WorldWideScience

Sample records for neural cell survival

  1. Control of neural stem cell survival by electroactive polymer substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lundin

    Full Text Available Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy, a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS, tosylate (TsO, perchlorate (ClO(4 and chloride (Cl, showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO(4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS, NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs.

  2. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells Survive and Mature in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Emborg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies.

  3. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  4. Neurogenesis and Increase in Differentiated Neural Cell Survival via Phosphorylation of Akt1 after Fluoxetine Treatment of Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Rahmani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoxetine (FLX is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI. Its action is possibly through an increase in neural cell survival. The mechanism of improved survival rate of neurons by FLX may relate to the overexpression of some kinases such as Akt protein. Akt1 (a serine/threonine kinase plays a key role in the modulation of cell proliferation and survival. Our study evaluated the effects of FLX on mesenchymal stem cell (MSC fate and Akt1 phosphorylation levels in MSCs. Evaluation tests included reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunocytochemistry assays. Nestin, MAP-2, and β-tubulin were detected after neurogenesis as neural markers. Ten μM of FLX upregulated phosphorylation of Akt1 protein in induced hEnSC significantly. Also FLX did increase viability of these MSCs. Continuous FLX treatment after neurogenesis elevated the survival rate of differentiated neural cells probably by enhanced induction of Akt1 phosphorylation. This study addresses a novel role of FLX in neurogenesis and differentiated neural cell survival that may contribute to explaining the therapeutic action of fluoxetine in regenerative pharmacology.

  5. Arctigenin protects against neuronal hearing loss by promoting neural stem cell survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinghua; Chen, Mo; Ding, Yan; Wang, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal hearing loss has become a prevalent health problem. This study focused on the function of arctigenin (ARC) in promoting survival and neuronal differentiation of mouse cochlear neural stem cells (NSCs), and its protection against gentamicin (GMC) induced neuronal hearing loss. Mouse cochlea was used to isolate NSCs, which were subsequently cultured in vitro. The effects of ARC on NSC survival, neurosphere formation, differentiation of NSCs, neurite outgrowth, and neural excitability in neuronal network in vitro were examined. Mechanotransduction ability demonstrated by intact cochlea, auditory brainstem response (ABR), and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude in mice were measured to evaluate effects of ARC on GMC-induced neuronal hearing loss. ARC increased survival, neurosphere formation, neuron differentiation of NSCs in mouse cochlear in vitro. ARC also promoted the outgrowth of neurites, as well as neural excitability of the NSC-differentiated neuron culture. Additionally, ARC rescued mechanotransduction capacity, restored the threshold shifts of ABR and DPOAE in our GMC ototoxicity murine model. This study supports the potential therapeutic role of ARC in promoting both NSCs proliferation and differentiation in vitro to functional neurons, thus supporting its protective function in the therapeutic treatment of neuropathic hearing loss in vivo. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Emerging role of LRRK2 in human neural progenitor cell cycle progression, survival and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milosevic, Javorina; Schwarz, Sigrid C; Ogunlade, Vera; Meyer, Anne K; Storch, Alexander; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-06-15

    Despite a comprehensive mapping of the Parkinson's disease (PD)-related mRNA and protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) in the mammalian brain, its physiological function in healthy individuals remains enigmatic. Based on its structural features and kinase properties, LRRK2 may interact with other proteins involved in signalling pathways. Here, we show a widespread LRRK2 mRNA and/or protein expression in expanded or differentiated human mesencephalic neural progenitor cells (hmNPCs) and in post-mortem substantia nigra PD patients. Using small interfering RNA duplexes targeting LRRK2 in hmNPCs following their differentiation into glia and neurons, we observed a reduced number of dopaminergic neurons due to apoptosis in LRRK2 knockdown samples. LRRK2-deficient hmNPCs exhibited elevated cell cycle- and cell death-related markers. In conclusion, a reduction of LRRK2 expression in hmNPCs severely impaired dopaminergic differentiation and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons most likely via preserving or reactivating the cell cycle.

  7. Emerging role of LRRK2 in human neural progenitor cell cycle progression, survival and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Anne K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Despite a comprehensive mapping of the Parkinson's disease (PD-related mRNA and protein leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 in the mammalian brain, its physiological function in healthy individuals remains enigmatic. Based on its structural features and kinase properties, LRRK2 may interact with other proteins involved in signalling pathways. Here, we show a widespread LRRK2 mRNA and/or protein expression in expanded or differentiated human mesencephalic neural progenitor cells (hmNPCs and in post-mortem substantia nigra PD patients. Using small interfering RNA duplexes targeting LRRK2 in hmNPCs following their differentiation into glia and neurons, we observed a reduced number of dopaminergic neurons due to apoptosis in LRRK2 knockdown samples. LRRK2-deficient hmNPCs exhibited elevated cell cycle- and cell death-related markers. In conclusion, a reduction of LRRK2 expression in hmNPCs severely impaired dopaminergic differentiation and/or survival of dopaminergic neurons most likely via preserving or reactivating the cell cycle.

  8. The effect of interferon-{beta} on mouse neural progenitor cell survival and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, Marek [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Knight, Julia [Neuroscience Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Tobita, Mari; Soltys, John; Panitch, Hillel [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States); Mao-Draayer, Yang, E-mail: yang.mao-draayer@vtmednet.org [Neurology Department, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, VT (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) is a mainstay therapy for relapse-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the direct effects of IFN-{beta} on the central nervous system (CNS) are not well understood. To determine whether IFN-{beta} has direct neuroprotective effects on CNS cells, we treated adult mouse neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in vitro with IFN-{beta} and examined the effects on proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation. We found that mouse NPCs express high levels of IFN{alpha}/{beta} receptor (IFNAR). In response to IFN-{beta} treatment, no effect was observed on differentiation or proliferation. However, IFN-{beta} treated mouse NPCs demonstrated decreased apoptosis upon growth factor withdrawal. Pathway-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays demonstrated that IFN-{beta} treatment upregulated the STAT 1 and 2 signaling pathway, as well as GFRA2, NOD1, Caspases 1 and 12, and TNFSF10. These results suggest that IFN-{beta} can directly affect NPC survival, possibly playing a neuroprotective role in the CNS by modulating neurotrophic factors.

  9. Forced mastication increases survival of adult neural stem cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazawa, Yuki; Kitamura, Takamasa; Fujihara, Yuri; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Mitome, Masato; Hasegawa, Tomokazu

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of forced mastication on neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of adult mice. Six-week-old mice were subjected to either a hard or normal diet for 13 weeks. They received a daily injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 12 consecutive days beginning at 14 weeks of age. The number of BrdU-positive cells in the DG was counted 1 day after and 5 weeks after the final BrdU injection. The number of BrdU-positive cells 1 day after injection did not differ between the 2 diet groups. However, the number of BrdU-positive cells in the group fed the hard diet was significantly increased 5 weeks after BrdU injection compared to the group fed the normal diet. The results of the Morris water maze test showed that mice fed a hard diet required significantly less time to reach the platform than the control mice when tested at 10 days. Moreover, mice in the group fed the hard diet spent significantly more time in the former platform area than the group fed the normal diet, indicating that hard diet feeding improved spatial memory compared to normal diet feeding. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of glutamate receptor 1 mRNA was significantly increased in the group fed the hard diet compared with the group fed the normal diet. These results suggest that mastication increases the survival of adult neural stem cells in the hippocampal DG.

  10. Xeya3 regulates survival and proliferation of neural progenitor cells within the anterior neural plate of Xenopus embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebel, Martin; Müller, Frank; Hollemann, Thomas

    2007-06-01

    The transcriptional coactivater and tyrosine phosphatase eyes absent (eya) is vital for eye development in Drosophila. We identified a vertebrate member of the Eya family, Xeya3, which is expressed in the anterior neural plate, including the eye field. Overexpression of wild-type Xeya3 or of a phosphatase-negative version of Xeya3 creates massive enlargements of brain and retinal tissues, mainly caused by overproliferation of neural precursor cells. On the other hand, suppression of Xeya3 function induces local apoptosis within the sensorial layer of the anterior neuroectoderm. Thus, Xeya3 is key factor for the formation and size control of brain and eyes in vertebrates. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Induced Neural Stem Cells Achieve Long-Term Survival and Functional Integration in the Adult Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Hemmer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Differentiated cells can be converted directly into multipotent neural stem cells (i.e., induced neural stem cells [iNSCs]. iNSCs offer an attractive alternative to induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC technology with regard to regenerative therapies. Here, we show an in vivo long-term analysis of transplanted iNSCs in the adult mouse brain. iNSCs showed sound in vivo long-term survival rates without graft overgrowths. The cells displayed a neural multilineage potential with a clear bias toward astrocytes and a permanent downregulation of progenitor and cell-cycle markers, indicating that iNSCs are not predisposed to tumor formation. Furthermore, the formation of synaptic connections as well as neuronal and glial electrophysiological properties demonstrated that differentiated iNSCs migrated, functionally integrated, and interacted with the existing neuronal circuitry. We conclude that iNSC long-term transplantation is a safe procedure; moreover, it might represent an interesting tool for future personalized regenerative applications.

  12. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin Volmer

    2003-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...... kinase (MAPK) pathway and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels. Stimulation of neurones with the synthetic NCAM-ligand, C3, induces neurite outgrowth through signalling pathways similar to the pathways activated through physiological, homophilic NCAM-stimulation. We present here data indicating...... indicating a survival-promoting effect of NCAM-stimulation by C3 on cerebellar and dopaminergic neurones induced to undergo apoptosis. This protective effect of C3 included an inhibition of both DNA-fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. The survival-promoting effect of NCAM-stimulation was also shown...

  13. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia; Kamand, Morad; Okarmus, Justyna; Rosenberg, Tine; Friis, Stig Düring; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Blaabjerg, Morten; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Skrydstrup, Troels; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert; Vieira, Helena L. A.

    2018-01-01

    Exploratory studies using human fetal tissue have suggested that intrastriatal transplantation of dopaminergic neurons may become a future treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease. However, the use of human fetal tissue is compromised by ethical, regulatory and practical concerns. Human stem cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson’s disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting in both protection and generation of reactive oxygen species. The present study investigated the effect of CO produced by a novel CO-releasing molecule on dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells. Short-term exposure to 25 ppm CO at days 0 and 4 significantly increased the relative content of β-tubulin III-immunoreactive immature neurons and tyrosine hydroxylase expressing catecholaminergic neurons, as assessed 6 days after differentiation. Also the number of microtubule associated protein 2-positive mature neurons had increased significantly. Moreover, the content of apoptotic cells (Caspase3) was reduced, whereas the expression of a cell proliferation marker (Ki67) was left unchanged. Increased expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultures exposed to CO may suggest a mechanism involving mitochondrial alterations and generation of ROS. In conclusion, the present procedure using controlled, short-term CO exposure allows efficient dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells at low cost and may as such be useful for derivation of cells for experimental studies and future development of donor cells for transplantation in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:29338033

  14. Serial in vivo imaging of transplanted allogeneic neural stem cell survival in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit K; Gross, Sarah K; Almad, Akshata A; Bulte, Camille A; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2017-03-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are being investigated as a possible treatment for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) through intraspinal transplantation, but no longitudinal imaging studies exist that describe the survival of engrafted cells over time. Allogeneic firefly luciferase-expressing murine NSCs (Luc+-NSCs) were transplanted bilaterally (100,000 cells/2μl) into the cervical spinal cord (C5) parenchyma of pre-symptomatic (63day-old) SOD1G93A ALS mice (n=14) and wild-type age-matched littermates (n=14). Six control SOD1G93A ALS mice were injected with saline. Mice were immunosuppressed using a combination of tacrolimus+sirolimus (1mg/kg each, i.p.) daily. Compared to saline-injected SOD1G93A ALS control mice, a transient improvement (pALS mice at the time of disease onset (71.7±17.9% at 4weeks post-transplantation, pALS mice, poor cell survival was accompanied by accumulation of mature macrophages and the presence of astrogliosis and microgliosis. We conclude that the disease progression adversely affects the survival of engrafted murine Luc+-NSCs in SOD1G93A ALS mice as a result of the hostile ALS spinal cord microenvironment, further emphasizing the challenges that face successful cell therapy of ALS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Neural stem/progenitor cell-laden microfibers promote transplant survival in a mouse transected spinal cord injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugai, Keiko; Nishimura, Soraya; Kato-Negishi, Midori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio; Takeuchi, Shoji; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NS/PCs) into the lesioned spinal cord can promote functional recovery following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models. However, this strategy is insufficient following complete SCI because of the gap at the lesion epicenter. To obtain functional recovery in a mouse model of complete SCI, this study uses a novel collagen-based microfiber as a scaffold for engrafted NS/PCs. We hypothesized that the NS/PC-microfiber combination would facilitate lesion closure as well as transplant survival in the transected spinal cord. NS/PCs were seeded inside the novel microfibers, where they maintained their capacity to differentiate and proliferate. After transplantation, the stumps of the transected spinal cord were successfully bridged by the NS/PC-laden microfibers. Moreover, the transplanted cells migrated into the host spinal cord and differentiated into three neural lineages (astrocytes, neurons, and oligodendrocytes). However, the NS/PC-laden scaffold could not achieve a neural connection between the rostral end of the injury and the intact caudal area of the spinal cord, nor could it achieve recovery of motor function. To obtain optimal functional recovery, a microfiber design with a modified composition may be useful. Furthermore, combinatorial therapy with rehabilitation and/or medications should also be considered for practical success of biomaterial/cell transplantation-based approaches to regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Survival of transplanted human neural stem cell line (ReNcell VM) into the rat brain with and without immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakimyan, M; Müller, J; Wree, A; Ortinau, S; Rolfs, A; Schmitt, O

    2012-09-01

    Functional replacement of specific neuronal populations through transplantation of neural tissue represents an attractive therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson's disease (PD). Even though the brain is a partially immune privileged site, immunosuppression is still needed for the prevention of host immune response, and thus, xenograft rejection. Here, we investigated the fate of human ventral mesencephalon derived immortalized cell line ReNcell VM upon unilateral transplantation into the intact rat striatum with or without immunosuppression with cyclosporine A (CsA). The status of xenografted human ReNcell VM cells was analysed by immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence 4 and 6weeks after transplantation. Four weeks after transplantation, ReNcell VM cells could be detected in both groups, although the number of survived cells was significantly higher in brains of immunosuppressed rats. In contrast, only 2 out of 6 brains grafted without immunosuppression revealed human ReNcell VM cells 6weeks post grafting, whereas a considerable number of human cells could still be found in all the brains of immunosuppressed rats. Immunohistochemical analysis of grafted cells showed almost no evidence of neuronal differentiation, but rather astroglial development. In summary, we have shown that the immunosuppression is needed for the survival of human VM derived progenitor cells in the rat striatum. CsA affected cell survival, but not differentiation capacity: in both groups, grafted either with or without immunosuppression, the ReNcell VM cells lacked neuronal phenotype and developed preferentially into astroglia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Long-term potentiation promotes proliferation/survival and neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taesup Cho

    Full Text Available Neural stem cell (NSC replacement therapy is considered a promising cell replacement therapy for various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the low rate of NSC survival and neurogenesis currently limits its clinical potential. Here, we examined if hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP, one of the most well characterized forms of synaptic plasticity, promotes neurogenesis by facilitating proliferation/survival and neuronal differentiation of NSCs. We found that the induction of hippocampal LTP significantly facilitates proliferation/survival and neuronal differentiation of both endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs and exogenously transplanted NSCs in the hippocampus in rats. These effects were eliminated by preventing LTP induction by pharmacological blockade of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR via systemic application of the receptor antagonist, 3-[(R-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phosphonic acid (CPP. Moreover, using a NPC-neuron co-culture system, we were able to demonstrate that the LTP-promoted NPC neurogenesis is at least in part mediated by a LTP-increased neuronal release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and its consequent activation of tropomysosin receptor kinase B (TrkB receptors on NSCs. Our results indicate that LTP promotes the neurogenesis of both endogenous and exogenously transplanted NSCs in the brain. The study suggests that pre-conditioning of the host brain receiving area with a LTP-inducing deep brain stimulation protocol prior to NSC transplantation may increase the likelihood of success of using NSC transplantation as an effective cell therapy for various neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Ferulic acid promotes survival and differentiation of neural stem cells to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Lintao; Cui, Xinhua; Wei, Wei; Yang, Jia; Li, Xuezhong

    2017-11-15

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have exhibited promising potential in therapies against neuronal hearing loss. Ferulic acid (FA) has been widely reported to enhance neurogenic differentiation of different stem cells. We investigated the role of FA in promoting NSC transplant therapy to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. NSCs were isolated from mouse cochlear tissues to establish in vitro culture, which were then treated with FA. The survival and differentiation of NSCs were evaluated. Subsequently, neurite outgrowth and excitability of the in vitro neuronal network were assessed. Gentamicin was used to induce neuronal hearing loss in mice, in the presence and absence of FA, followed by assessments of auditory brainstem response (ABR) and distortion product optoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) amplitude. FA promoted survival, neurosphere formation and differentiation of NSCs, as well as neurite outgrowth and excitability of in vitro neuronal network. Furthermore, FA restored ABR threshold shifts and DPOAE in gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss mouse model in vivo. Our data, for the first time, support potential therapeutic efficacy of FA in promoting survival and differentiation of NSCs to prevent gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  20. Long-term survival of human neural stem cells in the ischemic rat brain upon transient immunosuppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rota Nodari

    Full Text Available Understanding the physiology of human neural stem cells (hNSCs in the context of cell therapy for neurodegenerative disorders is of paramount importance, yet large-scale studies are hampered by the slow-expansion rate of these cells. To overcome this issue, we previously established immortal, non-transformed, telencephalic-diencephalic hNSCs (IhNSCs from the fetal brain. Here, we investigated the fate of these IhNSC's immediate progeny (i.e. neural progenitors; IhNSC-Ps upon unilateral implantation into the corpus callosum or the hippocampal fissure of adult rat brain, 3 days after global ischemic injury. One month after grafting, approximately one fifth of the IhNSC-Ps had survived and migrated through the corpus callosum, into the cortex or throughout the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. By the fourth month, they had reached the ipsilateral subventricular zone, CA1-3 hippocampal layers and the controlateral hemisphere. Notably, these results could be accomplished using transient immunosuppression, i.e administering cyclosporine for 15 days following the ischemic event. Furthermore, a concomitant reduction of reactive microglia (Iba1+ cells and of glial, GFAP+ cells was also observed in the ipsilateral hemisphere as compared to the controlateral one. IhNSC-Ps were not tumorigenic and, upon in vivo engraftment, underwent differentiation into GFAP+ astrocytes, and β-tubulinIII+ or MAP2+ neurons, which displayed GABAergic and GLUTAmatergic markers. Electron microscopy analysis pointed to the formation of mature synaptic contacts between host and donor-derived neurons, showing the full maturation of the IhNSC-P-derived neurons and their likely functional integration into the host tissue. Thus, IhNSC-Ps possess long-term survival and engraftment capacity upon transplantation into the globally injured ischemic brain, into which they can integrate and mature into neurons, even under mild, transient immunosuppressive conditions. Most notably

  1. Dennexin peptides modeled after the homophilic binding sites of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) promote neuronal survival, modify cell adhesion and impair spatial learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Christensen, Claus; Rossetti, Clara

    2010-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-mediated cell adhesion results in activation of intracellular signaling cascades that lead to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth, neuronal survival, and modulation of synaptic activity associated with cognitive processes. The crystal structure...... of the immunoglobulin (Ig) 1-2-3 fragment of the NCAM ectodomain has revealed novel mechanisms for NCAM homophilic adhesion. The present study addressed the biological significance of the so called dense zipper formation of NCAM. Two peptides, termed dennexinA and dennexinB, were modeled after the contact interfaces...... between Ig1 and Ig3 and between Ig2 and Ig2, respectively, observed in the crystal structure. Although the two dennexin peptides differed in amino acid sequence, they both modulated cell adhesion, reflected by inhibition of NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth. Both dennexins also promoted neuronal survival...

  2. Centriole Amplification in Zebrafish Affects Proliferation and Survival but Not Differentiation of Neural Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo Dzafic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In animal cells, supernumerary centrosomes, resulting from centriole amplification, cause mitotic aberrations and have been associated with diseases, including microcephaly and cancer. To evaluate how centriole amplification impacts organismal development at the cellular and tissue levels, we used the in vivo imaging potential of the zebrafish. We demonstrate that centriole amplification can induce multipolar anaphase, resulting in binucleated cells. Such binucleation causes substantial apoptosis in the neuroepithelium. Interestingly, not all epithelia are similarly sensitive to binucleation, as skin cells tolerate it without entering apoptosis. In the neuroepithelium, however, binucleation leads to tissue degeneration and subsequent organismal death. Notably, this tissue degeneration can be efficiently counterbalanced by compensatory proliferation of wild-type cells. Because the risk for generating a binucleated daughter recurs at every cell division, centriole amplification in the neuroepithelium is especially deleterious during progenitor proliferation. Once cells reach the differentiation phase, however, centriole amplification does not impair neuronal differentiation.

  3. Intermittent, low dose carbon monoxide exposure enhances survival and dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer-Andersen, Nanna; Almeida, Ana Sofia; Jensen, Pia

    2018-01-01

    cells constitute an alternative source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but efficient protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation need to be developed. Short-term, low-level carbon monoxide (CO) exposure has been shown to affect signaling in several tissues, resulting...

  4. Neuro-peptide treatment with Cerebrolysin improves the survival of neural stem cell grafts in an APP transgenic model of Alzheimer disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Rockenstein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSCs have been considered as potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD but their use is hampered by the poor survival of grafted cells. Supply of neurotrophic factors to the grafted cells has been proposed as a way to augment survival of the stem cells. In this context, we investigated the utility of Cerebrolysin (CBL, a peptidergic mixture with neurotrophic-like properties, as an adjunct to stem cell therapy in an APP transgenic (tg model of AD. We grafted murine NSCs into the hippocampus of non-tg and APP tg that were treated systemically with CBL and analyzed after 1, 3, 6 and 9 months post grafting. Compared to vehicle-treated non-tg mice, in the vehicle-treated APP tg mice there was considerable reduction in the survival of the grafted NSCs. Whereas, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in both non-tg and APP tg with the majority of the surviving NSCs remaining as neuroblasts. The NSCs of the CBL treated mice displayed reduced numbers of caspase-3 and TUNEL positive cells and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and furin immunoreactivity. These results suggest that CBL might protect grafted NSCs and as such be a potential adjuvant therapy when combined with grafting.

  5. Inhibition of HSP90 Promotes Neural Stem Cell Survival from Oxidative Stress through Attenuating NF-κB/p65 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell survival after transplantation determines the efficiency of stem cell treatment, which develops as a novel potential therapy for several central nervous system (CNS diseases in recent decades. The engrafted stem cells face the damage of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune response at the lesion point in host. Among the damaging pathologies, oxidative stress directs stem cells to apoptosis and even death through several signalling pathways and DNA damage. However, the in-detail mechanism of stem cell survival from oxidative stress has not been revealed clearly. Here, in this study, we used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 to induce the oxidative damage on neural stem cells (NSCs. The damage was in consequence demonstrated involving the activation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 and NF-κB/p65 signalling pathways. Further application of the pharmacological inhibitors, respectively, targeting at each signalling indicated an upper-stream role of HSP90 upon NF-κB/p65 on NSCs survival. Preinhibition of HSP90 with the specific inhibitor displayed a significant protection on NSCs against oxidative stress. In conclusion, inhibition of HSP90 would attenuate NF-κB/p65 activation by oxidative induction and promote NSCs survival from oxidative damage. The HSP90/NF-κB mechanism provides a new evidence on rescuing NSCs from oxidative stress and also promotes the stem cell application on CNS pathologies.

  6. The role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in neural cell adhesion molecule-mediated neuronal differentiation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Dorte K; Køhler, Lene B; Pedersen, Martin V

    2003-01-01

    that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for NCAM-mediated neurite outgrowth from PC12-E2 cells and from cerebellar and dopaminergic neurones in primary culture, and that the thr/ser kinase Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) is phosphorylated downstream of PI3K after stimulation with C3. Moreover, we present data...... to be dependent on PI3K.......The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM, is known to stimulate neurite outgrowth from primary neurones and PC12 cells presumably through signalling pathways involving the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), the Ras-mitogen activated protein...

  7. Migration, integration, survival, and differentiation of stem cell-derived neural progenitors in the retina in a pharmacological model of retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Gustavo; Navajas, Eduardo; Farah, Michel Eid; Maia, Mauricio; Rodrigues, Eduardo Buchele

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the retinal integration and differentiation of neurospheres formed by stem cells and mouse neural progenitor cells injected intravitreally in mice eyes with retinal injury. Methods. Eight male C57BL mice, 8 weeks old, were submitted to intraperitoneal injection of sodium iodate (2% NaIO3, 50 mg/kg). After 72 hours, 2  μ L of solution with mNPC were injected intravitreally (100.000 cells/ μ L). After 7 days, their eyes were dissected and cryoprotected in 30% sucrose in PB for at least 24 hours at 4°C. The material was analyzed by immunohistochemistry and the following primary antibodies evaluation. Results. The results showed that the grafted cells integrated and survived in the adult mice within the sinner retinal tissue for at least 7 days. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed mature neuronal pattern in some regions. The mNPC population in the transplants was tightly surrounded by neuroretinal cells, suggesting their active role in neuron survival. Notably, the appearance of GFP-positive mNPC was not the result of fusion between donor cells and endogenous neuroretinal cells. Conclusions. Migration, survival, and differentiation of mNPCs were observed after 7 days following a single application with neurosphere method. The results may be clinically relevant for future stem cell therapy to restore retinal degeneration.

  8. Effects of dibutyryl cyclic-AMP on survival and neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells transplanted into spinal cord injured rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Kim

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs have great potential as a cell replacement therapy for spinal cord injury. However, poor control over transplant cell differentiation and survival remain major obstacles. In this study, we asked whether dibutyryl cyclic-AMP (dbcAMP, which was shown to induce up to 85% in vitro differentiation of NSPCs into neurons would enhance survival of transplanted NSPCs through prolonged exposure either in vitro or in vivo through the controlled release of dbcAMP encapsulated within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres and embedded within chitosan guidance channels. NSPCs, seeded in fibrin scaffolds within the channels, differentiated in vitro to betaIII-tubulin positive neurons by immunostaining and mRNA expression, in response to dbcAMP released from PLGA microspheres. After transplantation in spinal cord injured rats, the survival and differentiation of NSPCs was evaluated. Untreated NSPCs, NSPCs transplanted with dbcAMP-releasing microspheres, and NSPCs pre-differentiated with dbcAMP for 4 days in vitro were transplanted after rat spinal cord transection and assessed 2 and 6 weeks later. Interestingly, NSPC survival was highest in the dbcAMP pre-treated group, having approximately 80% survival at both time points, which is remarkable given that stem cell transplantation often results in less than 1% survival at similar times. Importantly, dbcAMP pre-treatment also resulted in the greatest number of in vivo NSPCs differentiated into neurons (37±4%, followed by dbcAMP-microsphere treated NSPCs (27±14% and untreated NSPCs (15±7%. The reverse trend was observed for NSPC-derived oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with these populations being highest in untreated NSPCs. This combination strategy of stem cell-loaded chitosan channels implanted in a fully transected spinal cord resulted in extensive axonal regeneration into the injury site, with improved functional recovery after 6 weeks in animals implanted with

  9. Morin hydrate promotes inner ear neural stem cell survival and differentiation and protects cochlea against neuronal hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiang; Jia, Zhanwei; Zhang, Ying; Ren, Xiumin

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the effect of morin hydrate on neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from mouse inner ear and its potential in protecting neuronal hearing loss. 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assays were employed to assess the effect of morin hydrate on the viability and proliferation of in vitro NSC culture. The NSCs were then differentiated into neurons, in which neurosphere formation and differentiation were evaluated, followed by neurite outgrowth and neural excitability measurements in the subsequent in vitro neuronal network. Mechanotransduction of cochlea ex vivo culture and auditory brainstem responses threshold and distortion product optoacoustic emissions amplitude in mouse ototoxicity model were also measured following gentamicin treatment to investigate the protective role of morin hydrate against neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate improved viability and proliferation, neurosphere formation and neuronal differentiation of inner ear NSCs, and promoted in vitro neuronal network functions. In both ex vivo and in vivo ototoxicity models, morin hydrate prevented gentamicin-induced neuronal hearing loss. Morin hydrate exhibited potent properties in promoting growth and differentiation of inner ear NSCs into functional neurons and protecting from gentamicin ototoxicity. Our study supports its clinical potential in treating neuronal hearing loss. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  10. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  11. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel

    2008-01-01

    each week to a stress stimulus. When evaluated in the water maze at the early stages of aging (18 months old), chronic unpredictable stress accelerated spatial-cognitive decline, an effect that was accompanied by a reduction in the survival of newborn cells and in the number of adult granular cells......In this study, we examined whether chronic stress in adulthood can exert long-term effects on spatial-cognitive abilities and on the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress at midlife (12 months old) and then reexposed......, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule, during the 4 weeks of continuous stress not only prevented the deleterious effects of chronic stress on spatial memory, but also reduced the survival of the newly generated hippocampal cells in aging animals. FGL treatment did not, however, prevent...

  12. Neural Stem Cells Secreting Anti-HER2 Antibody Improve Survival in a Preclinical Model of HER2 Overexpressing Breast Cancer Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Deepak; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Morshed, Ramin A; Frank, Richard T; Yu, Dou; Zhang, Lingjiao; Spencer, Drew A; Kim, Julius W; Han, Yu; Yu, Dihua; Ahmed, Atique U; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-10-01

    The treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing breast cancer has been revolutionized by trastuzumab. However, longer survival of these patients now predisposes them to forming HER2 positive brain metastases, as the therapeutic antibodies cannot cross the blood brain barrier. The current oncologic repertoire does not offer a rational, nontoxic targeted therapy for brain metastases. In this study, we used an established human neural stem cell line, HB1.F3 NSCs and generated a stable pool of cells secreting a high amount of functional full-length anti-HER2 antibody, equivalent to trastuzumab. Anti-HER2Ab secreted by the NSCs (HER2Ab-NSCs) specifically binds to HER2 overexpressing human breast cancer cells and inhibits PI3K-Akt signaling. This translates to HER2Ab-NSC inhibition of breast cancer cell growth in vitro. Preclinical in vivo experiments using HER2Ab overexpressing NSCs in a breast cancer brain metastases (BCBM) mouse model demonstrate that intracranial injection of HER2Ab-NSCs significantly improves survival. In effect, these NSCs provide tumor localized production of HER2Ab, minimizing any potential off-target side effects. Our results establish HER2Ab-NSCs as a novel, nontoxic, and rational therapeutic approach for the successful treatment of HER2 overexpressing BCBM, which now warrants further preclinical and clinical investigation. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Survival, proliferation and differentiation enhancement of neural stem cells cultured in three-dimensional polyethylene glycol-RGD hydrogel with tenascin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghdi, Pejman; Tiraihi, Taki; Ganji, Fariba; Darabi, Shehram; Taheri, Taher; Kazemi, Hadi

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylene glycol hydrogel (PEG) conjugated with arginyl glycyl aspartic acid (RGD) (PEG-RGD) has been considered to be a scaffold in three-dimensional (3D) culture that improves neurite outgrowth; on the other hand, tenascin C controls neural growth and differentiation. In this study, the effect of a combined RGD and tenascin C mixture in 3D culture (3D-PEG-RGD-TnC) on the survival, growth and differentiation of neural stem cells. The viability of the culture has been evaluated by live/dead assay and the results show that the viability of NSCs in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC is significantly higher than its value in 3D-PEG-RGD. The proliferation was evaluated by MTS test and was found to be slightly improved but statistically not significant. Accordingly, the differentiation was evaluated by immunoreactivity to nestin, neurofilament 68, neurofilament 160, neurofilament 200 and GFAP; and the expression of nestin, neuro D, musashi1, β-tubulin III, GFAP, MBP and Oct4 was studied using RT-PCR. The results showed enhancement of the differentiation of NSCs into the neuronal phenotype in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC. The morphology of NSCs cultured in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC showed neurite outgrowths and increase in the contact between the differentiated cells' extensions. The conclusion of this study was that NSC survival, proliferation and differentiation are enhanced when the cells are cultured in 3D-PEG-RGD-TnC. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. CNS immunological modulation of neural graft rejection and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlongan, C V; Stahl, C E; Cameron, D F; Saporta, S; Freeman, T B; Cahill, D W; Sanberg, P R

    1996-08-01

    Neural transplantation therapy as a possible alternative treatment for neurological movement disorders, such as in Parkinson's disease (PD), has accentuated research interest on the immune status of the central nervous system (CNS). Most animal studies concerned with neural transplantation for the treatment of PD have utilized dopamine (DA) neurons from tissues of the embryonic ventral mesencephalon. Rat embryonic DA neurons, grafted either as solid blocks or dissociated into a cell suspension and stereotaxically injected intraparenchymally into a rat lesion model of PD, have been shown to survive and form connections with the host brain, and ameliorate the behavioral deficits of PD. Similarly, studies on nonhuman primate models of PD provide considerable support for neural transplantation of DA neurons as an experimental clinical procedure for the treatment of PD. To this end, experimental clinical trials have been centered upon transplantation of the embryonic ventral mesencephalic cells for PD patients. Although not conclusive, the findings from clinical studies have provided some evidence that most patients with marked increases in fluorodopa uptake (indicating graft survival) have been immunosuppressed. Furthermore, immune reactions have been observed in rats xenografted with human embryonic tissue. Of note, embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissues compared to adult tissues produce better morphological and long-lasting behavioral amelioration of the neurobehavioral deficits of PD, thus advocating the use of grafts from young donors (embryo) to circumvent the CNS immune rejection. The possible graft rejection due to CNS immune reactions, coupled with the social and ethical problems surrounding the use of embryonic neural tissue, and the logistical problems concerning tissue availability have prompted the development of alternative sources of DA-secreting cells. To circumvent these obstacles, several methods have been suggested including the use of

  15. Neural crest cell survival is dependent on Rho kinase and is required for development of the mid face in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Phillips

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NCC give rise to much of the tissue that forms the vertebrate head and face, including cartilage and bone, cranial ganglia and teeth. In this study we show that conditional expression of a dominant-negative (DN form of Rho kinase (Rock in mouse NCC results in severe hypoplasia of the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, ultimately resulting in reduction of the maxilla and nasal bones and severe craniofacial clefting affecting the nose, palate and lip. These defects resemble frontonasal dysplasia in humans. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to abnormalities in cell-matrix attachment, is seen in the RockDN;Wnt1-cre mutant embryos. This leads to elevated cell death, resulting in NCC deficiency and hypoplastic NCC-derived craniofacial structures. Rock is thus essential for survival of NCC that form the craniofacial region. We propose that reduced NCC numbers in the frontonasal processes and first pharyngeal arch, resulting from exacerbated cell death, may be the common mechanism underlying frontonasal dysplasia.

