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Sample records for neural cell replication

  1. Prion replication occurs in endogenous adult neural stem cells and alters their neuronal fate: involvement of endogenous neural stem cells in prion diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aroa Relaño-Ginès

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are irreversible progressive neurodegenerative diseases, leading to severe incapacity and death. They are characterized in the brain by prion amyloid deposits, vacuolisation, astrocytosis, neuronal degeneration, and by cognitive, behavioural and physical impairments. There is no treatment for these disorders and stem cell therapy therefore represents an interesting new approach. Gains could not only result from the cell transplantation, but also from the stimulation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSC or by the combination of both approaches. However, the development of such strategies requires a detailed knowledge of the pathology, particularly concerning the status of the adult neurogenesis and endogenous NSC during the development of the disease. During the past decade, several studies have consistently shown that NSC reside in the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS and that adult neurogenesis occurs throughout the adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle or the Dentate Gyrus of the hippocampus. Adult NSC are believed to constitute a reservoir for neuronal replacement during normal cell turnover or after brain injury. However, the activation of this system does not fully compensate the neuronal loss that occurs during neurodegenerative diseases and could even contribute to the disease progression. We investigated here the status of these cells during the development of prion disorders. We were able to show that NSC accumulate and replicate prions. Importantly, this resulted in the alteration of their neuronal fate which then represents a new pathologic event that might underlie the rapid progression of the disease.

  2. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  3. Replicating an expanded genetic alphabet in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, John C

    2014-09-05

    Recent advances in synthetic biology have made it possible to replicate an unnatural base pair in living cells. This study highlights the technologies developed to create a semisynthetic organism with an expanded genetic alphabet and the potential challenges of moving forward. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. T CELL REPLICATIVE SENESCENCE IN HUMAN AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jennifer P.; Effros, Rita B.

    2013-01-01

    The decline of the immune system appears to be an intractable consequence of aging, leading to increased susceptibility to infections, reduced effectiveness of vaccination and higher incidences of many diseases including osteoporosis and cancer in the elderly. These outcomes can be attributed, at least in part, to a phenomenon known as T cell replicative senescence, a terminal state characterized by dysregulated immune function, loss of the CD28 costimulatory molecule, shortened telomeres and elevated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Senescent CD8 T cells, which accumulate in the elderly, have been shown to frequently bear antigen specificity against cytomegalovirus (CMV), suggesting that this common and persistent infection may drive immune senescence and result in functional and phenotypic changes to the T cell repertoire. Senescent T cells have also been identified in patients with certain cancers, autoimmune diseases and chronic infections, such as HIV. This review discusses the in vivo and in vitro evidence for the contribution of CD8 T cell replicative senescence to a plethora of age-related pathologies and a few possible therapeutic avenues to delay or prevent this differentiative end-state in T cells. The age-associated remodeling of the immune system, through accumulation of senescent T cells has far-reaching consequences on the individual and society alike, for the current healthcare system needs to meet the urgent demands of the increasing proportions of the elderly in the US and abroad. PMID:23061726

  5. Flexibility of neural stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eumorphia eRemboutsika

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic cortical neural stem cells are self-renewing progenitors that can differentiate into neurons and glia. We generated neurospheres from the developing cerebral cortex using a mouse genetic model that allows for lineage selection and found that the self-renewing neural stem cells are restricted to Sox2 expressing cells. Under normal conditions, embryonic cortical neurospheres are heterogeneous with regard to Sox2 expression and contain astrocytes, neural stem cells and neural progenitor cells sufficiently plastic to give rise to neural crest cells when transplanted into the hindbrain of E1.5 chick and E8 mouse embryos. However, when neurospheres are maintained under lineage selection, such that all cells express Sox2, neural stem cells maintain their Pax6+ cortical radial glia identity and exhibit a more restricted fate in vitro and after transplantation. These data demonstrate that Sox2 preserves the cortical identity and regulates the plasticity of self-renewing Pax6+ radial glia cells.

  6. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  7. Replication of chaos in neural networks, economics and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmet, Marat

    2016-01-01

    This book presents detailed descriptions of chaos for continuous-time systems. It is the first-ever book to consider chaos as an input for differential and hybrid equations. Chaotic sets and chaotic functions are used as inputs for systems with attractors: equilibrium points, cycles and tori. The findings strongly suggest that chaos theory can proceed from the theory of differential equations to a higher level than previously thought. The approach selected is conducive to the in-depth analysis of different types of chaos. The appearance of deterministic chaos in neural networks, economics and mechanical systems is discussed theoretically and supported by simulations. As such, the book offers a valuable resource for mathematicians, physicists, engineers and economists studying nonlinear chaotic dynamics.

