision-making objectives, have made it essential to use better techniques for analysis of available data. This need is highlighted in the paper. The approach of neural networks, which have several analogous facets to complement and aid the information demands of modern product costing, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP structures and the dominant-computing environment (for information management in the object oriented paradigm form the domain for investigation. Simulated data is used in neural network applications across activities that consume resources and deliver products, to generate information for monitoring and control decisions. The results in application for feature extraction and variation detection and their implications are presented in the paper.

  4. Neural network versus classical time series forecasting models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Maria Elena; Safuan, Hamizah Mohd; Shab, Noorzehan Fazahiyah Md; Asrul, Mohd; Abdullah, Affendi; Mohamad, Nurul Asmaa Izzati; Lee, Muhammad Hisyam

    2017-05-01

    Artificial neural network (ANN) has advantage in time series forecasting as it has potential to solve complex forecasting problems. This is because ANN is data driven approach which able to be trained to map past values of a time series. In this study the forecast performance between neural network and classical time series forecasting method namely seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models was being compared by utilizing gold price data. Moreover, the effect of different data preprocessing on the forecast performance of neural network being examined. The forecast accuracy was evaluated using mean absolute deviation, root mean square error and mean absolute percentage error. It was found that ANN produced the most accurate forecast when Box-Cox transformation was used as data preprocessing.

  5. Statistical modelling of neural networks in {gamma}-spectrometry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneron, V.; Martinez, J.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie; Morel, J.; Lepy, M.C. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Applications et de la Metrologie des Rayonnements Ionisants

    1995-12-31

    Layered Neural Networks, which are a class of models based on neural computation, are applied to the measurement of uranium enrichment, i.e. the isotope ratio {sup 235} U/({sup 235} U + {sup 236} U + {sup 238} U). The usual method consider a limited number of {Gamma}-ray and X-ray peaks, and require previously calibrated instrumentation for each sample. But, in practice, the source-detector ensemble geometry conditions are critically different, thus a means of improving the above convention methods is to reduce the region of interest: this is possible by focusing on the K{sub {alpha}} X region where the three elementary components are present. Real data are used to study the performance of neural networks. Training is done with a Maximum Likelihood method to measure uranium {sup 235} U and {sup 238} U quantities in infinitely thick samples. (authors). 18 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Evolution of Neural Dynamics in an Ecological Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Williams

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available What is the optimal level of chaos in a computational system? If a system is too chaotic, it cannot reliably store information. If it is too ordered, it cannot transmit information. A variety of computational systems exhibit dynamics at the “edge of chaos”, the transition between the ordered and chaotic regimes. In this work, we examine the evolved neural networks of Polyworld, an artificial life model consisting of a simulated ecology populated with biologically inspired agents. As these agents adapt to their environment, their initially simple neural networks become increasingly capable of exhibiting rich dynamics. Dynamical systems analysis reveals that natural selection drives these networks toward the edge of chaos until the agent population is able to sustain itself. After this point, the evolutionary trend stabilizes, with neural dynamics remaining on average significantly far from the transition to chaos.

  7. Continuum Modeling of Inductor Hysteresis and Eddy Current Loss Effects in Resonant Circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pries, Jason L. [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL; Burress, Timothy A. [ORNL

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents experimental validation of a high-fidelity toroid inductor modeling technique. The aim of this research is to accurately model the instantaneous magnetization state and core losses in ferromagnetic materials. Quasi–static hysteresis effects are captured using a Preisach model. Eddy currents are included by coupling the associated quasi-static Everett function to a simple finite element model representing the inductor cross sectional area. The modeling technique is validated against the nonlinear frequency response from two different series RLC resonant circuits using inductors made of electrical steel and soft ferrite. The method is shown to accurately model shifts in resonant frequency and quality factor. The technique also successfully predicts a discontinuity in the frequency response of the ferrite inductor resonant circuit.