  16. Resistance of subventricular neural stem cells to chronic hypoxemia despite structural disorganization of the germinal center and impairment of neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny X

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xavier d'Anglemont de Tassigny,1,* M Salomé Sirerol-Piquer,2,3,* Ulises Gómez-Pinedo,4 Ricardo Pardal,1 Sonia Bonilla,1 Vivian Capilla-Gonzalez,2 Ivette López-López,1 Francisco Javier De la Torre-Laviana,1 José Manuel García-Verdugo,2,3 José López-Barneo1,3 1Medical Physiology and Biophysics Department, Institute of Biomedicine of Seville (IBiS, Virgen del Rocío University Hospital/CSIC/University of Seville, Seville, Spain; 2Cavanilles Institute of Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; 3Network Center of Biomedical Research on Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIBERNED, Spain; 4Laboratory of Regenerative Medicine, San Carlos Institute of Health Investigation, Madrid, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic hypoxemia, as evidenced in de-acclimatized high-altitude residents or in patients with chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, is a common medical condition that can produce serious neurological alterations. However, the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is unknown. We have found that adult rodents exposed for several days/weeks to hypoxia, with an arterial oxygen tension similar to that of chronically hypoxemic patients, manifest a partially irreversible structural disarrangement of the subventricular neurogenic niche (subventricular zone characterized by displacement of neurons and myelinated axons, flattening of the ependymal cell layer, and thinning of capillary walls. Despite these abnormalities, the number of neuronal and oligodendrocyte progenitors, neuroblasts, and neurosphere-forming cells as well as the proliferative activity in subventricular zone was unchanged. These results suggest that neural stem cells and their undifferentiated progeny are resistant to hypoxia. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that severe chronic hypoxia decreases the survival of newly generated neurons and oligodendrocytes, with damage of myelin sheaths. These

  17. Resistance of subventricular neural stem cells to chronic hypoxemia despite structural disorganization of the germinal center and impairment of neuronal and oligodendrocyte survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    d’Anglemont de Tassigny, Xavier; Sirerol-Piquer, M Salomé; Gómez-Pinedo, Ulises; Pardal, Ricardo; Bonilla, Sonia; Capilla-Gonzalez, Vivian; López-López, Ivette; De la Torre-Laviana, Francisco Javier; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; López-Barneo, José

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hypoxemia, as evidenced in de-acclimatized high-altitude residents or in patients with chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, is a common medical condition that can produce serious neurological alterations. However, the pathogenesis of this phenomenon is unknown. We have found that adult rodents exposed for several days/weeks to hypoxia, with an arterial oxygen tension similar to that of chronically hypoxemic patients, manifest a partially irreversible structural disarrangement of the subventricular neurogenic niche (subventricular zone) characterized by displacement of neurons and myelinated axons, flattening of the ependymal cell layer, and thinning of capillary walls. Despite these abnormalities, the number of neuronal and oligodendrocyte progenitors, neuroblasts, and neurosphere-forming cells as well as the proliferative activity in subventricular zone was unchanged. These results suggest that neural stem cells and their undifferentiated progeny are resistant to hypoxia. However, in vivo and in vitro experiments indicate that severe chronic hypoxia decreases the survival of newly generated neurons and oligodendrocytes, with damage of myelin sheaths. These findings help explain the effects of hypoxia on adult neurogenesis and provide new perspectives on brain responsiveness to persistent hypoxemia. PMID:27774479

  18. A peptide derived from a trans-homophilic binding site in neural cell adhesion molecule induces neurite outgrowth and neuronal survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Lene B; Soroka, Vladislav; Korshunova, Irina

    2010-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a key role in neural development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of a fragment of NCAM comprising the three N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig)-like modules indicates that the first and second Ig modules bind to each other...

  19. Critical role of astrocytic interleukin-17 A in post-stroke survival and neuronal differentiation of neural precursor cells in adult mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Zhang, J-C; Yao, C-Y; Wu, Y; Abdelgawad, A F; Yao, S-L; Yuan, S-Y

    2016-01-01

    The brain and the immune system interact in complex ways after ischemic stroke, and the long-term effects of immune response associated with stroke remain controversial. As a linkage between innate and adaptive immunity, interleukin-17 A (IL-17 A) secreted from gamma delta (γδ) T cells has detrimental roles in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic stroke. However, to date, the long-term actions of IL-17 A after stroke have not been investigated. Here, we found that IL-17 A showed two distinct peaks of expression in the ischemic hemisphere: the first occurring within 3 days and the second on day 28 after stroke. Our data also showed that astrocyte was the major cellular source of IL-17 A that maintained and augmented subventricular zone (SVZ) neural precursor cells (NPCs) survival, neuronal differentiation, and subsequent synaptogenesis and functional recovery after stroke. IL-17 A also promoted neuronal differentiation in cultured NPCs from the ischemic SVZ. Furthermore, our in vitro data revealed that in primary astrocyte cultures activated astrocytes released IL-17 A via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Culture media from reactive astrocytes increased neuronal differentiation of NSCs in vitro. Blockade of IL-17 A with neutralizing antibody prevented this effect. In addition, after screening for multiple signaling pathways, we revealed that the p38 MAPK/calpain 1 signaling pathway was involved in IL-17 A-mediated neurogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Thus, our results reveal a previously uncharacterized property of astrocytic IL-17 A in the maintenance and augment of survival and neuronal differentiation of NPCs, and subsequent synaptogenesis and spontaneous recovery after ischemic stroke. PMID:27336717

  20. Lead decreases cell survival, proliferation, and neuronal differentiation of primary cultured adult neural precursor cells through activation of the JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engstrom, Anna; Wang, Hao; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is the process whereby adult neural precursor cells (aNPCs) in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) generate adult-born, functional neurons in the hippocampus. This process is modulated by various extracellular and intracellular stimuli, and the adult-born neurons have been implicated in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. However, studies on how neurotoxic agents affect this process and the underlying mechanisms are limited. The goal of this study was to determine whether lead, a heavy metal, directly impairs critical processes in adult neurogenesis and to characterize the underlying signaling pathways using primary cultured SGZ-aNPCs isolated from adult mice. We report here that lead significantly increases apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in SGZ-aNPCs. In addition, lead significantly impairs spontaneous neuronal differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, we found that activation of the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling pathways are important for lead cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that lead can directly act on adult neural stem cells and impair critical processes in adult hippocampal neurogenesis, which may contribute to its neurotoxicity and adverse effects on cognition in adults. PMID:25967738

  1. Non-SMC condensin I complex proteins control chromosome segregation and survival of proliferating cells in the zebrafish neural retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The condensation of chromosomes and correct sister chromatid segregation during cell division is an essential feature of all proliferative cells. Structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC and non-SMC proteins form the condensin I complex and regulate chromosome condensation and segregation during mitosis. However, due to the lack of appropriate mutants, the function of the condensin I complex during vertebrate development has not been described. Results Here, we report the positional cloning and detailed characterization of retinal phenotypes of a zebrafish mutation at the cap-g locus. High resolution live imaging reveals that the progression of mitosis between prometa- to telophase is delayed and that sister chromatid segregation is impaired upon loss of CAP-G. CAP-G associates with chromosomes between prometa- and telophase of the cell cycle. Loss of the interaction partners CAP-H and CAP-D2 causes cytoplasmic mislocalization of CAP-G throughout mitosis. DNA content analysis reveals increased genomic imbalances upon loss of non-SMC condensin I subunits. Within the retina, loss of condensin I function causes increased rates of apoptosis among cells within the proliferative ciliary marginal zone (CMZ whereas postmitotic retinal cells are viable. Inhibition of p53-mediated apoptosis partially rescues cell numbers in cap-g mutant retinae and allows normal layering of retinal cell types without alleviating their aberrant nuclear sizes. Conclusion Our findings indicate that the condensin I complex is particularly important within rapidly amplifying progenitor cell populations to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. In contrast, differentiation of postmitotic retinal cells is not impaired upon polyploidization.

  2. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  3. Neuritogenic and survival-promoting effects of the P2 peptide derived from a homophilic binding site in the neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Martin V; Køhler, Lene B; Ditlevsen, Dorte K

    2004-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays a pivotal role in neural development, regeneration, and plasticity. NCAM mediates adhesion and subsequent signal transduction through NCAM-NCAM binding. Recently, a peptide ligand termed P2 corresponding to a 12-amino-acid sequence in the FG loop...... lowered by P2. Finally, treatment of neurons with P2 resulted in phosphorylation of the ser/thr kinase Akt. Thus, a small peptide mimicking homophilic NCAM interaction is capable of inducing differentiation as reflected by neurite outgrowth in several neuronal cell types and inhibiting apoptosis...

  4. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    Chronically implanted neural electrode arrays have the potential to be used as neural prostheses in patients with various neurological disorders. While these electrodes perform well in acute recordings, they often fail to function reliably in clinically relevant chronic settings because of glial encapsulation and the loss of neurons. Surface modification of these implants may provide a means of improving their biocompatibility and integration within host brain tissue. The authors proposed a method of improving the brain-implant interface by seeding the implant's surface with a layer of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from adult murine subependyma. Neural progenitor cells may reduce the foreign body reaction by presenting a tissue-friendly surface and repair implant-induced injury and inflammation by releasing neurotrophic factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the growth and differentiation of NPCs on laminin-immobilized probe surfaces and explored the potential impact on transplant survival of these cells. Laminin protein was successfully immobilized on the silicon surface via covalent binding using silane chemistry. The growth, adhesion, and differentiation of NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) on laminin-modified silicon surfaces were characterized in vitro by using immunocytochemical techniques. Shear forces were applied to NPC cultures in growth medium to evaluate their shearing properties. In addition, neural probes seeded with GFP-labeled NPCs cultured in growth medium for 14 days were implanted in murine cortex. The authors assessed the adhesion properties of these cells during implantation conditions. Moreover, the tissue response around NPC-seeded implants was observed after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Significantly improved NPC attachment and growth was found on the laminin-immobilized surface compared with an unmodified control before and after shear force application. The NPCs grown on the laminin-immobilized surface

  5. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  6. Five Years Survival on Hemodialysis Predicted by Artificial Neural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five Years Survival on Hemodialysis Predicted by Artificial Neural Network Model. ... Introduction: Maintenance hemodialysis (HD) patients' morbidity and mortality remain unacceptably high. It is important to identify risk factors affecting outcome and define their relative contribution. Methods: The data of 93 patients who ...

  7. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  8. The mych gene is required for neural crest survival during zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Kook Hong

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Among Myc family genes, c-Myc is known to have a role in neural crest specification in Xenopus and in craniofacial development in the mouse. There is no information on the function of other Myc genes in neural crest development, or about any developmental role of zebrafish Myc genes.We isolated the zebrafish mych (myc homologue gene. Knockdown of mych leads to severe defects in craniofacial development and in certain other tissues including the eye. These phenotypes appear to be caused by cell death in the neural crest and in the eye field in the anterior brain.Mych is a novel factor required for neural crest cell survival in zebrafish.

  9. Predicting the survival of diabetes using neural network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamuda, Mamman; Sathasivam, Saratha

    2017-08-01

    Data mining techniques at the present time are used in predicting diseases of health care industries. Neural Network is one among the prevailing method in data mining techniques of an intelligent field for predicting diseases in health care industries. This paper presents a study on the prediction of the survival of diabetes diseases using different learning algorithms from the supervised learning algorithms of neural network. Three learning algorithms are considered in this study: (i) The levenberg-marquardt learning algorithm (ii) The Bayesian regulation learning algorithm and (iii) The scaled conjugate gradient learning algorithm. The network is trained using the Pima Indian Diabetes Dataset with the help of MATLAB R2014(a) software. The performance of each algorithm is further discussed through regression analysis. The prediction accuracy of the best algorithm is further computed to validate the accurate prediction

  10. Surviving the crash: T-cell homeostasis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TOSHIBA

    Spatial and temporal elements. – Cellular sites for the integration of cell death and survival cues. – Spatial regulation of Notch activity for cell survival. Page 4. Cell survival is determined by the availability and uptake of nutrients live dead. Activated T-cells. T-cells. Page 5. dead wildtype. Bax active -6A7. Nucleus – H33342.

  11. Low immunogenicity of mouse induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Go; Ozaki, Masahiro; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Rei; Ookubo, Toshiki; Yastake, Kaori; Matsubayashi, Kohei; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-10-11

    Resolving the immunogenicity of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains an important challenge for cell transplant strategies that use banked allogeneic cells. Thus, we evaluated the immunogenicity of mouse fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (fetus-NSPCs) and iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the low expression of immunological surface antigens, and these cells survived in all mice when transplanted syngeneically into subcutaneous tissue and the spinal cord. In contrast, an allogeneic transplantation into subcutaneous tissue was rejected in all mice, and allogeneic cells transplanted into intact and injured spinal cords survived for 3 months in approximately 20% of mice. In addition, cell survival was increased after co-treatment with an immunosuppressive agent. Thus, the immunogenicity and post-transplantation immunological dynamics of iPSC-NSPCs resemble those of fetus-NSPCs.

  12. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  13. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Du; Linna Zhang; Scorsone, Kathleen A.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formatio...

  14. AKT signaling mediates IGF-I survival actions on otic neural progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria R Aburto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Otic neurons and sensory cells derive from common progenitors whose transition into mature cells requires the coordination of cell survival, proliferation and differentiation programmes. Neurotrophic support and survival of post-mitotic otic neurons have been intensively studied, but the bases underlying the regulation of programmed cell death in immature proliferative otic neuroblasts remains poorly understood. The protein kinase AKT acts as a node, playing a critical role in controlling cell survival and cell cycle progression. AKT is activated by trophic factors, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, through the generation of the lipidic second messenger phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K. Here we have investigated the role of IGF-dependent activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway in maintenance of otic neuroblasts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a combination of organotypic cultures of chicken (Gallus gallus otic vesicles and acoustic-vestibular ganglia, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, we show that IGF-I-activation of AKT protects neural progenitors from programmed cell death. IGF-I maintains otic neuroblasts in an undifferentiated and proliferative state, which is characterised by the upregulation of the forkhead box M1 (FoxM1 transcription factor. By contrast, our results indicate that post-mitotic p27(Kip-positive neurons become IGF-I independent as they extend their neuronal processes. Neurons gradually reduce their expression of the Igf1r, while they increase that of the neurotrophin receptor, TrkC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Proliferative otic neuroblasts are dependent on the activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway by IGF-I for survival during the otic neuronal progenitor phase of early inner ear development.

  15. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Orlando R, Stice SL. Membrane proteomic signatures of karyotypically normal and abnormal human embryonic stem cell lines and derivatives. Proteomics. 2011...format (96-,384-well) assays, 2) grow as adherent monolayers, and 3) possess a stable karyotype for multiple (>10) passages with a doubling time of ~36...derived neural progenitor cell line working stock has been amplified, characterized for karyotype and evaluated for the expression of neural progenitor

  16. High glucose environment inhibits cranial neural crest survival by activating excessive autophagy in the chick embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Shuai; Wang, Guang; Ma, Zheng-Lai; Chuai, Manli; Cao, Liu; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    High glucose levels induced by maternal diabetes could lead to defects in neural crest development during embryogenesis, but the cellular mechanism is still not understood. In this study, we observed a defect in chick cranial skeleton, especially parietal bone development in the presence of high glucose levels, which is derived from cranial neural crest cells (CNCC). In early chick embryo, we found that inducing high glucose levels could inhibit the development of CNCC, however, cell proliferation was not significantly involved. Nevertheless, apoptotic CNCC increased in the presence of high levels of glucose. In addition, the expression of apoptosis and autophagy relevant genes were elevated by high glucose treatment. Next, the application of beads soaked in either an autophagy stimulator (Tunicamycin) or inhibitor (Hydroxychloroquine) functionally proved that autophagy was involved in regulating the production of CNCC in the presence of high glucose levels. Our observations suggest that the ERK pathway, rather than the mTOR pathway, most likely participates in mediating the autophagy induced by high glucose. Taken together, our observations indicated that exposure to high levels of glucose could inhibit the survival of CNCC by affecting cell apoptosis, which might result from the dysregulation of the autophagic process. PMID:26671447

  17. Predicting the Survival of Gastric Cancer Patients Using Artificial and Bayesian Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhani Kangi, Azam; Bahrampour, Abbas

    2018-02-26

    Introduction and purpose: In recent years the use of neural networks without any premises for investigation of prognosis in analyzing survival data has increased. Artificial neural networks (ANN) use small processors with a continuous network to solve problems inspired by the human brain. Bayesian neural networks (BNN) constitute a neural-based approach to modeling and non-linearization of complex issues using special algorithms and statistical methods. Gastric cancer incidence is the first and third ranking for men and women in Iran, respectively. The aim of the present study was to assess the value of an artificial neural network and a Bayesian neural network for modeling and predicting of probability of gastric cancer patient death. Materials and Methods: In this study, we used information on 339 patients aged from 20 to 90 years old with positive gastric cancer, referred to Afzalipoor and Shahid Bahonar Hospitals in Kerman City from 2001 to 2015. The three layers perceptron neural network (ANN) and the Bayesian neural network (BNN) were used for predicting the probability of mortality using the available data. To investigate differences between the models, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and the area under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROCs) were generated. Results: In this study, the sensitivity and specificity of the artificial neural network and Bayesian neural network models were 0.882, 0.903 and 0.954, 0.909, respectively. Prediction accuracy and the area under curve ROC for the two models were 0.891, 0.944 and 0.935, 0.961. The age at diagnosis of gastric cancer was most important for predicting survival, followed by tumor grade, morphology, gender, smoking history, opium consumption, receiving chemotherapy, presence of metastasis, tumor stage, receiving radiotherapy, and being resident in a village. Conclusion: The findings of the present study indicated that the Bayesian neural network is preferable to an artificial neural network for

  18. In vitro induction and differentiation of newborn guinea pig hippocampus neural stem cells into cells resembling inner hair cells, using artificial perilymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Dong, M-M

    2011-08-01

    To investigate whether artificial perilymph can induce neural stem cells, derived from the hippocampus of newborn guinea pigs, to differentiate into inner ear hair cells, in vitro. Primary neural stem cells derived from the hippocampus of newborn guinea pigs were incubated in medium containing either 10 per cent fetal bovine serum or 5, 10 or 15 per cent artificial perilymph, for three weeks. Differentiated cells were identified using immunofluorescence, Western blot and scanning electron microscopy. Both fetal bovine serum and artificial perilymph induced the neural stem cells to differentiate into cells with hair-cell-specific antibodies. Neural stem cells can survive in both fetal bovine serum and artificial perilymph, and within these media can differentiate into cells with hair-cell-specific antibodies. This provides an experimental basis for transplantation of neural stem cells into the inner ear.

  19. Modelling survival after treatment of intraocular melanoma using artificial neural networks and Bayes theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taktak, Azzam F G [Department of Clinical Engineering, Duncan Building, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool L7 8XP (United Kingdom); Fisher, Anthony C [Department of Clinical Engineering, Duncan Building, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool L7 8XP (United Kingdom); Damato, Bertil E [Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool L7 8XP (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-07

    This paper describes the development of an artificial intelligence (AI) system for survival prediction from intraocular melanoma. The system used artificial neural networks (ANNs) with five input parameters: coronal and sagittal tumour location, anterior tumour margin, largest basal tumour diameter and the cell type. After excluding records with missing data, 2331 patients were included in the study. These were split randomly into training and test sets. Date censorship was applied to the records to deal with patients who were lost to follow-up and patients who died from general causes. Bayes theorem was then applied to the ANN output to construct survival probability curves. A validation set with 34 patients unseen to both training and test sets was used to compare the AI system with Cox's regression (CR) and Kaplan-Meier (KM) analyses. Results showed large differences in the mean 5 year survival probability figures when the number of records with matching characteristics was small. However, as the number of matches increased to >100 the system tended to agree with CR and KM. The validation set was also used to compare the system with a clinical expert in predicting time to metastatic death. The rms error was 3.7 years for the system and 4.3 years for the clinical expert for 15 years survival. For <10 years survival, these figures were 2.7 and 4.2, respectively. We concluded that the AI system can match if not better the clinical expert's prediction. There were significant differences with CR and KM analyses when the number of records was small, but it was not known which model is more accurate.

  20. Aebp2 as an epigenetic regulator for neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kim

    Full Text Available Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2. We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism.

  1. Bioluminescence Imaging of Olig2-Neural Stem Cells Reveals Improved Engraftment in a Demyelination Mouse Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; van Dam, Go; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    2009-01-01

    A major issue in the potential application of neural stem cell (NSC)-based cell replacement therapy for demyelinating diseases is the question of the survival, functional behavior, and stability of implanted NSC-derived oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) over an extended period. To address this

  2. Artificial neural network: predicted vs observed survival in patients with colonic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgobrodov, S G; Moore, P; Marshall, R; Bittern, R; Steele, R J C; Cuschieri, A

    2007-02-01

    An Internet-web-based artificial neural network has been developed for practicing clinical oncologists and medical researchers as part of an ongoing program designed for the implementation of advanced neural networks for prognostic estimates and eventually for management/treatment decisions in individual patients with colonic cancer. An interdisciplinary team of academic oncologists and physicists has configured and implemented a Partial Logistic Artificial Neural Network and trained it to predict cancer-related survival in patients with confirmed colorectal cancer by using a database (1,558 patients) made available for the study by the Information & Statistics Division of National Health Service Scotland. The reliability of the trained network was evaluated against Kaplan-Meier observed survival plots of a random sample of 300 patients not used in the training but forming part of the same data set. The predicted survival curves obtained as the output from the artificial neural network showed close agreement with observed actual survival rates of a cohort of 300 patients with four grades of risk of dying from the cancer within five years of diagnosis. The web-based Partial Logistic Artificial Neural Network system accurately predicts survival after staging and treatment of colonic cancer. It can be made web-accessible where it is powerful enough to serve hundreds of users simultaneously.

  3. Control of obesity and glucose intolerance via building neural stem cells in the hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Juxue; Tang, Yizhe; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Yan, Jingqi; Cai, DongSheng

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) were recently revealed to exist in the hypothalamus of adult mice. Here, following our observation showing that a partial loss of hypothalamic NSCs caused weight gain and glucose intolerance, we studied if NSCs-based cell therapy could be developed to control these disorders. While hypothalamus-implanted NSCs failed to survive in mice with obesity, NF-κB inhibition induced survival and neurogenesis of these cells, leading to effects in counteracting obesity and glucos...

  4. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Goffart, Nicolas; KROONEN, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays sti...

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Hallmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  6. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  9. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2016-06-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell-substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell-material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell-substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo.

  10. Antibiotics Reduce Retinal Cell Survival In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Amy E; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2017-11-02

    Antibiotics such as gentamicin (an aminoglycoside) and penicillin (a beta-lactam antibiotic) are routinely used in retinal cell and explant cultures. In many cases, these in vitro systems are testing parameters regarding photoreceptor transplantation or preparing cells for transplantation. In vivo, milligram doses of gentamicin are neurotoxic to the retina. However, little is known about the effects of antibiotics to retina in vitro and whether smaller doses of gentamicin are toxic to retinal cells. To test toxicity, retinal cells were dissociated from tiger salamander, placed in culture, and treated with either 20 μg/ml gentamicin, 100 μg/ml streptomycin, 100 U/ml antibiotic/antimycotic, 0.25 μg/ml amphotericin B, or 100 U/ml penicillin G. All dosages were within manufacturer's recommended levels. Control cultures had defined medium only. Cells were fixed at 2 h or 7 days. Three criteria were used to assess toxicity: (1) survival of retinal neurons, (2) neuritic growth of photoreceptors assessed by the development of presynaptic varicosities, and (3) survival and morphology of Mueller cells. Rod cells were immunolabeled for rod opsin, Mueller cells for glial fibrillary acidic protein, and varicosities for synaptophysin. Neuronal cell density was reduced with all pharmacological treatments. The number of presynaptic varicosities was also significantly lower in both rod and cone photoreceptors in treated compared to control cultures; further, rods were more sensitive to gentamicin than cones. Penicillin G (100 U/ml) was overall the least inhibitory and amphotericin B the most toxic of all the agents to photoreceptors. Mueller cell survival was reduced with all treatments; reduced survival was accompanied by the appearance of proportionally fewer stellate and more rounded glial morphologies. These findings suggest that even microgram doses of antibiotic and antimycotic drugs can be neurotoxic to retinal cells and reduce neuritic regeneration in cell

  11. Brain Metastasis-Initiating Cells: Survival of the Fittest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohini Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastases (BMs are the most common brain tumor in adults, developing in about 10% of adult cancer patients. It is not the incidence of BM that is alarming, but the poor patient prognosis. Even with aggressive treatments, median patient survival is only months. Despite the high rate of BM-associated mortality, very little research is conducted in this area. Lack of research and staggeringly low patient survival is indicative that a novel approach to BMs and their treatment is needed. The ability of a small subset of primary tumor cells to produce macrometastases is reminiscent of brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs or cancer stem cells (CSCs hypothesized to form primary brain tumors. BTICs are considered stem cell-like due to their self-renewal and differentiation properties. Similar to the subset of cells forming metastases, BTICs are most often a rare subpopulation. Based on the functional definition of a TIC, cells capable of forming a BM could be considered to be brain metastasis-initiating cells (BMICs. These putative BMICs would not only have the ability to initiate tumor growth in a secondary niche, but also the machinery to escape the primary tumor, migrate through the circulation, and invade the neural niche.

  12. Integrating Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Neural Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Francesca L; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-02-01

    The central nervous system has a limited capacity to regenerate, and thus, traumatic injuries or diseases often have devastating consequences. Therefore, there is a distinct need to develop alternative treatments that can achieve functional recovery without side effects currently observed with some pharmacological treatments. Combining biomaterials with pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), either embryonic or induced, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Biomaterials can mimic the extracellular matrix and present a myriad of relevant biochemical cues through rational design or further functionalization. Biomaterials such as nanofibers and hydrogels, including self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels can provide a superior cell culture environment. When these materials are then combined with PSCs, more accurate drug screening and disease modeling could be developed, and the generation of large number of cells with the appropriate phenotype can be achieved, for subsequent use in vitro. Biomaterials have also been shown to support endogenous cell growth after implantation, and, in particular, hydrogels and SAPs have effectively acted as cell delivery vehicles, increasing cell survival after transplantation. Few studies are yet to fully exploit the combination of PSCs and innovative biomaterials; however, initial studies with neural stem cells, for example, are promising, and, hence, such a combination for use in vitro and in vivo is an exciting new direction for the field of neural regeneration.

  13. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  14. Predicting post-treatment survivability of patients with breast cancer using Artificial Neural Network methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tan-Nai; Cheng, Chung-Hao; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the use of data mining techniques has become widely accepted in medical applications, especially in predicting cancer patients' survival. In this study, we attempted to train an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to predict the patients' five-year survivability. Breast cancer patients who were diagnosed and received standard treatment in one hospital during 2000 to 2003 in Taiwan were collected for train and test the ANN. There were 604 patients in this dataset excluding died not in breast cancer. Among them 140 patients died within five years after their first radiotherapy treatment. The artificial neural networks were created by STATISTICA(®) software. Five variables (age, surgery and radiotherapy type, tumor size, regional lymph nodes, distant metastasis) were selected as the input features for ANN to predict the five-year survivability of breast cancer patients. We trained 100 artificial neural networks and chose the best one to analyze. The accuracy rate is 85% and area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve is 0.79. It shows that artificial neural network is a good tool to predict the five-year survivability of breast cancer patients.

  15. Protection of neurons derived from human neural progenitor cells by veratridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter J; Ortinau, Stefanie; Frahm, Jana; Krüger, Norman; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2009-08-26

    The survival of developing dopaminergic neurons has been shown to be modulated by voltage-dependent mechanisms. Manipulation of these mechanisms in human neural progenitor cell cultures could improve the survival of immature dopaminergic neurons, and therefore aid research into pharmacological and cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease. Here, we examined the effect of the Na+ channel agonist veratridine on the human fetal neural progenitor ReNcell VM cell line. Neuronal differentiation was determined by immunocytochemistry, whereas patch clamp recordings showed the expression of functional voltage-gated sodium channels. Our results show that veratridine is neuroprotective in human fetal neural progenitor cells, which may benefit studies investigating neuronal development by reducing premature death amongst developing neurons.

  16. Gelatin methacrylamide hydrogel with graphene nanoplatelets for neural cell-laden 3D bioprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei Zhu; Harris, Brent T; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system is extremely complex which leads to rare regrowth of nerves once injury or disease occurs. Advanced 3D bioprinting strategy, which could simultaneously deposit biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components in a layer-by-layer manner, may be a promising solution to address neural damages. Here we presented a printable nano-bioink composed of gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA), neural stem cells, and bioactive graphene nanoplatelets to target nerve tissue regeneration in the assist of stereolithography based 3D bioprinting technique. We found the resultant GelMA hydrogel has a higher compressive modulus with an increase of GelMA concentration. The porous GelMA hydrogel can provide a biocompatible microenvironment for the survival and growth of neural stem cells. The cells encapsulated in the hydrogel presented good cell viability at the low GelMA concentration. Printed neural construct exhibited well-defined architecture and homogenous cell distribution. In addition, neural stem cells showed neuron differentiation and neurites elongation within the printed construct after two weeks of culture. These findings indicate the 3D bioprinted neural construct has great potential for neural tissue regeneration.

  17. Nestin-GFP Transgene Reveals Neural Precursor Cells in Adult Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapy for neural lesions or degenerative diseases relies mainly on finding transplantable active precursor cells. Identifying them in peripheral tissues accessible for biopsy, outside the central nervous system, would circumvent the serious immunological and ethical concerns impeding cell therapy. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated neural progenitor cells in cultured adult skeletal muscle from transgenic mice in which nestin regulatory elements control GFP expression. These cells also expressed the early neural marker Tuj1 and light and heavy neurofilament but not S100β, indicating that they express typical neural but not Schwann cell markers. GFP+/Tuj1+ cells were also negative for the endothelial and pericyte markers CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We established their a) functional response to glutamate in patch-clamp recordings; b) interstitial mesenchymal origin; c) replicative capacity; and d) the environment necessary for their survival after fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the decline in nestin-GFP expression in muscle progenitor cells and its persistence in neural precursor cells in muscle cultures provide an invaluable tool for isolating a population of predifferentiated neural cells with therapeutic potential. PMID:21304812

  18. Mir-29b Mediates the Neural Tube versus Neural Crest Fate Decision during Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Wu, Yukang; Li, Guoping; Ma, Li; Feng, Ke; Guo, Xudong; Jia, Wenwen; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Guang; Li, Ping; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-08-08

    During gastrulation, the neuroectoderm cells form the neural tube and neural crest. The nervous system contains significantly more microRNAs than other tissues, but the role of microRNAs in controlling the differentiation of neuroectodermal cells into neural tube epithelial (NTE) cells and neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unknown. Using embryonic stem cell (ESC) neural differentiation systems, we found that miR-29b was upregulated in NTE cells and downregulated in NCCs. MiR-29b promoted the differentiation of ESCs into NTE cells and inhibited their differentiation into NCCs. Accordingly, the inhibition of miR-29b significantly inhibited the differentiation of NTE cells. A mechanistic study revealed that miR-29b targets DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) to regulate neural differentiation. Moreover, miR-29b mediated the function of Pou3f1, a critical neural transcription factor. Therefore, our study showed that the Pou3f1-miR-29b-Dnmt3a regulatory axis was active at the initial stage of neural differentiation and regulated the determination of cell fate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of neural progenitor proliferation and survival by beta1 integrins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leone, Dino P; Relvas, João B; Campos, Lia S

    2005-01-01

    Neural stem cells give rise to undifferentiated nestin-positive progenitors that undergo extensive cell division before differentiating into neuronal and glial cells. The precise control of this process is likely to be, at least in part, controlled by instructive cues originating from...

  20. Lipid degradation promotes prostate cancer cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Harri M; Brown, Michael; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Tredwell, Gregory; Lau, Chung Ho; Barfeld, Stefan; Hart, Claire; Guldvik, Ingrid J.; Takhar, Mandeep; Heemers, Hannelore V.; Erho, Nicholas; Bloch, Katarzyna; Davicioni, Elai; Derua, Rita; Waelkens, Etienne; Mohler, James L.; Clarke, Noel; Swinnen, Johan V.; Keun, Hector C.; Rekvig, Ole P.; Mills, Ian G.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer and androgen receptor (AR) is the major driver of the disease. Here we show that Enoyl-CoA delta isomerase 2 (ECI2) is a novel AR-target that promotes prostate cancer cell survival. Increased ECI2 expression predicts mortality in prostate cancer patients (p = 0.0086). ECI2 encodes for an enzyme involved in lipid metabolism, and we use multiple metabolite profiling platforms and RNA-seq to show that inhibition of ECI2 expression leads to decreased glucose utilization, accumulation of fatty acids and down-regulation of cell cycle related genes. In normal cells, decrease in fatty acid degradation is compensated by increased consumption of glucose, and here we demonstrate that prostate cancer cells are not able to respond to decreased fatty acid degradation. Instead, prostate cancer cells activate incomplete autophagy, which is followed by activation of the cell death response. Finally, we identified a clinically approved compound, perhexiline, which inhibits fatty acid degradation, and replicates the major findings for ECI2 knockdown. This work shows that prostate cancer cells require lipid degradation for survival and identifies a small molecule inhibitor with therapeutic potential. PMID:28415728

  1. Neural cell adhesion molecule is a cardioprotective factor up-regulated by metabolic stress.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, Kazuya; Ono, Koh; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Yodo; Kojima, Yoji; Horie, Takahiro; Nishi, Hitoo; Kinoshita, Minako; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Koji; Kita, Toru; KIMURA, TAKESHI

    2010-01-01

    Screening for cell surface proteins up-regulated under stress conditions may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. To search for genes whose expression was enhanced by treatment with oligomycin, a mitochondrial-F(0)F(1) ATP synthase inhibitor, signal sequence trapping was performed in H9C2 rat cardiac myoblasts. One of the genes identified was that for neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, CD56), a major regulator of development, cell survival, migration, and neurite outgrowth...

  2. Artificial neural networks for diagnosis and survival prediction in colon cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2005-01-01

    Abstract ANNs are nonlinear regression computational devices that have been used for over 45 years in classification and survival prediction in several biomedical systems, including colon cancer. Described in this article is the theory behind the three-layer free forward artificial neural networks with backpropagation error, which is widely used in biomedical fields, and a methodological approach to its application for cancer research, as exemplified by colon cancer. Review of the literature ...

  3. MANF Promotes Differentiation and Migration of Neural Progenitor Cells with Potential Neural Regenerative Effects in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Anttila, Jenni E; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia activates endogenous reparative processes, such as increased proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migration of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward the ischemic area. However, this reparative process is limited because most of the NPCs...