  8. Fast automatic quantitative cell replication with fluorescent live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background live cell imaging is a useful tool to monitor cellular activities in living systems. It is often necessary in cancer research or experimental research to quantify the dividing capabilities of cells or the cell proliferation level when investigating manipulations of the cells or their environment. Manual quantification of fluorescence microscopic image is difficult because human is neither sensitive to fine differences in color intensity nor effective to count and average fluorescence level among cells. However, auto-quantification is not a straightforward problem to solve. As the sampling location of the microscopy changes, the amount of cells in individual microscopic images varies, which makes simple measurement methods such as the sum of stain intensity values or the total number of positive stain within each image inapplicable. Thus, automated quantification with robust cell segmentation techniques is required. Results An automated quantification system with robust cell segmentation technique are presented. The experimental results in application to monitor cellular replication activities show that the quantitative score is promising to represent the cell replication level, and scores for images from different cell replication groups are demonstrated to be statistically significantly different using ANOVA, LSD and Tukey HSD tests (p-value Conclusion A robust automated quantification method of live cell imaging is built to measure the cell replication level, providing a robust quantitative analysis system in fluorescent live cell imaging. In addition, the presented unsupervised entropy based cell segmentation for live cell images is demonstrated to be also applicable for nuclear segmentation of IHC tissue images.

  9. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  10. Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hak (Tony); J. Dul (Jan)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractReplication is conducting a study in another case (or population) in order to assess whether a research finding from previous studies can be confirmed. The aim of replication is to assess the generalizability of a theoretical claim and the “research finding” that is (or is not) confirmed

  11. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations....... Disruption of multiple proteins, including PARP1 and CHD4, leads to the same end point of replication fork protection, highlighting the complexities by which tumour cells evade chemotherapeutic interventions and acquire drug resistance....

  12. Autophagy Facilitates Salmonella Replication in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong B.; Croxen, Matthew A.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Ferreira, Rosana B. R.; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J.; Finlay, B. Brett

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. PMID:24618251

  13. Replication timing: a fingerprint for cell identity and pluripotency.

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    Tyrone Ryba

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Many types of epigenetic profiling have been used to classify stem cells, stages of cellular differentiation, and cancer subtypes. Existing methods focus on local chromatin features such as DNA methylation and histone modifications that require extensive analysis for genome-wide coverage. Replication timing has emerged as a highly stable cell type-specific epigenetic feature that is regulated at the megabase-level and is easily and comprehensively analyzed genome-wide. Here, we describe a cell classification method using 67 individual replication profiles from 34 mouse and human cell lines and stem cell-derived tissues, including new data for mesendoderm, definitive endoderm, mesoderm and smooth muscle. Using a Monte-Carlo approach for selecting features of replication profiles conserved in each cell type, we identify "replication timing fingerprints" unique to each cell type and apply a k nearest neighbor approach to predict known and unknown cell types. Our method correctly classifies 67/67 independent replication-timing profiles, including those derived from closely related intermediate stages. We also apply this method to derive fingerprints for pluripotency in human and mouse cells. Interestingly, the mouse pluripotency fingerprint overlaps almost completely with previously identified genomic segments that switch from early to late replication as pluripotency is lost. Thereafter, replication timing and transcription within these regions become difficult to reprogram back to pluripotency, suggesting these regions highlight an epigenetic barrier to reprogramming. In addition, the major histone cluster Hist1 consistently becomes later replicating in committed cell types, and several histone H1 genes in this cluster are downregulated during differentiation, suggesting a possible instrument for the chromatin compaction observed during differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that unknown samples can be classified independently using site

  14. Renin modulates HIV replication in T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandel, Nirupama; Ayasolla, Kamesh; Lan, Xiqian; Rai, Partab; Mikulak, Joanna; Husain, Mohammad; Malhotra, Ashwani; McGowan, Joseph; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2014-01-01

    HIV is known to subvert cellular machinery to enhance its replication. Recently, HIV has been reported to enhance TC renin expression. We hypothesized that HIV induces and maintains high renin expression to promote its own replication in TCs. Renin enhanced HIV replication in TCs in a dose-dependent manner. (P)RR-deficient TCs, as well as those lacking renin, displayed attenuated NF-κB activity and HIV replication. TCs treated with renin and Hpr displayed activation of the (P)RR-PLZF protein signaling cascade. Renin, HIV, and Hpr activated the PI3K pathway. Both renin and Hpr cleaved Agt (a renin substrate) to Ang I and also cleaved Gag polyproteins (protease substrate) to p24. Furthermore, aliskiren, a renin inhibitor, reduced renin- and Hpr-induced cleavage of Agt and Gag polyproteins. These findings indicate that renin contributes to HIV replication in TCs via the (P)RR-PLZF signaling cascade and through cleavage of the Gag polyproteins. PMID:24970860

  15. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  16. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  17. Replication Stress in Mammalian Cells and Its Consequences for Mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Gelot

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1 local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2 genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA, which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability.