  8. A continuous-time neural model for sequential action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachergis, George; Wyatte, Dean; O'Reilly, Randall C; de Kleijn, Roy; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-11-05

    Action selection, planning and execution are continuous processes that evolve over time, responding to perceptual feedback as well as evolving top-down constraints. Existing models of routine sequential action (e.g. coffee- or pancake-making) generally fall into one of two classes: hierarchical models that include hand-built task representations, or heterarchical models that must learn to represent hierarchy via temporal context, but thus far lack goal-orientedness. We present a biologically motivated model of the latter class that, because it is situated in the Leabra neural architecture, affords an opportunity to include both unsupervised and goal-directed learning mechanisms. Moreover, we embed this neurocomputational model in the theoretical framework of the theory of event coding (TEC), which posits that actions and perceptions share a common representation with bidirectional associations between the two. Thus, in this view, not only does perception select actions (along with task context), but actions are also used to generate perceptions (i.e. intended effects). We propose a neural model that implements TEC to carry out sequential action control in hierarchically structured tasks such as coffee-making. Unlike traditional feedforward discrete-time neural network models, which use static percepts to generate static outputs, our biological model accepts continuous-time inputs and likewise generates non-stationary outputs, making short-timescale dynamic predictions. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  9. Network model and short circuit program for the Kennedy Space Center electric power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Assumptions made and techniques used in modeling the power network to the 480 volt level are discussed. Basic computational techniques used in the short circuit program are described along with a flow diagram of the program and operational procedures. Procedures for incorporating network changes are included in this user's manual.

  10. An action-learning model to assist Circuit Teams to support School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We report on the construction of a theoretical model to assist Circuit Teams to support School Management Teams of underperforming high schools towards whole-school development in which these improvement plans play a central role. We followed an action research design, employing qualitative data generation and ...

  11. Modeling printed circuit board curvature in relation to manufacturing process steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuerink, G.A.; Slomp, M.; Wits, Wessel Willems; Legtenberg, R.; Legtenberg, R.; Kappel, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to predict deformations of Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) in relation to their manufacturing process steps. Classical Lamination Theory (CLT) is used as a basis. The model tracks internal stresses and includes the results of subsequent production steps, such

  12. AUTOMATING THREE DIMENSIONAL (3D) MODEL CREATION OF CIRCUIT CARD ASSEMBLIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    make high quality technical drawings. The method described in this document is specific to the CAD software used but could be adapted to other...release; distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Weapons and Software Engineering Center... software applications. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Computer-aided design (CAD) Computer-aided model (CAM) Printed circuit boards

  13. Logical diagnosis model turbojet engine including double-circuit intermittent flow of his injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.П. Стьопушкіна

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available  In this article is considered question of the change quantitative and qualitative factors of the technical condition constructive element running part of jet engine. As a result called on experimental studies diagnostic sign were definite sign with provision for intermittent damages and on base this is built expert model of the turbojet double-circuit engine.

  14. Electro-thermal modeling of high power IGBT module short-circuits with experimental validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Rui; Iannuzzo, Francesco; Wang, Huai

    2015-01-01

    A novel Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) electro-thermal modeling approach involving PSpice and ANSYS/Icepak with both high accuracy and simulation speed has been presented to study short-circuit of a 1.7 kV/1 kA commercial IGBT module. The approach successfully predicts the current...

  15. Mental Models of Elementary and Middle School Students in Analyzing Simple Battery and Bulb Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabot, Michael; Henry, David

    2007-01-01

    Written assessment items were developed to probe students' understanding of a variety of direct current (DC) resistive electric circuit concepts. The items were used to explore the mental models that grade 3-8 students use in explaining the direction of electric current and how electric current is affected by different configurations of simple…

  16. A neural model of decision making

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Torben

    2008-01-01

    Background: A descriptive neuroeconomic model is aimed for relativity of the concept of economic man to empirical science.Method: A 4-level client-server-integrator model integrating the brain models of McLean and Luria is the general framework for the model of empirical findings.Results: Decision making relies on integration across brain levels of emotional intelligence (LU) and logico-matematico intelligence (RIA), respectively. The integrated decision making formula approaching zero by bot...