  4. Doxycycline Enhances Survival and Self-Renewal of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mi-Yoon; Rhee, Yong-Hee; Yi, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Kim, Hyongbum; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2014-01-01

    Summary We here report that doxycycline, an antibacterial agent, exerts dramatic effects on human embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC/iPSCs) survival and self-renewal. The survival-promoting effect was also manifest in cultures of neural stem cells (NSCs) derived from hESC/iPSCs. These doxycycline effects are not associated with its antibacterial action, but mediated by direct activation of a PI3K-AKT intracellular signal. These findings indicate doxycycline as a useful supplement for stem cell cultures, facilitating their growth and maintenance. PMID:25254347

  5. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  6. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Artificial neural networks predict survival from pancreatic cancer after radical surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Daniel; Nilsson, Johan; Andersson, Roland; Regnér, Sara; Tingstedt, Bobby; Andersson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are nonlinear pattern recognition techniques that can be used as a tool in medical decision making. The objective of this study was to develop an ANN model for predicting survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). A flexible nonlinear survival model based on ANNs was designed by using clinical and histopathological data from 84 patients who underwent resection for PDAC. Seven of 33 potential risk variables were selected to construct the ANN, including lymph node metastasis, differentiation, body mass index, age, resection margin status, peritumoral inflammation, and American Society of Anesthesiologists grade. Three variables (ie, lymph node metastasis, leukocyte count, and tumor location) were significant according to Cox regression analysis. Harrell's concordance index for the ANN model was .79, and for Cox regression it was .67. For the first time, ANNs have been used to successfully predict individual long-term survival for patients after radical surgery for PDAC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Two Artificial Neural Networks for Modeling Discrete Survival Time of Censored Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taysseer Sharaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural network (ANN theory is emerging as an alternative to conventional statistical methods in modeling nonlinear functions. The popular Cox proportional hazard model falls short in modeling survival data with nonlinear behaviors. ANN is a good alternative to the Cox PH as the proportionality of the hazard assumption and model relaxations are not required. In addition, ANN possesses a powerful capability of handling complex nonlinear relations within the risk factors associated with survival time. In this study, we present a comprehensive comparison of two different approaches of utilizing ANN in modeling smooth conditional hazard probability function. We use real melanoma cancer data to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed ANN methods. We report some significant results in comparing the survival time of male and female melanoma patients.

  9. A Hyaluronan-Based Injectable Hydrogel Improves the Survival and Integration of Stem Cell Progeny following Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G. Ballios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The utility of stem cells and their progeny in adult transplantation models has been limited by poor survival and integration. We designed an injectable and bioresorbable hydrogel blend of hyaluronan and methylcellulose (HAMC and tested it with two cell types in two animal models, thereby gaining an understanding of its general applicability for enhanced cell distribution, survival, integration, and functional repair relative to conventional cell delivery in saline. HAMC improves cell survival and integration of retinal stem cell (RSC-derived rods in the retina. The pro-survival mechanism of HAMC is ascribed to the interaction of the CD44 receptor with HA. Transient disruption of the retinal outer limiting membrane, combined with HAMC delivery, results in significantly improved rod survival and visual function. HAMC also improves the distribution, viability, and functional repair of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs. The HAMC delivery system improves cell transplantation efficacy in two CNS models, suggesting broad applicability.

  10. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    such as sea urchins, flies, fish and humans. (ii) Embryos (and so larvae and adults) form by differentiation from these germ layers. (iii) Homologous structures in different animals arise from the same germ layers. The germ-layer theory exerted a profound influence on those claiming a neural crest — that is, an ectodermal.

  11. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8 weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12 weeks after injury and in the 8 weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  12. An avian model for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Sharon; Pinkas, Adi; Slotkin, Theodore A; Yanai, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A fast and simple model which uses lower animals on the evolutionary scale is beneficial for developing procedures for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells. Here, we established a procedure for the derivation of chick neural stem cells, establishing embryonic day (E) 10 as optimal for progression to neuronal phenotypes. Cells were obtained from the embryonic cerebral hemispheres and incubated for 5-7 days in enriched medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) according to a procedure originally developed for mice. A small percentage of the cells survived, proliferated and formed nestin-positive neurospheres. After removal of the growth factors to allow differentiation (5 days), 74% of the cells differentiated into all major lineages of the nervous system, including neurons (Beta III tubulin-positive, 54% of the total number of differentiated cells), astrocytes (GFAP-positive, 26%), and oligodendrocytes (O4-positive, 20%). These findings demonstrate that the cells were indeed neural stem cells. Next, the cells were transplanted in two allograft chick models; (1) direct cerebral transplantation to 24-h-old chicks, followed by post-transplantation cell tracking at 24 h, 6 days and 14 days, and (2) intravenous transplantation to chick embryos on E13, followed by cell tracking on E19. With both methods, transplanted cells were found in the brain. The chick embryo provides a convenient, precisely-timed and unlimited supply of neural progenitors for therapy by transplantation, as well as constituting a fast and simple model in which to evaluate the ability of neural stem cell transplantation to repair neural damage, steps that are critical for progress toward therapeutic applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Defective ALK5 signaling in the neural crest leads to increased postmigratory neural crest cell apoptosis and severe outflow tract defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucov Henry M

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cardiovascular diseases are the most common form of birth defects in humans. A substantial portion of these defects has been associated with inappropriate induction, migration, differentiation and patterning of pluripotent cardiac neural crest stem cells. While TGF-β-superfamily signaling has been strongly implicated in neural crest cell development, the detailed molecular signaling mechanisms in vivo are still poorly understood. Results We deleted the TGF-β type I receptor Alk5 specifically in the mouse neural crest cell lineage. Failure in signaling via ALK5 leads to severe cardiovascular and pharyngeal defects, including inappropriate remodeling of pharyngeal arch arteries, abnormal aortic sac development, failure in pharyngeal organ migration and persistent truncus arteriosus. While ALK5 is not required for neural crest cell migration, our results demonstrate that it plays an important role in the survival of post-migratory cardiac neural crest cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ALK5-mediated signaling in neural crest cells plays an essential cell-autonomous role in the pharyngeal and cardiac outflow tract development.

  14. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Michael; Zhang, Linna; Scorsone, Kathleen A; Woodfield, Sarah E; Zage, Peter E

    2016-06-10

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formation and poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage were performed to measure the induction of apoptosis after nifurtimox treatment. Inhibition of intracellular signaling was measured by Western blot analysis of treated and untreated cells. Tumor cells were then treated with combinations of nifurtimox and BSO and evaluated for viability using MTT assays. All neural tumor cell lines were sensitive to nifurtimox, and IC50 values ranged from approximately 20 to 210 μM. Nifurtimox treatment inhibited ERK phosphorylation and induced apoptosis in tumor cells. Furthermore, the combination of nifurtimox and BSO demonstrated significant synergistic efficacy in all tested cell lines. Additional preclinical and clinical studies of the combination of nifurtimox and BSO in patients with neural tumors are warranted.

  15. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  16. Hydrogel formulation determines cell fate of fetal and adult neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R. Aurand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogels provide a unique tool for neural tissue engineering. These materials can be customized for certain functions, i.e. to provide cell/drug delivery or act as a physical scaffold. Unfortunately, hydrogel complexities can negatively impact their biocompatibility, resulting in unintended consequences. These adverse effects may be combated with a better understanding of hydrogel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, and how these properties affect encapsulated neural cells. We defined the polymerization and degradation rates and compressive moduli of 25 hydrogels formulated from different concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA and poly(ethylene glycol (PEG. Changes in compressive modulus were driven primarily by the HA concentration. The in vitro biocompatibility of fetal-derived (fNPC and adult-derived (aNPC neural progenitor cells was dependent on hydrogel formulation. Acute survival of fNPC benefited from hydrogel encapsulation. NPC differentiation was divergent: fNPC differentiated into mostly glial cells, compared with neuronal differentiation of aNPC. Differentiation was influenced in part by the hydrogel mechanical properties. This study indicates that there can be a wide range of HA and PEG hydrogels compatible with NPC. Additionally, this is the first study comparing hydrogel encapsulation of NPC derived from different aged sources, with data suggesting that fNPC and aNPC respond dissimilarly within the same hydrogel formulation.

  17. Hydrogel formulation determines cell fate of fetal and adult neural progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer L.; Shandas, Robin; Bjugstad, Kimberly B.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogels provide a unique tool for neural tissue engineering. These materials can be customized for certain functions, i.e. to provide cell/drug delivery or act as a physical scaffold. Unfortunately, hydrogel complexities can negatively impact their biocompatibility, resulting in unintended consequences. These adverse effects may be combated with a better understanding of hydrogel chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, and how these properties affect encapsulated neural cells. We defined the polymerization and degradation rates and compressive moduli of 25 hydrogels formulated from different concentrations of hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). Changes in compressive modulus were driven primarily by the HA concentration. The in vitro biocompatibility of fetal-derived (fNPC) and adult-derived (aNPC) neural progenitor cells was dependent on hydrogel formulation. Acute survival of fNPC benefited from hydrogel encapsulation. NPC differentiation was divergent: fNPC differentiated into mostly glial cells, compared with neuronal differentiation of aNPC. Differentiation was influenced in part by the hydrogel mechanical properties. This study indicates that there can be a wide range of HA and PEG hydrogels compatible with NPC. Additionally, this is the first study comparing hydrogel encapsulation of NPC derived from different aged sources, with data suggesting that fNPC and aNPC respond dissimilarly within the same hydrogel formulation. PMID:24141109

  18. TSP-1 secreted by bone marrow stromal cells contributes to retinal ganglion cell neurite outgrowth and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are pluripotent and thereby a potential candidate for cell replacement therapy for central nervous system degenerative disorders and traumatic injury. However, the mechanism of their differentiation and effect on neural tissues has not been fully elucidated. This study evaluates the effect of BMSCs on neural cell growth and survival in a retinal ganglion cell (RGCs model by assessing the effect of changes in the expression of a BMSC-secreted protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1, as a putative mechanistic agent acting on RGCs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The effect of co-culturing BMSCs and RGCs in vitro was evaluated by measuring the following parameters: neurite outgrowth, RGC survival, BMSC neural-like differentiation, and the effect of TSP-1 on both cell lines under basal secretion conditions and when TSP-1 expression was inhibited. Our data show that BMSCs improved RGC survival and neurite outgrowth. Synaptophysin, MAP-2, and TGF-beta expression are up-regulated in RGCs co-cultured with BMSCs. Interestingly, the BMSCs progressively displayed neural-like morphology over the seven-day study period. Restriction display polymerase chain reaction (RD-PCR was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes in BMSCs cultured alone or co-cultured with RGCs. TSP-1, a multifactorial extracellular matrix protein, is critically important in the formation of neural connections during development, so its function in our co-culture model was investigated by small interfering RNA (siRNA transfection. When TSP-1 expression was decreased with siRNA silencing, BMSCs had no impact on RGC survival, but reduced neurite outgrowth and decreased expression of synaptophysin, MAP-2 and TGF-beta in RGCs. Furthermore, the number of BMSCs with neural-like characteristics was significantly decreased by more than two-fold using siRNA silencing. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the TSP-1 signaling pathway might have an important

  19. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  20. SERCA control of cell death and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemaly, Elie R; Troncone, Luca; Lebeche, Djamel

    2018-01-01

    Intracellular calcium (Ca2+) is a critical coordinator of various aspects of cellular physiology. It is increasingly apparent that changes in cellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to the regulation of normal and pathological signal transduction that controls cell growth and survival. Aberrant perturbations in Ca2+ homeostasis have been implicated in a range of pathological conditions, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, tumorigenesis and steatosis hepatitis. Intracellular Ca2+ concentrations are therefore tightly regulated by a number of Ca2+ handling enzymes, proteins, channels and transporters located in the plasma membrane and in Ca2+ storage organelles, which work in concert to fine tune a temporally and spatially precise Ca2+ signal. Chief amongst them is the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER) Ca2+ ATPase pump (SERCA) which actively re-accumulates released Ca2+ back into the SR/ER, therefore maintaining Ca2+ homeostasis. There are at least 14 different SERCA isoforms encoded by three ATP2A1-3 genes whose expressions are species- and tissue-specific. Altered SERCA expression and activity results in cellular malignancy and induction of ER stress and ER stress-associated apoptosis. The role of SERCA misregulation in the control of apoptosis in various cell types and disease setting with prospective therapeutic implications is the focus of this review. Ca2+ is a double edge sword for both life as well as death, and current experimental evidence supports a model in which Ca2+ homeostasis and SERCA activity represent a nodal point that controls cell survival. Pharmacological or genetic targeting of this axis constitutes an incredible therapeutic potential to treat different diseases sharing similar biological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mediation of autophagic cell death by type 3 ryanodine receptor (RyR3 in adult hippocampal neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Min eChung

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic Ca2+ actively engages in diverse intracellular processes from protein synthesis, folding and trafficking to cell survival and death. Dysregulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels is observed in various neuropathological states including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Ryanodine receptors (RyRs and IP3 receptors (IP3Rs, the main Ca2+ release channels located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes, are known to direct various cellular events such as autophagy and apoptosis. Here we investigated the intracellular Ca2+-mediated regulation of survival and death of adult hippocampal neural stem (HCN cells utilizing an insulin withdrawal model of autophagic cell death. Despite comparable expression levels of RyR and IP3R transcripts in HCN cells at normal state, the expression levels of RyRs — especially RyR3 — were markedly upregulated upon insulin withdrawal. While treatment with the RyR agonist caffeine significantly promoted the autophagic death of insulin-deficient HCN cells, treatment with its inhibitor dantrolene prevented the induction of autophagy following insulin withdrawal. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of the RyR3 gene abolished autophagic cell death of HCN cells. This study delineates a distinct, RyR3-mediated ER Ca2+ regulation of autophagy and programmed cell death in neural stem cells. Our findings provide novel insights into the critical, yet understudied mechanisms underlying the regulatory function of ER Ca2+ in neural stem cell biology.

  2. Sox2 promotes survival of satellite glial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Taro, E-mail: koiket@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Hirahara, Yukie; Yamada, Hisao

    2015-08-14

    Sox2 is a transcriptional factor expressed in neural stem cells. It is known that Sox2 regulates cell differentiation, proliferation and survival of the neural stem cells. Our previous study showed that Sox2 is expressed in all satellite glial cells of the adult rat dorsal root ganglion. In this study, to examine the role of Sox2 in satellite glial cells, we establish a satellite glial cell-enriched culture system. Our culture method succeeded in harvesting satellite glial cells with the somata of neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. Using this culture system, Sox2 was downregulated by siRNA against Sox2. The knockdown of Sox2 downregulated ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA at 2 and 4 days after siRNA treatment. MAPK phosphorylation, downstream of ErbB, was also inhibited by Sox2 knockdown. Because ErbB2 and ErbB3 are receptors that support the survival of glial cells in the peripheral nervous system, apoptotic cells were also counted. TUNEL-positive cells increased at 5 days after siRNA treatment. These results suggest that Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through the MAPK pathway via ErbB receptors. - Highlights: • We established satellite glial cell culture system. • Function of Sox2 in satellite glial cell was examined using siRNA. • Sox2 knockdown downregulated expression level of ErbB2 and ErbB3 mRNA. • Sox2 knockdown increased apoptotic satellite glial cell. • Sox2 promotes satellite glial cell survival through ErbB signaling.

  3. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  4. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffart, Nicolas [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Kroonen, Jérôme [Human Genetics, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); The T& P Bohnenn Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht 3556 (Netherlands); Rogister, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Register@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); GIGA-Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2013-08-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  5. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Goffart

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  6. Functional Stem Cell Integration into Neural Networks Assessed by Organotypic Slice Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, David; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Jäderstad, Johan; Jäderstad, Linda Maria; Olivius, Petri; Herlenius, Eric

    2017-08-14

    Re-formation or preservation of functional, electrically active neural networks has been proffered as one of the goals of stem cell-mediated neural therapeutics. A primary issue for a cell therapy approach is the formation of functional contacts between the implanted cells and the host tissue. Therefore, it is of fundamental interest to establish protocols that allow us to delineate a detailed time course of grafted stem cell survival, migration, differentiation, integration, and functional interaction with the host. One option for in vitro studies is to examine the integration of exogenous stem cells into an existing active neural network in ex vivo organotypic cultures. Organotypic cultures leave the structural integrity essentially intact while still allowing the microenvironment to be carefully controlled. This allows detailed studies over time of cellular responses and cell-cell interactions, which are not readily performed in vivo. This unit describes procedures for using organotypic slice cultures as ex vivo model systems for studying neural stem cell and embryonic stem cell engraftment and communication with CNS host tissue. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Artificial neural networks for diagnosis and survival prediction in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Farid E

    2005-08-06

    ANNs are nonlinear regression computational devices that have been used for over 45 years in classification and survival prediction in several biomedical systems, including colon cancer. Described in this article is the theory behind the three-layer free forward artificial neural networks with backpropagation error, which is widely used in biomedical fields, and a methodological approach to its application for cancer research, as exemplified by colon cancer. Review of the literature shows that applications of these networks have improved the accuracy of colon cancer classification and survival prediction when compared to other statistical or clinicopathological methods. Accuracy, however, must be exercised when designing, using and publishing biomedical results employing machine-learning devices such as ANNs in worldwide literature in order to enhance confidence in the quality and reliability of reported data.

  8. Artificial neural networks for diagnosis and survival prediction in colon cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farid E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract ANNs are nonlinear regression computational devices that have been used for over 45 years in classification and survival prediction in several biomedical systems, including colon cancer. Described in this article is the theory behind the three-layer free forward artificial neural networks with backpropagation error, which is widely used in biomedical fields, and a methodological approach to its application for cancer research, as exemplified by colon cancer. Review of the literature shows that applications of these networks have improved the accuracy of colon cancer classification and survival prediction when compared to other statistical or clinicopathological methods. Accuracy, however, must be exercised when designing, using and publishing biomedical results employing machine-learning devices such as ANNs in worldwide literature in order to enhance confidence in the quality and reliability of reported data.

  9. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Triiodothyronine regulates cell growth and survival in renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecka, Anna M; Matak, Damian; Szymanski, Lukasz; Czarnecka, Karolina H; Lewicki, Slawomir; Zdanowski, Robert; Brzezianska-Lasota, Ewa; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-10-01

    Triiodothyronine plays an important role in the regulation of kidney cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. Patients with renal cell cancer who develop hypothyreosis during tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment have statistically longer survival. In this study, we developed cell based model of triiodothyronine (T3) analysis in RCC and we show the different effects of T3 on renal cell cancer (RCC) cell growth response and expression of the thyroid hormone receptor in human renal cell cancer cell lines from primary and metastatic tumors along with human kidney cancer stem cells. Wild-type thyroid hormone receptor is ubiquitously expressed in human renal cancer cell lines, but normalized against healthy renal proximal tube cell expression its level is upregulated in Caki-2, RCC6, SKRC-42, SKRC-45 cell lines. On the contrary the mRNA level in the 769-P, ACHN, HKCSC, and HEK293 cells is significantly decreased. The TRβ protein was abundant in the cytoplasm of the 786-O, Caki-2, RCC6, and SKRC-45 cells and in the nucleus of SKRC-42, ACHN, 769-P and cancer stem cells. T3 has promoting effect on the cell proliferation of HKCSC, Caki-2, ASE, ACHN, SK-RC-42, SMKT-R2, Caki-1, 786-0, and SK-RC-45 cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, directly inhibits proliferation of RCC cells, while thyroid hormone receptor antagonist 1-850 (CAS 251310‑57-3) has less significant inhibitory impact. T3 stimulation does not abrogate inhibitory effect of sunitinib. Renal cancer tumor cells hypostimulated with T3 may be more responsive to tyrosine kinase inhibition. Moreover, some tumors may be considered as T3-independent and present aggressive phenotype with thyroid hormone receptor activated independently from the ligand. On the contrary proliferation induced by deregulated VHL and or c-Met pathways may transgress normal T3 mediated regulation of the cell cycle.

  11. Comparative study on influence of fetal bovine serum and serum of adult rat on cultivation of newborn rat neural cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukach A. N.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the influence of fetal bovine serum and serum of adult rats on behavior of newborn rat isolated neural cells during their cultivation in vitro. Methods. The isolation of neural cells from neonatal rat brain. The determination of the dynamics of cellular monolayer formation. Immunocytochemical staining of cells for β-tubulin III, nestin and vimentin. Results. It has been determined that the addition of serum of adult rats to the cultivation medium creates more favorable conditions for survival, attachment and spread of differentiated, and proliferation of the stem/progenitor neural cells of newborn rats during cultivation in vitro compared with the fetal bovine serum. Conclusions. Using the serum of adult rats is preferable for the cultivation of isolated neural cells of newborn rats compared with the fetal bovine serum.

  12. Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Rosettes Developmentally Mimic Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Cárdenas, Amalia; Webb, Robin; Jordan, Erin; West, Rachel; West, Franklin D; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Wang, Kai; Stice, Steven L

    2015-08-15

    For diseases of the brain, the pig (Sus scrofa) is increasingly being used as a model organism that shares many anatomical and biological similarities with humans. We report that pig induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can recapitulate events in early mammalian neural development. Pig iPSC line (POU5F1(high)/SSEA4(low)) had a higher potential to form neural rosettes (NR) containing neuroepithelial cells than either POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(low) or POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(high) lines. Thus, POU5F1 and SSEA4 pluripotency marker profiles in starting porcine iPSC populations can predict their propensity to form more robust NR populations in culture. The NR were isolated and expanded in vitro, retaining their NR morphology and neuroepithelial molecular properties. These cells expressed anterior central nervous system fate markers OTX2 and GBX2 through at least seven passages, and responded to retinoic acid, promoting a more posterior fate (HOXB4+, OTX2-, and GBX2-). These findings offer insight into pig iPSC development, which parallels the human iPSC in both anterior and posterior neural cell fates. These in vitro similarities in early neural differentiation processes support the use of pig iPSC and differentiated neural cells as a cell therapy in allogeneic porcine neural injury and degeneration models, providing relevant translational data for eventual human neural cell therapies.

  13. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  14. [18F]FDG labeling of neural stem cells for in vivo cell tracking with positron emission tomography : inhibition of tracer release by phloretin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanov, Katica; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Hoekstra, Dick; van Waarde, Aren; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    The introduction of neural stem cells into the brain has promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To monitor the cellular replacement therapy, that is, to determine stem cell migration, survival, and differentiation, in vivo tracking methods are needed.

  15. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  16. Bmi1 overexpression in the cerebellar granule cell lineage of mice affects cell proliferation and survival without initiating medulloblastoma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hourinaz Behesti

    2013-01-01

    BMI1 is a potent inducer of neural stem cell self-renewal and neural progenitor cell proliferation during development and in adult tissue homeostasis. It is overexpressed in numerous human cancers – including medulloblastomas, in which its functional role is unclear. We generated transgenic mouse lines with targeted overexpression of Bmi1 in the cerebellar granule cell lineage, a cell type that has been shown to act as a cell of origin for medulloblastomas. Overexpression of Bmi1 in granule cell progenitors (GCPs led to a decrease in cerebellar size due to decreased GCP proliferation and repression of the expression of cyclin genes, whereas Bmi1 overexpression in postmitotic granule cells improved cell survival in response to stress by altering the expression of genes in the mitochondrial cell death pathway and of Myc and Lef-1. Although no medulloblastomas developed in ageing cohorts of transgenic mice, crosses with Trp53−/− mice resulted in a low incidence of medulloblastoma formation. Furthermore, analysis of a large collection of primary human medulloblastomas revealed that tumours with a BMI1high TP53low molecular profile are significantly enriched in Group 4 human medulloblastomas. Our data suggest that different levels and timing of Bmi1 overexpression yield distinct cellular outcomes within the same cellular lineage. Importantly, Bmi1 overexpression at the GCP stage does not induce tumour formation, suggesting that BMI1 overexpression in GCP-derived human medulloblastomas probably occurs during later stages of oncogenesis and might serve to enhance tumour cell survival.

  17. WITHDRAWN: The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter S

    2008-03-27

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is a well characterized, ubiquitously expressed CAM that is highly expressed in the nervous system. In addition to mediating cell adhesion, NCAM participates in a multitude of cellular events, including survival, migration, and differentiation of cells, outgrowth of neurites, and formation and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two proteins suggests that they are transcribed from paralogous genes. However, very little is known about the function of NCAM2, although it originally was described more than 20 years ago. In this review we summarize the known properties and functions of NCAM2 and describe some of the differences and similarities between NCAM and NCAM2.

  18. Umbilical cord blood cells CD133+/CD133- cultivation in neural proliferation media differentiates towards neural cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinska, Lucia; Novotna, Ivana; Kubes, Miroslav; Radonak, Jozef; Jergova, Stanislava; Cigankova, Viera; Rosocha, Jan; Cizkova, Dasa

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been identified as a good source of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stem cells that can be easily isolated. In the present study we investigated the possibility of whether stem cells in mononuclear UCB grown under defined conditions can produce progeny with neural phenotype. A combination of antigen-driven magnetic cell sorting (MACs) method and defined culture conditions specific for cells of neural lineages were used for isolation, expansion and differentiation of CD133+/- cells from UCB. Both UCB-derived fractions were expanded by exposure to growth factors (EGF, bFGF). Differentiation was induced by replacing them with fetal bovine serum. Using immunocytochemistry, the cell markers for neural (MAP2, GFAP, RIP) and non-neural lineages (S-100, von Willebrand factor) were detected. The analysis revealed occurrence of fully mature neural and non-neural lineages, which showed qualitative and quantitative differences between population of CD133+ and CD133- cells. The expression levels of MAP2 and RIP in CD133+ were significantly higher than in CD133-, more GFAP positive cells were found in the CD133-. At the same time, S-100 was expressed by 32.47 ± 6.24% of CD133- cells and 29.42 ± 1.32% of CD133- cell expressed a von Willebrand factor antigen. Our results indicate that stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood are easy to obtain, proliferate and are able to differentiate towards the cells of neural lineages, which represents a promising way for their utilization in cell-based therapies for CNS injuries and diseases. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  20. Integrin Signaling, Cell Survival, and Anoikis: Distinctions, Differences, and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre H. Vachon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell survival and apoptosis implicate an increasing complexity of players and signaling pathways which regulate not only the decision-making process of surviving (or dying, but as well the execution of cell death proper. The same complex nature applies to anoikis, a form of caspase-dependent apoptosis that is largely regulated by integrin-mediated, cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Not surprisingly, the regulation of cell survival, apoptosis, and anoikis furthermore implicates additional mechanistic distinctions according to the specific tissue, cell type, and species. Incidentally, studies in recent years have unearthed yet another layer of complexity in the regulation of these cell processes, namely, the implication of cell differentiation state-specific mechanisms. Further analyses of such differentiation state-distinct mechanisms, either under normal or physiopathological contexts, should increase our understanding of diseases which implicate a deregulation of integrin function, cell survival, and anoikis.

  1. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kafi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C, C(RGD4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot or three dimensional (rod or pillar like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD, graphene oxide (GO and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  2. Endoscopic delivery of enteric neural stem cells to treat Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L S; Hotta, R; Graham, H K; Nagy, N; Goldstein, A M; Belkind-Gerson, J

    2015-10-01

    Transplantation of enteric neural stem cells (ENSC) holds promise as a potential therapy for enteric neuropathies, including Hirschsprung disease. Delivery of transplantable cells via laparotomy has been described, but we propose a novel, minimally invasive endoscopic method of cell delivery. Enteric neural stem cells for transplantation were cultured from dissociated gut of postnatal donor mice. Twelve recipient mice, including Ednrb(-/-) mice with distal colonic aganglionosis, underwent colonoscopic injection of ENSC under direct vision using a 30-gauge Hamilton needle passed through a rigid cystoureteroscope. Cell engraftment, survival, and neuroglial differentiation were studied 1-4 weeks after the procedure. All recipient mice tolerated the procedure without complications and survived to sacrifice. Transplanted cells were found within the colonic wall in 9 of 12 recipient mice with differentiation into enteric neurons and glia. Endoscopic injection of ENSC is a safe and reliable method for cell delivery, and can be used to deliver a large number of cells to a specific area of disease. This minimally invasive endoscopic approach may prove beneficial to future human applications of cell therapy for neurointestinal disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  4. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell–Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell–substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell–material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell–substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo. PMID:26669274

  5. Borna disease virus infects human neural progenitor cells and impairs neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnic, Dragan; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Cochet, Marielle; Agier, Cécilia; Richardson, Jennifer; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Milhavet, Ollivier; Eloit, Marc; Coulpier, Muriel

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the complex mechanisms by which infectious agents can disrupt behavior represents a major challenge. The Borna disease virus (BDV), a potential human pathogen, provides a unique model to study such mechanisms. Because BDV induces neurodegeneration in brain areas that are still undergoing maturation at the time of infection, we tested the hypothesis that BDV interferes with neurogenesis. We showed that human neural stem/progenitor cells are highly permissive to BDV, although infection does not alter their survival or undifferentiated phenotype. In contrast, upon the induction of differentiation, BDV is capable of severely impairing neurogenesis by interfering with the survival of newly generated neurons. Such impairment was specific to neurogenesis, since astrogliogenesis was unaltered. In conclusion, we demonstrate a new mechanism by which BDV might impair neural function and brain plasticity in infected individuals. These results may contribute to a better understanding of behavioral disorders associated with BDV infection.

  6. A track-event theory of cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  7. Identification of neural cell adhesion molecule L1-derived neuritogenic ligands of the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Li, Shizhong; Kiselyov, Vladislav

    2009-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule L1 plays an important role in axon growth, neuronal survival, and synaptic plasticity. We recently demonstrated that the L1 fibronectin type III (FN3) modules interact directly with the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor (FGFR). Sequence alignment...

  8. Radial glial cells play a key role in echinoderm neural regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), the CNS of echinoderms is capable of fast and efficient regeneration following injury and constitutes one of the most promising model systems that can provide important insights into evolution of the cellular and molecular events involved in neural repair in deuterostomes. So far, the cellular mechanisms of neural regeneration in echinoderm remained obscure. In this study we show that radial glial cells are the main source of new cells in the regenerating radial nerve cord in these animals. Results We demonstrate that radial glial cells of the sea cucumber Holothuria glaberrima react to injury by dedifferentiation. Both glia and neurons undergo programmed cell death in the lesioned CNS, but it is the dedifferentiated glial subpopulation in the vicinity of the injury that accounts for the vast majority of cell divisions. Glial outgrowth leads to formation of a tubular scaffold at the growing tip, which is later populated by neural elements. Most importantly, radial glial cells themselves give rise to new neurons. At least some of the newly produced neurons survive for more than 4 months and express neuronal markers typical of the mature echinoderm CNS. Conclusions A hypothesis is formulated that CNS regeneration via activation of radial glial cells may represent a common capacity of the Deuterostomia, which is not invoked spontaneously in higher vertebrates, whose adult CNS does not retain radial glial cells. Potential implications for biomedical research aimed at finding the cure for human CNS injuries are discussed. PMID:23597108

  9. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315277,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315278,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238868,SRX238870 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX802060,SRX109471 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX109471,SRX802060 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315277,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural progenito...r cells SRX109472,SRX315274,SRX109471,SRX802060 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX869069,S...7,SRX1433432 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX707369,...SRX707366 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX141...1156,SRX1411157 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX8...SRX869081,SRX869082,SRX869077,SRX869071 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX380...SRX1433431,SRX869084 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 DNase-seq Neural Neural progenitor cel...ls SRX238870,SRX238868 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX...534844,SRX534845,SRX707368 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX141...1156,SRX1411157 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX71...0680,SRX710679,SRX710682,SRX710681,SRX710683 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX1...SRX869077,SRX869081,SRX869074,SRX869084 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX...534844,SRX534845,SRX707368 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX...534844,SRX534845,SRX707368 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural progenito...r cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX141...1156,SRX1411157 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX141...1156,SRX1411157 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  2. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Unclassified Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX71...0680,SRX710679,SRX710682,SRX710681,SRX710683 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Unclassified Neural Neural progenitor ...cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX380...,SRX869077,SRX869071 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX707366,...SRX707369 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX70...710683 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX...534844,SRX534845,SRX707368 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Neural Stem Cells http...://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  10. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural progenitor cells... SRX315278,SRX315277,SRX667383,SRX668241,SRX315276 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX505088,S...70,SRX869076 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  12. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX707366,...SRX707369 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX70...710683 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  14. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX380...SRX869067,SRX1433432 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  15. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX707366,...SRX707369 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  16. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Histone Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX505088,S...2,SRX1433429 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 All antigens Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX70...710683 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 TFs and others Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX3...SRX869081,SRX869082,SRX869071,SRX869084 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  19. An Evaluation of Artificial Neural Networks in Predicting Pancreatic Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Steven; Velanovich, Vic

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the development of an artificial neural network (ANN) method for predicting the survival likelihood of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. The ANN predictive model should produce results with a 90% sensitivity. A prospective examination of the records for 283 consecutive pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients is used to identify 219 records with complete data. These records are then used to create two unique samples which are then used to train and validate an ANN predictive model. Numerous network architectures are evaluated, following recommended ANN development protocols. Several backpropagation-trained ANNs were produced that satisfied the 90% sensitivity requirement. An ANN model with over a 91% sensitivity is selected because even though it did not have the highest sensitivity, it was able to achieve over 38% specificity. ANN models can accurately predict the 7-month survival of pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients, both with and without resection, at a 91% sensitivity and 38% specificity. This implies that ANN models may be useful objective decision tools in complex treatment decisions. This information may be used by patients and surgeons in determining optimal treatment plans that minimize regret and improve the quality of life for these patients.

  20. Functional role of kallikrein 6 in regulating immune cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobel A Scarisbrick

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kallikrein 6 (KLK6 is a newly identified member of the kallikrein family of secreted serine proteases that prior studies indicate is elevated at sites of central nervous system (CNS inflammation and which shows regulated expression with T cell activation. Notably, KLK6 is also elevated in the serum of multiple sclerosis (MS patients however its potential roles in immune function are unknown. Herein we specifically examine whether KLK6 alters immune cell survival and the possible mechanism by which this may occur.Using murine whole splenocyte preparations and the human Jurkat T cell line we demonstrate that KLK6 robustly supports cell survival across a range of cell death paradigms. Recombinant KLK6 was shown to significantly reduce cell death under resting conditions and in response to camptothecin, dexamethasone, staurosporine and Fas-ligand. Moreover, KLK6-over expression in Jurkat T cells was shown to generate parallel pro-survival effects. In mixed splenocyte populations the vigorous immune cell survival promoting effects of KLK6 were shown to include both T and B lymphocytes, to occur with as little as 5 minutes of treatment, and to involve up regulation of the pro-survival protein B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-XL, and inhibition of the pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death (Bim. The ability of KLK6 to promote survival of splenic T cells was also shown to be absent in cell preparations derived from PAR1 deficient mice.KLK6 promotes lymphocyte survival by a mechanism that depends in part on activation of PAR1. These findings point to a novel molecular mechanism regulating lymphocyte survival that is likely to have relevance to a range of immunological responses that depend on apoptosis for immune clearance and maintenance of homeostasis.

  1. Prediction of survival after radical cystectomy for invasive bladder carcinoma: risk group stratification, nomograms or artificial neural networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Mekresh, Mohsen; Akl, Ahmed; Mosbah, Ahmed; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed; Abol-Enein, Hassan; Ghoneim, Mohamed A

    2009-08-01

    We compared 3 predictive models for survival after radical cystectomy, risk group stratification, nomogram and artificial neural networks, in terms of their accuracy, performance and level of complexity. Between 1996 and 2002, 1,133 patients were treated with single stage radical cystectomy as monotherapy for invasive bladder cancer. A randomly selected 776 cases (70%) were used as a reference series. The remaining 357 cases (test series) were used for external validation. Survival estimates were analyzed using univariate and then multivariate appraisal. The results of multivariate analysis were used for risk group stratification and construction of a nomogram, whereas all studied variables were entered directly into the artificial neural networks. Overall 5-year disease-free survival was 64.5% with no statistical difference between the reference and test series. Comparisons of the 3 predictive models revealed that artificial neural networks outperformed the other 2 models in terms of the value of the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve, sensitivity and specificity, as well as positive and negative predictive values. In this study artificial neural networks outperformed the risk group stratification model and nomogram construction in predicting patient 5-year survival probability, and in terms of sensitivity and specificity.