  18. Insect cell culture: virus replication and applications in biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arif, B.M; Pavlik, L

    2013-01-01

    .... Since the latter group of viruses cause serious diseased in man and equines, efforts were expended to characterize the viruses in the new cell lines in attempts to understand the replication cycle...

  19. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  20. Dynamics of picornavirus RNA replication within infected cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Normann, Preben

    2008-01-01

    Replication of many picornaviruses is inhibited by low concentrations of guanidine. Guanidine-resistant mutants are readily isolated and the mutations map to the coding region for the 2C protein. Using in vitro replication assays it has been determined previously that guanidine blocks the initiat...... replication. Thus, the guanidine-sensitive step in RNA synthesis is important throughout the virus life cycle in cells....... the initiation of negative-strand synthesis. We have now examined the dynamics of RNA replication, measured by quantitative RT-PCR, within cells infected with either swine vesicular disease virus (an enterovirus) or foot-and-mouth disease virus as regulated by the presence or absence of guanidine. Following...... the removal of guanidine from the infected cells, RNA replication occurs after a significant lag phase. This restoration of RNA synthesis requires de novo protein synthesis. Viral RNA can be maintained for at least 72 h within cells in the absence of apparent replication but guanidine-resistant virus can...

  1. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, Jason; Wang, Xin; Tsang, Sabrina H. [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiao, Jing [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); You, Jianxin, E-mail: jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2014-07-08

    Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT) is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  2. Phosphorylation of Large T Antigen Regulates Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Diaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV was recently discovered as a novel human polyomavirus that is associated with ~80% of Merkel Cell Carcinomas. The Large Tumor antigen (LT is an early viral protein which has a variety of functions, including manipulation of the cell cycle and initiating viral DNA replication. Phosphorylation plays a critical regulatory role for polyomavirus LT proteins, but no investigation of MCPyV LT phosphorylation has been performed to date. In this report mass spectrometry analysis reveals three unique phosphorylation sites: T271, T297 and T299. In vivo replication assays confirm that phosphorylation of T271 does not play a role in viral replication, while modification at T297 and T299 have dramatic and opposing effects on LT’s ability to initiate replication from the viral origin. We test these mutants for their ability to bind, unwind, and act as a functional helicase at the viral origin. These studies provide a framework for understanding how phosphorylation of LT may dynamically regulate viral replication. Although the natural host cell of MCPyV has not yet been established, this work provides a foundation for understanding how LT activity is regulated and provides tools for better exploring this regulation in both natural host cells and Merkel cells.

  3. Cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert S Hill

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, DNA replication is coupled to the cell cycle through the actions of cyclin-dependent kinases and associated factors. In bacteria, the prevailing view, based primarily from work in Escherichia coli, is that growth-dependent accumulation of the highly conserved initiator, DnaA, triggers initiation. However, the timing of initiation is unchanged in Bacillus subtilis mutants that are ~30% smaller than wild-type cells, indicating that achievement of a particular cell size is not obligatory for initiation. Prompted by this finding, we re-examined the link between cell size and initiation in both E. coli and B. subtilis. Although changes in DNA replication have been shown to alter both E. coli and B. subtilis cell size, the converse (the effect of cell size on DNA replication has not been explored. Here, we report that the mechanisms responsible for coordinating DNA replication with cell size vary between these two model organisms. In contrast to B. subtilis, small E. coli mutants delayed replication initiation until they achieved the size at which wild-type cells initiate. Modest increases in DnaA alleviated the delay, supporting the view that growth-dependent accumulation of DnaA is the trigger for replication initiation in E. coli. Significantly, although small E. coli and B. subtilis cells both maintained wild-type concentration of DnaA, only the E. coli mutants failed to initiate on time. Thus, rather than the concentration, the total amount of DnaA appears to be more important for initiation timing in E. coli. The difference in behavior of the two bacteria appears to lie in the mechanisms that control the activity of DnaA.

  4. Defects in DNA replication hit NK cells and neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Klaus

    2017-05-01

    Patients who present with unique immunological phenotypes provide an opportunity to better understand defect-driving mutations. In this issue of the JCI, Cottineau and colleagues characterize 5 individuals who exhibited growth restriction, facial deformities, and a history of bacterial and viral infection. Further characterization revealed that these patients were neutropenic and NK cell deficient. These phenotypes were unexpectedly linked to mutations in the gene encoding a subunit of the Go-Ichi-Ni-San (GINS) complex, which is essential for DNA replication prior to cell division. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for future studies to explore the role of DNA replication in immune cell generation and function.