  17. Distributed Recurrent Neural Forward Models with Neural Control for Complex Locomotion in Walking Robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasgupta, Sakyasingha; Goldschmidt, Dennis; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2015-01-01

    Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental...... conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological study has revealed that such complex behaviors are a result of a combination of biomechanics and neural mechanism thus representing the true nature of embodied interactions. While the biomechanics helps maintain flexibility and sustain...... a variety of movements, the neural mechanisms generate movements while making appropriate predictions crucial for achieving adaptation. Such predictions or planning ahead can be achieved by way of internal models that are grounded in the overall behavior of the animal. Inspired by these findings, we present...

  18. Building footprint extraction from digital surface models using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, Ksenia; Cui, Shiyong; Reinartz, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Two-dimensional building footprints are a basis for many applications: from cartography to three-dimensional building models generation. Although, many methodologies have been proposed for building footprint extraction, this topic remains an open research area. Neural networks are able to model the complex relationships between the multivariate input vector and the target vector. Based on these abilities we propose a methodology using neural networks and Markov Random Fields (MRF) for automatic building footprint extraction from normalized Digital Surface Model (nDSM) and satellite images within urban areas. The proposed approach has mainly two steps. In the first step, the unary terms are learned for the MRF energy function by a four-layer neural network. The neural network is learned on a large set of patches consisting of both nDSM and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Then prediction is performed to calculate the unary terms that are used in the MRF. In the second step, the energy function is minimized using a maxflow algorithm, which leads to a binary building mask. The building extraction results are compared with available ground truth. The comparison illustrates the efficiency of the proposed algorithm which can extract approximately 80% of buildings from nDSM with high accuracy.

  19. Frequency- and time-domain simulations of semiconductor optical amplifiers using equivalent circuit modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Rafael C.; Ribeiro, Napoleão S.; Gallep, Cristiano M.; Conforti, Evandro

    2015-11-01

    We propose an equivalent circuit modeling for a chip-on-carrier and for two encapsulated semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). The models include main parasitic leaks and were used in reflection and transmission simulations, showing good agreement with experimental data. The model for each SOA is validated, comparing the simulated results with experimental data from SOAs operating as high-speed electro-optical switches, reaching rise times below 200 ps.

  20. Numerical Modeling of Thermoelectric Generators with Varing Material Properties in a Circuit Simulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Min; Rosendahl, Lasse; Condra, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    When a thermoelectric generator (TEG) and its external load circuitry are considered together as a system, the codesign and cooptimization of the electronics and the device are crucial in maximizing the system efficiency. In this paper, an accurate TEG model is proposed and implemented in a SPICE...... from a real thermoelectric device, respectively.Within a common circuit simulator, the model can be easily connected to various electrical models of applied loads to predict and optimize the system performance....

  1. An Empirical Model for Estimating the Probability of Electrical Short Circuits from Tin Whiskers. Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courey, Karim; Wright, Clara; Asfour, Shihab; Onar, Arzu; Bayliss, Jon; Ludwig, Larry

    2009-01-01

    In this experiment, an empirical model to quantify the probability of occurrence of an electrical short circuit from tin whiskers as a function of voltage was developed. This empirical model can be used to improve existing risk simulation models. FIB and TEM images of a tin whisker confirm the rare polycrystalline structure on one of the three whiskers studied. FIB cross-section of the card guides verified that the tin finish was bright tin.

  2. Semiconductor device models for circuit simulation power electronics; Modeles de composants semiconducteurs pour la simulation des circuits en electronique de puissance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berraies, M.O.