  2. Predicting patient survival after liver transplantation using evolutionary multi-objective artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramírez, Manuel; Hervás-Martínez, César; Fernández, Juan Carlos; Briceño, Javier; de la Mata, Manuel

    2013-05-01

    The optimal allocation of organs in liver transplantation is a problem that can be resolved using machine-learning techniques. Classical methods of allocation included the assignment of an organ to the first patient on the waiting list without taking into account the characteristics of the donor and/or recipient. In this study, characteristics of the donor, recipient and transplant organ were used to determine graft survival. We utilised a dataset of liver transplants collected by eleven Spanish hospitals that provides data on the survival of patients three months after their operations. To address the problem of organ allocation, the memetic Pareto evolutionary non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm 2 (MPENSGA2 algorithm), a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, was used to train radial basis function neural networks, where accuracy was the measure used to evaluate model performance, along with the minimum sensitivity measurement. The neural network models obtained from the Pareto fronts were used to develop a rule-based system. This system will help medical experts allocate organs. The models obtained with the MPENSGA2 algorithm generally yielded competitive results for all performance metrics considered in this work, namely the correct classification rate (C), minimum sensitivity (MS), area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), root mean squared error (RMSE) and Cohen's kappa (Kappa). In general, the multi-objective evolutionary algorithm demonstrated a better performance than the mono-objective algorithm, especially with regard to the MS extreme of the Pareto front, which yielded the best values of MS (48.98) and AUC (0.5659). The rule-based system efficiently complements the current allocation system (model for end-stage liver disease, MELD) based on the principles of efficiency and equity. This complementary effect occurred in 55% of the cases used in the simulation. The proposed rule-based system minimises the prediction probability

  3. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  4. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal

  5. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Parisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  6. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Ludovica; Manfredi, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  7. Wnt5a-treated midbrain neural stem cells improve dopamine cell replacement therapy in parkinsonian mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parish, Clare L; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Rawal, Nina

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) cell replacement therapy in Parkinson disease (PD) can be achieved using human fetal mesencephalic tissue; however, limited tissue availability has hindered further developments. Embryonic stem cells provide a promising alternative, but poor survival and risk of teratoma formation h...... and functional integration of stem cell-derived DA neurons in vivo and define Wnt5a-treated neural stem cells as an efficient and safe source of DA neurons for cell replacement therapy in PD.......Dopamine (DA) cell replacement therapy in Parkinson disease (PD) can be achieved using human fetal mesencephalic tissue; however, limited tissue availability has hindered further developments. Embryonic stem cells provide a promising alternative, but poor survival and risk of teratoma formation...... have prevented their clinical application. We present here a method for generating large numbers of DA neurons based on expanding and differentiating ventral midbrain (VM) neural stem cells/progenitors in the presence of key signals necessary for VM DA neuron development. Mouse VM neurospheres (VMNs...

  8. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  9. Role of SDF1/CXCR4 Interaction in Experimental Hemiplegic Models with Neural Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Suzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been focused on neural cell transplantation because of its promising clinical applications. We have reported that embryonic stem (ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation significantly improved motor functions in a hemiplegic mouse model. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms governing neural regeneration of the damaged motor cortex after the transplantation. Recent investigations disclosed that chemokines participated in the regulation of migration and maturation of neural cell grafts. In this review, we summarize the involvement of inflammatory chemokines including stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1 in neural regeneration after ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation in mouse stroke models.

  10. Assessing the effect of quantitative and qualitative predictors on gastric cancer individuals survival using hierarchical artificial neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Zohreh; Mohammad, Kazem; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Zeraati, Hojjat

    2013-01-01

    There are numerous unanswered questions in the application of artificial neural network models for analysis of survival data. In most studies, independent variables have been studied as qualitative dichotomous variables, and results of using discrete and continuous quantitative, ordinal, or multinomial categorical predictive variables in these models are not well understood in comparison to conventional models. This study was designed and conducted to examine the application of these models in order to determine the survival of gastric cancer patients, in comparison to the Cox proportional hazards model. We studied the postoperative survival of 330 gastric cancer patients who suffered surgery at a surgical unit of the Iran Cancer Institute over a five-year period. Covariates of age, gender, history of substance abuse, cancer site, type of pathology, presence of metastasis, stage, and number of complementary treatments were entered in the models, and survival probabilities were calculated at 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months using the Cox proportional hazards and neural network models. We estimated coefficients of the Cox model and the weights in the neural network (with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer) in the training group, and used them to derive predictions in the study group. Predictions with these two methods were compared with those of the Kaplan-Meier product limit estimator as the gold standard. Comparisons were performed with the Friedman and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Survival probabilities at different times were determined using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with three nodes in the hidden layer; the ratios of standard errors with these two methods to the Kaplan-Meier method were 1.1593 and 1.0071, respectively, revealed a significant difference between Cox and Kaplan-Meier (P neural network, and the neural network and the standard (Kaplan-Meier), as well as better accuracy for the neural network (with 3 nodes in the hidden layer

  11. PEM Fuel Cell Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Doumbia, Mamadou Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a reaction directly into dc electrical energy. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a suitable alternative for both electrical transportation and stationary applications. In this article, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modelling approach of a PEM fuel cell is developed. This model describes the behaviour of PEM fuel cell voltage under both steady-state and transient conditions. Moreover, the prediction of th...

  12. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  13. Enteric neurospheres are not specific to neural crest cultures : Implications for neural stem cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, E. (Ellen); D. Natarajan (Dipa); J.E. Cooper (Julie E.); Kronfli, R. (Rania); Cananzi, M. (Mara); J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); C. Mccann; A.J. Burns (Alan); N. Thapar (Nikhil)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Enteric neural stem cells provide hope of curative treatment for enteric neuropathies. Current protocols for their harvesting from humans focus on the generation of 'neurospheres' from cultures of dissociated gut tissue. The study aims to better understand the derivation,

  14. Concentration-dependent effect of nerve growth factor on cell fate determination of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Hui; Hu, Zhengqing

    2011-10-01

    Stem cell-based spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) replacement therapy has been proposed to be a promising strategy to restore hearing either via replacing degenerated neurons or by improving the efficacy of cochlear implants which rely on functional neurons. However, lack of suitable donor cells and low survival rate of implanted cells are the major obstacles to successful implementation of therapeutic transplantation. The present study investigated the potential of mouse inner ear statoacoustic ganglion (SAG)-derived neural progenitors (NPs) to differentiate toward SGN-like glutamatergic cells and the influence to cell survival and differentiation when nerve growth factor (NGF) was supplied. We found that SAG-NPs could form neurospheres, proliferate, and differentiate into cells expressing neuronal protein neurofilament and β-III tubulin. NGF affected the cell fate of SAG-NP in a concentration-dependent manner in vitro. Low concentration of NGF (2-5 ng/mL) promoted cell proliferation. Medium concentration of NGF (20-40 ng/mL) stimulated cells to differentiate into bi-polar SGN-like cells expressing glutamatergic proteins. High concentration of NGF (100 ng/mL) could rescue cells from induced apoptosis. In the in vivo study, NGF (100 ng/mL) dramatically enhanced SAG-NP survival rate after implantation into adult mammalian inner ear. This finding raises the possibility to further induce these NPs to differentiate into SGN-like neurons in future in vivo study. In conclusion, given the capability of proliferation and differentiation into SGN-like cells with the supplement of NGF in vitro, SAG-NPs can serve as donor cells in stem cell-based SGN replacement therapy. NGF improved the survival of SAG-NPs not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  15. Differentiation of human neural progenitor cell-derived spiral ganglion-like neurons: a time-lapse video study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edin, Fredrik; Liu, Wei; Boström, Marja; Magnusson, Peetra U; Rask-Andersen, Helge

    2014-05-01

    Human neural progenitor cells can differentiate into spiral ganglion-like cells when exposed to inner ear-associated growth factors. The phenotype bears resemblance to human sphere-derived neurons. To establish an in vitro model for the human auditory nerve to replace and complement in vivo animal experiments and ultimately human in vivo transplantation. Human neural progenitors were differentiated under conditions developed for in vitro survival of human primary spiral ganglion culture with media containing growth factors associated with inner ear development. Differentiation was documented using time-lapse video microscopy. Time-dependent marker expression was evaluated using immunocytochemistry with fluorescence and laser confocal microscopy. Within 14 days of differentiation, neural progenitors adopted neural phenotype and expressed spiral ganglion-associated markers.

  16. Ten-year survival of patients with oesophageal squamous cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    oesophageal junction ... after treatment of cancer. Reports of actual 10-year survivors of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are rare, and demographic .... nodes, number of resected lymph nodes, adjuvant treatment and length of survival.

  17. Red cell survival time in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rath, R.N.; Das, R.K.; Panda, R.K.; Mahakur, A.C.; Patnaik, S.R. (M.K.C.G. Medical College, Berhampur (India))

    1979-10-01

    The red cell survival time was estimated in 50 cases of chronic renal failure and 20 healthy subjects, using radioactive chromium /sup 51/Cr. The mean value of red cell survival half time (T1/2/sup 51/Cr) was determined to be 25.9 +- 1.1 days in control subjects. The red cell survival half time (17.9 +- 4.67 days) was found to be significantly decreased in cases of chronic renal failure, when compared to the control group. An inverse relationship was observed between T1/2/sup 51/Cr value and blood urea, serum creatinine, the magnitude of hypertension, and duration of illness, whereas, creatinine clearance showed a direct relationship. There was no increased splenic uptake of radioactive chromium, indicating that haemolysis occurred elsewhere in the circulation other than spleen. The possible mechanism for the reduction of red cell survival time and the effect of uraemic environment on it has been discussed.

  18. Cell survival in a simulated Mars environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Paul; Kurk, Michael Andy; Boland, Eugene; Thomas, David

    2016-07-01

    The most ancient life forms on earth date back comfortably to the time when liquid water was believed to be abundant on Mars. These ancient life forms include cyanobacteria, contemporary autotrophic earth organisms believed to have descended from ancestors present as long as 3.5 billion years ago. Contemporary cyanobacteria have adapted to the earth environment's harshest conditions (long-term drying, high and low temperature), and, being autotrophic, they are among the most likely life forms to withstand space travel and the Mars environment. However, it is unlikely that humans would unwittingly contaminate a planetary spacecraft with these microbes. One the other hand, heterotrophic microbes that co-habit with humans are more likely spacecraft contaminants, as history attests. Indeed, soil samples from the Atacama desert have yielded colony-forming organisms resembling enteric bacteria. There is a need to understand the survivability of cyanobacteria (likely survivors, unlikely contaminants) and heterotrophic eubacteria (unlikely survivors, likely contaminants) under simulated planetary conditions. A 35-day test was performed in a commercial planetary simulation system (Techshot, Inc., Greenville, IN) in which the minimum night-time temperature was -80 C, the maximum daytime temperature was +26 C, the simulated day-night light cycle in earth hours was 12-on and 12-off, and the total pressure of the pure CO _{2} atmosphere was maintained below 11 mbar. Any water present was allowed to equilibrate with the changing temperature and pressure. The gas phase was sampled into a CR1-A low-pressure hygrometer (Buck Technologies, Boulder, CO), and dew/frost point was measured once every hour and recorded on a data logger, along with the varying temperature in the chamber, from which the partial pressure of water was calculated. According to measurements there was no liquid water present throughout the test except during the initial pump-down period when aqueous specimens

  19. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. Properties of Lewis Lung Carcinoma Cells Surviving Curcumin Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Yan, Michael E. Geusz, Roudabeh J. Jamasbi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory agent curcumin can selectively eliminate malignant rather than normal cells. The present study examined the effects of curcumin on the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cell line and characterized a subpopulation surviving curcumin treatments. Cell density was measured after curcumin was applied at concentrations between 10 and 60 μM for 30 hours. Because of the high cell loss at 60 μM, this dose was chosen to select for surviving cells that were then used to establish a new cell line. The resulting line had approximately 20% slower growth than the original LLC cell line and based on ELISA contained less of two markers, NF-κB and ALDH1A, used to identify more aggressive cancer cells. We also injected cells from the original and surviving lines subcutaneously into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and monitored tumor development over three weeks and found that the curcumin surviving-line remained tumorigenic. Because curcumin has been reported to kill cancer cells more effectively when administered with light, we examined this as a possible way of enhancing the efficacy of curcumin against LLC cells. When LLC cells were exposed to curcumin and light from a fluorescent lamp source, cell loss caused by 20 μM curcumin was enhanced by about 50%, supporting a therapeutic use of curcumin in combination with white light. This study is the first to characterize a curcumin-surviving subpopulation among lung cancer cells. It shows that curcumin at a high concentration either selects for an intrinsically less aggressive cell subpopulation or generates these cells. The findings further support a role for curcumin as an adjunct to traditional chemical or radiation therapy of lung and other cancers.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency...

  4. Nano-topography Enhances Communication in Neural Cells Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2017-08-23

    Neural cells are the smallest building blocks of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Information in neural networks and cell-substrate interactions have been heretofore studied separately. Understanding whether surface nano-topography can direct nerve cells assembly into computational efficient networks may provide new tools and criteria for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we used information theory approaches and functional multi calcium imaging (fMCI) techniques to examine how information flows in neural networks cultured on surfaces with controlled topography. We found that substrate roughness Sa affects networks topology. In the low nano-meter range, S-a = 0-30 nm, information increases with Sa. Moreover, we found that energy density of a network of cells correlates to the topology of that network. This reinforces the view that information, energy and surface nano-topography are tightly inter-connected and should not be neglected when studying cell-cell interaction in neural tissue repair and regeneration.

  5. Differentiation of reprogrammed human adipose mesenchymal stem cells toward neural cells with defined transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xinjian; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Li, Xiangqin; Ge, Dan

    2013-10-04

    Somatic cell reprogramming may become a powerful approach to generate specific human cell types for cell-fate determination studies and potential transplantation therapies of neurological diseases. Here we report a reprogramming methodology with which human adipose stem cells (hADSCs) can be differentiated into neural cells. After being reprogrammed with polycistronic plasmid carrying defined factor OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, and further treated with neural induce medium, the hADSCs switched to differentiate toward neural cell lineages. The generated cells had normal karyotypes and exogenous vector sequences were not inserted in the genomes. Therefore, this cell lineage conversion methodology bypasses the risk of mutation and gene instability, and provides a novel strategy to obtain patient-specific neural cells for basic research and therapeutic application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The regulation of function, growth and survival of GLP-1-producing L-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich; Holst, Jens Juul; Kappe, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a peptide hormone, released from intestinal L-cells in response to hormonal, neural and nutrient stimuli. In addition to potentiation of meal-stimulated insulin secretion, GLP-1 signalling exerts numerous pleiotropic effects on various tissues, regulating energy...... absorption and disposal, as well as cell proliferation and survival. In Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) reduced plasma levels of GLP-1 have been observed, and plasma levels of GLP-1, as well as reduced numbers of GLP-1 producing cells, have been correlated to obesity and insulin resistance. Increasing endogenous...... secretion of GLP-1 by selective targeting of the molecular mechanisms regulating secretion from the L-cell has been the focus of much recent research. An additional and promising strategy for enhancing endogenous secretion may be to increase the L-cell mass in the intestinal epithelium, but the mechanisms...

  7. LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural crest-like cells have the potential to develop into mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Takehito; Morikawa, Satoru; Shibata, Shinsuke; Fukuda, Kimiko; Okuno, Hironobu; Fujimura, Takumi; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Ohyama, Manabu; Akamatsu, Wado; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as non-hematopoietic, plastic-adherent, self-renewing cells that are capable of tri-lineage differentiation into bone, cartilage or fat in vitro. Thus, MSCs are promising candidates for cell-based medicine. However, classifications of MSCs have been defined retrospectively; moreover, this conventional criterion may be inaccurate due to contamination with other hematopoietic lineage cells. Human MSCs can be enriched by selection for LNGFR and THY-1, and this population may be analogous to murine PDGFRα(+)Sca-1(+) cells, which are developmentally derived from neural crest cells (NCCs). Murine NCCs were labeled by fluorescence, which provided definitive proof of neural crest lineage, however, technical considerations prevent the use of a similar approach to determine the origin of human LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) MSCs. To further clarify the origin of human MSCs, human embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) were used in this study. Under culture conditions required for the induction of neural crest cells, human ESCs and iPSCs-derived cells highly expressed LNGFR and THY-1. These LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) neural crest-like cells, designated as LT-NCLCs, showed a strong potential to differentiate into both mesenchymal and neural crest lineages. LT-NCLCs proliferated to form colonies and actively migrated in response to serum concentration. Furthermore, we transplanted LT-NCLCs into chick embryos, and traced their potential for survival, migration and differentiation in the host environment. These results suggest that LNGFR(+)THY-1(+) cells identified following NCLC induction from ESCs/iPSCs shared similar potentials with multipotent MSCs. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neural Circuitry That Mediates Behavior Governing the Tradeoffs Between Survival and Reproduction in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Scott W

    2017-12-01

    In all outcrossing sexual species there is a mechanism that brings two parents together. For animals, this reproductive requirement may at times conflict with other needs, such as foraging for food. This tension has been studied using the tiny (1 mm) nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. In a trade off between certainty of survival and possibility of reproduction, the C. elegans male will abandon a food patch lacking mates and explore its environment to find one where mates are present. A quantitative behavioral assay has been used to study the behavioral mechanism of mate searching and nutritional, sexual, and neurohormonal pathways that influence the underlying drive state. Taking advantage of the known connectivity of the C. elegans nervous system, neural pathways have been identified that influence the male's behavior in the presence of food with and without mates. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Cell survival, cell death and cell cycle pathways are interconnected: Implications for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maddika, S; Ande, SR; Panigrahi, S

    2007-01-01

    both for their apoptosis-regulating capacity and also for their effect on the cell cycle progression. The PI3-K/Akt cell survival pathway is shown as regulator of cell metabolism and cell survival, but examples are also provided where aberrant activity of the pathway may contribute to the induction......The partial cross-utilization of molecules and pathways involved in opposing processes like cell survival, proliferation and cell death, assures that mutations within one signaling cascade will also affect the other opposite process at least to some extent, thus contributing to homeostatic...... regulatory circuits. This review highlights some of the connections between opposite-acting pathways. Thus, we discuss the role of cyclins in the apoptotic process, and in the regulation of cell proliferation. CDKs and their inhibitors like the INK4-family (p16(Ink4a), p15(Ink4b), p18(Ink4c), p19(Ink4d...

  10. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael P; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J; Santos Costa, Vitor; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C David; Murphy, William L; Thomson, James A

    2015-10-06

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial.

  11. Engraftment of enteric neural progenitor cells into the injured adult brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Hotta, Ryo; Whalen, Michael; Nayyar, Naema; Nagy, Nandor; Cheng, Lily; Zuckerman, Aaron; Goldstein, Allan M; Dietrich, Jorg

    2016-01-25

    A major area of unmet need is the development of strategies to restore neuronal network systems and to recover brain function in patients with neurological disease. The use of cell-based therapies remains an attractive approach, but its application has been challenging due to the lack of suitable cell sources, ethical concerns, and immune-mediated tissue rejection. We propose an innovative approach that utilizes gut-derived neural tissue for cell-based therapies following focal or diffuse central nervous system injury. Enteric neuronal stem and progenitor cells, able to differentiate into neuronal and glial lineages, were isolated from the postnatal enteric nervous system and propagated in vitro. Gut-derived neural progenitors, genetically engineered to express fluorescent proteins, were transplanted into the injured brain of adult mice. Using different models of brain injury in combination with either local or systemic cell delivery, we show that transplanted enteric neuronal progenitor cells survive, proliferate, and differentiate into neuronal and glial lineages in vivo. Moreover, transplanted cells migrate extensively along neuronal pathways and appear to modulate the local microenvironment to stimulate endogenous neurogenesis. Our findings suggest that enteric nervous system derived cells represent a potential source for tissue regeneration in the central nervous system. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to explore whether autologous gut-derived cell transplantation into the injured brain can result in functional neurologic recovery.

  12. Kif11 dependent cell cycle progression in radial glial cells is required for proper neurogenesis in the zebrafish neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kimberly; Moriarty, Chelsea; Tania, Nessy; Ortman, Alissa; DiPietrantonio, Kristina; Edens, Brittany; Eisenman, Jean; Ok, Deborah; Krikorian, Sarah; Barragan, Jessica; Golé, Christophe; Barresi, Michael J F

    2014-03-01

    Radial glia serve as the resident neural stem cells in the embryonic vertebrate nervous system, and their proliferation must be tightly regulated to generate the correct number of neuronal and glial cell progeny in the neural tube. During a forward genetic screen, we recently identified a zebrafish mutant in the kif11 loci that displayed a significant increase in radial glial cell bodies at the ventricular zone of the spinal cord. Kif11, also known as Eg5, is a kinesin-related, plus-end directed motor protein responsible for stabilizing and separating the bipolar mitotic spindle. We show here that Gfap+ radial glial cells express kif11 in the ventricular zone and floor plate. Loss of Kif11 by mutation or pharmacological inhibition with S-trityl-L-cysteine (STLC) results in monoastral spindle formation in radial glial cells, which is characteristic of mitotic arrest. We show that M-phase radial glia accumulate over time at the ventricular zone in kif11 mutants and STLC treated embryos. Mathematical modeling of the radial glial accumulation in kif11 mutants not only confirmed an ~226× delay in mitotic exit (likely a mitotic arrest), but also predicted two modes of increased cell death. These modeling predictions were supported by an increase in the apoptosis marker, anti-activated Caspase-3, which was also found to be inversely proportional to a decrease in cell proliferation. In addition, treatment with STLC at different stages of neural development uncovered two critical periods that most significantly require Kif11 function for stem cell progression through mitosis. We also show that loss of Kif11 function causes specific reductions in oligodendroglia and secondary interneurons and motorneurons, suggesting these later born populations require proper radial glia division. Despite these alterations to cell cycle dynamics, survival, and neurogenesis, we document unchanged cell densities within the neural tube in kif11 mutants, suggesting that a mechanism of

  13. Mitochondria: Regulators of Cell Death and Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Granville

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The past 5 years has seen an intense surge in research devoted toward understanding the critical role of mitochondria in the regulation of cell death. Apoptosis can be initiated by a wide array of stimuli, inducing multiple signaling pathways that, for the most part, converge at the mitochondrion. Although classically considered the powerhouses of the cell, it is now understood that mitochondria are also “gatekeepers” that ultimately determine the fate of the cell. The mitochondrial decision as to whether a cell lives or dies is complex, involving protein-protein interactions, ionic changes, reactive oxygen species, and other mechanisms that require further elucidation. Once the death process is initiated, mitochondria undergo conformational changes, resulting in the release of cytochrome c (cyt c, caspases, endonucleases, and other factors leading to the onset and execution of apoptosis. The present review attempts to outline the complex milieu of events regulating the mitochondrial commitment to and processes involved in the implementation of the executioner phase of apoptotic cell death.

  14. Methods for Derivation of Multipotent Neural Crest Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration.

  15. Human conditionally immortalized neural stem cells improve locomotor function after spinal cord injury in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A growing number of studies have highlighted the potential of stem cell and more-differentiated neural cell transplantation as intriguing therapeutic approaches for neural repair after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods A conditionally immortalized neural stem cell line derived from human fetal spinal cord tissue (SPC-01) was used to treat a balloon-induced SCI. SPC-01 cells were implanted into the lesion 1 week after SCI. To determine the feasibility of tracking transplanted stem cells, a portion of the SPC-01 cells was labeled with poly-L-lysine-coated superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles, and the animals grafted with labeled cells underwent magnetic resonance imaging. Functional recovery was evaluated by using the BBB and plantar tests, and lesion morphology, endogenous axonal sprouting and graft survival, and differentiation were analyzed. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used to evaluate the effect of transplanted SPC-01 cells on endogenous regenerative processes. Results Transplanted animals displayed significant motor and sensory improvement 2 months after SCI, when the cells robustly survived in the lesion and partially filled the lesion cavity. qPCR revealed the increased expression of rat and human neurotrophin and motor neuron genes. The grafted cells were immunohistologically positive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP); however, we found 25% of the cells to be positive for Nkx6.1, an early motor neuron marker. Spared white matter and the robust sprouting of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)+ axons were found in the host tissue. Four months after SCI, the grafted cells matured into Islet2+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+ neurons, and the graft was grown through with endogenous neurons. Grafted cells labeled with poly-L-lysine-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles before transplantation were detected in the lesion on T2-weighted images as hypointense spots that correlated with histologic staining for

  16. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  17. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  18. Schwann cell-derived factors support serotoninergic neuron survival and promote neurite outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pellitteri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryogenesis and the postnatal period, neurons and glia interact in the development and differentiation of specific populations of nerve cells. Both in the peripheral (PNS and in the central nervous system (CNS, glial cells have been shown in various experimental conditions to constitute a favorable substrate for neural adhesion, neural polarity, shape and axonal extension, while numerous soluble molecules secreted by neurons influence the survival and differentiation of the glial cells themselves. The aim of the present work was to investigate the influence of postnatal Schwann cells (SC on embryonic serotoninergic (5-HT neurons of the raphe, in order to study the possible influence of the peripheral glia on the CNS neurons. Cultures of SC from sciatic nerve of postnatal rats and neurons from rat embryonic rhombencephalon were successfully established and cells were immunocytochemically characterized. The number of 5-HT neurons, and the number and length of their branches were quantified in the cultures of 5-HT neurons, in cultures added with Nerve Growth Factor (NGF and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I, in co-cultures with SC and in cultures added with conditioned medium obtained from SC cultures. The results indicated that SC have the capacity to promote the survival and growth of 5-HT neurons in culture, and that this activity is mediated by soluble factors. Although the precise nature and mechanism of action of the growth factor or factors produced by SC in the presence of 5-HT neurons was not identified, our results add more data on the possible activity of the peripheral glia in promoting and enhancing the survival and outgrowth of the CNS neurons.

  19. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  20. A novel Fizzy/Cdc20-dependent mechanism suppresses necrosis in neural stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Chaoyuan; Golden, Krista L.; Simon, Claudio R.; Damrath, John; Buttitta, Laura; Gamble, Caitlin E.; Lee, Cheng-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells likely survive chemotherapy or radiotherapy by acquiring mutations that inactivate the endogenous apoptotic machinery or by cycling slowly. Thus, knowledge about the mechanisms linking the activation of an alternative cell death modality and the cell cycle machinery could have a transformative impact on the development of new cancer therapies, but the mechanisms remain completely unknown. We investigated the regulation of alternative cell death in Drosophila larval brain neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in which apoptosis is normally repressed. From a screen, we identified two novel loss-of-function alleles of the Cdc20/fizzy (fzy) gene that lead to premature brain neuroblast loss without perturbing cell proliferation in other diploid cell types. Fzy is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). Neuroblasts carrying the novel fzy allele or exhibiting reduced APC/C function display hallmarks of necrosis. By contrast, neuroblasts overexpressing the non-degradable form of canonical APC/C substrates required for cell cycle progression undergo mitotic catastrophe. These data strongly suggest that Fzy can elicit a novel pro-survival function of APC/C by suppressing necrosis. Neuroblasts experiencing catastrophic cellular stress, or overexpressing p53, lose Fzy expression and undergo necrosis. Co-expression of fzy suppresses the death of these neuroblasts. Consequently, attenuation of the Fzy-dependent survival mechanism functions downstream of catastrophic cellular stress and p53 to eliminate neuroblasts by necrosis. Strategies that target the Fzy-dependent survival mechanism might lead to the discovery of new treatments or complement the pre-existing therapies to eliminate apoptosis-resistant cancer stem cells by necrosis. PMID:24598157

  1. Impact of Lipid Nutrition on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Sakayori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural system originates from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. Embryonic NSPCs first proliferate to increase their numbers and then produce neurons and glial cells that compose the complex neural circuits in the brain. New neurons are continually produced even after birth from adult NSPCs in the inner wall of the lateral ventricle and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These adult-born neurons are involved in various brain functions, including olfaction-related functions, learning and memory, pattern separation, and mood control. NSPCs are regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Diet is one of such important extrinsic factors. Of dietary nutrients, lipids are important because they constitute the cell membrane, are a source of energy, and function as signaling molecules. Metabolites of some lipids can be strong lipid mediators that also regulate various biological activities. Recent findings have revealed that lipids are important regulators of both embryonic and adult NSPCs. We and other groups have shown that lipid signals including fat, fatty acids, their metabolites and intracellular carriers, cholesterol, and vitamins affect proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult NSPCs. A better understanding of the NSPCs regulation by lipids may provide important insight into the neural development and brain function.

  2. Capacity of Human Dental Follicle Cells to Differentiate into Neural Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Kanao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dental follicle is an ectomesenchymal tissue surrounding the developing tooth germ. Human dental follicle cells (hDFCs have the capacity to commit to differentiation into multiple cell types. Here we investigated the capacity of hDFCs to differentiate into neural cells and the efficiency of a two-step strategy involving floating neurosphere-like bodies for neural differentiation. Undifferentiated hDFCs showed a spindle-like morphology and were positive for neural markers such as nestin, β-III-tubulin, and S100β. The cellular morphology of several cells was neuronal-like including branched dendrite-like processes and neurites. Next, hDFCs were used for neurosphere formation in serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and B27 supplement. The number of cells with neuronal-like morphology and that were strongly positive for neural markers increased with sphere formation. Gene expression of neural markers also increased in hDFCs with sphere formation. Next, gene expression of neural markers was examined in hDFCs during neuronal differentiation after sphere formation. Expression of Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, MAP2, GFAP, MBP, and SOX10 was upregulated in hDFCs undergoing neuronal differentiation via neurospheres, whereas expression of nestin and β-III-tubulin was downregulated. In conclusion, hDFCs may be another optimal source of neural/glial cells for cell-based therapies to treat neurological diseases.

  3. Feasibility Study of Canine Epidermal Neural Crest Stem Cell Transplantation in the Spinal Cords of Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahill, Barbara G; Spriet, Mathieu; Sisó, Sílvia; Manzer, Michael D; Mitchell, Gaela; McGee, Jeannine; Garcia, Tanya C; Borjesson, Dori L; Sieber-Blum, Maya; Nolta, Jan A; Sturges, Beverly K

    2015-10-01

    This pilot feasibility study aimed to determine the outcome of canine epidermal neural crest stem cell (cEPI-NCSC) grafts in the normal spinal cords of healthy bred-for-research dogs. This included developing novel protocols for (a) the ex vivo expansion of cEPI-NCSCs, (b) the delivery of cEPI-NCSCs into the spinal cord, and (c) the labeling of the cells and subsequent tracing of the graft in the live animal by magnetic resonance imaging. A total of four million cEPI-NCSCs were injected into the spinal cord divided in two locations. Differences in locomotion at baseline and post-treatment were evaluated by gait analysis and compared with neurological outcome and behavioral exams. Histopathological analyses of the spinal cords and cEPI-NCSC grafts were performed at 3 weeks post-transplantation. Neurological and gait parameters were minimally affected by the stem cell injection. cEPI-NCSCs survived in the canine spinal cord for the entire period of investigation and did not migrate or proliferate. Subsets of cEPI-NCSCs expressed the neural crest stem cell marker Sox10. There was no detectable expression of markers for glial cells or neurons. The tissue reaction to the cell graft was predominantly vascular in addition to a degree of reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation. In the present study, we demonstrated that cEPI-NCSC grafts survive in the spinal cords of healthy dogs without major adverse effects. They persist locally in the normal spinal cord, may promote angiogenesis and tissue remodeling, and elicit a tissue response that may be beneficial in patients with spinal cord injury. It has been established that mouse and human epidermal neural crest stem cells are somatic multipotent stem cells with proved innovative potential in a mouse model of spinal cord injury (SCI) offering promise of a valid treatment for SCI. Traumatic SCI is a common neurological problem in dogs with marked similarities, clinically and pathologically, to the syndrome in people

  4. Safety of human neural stem cell transplantation in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Salazar, Desiree L; Uchida, Nobuko; Cummings, Brian J; Anderson, Aileen J

    2013-12-01

    The spinal cord injury (SCI) microenvironment undergoes dynamic changes over time, which could potentially affect survival or differentiation of cells in early versus delayed transplantation study designs. Accordingly, assessment of safety parameters, including cell survival, migration, fate, sensory fiber sprouting, and behavioral measures of pain sensitivity in animals receiving transplants during the chronic postinjury period is required for establishing a potential therapeutic window. The goal of the study was assessment of safety parameters for delayed transplantation of human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) by comparing hCNS-SCns transplantation in the subacute period, 9 days postinjury (DPI), versus the chronic period, 60 DPI, in contusion-injured athymic nude rats. Although the number of surviving human cells after chronic transplantation was lower, no changes in cell migration were detected between the 9 and 60 DPI cohorts; however, the data suggest chronic transplantation may have enhanced the generation of mature oligodendrocytes. The timing of transplantation did not induce changes in allodynia or hyperalgesia measures. Together, these data support the safety of hCNS-SCns transplantation in the chronic period post-SCI.

  5. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  6. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  7. Injectable uncrosslinked biomimetic hydrogels as candidate scaffolds for neural stem cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Kurt; Joshi, Jyotsna; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian central nervous system has a limited ability for self-repair under diseased or injury conditions. Repair strategies focused on exogenously delivering autologous neural stem cells (NSCs) to replace lost neuronal populations and axonal pathways in situ, and promote endogenous repair mechanisms are gaining traction. Successful outcomes are contingent on selecting an appropriate delivery vehicle for injecting cells that promotes cell retention and survival, elicits differentiation to desired lineages, and enhances axonal outgrowth upon integration into the host tissue. Hydrogels made of varying compositions of collagen, laminin, hyaluronic acid (HA), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) were developed, with no external crosslinking agents, to mimic the native extracellular matrix composition. The physical (porosity, pore-size, gel integrity, swelling ratio, and enzymatic degradation), mechanical (viscosity, storage and loss moduli, Young's modulus, creep, and stress-relaxation), and biological (cell survival, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and integrin expression) characteristics of these hydrogels were assessed. These hydrogels exhibited excellent injectability, retained gel integrity, and matched the mechanical moduli of native brain tissue, possibly due to natural collagen fibril polymerization and physical-crosslinking between HA molecules and collagen fibrils. Depending on the composition, these hydrogels promoted cell survival, neural differentiation, and neurite outgrowth, as evident from immunostaining and western blots. These cellular outcomes were facilitated by cellular binding via α6 , β1 , and CD44 surface integrins to these hydrogels. Results attest to the utility of uncrosslinked, ECM-mimicking hydrogels to deliver NSCs for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 790-805, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossin, Yves; Lee, Minhui; Klezovitch, Olga; Kon, Elif; Cossard, Alexia; Lien, Wen-Hui; Fernandez, Tania E; Cooper, Jonathan A; Vasioukhin, Valera

    2017-06-05

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Blood-neural barrier: its diversity and coordinated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-05-31

    The cerebral microvessels possess barrier characteristics which are tightly sealed excluding many toxic substances and protecting neural tissues. The specialized blood-neural barriers as well as the cerebral microvascular barrier are recognized in the retina, inner ear, spinal cord, and cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular endothelial cells in the brain closely interact with other components such as astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular microglia and neurons to form functional 'neurovascular unit'. Communication between endothelial cells and other surrounding cells enhances the barrier functions, consequently resulting in maintenance and elaboration of proper brain homeostasis. Furthermore, the disruption of the neurovascular unit is closely involved in cerebrovascular disorders. In this review, we focus on the location and function of these various blood-neural barriers, and the importance of the cell-to-cell communication for development and maintenance of the barrier integrity at the neurovascular unit. We also demonstrate the close relation between the alteration of the blood-neural barriers and cerebrovascular disorders.