  5. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  6. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M B Musser

    Full Text Available Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  7. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...... and functional oriC sequence. The seqA2 mutation was found to overcome the incompatibility phenotype by increasing the cellular oriC copy nnumber 3-fold thereby allowing minichromosomes to coexist with the chromosome. The replication pattern of a wild type strain with multiple integrated minichromosomes...

  8. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F. T.; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, EL Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression. PMID:26764384

  9. Seeding neural progenitor cells on silicon-based neural probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azemi, Erdrin; Gobbel, Glenn T; Cui, Xinyan Tracy

    2010-09-01

    Chronically implanted neural electrode arrays have the potential to be used as neural prostheses in patients with various neurological disorders. While these electrodes perform well in acute recordings, they often fail to function reliably in clinically relevant chronic settings because of glial encapsulation and the loss of neurons. Surface modification of these implants may provide a means of improving their biocompatibility and integration within host brain tissue. The authors proposed a method of improving the brain-implant interface by seeding the implant's surface with a layer of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from adult murine subependyma. Neural progenitor cells may reduce the foreign body reaction by presenting a tissue-friendly surface and repair implant-induced injury and inflammation by releasing neurotrophic factors. In this study, the authors evaluated the growth and differentiation of NPCs on laminin-immobilized probe surfaces and explored the potential impact on transplant survival of these cells. Laminin protein was successfully immobilized on the silicon surface via covalent binding using silane chemistry. The growth, adhesion, and differentiation of NPCs expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) on laminin-modified silicon surfaces were characterized in vitro by using immunocytochemical techniques. Shear forces were applied to NPC cultures in growth medium to evaluate their shearing properties. In addition, neural probes seeded with GFP-labeled NPCs cultured in growth medium for 14 days were implanted in murine cortex. The authors assessed the adhesion properties of these cells during implantation conditions. Moreover, the tissue response around NPC-seeded implants was observed after 1 and 7 days postimplantation. Significantly improved NPC attachment and growth was found on the laminin-immobilized surface compared with an unmodified control before and after shear force application. The NPCs grown on the laminin-immobilized surface

  10. Temporal organization of replication in DNA fibers of mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The extent of coordinate control over the multiple initiation events in DNA replication has been investigated in three mammalian cell lines by DNA fiber autoradiography. Quantitative estimates have been obtained of the degree of synchrony among initiations occurring on stretches of DNA. Synchrony decreases markedly with increasing distance between initiation sites in MDBK (bovine) and L929 (mouse) cells, but only slightly in muntjac cells. Possible control mechanisms for the initiation process are discussed. PMID:457781

  11. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived neural constructs for predicting neural toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael P; Hou, Zhonggang; Propson, Nicholas E; Zhang, Jue; Engstrom, Collin J; Santos Costa, Vitor; Jiang, Peng; Nguyen, Bao Kim; Bolin, Jennifer M; Daly, William; Wang, Yu; Stewart, Ron; Page, C David; Murphy, William L; Thomson, James A

    2015-10-06

    Human pluripotent stem cell-based in vitro models that reflect human physiology have the potential to reduce the number of drug failures in clinical trials and offer a cost-effective approach for assessing chemical safety. Here, human embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived neural progenitor cells, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and microglia/macrophage precursors were combined on chemically defined polyethylene glycol hydrogels and cultured in serum-free medium to model cellular interactions within the developing brain. The precursors self-assembled into 3D neural constructs with diverse neuronal and glial populations, interconnected vascular networks, and ramified microglia. Replicate constructs were reproducible by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and expressed neurogenesis, vasculature development, and microglia genes. Linear support vector machines were used to construct a predictive model from RNA-Seq data for 240 neural constructs treated with 34 toxic and 26 nontoxic chemicals. The predictive model was evaluated using two standard hold-out testing methods: a nearly unbiased leave-one-out cross-validation for the 60 training compounds and an unbiased blinded trial using a single hold-out set of 10 additional chemicals. The linear support vector produced an estimate for future data of 0.91 in the cross-validation experiment and correctly classified 9 of 10 chemicals in the blinded trial.

  12. Replication of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorchenko D. B.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The technique for replicating hepatitis C virus (HCV in cell culture has been modified and the susceptibility of the cells of various origin to HCV upon their infection with HCV-containing sera has been compared. The viral load on the fifth day post-infection has been assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction technique. The highest infection and replication efficacy have been found in cells of rat Gasser’s ganglion neurinoma. The peculiar features of the mitotic index and the anomalous forms of the mitosis have been studied in HCV-infected cells. The data presented may be used as a basis for the experimental model of HCV infection in vitro suitable for studying the effects of antiviral drugs on the infection caused by the cytopathogenic variant of HCV.