    1998-09-10

    In this thesis, an alternative strategy based on a regional approach to modeling and a new partition of the model library in the simulation is proposed. The main objective is to substitute for the usual concept of `one device, on model` that of an adaptable assembly of a limited number of submodels associated with well-identified regions of semiconductor structures. In other words, the library will only contain the primitive building-blocks of the power device models. This strategy guarantees the compatibility of the various semiconductor models in terms of physical concepts, validity domain, accuracy, homogeneity of parameter identification procedures, similarly of implementation in the simulator. This approach has been applied to PIN diodes and IGBTs for experimental validation. The next step consisted on the simulation of circuit involving several interacting devices. A simple IGBT/PIN diode chopper cell has been chosen. The results obtained compare well with experiment. This demonstrates the consistency of the proposed approach. (author) 43 refs.

  3. Modeling of surface dust concentrations using neural networks and kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buevich, Alexander G.; Medvedev, Alexander N.; Sergeev, Alexander P.; Tarasov, Dmitry A.; Shichkin, Andrey V.; Sergeeva, Marina V.; Atanasova, T. B.

    2016-12-01

    Creating models which are able to accurately predict the distribution of pollutants based on a limited set of input data is an important task in environmental studies. In the paper two neural approaches: (multilayer perceptron (MLP)) and generalized regression neural network (GRNN)), and two geostatistical approaches: (kriging and cokriging), are using for modeling and forecasting of dust concentrations in snow cover. The area of study is under the influence of dust emissions from a copper quarry and a several industrial companies. The comparison of two mentioned approaches is conducted. Three indices are used as the indicators of the models accuracy: the mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE) and relative root mean square error (RRMSE). Models based on artificial neural networks (ANN) have shown better accuracy. When considering all indices, the most precision model was the GRNN, which uses as input parameters for modeling the coordinates of sampling points and the distance to the probable emissions source. The results of work confirm that trained ANN may be more suitable tool for modeling of dust concentrations in snow cover.

  4. Recursive Bayesian recurrent neural networks for time-series modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirikitani, Derrick T; Nikolaev, Nikolay

    2010-02-01

    This paper develops a probabilistic approach to recursive second-order training of recurrent neural networks (RNNs) for improved time-series modeling. A general recursive Bayesian Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is derived to sequentially update the weights and the covariance (Hessian) matrix. The main strengths of the approach are a principled handling of the regularization hyperparameters that leads to better generalization, and stable numerical performance. The framework involves the adaptation of a noise hyperparameter and local weight prior hyperparameters, which represent the noise in the data and the uncertainties in the model parameters. Experimental investigations using artificial and real-world data sets show that RNNs equipped with the proposed approach outperform standard real-time recurrent learning and extended Kalman training algorithms for recurrent networks, as well as other contemporary nonlinear neural models, on time-series modeling.

  5. Visual motion imagery neurofeedback based on the hMT+/V5 complex: evidence for a feedback-specific neural circuit involving neocortical and cerebellar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banca, Paula; Sousa, Teresa; Catarina Duarte, Isabel; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Current approaches in neurofeedback/brain-computer interface research often focus on identifying, on a subject-by-subject basis, the neural regions that are best suited for self-driven modulation. It is known that the hMT+/V5 complex, an early visual cortical region, is recruited during explicit and implicit motion imagery, in addition to real motion perception. This study tests the feasibility of training healthy volunteers to regulate the level of activation in their hMT+/V5 complex using real-time fMRI neurofeedback and visual motion imagery strategies. Approach. We functionally localized the hMT+/V5 complex to further use as a target region for neurofeedback. An uniform strategy based on motion imagery was used to guide subjects to neuromodulate hMT+/V5. Main results. We found that 15/20 participants achieved successful neurofeedback. This modulation led to the recruitment of a specific network as further assessed by psychophysiological interaction analysis. This specific circuit, including hMT+/V5, putative V6 and medial cerebellum was activated for successful neurofeedback runs. The putamen and anterior insula were recruited for both successful and non-successful runs. Significance. Our findings indicate that hMT+/V5 is a region that can be modulated by focused imagery and that a specific cortico-cerebellar circuit is recruited during visual motion imagery leading to successful neurofeedback. These findings contribute to the debate on the relative potential of extrinsic (sensory) versus intrinsic (default-mode) brain regions in the clinical application of neurofeedback paradigms. This novel circuit might be a good target for future neurofeedback approaches that aim, for example, the training of focused attention in disorders such as ADHD.