  10. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  11. Characterizing low dose and dose rate effects in rodent and human neural stem cells exposed to proton and gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand P. Tseng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Past work has shown that exposure to gamma rays and protons elicit a persistent oxidative stress in rodent and human neural stem cells (hNSCs. We have now adapted these studies to more realistic exposure scenarios in space, using lower doses and dose rates of these radiation modalities, to further elucidate the role of radiation-induced oxidative stress in these cells. Rodent neural stem and precursor cells grown as neurospheres and human neural stem cells grown as monolayers were subjected to acute and multi-dosing paradigms at differing dose rates and analyzed for changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, nitric oxide and superoxide for 2 days after irradiation. While acute exposures led to significant changes in both cell types, hNSCs in particular, exhibited marked and significant elevations in radiation-induced oxidative stress. Elevated oxidative stress was more significant in hNSCs as opposed to their rodent counterparts, and hNSCs were significantly more sensitive to low dose exposures in terms of survival. Combinations of protons and γ-rays delivered as lower priming or higher challenge doses elicited radioadaptive changes that were associated with improved survival, but in general, only under conditions where the levels of reactive species were suppressed compared to cells irradiated acutely. Protective radioadaptive effects on survival were eliminated in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, suggesting further that radiation-induced oxidative stress could activate pro-survival signaling pathways that were sensitive to redox state. Data corroborates much of our past work and shows that low dose and dose rate exposures elicit significant changes in oxidative stress that have functional consequences on survival.

  12. Differentiation and Cell-Cell Interactions of Neural Progenitor Cells Transplanted into Intact Adult Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinich, K K; Kosykh, A V; Aleksandrova, M A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the behavior and cell-cell interactions of embryonic brain cell from GFP-reporter mice after their transplantation into the intact adult brain. Fragments or cell suspensions of fetal neocortical cells at different stages of development were transplanted into the neocortex and striatum of adult recipients. Even in intact brain, the processes of transplanted neurons formed extensive networks in the striatum and neocortical layers I and V-VI. Processes of transplanted cells at different stages of development attained the rostral areas of the frontal cortex and some of them reached the internal capsule. However, the cells transplanted in suspension had lower process growth potency than cells from tissue fragments. Tyrosine hydroxylase fibers penetrated from the recipient brain into grafts at both early and late stages of development. Our experiments demonstrated the formation of extensive reciprocal networks between the transplanted fetal neural cells and recipient brain neurons even in intact brain.

  13. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...

  14. Anti-Fas conjugated hyaluronic acid microsphere gels for neural stem cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendi, Dalia; Albrecht, Dirk R; Jain, Anjana

    2017-02-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) injuries and diseases result in neuronal damage and loss of function. Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) has been shown to improve locomotor function after transplantation. However, due to the immune and inflammatory response at the injury site, the survival rate of the engrafted cells is low. Engrafted cell viability has been shown to increase when transplanted within a hydrogel. Hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels have natural anti-inflammatory properties and the backbone can be modified to introduce bioactive agents, such as anti-Fas, which we have previously shown to promote NSC survival while suppressing immune cell activity in bulk hydrogels in vitro. Although bulk HA hydrogels have shown to promote stem cell survival, microsphere gels for NSC encapsulation and delivery may have additional advantages. In this study, a flow-focusing microfluidic device was used to fabricate either vinyl sulfone-modified HA (VS-HA) or anti-Fas-conjugated HA (anti-Fas HA) microsphere gels encapsulated with NSCs. The majority of encapsulated NSCs remained viable for at least 24 h in the VS-HA and anti-Fas HA microsphere gels. Moreover, T-cells cultured in suspension with the anti-Fas HA microsphere gels had reduced viability after contact with the microsphere gels compared to the media control and soluble anti-Fas conditions. This approach can be adapted to encapsulate various cell types for therapeutic strategies in other physiological systems in order to increase survival by reducing the immune response. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 608-618, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling Predicts Survival in Conventional Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  16. Gene expression profiling predicts survival in conventional renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjuan Zhao

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional renal cell carcinoma (cRCC accounts for most of the deaths due to kidney cancer. Tumor stage, grade, and patient performance status are used currently to predict survival after surgery. Our goal was to identify gene expression features, using comprehensive gene expression profiling, that correlate with survival. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined in 177 primary cRCCs using DNA microarrays. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis segregated cRCC into five gene expression subgroups. Expression subgroup was correlated with survival in long-term follow-up and was independent of grade, stage, and performance status. The tumors were then divided evenly into training and test sets that were balanced for grade, stage, performance status, and length of follow-up. A semisupervised learning algorithm (supervised principal components analysis was applied to identify transcripts whose expression was associated with survival in the training set, and the performance of this gene expression-based survival predictor was assessed using the test set. With this method, we identified 259 genes that accurately predicted disease-specific survival among patients in the independent validation group (p < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, the gene expression predictor was a strong predictor of survival independent of tumor stage, grade, and performance status (p < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: cRCC displays molecular heterogeneity and can be separated into gene expression subgroups that correlate with survival after surgery. We have identified a set of 259 genes that predict survival after surgery independent of clinical prognostic factors.

  17. Isolation and characterization of adult neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Azari, Hassan; Reynolds, Brent A; Deleyrolle, Loic P

    2011-01-01

    It has been thought for a long time that the adult brain is incapable of generating new neurons, or that neurons cannot be added to its complex circuitry. However, recent technology has resulted in an explosion of research demonstrating that neurogenesis, or the birth of new neurons from adult stem cells constitutively occurs in two specific regions of the mammalian brain; namely the subventricular zone and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult CNS stem cells exhibit three main characteristics: (1) they are "self-renewing," i.e., they possess a theoretically unlimited ability to produce progeny indistinguishable from themselves, (2) they are proliferative (undergoing mitosis) and (3) they are multipotent for the different neuroectodermal lineages of the CNS, including the different neuronal, and glial subtypes. CNS stem cells and all progenitor cell types are broadly termed "precursors." In this chapter, we describe methods to identify, isolate and experimentally manipulate stem cells of the adult brain. We outline how to prepare a precursor cell culture from naive brain tissue and how to test the "stemness" potential of different cell types present in that culture, which is achieved in a three-step paradigm. Following their isolation, stem/progenitor cells are expanded in neurosphere culture. Single cells obtained from these neurospheres are sorted for the expression of surface markers by flow cytometry. Finally, putative stem cells from cell sorting will be subjected to the so-called neural colony-forming cell assay, which allows discrimination between stem and progenitor cells. At the end of this chapter we will also describe how to identify neural stem cells in vivo.

  18. Neural Crest Migration and Survival Are Susceptible to Morpholino-Induced Artifacts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena F Boer

    Full Text Available The neural crest (NC is a stem cell-like embryonic population that is essential for generating and patterning the vertebrate body, including the craniofacial skeleton and peripheral nervous system. Defects in NC development underlie many birth defects and contribute to formation of some of the most malignant cancers in humans, such as melanoma and neuroblastoma. For these reasons, significant research efforts have been expended to identify genes that control NC development, as it is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of the genetic mechanisms controlling vertebrate development and identify new treatments for NC-derived diseases and cancers. However, a number of inconsistencies regarding gene function during NC development have emerged from comparative analyses of gene function between mammalian and non-mammalian systems (chick, frog, zebrafish. This poses a significant barrier to identification of single genes and/or redundant pathways to target in NC diseases. Here, we determine whether technical differences, namely morpholino-based approaches used in non-mammalian systems, could contribute to these discrepancies, by examining the extent to which NC phenotypes in fascin1a (fscn1a morphant embryos are similar to or different from fscn1a null mutants in zebrafish. Analysis of fscn1a morphants showed that they mimicked early NC phenotypes observed in fscn1a null mutants; however, these embryos also displayed NC migration and derivative phenotypes not observed in null mutants, including accumulation of p53-independent cell death. These data demonstrate that morpholinos can cause seemingly specific NC migration and derivative phenotypes, and thus have likely contributed to the inconsistencies surrounding NC gene function between species. We suggest that comparison of genetic mutants between different species is the most rigorous method for identifying conserved genetic mechanisms controlling NC development and is critical to identify new

  19. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  20. Stem cell property of postmigratory cranial neural crest cells and their utility in alveolar bone regeneration and tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Il-Hyuk; Yamaza, Takayoshi; Zhao, Hu; Choung, Pill-Hoon; Shi, Songtao; Chai, Yang

    2009-04-01

    The vertebrate neural crest is a multipotent cell population that gives rise to a variety of different cell types. We have discovered that postmigratory cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) maintain mesenchymal stem cell characteristics and show potential utility for the regeneration of craniofacial structures. We are able to induce the osteogenic differentiation of postmigratory CNCCs, and this differentiation is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and transforming growth factor-beta signaling pathways. After transplantation into a host animal, postmigratory CNCCs form bone matrix. CNCC-formed bones are distinct from bones regenerated by bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. In addition, CNCCs support tooth germ survival via BMP signaling in our CNCC-tooth germ cotransplantation system. Thus, we conclude that postmigratory CNCCs preserve stem cell features, contribute to craniofacial bone formation, and play a fundamental role in supporting tooth organ development. These findings reveal a novel function for postmigratory CNCCs in organ development, and demonstrate the utility of these CNCCs in regenerating craniofacial structures.

  1. Germ Cell Cancer and Multiple Relapses: Toxicity and Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritsen, Jakob; Kier, Maria G.G.; Mortensen, Mette S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A small number of patients with germ cell cancer (GCC) receive more than one line of treatment for disseminated disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate late toxicity and survival in an unselected cohort of patients who experienced relapse after receiving first-line treatment...

  2. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroughs, Lindsey K; DeBerardinis, Ralph J

    2015-04-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further.

  3. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency......), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells...... and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between...

  4. Proteome-wide analysis of neural stem cell differentiation to facilitate transition to cell replacement therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Martina; Suchá, Rita; Tylečková, Jiřina; Jarkovská, Karla; Mairychová, Kateřina; Kotrčová, Eva; Marsala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 83-95 ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell therapy * immunomodulation * neural stem cell differentiation * neural subpopulation * neurodegenerative disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.465, year: 2015

  5. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  6. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. Recombinant spider silk matrices for neural stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka, Michalina; Hermanson, Ola; Rising, Anna U

    2012-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Accordingly, NSCs hold great promise in drug screening and treatment of several common diseases. However, a major obstacle in applied stem cell research is the limitation of synthetic matrices for culturing stem cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of recombinant spider silk (4RepCT) matrices for growth of NSCs. NSCs isolated from the cerebral cortices of mid-gestation rat embryos were cultured on either 4RepCT matrices or conventional poly-L-ornithine and fibronectin (P + F) coated polystyrene plates. From 48 h of culture, no significant differences in cell proliferation or viability were detected in NSC cultures on 4RepCT compared to control matrices (polystyrene plates coated with P + F). The NSCs retained an undifferentiated state, displaying low or no staining for markers of differentiated cells. Upon stimulation NSCs grown on 4RepCT differentiated efficiently into neuronal and astrocytic cells to virtually the same degree as control cultures, but a slightly less efficient oligodendrocyte differentiation was noted. We suggest that recombinant spider silk matrices provide a functional microenvironment and represent a useful tool for the development of new strategies in neural stem cell research. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Kalderstam

    Full Text Available We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart, which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  9. Finding Risk Groups by Optimizing Artificial Neural Networks on the Area under the Survival Curve Using Genetic Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalderstam, Jonas; Edén, Patrik; Ohlsson, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a new method to place patients into risk groups in censored survival data. Properties such as median survival time, and end survival rate, are implicitly improved by optimizing the area under the survival curve. Artificial neural networks (ANN) are trained to either maximize or minimize this area using a genetic algorithm, and combined into an ensemble to predict one of low, intermediate, or high risk groups. Estimated patient risk can influence treatment choices, and is important for study stratification. A common approach is to sort the patients according to a prognostic index and then group them along the quartile limits. The Cox proportional hazards model (Cox) is one example of this approach. Another method of doing risk grouping is recursive partitioning (Rpart), which constructs a decision tree where each branch point maximizes the statistical separation between the groups. ANN, Cox, and Rpart are compared on five publicly available data sets with varying properties. Cross-validation, as well as separate test sets, are used to validate the models. Results on the test sets show comparable performance, except for the smallest data set where Rpart's predicted risk groups turn out to be inverted, an example of crossing survival curves. Cross-validation shows that all three models exhibit crossing of some survival curves on this small data set but that the ANN model manages the best separation of groups in terms of median survival time before such crossings. The conclusion is that optimizing the area under the survival curve is a viable approach to identify risk groups. Training ANNs to optimize this area combines two key strengths from both prognostic indices and Rpart. First, a desired minimum group size can be specified, as for a prognostic index. Second, the ability to utilize non-linear effects among the covariates, which Rpart is also able to do.

  10. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  11. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially re...

  12. Cell delamination in the mesencephalic neural fold and its implication for the origin of ectomesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakaya, Yukiko; Sheng, Guojun; Trainor, Paul A.; Weston, James A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure unique to vertebrate embryos that gives rise to multiple lineages along the rostrocaudal axis. In cranial regions, neural crest cells are thought to differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes, pericytes and stromal cells, which are collectively termed ectomesenchyme derivatives, as well as pigment and neuronal derivatives. There is still no consensus as to whether the neural crest can be classified as a homogenous multipotent population of cells. This unresolved controversy has important implications for the formation of ectomesenchyme and for confirmation of whether the neural fold is compartmentalized into distinct domains, each with a different repertoire of derivatives. Here we report in mouse and chicken that cells in the neural fold delaminate over an extended period from different regions of the cranial neural fold to give rise to cells with distinct fates. Importantly, cells that give rise to ectomesenchyme undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition from a lateral neural fold domain that does not express definitive neural markers, such as Sox1 and N-cadherin. Additionally, the inference that cells originating from the cranial neural ectoderm have a common origin and cell fate with trunk neural crest cells prompted us to revisit the issue of what defines the neural crest and the origin of the ectomesenchyme. PMID:24198279

  13. A novel three-dimensional system to study interactions between endothelial cells and neural cells of the developing central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milner Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During angiogenesis in the developing central nervous system (CNS, endothelial cells (EC detach from blood vessels growing on the brain surface, and migrate into the expanding brain parenchyma. Brain angiogenesis is regulated by growth factors and extracellular matrix (ECM proteins secreted by cells of the developing CNS. In addition, recent evidence suggests that EC play an important role in establishing the neural stem cell (NSC niche. Therefore, two-way communication between EC and neural cells is of fundamental importance in the developing CNS. To study the interactions between brain EC and neural cells of the developing CNS, a novel three-dimensional (3-D murine co-culture system was developed. Fluorescent-labelled brain EC were seeded onto neurospheres; floating cellular aggregates that contain NSC/neural precursor cells (NPC and smaller numbers of differentiated cells. Using this system, brain EC attachment, survival and migration into neurospheres was evaluated and the role of integrins in mediating the early adhesive events addressed. Results Brain EC attached, survived and migrated deep into neurospheres over a 5-day period. Neurospheres express the ECM proteins fibronectin and laminin, and brain EC adhesion to neurospheres was inhibited by RGD peptides and antibodies specific for the β1, but not the α6 integrin subunit. Conclusion A novel 3-D co-culture system for analysing the interactions between EC and neural cells of the developing CNS is presented. This system could be used to investigate the reciprocal influence of EC and NSC/NPC; to examine how NSC/NPC influence cerebral angiogenesis, and conversely, to examine how EC regulate the maintenance and differentiation of NSC/NPC. Using this system it is demonstrated that EC attachment to neurospheres is mediated by the fibronectin receptor, α5β1 integrin.

  14. The Protective Effect of Melatonin on Neural Stem Cell against LPS-Induced Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy for tissue regeneration has several limitations in the fact that transplanted cells could not survive for a long time. For solving these limitations, many studies have focused on the antioxidants to increase survival rate of neural stem cells (NSCs. Melatonin, an antioxidant synthesized in the pineal gland, plays multiple roles in various physiological mechanisms. Melatonin exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system. To determine the effect of melatonin on NSCs which is in LPS-induced inflammatory stress state, we first investigated nitric oxide (NO production and cytotoxicity using Griess reagent assays, LDH assay, and neurosphere counting. Also, we investigated the effect of melatonin on NSCs by measuring the mRNA levels of SOX2, TLX, and FGFR-2. In addition, western blot analyses were performed to examine the activation of PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling in LPS-treated NSCs. In the present study, we suggested that melatonin inhibits NO production and protects NSCs against LPS-induced inflammatory stress. In addition, melatonin promoted the expression of SOX2 and activated the PI3K/Akt/Nrf2 signaling under LPS-induced inflammation condition. Based on our results, we conclude that melatonin may be an important factor for the survival and proliferation of NSCs in neuroinflammatory diseases.

  15. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sontag

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation.

  16. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  17. Radiation-induced glioblastoma signaling cascade regulates viability, apoptosis and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vladimir N; Hei, Tom K

    2014-12-01

    Ionizing radiation alone or in combination with chemotherapy is the main treatment modality for brain tumors including glioblastoma. Adult neurons and astrocytes demonstrate substantial radioresistance; in contrast, human neural stem cells (NSC) are highly sensitive to radiation via induction of apoptosis. Irradiation of tumor cells has the potential risk of affecting the viability and function of NSC. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of irradiated glioblastoma cells on viability, proliferation and differentiation potential of non-irradiated (bystander) NSC through radiation-induced signaling cascades. Using media transfer experiments, we demonstrated significant effects of the U87MG glioblastoma secretome after gamma-irradiation on apoptosis in non-irradiated NSC. Addition of anti-TRAIL antibody to the transferred media partially suppressed apoptosis in NSC. Furthermore, we observed a dramatic increase in the production and secretion of IL8, TGFβ1 and IL6 by irradiated glioblastoma cells, which could promote glioblastoma cell survival and modify the effects of death factors in bystander NSC. While differentiation of NSC into neurons and astrocytes occurred efficiently with the corresponding differentiation media, pretreatment of NSC for 8 h with medium from irradiated glioblastoma cells selectively suppressed the differentiation of NSC into neurons, but not into astrocytes. Exogenous IL8 and TGFβ1 increased NSC/NPC survival, but also suppressed neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, IL6 was known to positively affect survival and differentiation of astrocyte progenitors. We established a U87MG neurosphere culture that was substantially enriched by SOX2(+) and CD133(+) glioma stem-like cells (GSC). Gamma-irradiation up-regulated apoptotic death in GSC via the FasL/Fas pathway. Media transfer experiments from irradiated GSC to non-targeted NSC again demonstrated induction of apoptosis and suppression of neuronal differentiation of NSC. In

  18. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  19. Webs, cell assemblies, and chunking in neural nets: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickelgren, W A

    1999-03-01

    This introduction to Wickelgren (1992), describes a theory of idea representation and learning in the cerebral cortex and seven properties of Hebb's (1949) formulation of cell assemblies that have played a major role in all such neural net models. Ideas are represented in the cerebral cortex by webs (innate cell assemblies), using sparse coding with sparse, all-or-none, innate linking. Recruiting a web to represent a new idea is called chunking. The innate links that bind the neurons of a web are basal dendritic synapses. Learning modifies the apical dendritic synapses that associate neurons in one web to neurons in another web.

  20. Human neural stem cells over-expressing VEGF provide neuroprotection, angiogenesis and functional recovery in mouse stroke model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH is a lethal stroke type. As mortality approaches 50%, and current medical therapy against ICH shows only limited effectiveness, an alternative approach is required, such as stem cell-based cell therapy. Previously we have shown that intravenously transplanted human neural stem cells (NSCs selectively migrate to the brain and induce behavioral recovery in rat ICH model, and that combined administration of NSCs and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF results in improved structural and functional outcome from cerebral ischemia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We postulated that human NSCs overexpressing VEGF transplanted into cerebral cortex overlying ICH lesion could provide improved survival of grafted NSCs, increased angiogenesis and behavioral recovery in mouse ICH model. ICH was induced in adult mice by unilateral injection of bacterial collagenase into striatum. HB1.F3.VEGF human NSC line produced an amount of VEGF four times higher than parental F3 cell line in vitro, and induced behavioral improvement and 2-3 fold increase in cell survival at two weeks and eight weeks post-transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Brain transplantation of F3 human NSCs over-expressing VEGF near ICH lesion sites provided differentiation and survival of grafted human NSCs and renewed angiogenesis of host brain and functional recovery of ICH animals. These results suggest a possible application of the human neural stem cell line, which is genetically modified to over-express VEGF, as a therapeutic agent for ICH-stroke.

  1. Abnormal neural precursor cell regulation in the early postnatal Fragile X mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourial, Mary; Doering, Laurie C

    2017-07-01

    The regulation of neural precursor cells (NPCs) is indispensable for a properly functioning brain. Abnormalities in NPC proliferation, differentiation, survival, or integration have been linked to various neurological diseases including Fragile X syndrome. Yet, no studies have examined NPCs from the early postnatal Fragile X mouse hippocampus despite the importance of this developmental time point, which marks the highest expression level of FMRP, the protein missing in Fragile X, in the rodent hippocampus and is when hippocampal NPCs have migrated to the dentate gyrus (DG) to give rise to lifelong neurogenesis. In this study, we examined NPCs from the early postnatal hippocampus and DG of Fragile X mice (Fmr1-KO). Immunocytochemistry on neurospheres showed increased Nestin expression and decreased Ki67 expression, which collectively indicated aberrant NPC biology. Intriguingly, flow cytometric analysis of the expression of the antigens CD15, CD24, CD133, GLAST, and PSA-NCAM showed a decreased proportion of neural stem cells (GLAST + CD15 + CD133 + ) and an increased proportion of neuroblasts (PSA-NCAM + CD15 + ) in the DG of P7 Fmr1-KO mice. This was mirrored by lower expression levels of Nestin and the mitotic marker phospho-histone H3 in vivo in the P9 hippocampus, as well as a decreased proportion of cells in the G 2 /M phases of the P7 DG. Thus, the absence of FMRP leads to fewer actively cycling NPCs, coinciding with a decrease in neural stem cells and an increase in neuroblasts. Together, these results show the importance of FMRP in the developing hippocampal formation and suggest abnormalities in cell cycle regulation in Fragile X. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Chitosan scaffolds induce human dental pulp stem cells to neural differentiation: potential roles for spinal cord injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Lu, Xiaohui; Feng, Guijuan; Gu, Zhifeng; Sun, Yuyu; Bao, Guofeng; Xu, Guanhua; Lu, Yuanzhou; Chen, Jiajia; Xu, Lingfeng; Feng, Xingmei; Cui, Zhiming

    2016-10-01

    Cell-based transplantation strategies hold great potential for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Chitosan scaffolds have therapeutic benefits for spinal cord regeneration. Human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) are abundant available stem cells with low immunological incompatibility and can be considered for cell replacement therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the role of chitosan scaffolds in the neural differentiation of DPSCs in vitro and to assess the supportive effects of chitosan scaffolds in an animal model of SCI. DPSCs were incubated with chitosan scaffolds. Cell viability and the secretion of neurotrophic factors were analyzed. DPSCs incubated with chitosan scaffolds were treated with neural differentiation medium for 14 days and then neural genes and protein markers were analyzed by Western blot and reverse transcription plus the polymerase chain reaction. Our study revealed a higher cell viability and neural differentiation in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. Compared with the control group, the levels of BDNF, GDNF, b-NGF, and NT-3 were significantly increased in the DPSC/chitosan-scaffold group. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played a key role in the neural differentiation of DPSCs combined with chitosan scaffolds. Transplantation of DPSCs together with chitosan scaffolds into an SCI rat model resulted in the marked recovery of hind limb locomotor functions. Thus, chitosan scaffolds were non-cytotoxic and provided a conducive and favorable microenvironment for the survival and neural differentiation of DPSCs. Transplantation of DPSCs might therefore be a suitable candidate for treating SCI and other neuronal degenerative diseases.

  3. Epigenetic landscaping during hESC differentiation to neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiewska, Anna; Atkinson, Stuart P; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2009-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency and lineage specification from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still largely unclear. To address the role of chromatin structure in maintenance of pluripotency in human ESCs (hESCs) and establishment of lineage commitment, we analyzed a panel of histone modifications at promoter sequences of genes involved in maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal, and in early stages of differentiation. To understand the changes occurring at lineage-specific gene regulatory sequences, we have established an efficient purification system that permits the examination of two distinct populations of lineage committed cells; fluorescence activated cell sorted CD133(+) CD45(-)CD34(-) neural stem cells and beta-III-tubulin(+) putative neurons. Here we report the importance of other permissive marks supporting trimethylation of Lysine 4 H3 at the active stem cell promoters as well as poised bivalent and nonbivalent lineage-specific gene promoters in hESCs. Methylation of lysine 9 H3 was found to play a role in repression of pluripotency-associated and lineage-specific genes on differentiation. Moreover, presence of newly formed bivalent domains was observed at the neural progenitor stage. However, they differ significantly from the bivalent domains observed in hESCs, with a possible role of dimethylation of lysine 9 H3 in repressing the poised genes.

  4. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  5. Control of obesity and glucose intolerance via building neural stem cells in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juxue; Tang, Yizhe; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Yan, Jingqi; Cai, Dongsheng

    2014-06-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) were recently revealed to exist in the hypothalamus of adult mice. Here, following our observation showing that a partial loss of hypothalamic NSCs caused weight gain and glucose intolerance, we studied if NSCs-based cell therapy could be developed to control these disorders. While hypothalamus-implanted NSCs failed to survive in mice with obesity, NF-κB inhibition induced survival and neurogenesis of these cells, leading to effects in counteracting obesity and glucose intolerance. To generate an alternative cell source, we revealed that iPS-derived NSCs were converted into htNSCs by neuropeptide treatment. Of note, obesity condition potentiated the transfer of carotid artery-injected NSCs into the hypothalamus. These iPS-derived cells when engineered with NF-κB inhibition were also effective in reducing obesity and glucose intolerance, and neurogenesis towards POMCergic and GABAergic lineages was accountable. In conclusion, building NSCs in the hypothalamus represents a strategy for controlling obesity and glucose disorders.

  6. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  7. Human dental follicle cells express embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde Carvalho; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Bolognese, Ana Maria; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; Souza, Margareth Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify and characterize dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by analyzing expression of embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells surface markers. Design Dental follicle cells (DFCs) were evaluated by immunocytochemistry using embryonic stem cells markers (OCT4 and SOX2), mesenchmal stem cells (MSCs) markers (Notch1, active Notch1, STRO, CD44, HLA-ABC, CD90), neural stem cells markers (Nestin and β-III-tubulin), neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) markers (p75 and HNK1) and a glial cells marker (GFAP). RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of OCT4 and NANOG in DFCs and dental follicle tissue. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis revealed that a significant proportion of the DFCs evaluated expressed human embryonic stem cells marker OCT4 (75%) whereas NANOG was weakly expressed. A considerable amount of MSCs (90%) expressed Notch1, STRO, CD44 and HLA-ABC. However, they were weakly positive for CD90. Moreover, it was possible to demonstrate that dental follicle contains a significant proportion of neural stem/progenitors cells, expressing β-III-tubulin (90%) and nestin (70%). Interestingly, immunocytochemistry showed DFCs positive for p75 (50%), HNK1 (cells. This is the first study reporting the presence of NCSCs and glial-like cells in the dental follicle. The results of the present study suggest the occurrence of heterogeneous populations of stem cells, particularly neural stem/progenitor cells, in the dental follicle, Therefore, the human dental follicle might be a promising source of adult stem cells for regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural stem cells have the capacity to respond to their environment, migrate to the injury site and generate functional cell types, and thus they hold great promise for cell therapies. In addition to representing a source for central nervous system (CNS) repair, neural stem and progenitor cells als...

  9. Studies on the differentiation of dopaminergic traits in human neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Donaldson, Angela E; Marshall, Cheryl E; Shen, James; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    The development of cell replacement therapies for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD) may depend upon the successful differentiation of human neural stem/progenitor cells into dopamine (DA) neurons. We show here that primary human neural progenitors (HNPs) can be expanded and maintained in culture both as neurospheres (NSPs) and attached monolayers where they develop into neurons and glia. When transplanted into the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat striatum, undifferentiated NSPs survive longer (60% graft survival at 8-16 weeks vs. 30% graft survival at 8-13 weeks) and migrate farther than their attached counterparts. While both NSP and attached cells continue to express neuronal traits after transplantation, the spontaneous expression of differentiated transmitter-related traits is not observed in either cell type. However, following predifferentiation in culture using a previously described cocktail of reagents, approximately 25% of HNPs can permanently express the DA enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), even following replating and removal of the DA differentiation cocktail. When these predifferentiated HNPs are transplanted into the brain, however, TH staining is not observed, either because expression is lost or TH-expressing cells preferentially die. Consistent with the latter view is a decrease in total cell survival and migration, and an enhanced glial response in these grafts. In contrast, we found that the overall survival of HNPs is improved when cells engraft near blood vessels or CSF compartments or when they are placed into an intact unlesioned brain, suggesting that there are factors, as yet unidentified, that can better support the development of engrafted HNPs.

  10. Origin-Dependent Neural Cell Identities in Differentiated Human iPSCs In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Hargus

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation capability of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs toward certain cell types for disease modeling and drug screening assays might be influenced by their somatic cell of origin. Here, we have compared the neural induction of human iPSCs generated from fetal neural stem cells (fNSCs, dermal fibroblasts, or cord blood CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons could be generated at similar efficiencies from all iPSCs. Transcriptomics analysis of the whole genome and of neural genes revealed a separation of neuroectoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs from mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Furthermore, we found genes that were similarly expressed in fNSCs and neuroectoderm, but not in mesoderm-derived iPSC-NPCs. Notably, these neural signatures were retained after transplantation into the cortex of mice and paralleled with increased survival of neuroectoderm-derived cells in vivo. These results indicate distinct origin-dependent neural cell identities in differentiated human iPSCs both in vitro and in vivo.

  11. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  12. Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remains largely qualitative. Here we report on the collective dynamics of cultured murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system. At low densities, NPCs moved randomly in an amoeba-like fashion. However, NPCs at high density elongated and aligned their shapes with one another, gliding at relatively high velocities. Although the direction of motion of individual cells reversed stochastically along the axes of alignment, the cells were capable of forming an aligned pattern up to length scales similar to that of the migratory stream observed in the adult brain. The two-dimensional order of alignment within the culture showed a liquid-crystalline pattern containing interspersed topological defects with winding numbers of +1/2 and -1/2 (half-integer due to the nematic feature that arises from the head-tail symmetry of cell-to-cell interaction). We identified rapid cell accumulation at +1/2 defects and the formation of three-dimensional mounds. Imaging at the single-cell level around the defects allowed us to quantify the velocity field and the evolving cell density; cells not only concentrate at +1/2 defects, but also escape from -1/2 defects. We propose a generic mechanism for the instability in cell density around the defects that arises from the interplay between the anisotropic friction and the active force field.

  13. Modulation of calcium-induced cell death in human neural stem cells by the novel peptidylarginine deiminase-AIF pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, Kin Pong; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Nicholas, Antony P; Thompson, Paul R; Ferretti, Patrizia

    2014-06-01

    PADs (peptidylarginine deiminases) are calcium-dependent enzymes that change protein-bound arginine to citrulline (citrullination/deimination) affecting protein conformation and function. PAD up-regulation following chick spinal cord injury has been linked to extensive tissue damage and loss of regenerative capability. Having found that human neural stem cells (hNSCs) expressed PAD2 and PAD3, we studied PAD function in these cells and investigated PAD3 as a potential target for neuroprotection by mimicking calcium-induced secondary injury responses. We show that PAD3, rather than PAD2 is a modulator of cell growth/death and that PAD activity is not associated with caspase-3-dependent cell death, but is required for AIF (apoptosis inducing factor)-mediated apoptosis. PAD inhibition prevents association of PAD3 with AIF and AIF cleavage required for its translocation to the nucleus. Finally, PAD inhibition also hinders calcium-induced cytoskeleton disassembly and association of PAD3 with vimentin, that we show to be associated also with AIF; together this suggests that PAD-dependent cytoskeleton disassembly may play a role in AIF translocation to the nucleus. This is the first study highlighting a role of PAD activity in balancing hNSC survival/death, identifying PAD3 as an important upstream regulator of calcium-induced apoptosis, which could be targeted to reduce neural loss, and shedding light on the mechanisms involved. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Copine1 regulates neural stem cell functions during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Sung, Soo-Eun; Cheal Yoo, Jae; Park, Jae-Yong; Yi, Gwan-Su; Heo, Jun Young; Lee, Jae-Ran; Kim, Nam-Soon; Lee, Da Yong

    2018-01-01

    Copine 1 (CPNE1) is a well-known phospholipid binding protein in plasma membrane of various cell types. In brain cells, CPNE1 is closely associated with AKT signaling pathway, which is important for neural stem cell (NSC) functions during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of CPNE1 in the regulation of brain NSC functions during brain development and determined its underlying mechanism. In this study, abundant expression of CPNE1 was observed in neural lineage cells including NSCs and immature neurons in human. With mouse brain tissues in various developmental stages, we found that CPNE1 expression was higher at early embryonic stages compared to postnatal and adult stages. To model developing brain in vitro, we used primary NSCs derived from mouse embryonic hippocampus. Our in vitro study shows decreased proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potential in CPNE1 deficient NSCs. Finally, we found that the deficiency of CPNE1 downregulated mTOR signaling in embryonic NSCs. These data demonstrate that CPNE1 plays a key role in the regulation of NSC functions through the activation of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway during brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Disease-free survival after hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma patients: a prediction approach using artificial neural network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Ho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A database for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients who had received hepatic resection was used to develop prediction models for 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival based on a set of clinical parameters for this patient group. METHODS: The three prediction models included an artificial neural network (ANN model, a logistic regression (LR model, and a decision tree (DT model. Data for 427, 354 and 297 HCC patients with histories of 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival after hepatic resection, respectively, were extracted from the HCC patient database. From each of the three groups, 80% of the cases (342, 283 and 238 cases of 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival, respectively were selected to provide training data for the prediction models. The remaining 20% of cases in each group (85, 71 and 59 cases in the three respective groups were assigned to validation groups for performance comparisons of the three models. Area under receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROC was used as the performance index for evaluating the three models. CONCLUSIONS: The ANN model outperformed the LR and DT models in terms of prediction accuracy. This study demonstrated the feasibility of using ANNs in medical decision support systems for predicting disease-free survival based on clinical databases in HCC patients who have received hepatic resection.