  13. Human Neural Cell-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    Orlando R, Stice SL. Membrane proteomic signatures of karyotypically normal and abnormal human embryonic stem cell lines and derivatives. Proteomics. 2011...format (96-,384-well) assays, 2) grow as adherent monolayers, and 3) possess a stable karyotype for multiple (>10) passages with a doubling time of ~36...derived neural progenitor cell line working stock has been amplified, characterized for karyotype and evaluated for the expression of neural progenitor

  14. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  15. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived models to investigate human cytomegalovirus infection in neural cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo D'Aiuto

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is one of the leading prenatal causes of congenital mental retardation and deformities world-wide. Access to cultured human neuronal lineages, necessary to understand the species specific pathogenic effects of HCMV, has been limited by difficulties in sustaining primary human neuronal cultures. Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells now provide an opportunity for such research. We derived iPS cells from human adult fibroblasts and induced neural lineages to investigate their susceptibility to infection with HCMV strain Ad169. Analysis of iPS cells, iPS-derived neural stem cells (NSCs, neural progenitor cells (NPCs and neurons suggests that (i iPS cells are not permissive to HCMV infection, i.e., they do not permit a full viral replication cycle; (ii Neural stem cells have impaired differentiation when infected by HCMV; (iii NPCs are fully permissive for HCMV infection; altered expression of genes related to neural metabolism or neuronal differentiation is also observed; (iv most iPS-derived neurons are not permissive to HCMV infection; and (v infected neurons have impaired calcium influx in response to glutamate.

  16. The Bimodal Lifestyle of Intracellular Salmonella in Epithelial Cells: Replication in the Cytosol Obscures Defects in Vacuolar Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades and proliferates within epithelial cells. Intracellular bacteria replicate within a membrane bound vacuole known as the Salmonella containing vacuole. However, this bacterium can also replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells and net intracellular growth is a product of both vacuolar and cytosolic replication. Here we have used semi-quantitative single-cell analyses to investigate the contribution of each of these replicative niches to intracellular proliferation in cultured epithelial cells. We show that cytosolic replication can account for the majority of net replication even though it occurs in less than 20% of infected cells. Consequently, assays for net growth in a population of infected cells, for example by recovery of colony forming units, are not good indicators of vacuolar proliferation. We also show that the Salmonella Type III Secretion System 2, which is required for SCV biogenesis, is not required for cytosolic replication. Altogether this study illustrates the value of single cell analyses when studying intracellular pathogens. PMID:22719929

  17. Embryonic Stem Cells License a High Level of Dormant Origins to Protect the Genome against Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Quan Ge

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining genomic integrity during DNA replication is essential for stem cells. DNA replication origins are licensed by the MCM2–7 complexes, with most of them remaining dormant. Dormant origins (DOs rescue replication fork stalling in S phase and ensure genome integrity. However, it is not known whether DOs exist and play important roles in any stem cell type. Here, we show that embryonic stem cells (ESCs contain more DOs than tissue stem/progenitor cells such as neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. Partial depletion of DOs does not affect ESC self-renewal but impairs their differentiation, including toward the neural lineage. However, reduction of DOs in NSPCs impairs their self-renewal due to accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, mice with reduced DOs show abnormal neurogenesis and semi-embryonic lethality. Our results reveal that ESCs are equipped with more DOs to better protect against replicative stress than tissue-specific stem/progenitor cells.

  18. Macrophages sustain HIV replication in vivo independently of T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Angela; Baker, Caroline; Spagnuolo, Rae Ann; Foster, John; Zakharova, Oksana; Wietgrefe, Stephen; Caro-Vegas, Carolina; Sharpe, Garrett; Haase, Ashley T.; Eron, Joseph J.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages have long been considered to contribute to HIV infection of the CNS; however, a recent study has contradicted this early work and suggests that myeloid cells are not an in vivo source of virus production. Here, we addressed the role of macrophages in HIV infection by first analyzing monocytes isolated from viremic patients and patients undergoing antiretroviral treatment. We were unable to find viral DNA or viral outgrowth in monocytes isolated from peripheral blood. To determine whether tissue macrophages are productively infected, we used 3 different but complementary humanized mouse models. Two of these models (bone marrow/liver/thymus [BLT] mice and T cell–only mice [ToM]) have been previously described, and the third model was generated by reconstituting immunodeficient mice with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells that were devoid of human T cells (myeloid-only mice [MoM]) to specifically evaluate HIV replication in this population. Using MoM, we demonstrated that macrophages can sustain HIV replication in the absence of T cells; HIV-infected macrophages are distributed in various tissues including the brain; replication-competent virus can be rescued ex vivo from infected macrophages; and infected macrophages can establish de novo infection. Together, these results demonstrate that macrophages represent a genuine target for HIV infection in vivo that can sustain and transmit infection. PMID:26950420