  6. A general circuit model for spintronic devices under electric and magnetic fields

    KAUST Repository

    Alawein, Meshal

    2017-10-25

    In this work, we present a circuit model of diffusive spintronic devices capable of capturing the effects of both electric and magnetic fields. Starting from a modified version of the well-established drift-diffusion equations, we derive general equivalent circuit models of semiconducting/metallic nonmagnets and metallic ferromagnets. In contrast to other models that are based on steady-state transport equations which might also neglect certain effects such as thermal fluctuations, spin dissipation in the ferromagnets, and spin precession under magnetic fields, our model incorporates most of the important physics and is based on a time-dependent formulation. An application of our model is shown through simulations of a nonlocal spin-valve under the presence of a magnetic field, where we reproduce experimental results of electrical measurements that demonstrate the phenomena of spin precession and dephasing (“Hanle effect”).

  7. Modeling the transport of nitrogen in an NPP-2006 reactor circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, O. E.; Galkin, I. Yu.; Sledkov, R. M.; Melekh, S. S.; Strebnev, N. A.

    2016-07-01

    Efficient radiation protection of the public and personnel requires detecting an accident-initiating event quickly. Specifically, if a heat-exchange tube in a steam generator is ruptured, the 16N radioactive nitrogen isotope, which contributes to a sharp increase in the steam activity before the turbine, may serve as the signaling component. This isotope is produced in the core coolant and is transported along the circulation circuit. The aim of the present study was to model the transport of 16N in the primary and the secondary circuits of a VVER-1000 reactor facility (RF) under nominal operation conditions. KORSAR/GP and RELAP5/Mod.3.2 codes were used to perform the calculations. Computational models incorporating the major components of the primary and the secondary circuits of an NPP-2006 RF were constructed. These computational models were subjected to cross-verification, and the calculation results were compared to the experimental data on the distribution of the void fraction over the steam generator height. The models were proven to be valid. It was found that the time of nitrogen transport from the core to the heat-exchange tube leak was no longer than 1 s under RF operation at a power level of 100% N nom with all primary circuit pumps activated. The time of nitrogen transport from the leak to the γ-radiation detection unit under the same operating conditions was no longer than 9 s, and the nitrogen concentration in steam was no less than 1.4% (by mass) of its concentration at the reactor outlet. These values were obtained using conservative approaches to estimating the leak flow and the transport time, but the radioactive decay of nitrogen was not taken into account. Further research concerned with the calculation of thermohydraulic processes should be focused on modeling the transport of nitrogen under RF operation with some primary circuit pumps deactivated.

  8. Synthesis of the system modeling and signal detecting circuit of a novel vacuum microelectronic accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongling; Wen, Zhiyu; Wen, Zhongquan; He, Xuefeng; Yang, Yinchuan; Shang, Zhengguo

    2009-01-01

    A novel high-precision vacuum microelectronic accelerometer has been successfully fabricated and tested in our laboratory. This accelerometer has unique advantages of high sensitivity, fast response, and anti-radiation stability. It is a prototype intended for navigation applications and is required to feature micro-g resolution. This paper briefly describes the structure and working principle of our vacuum microelectronic accelerometer, and the mathematical model is also established. The performances of the accelerometer system are discussed after Matlab modeling. The results show that, the dynamic response of the accelerometer system is significantly improved by choosing appropriate parameters of signal detecting circuit, and the signal detecting circuit is designed. In order to attain good linearity and performance, the closed-loop control mode is adopted. Weak current detection technology is studied, and integral T-style feedback network is used in I/V conversion, which will eliminate high-frequency noise at the front of the circuit. According to the modeling parameters, the low-pass filter is designed. This circuit is simple, reliable, and has high precision. Experiments are done and the results show that the vacuum microelectronic accelerometer exhibits good linearity over -1 g to +1 g, an output sensitivity of 543 mV/g, and a nonlinearity of 0.94 %.