  16. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Fetal neural... progenitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 DNase-seq Neural Fetal neural p...rogenitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Fetal neural... progenitor cells SRX109477 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 All antigens Neural Fetal neural... progenitor cells SRX109477,SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Histone Neural Fetal neural pro...genitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Unclassified Neural Fetal neural... progenitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural progenitor... cells SRX109476,SRX667382,SRX109475,SRX315272,SRX315273,SRX668239 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 No description Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Input control Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Histone Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 All antigens Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109477,SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Unclassified Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Unclassified Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 All antigens Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109477,SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 DNase-seq Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 No description Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 No description Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109477 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 TFs and others Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109477 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Input control Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural progenitor... cells SRX109476,SRX315272,SRX315273,SRX109475,SRX667382,SRX668239 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Input control Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 DNase-seq Neural Fetal neural progeni...tor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX7...07365,SRX707367 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  3. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX32...6209,SRX505085,SRX505089,SRX505087,SRX1000539,SRX1433428,SRX1000538,SRX1433431 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  4. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  5. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX32...6209,SRX505087,SRX505085,SRX505089,SRX1433428,SRX1433431,SRX1000539,SRX1000538 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  6. File list: InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX32...6209,SRX505087,SRX505085,SRX505089,SRX1000538,SRX1433428,SRX1433431,SRX1000539 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  7. File list: InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural progenitor... cells SRX109476,SRX315272,SRX315273,SRX109475,SRX668239,SRX667382 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX7...07365,SRX707367 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  9. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 Input control Neural Neural Stem Cells SRX7...07365,SRX707367 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 Input control Neural Neural progenitor... cells SRX109476,SRX315272,SRX315273,SRX109475,SRX668239,SRX667382 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX3...X028786,ERX028784,ERX629700,ERX629702 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  12. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX3...X380398,ERX028784,ERX629702,ERX629700 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  14. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells hg19 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells mm9 No description Neural Neural Stem Cells ERX3...X629700,ERX629702,ERX380401,ERX028784 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Input control Neural Fetal neural... progenitor cells SRX109478 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells hg19 Histone Neural Fetal neural pro...genitor cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. miR-381 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation via Regulating Hes1 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Shi

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent and undifferentiated precursors that retain the capacity for differentiation into both glial (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neuronal lineages. Neural stem cells offer cell-based therapies for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinal cord injuries. However, their cellular behavior is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs involved in cell development, proliferation and differentiation through regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The role of miR-381 in the development of neural stem cells remains unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of miR-381 promoted neural stem cells proliferation. It induced the neural stem cells differentiation to neurons and inhibited their differentiation to astrocytes. Furthermore, we identified HES1 as a direct target of miR-381 in neural stem cells. Moreover, re-expression of HES1 impaired miR-381-induced promotion of neural stem cells proliferation and induce neural stem cells differentiation to neurons. In conclusion, miR-381 played important role in neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation.

  19. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  20. SSEA4-positive pig induced pluripotent stem cells are primed for differentiation into neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Mumaw, Jennifer L; Liu, Yubing; Stice, Steve L; West, Franklin D

    2013-01-01

    Neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential for autologous cell therapies in treating patients with severe neurological disorders or injury. However, further study of efficacy and safety are needed in large animal preclinical models that have similar neural anatomy and physiology to humans such as the pig. The pig model for pluripotent stem cell therapy has been made possible for the first time with the development of pig iPSCs (piPSCs) capable of in vitro and in vivo differentiation into tissues of all three germ layers. Still, the question remains if piPSCs are capable of undergoing robust neural differentiation using a system similar to those being used with human iPSCs. In this study, we generated a new line of piPSCs from fibroblast cells that expressed pluripotency markers and were capable of embryoid body differentiation into all three germ layers. piPSCs demonstrated robust neural differentiation forming βIII-TUB/MAP2+ neurons, GFAP+ astrocytes, and O4+ oligodendrocytes and demonstrated strong upregulation of neural cell genes representative of all three major neural lineages of the central nervous system. In the presence of motor neuron signaling factors, piPSC-derived neurons showed expression of transcription factors associated with motor neuron differentiation (HB9 and ISLET1). Our findings demonstrate that SSEA4 expression is required for piPSCs to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes and furthermore develop specific neuronal subtypes. This indicates that the pigs can fill the need for a powerful model to study autologous neural iPSC therapies in a system similar to humans.

  1. Pharmacologically active microcarriers for endothelial progenitor cell support and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilli, Claudia; Karam, Jean-Pierre; Paccosi, Sara; Muscari, Claudio; Mugelli, Alessandro; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Parenti, Astrid

    2012-08-01

    The regenerative potential of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-based therapies is limited due to poor cell viability and minimal retention following application. Neovascularization can be improved by means of scaffolds supporting EPCs. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether human early EPCs (eEPCs) could be efficiently cultured on pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made with poly(d,l-lactic-coglycolic acid) and coated with adhesion/extracellular matrix molecules. They may serve as a support for stem cells and may be used as cell carriers providing a controlled delivery of active protein such as the angiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A). eEPC adhesion to fibronectin-coated PAMs (FN-PAMs) was assessed by means of microscopic evaluation and by means of Alamar blue assay. Phospho ERK(1/2) and PARP-1 expression was measured by means of Western blot to assess the survival effects of FN-PAMs releasing VEGF-A (FN-VEGF-PAMs). The Alamar blue assay or a modified Boyden chamber assay was employed to assess proliferative or migratory capacity, respectively. Our data indicate that eEPCs were able to adhere to empty FN-PAMs within a few hours. FN-VEGF-PAMs increased the ability of eEPCs to adhere to them and strongly supported endothelial-like phenotype and cell survival. Moreover, the release of VEGF-A by FN-PAMs stimulated in vitro HUVEC migration and proliferation. These data strongly support the use of PAMs for supporting eEPC growth and survival and for stimulating resident mature human endothelial cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion...

  3. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K.; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D’Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096717696; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric C; Zon, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly

  4. Transient expression of Olig1 initiates the differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; Timmer, N; Kust, B; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop an efficient strategy to induce the in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), NSCs were isolated from E14 mice and grown in medium containing epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Besides supplementing

  5. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-fei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco′s modified Eagle′s medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem

  6. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  7. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  8. Steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival: molecular insights using RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthi Chittaranjan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The insect steroid hormone ecdysone triggers programmed cell death of obsolete larval tissues during metamorphosis and provides a model system for understanding steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival. Previous genome-wide expression studies of Drosophila larval salivary glands resulted in the identification of many genes associated with ecdysone-induced cell death and cell survival, but functional verification was lacking. In this study, we test functionally 460 of these genes using RNA interference in ecdysone-treated Drosophila l(2mbn cells. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays confirmed the effects of known genes and additionally resulted in the identification of six new pro-death related genes, including sorting nexin-like gene SH3PX1 and Sox box protein Sox14, and 18 new pro-survival genes. Identified genes were further characterized to determine their ecdysone dependency and potential function in cell death regulation. We found that the pro-survival function of five genes (Ras85D, Cp1, CG13784, CG32016, and CG33087, was dependent on ecdysone signaling. The TUNEL assay revealed an additional two genes (Kap-alpha3 and Smr with an ecdysone-dependent cell survival function that was associated with reduced cell death. In vitro, Sox14 RNAi reduced the percentage of TUNEL-positive l(2mbn cells (p<0.05 following ecdysone treatment, and Sox14 overexpression was sufficient to induce apoptosis. In vivo analyses of Sox14-RNAi animals revealed multiple phenotypes characteristic of aberrant or reduced ecdysone signaling, including defects in larval midgut and salivary gland destruction. These studies identify Sox14 as a positive regulator of ecdysone-mediated cell death and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the ecdysone signaling network governing cell death and cell survival.

  9. Survival rate of eukaryotic cells following electrophoretic nanoinjection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonis, Matthias; Hübner, Wolfgang; Wilking, Alice; Huser, Thomas; Hennig, Simon

    2017-01-25

    Insertion of foreign molecules such as functionalized fluorescent probes, antibodies, or plasmid DNA to living cells requires overcoming the plasma membrane barrier without harming the cell during the staining process. Many techniques such as electroporation, lipofection or microinjection have been developed to overcome the cellular plasma membrane, but they all result in reduced cell viability. A novel approach is the injection of cells with a nanopipette and using electrophoretic forces for the delivery of molecules. The tip size of these pipettes is approximately ten times smaller than typical microinjection pipettes and rather than pressure pulses as delivery method, moderate DC electric fields are used to drive charged molecules out of the tip. Here, we show that this approach leads to a significantly higher survival rate of nanoinjected cells and that injection with nanopipettes has a significantly lower impact on the proliferation behavior of injected cells. Thus, we propose that injection with nanopipettes using electrophoretic delivery is an excellent alternative when working with valuable and rare living cells, such as primary cells or stem cells.

  10. Promoting survival, migration, and integration of transplanted Schwann cells by over-expressing polysialic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Juan; Bo, Xuenong; Wu, Dongsheng; Yeh, John; Richardson, Peter M; Zhang, Yi

    2011-03-01

    The poor survival and migration of transplanted Schwann cells (SCs) are major drawbacks for their clinical application in cell therapy for neurotrauma. To overcome such drawbacks we genetically modified SCs to over-express polysialic acid (PSA) by lentiviral delivery of polysialyltransferase (PST) to study whether over-expression of PSA could enhance their survival, migration, and integration when transplanted into the spinal cord. It was found that more PSA-expressing SCs (PST/SCs) survived than GFP-expressing SCs (GFP/SCs) after transplantation, although cell loss was still quite significant. PSA expression did not enhance the motility of transplanted SCs in uninjured spinal cord. However, in a spinal cord crush injury model PST/SCs transplanted caudal to the lesion showed that increased number of PST/SCs migrated to the injury site compared with that of GFP/SCs. Induced expression of PSA in spinal cord can further facilitate the infiltration of PST/SCs into the lesion site. PST/SCs were also shown to intermingle well with host spinal cells while GFP/SCs formed boundaries with host tissue. This was confirmed by an in vitro confrontation assay showing that more PST/SCs crossed over to astrocyte territory than GFP/SCs. Furthermore, PST/SCs induced much less expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan in the surrounding tissues than GFP/SCs, indicating that expression of PSA on SCs do not cause significant stress response of astrocytes. These results demonstrate that expression of PSA on SCs significantly changes their biological properties and makes them more feasible for neural repair after neurotrauma. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Calcium-mediated repression of β-catenin and its transcriptional signaling mediates neural crest cell death in an avian model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M

    2011-07-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates G-protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol's calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol's repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically relevant ethanol concentrations (22-78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion, and survival. Using forced expression studies, we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative T cell transcription factor [TCF]) recapitulates ethanol's effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol's presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol's calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol's repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol's teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Ezh2 Expression in Astrocytes Induces Their Dedifferentiation Toward Neural Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of the polycomb group protein Ezh2 in embryonic and adult neural stem cells. Although Ezh2 remained highly expressed when neural stem cells differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor cells, it is downregulated during the differentiation into neurons or

  13. Neural cell adhesion molecule is a cardioprotective factor up-regulated by metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Kazuya; Ono, Koh; Iwanaga, Yoshitaka; Tamaki, Yodo; Kojima, Yoji; Horie, Takahiro; Nishi, Hitoo; Kinoshita, Minako; Kuwabara, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Koji; Kita, Toru; Kimura, Takeshi

    2010-06-01

    Screening for cell surface proteins up-regulated under stress conditions may lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. To search for genes whose expression was enhanced by treatment with oligomycin, a mitochondrial-F(0)F(1) ATP synthase inhibitor, signal sequence trapping was performed in H9C2 rat cardiac myoblasts. One of the genes identified was that for neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, CD56), a major regulator of development, cell survival, migration, and neurite outgrowth in the nervous system. Immunohistochemical analyses in a mouse myocardial infarction model revealed that NCAM was strongly expressed in residual cardiac myocytes in the infarcted region. Increased expression of NCAM was also found during the remodeling period in a rat model of hypertension-induced heart failure. Lentivirus-mediated knockdown of NCAM decreased the cell growth and survival following oligomycin treatment in H9C2 cells. In primary rat neonatal cardiac myocytes, NCAM was also found to be up-regulated and played a protective role following oligomycin treatment. Analyses of downstream signaling revealed that knockdown of NCAM significantly decreased the basal AKT phosphorylation level. In contrast, NCAM mimetic peptide P2d activated AKT and significantly reduced oligomycin-induced cardiomyocyte death, which was abolished by treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 as well as overexpression of the dominant-negative AKT mutant. These findings demonstrate that NCAM is a cardioprotective factor up-regulated under metabolic stress in cardiomyocytes and augmentation of this signal improved survival. (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Artificial neural networks--a method for prediction of survival following liver resection for colorectal cancer metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spelt, L; Nilsson, J; Andersson, R; Andersson, B

    2013-06-01

    To construct an artificial neural network (ANN) model to predict survival after liver resection for colorectal cancer (CRC) metastases. CRC liver metastases are fatal if untreated and resection can possibly be curative. Predictive models stratify patients into risk categories to predict prognosis and select those who can benefit from aggressive multidisciplinary treatment and intensive follow-up. Standard linear models assume proportional hazards, whereas more flexible non-linear survival models based on ANNs may better predict individual long-term survival. Clinicopathological and perioperative data on patients who underwent liver resection for CRC metastases between 1994 and 2009 were studied retrospectively. A five-fold cross-validated ANN model was constructed. Risk variables were ranked and minimised through calibrated ANNs. Time dependent hazard ratio (HR) was calculated using the ANN. Performance of the ANN model and Cox regression were analysed using Harrell's C-index. 241 patients with a median age of 66 years were included. There were no perioperative deaths and median survival was 56 months. Of 28 potential risk variables, the ANN selected six: age, preoperative chemotherapy, size of largest metastasis, haemorrhagic complications, preoperative CEA-level and number of metastases. The C-index was 0.72 for the ANN model and 0.66 for Cox regression. For the first time ANNs were used to successfully predict individual long-term survival for patients following liver resection for CRC metastases. In the future, more complex prognostic factors can be incorporated into the ANN model to increase its predictive ability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  16. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro....... Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal...

  17. Oral squamous cell carcinoma: survival, recurrence and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Camilo Souza Cruz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper was based in data survey from macro and microscopic oral lesions characteristics, personal data and medical history of patients diagnosed with oral squamous cell carcinoma in the Lab of Pathological Anatomy from the Federal University of Alfenas from January 2000 to December 2010, establishing comparative parameters among clinical data, type of treatment, recurrence, survival and anatomic pathological characteristics of the lesions. Were analyzed the histopathological reports, dental and hospital records. The highest incidence was in white men, age between 50 and 60 years, married, with low education and socioeconomic levels. The beginning of treatment occurred in average 67 days after the histopathological diagnosis. The estimated survival of patients at five years was 42%. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco and the occurrence of metastasis were statistically significant for the increase of recurrence and lethality.

  18. Major histocompatibility complex I upregulation in clear cell renal cell carcinoma is associated with increased survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi R. Sekar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that high MHCI expression confers improved overall and recurrence free survival in patients with clear cell RCC and could serve as an important prognostic tool in identifying high-risk patients.

  19. Study of brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene transgenic neural stem cells in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Yuan, Hui-ping; Wu, Dong-lai; Zhou, Xin-rong; Sun, Da-wei; Li, Hong-yi; Shao, Zheng-bo

    2009-07-20

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation and gene therapy have been widely investigated for treating the cerebullar and myelonic injuries, however, studies on the ophthalmology are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the migration and differentiation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene transgenic NSCs transplanted into the normal rat retinas. NSCs were cultured and purified in vitro and infected with recombinant retrovirus pLXSN-BDNF and pLXSN respectively, to obtain the BDNF overexpressed NSCs (BDNF-NSCs) and control cells (p-NSCs). The expression of BDNF genes in two transgenic NSCs and untreated NSCs were measured by fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). BDNF-NSCs and NSCs were infected with adeno-associated viruses-enhanced green fluorescent protein (AAV-EGFP) to track them in vivo and served as donor cells for transplantation into the subretinal space of normal rat retinas, phosphated buffer solution (PBS) served as pseudo transplantation for a negative control. Survival, migration, and differentiation of donor cells in host retinas were observed and analyzed with Heidelberg retina angiograph (HRA) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. NSCs were purified successfully by limiting dilution assay. The expression of BDNF gene in BDNF-NSCs was the highest among three groups both at mRNA level tested by FQ-PCR (P neuron more efficiently compared with the control NSCs 2 months after transplantation. The seed cells of NSCs highly secreting BDNF were established. BDNF can promote NSCs to migrate and differentiate into neural cells in the normal host retinas.

  20. In vivo neural stem cell imaging: current modalities and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Atul; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating a wide variety of neuropathologies. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of neural stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand these mechanisms, and before neural stem cell-based therapies can be utilized in a clinical context, we must develop means of monitoring these cells in vivo. However, because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier, in vivo imaging of neural stem cells in the brain has unique challenges that do not apply to stem cells for other purposes. In this paper, we review contemporary methods for in vivo neural stem cell imaging, including MRI, PET and optical imaging techniques.

  1. Functional evaluation of neural stem cell differentiation by single cell calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriz, Maria Francisca; Grade, Sofia; Rosa, Alexandra; Xapelli, Sara; Bernardino, Liliana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain occurs in two specific brain areas, the subventricular zone (SVZ) bordering the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. Although these regions are prone to produce new neurons, cultured cells from these neurogenic niches tend to be mixed cultures, containing both neurons and glial cells. Several reports highlight the potential of the self-healing capacity of the brain following injury. Even though much knowledge has been produced on the neurogenesis itself, brain repairing strategies are still far away from patients cure. Here we review general concepts in the neurogenesis field, also addressing the methods available to study neural stem cell differentiation. A major problem faced by research groups and companies dedicated to brain regenerative medicine resides on the lack of good methods to functionally identify neural stem cell differentiation and novel drug targets. To address this issue, we developed a unique single cell calcium imaging-based method to functionally discriminate different cell types derived from SVZ neural stem cell cultures. The unique functional profile of each SVZ cell type was correlated at the single cell level with the immunodetection of specific phenotypic markers. This platform was raised on the basis of the functional response of neurons, oligodendrocytes and immature cells to depolarising agents, to thrombin and to histamine, respectively. We also outline key studies in which our new platform was extremely relevant in the context of drug discovery and development in the area of brain regenerative medicine.

  2. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yan; Tang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Di; Wang, Sha-Li

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  4. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  5. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  6. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 No description Neural Neural progenito...SRX346675,SRX346817 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 No description Neural Neural progenito...SRX346675,SRX298043 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 No description Neural Neural progenito...SRX346817,SRX346814 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  9. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  10. A Robust Single Primate Neuroepithelial Cell Clonal Expansion System for Neural Tube Development and Disease Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Developing a model of primate neural tube (NT development is important to promote many NT disorder studies in model organisms. Here, we report a robust and stable system to allow for clonal expansion of single monkey neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs to develop into miniature NT-like structures. Single NESCs can produce functional neurons in vitro, survive, and extensively regenerate neuron axons in monkey brain. NT formation and NESC maintenance depend on high metabolism activity and Wnt signaling. NESCs are regionally restricted to a telencephalic fate. Moreover, single NESCs can turn into radial glial progenitors (RGPCs. The transition is accurately regulated by Wnt signaling through regulation of Notch signaling and adhesion molecules. Finally, using the “NESC-TO-NTs” system, we model the functions of folic acid (FA on NT closure and demonstrate that FA can regulate multiple mechanisms to prevent NT defects. Our system is ideal for studying NT development and diseases.

  11. Role of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; He, Zhili; Ruan, Juan; Ma, Zilong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Chengxin; Iqbal, Khalid; Sun, Shenggang; Chen, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been fully studied for its structure, receptor, and signaling pathways and its multiplex effects on neural system, skeletal muscle, and weight control. Recent research demonstrates that CNTF also plays an important role in neurogenesis and the differentiation of neural stem cells. In this article, we summarize the general characteristics of CNTF and its function on neural stem cells, which could be a valuable therapeutic strategy in treating neurological disorders.

  12. Gap Junction–mediated Cell–Cell Communication Modulates Mouse Neural Crest Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G.Y.; Cooper, E.S.; Waldo, K.; Kirby, M L; Gilula, N B; Lo, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies showed that conotruncal heart malformations can arise with the increase or decrease in α1 connexin function in neural crest cells. To elucidate the possible basis for the quantitative requirement for α1 connexin gap junctions in cardiac development, a neural crest outgrowth culture system was used to examine migration of neural crest cells derived from CMV43 transgenic embryos overexpressing α1 connexins, and from α1 connexin knockout (KO) mice and FC transgenic mice expressi...

  13. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  14. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  15. Possible role of pineal allopregnanolone in Purkinje cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Shogo; Hara, Sakurako; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Mita, Masatoshi; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    It is believed that neurosteroids are produced in the brain and other nervous systems. Here, we show that allopregnanolone (ALLO), a neurosteroid, is exceedingly produced in the pineal gland compared with the brain and that pineal ALLO acts on the Purkinje cell, a principal cerebellar neuron, to prevent apoptosis in the juvenile quail. We first demonstrated that the pineal gland is a major organ of neurosteroidogenesis. A series of experiments using molecular and biochemical techniques has further demonstrated that the pineal gland produces a variety of neurosteroids de novo from cholesterol in the juvenile quail. Importantly, ALLO was far more actively produced in the pineal gland than in the brain. Pinealectomy (Px) decreased ALLO concentration in the cerebellum and induced apoptosis of Purkinje cells, whereas administration of ALLO to Px quail chicks prevented apoptosis of Purkinje cells. We further found that Px significantly increased the number of Purkinje cells that expressed active caspase-3, a key protease in apoptotic pathway, and daily injection of ALLO to Px quail chicks decreased the number of Purkinje cells expressing active caspase-3. These results indicate that the neuroprotective effect of pineal ALLO is associated with the decrease in caspase-3 activity during the early stage of neuronal development. We thus provide evidence that the pineal gland is an important neurosteroidogenic organ and that pineal ALLO may be involved in Purkinje cell survival during development. This is an important function of the pineal gland in the formation of neuronal circuits in the developing cerebellum. PMID:23213208

  16. Angiogenic factors stimulate growth of adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Androutsellis-Theotokis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to grow a uniform cell type from the adult central nervous system (CNS is valuable for developing cell therapies and new strategies for drug discovery. The adult mammalian brain is a source of neural stem cells (NSC found in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic zones but difficulties in culturing these hinders their use as research tools.Here we show that NSCs can be efficiently grown in adherent cell cultures when angiogenic signals are included in the medium. These signals include both anti-angiogenic factors (the soluble form of the Notch receptor ligand, Dll4 and pro-angiogenic factors (the Tie-2 receptor ligand, Angiopoietin 2. These treatments support the self renewal state of cultured NSCs and expression of the transcription factor Hes3, which also identifies the cancer stem cell population in human tumors. In an organotypic slice model, angiogenic factors maintain vascular structure and increase the density of dopamine neuron processes.We demonstrate new properties of adult NSCs and a method to generate efficient adult NSC cultures from various central nervous system areas. These findings will help establish cellular models relevant to cancer and regeneration.

  17. The Calcium-Mediated Repression of β-Catenin and Its Transcriptional Signaling Mediates Neural Crest Cell Death in an Avian Model of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flentke, George R.; Garic, Ana; Amberger, Ed; Hernandez, Marcos; Smith, Susan M.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a common birth defect in many societies. Affected individuals have neurodevelopmental disabilities and a distinctive craniofacial dysmorphology. These latter deficits originate during early development from the ethanol-mediated apoptotic depletion of cranial facial progenitors, a population known as the neural crest. We showed previously that this apoptosis is caused because acute ethanol exposure activates a G protein-dependent intracellular calcium within cranial neural crest progenitors, and this calcium transient initiates the cell death. The dysregulated signals that reside downstream of ethanol’s calcium transient and effect neural crest death are unknown. Here we show that ethanol’s repression of the transcriptional effector β-catenin causes the neural crest losses. Clinically-relevant ethanol concentrations (22–78 mM) rapidly deplete nuclear β-catenin from neural crest progenitors, with accompanying losses of β-catenin transcriptional activity and downstream genes that govern neural crest induction, expansion and survival. Using forced expression studies we show that β-catenin loss of function (via dominant-negative TCF) recapitulates ethanol’s effects on neural crest apoptosis, whereas β-catenin gain-of-function in ethanol’s presence preserves neural crest survival. Blockade of ethanol’s calcium transient using Bapta-AM normalizes β-catenin activity and prevents the neural crest losses, whereas ionomycin treatment is sufficient to destabilize β-catenin. We propose that ethanol’s repression of β-catenin causes the neural crest losses in this model of FAS. β-Catenin is a novel target for ethanol’s teratogenicity. β-Catenin/Wnt signals participate in many developmental events and its rapid and persistent dysregulation by ethanol may explain why the latter is such a potent teratogen. PMID:21630427

  18. Unique TTC repeat base pair loss mutation in cases of pure neural leprosy: A survival strategy of Mycobacterium leprae?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek De

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genomic reduction helps obligate intracellular microbes to survive difficult host niches. Adaptation of Mycobacterium leprae in cases of pure neural leprosy (PNL in the intracellular niche of peripheral nerves can be associated with some gene loss. Recently, a stable but variable number of tandem repefzats (TTC have been reported in strains of M. leprae. FolP and rpoB genes are the two common mutation sites which deal with the susceptibility of the bacteria to drugs. Aim: We attempted to find if genomic reduction of M. leprae in context of these TTC repeats or mutations in folP1 and rpoB can be the reason for the restriction of M. leprae in the nerves in PNL. Materials and Methods: DNA extracts taken from fine needle aspiration of affected nerves of 24 PNL cases were studied for tandem repeats with 21TTC primer in multiplex-PCR. Mutations were also studied by PCR Amplification of SRDR (Sulphone Resistance Determining Region of the folP1 and multiple primer PCR amplification refractory mutation system (MARS of the rpoB. Results: Of the 24 PNL, only 1 patient showed mutation in the rpoB gene and none in the folp1 gene. Studying the mutation in TTC region of the M. leprae gene we found that all the cases have a loss of a few bases in the sequence. Conclusion: We can conclude that there is consistent loss in the bases in the TTC region in all cases of pure neural Hansen and we postulate that it may be an adaptive response of the bacteria to survive host niche resulting in its restriction to peripheral nerves.

  19. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells SRX702550 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: InP.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells SRX702550 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived... neural cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440731,SRX440736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440736,SRX440731 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440736,SRX440731 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 DNase-seq Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX121241,SRX134721 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/DNS.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 No description Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural... cells SRX440731,SRX440736 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells SRX702550 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX190259 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural... cells SRX378284 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural... cells http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Pol.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. Endothelial Cell Implantation and Survival within Experimental Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Bachchu; Indurti, Ravi R.; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Goldstein, Gary W.; Laterra, John

    1994-10-01

    The delivery of therapeutic genes to primary brain neoplasms opens new opportunities for treating these frequently fatal tumors. Efficient gene delivery to tissues remains an important obstacle to therapy, and this problem has unique characteristics in brain tumors due to the blood-brain and blood-tumor barriers. The presence of endothelial mitogens and vessel proliferation within solid tumors suggests that genetically modified endothelial cells might efficiently transplant to brain tumors. Rat brain endothelial cells immortalized with the adenovirus E1A gene and further modified to express the β-galactosidase reporter were examined for their ability to survive implantation to experimental rat gliomas. Rats received 9L, F98, or C6 glioma cells in combination with endothelial cells intracranially to caudate/putamen or subcutaneously to flank. Implanted endothelial cells were identified by β-galactosidase histochemistry or by polymerase chain reaction in all tumors up to 35 days postimplantation, the latest time examined. Implanted endothelial cells appeared to cooperate in tumor vessel formation and expressed the brain-specific endothelial glucose transporter type 1 as identified by immunohistochemistry. The proliferation of implanted endothelial cells was supported by their increased number within tumors between postimplantation days 14 and 21 (P = 0.015) and by their expression of the proliferation antigen Ki67. These findings establish that genetically modified endothelial cells can be stably engrafted to growing gliomas and suggest that endothelial cell implantation may provide a means of delivering therapeutic genes to brain neoplasms and other solid tumors. In addition, endothelial implantation to brain may be useful for defining mechanisms of brain-specific endothelial differentiation.

  12. NAC, tiron and trolox impair survival of cell cultures containing glioblastoma tumorigenic initiating cells by inhibition of cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monticone, Massimiliano; Taherian, Razieh; Stigliani, Sara; Carra, Elisa; Monteghirfo, Stefano; Longo, Luca; Daga, Antonio; Dono, Mariella; Zupo, Simona; Giaretti, Walter; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are metabolism by-products that may act as signaling molecules to sustain tumor growth. Antioxidants have been used to impair cancer cell survival. Our goal was to determine the mechanisms involved in the response to antioxidants of a human cell culture (PT4) containing glioblastoma (GBM) tumorigenic initiating cells (TICs). ROS production in the absence or presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), tiron, and trolox was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). The effects of these antioxidants on cell survival and apoptosis were evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT) and FCM. The biological processes modulated by these drugs were determined by oligonucleotide microarray gene expression profiling. Our results showed that NAC, tiron and trolox impaired PT4 cell survival, had minor effects on ROS levels and caused wide deregulation of cell cycle genes. Furthermore, tiron and trolox caused inhibition of cell survival in two additional cell cultures containing TICs, FO-1 and MM1, established from a melanoma and a mesothelioma patient, respectively. NAC, instead, impaired survival of the MM1 cells but not of the FO-1 cells. However, when used in combination, NAC enhanced the inhibitory effect of PLX4032 (BRAF V600E inhibitor) and Gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), on FO-1 and PT4 cell survival. Collectively, NAC, tiron and trolox modulated gene expression and impaired the growth of cultures containing TICs primarily by inhibiting cell cycle progression.

  13. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  14. Reversible neural stem cell niche dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Imitola, Jaime; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain constitutes a niche for neural stem and progenitor cells that can initiate repair after central nervous system (CNS) injury. In a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the neural stem cells (NSCs) become...

  15. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja M. Piltti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury.

  16. Transplantation dose alters the dynamics of human neural stem cell engraftment, proliferation and migration after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Avakian, Sabrina N; Funes, Gabriella M; Hu, Antoinette; Uchida, Nobuko; Anderson, Aileen J; Cummings, Brian J

    2015-09-01

    The effect of transplantation dose on the spatiotemporal dynamics of human neural stem cell (hNSC) engraftment has not been quantitatively evaluated in the central nervous system. We investigated changes over time in engraftment/survival, proliferation, and migration of multipotent human central nervous system-derived neural stem cells (hCNS-SCns) transplanted at doses ranging from 10,000 to 500,000 cells in spinal cord injured immunodeficient mice. Transplant dose was inversely correlated with measures of donor cell proliferation at 2 weeks post-transplant (WPT) and dose-normalized engraftment at 16 WPT. Critically, mice receiving the highest cell dose exhibited an engraftment plateau, in which the total number of engrafted human cells never exceeded the initial dose. These data suggest that donor cell expansion was inversely regulated by target niche parameters and/or transplantation density. Investigation of the response of donor cells to the host microenvironment should be a key variable in defining target cell dose in pre-clinical models of CNS disease and injury. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Optimization of a Neural Stem-Cell-Mediated Carboxylesterase/Irinotecan Gene Therapy for Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Gutova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite improved survival for children with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma (NB, recurrent disease is a significant problem, with treatment options limited by anti-tumor efficacy, patient drug tolerance, and cumulative toxicity. We previously demonstrated that neural stem cells (NSCs expressing a modified rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE can distribute to metastatic NB tumor foci in multiple organs in mice and convert the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11 to the 1,000-fold more toxic topoisomerase-1 inhibitor SN-38, resulting in significant therapeutic efficacy. We sought to extend these studies by using a clinically relevant NSC line expressing a modified human CE (hCE1m6-NSCs to establish proof of concept and identify an intravenous dose and treatment schedule that gave maximal efficacy. Human-derived NB cell lines were significantly more sensitive to treatment with hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan as compared with drug alone. This was supported by pharmacokinetic studies in subcutaneous NB mouse models demonstrating tumor-specific conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Furthermore, NB-bearing mice that received repeat treatment with intravenous hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan showed significantly lower tumor burden (1.4-fold, p = 0.0093 and increased long-term survival compared with mice treated with drug alone. These studies support the continued development of NSC-mediated gene therapy for improved clinical outcome in NB patients.

  18. A preclinical assessment of neural stem cells as delivery vehicles for anti-amyloid therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    eMalick G Njie

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stems cells (NSCs could be a useful means to deliver biologic therapeutics for late-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this study, we conducted a small preclinical investigation of whether NSCs could be modified to express metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, a secreted protease reported to degrade aggregated Aβ peptides that are the major constituents of the senile plaques. Our findings illuminated three issues with using NSCs as delivery vehicles for this particular application. First, transplanted NSCs generally failed to migrate to amyloid plaques, instead tending to colonize white matter tracts. Second, the final destination of these cells was highly influenced by how they were delivered. We found that our injection methods led to cells largely distributing to white matter tracts, which are anisotropic conduits for fluids that facilitate rapid distribution within the CNS. Third, with regard to MMP9 as a therapeutic to remove senile plaques, we observed high concentrations of endogenous metalloproteinases around amyloid plaques in the mouse models used for these preclinical tests with no evidence that the NSC-delivered enzymes elevated these activities or had any impact. Interestingly, MMP9-expressing NSCs formed substantially larger grafts. Overall, we observed long-term survival of NSCs in the brains of mice with high amyloid burden. Therefore, we conclude that such cells may have potential in therapeutic applications in AD but improved targeting of these cells to disease-specific lesions may be required to enhance efficacy.

  19. Evaluation of motion tracking by cell survival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Alexander; Bert, Christoph; Saito, Nami; Chaudhri, Naved; Neubeck, Claere von; Iancu, Gheorghe; Schardt, Dieter [GSI, Abt. Biophysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Rietzel, Eike [GSI, Abt. Biophysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Siemens Medical Solutions, Particle Therapy, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    At GSI patients with stationary tumors are treated with a rasterscanned carbon ion beam. For moving targets interplay possibly deteriorates the dose distribution because target motion and scanner motion interfere. Several motion mitigation techniques are proposed to solve this problem. We use a fully integrated 3D online motion compensation system to track target motion of phantoms which includes adaptation of the Bragg peak position. To validate motion tracking with biological systems we conducted a series of repetitive experiments with hamster cells grown in wellplates. The wellplates were placed on a sliding table to induce lateral as well as longitudinal motion. Irradiations were performed with stationary wellplates and by tracking moving wellplates. Multiple samples were irradiated to gain statistics. As a result, we observed no significant difference in cell survival between the motion compensated measurements in comparison to a stationary reference irradiation. We conclude that our motion compensation system allows correct delivery of the biologically effective dose to moving phantoms.