  19. DNA replication of histone gene repeats in Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells: multiple initiation sites and replication pause sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, T; Ina, S

    1993-01-01

    We showed previously that DNA replication initiates at multiple sites in the 5-kb histone gene repeating unit in early embryos of Drosophila melanogaster. The present report shows evidence that replication in the same chromosomal region initiates at multiple sites in tissue culture cells as well. First, we analyzed replication intermediates by the two-dimensional gel electrophoretic replicon mapping method and detected bubble-form replication intermediates for all fragments restricted at different sites in the repeating unit. Second, we analyzed bromodeoxyuridine-labeled nascent strands amplified by the polymerase chain reaction method and detected little differences in the size distribution of nascent strands specific to six short segments located at different sites in the repeating unit. These results strongly suggest that DNA replication initiates at multiple sites located within the repeating unit. We also found several replication pause sites located at 5' upstream regions of some histone genes. Images PMID:8321216

  20. Spatio-temporal re-organization of replication foci accompanies replication domain consolidation during human pluripotent stem cell lineage specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Korey A; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G; Gilbert, David M

    2016-09-16

    Lineage specification of both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is accompanied by spatial consolidation of chromosome domains and temporal consolidation of their replication timing. Replication timing and chromatin organization are both established during G1 phase at the timing decision point (TDP). Here, we have developed live cell imaging tools to track spatio-temporal replication domain consolidation during differentiation. First, we demonstrate that the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system is incapable of demarcating G1/S or G2/M cell cycle transitions. Instead, we employ a combination of fluorescent PCNA to monitor S phase progression, cytokinesis to demarcate mitosis, and fluorescent nucleotides to label early and late replication foci and track their 3D organization into sub-nuclear chromatin compartments throughout all cell cycle transitions. We find that, as human PSCs differentiate, the length of S phase devoted to replication of spatially clustered replication foci increases, coincident with global compartmentalization of domains into temporally clustered blocks of chromatin. Importantly, re-localization and anchorage of domains was completed prior to the onset of S phase, even in the context of an abbreviated PSC G1 phase. This approach can also be employed to investigate cell fate transitions in single PSCs, which could be seen to differentiate preferentially from G1 phase. Together, our results establish real-time, live-cell imaging methods for tracking cell cycle transitions during human PSC differentiation that can be applied to study chromosome domain consolidation and other aspects of lineage specification.

  1. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  2. Replication stress in hematopoietic stem cells in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flach, Johanna; Milyavsky, Michael

    2017-10-18

    Life-long blood regeneration relies on a rare population of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). These cells' nearly unlimited self-renewal potential and lifetime persistence in the body signifies the need for tight control of their genome integrity. Their quiescent state, tightly linked with low metabolic activity, is one of the main strategies employed by HSCs to preserve an intact genome. On the other hand, HSCs need to be able to quickly respond to increased blood demands and rapidly increase their cellular output in order to fight infection-associated inflammation or extensive blood loss. This increase in proliferation rate, however, comes at the price of exposing HSCs to DNA damage inevitably associated with the process of DNA replication. Any interference with normal replication fork progression leads to a specialized molecular response termed replication stress (RS). Importantly, increased levels of RS are a hallmark feature of aged HSCs, where an accumulating body of evidence points to causative relationships between RS and the aging-associated impairment of the blood system's functional capacity. In this review, we present an overview of RS in HSCs focusing on its causes and consequences for the blood system of mice and men. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication...

  4. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  5. Nestin-GFP Transgene Reveals Neural Precursor Cells in Adult Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Wang, Zhong-Min; Messi, Maria Laura; Enikolopov, Grigori N.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapy for neural lesions or degenerative diseases relies mainly on finding transplantable active precursor cells. Identifying them in peripheral tissues accessible for biopsy, outside the central nervous system, would circumvent the serious immunological and ethical concerns impeding cell therapy. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we isolated neural progenitor cells in cultured adult skeletal muscle from transgenic mice in which nestin regulatory elements control GFP expression. These cells also expressed the early neural marker Tuj1 and light and heavy neurofilament but not S100β, indicating that they express typical neural but not Schwann cell markers. GFP+/Tuj1+ cells were also negative for the endothelial and pericyte markers CD31 and α-smooth muscle actin, respectively. We established their a) functional response to glutamate in patch-clamp recordings; b) interstitial mesenchymal origin; c) replicative capacity; and d) the environment necessary for their survival after fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the decline in nestin-GFP expression in muscle progenitor cells and its persistence in neural precursor cells in muscle cultures provide an invaluable tool for isolating a population of predifferentiated neural cells with therapeutic potential. PMID:21304812

  6. Shaping the landscape of the Escherichia coli chromosome: replication-transcription encounters in cells with an ectopic replication origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Darja; Taylor, Toni; Smith, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Each cell division requires the unwinding of millions of DNA base pairs to allow chromosome duplication and gene transcription. As DNA replication and transcription share the same template, conflicts between both processes are unavoidable and head-on collisions are thought to be particularly prob...... a chromosomal rearrangement that alleviates replication-transcription conflicts in an intriguingly simple way. Our data support the idea that avoiding head-on collisions has significantly contributed to shaping the distinct architecture of bacterial chromosomes...