  9. Synthesis of the System Modeling and Signal Detecting Circuit of a Novel Vacuum Microelectronic Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengguo Shang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel high-precision vacuum microelectronic accelerometer has been successfully fabricated and tested in our laboratory. This accelerometer has unique advantages of high sensitivity, fast response, and anti-radiation stability. It is a prototype intended for navigation applications and is required to feature micro-g resolution. This paper briefly describes the structure and working principle of our vacuum microelectronic accelerometer, and the mathematical model is also established. The performances of the accelerometer system are discussed after Matlab modeling. The results show that, the dynamic response of the accelerometer system is significantly improved by choosing appropriate parameters of signal detecting circuit, and the signal detecting circuit is designed. In order to attain good linearity and performance, the closed-loop control mode is adopted. Weak current detection technology is studied, and integral T-style feedback network is used in I/V conversion, which will eliminate high-frequency noise at the front of the circuit. According to the modeling parameters, the low-pass filter is designed. This circuit is simple, reliable, and has high precision. Experiments are done and the results show that the vacuum microelectronic accelerometer exhibits good linearity over -1 g to +1 g, an output sensitivity of 543 mV/g, and a nonlinearity of 0.94 %.

  10. A nonlinear equivalent circuit model for flux density calculation of a permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanaee Reza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a nonlinear magnetic equivalent circuit is presented as an analytical solution method for modeling of a permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (PMLSM. The accuracy of the proposed model is verified via comparing its simulation results with those obtained by two other methods. These two are the Maxwell’s Equations based analytical method and the wellknown finite elements method (FEM. Saturation and any saliency e.g. slotting effects can be considered properly by both nonlinear magnetic equivalent circuit and FEM, where it cannot be taken into account easily by the Maxwell’s Equations based analytical approach. Accordingly, as the simulation results presented in this paper confirm, the proposed nonlinear magnetic equivalent circuit is compatible with FEM regarding the accuracy while it requires very shorter execution time. Therefore, the magnetic equivalent circuit model of the present paper can be considered as a preferable substitute for the time consuming FEM and approximated analytical method built on Maxwell’s Equations in particular when required to be applied for a design optimization problem.

  11. Current approaches to model extracellular electrical neural microstimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien eJoucla

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, high-density microelectrode arrays provide unprecedented possibilities to precisely activate spatially well-controlled central nervous system (CNS areas. However, this requires optimizing stimulating devices, which in turn requires a good understanding of the effects of microstimulation on cells and tissues. In this context, modeling approaches provide flexible ways to predict the outcome of electrical stimulation in terms of CNS activation. In this paper, we present state-of-the-art modeling methods with sufficient details to allow the reader to rapidly build numerical models of neuronal extracellular microstimulation. These include 1 the computation of the electrical potential field created by the stimulation in the tissue, and 2 the response of a target neuron to this field. Two main approaches are described: First we describe the classical hybrid approach that combines the finite element modeling of the potential field with the calculation of the neuron’s response in a cable equation framework (compartmentalized neuron models. Then, we present a whole finite element approach allows the simultaneous calculation of the extracellular and intracellular potentials, by representing the neuronal membrane with a thin-film approximation. This approach was previously introduced in the frame of neural recording, but has never been implemented to determine the effect of extracellular stimulation on the neural response at a sub-compartment level. Here, we show on an example that the latter modeling scheme can reveal important sub-compartment behavior of the neural membrane that cannot be resolved using the hybrid approach. The goal of this paper is also to describe in detail the practical implementation of these methods to allow the reader to easily build new models using standard software packages. These modeling paradigms, depending on the situation, should help build more efficient high-density neural prostheses for CNS rehabilitation.

  12. A scale-free neural network for modelling neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Juan I.; Tamarit, Francisco A.; Cannas, Sergio A.

    2006-11-01

    In this work we introduce a neural network model for associative memory based on a diluted Hopfield model, which grows through a neurogenesis algorithm that guarantees that the final network is a small-world and scale-free one. We also analyze the storage capacity of the network and prove that its performance is larger than that measured in a randomly dilute network with the same connectivity.