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan X; Ochalek, Anna; Rösingh, Lone N; Molnár, Kinga; László, Lajos; Bellák, Tamás; Téglási, Annamária; Pesti, Krisztina; Mike, Arpad; Phanthong, Phetcharat; Bíró, Orsolya; Hall, Vanessa; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of 2D induction with 3D induction method in their ability to generate NPCs, and subsequently neurons and astrocytes. Neural differentiation was analysed at the protein level qualitatively by immunocytochemistry and quantitatively by flow cytometry for NPC (SOX1, PAX6, NESTIN), neuronal (MAP2, TUBB3), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between the electrophysiological properties between the two induction methods. In conclusion, 3D neural induction increases the yield of PAX6+/NESTIN+ cells and gives rise to neurons with longer neurites, which might be an advantage for the production of forebrain cortical neurons, highlighting the potential of 3D neural induction, independent of iPSCs' genetic background. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Neuroglobin, a Factor Playing for Nerve Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Guidolin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell death represents the final outcome of several pathological conditions of the central nervous system and available evidence suggests that in both acute injuries and neurodegenerative diseases it is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, the possibility to prevent mitochondrial events involved in cell death might represent efficient tools to limit neuronal damage. In recent years, increased attention has been paid to the endogenous protein neuroglobin, since accumulating evidence showed that its high expression was associated with preserved mitochondrial function and to an increased survival of nerve cells in vitro and in vivo in a variety of experimental models of cell insult. The biological and structural features of neuroglobin and the mitochondria-related mechanisms of neuroglobin-induced neuroprotection will be here briefly discussed. In this respect, the inhibition of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis emerges as a key neuroprotective effect induced by the protein. These findings could open the possibility to develop efficient neuroglobin-mediated therapeutic strategies aimed at minimizing the neuronal cell death occurring in impacting neurological pathologies like stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Neurogenin-2-transduced human neural progenitor cells attenuate neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Shin; Koo, Kyo Yeon; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Miri; Kim, Il-Sun; Hwang, Kyujin; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Haejin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2017-05-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury leads to high mortality and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Multipotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with self-renewing capacity have the potential to reduce neuronal loss and improve the compromised environment in the HI brain injury. However, the therapeutic efficacy of neuronal-committed progenitor cells and the underlying mechanisms of recovery are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigated the regenerative ability and action mechanisms of neuronally committed human NPCs (hNPCs) transduced with neurogenin-2 (NEUROG2) in neonatal HI brain injury. NEUROG2- or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding adenoviral vector-transduced hNPCs (NEUROG2- or GFP-NPCs) were transplanted into neonatal mouse brains with HI injury. Grafted NEUROG2-NPCs showed robust dispersion and engraftment, prolonged survival, and neuronal differentiation in HI brain injury. NEUROG2-NPCs significantly improved neurological behaviors, decreased cellular apoptosis, and increased the neurite outgrowth and axonal sprouting in HI brain injury. In contrast, GFP-NPC grafts moderately enhanced axonal extension with limited behavioral recovery. Notably, NEUROG2-NPCs showed increased secretion of multiple factors, such as nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 (NTF3), fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and thrombospondins 1 and 2 (THBS 1/2), which promoted SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell survival and neurite outgrowth. Thus, we postulate that NEUROG2-expressing human NPCs facilitate functional recovery after neonatal HI brain injury via their ability to secrete multiple factors that enhance neuronal survival and neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cultivation of human neural progenitor cells in a 3-dimensional self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedmann, Andrea; Rolfs, Arndt; Frech, Moritz J

    2012-01-11

    The influence of 3-dimensional (3D) scaffolds on growth, proliferation and finally neuronal differentiation is of great interest in order to find new methods for cell-based and standardised therapies in neurological disorders or neurodegenerative diseases. 3D structures are expected to provide an environment much closer to the in vivo situation than 2D cultures. In the context of regenerative medicine, the combination of biomaterial scaffolds with neural stem and progenitor cells holds great promise as a therapeutic tool. Culture systems emulating a three dimensional environment have been shown to influence proliferation and differentiation in different types of stem and progenitor cells. Herein, the formation and functionalisation of the 3D-microenviroment is important to determine the survival and fate of the embedded cells. Here we used PuraMatrix (RADA16, PM), a peptide based hydrogel scaffold, which is well described and used to study the influence of a 3D-environment on different cell types. PuraMatrix can be customised easily and the synthetic fabrication of the nano-fibers provides a 3D-culture system of high reliability, which is in addition xeno-free. Recently we have studied the influence of the PM-concentration on the formation of the scaffold. In this study the used concentrations of PM had a direct impact on the formation of the 3D-structure, which was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy. A subsequent analysis of the survival and differentiation of the hNPCs revealed an influence of the used concentrations of PM on the fate of the embedded cells. However, the analysis of survival or neuronal differentiation by means of immunofluorescence techniques posses some hurdles. To gain reliable data, one has to determine the total number of cells within a matrix to obtain the relative number of e.g. neuronal cells marked by βIII-tubulin. This prerequisites a technique to analyse the scaffolds in all 3-dimensions by a confocal microscope or a comparable

  4. Secretome analysis of human oligodendrocytes derived from neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the secretome of human oligodendrocytes (F3.Olig2 cells generated from human neural stem cells by transduction with the gene encoding the Olig2 transcription factor. Using mRNA sequencing and protein cytokine arrays, we identified a number of biologically important secretory proteins whose expression has not been previously reported in oligodendrocytes. We found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete IL-6, PDGF-AA, GRO, GM-CSF, and M-CSF, and showed prominent expression of their corresponding receptors. Co-expression of ligands and receptors suggests that autocrine signaling loops may play important roles in both differentiation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes. We also found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases and matrix metalloproteinase-associated proteins associated with functional competence of oligodendrocytes. The results of our secretome analysis provide insights into the functional and molecular details of human oligodendrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the secretome of oligodendrocytes.

  5. Raman spectroscopy for discrimination of neural progenitor cells and their lineages (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keren; Ong, William; Chew, Sing Yian; Liu, Quan

    2017-02-01

    Neurological diseases are one of the leading causes of adult disability and they are estimated to cause more deaths than cancer in the elderly population by 2040. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential in treating neurological diseases. However, before cell therapy can be widely adopted in the long term, a number of challenges need to be addressed, including the fundamental research about cellular development of neural progenitor cells. To facilitate the fundamental research of neural progenitor cells, many methods have been developed to identify neural progenitor cells. Although great progress has been made, there is still lack of an effective method to achieve fast, label-free and noninvasive differentiation of neural progenitor cells and their lineages. As a fast, label-free and noninvasive technique, spontaneous Raman spectroscopy has been conducted to characterize many types of stem cells including neural stem cells. However, to our best knowledge, it has not been studied for the discrimination of neural progenitor cells from specific lineages. Here we report the differentiation of neural progenitor cell from their lineages including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons using spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, we also evaluate the influence of system parameters during spectral acquisition on the quality of measured Raman spectra and the accuracy of classification using the spectra, which yield a set of optimal system parameters facilitating future studies.

  6. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Motohashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NC cells are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+ cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells.

  7. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo. PMID:24449840

  8. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lithium promotes neural precursor cell proliferation: evidence for the involvement of the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qu Zhaoxia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lithium, a drug that has long been used to treat bipolar disorder and some other human pathogenesis, has recently been shown to stimulate neural precursor growth. However, the involved mechanism is not clear. Here, we show that lithium induces proliferation but not survival of neural precursor cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that the effect of lithium mainly involved activation of the transcription factor NF-AT and specific induction of a subset of proliferation-related genes. While NF-AT inactivation by specific inhibition of its upstream activator calcineurin antagonized the effect of lithium on the proliferation of neural precursor cells, specific inhibition of the NF-AT inhibitor GSK-3β, similar to lithium treatment, promoted neural precursor cell proliferation. One important function of lithium appeared to increase inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, leading to GSK-3β suppression and subsequent NF-AT activation. Moreover, lithium-induced proliferation of neural precursor cells was independent of its role in inositol depletion. These findings not only provide mechanistic insights into the clinical effects of lithium, but also suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy for bipolar disorder and other neural diseases by targeting the non-canonical GSK-3β-NF-AT signaling.

  10. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  11. High power fuel cell simulator based on artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Ramirez, Abraham U.; Munoz-Guerrero, Roberto [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, CINVESTAV-IPN. Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, D.F. CP 07360 (Mexico); Duron-Torres, S.M. [Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Campus Siglo XXI, Edif. 6 (Mexico); Ferraro, M.; Brunaccini, G.; Sergi, F.; Antonucci, V. [CNR-ITAE, Via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse 5-98126 Messina (Italy); Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has become a powerful modeling tool for predicting the performance of complex systems with no well-known variable relationships due to the inherent properties. A commercial Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack (5 kW) was modeled successfully using this tool, increasing the number of test into the 7 inputs - 2 outputs-dimensional spaces in the shortest time, acquiring only a small amount of experimental data. Some parameters could not be measured easily on the real system in experimental tests; however, by receiving the data from PEMFC, the ANN could be trained to learn the internal relationships that govern this system, and predict its behavior without any physical equations. Confident accuracy was achieved in this work making possible to import this tool to complex systems and applications. (author)

  12. Isolation and culture of porcine neural progenitor cells from embryos and pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hyttel, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and culture of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from pluripotent stem cells has facilitated in vitro mechanistic studies of diseases related to the nervous system, as well as discovery of new medicine. In addition, NPCs are envisioned to play a crucial role in future cell replacement...... therapy. The pig has become recognized as an important large animal model and establishment of in vitro-derived porcine NPCs would allow for preclinical safety testing by transplantation in a porcine biomedical model. In this chapter, a detailed method for isolation and in vitro culture of porcine NPCs...... from porcine embryos or induced pluripotent stem cells is presented. The neural induction is performed in coculture and the isolation of rosette structures is carried out manually to ensure a homogenous population of NPCs. Using this method, multipotent NPCs can be obtained in approximately 1 month...

  13. The DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 influence differentiation potential, proliferation, and senescence-associated signs in neural stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Amilcar [Linnaeus Center in Developmental Biology for Regenerative Medicine (DBRM), Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE 17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hermanson, Ola, E-mail: ola.hermanson@ki.se [Linnaeus Center in Developmental Biology for Regenerative Medicine (DBRM), Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE 17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 are required for neural stem cell state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No effect on cell viability by OGG1 or NEIL3 knockdown in neural stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OGG1 or NEIL3 RNA knockdown result in decreased proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased HP1{gamma} immunoreactivity after NEIL3 knockdown suggests premature senescence. -- Abstract: Embryonic neural stem cells (NSCs) exhibit self-renewal and multipotency as intrinsic characteristics that are key parameters for proper brain development. When cells are challenged by oxidative stress agents the resulting DNA lesions are repaired by DNA glycosylases through the base excision repair (BER) pathway as a means to maintain the fidelity of the genome, and thus, proper cellular characteristics. The functional roles for DNA glycosylases in NSCs have however remained largely unexplored. Here we demonstrate that RNA knockdown of the DNA glycosylases OGG1 and NEIL3 decreased NSC differentiation ability and resulted in decreased expression of both neuronal and astrocytic genes after mitogen withdrawal, as well as the stem cell marker Musashi-1. Furthermore, while cell survival remained unaffected, NEIL3 deficient cells displayed decreased cell proliferation rates along with an increase in HP1{gamma} immunoreactivity, a sign of premature senescence. Our results suggest that DNA glycosylases play multiple roles in governing essential neural stem cell characteristics.

  14. Alternative Routes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Revealed by Reprogramming of the Neural Lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Steven A.; Zachariah P.G. Olufs; Tran, Khoa A.; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Sridharan, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to induced pluripotent stem cells, the activation of pluripotency genes such as NANOG occurs after the mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Here we report that both adult stem cells (neural stem cells) and differentiated cells (astrocytes) of the neural lineage can activate NANOG in the absence of cadherin expression during reprogramming. Gene expression analysis revealed that only the NANOG+E-cadherin+ populations expres...

  15. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Harish eBabu; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Suresh eKannan; Annette E. Rünker; Theo ePalmer; Gerd eKempermann; Gerd eKempermann

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., Enriched monolayer precursor cell cultures from micro-dissected adult mouse dentate gyrus yield functional granule cell-like neurons, PLoS One 2007, 2:e388) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and pro...

  16. Safety of epicenter versus intact parenchyma as a transplantation site for human neural stem cells for spinal cord injury therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piltti, Katja M; Salazar, Desirée L; Uchida, Nobuko; Cummings, Brian J; Anderson, Aileen J

    2013-03-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation may have the potential to yield repair and recovery of function in central nervous system injury and disease, including spinal cord injury (SCI). Multiple pathological processes are initiated at the epicenter of a traumatic spinal cord injury; these are generally thought to make the epicenter a particularly hostile microenvironment. Conversely, the injury epicenter is an appealing potential site of therapeutic human central nervous system-derived neural stem cell (hCNS-SCns) transplantation because of both its surgical accessibility and the avoidance of spared spinal cord tissue. In this study, we compared hCNS-SCns transplantation into the SCI epicenter (EPI) versus intact rostral/caudal (R/C) parenchyma in contusion-injured athymic nude rats, and assessed the cell survival, differentiation, and migration. Regardless of transplantation site, hCNS-SCns survived and proliferated; however, the total number of hCNS-SCns quantified in the R/C transplant animals was twice that in the EPI animals, demonstrating increased overall engraftment. Migration and fate profile were unaffected by transplantation site. However, although transplantation site did not alter the proportion of human astrocytes, EPI transplantation shifted the localization of these cells and exhibited a correlation with calcitonin gene-related peptide fiber sprouting. Critically, no changes in mechanical allodynia or thermal hyperalgesia were observed. Taken together, these data suggest that the intact parenchyma may be a more favorable transplantation site than the injury epicenter in the subacute period post-SCI.

  17. Directed Migration of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Cells In An Applied Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongchao; Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central ne...

  18. Multifaceted role of prohibitin in cell survival and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ping; Ouyang, Ruo-Yun; Song, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Human eukaryotic prohibitin (prohibitin-1 and prohibitin-2) is a membrane protein with different cellular localizations. It is involved in multiple cellular functions, including energy metabolism, proliferation, apoptosis, and senescence. The subcellular localization of prohibitin may determine its functions. Membrane prohibitin regulate the cellular signaling of membrane transport, nuclear prohibitin control transcription activation and the cell cycle, and mitochondrial prohibitin complex stabilize the mitochondrial genome and modulate mitochondrial dynamics, mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial biogenesis, and the mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Moreover, prohibitin can translocates into the nucleus or the mitochondria under apoptotic signals and the subcellular shuttling of prohibitin is necessary for apoptosis process. Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death that is important for the maintenance of normal physiological functions. Consequently, any alteration in the content, post-transcriptional modification (i.e. phosphorylation) or the nuclear or mitochondrial translocation of prohibitin may influence cell fate. Understanding the mechanisms of the expression and regulation of prohibitin may be useful for future research. This review provides an overview of the multifaceted and essential roles played by prohibitin in the regulation of cell survival and apoptosis.

  19. Transplanted neurally modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote tissue protection and locomotor recovery in spinal cord injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexanian, Arshak R; Fehlings, Michael G; Zhang, Zhiying; Maiman, Dennis J

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy for repair and replacement of lost neural cells is a promising treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can differentiate into neural phenotypes and be isolated and expanded for autotransplantation with no risk of rejection. The authors examined whether transplanted neurally induced human MSCs (NI hMSCs), developed by a new procedure, can survive, differentiate, and promote tissue protection and functional recovery in injured spinal cord (ISC) rats. Neural induction was achieved by exposing cells simultaneously to inhibitors of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation, and pharmacological agents that increased cAMP levels. Three groups of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were injected immediately rostral and caudal to the midline lesion with phosphate-buffered saline, MSCs, or NI hMSCs, 1 week after a spinal cord impact injury at T-8. Functional outcome was measured using the Basso Beattie Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale and thermal sensitivity test on a weekly basis up to 12 weeks postinjury. Graft integration and anatomy of spinal cord was assessed by stereological, histochemical, and immunohistochemical techniques. The transplanted NI hMSCs survived, differentiated, and significantly improved locomotor recovery of ISC rats. Transplantation also reduced the volume of lesion cavity and white matter loss. This method of hMSC modification may provide an alternative source of autologous adult stem cells for CNS repair.

  20. 3D culture of murine neural stem cells on decellularized mouse brain sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Waele, Jorrit; Reekmans, Kristien; Daans, Jasmijn; Goossens, Herman; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSC) in diseased or injured brain tissue is widely studied as a potential treatment for various neurological pathologies. However, effective cell replacement therapy relies on the intrinsic capacity of cellular grafts to overcome hypoxic and/or immunological barriers after transplantation. In this context, it is hypothesized that structural support for grafted NSC will be of utmost importance. With this study, we present a novel decellularization protocol for 1.5 mm thick mouse brain sections, resulting in the generation of acellular three-dimensional (3D) brain sections. Next, the obtained 3D brain sections were seeded with murine NSC expressing both the eGFP and luciferase reporter proteins (NSC-eGFP/Luc). Using real-time bioluminescence imaging, the survival and growth of seeded NSC-eGFP/Luc cells was longitudinally monitored for 1-7 weeks in culture, indicating the ability of the acellular brain sections to support sustained ex vivo growth of NSC. Next, the organization of a 3D maze-like cellular structure was examined using confocal microscopy. Moreover, under mitogenic stimuli (EGF and hFGF-2), most cells in this 3D culture retained their NSC phenotype. Concluding, we here present a novel protocol for decellularization of mouse brain sections, which subsequently support long-term 3D culture of undifferentiated NSC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural stem cell biology in vertebrates and invertebrates: more alike than different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Andrea H; Livesey, Frederick J

    2011-05-26

    Many of the regulatory mechanisms controlling neural stem cell behavior are proving to be conserved between organisms as diverse as worms and man. Common principles are emerging with respect to the regulation of neural stem cell division and the specification of distinct stem and progenitor cell types. Great progress has been made in recent years in identifying the cellular mechanisms underpinning these processes, thanks in large part to the cross-fertilization of research on different model systems. We review here recent findings that highlight hitherto unappreciated similarities in the cell and molecular biology of neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation between invertebrates and vertebrates. As well as underscoring the possible conservation of stem cell mechanisms across phyla, these similarities are proving to be practically useful in studying neural stem cell biology in health and disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Lack of aspartoacylase activity disrupts survival and differentiation of neural progenitors and oligodendrocytes in a mouse model of Canavan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shalini; Biancotti, Juan Carlos; Matalon, Reuben; de Vellis, Jean

    2009-11-15

    Loss of the oligodendrocyte (OL)-specific enzyme aspartoacylase (ASPA) from gene mutation results in the sponginess and loss of white matter (WM) in Canavan disease (CD). This study addresses the fate of OLs during the pathophysiology of CD in an adult ASPA knockout (KO) mouse strain. Massive arrays of neural stem/progenitor cells, immunopositive for PSA-NCAM, nestin, vimentin, and NG2, were observed within the severely affected spongy WM of the KO mouse brain. In these mice, G1-->S cell cycle progression was confirmed by an increase in cdk2-kinase activity, a reduction in mitotic inhibitors p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1), and an increase in bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Highly acetylated nuclear histones H2B and H3 were detected in adult KO mouse WM, suggesting the existence of noncompact chromatin as seen during early development. Costaining for BrdU- or Ki67-positive cells with markers for neural progenitors confirmed a continuous generation of OL lineage cells in KO WM. We observed a severe reduction in 21.5- and 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein and PLP/DM20 proteolipid proteins combined with a decrease in myelinated fibers and a perinuclear retention of myelin protein staining, indicating impairment in protein trafficking. Death of OLs, neurons, and astrocytes was identified in every region of the KO brain. Immature OLs constituted the largest population of dying cells, particularly in WM. We also report an early expression of full-length ASPA mRNA in normal mouse brain at embryonic day 12.5, when OL progenitors first appear during development. These findings support involvement of ASPA in CNS development and function.

  3. Glioma migration: clues from the biology of neural progenitor cells and embryonic CNS cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, P B

    2001-06-01

    Neural stem cells have recently come to the forefront in neurobiology because of the possibilities for CNS repair by transplantation. Further understanding of the biology of these cells is critical for making their use in CNS repair possible. It is likely that these discoveries will also have spin-offs for neuro-oncology as primary brain tumors may arise from a CNS progenitor cell. An understanding of the normal migratory ability of these cells is also likely to have a very important impact on the knowledge of brain tumor invasion.

  4. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...archive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 Histone Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...RX213760,SRX213764 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...13762,SRX213759,SRX352995 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.10.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...,SRX213761,SRX213757 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...RX213760,SRX213764 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.50.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...52996,SRX213763,SRX213758 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...10563,SRX213763,SRX352996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...X968908 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...archive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...edbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  16. File list: InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...RX698183,SRX729701,SRX729711 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...692,SRX729710,SRX729684,SRX729689,SRX729699,SRX729704,SRX729694 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: His.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...707,SRX027494,SRX698181,SRX729681,SRX729682,SRX729698,SRX729709 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  1. File list: Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...,SRX213761,SRX213757 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.20.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  2. File list: His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Histone Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...710,SRX729692,SRX729688,SRX729689,SRX729698,SRX729709,SRX729699 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/His.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  3. File list: NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...edbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.10.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...13763,SRX213758,SRX352996 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  5. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...X968908 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  7. File list: Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 RNA polymerase Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...RX213764,SRX213760 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...RX729682,SRX729698,SRX729709 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  9. File list: NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 No description Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...edbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/NoD.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  10. File list: InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...RX698183,SRX729711,SRX729701 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.05.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  11. File list: ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...RX729698,SRX729709,SRX729699 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 TFs and others Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  13. File list: ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells hg19 All antigens Pluripotent stem cell iPS derived neural...hive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/ALL.PSC.50.AllAg.iPS_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells mm9 Unclassified Pluripotent stem cell mESC derived neural...,SRX213761,SRX213757 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.PSC.05.AllAg.mESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  15. File list: InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells hg19 Input control Pluripotent stem cell hESC derived neural...RX698183,SRX326376,SRX027491 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/InP.PSC.50.AllAg.hESC_derived_neural_cells.bed ...

  16. Enhanced Neural Cell Adhesion and Neurite Outgrowth on Graphene-Based Biomimetic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kang, Seok Hee; Hwang, Eun Young; Hwang, Yu-Shik; Lee, Mi Hee; Park, Jong-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Neural cell adhesion and neurite outgrowth were examined on graphene-based biomimetic substrates. The biocompatibility of carbon nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), that is, single-walled and multiwalled CNTs, against pheochromocytoma-derived PC-12 neural cells was also evaluated by quantifying metabolic activity (with WST-8 assay), intracellular oxidative stress (with ROS assay), and membrane integrity (with LDH assay). Graphene films were grown by using chemical vapor deposition and were then coated onto glass coverslips by using the scooping method. Graphene sheets were patterned on SiO2/Si substrates by using photolithography and were then covered with serum for a neural cell culture. Both types of CNTs induced significant dose-dependent decreases in the viability of PC-12 cells, whereas graphene exerted adverse effects on the neural cells just at over 62.5 ppm. This result implies that graphene and CNTs, even though they were the same carbon-based nanomaterials, show differential influences on neural cells. Furthermore, graphene-coated or graphene-patterned substrates were shown to substantially enhance the adhesion and neurite outgrowth of PC-12 cells. These results suggest that graphene-based substrates as biomimetic cues have good biocompatibility as well as a unique surface property that can enhance the neural cells, which would open up enormous opportunities in neural regeneration and nanomedicine. PMID:24592382

  17. Cadherin-6B undergoes macropinocytosis and clathrin-mediated endocytosis during cranial neural crest cell EMT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Rangarajan; Taneyhill, Lisa A

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is important for the formation of migratory neural crest cells during development and is co-opted in human diseases such as cancer metastasis. Chick premigratory cranial neural crest cells lose intercellular contacts, mediated in part by Cadherin-6B (Cad6B), migrate extensively, and later form a variety of adult derivatives. Importantly, modulation of Cad6B is crucial for proper neural crest cell EMT. Although Cad6B possesses a long half-life, it is rapidly lost from premigratory neural crest cell membranes, suggesting the existence of post-translational mechanisms during EMT. We have identified a motif in the Cad6B cytoplasmic tail that enhances Cad6B internalization and reduces the stability of Cad6B upon its mutation. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that Cad6B is removed from premigratory neural crest cells through cell surface internalization events that include clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Both of these processes are dependent upon the function of dynamin, and inhibition of Cad6B internalization abrogates neural crest cell EMT and migration. Collectively, our findings reveal the significance of post-translational events in controlling cadherins during neural crest cell EMT and migration. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Neural stem cells express melatonin receptors and neurotrophic factors: colocalization of the MT1 receptor with neuronal and glial markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan Catherine R

    2004-10-01

    a heterogeneous population of NSCs including both neural and glial progenitors, as observed under the cell culture conditions used in this study. These NSCs have an intrinsic ability to express neurotrophic factors, with an apparent suppression of GDNF expression after several days in culture. The detection of melatonin receptors in neural stem/progenitor cells suggests involvement of this pleiotropic hormone in mammalian neurodevelopment. Moreover, the ability of melatonin to induce GDNF expression in C17.2 cells supports a functional role for the MT1 receptor expressed in these NSCs. In view of the potency of GDNF in promoting the survival of dopaminergic neurons, these novel findings have implications for the utilization of melatonin in neuroprotective strategies, especially in Parkinson's disease.

  19. Human neural progenitors express functional lysophospholipid receptors that regulate cell growth and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callihan Phillip

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysophospholipids regulate the morphology and growth of neurons, neural cell lines, and neural progenitors. A stable human neural progenitor cell line is not currently available in which to study the role of lysophospholipids in human neural development. We recently established a stable, adherent human embryonic stem cell-derived neuroepithelial (hES-NEP cell line which recapitulates morphological and phenotypic features of neural progenitor cells isolated from fetal tissue. The goal of this study was to determine if hES-NEP cells express functional lysophospholipid receptors, and if activation of these receptors mediates cellular responses critical for neural development. Results Our results demonstrate that Lysophosphatidic Acid (LPA and Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P receptors are functionally expressed in hES-NEP cells and are coupled to multiple cellular signaling pathways. We have shown that transcript levels for S1P1 receptor increased significantly in the transition from embryonic stem cell to hES-NEP. hES-NEP cells express LPA and S1P receptors coupled to Gi/o G-proteins that inhibit adenylyl cyclase and to Gq-like phospholipase C activity. LPA and S1P also induce p44/42 ERK MAP kinase phosphorylation in these cells and stimulate cell proliferation via Gi/o coupled receptors in an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR- and ERK-dependent pathway. In contrast, LPA and S1P stimulate transient cell rounding and aggregation that is independent of EGFR and ERK, but dependent on the Rho effector p160 ROCK. Conclusion Thus, lysophospholipids regulate neural progenitor growth and morphology through distinct mechanisms. These findings establish human ES cell-derived NEP cells as a model system for studying the role of lysophospholipids in neural progenitors.

  20. Derivation of corneal endothelial cell-like cells from rat neural crest cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengqun Ju

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing rat neural crest cells (NCC to differentiate to functional corneal endothelial cell (CEC-like cells in vitro. Rat NCC were induced with adult CEC-derived conditioned medium. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real time RT-PCR assay were used to detect expression of the corneal endothelium differentiation marker N-cadherin and transcription factors FoxC1 and Pitx2. CFDA SE-labeled CEC-like cells were transplanted to the corneal endothelium of a rat corneal endothelium deficiency model, and an eye-down position was maintained for 24 hours to allow cell attachment. The animals were observed for as long as 2 months after surgery and underwent clinical and histological examination. Spindle-like NCC turned to polygonal CEC-like after induction and expressed N-cadherin, FoxC1, Pitx2, zonula occludens-1 and sodium-potassium pump Na(+/K(+ ATPase. The corneas of the experimental group were much clearer than those of the control group and the mean corneal thickness in the experimental group was significantly less than in the control group7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery. Confocal microscopy through focusing and histological analysis confirmed that green fluorescence-positive CEC-like cells formed a monolayer covering the Descemet's membrane in the experimental group. In conclusion, CEC-like cells derived from NCCs displayed characters of native CEC, and the induction protocol provides guidance for future human CEC induction from NCC.

  1. The effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferensztajn-Rochowiak, Ewa; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2016-04-01

    Lithium has been used in modern psychiatry for more than 65 years, constituting a cornerstone for the long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. A number of biological properties of lithium have been discovered, including its hematological, antiviral and neuroprotective effects. In this article, a systematic review of the effect of lithium on hematopoietic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells is presented. The beneficial effects of lithium on the level of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and growth factors have been reported since 1970s. Lithium improves homing of stem cells, the ability to form colonies and HSC self-renewal. Lithium also exerts a favorable influence on the proliferation and maintenance of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Studies on the effect of lithium on neurogenesis have indicated an increased proliferation of progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and enhanced mitotic activity of Schwann cells. This may be connected with the neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects of lithium, reflected in an improvement in synaptic plasticity promoting cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis. In clinical studies, lithium treatment increases cerebral gray matter, mainly in the frontal lobes, hippocampus and amygdala. Recent findings also suggest that lithium may reduce the risk of dementia and exert a beneficial effect in neurodegenerative diseases. The most important mediators and signaling pathways of lithium action are the glycogen synthase kinase-3 and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Recently, to study of bipolar disorder pathogenesis and the mechanism of lithium action, the induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) obtained from bipolar patients have been used. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors influencing the differentiation of dopaminergic traits in transplanted neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Donaldson, Angela E; Jiang, Yubao; Iacovitti, Lorraine

    2003-10-01

    1. Our previous studies demonstrated that when neural stem cells (NSCs) of the C17.2 clonal line are transplanted into the intact or 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesioned rat striatum, in most, but not all grafts, cells spontaneously express the dopamine (DA) biosynthetic enzymes, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (Yang, M., Stull, N. D., Snyder. E. Y., Berk, M. A., and Iacovitti, L. (2002). Exp. Neurol.). 2. These results suggested that there were certain conditions which were more conducive to the development of DA traits in NSCs and possibly other neurotransmitter phenotypes. 3. In the present study, we modified a number of variables in vitro (i.e. passage number, confluence) and/or in vivo (degree, type, and site of injury) before assessing the survival, migration. and differentiation of engrafted NSCs. 4. We found that low confluence cultures were comprised exclusively of flattened polygonal cells, which when transplanted, migrated widely in the brain but did not express TH. 5. In contrast, high confluence cultures contained both polygonal cells and an overlying bed of fusiform cells. 6. When these NSCs were maintained for 12-20 passages and then transplanted, virtually all engrafted cells in 65% of the grafts expressed TH but not markers of other neurotransmitter systems. 7. Importantly, all TH+ grafts were accompanied by significant physical damage to the brain while TH- grafts were not, suggesting that local injury-related factors were also important. 8. Of no apparent influence on TH expression, regardless of how cells were grown prior to implantation, was the site of transplantation (cortex or striatum) or the degree of chemical lesion (intact, partial or full). 9. We conclude that transplanted NSCs can express traits specifically associated with DA neurons but only when cells are grown under certain conditions in vitro and then transplanted in proximity to injury-induced factors present in vivo.

  3. Biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule: characterization of polypeptide C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, O; Albrechtsen, M; Dahlin, J

    1985-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was studied in primary cultures of rat cerebral glial cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and skeletal muscle cells. The three cell types produced different N-CAM polypeptide patterns. Glial cells synthesized a 135,000 Mr polypeptide B...

  4. Human fetal striatum-derived neural stem (NS) cells differentiate to mature neurons in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monni, Emanuela; Cusulin, Carlo; Cavallaro, Maurizio; Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2014-01-01

    Clonogenic neural stem (NS) cell lines grown in adherent cultures have previously been established from embryonic stem cells and fetal and adult CNS in rodents and from human fetal brain and spinal cord. Here we describe the isolation of a new cell line from human fetal striatum (hNS cells). These cells showed properties of NS cells in vitro such as monolayer growth, high proliferation rate and expression of radial glia markers. The hNS cells expressed an early neuronal marker while being in the proliferative state. Under appropriate conditions, the hNS cells were efficiently differentiated to neurons, and after 4 weeks about 50% of the cells were βIII tubulin positive. They also expressed the mature neuronal marker NeuN and markers of neuronal subtypes, GABA, calbindin, and DARPP32. After intrastriatal implantation into newborn rats, the hNS cells survived and many of them migrated outside the transplant core into the surrounding tissue. A high percentage of cells in the grafts expressed the neuroblast marker DCX, indicating their neurogenic potential, and some of the cells differentiated to NeuN+ mature neurons. The human fetal striatum-derived NS cell line described here should be a useful tool for studies on cell replacement strategies in models of the striatal neuronal loss occurring in Huntington's disease and stroke.

  5. Patulin triggers NRF2-mediated survival mechanisms in kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Y; Phulukdaree, A; Nagiah, S; Chuturgoon, A A

    2015-06-01

    Patulin (PAT), a mycotoxin contaminant of apples and apple products, has been implicated in nephrotoxicity. PAT depletes glutathione (GSH) and elevates reactive oxygen species (ROS). The antioxidant (AO) response is activated by Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor (NRF2) and enhanced by Silent information regulator 3 (SIRT3). The effects of PAT on these molecules have yet to be examined. We investigated the effects of PAT on AO response survival pathways in human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293). PAT cytotoxicity on HEK293 cells was evaluated (MTT assay; 24 h; [0-100 μM]) to determine an IC50. GSH levels were measured using luminometry. Intracellular ROS was evaluated by flow cytometry. Protein expression of Keap1, NRF2, SIRT3 and PGC-1α was quantified by western blotting and gene expression of SOD2, CAT and GPx was evaluated by qPCR. PAT caused a dose dependent decrease in HEK293 cell viability and a significant increase in levels of intracellular ROS (p = 0.0006). A significant increase in protein expression (p = 0.029) was observed. PAT increased gene expression of SOD2 and CAT (p = 0.0043), however, gene expression of GPx was significantly reduced (p = 0.0043). These results show the up-regulation of NRF2 mediated AO mechanisms in response to PAT toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Highly Efficient Neural Conversion of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells in Adherent and Animal-Free Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Diez Lloret, Andrea; Stojkovic, Petra; Rodríguez-Martínez, Daniel; Perez Arago, Maria Amparo; Rodriguez-Jimenez, Francisco Javier; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; López-Barneo, José; Sykova, Eva; Jendelova, Pavla; Kostic, Jelena; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Erceg, Slaven

    2017-04-01

    Neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can produce a valuable and robust source of human neural cell subtypes, holding great promise for the study of neurogenesis and development, and for treating neurological diseases. However, current hESCs and hiPSCs neural differentiation protocols require either animal factors or embryoid body formation, which decreases efficiency and yield, and strongly limits medical applications. Here we develop a simple, animal-free protocol for neural conversion of both hESCs and hiPSCs in adherent culture conditions. A simple medium formula including insulin induces the direct conversion of >98% of hESCs and hiPSCs into expandable, transplantable, and functional neural progenitors with neural rosette characteristics. Further differentiation of neural progenitors into dopaminergic and spinal motoneurons as well as astrocytes and oligodendrocytes indicates that these neural progenitors retain responsiveness to instructive cues revealing the robust applicability of the protocol in the treatment of different neurodegenerative diseases. The fact that this protocol includes animal-free medium and human extracellular matrix components avoiding embryoid bodies makes this protocol suitable for the use in clinic. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:1217-1226. © 2017 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  7. Skin-Derived Precursor Cells Promote Angiogenesis and Stimulate Proliferation of Endogenous Neural Stem Cells after Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duo Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common diseases that caused high mortality and has become burden to the health care systems. Stem cell transplantation has shown therapeutic effect in ameliorating ischemic damage after cerebral artery occlusion mainly due to their neurogenesis, immune regulation, or effects on the plasticity, proliferation, and survival of host cells. Recent studies demonstrated that skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs could promote central nervous system regeneration in spinal cord injury model or the neonatal peripheral neuron. Here, we investigated the therapeutic potential of SKPs in a rat model of cerebral ischemia. SKPs were isolated, expanded, and transplanted into rat cortex and striatum after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Our results revealed that SKPs transplantation could improve the behavioral measures of neurological deficit. Moreover, immunohistology confirmed that SKPs could secrete basic FGF and VEGF in the ischemic region and further markedly increase the proliferation of endogenous nestin+ and βIII-tubulin+ neural stem cells. Furthermore, increased angiogenesis induced by SKPs was observed by vWF and α-SMA staining. These data suggest that SKPs induced endogenous neurogenesis and angiogenesis and protected neuron from hypoxic-ischemic environment. In conclusion, SKPs transplantation may be a promising approach in treatment of stroke.