  7. Neural crest cells: from developmental biology to clinical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells are multipotent cells, which are specified in embryonic ectoderm in the border of neural plate and epiderm during early development by interconnection of extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic factors. Neural crest cells are capable of differentiating into various somatic cell types, including melanocytes, craniofacial cartilage and bone, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous cells, which supports their promise for cell therapy. In this work, we provide a comprehensive review of wide aspects of neural crest cells from their developmental biology to applicability in medical research. We provide a simplified model of neural crest cell development and highlight the key external stimuli and intrinsic regulators that determine the neural crest cell fate. Defects of neural crest cell development leading to several human disorders are also mentioned, with the emphasis of using human induced pluripotent stem cells to model neurocristopathic syndromes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Differentiation state determines neural effects on microvascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muffley, Lara A., E-mail: muffley@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Pan, Shin-Chen, E-mail: pansc@mail.ncku.edu.tw [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Smith, Andria N., E-mail: gnaunderwater@gmail.com [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Ga, Maricar, E-mail: marga16@uw.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Hocking, Anne M., E-mail: ahocking@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States); Gibran, Nicole S., E-mail: nicoleg@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, Campus Box 359796, 300 9th Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Growing evidence indicates that nerves and capillaries interact paracrinely in uninjured skin and cutaneous wounds. Although mature neurons are the predominant neural cell in the skin, neural progenitor cells have also been detected in uninjured adult skin. The aim of this study was to characterize differential paracrine effects of neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons on dermal microvascular endothelial cells. Our results suggest that neural progenitor cells and mature sensory neurons have unique secretory profiles and distinct effects on dermal microvascular endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and nitric oxide production. Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons secrete different proteins related to angiogenesis. Specific to neural progenitor cells were dipeptidyl peptidase-4, IGFBP-2, pentraxin-3, serpin f1, TIMP-1, TIMP-4 and VEGF. In contrast, endostatin, FGF-1, MCP-1 and thrombospondin-2 were specific to dorsal root ganglion neurons. Microvascular endothelial cell proliferation was inhibited by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. In contrast, microvascular endothelial cell migration in a scratch wound assay was inhibited by neural progenitor cells and unaffected by dorsal root ganglion neurons. In addition, nitric oxide production by microvascular endothelial cells was increased by dorsal root ganglion neurons but unaffected by neural progenitor cells. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate microvascular endothelial cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells, not dorsal root ganglion neurons, regulate microvascular endothelial cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neural progenitor cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons do not effect microvascular endothelial tube formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dorsal root ganglion neurons, not neural progenitor cells, regulate

  9. Spatio-temporal re-organization of replication foci accompanies replication domain consolidation during human pluripotent stem cell lineage specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Korey A.; Elefanty, Andrew G.; Stanley, Edouard G.; Gilbert, David M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lineage specification of both mouse and human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is accompanied by spatial consolidation of chromosome domains and temporal consolidation of their replication timing. Replication timing and chromatin organization are both established during G1 phase at the timing decision point (TDP). Here, we have developed live cell imaging tools to track spatio-temporal replication domain consolidation during differentiation. First, we demonstrate that the fluorescence ubiquitination cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system is incapable of demarcating G1/S or G2/M cell cycle transitions. Instead, we employ a combination of fluorescent PCNA to monitor S phase progression, cytokinesis to demarcate mitosis, and fluorescent nucleotides to label early and late replication foci and track their 3D organization into sub-nuclear chromatin compartments throughout all cell cycle transitions. We find that, as human PSCs differentiate, the length of S phase devoted to replication of spatially clustered replication foci increases, coincident with global compartmentalization of domains into temporally clustered blocks of chromatin. Importantly, re-localization and anchorage of domains was completed prior to the onset of S phase, even in the context of an abbreviated PSC G1 phase. This approach can also be employed to investigate cell fate transitions in single PSCs, which could be seen to differentiate preferentially from G1 phase. Together, our results establish real-time, live-cell imaging methods for tracking cell cycle transitions during human PSC differentiation that can be applied to study chromosome domain consolidation and other aspects of lineage specification. PMID:27433885

  10. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell-Substrate Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M; Willits, Rebecca Kuntz

    2016-06-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell-substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell-material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell-substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo.