  13. PEM Fuel Cell Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Doumbia, Mamadou Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a reaction directly into dc electrical energy. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a suitable alternative for both electrical transportation and stationary applications. In this article, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modelling approach of a PEM fuel cell is developed. This model describes the behaviour of PEM fuel cell voltage under both steady-state and transient conditions. Moreover, the prediction of th...

  14. Curcumin Alters Neural Plasticity and Viability of Intact Hippocampal Circuits and Attenuates Behavioral Despair and COX-2 Expression in Chronically Stressed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ga-Young; Kim, Hyun-Bum; Hwang, Eun-Sang; Lee, Seok; Kim, Min-Ji; Choi, Ji-Young; Lee, Sung-Ok; Kim, Sang-Seong; Park, Ji-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin is a major diarylheptanoid component of Curcuma longa with traditional usage for anxiety and depression. It has been known for the anti-inflammatory, antistress, and neurotropic effects. Here we examined curcumin effect in neural plasticity and cell viability. 60-channel multielectrode array was applied on organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) to monitor the effect of 10 μM curcumin in long-term depression (LTD) through low-frequency stimulation (LFS) to the Schaffer collaterals and commissural pathways. Cell viability was assayed by propidium iodide uptake test in OHSCs. In addition, the influence of oral curcumin administration on rat behavior was assessed with the forced swim test (FST). Finally, protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were measured by Western blot in chronically stressed rats. Our results demonstrated that 10 μM curcumin attenuated LTD and reduced cell death. It also recovered the behavior immobility of FST, rescued the attenuated BDNF expression, and inhibited the enhancement of COX-2 expression in stressed animals. These findings indicate that curcumin can enhance postsynaptic electrical reactivity and cell viability in intact neural circuits with antidepressant-like effects, possibly through the upregulation of BDNF and reduction of inflammatory factors in the brain.

  15. Curcumin Alters Neural Plasticity and Viability of Intact Hippocampal Circuits and Attenuates Behavioral Despair and COX-2 Expression in Chronically Stressed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ga-Young Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a major diarylheptanoid component of Curcuma longa with traditional usage for anxiety and depression. It has been known for the anti-inflammatory, antistress, and neurotropic effects. Here we examined curcumin effect in neural plasticity and cell viability. 60-channel multielectrode array was applied on organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs to monitor the effect of 10 μM curcumin in long-term depression (LTD through low-frequency stimulation (LFS to the Schaffer collaterals and commissural pathways. Cell viability was assayed by propidium iodide uptake test in OHSCs. In addition, the influence of oral curcumin administration on rat behavior was assessed with the forced swim test (FST. Finally, protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 were measured by Western blot in chronically stressed rats. Our results demonstrated that 10 μM curcumin attenuated LTD and reduced cell death. It also recovered the behavior immobility of FST, rescued the attenuated BDNF expression, and inhibited the enhancement of COX-2 expression in stressed animals. These findings indicate that curcumin can enhance postsynaptic electrical reactivity and cell viability in intact neural circuits with antidepressant-like effects, possibly through the upregulation of BDNF and reduction of inflammatory factors in the brain.

  16. A neural click model for web search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borisov, A.; Markov, I.; de Rijke, M.; Serdyukov, P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding user browsing behavior in web search is key to improving web search effectiveness. Many click models have been proposed to explain or predict user clicks on search engine results. They are based on the probabilistic graphical model (PGM) framework, in which user behavior is represented

  17. Internal models and neural computation in the vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Andrea M; Angelaki, Dora E

    2010-01-01

    The vestibular system is vital for motor control and spatial self-motion perception. Afferents from the otolith organs and the semicircular canals converge with optokinetic, somatosensory and motor-related signals in the vestibular nuclei, which are reciprocally interconnected with the vestibulocerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei. Here, we review the properties of the many cell types in the vestibular nuclei, as well as some fundamental computations implemented within this brainstem-cerebellar circuitry. These include the sensorimotor transformations for reflex generation, the neural computations for inertial motion estimation, the distinction between active and passive head movements, as well as the integration of vestibular and proprioceptive information for body motion estimation. A common theme in the solution to such computational problems is the concept of internal models and their neural implementation. Recent studies have shed new insights into important organizational principles that closely resemble those proposed for other sensorimotor systems, where their neural basis has often been more difficult to identify. As such, the vestibular system provides an excellent model to explore common neural processing strategies relevant both for reflexive and for goal-directed, voluntary movement as well as perception.