  8. Predicting survival of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in dry fermented sausage using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, A; Jayas, D S; Holley, R A

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Food Inspection Agency required the meat industry to ensure Escherichia coli O157:H7 does not survive (experiences > or = 5 log CFU/g reduction) in dry fermented sausage (salami) during processing after a series of foodborne illness outbreaks resulting from this pathogenic bacterium occurred. The industry is in need of an effective technique like predictive modeling for estimating bacterial viability, because traditional microbiological enumeration is a time-consuming and laborious method. The accuracy and speed of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for this purpose is an attractive alternative (developed from predictive microbiology), especially for on-line processing in industry. Data from a study of interactive effects of different levels of pH, water activity, and the concentrations of allyl isothiocyanate at various times during sausage manufacture in reducing numbers of E. coli O157:H7 were collected. Data were used to develop predictive models using a general regression neural network (GRNN), a form of ANN, and a statistical linear polynomial regression technique. Both models were compared for their predictive error, using various statistical indices. GRNN predictions for training and test data sets had less serious errors when compared with the statistical model predictions. GRNN models were better and slightly better for training and test sets, respectively, than was the statistical model. Also, GRNN accurately predicted the level of allyl isothiocyanate required, ensuring a 5-log reduction, when an appropriate production set was created by interpolation. Because they are simple to generate, fast, and accurate, ANN models may be of value for industrial use in dry fermented sausage manufacture to reduce the hazard associated with E. coli O157:H7 in fresh beef and permit production of consistently safe products from this raw material.

  9. The novel steroidal alkaloids dendrogenin A and B promote proliferation of adult neural stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Shaden A.M., E-mail: shaden.khalifa@ki.se [Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Medina, Philippe de [Affichem, Toulouse (France); INSERM UMR 1037, Team “Sterol Metabolism and Therapeutic Innovations in Oncology”, Cancer Research Center of Toulouse, F-31052 Toulouse (France); Erlandsson, Anna [Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); El-Seedi, Hesham R. [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine [INSERM UMR 1037, Team “Sterol Metabolism and Therapeutic Innovations in Oncology”, Cancer Research Center of Toulouse, F-31052 Toulouse (France); University of Toulouse III, Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France); Poirot, Marc, E-mail: marc.poirot@inserm.fr [INSERM UMR 1037, Team “Sterol Metabolism and Therapeutic Innovations in Oncology”, Cancer Research Center of Toulouse, F-31052 Toulouse (France); University of Toulouse III, Toulouse (France); Institut Claudius Regaud, Toulouse (France)

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Dendrogenin A and B are new aminoalkyl oxysterols. • Dendrogenins stimulated neural stem cells proliferation. • Dendrogenins induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres. • Dendrogenins provide new therapeutic options for neurodegenerative disorders. - Abstract: Dendrogenin A (DDA) and dendrogenin B (DDB) are new aminoalkyl oxysterols which display re-differentiation of tumor cells of neuronal origin at nanomolar concentrations. We analyzed the influence of dendrogenins on adult mice neural stem cell proliferation, sphere formation and differentiation. DDA and DDB were found to have potent proliferative effects in neural stem cells. Additionally, they induce neuronal outgrowth from neurospheres during in vitro cultivation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel role for dendrogenins A and B in neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation which further increases their likely importance to compensate for neuronal cell loss in the brain.

  10. Claudins are essential for cell shape changes and convergent extension movements during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumholtz, Amanda I; Simard, Annie; Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Oosenbrug, Marcus; Collins, Michelle M; Piontek, Anna; Krause, Gerd; Piontek, Jörg; Greene, Nicholas D E; Ryan, Aimee K

    2017-08-01

    During neural tube closure, regulated changes at the level of individual cells are translated into large-scale morphogenetic movements to facilitate conversion of the flat neural plate into a closed tube. Throughout this process, the integrity of the neural epithelium is maintained via cell interactions through intercellular junctions, including apical tight junctions. Members of the claudin family of tight junction proteins regulate paracellular permeability, apical-basal cell polarity and link the tight junction to the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we show that claudins are essential for neural tube closure: the simultaneous removal of Cldn3, -4 and -8 from tight junctions caused folate-resistant open neural tube defects. Their removal did not affect cell type differentiation, neural ectoderm patterning nor overall apical-basal polarity. However, apical accumulation of Vangl2, RhoA, and pMLC were reduced, and Par3 and Cdc42 were mislocalized at the apical cell surface. Our data showed that claudins act upstream of planar cell polarity and RhoA/ROCK signaling to regulate cell intercalation and actin-myosin contraction, which are required for convergent extension and apical constriction during neural tube closure, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-E-T-131: Artificial Neural Networks Applied to Overall Survival Prediction for Patients with Periampullary Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y; Yu, J; Yeung, V; Palmer, J; Yu, Y; Lu, B; Babinsky, L; Burkhart, R; Leiby, B; Siow, V; Lavu, H; Rosato, E; Winter, J; Lewis, N; Sama, A; Mitchell, E; Anne, P; Hurwitz, M; Yeo, C; Bar-Ad, V [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); and others

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Artificial neural networks (ANN) can be used to discover complex relations within datasets to help with medical decision making. This study aimed to develop an ANN method to predict two-year overall survival of patients with peri-ampullary cancer (PAC) following resection. Methods: Data were collected from 334 patients with PAC following resection treated in our institutional pancreatic tumor registry between 2006 and 2012. The dataset contains 14 variables including age, gender, T-stage, tumor differentiation, positive-lymph-node ratio, positive resection margins, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and tumor histology.After censoring for two-year survival analysis, 309 patients were left, of which 44 patients (∼15%) were randomly selected to form testing set. The remaining 265 cases were randomly divided into training set (211 cases, ∼80% of 265) and validation set (54 cases, ∼20% of 265) for 20 times to build 20 ANN models. Each ANN has one hidden layer with 5 units. The 20 ANN models were ranked according to their concordance index (c-index) of prediction on validation sets. To further improve prediction, the top 10% of ANN models were selected, and their outputs averaged for prediction on testing set. Results: By random division, 44 cases in testing set and the remaining 265 cases have approximately equal two-year survival rates, 36.4% and 35.5% respectively. The 20 ANN models, which were trained and validated on the 265 cases, yielded mean c-indexes as 0.59 and 0.63 on validation sets and the testing set, respectively. C-index was 0.72 when the two best ANN models (top 10%) were used in prediction on testing set. The c-index of Cox regression analysis was 0.63. Conclusion: ANN improved survival prediction for patients with PAC. More patient data and further analysis of additional factors may be needed for a more robust model, which will help guide physicians in providing optimal post-operative care. This project was supported by PA CURE Grant.

  12. Neurogenic and non neurogenic functions of endogenous neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica eButti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis is a lifelong process that occurs in two main neurogenic niches of the brain, namely in the subventricular zone (SVZ of the lateral ventricles and in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG in the hippocampus. In the 1960s, studies on adult neurogenesis have been hampered by the lack of established phenotypic markers. The precise tracing of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs was therefore, not properly feasible. After the (partial identification of those markers, it was the lack of specific tools that hindered a proper experimental elimination and tracing of those cells to demonstrate their terminal fate and commitment. Nowadays, irradia-tion, cytotoxic drugs as well as genetic tracing/ablation procedures have moved the field forward and increased our understanding of neurogenesis processes in both physiological and pathological conditions. Newly formed NPC progeny from the SVZ can replace granule cells in the olfactory bulbs of rodents, thus contributing to orchestrate sophisticated odour behaviour. SGZ-derived new granule cells, instead, integrate within the DG where they play an essential role in memory functions. Furthermore, converging evidence claim that endogenous NPCs not only exert neurogenic functions, but might also have non-neurogenic homeostatic functions by the release of different types of neuroprotective molecules. Remarkably, these non-neurogenic homeostatic functions seem to be necessary, both in healthy and diseased conditions, for example for preventing or limiting tissue damage. In this review, we will discuss the neurogenic and the non-neurogenic functions of adult NPCs both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  13. Neural crest cell-derived VEGF promotes embryonic jaw extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiszniak, Sophie; Mackenzie, Francesca E.; Anderson, Peter; Kabbara, Samuela; Ruhrberg, Christiana; Schwarz, Quenten

    2015-01-01

    Jaw morphogenesis depends on the growth of Meckel’s cartilage during embryogenesis. However, the cell types and signals that promote chondrocyte proliferation for Meckel’s cartilage growth are poorly defined. Here we show that neural crest cells (NCCs) and their derivatives provide an essential source of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to enhance jaw vascularization and stabilize the major mandibular artery. We further show in two independent mouse models that blood vessels promote Meckel’s cartilage extension. Coculture experiments of arterial tissue with NCCs or chondrocytes demonstrated that NCC-derived VEGF promotes blood vessel growth and that blood vessels secrete factors to instruct chondrocyte proliferation. Computed tomography and X-ray scans of patients with hemifacial microsomia also showed that jaw hypoplasia correlates with mandibular artery dysgenesis. We conclude that cranial NCCs and their derivatives provide an essential source of VEGF to support blood vessel growth in the developing jaw, which in turn is essential for normal chondrocyte proliferation, and therefore jaw extension. PMID:25922531

  14. Twist1 Controls a Cell-Specification Switch Governing Cell Fate Decisions within the Cardiac Neural Crest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincentz, Joshua W.; Firulli, Beth A.; Lin, Andrea; Spicer, Douglas B.; Howard, Marthe J.; Firulli, Anthony B.

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent progenitor cells that can generate both ectodermal cell types, such as neurons, and mesodermal cell types, such as smooth muscle. The mechanisms controlling this cell fate choice are not known. The basic Helix-loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factor Twist1 is expressed throughout the migratory and post-migratory cardiac neural crest. Twist1 ablation or mutation of the Twist-box causes differentiation of ectopic neuronal cells, which molecularly resemble sympathetic ganglia, in the cardiac outflow tract. Twist1 interacts with the pro-neural factor Sox10 via its Twist-box domain and binds to the Phox2b promoter to repress transcriptional activity. Mesodermal cardiac neural crest trans-differentiation into ectodermal sympathetic ganglia-like neurons is dependent upon Phox2b function. Ectopic Twist1 expression in neural crest precursors disrupts sympathetic neurogenesis. These data demonstrate that Twist1 functions in post-migratory neural crest cells to repress pro-neural factors and thereby regulate cell fate determination between ectodermal and mesodermal lineages. PMID:23555309

  15. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    and the lysis of relevant in vivo targets. However, the CTLA-4 blockage dependent expansion of CTLs also affect DC survival during booster DC injections and our data suggest that during a booster DC vaccine, the largest increase in CTL levels is already obtained during the first vaccination.......Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...... are emerging that combine vaccination with CTL expanding strategies, such as e.g. blockade of CTLA-4 signalling. On the other hand, the lifespan and in vivo survival of therapeutic DCs have only been addressed in a few studies, although this is of importance for the kinetics of CTL induction during vaccination...

  16. An avian model for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Dotan, Sharon; Pinkas, Adi; Slotkin, Theodore A.; Yanai, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A fast and simple model which uses lower animals on the evolutionary scale is beneficial for developing procedures for the reversal of neurobehavioral teratogenicity with neural stem cells. Here, we established a procedure for the derivation of chick neural stem cells, establishing embryonic day (E) 10 as optimal for progression to neuronal phenotypes. Cells were obtained from the embryonic cerebral hemispheres and incubated for 5–7 days in enriched medium containing epidermal growth factor (...

  17. A Protocol for Isolation and Enriched Monolayer Cultivation of Neural Precursor Cells from Mouse Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, Harish; Claasen, Jan-Hendrik; Kannan, Suresh; Rünker, Annette E.; Palmer, Theo; Kempermann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., 2007) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and propagate them as adherent monolayer cultures. The strategy is based on the use of Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich precursor cells from ...

  18. Stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous tooth exhibit stromal-derived inducing activity and lead to generation of neural crest cells from human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Tanhaei, Somayyeh; Rabiei, Farzaneh; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Masoudi, Najmeh Sadat; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein; Baharvand, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure of early vertebrate embryos that generates neural crest cells (NCCs). These cells can migrate throughout the body and produce a diverse array of mature tissue types. Due to the ethical and technical problems surrounding the isolation of these early human embryo cells, researchers have focused on in vitro studies to produce NCCs and increase their knowledge of neural crest development. In this experimental study, we cultured human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) on stromal stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) for a two-week period. We used different approaches to characterize these differentiated cells as neural precursor cells (NPCs) and NCCs. In the first co-culture week, hESCs appeared as crater-like structures with marginal rosettes. NPCs derived from these structures expressed the early neural crest marker p75 in addition to numerous other genes associated with neural crest induction such as SNAIL, SLUG, PTX3 and SOX9. Flow cytometry analysis showed 70% of the cells were AP2/P75 positive. Moreover, the cells were able to self-renew, sustain multipotent differentiation potential, and readily form neurospheres in suspension culture. SHED, as an adult stem cell with a neural crest origin, has stromal-derived inducing activity (SDIA) and can be used as an NCC inducer from hESCs. These cells provide an invaluable resource to study neural crest differentiation in both normal and disordered human neural crest development.

  19. Slit/Robo1 signaling regulates neural tube development by balancing neuroepithelial cell proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guang; Li, Yan; Wang, Xiao-yu [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Han, Zhe [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Chuai, Manli [College of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH (United Kingdom); Wang, Li-jing [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Ho Lee, Kenneth Ka [Stem Cell and Regeneration Thematic Research Programme, School of Biomedical Sciences, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin (Hong Kong); Geng, Jian-guo, E-mail: jgeng@umich.edu [Institute of Vascular Biological Sciences, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou 510224 (China); Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Yang, Xuesong, E-mail: yang_xuesong@126.com [Key Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine of The Ministry of Education, Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2013-05-01

    Formation of the neural tube is the morphological hallmark for development of the embryonic central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, neural tube development is a crucial step in the neurulation process. Slit/Robo signaling was initially identified as a chemo-repellent that regulated axon growth cone elongation, but its role in controlling neural tube development is currently unknown. To address this issue, we investigated Slit/Robo1 signaling in the development of chick neCollege of Life Sciences Biocentre, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UKural tube and transgenic mice over-expressing Slit2. We disrupted Slit/Robo1 signaling by injecting R5 monoclonal antibodies into HH10 neural tubes to block the Robo1 receptor. This inhibited the normal development of the ventral body curvature and caused the spinal cord to curl up into a S-shape. Next, Slit/Robo1 signaling on one half-side of the chick embryo neural tube was disturbed by electroporation in ovo. We found that the morphology of the neural tube was dramatically abnormal after we interfered with Slit/Robo1 signaling. Furthermore, we established that silencing Robo1 inhibited cell proliferation while over-expressing Robo1 enhanced cell proliferation. We also investigated the effects of altering Slit/Robo1 expression on Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) and Pax7 expression in the developing neural tube. We demonstrated that over-expressing Robo1 down-regulated Shh expression in the ventral neural tube and resulted in the production of fewer HNK-1{sup +} migrating neural crest cells (NCCs). In addition, Robo1 over-expression enhanced Pax7 expression in the dorsal neural tube and increased the number of Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs. Conversely, silencing Robo1 expression resulted in an enhanced Shh expression and more HNK-1{sup +} migrating NCCs but reduced Pax7 expression and fewer Slug{sup +} pre-migratory NCCs were observed. In conclusion, we propose that Slit/Robo1 signaling is involved in regulating neural tube

  20. Neural crest-derived cells with stem cell features can be traced back to multiple lineages in the adult skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Wong (Christine); S. Paratore (Sabrina); M.T. Dours-Zimmermann (María); T. Rochat (Thierry); T. Pietri (Thomas); U. Suter (Ueli); D. Zimmermann (Dieter); S. Dufour (Sylvie); J.P. Thiery (Joachim); D.N. Meijer (Dies); C. Beermann (Christopher); Y. Barrandon (Yann); L. Sommer (Lukas)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGiven their accessibility, multipotent skin-derived cells might be useful for future cell replacement therapies. We describe the isolation of multipotent stem cell-like cells from the adult trunk skin of mice and humans that express the neural crest stem cell markers p75 and Sox10 and

  1. Combination of edaravone and neural stem cell transplantation repairs injured spinal cord in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y Y; Peng, C G; Ye, X B

    2015-12-29

    This study sought to observe the effect of the combination of edaravone and neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation on the repair of complete spinal cord transection in rats. Eighty adult female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used to establish the injury model of complete spinal cord transection at T9. Animals were divided randomly into four groups (N = 20 each): control, edaravone, transplantation, and edaravone + transplantation. The recovery of spinal function was evaluated with the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) rating scale on days 1, 3, and 7 each week after the surgery. After 8 weeks, the BBB scores of the control, edaravone, transplantation, and combination groups were 4.21 ± 0.11, 8.46 ± 0.1, 8.54 ± 0.13, and 11.21 ± 0.14, respectively. At 8 weeks after surgery, the spinal cord was collected; the survival and transportation of transplanted cells were observed with PKH-26 labeling, and the regeneration and distribution of spinal nerve fibers with fluorescent-gold (FG) retrograde tracing. Five rats died due to the injury. PKH-26-labeled NSCs had migrated into the spinal cord. A few intact nerve fibers and pyramidal neurons passed the injured area in the transplantation and combination groups. The numbers of PKH-26-labeled cells and FG-labeled nerve fibers were in the order: combination group > edaravone group and transplantation group > control group (P transplantation can improve the effectiveness of spinal cord injury repair in rats.

  2. Neural stem cells sustain natural killer cells that dictate recovery from brain inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang; Sanai, Nader; Jin, Wei-Na; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Recovery from organ-specific autoimmune diseases largely relies on the mobilization of endogenous repair mechanisms and local factors that control them. Natural killer (NK) cells are swiftly mobilized to organs targeted by autoimmunity and typically undergo numerical contraction when inflammation wanes. We report the unexpected finding that NK cells are retained in the brain subventricular zone (SVZ) during the chronic phase of multiple sclerosis in humans and its animal model in mice. These NK cells were found preferentially in close proximity to SVZ neural stem cells (NSCs) that produce interleukin-15 and sustain functionally competent NK cells. Moreover, NK cells limited the reparative capacity of NSCs following brain inflammation. These findings reveal that reciprocal interactions between NSCs and NK cells regulate neurorepair. PMID:26752157

  3. Rescue of Brain Function Using Tunneling Nanotubes Between Neural Stem Cells and Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Yu, Xiaowen; Xie, Chong; Tan, Zijian; Tian, Qi; Zhu, Desheng; Liu, Mingyuan; Guan, Yangtai

    2016-05-01

    Evidence indicates that neural stem cells (NSCs) can ameliorate cerebral ischemia in animal models. In this study, we investigated the mechanism underlying one of the neuroprotective effects of NSCs: tunneling nanotube (TNT) formation. We addressed whether the control of cell-to-cell communication processes between NSCs and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) and, particularly, the control of TNT formation could influence the rescue function of stem cells. In an attempt to mimic the cellular microenvironment in vitro, a co-culture system consisting of terminally differentiated BMECs from mice in a distressed state and NSCs was constructed. Additionally, engraftment experiments with infarcted mouse brains revealed that control of TNT formation influenced the effects of stem cell transplantation in vivo. In conclusion, our findings provide the first evidence that TNTs exist between NSCs and BMECs and that regulation of TNT formation alters cell function.

  4. Triple Effect of Mimetic Peptides Interfering with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Homophilic Cis Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, S. Z.; Kolkova, Kateryna; Rudenko, Olga

    2005-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is pivotal in neural development, regeneration, and learning. Here we characterize two peptides, termed P1-B and P2, derived from the homophilic binding sites in the first two N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of NCAM, with regard to their effects...

  5. Chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in cultured human neural progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruv Sareen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stem cell expansion and differentiation is the foundation of emerging cell therapy technologies. The potential applications of human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs are wide ranging, but a normal cytogenetic profile is important to avoid the risk of tumor formation in clinical trials. FDA approved clinical trials are being planned and conducted for hNPC transplantation into the brain or spinal cord for various neurodegenerative disorders. Although human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are known to show recurrent chromosomal abnormalities involving 12 and 17, no studies have revealed chromosomal abnormalities in cultured hNPCs. Therefore, we investigated frequently occurring chromosomal abnormalities in 21 independent fetal-derived hNPC lines and the possible mechanisms triggering such aberrations. METHODS AND FINDINGS: While most hNPC lines were karyotypically normal, G-band karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH analyses revealed the emergence of trisomy 7 (hNPC(+7 and trisomy 19 (hNPC(+19, in 24% and 5% of the lines, respectively. Once detected, subsequent passaging revealed emerging dominance of trisomy hNPCs. DNA microarray and immunoblotting analyses demonstrate epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 cells. We observed greater levels of telomerase (hTERT, increased proliferation (Ki67, survival (TUNEL, and neurogenesis (beta(III-tubulin in hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19, using respective immunocytochemical markers. However, the trisomy lines underwent replicative senescence after 50-60 population doublings and never showed neoplastic changes. Although hNPC(+7 and hNPC(+19 survived better after xenotransplantation into the rat striatum, they did not form malignant tumors. Finally, EGF deprivation triggered a selection of trisomy 7 cells in a diploid hNPC line. CONCLUSIONS: We report that hNPCs are susceptible to accumulation of chromosome 7 and 19 trisomy in long-term cell culture. These

  6. Enrichment and Schwann Cell Differentiation of Neural Crest-derived Dental Pulp Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zer, Heba; Apel, Christian; Heiland, Max; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Jung, Ole; Kroeger, Nadja; Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Smeets, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    As already described in previous studies, neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) can be found in adult human dental pulp. The present study investigated the methodology for enrichment and differentiation-induction of the above mentioned cells. Dental pulp was extracted from human wisdom teeth of four patients and subsequently cultured as explants on fibronectin-coated plates in neurobasal medium supplemented with B27, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, l-glutamine and neuregulin-β1. The cells were then characterized by immunofluorescence, while their differentiation-potential was tested by the attempt to induce cells into different lineages, i.e. osteogenic, melanocytic and glial. The enriched cell population expressed nestin, CD271 and SOX10, which are well-known markers for NCSCs. Consequently, the cells were successfully induced to differentiate into osteoblasts, melanocytes and Schwann cells, expressing the corresponding differentiation markers. Human adult dental pulp contains a population of stem cells with neural crest ontogeny, which can thus be recruited for multiple regenerative therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. Differentiation of neurons from neural precursors generated in floating spheres from embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forrester Jeff

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural differentiation of embryonic stem (ES cells is usually achieved by induction of ectoderm in embryoid bodies followed by the enrichment of neuronal progenitors using a variety of factors. Obtaining reproducible percentages of neural cells is difficult and the methods are time consuming. Results Neural progenitors were produced from murine ES cells by a combination of nonadherent conditions and serum starvation. Conversion to neural progenitors was accompanied by downregulation of Oct4 and NANOG and increased expression of nestin. ES cells containing a GFP gene under the control of the Sox1 regulatory regions became fluorescent upon differentiation to neural progenitors, and ES cells with a tau-GFP fusion protein became fluorescent upon further differentiation to neurons. Neurons produced from these cells upregulated mature neuronal markers, or differentiated to glial and oligodendrocyte fates. The neurons gave rise to action potentials that could be recorded after application of fixed currents. Conclusion Neural progenitors were produced from murine ES cells by a novel method that induced neuroectoderm cells by a combination of nonadherent conditions and serum starvation, in contrast to the embryoid body method in which neuroectoderm cells must be selected after formation of all three germ layers.

  8. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic......-culture, large numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive, catecholaminergic cells could be found underneath individual striatal slices. Cell counting revealed that up to 25.3% (average 16.1%) of the total number of cells in these areas were TH-positive, contrasting a few TH-positive cells (

  9. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Xing Zuo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD.

  10. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-11-05

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD.

  11. Intranasal Oncolytic Virotherapy with CXCR4-Enhanced Stem Cells Extends Survival in Mouse Model of Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Mahua; Yu, Dou; Kanojia, Deepak; Li, Gina; Sukhanova, Madina; Spencer, Drew A; Pituch, Katatzyna C; Zhang, Lingjiao; Han, Yu; Ahmed, Atique U; Aboody, Karen S; Lesniak, Maciej S; Balyasnikova, Irina V

    2016-09-13

    The challenges to effective drug delivery to brain tumors are twofold: (1) there is a lack of non-invasive methods of local delivery and (2) the blood-brain barrier limits systemic delivery. Intranasal delivery of therapeutics to the brain overcomes both challenges. In mouse model of malignant glioma, we observed that a small fraction of intranasally delivered neural stem cells (NSCs) can migrate to the brain tumor site. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxic preconditioning or overexpression of CXCR4 significantly enhances the tumor-targeting ability of NSCs, but without altering their phenotype only in genetically modified NSCs. Modified NSCs deliver oncolytic virus to glioma more efficiently and extend survival of experimental animals in the context of radiotherapy. Our findings indicate that intranasal delivery of stem cell-based therapeutics could be optimized for future clinical applications, and allow for safe and repeated administration of biological therapies to brain tumors and other CNS disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Scaffolds for 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ashley R; Laslett, Andrew; O'Brien, Carmel M; Cameron, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how neurodegenerative disorders develop is not only a key challenge for researchers but also for the wider society, given the rapidly aging populations in developed countries. Advances in this field require new tools with which to recreate neural tissue in vitro and produce realistic disease models. This in turn requires robust and reliable systems for performing 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells. This review provides a state of the art update on three-dimensional culture systems for in vitro development of neural tissue, employing a wide range of scaffold types including hydrogels, solid porous polymers, fibrous materials and decellularised tissues as well as microfluidic devices and lab-on-a-chip systems. To provide some context with in vivo development of the central nervous system (CNS), we also provide a brief overview of the neural stem cell niche, neural development and neural differentiation in vitro. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for this exciting and important field of biomaterials research. Neurodegenerative diseases, including dementia, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and motor neuron diseases, are a major societal challenge for aging populations. Understanding these conditions and developing therapies against them will require the development of new physical models of healthy and diseased neural tissue. Cellular models resembling neural tissue can be cultured in the laboratory with the help of 3D scaffolds - materials that allow the organization of neural cells into tissue-like structures. This review presents recent work on the development of different types of scaffolds for the 3D culture of neural lineage cells and the generation of functioning neural-like tissue. These in vitro culture systems are enabling the development of new approaches for modelling and tackling diseases of the brain and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulating cancer cell survival by targeting intracellular cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzu, Omer F; Gowda, Raghavendra; Noory, Mohammad A; Robertson, Gavin P

    2017-08-08

    Demand for cholesterol is high in certain cancers making them potentially sensitive to therapeutic strategies targeting cellular cholesterol homoeostasis. A potential approach involves disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport, which occurs in Niemann-Pick disease as a result of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) deficiency. Hence, a class of lysosomotropic compounds that were identified as functional ASM inhibitors (FIASMAs) might exhibit chemotherapeutic activity by disrupting cancer cell cholesterol homoeostasis. Here, the chemotherapeutic utility of ASM inhibition was investigated. The effect of FIASMAs on intracellular cholesterol levels, cholesterol homoeostasis, cellular endocytosis and signalling cascades were investigated. The in vivo efficacy of ASM inhibition was demonstrated using melanoma xenografts and a nanoparticle formulation was developed to overcome dose-limiting CNS-associated side effects of certain FIASMAs. Functional ASM inhibitors inhibited intracellular cholesterol transport leading to disruption of autophagic flux, cellular endocytosis and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Consequently, major oncogenic signalling cascades on which cancer cells were reliant for survival were inhibited. Two tested ASM inhibitors, perphenazine and fluphenazine that are also clinically used as antipsychotics, were effective in inhibiting xenografted tumour growth. Nanoliposomal encapsulation of the perphenazine enhanced its chemotherapeutic efficacy while decreasing CNS-associated side effects. This study suggests that disruption of intracellular cholesterol transport by targeting ASM could be utilised as a potential chemotherapeutic approach for treating cancer.

  14. Repurposing Lesogaberan to Promote Human Islet Cell Survival and β-Cell Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jide Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of β-cell’s A- and B-type gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs can promote their survival and replication, and the activation of α-cell GABAA-Rs promotes their conversion into β-cells. However, GABA and the most clinically applicable GABA-R ligands may be suboptimal for the long-term treatment of diabetes due to their pharmacological properties or potential side-effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Lesogaberan (AZD3355 is a peripherally restricted high-affinity GABAB-R-specific agonist, originally developed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD that appears to be safe for human use. This study tested the hypothesis that lesogaberan could be repurposed to promote human islet cell survival and β-cell replication. Treatment with lesogaberan significantly enhanced replication of human islet cells in vitro, which was abrogated by a GABAB-R antagonist. Immunohistochemical analysis of human islets that were grafted into immune-deficient mice revealed that oral treatment with lesogaberan promoted human β-cell replication and islet cell survival in vivo as effectively as GABA (which activates both GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs, perhaps because of its more favorable pharmacokinetics. Lesogaberan may be a promising drug candidate for clinical studies of diabetes intervention and islet transplantation.

  15. Neural stem cells differentiated from iPS cells spontaneously regain pluripotency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun Woo; Kim, Jong Soo; Choi, Sol; Hong, Yean Ju; Kim, Min Jung; Seo, Han Geuk; Do, Jeong Tae

    2014-10-01

    Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells by transduction of exogenous reprogramming factors. After induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are established, exogenous genes are silenced. In the pluripotent state, retroviral genes integrated in the host genome are kept inactive through epigenetic transcriptional regulation. In this study, we tried to determine whether exogenous genes remain silenced or are reactivated upon loss of pluripotency or on differentiation using an in vitro system. We induced differentiation of iPS cells into neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro; the NSCs appeared morphologically indistinguishable from brain-derived NSCs and stained positive for the NSC markers Nestin and Sox2. These iPS cell-derived NSCs (iPS-NSCs) were also capable of differentiating into all three neural subtypes. Interestingly, iPS-NSCs spontaneously formed aggregates on long-term culture and showed reactivation of the Oct4-GFP marker, which was followed by the formation of embryonic stem cell-like colonies. The spontaneously reverted green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive (iPS-NSC-GFP(+) ) cells expressed high levels of pluripotency markers (Oct4 and Nanog) and formed germline chimeras, indicating that iPS-NSC-GFP(+) cells had the same pluripotency as the original iPS cells. The reactivation of silenced exogenous genes was tightly correlated with the downregulation of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts) during differentiation of iPS cells. This phenomenon was not observed in doxycycline-inducible iPS cells, where the reactivation of exogenous genes could be induced only by doxycycline treatment. These results indicate that pluripotency can be regained through reactivation of exogenous genes, which is associated with dynamic change of Dnmt levels during differentiation of iPS cells. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  16. Efficient and Fast Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells for Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxin Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell-based therapies have been used for repairing damaged brain tissue and helping functional recovery after brain injury. Aberrance neurogenesis is related with brain injury, and multipotential neural stem cells from human embryonic stem (hES cells provide a great promise for cell replacement therapies. Optimized protocols for neural differentiation are necessary to produce functional human neural stem cells (hNSCs for cell therapy. However, the qualified procedure is scarce and detailed features of hNSCs originated from hES cells are still unclear. In this study, we developed a method to obtain hNSCs from hES cells, by which we could harvest abundant hNSCs in a relatively short time. Then, we examined the expression of pluripotent and multipotent marker genes through immunostaining and confirmed differentiation potential of the differentiated hNSCs. Furthermore, we analyzed the mitotic activity of these hNSCs. In this report, we provided comprehensive features of hNSCs and delivered the knowledge about how to obtain more high-quality hNSCs from hES cells which may help to accelerate the NSC-based therapies in brain injury treatment.

  17. Towards the fabrication of artificial 3D microdevices for neural cell networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew A; Ortega, Ílida; Kelly, Stephen; Claeyssens, Frederik

    2015-04-01

    This work reports first steps towards the development of artificial neural stem cell microenvironments for the control and assessment of neural stem cell behaviour. Stem cells have been shown to be found in specific, supportive microenvironments (niches) and are believed to play an important role in tissue regeneration mechanisms. These environments are intricate spaces with chemical and biological features. Here we present work towards the development of physically defined microdevices in which neural and neural stem cells can be studied in 3-dimensions. We have approached this challenge by creating bespoke, microstructured polymer environments using both 2-photon polymerisation and soft lithography techniques. Specifically, we have designed and fabricated biodegradable microwell-shaped devices using an in house synthetized polymer (4-arm photocurable poly-lactid acid) on a bespoke 2-photon polymerisation (2PP) set-up. We have studied swelling and degradation of the constructs as well as biocompatibility. Moreover, we have explored the potential of these constructs as artificial neural cell substrates by culturing NG108-15 cells (mouse neuroblastoma; rat glioma hybrid) and human neural progenitor cells on the microstructures. Finally, we have studied the effects of our artificial microenvironments upon neurite length and cell density.

  18. Pitx2 expression promotes p21 expression and cell cycle exit in neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldring, Nina; Joseph, Bertrand; Hermanson, Ola; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2012-11-01

    Cortical development is a complex process that involves many events including proliferation, cell cycle exit and differentiation that need to be appropriately synchronized. Neural stem cells (NSCs) isolated from embryonic cortex are characterized by their ability of self-renewal under continued maintenance of multipotency. Cell cycle progression and arrest during development is regulated by numerous factors, including cyclins, cyclin dependent kinases and their inhibitors. In this study, we exogenously expressed the homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2, usually expressed in postmitotic progenitors and neurons of the embryonic cortex, in NSCs with low expression of endogenous Pitx2. We found that Pitx2 expression induced a rapid decrease in proliferation associated with an accumulation of NSCs in G1 phase. A search for potential cell cycle inhibitors responsible for such cell cycle exit of NSCs revealed that Pitx2 expression caused a rapid and dramatic (≉20-fold) increase in expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 (WAF1/Cip1). In addition, Pitx2 bound directly to the p21 promoter as assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in NSCs. Surprisingly, Pitx2 expression was not associated with an increase in differentiation markers, but instead the expression of nestin, associated with undifferentiated NSCs, was maintained. Our results suggest that Pitx2 promotes p21 expression and induces cell cycle exit in neural progenitors.

  19. Directed Migration of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Cells In An Applied Electric Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central nervous system. A strong biological effect of EFs is the induction of directional cell migration. In this study, we investigated the guided migration of embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived presumptive motor neurons in an applied EF. The dissociated mouse ESC derived presumptive motor neurons or embryoid bodies were subjected to EFs stimulation and the cell migration was studied. We found that the migration of neural precursors from embryoid bodies was toward cathode pole of applied EFs. Single motor neurons migrated to the cathode of the EFs and reversal of EFs poles reversed their migration direction. The directedness and displacement of cathodal migration became more significant when the field strength was increased from 50 mV/mm to 100 mV/mm. EFs stimulation did not influence the cell migration velocity. Our work suggests that EFs may serve as a guidance cue to direct grafted cell migration in vivo. PMID:24804615

  20. Directed migration of embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells in an applied electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongchao; Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-10-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central nervous system. A strong biological effect of EFs is the induction of directional cell migration. In this study, we investigated the guided migration of embryonic stem cell (ESC) derived presumptive motor neurons in an applied EF. The dissociated mouse ESC derived presumptive motor neurons or embryoid bodies were subjected to EFs stimulation and the cell migration was studied. We found that the migration of neural precursors from embryoid bodies was toward cathode pole of applied EFs. Single motor neurons migrated to the cathode of the EFs and reversal of EFs poles reversed their migration direction. The directedness and displacement of cathodal migration became more significant when the field strength was increased from 50 mV/mm to 100 mV/mm. EFs stimulation did not influence the cell migration velocity. Our work suggests that EFs may serve as a guidance cue to direct grafted cell migration in vivo.