  18. Empirical Modeling of the Plasmasphere Dynamics Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelavskaya, Irina S.; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Spasojević, Maria

    2017-11-01

    We present the PINE (Plasma density in the Inner magnetosphere Neural network-based Empirical) model - a new empirical model for reconstructing the global dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution based only on solar wind data and geomagnetic indices. Utilizing the density database obtained using the NURD (Neural-network-based Upper hybrid Resonance Determination) algorithm for the period of 1 October 2012 to 1 July 2016, in conjunction with solar wind data and geomagnetic indices, we develop a neural network model that is capable of globally reconstructing the dynamics of the cold plasma density distribution for 2≤L≤6 and all local times. We validate and test the model by measuring its performance on independent data sets withheld from the training set and by comparing the model-predicted global evolution with global images of He+ distribution in the Earth's plasmasphere from the IMAGE Extreme UltraViolet (EUV) instrument. We identify the parameters that best quantify the plasmasphere dynamics by training and comparing multiple neural networks with different combinations of input parameters (geomagnetic indices, solar wind data, and different durations of their time history). The optimal model is based on the 96 h time history of Kp, AE, SYM-H, and F10.7 indices. The model successfully reproduces erosion of the plasmasphere on the nightside and plume formation and evolution. We demonstrate results of both local and global plasma density reconstruction. This study illustrates how global dynamics can be reconstructed from local in situ observations by using machine learning techniques.

  19. Some Advances in the Circuit Modeling of Extraordinary Optical Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Medina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT through electrically small holes perforated on opaque metal screens has been a hot topic in the optics community for more than one decade. This experimentally observed frequency-selective enhanced transmission of electromagnetic power through holes, for which classical Bethe's theory predicts very poor transmission, later attracted the attention of engineers working on microwave engineering or applied electromagnetics. Extraordinary transmission was first linked to the plasma-like behavior of metals at optical frequencies. However, the primary role played by the periodicity of the distribution of holes was soon made evident, in such a way that extraordinary transmission was disconnected from the particular behavior of metals at optical frequencies. Indeed, the same phenomenon has been observed in the microwave and millimeter wave regime, for instance. Nowadays, the most commonly accepted theory explains EOT in terms of the interaction of the impinging plane wave with the surface plasmon-polariton-Bloch waves (SPP-Bloch supported by the periodically perforated plate. The authors of this paper have recently proposed an alternative model whose details will be briefly summarized here. A parametric study of the predictions of the model and some new potential extensions will be reported to provide additional insight.

  20. Extraction of battery parameters of the equivalent circuit model using a multi-objective genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jonathan; Zhang, Zheming; Agarwal, Ramesh K.

    2014-02-01

    A simple but reasonably accurate battery model is required for simulating the performance of electrical systems that employ a battery for example an electric vehicle, as well as for investigating their potential as an energy storage device. In this paper, a relatively simple equivalent circuit based model is employed for modeling the performance of a battery. A computer code utilizing a multi-objective genetic algorithm is developed for the purpose of extracting the battery performance parameters. The code is applied to several existing industrial batteries as well as to two recently proposed high performance batteries which are currently in early research and development stage. The results demonstrate that with the optimally extracted performance parameters, the equivalent circuit based battery model can accurately predict the performance of various batteries of different sizes, capacities, and materials. Several test cases demonstrate that the multi-objective genetic algorithm can serve as a robust and reliable tool for extracting the battery performance parameters.