  11. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper I provide a brief overview of the major phases of investigation into the neural crest and the major players involved, discuss how the origin of the neural crest relates to the origin of the nervous system in vertebrate embryos, discuss the impact on the germ-layer theory of the discovery of the neural crest and of ...

  12. The impact of acute stress on the neural processing of food cues in bulimia nervosa: Replication in two samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brittany; Breithaupt, Lauren; McDowell, Jennifer E; Miller, L Stephen; Thompson, James; Fischer, Sarah

    2017-07-01

    The impact of acute stress on the neural processing of food cues in bulimia nervosa (BN) is unknown, despite theory that acute stress decreases cognitive control over food and hence increases vulnerability to environmental triggers for binge eating. Thus, the goals of this manuscript were to explore the impact of acute stress on the neural processing of food cues in BN. In Study 1, 10 women with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) BN and 10 healthy controls participated in an fMRI paradigm examining the neural correlates of visual food cue processing pre and post an acute stress induction. Whole brain analysis indicated that women with BN exhibited significant decreases in activation in the precuneus, associated with self-referential processing, the paracingulate gyrus, and the anterior vermis of the cerebellum. Healthy controls exhibited increased activation in these regions in response to food cues poststress. In Study 2, 17 women with DSM-5 BN or otherwise specified feeding and eating disorder with BN symptoms participated in the same paradigm. A region of interest analysis replicated findings from Study 1. Replication of imaging findings in 2 different samples suggests the potential importance of these regions in relation to BN. Decreased activation in the precuneus, specifically, is consistent with models of BN that posit that binge eating serves as a concrete distraction from aversive internal stimuli. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Cell-to-cell spread of HIV permits ongoing replication despite antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Alex; Kim, Jocelyn T; Balazs, Alejandro B; Dekel, Erez; Mayo, Avi; Milo, Ron; Baltimore, David

    2011-08-17

    Latency and ongoing replication have both been proposed to explain the drug-insensitive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reservoir maintained during antiretroviral therapy. Here we explore a novel mechanism for ongoing HIV replication in the face of antiretroviral drugs. We propose a model whereby multiple infections per cell lead to reduced sensitivity to drugs without requiring drug-resistant mutations, and experimentally validate the model using multiple infections per cell by cell-free HIV in the presence of the drug tenofovir. We then examine the drug sensitivity of cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a mode of HIV transmission that can lead to multiple infection events per target cell. Infections originating from cell-free virus decrease strongly in the presence of antiretrovirals tenofovir and efavirenz whereas infections involving cell-to-cell spread are markedly less sensitive to the drugs. The reduction in sensitivity is sufficient to keep multiple rounds of infection from terminating in the presence of drugs. We examine replication from cell-to-cell spread in the presence of clinical drug concentrations using a stochastic infection model and find that replication is intermittent, without substantial accumulation of mutations. If cell-to-cell spread has the same properties in vivo, it may have adverse consequences for the immune system, lead to therapy failure in individuals with risk factors, and potentially contribute to viral persistence and hence be a barrier to curing HIV infection.

  14. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ATRX dysfunction induces replication defects in primary mouse cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clynes

    Full Text Available The chromatin remodeling protein ATRX, which targets tandem repetitive DNA, has been shown to be required for expression of the alpha globin genes, for proliferation of a variety of cellular progenitors, for chromosome congression and for the maintenance of telomeres. Mutations in ATRX have recently been identified in tumours which maintain their telomeres by a telomerase independent pathway involving homologous recombination thought to be triggered by DNA damage. It is as yet unknown whether there is a central underlying mechanism associated with ATRX dysfunction which can explain the numerous cellular phenomena observed. There is, however, growing evidence for its role in the replication of various repetitive DNA templates which are thought to have a propensity to form secondary structures. Using a mouse knockout model we demonstrate that ATRX plays a direct role in facilitating DNA replication. Ablation of ATRX alone, although leading to a DNA damage response at telomeres, is not sufficient to trigger the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

  16. ATRX dysfunction induces replication defects in primary mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Jelinska, Clare; Xella, Barbara; Ayyub, Helena; Taylor, Stephen; Mitson, Matthew; Bachrati, Csanád Z; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin remodeling protein ATRX, which targets tandem repetitive DNA, has been shown to be required for expression of the alpha globin genes, for proliferation of a variety of cellular progenitors, for chromosome congression and for the maintenance of telomeres. Mutations in ATRX have recently been identified in tumours which maintain their telomeres by a telomerase independent pathway involving homologous recombination thought to be triggered by DNA damage. It is as yet unknown whether there is a central underlying mechanism associated with ATRX dysfunction which can explain the numerous cellular phenomena observed. There is, however, growing evidence for its role in the replication of various repetitive DNA templates which are thought to have a propensity to form secondary structures. Using a mouse knockout model we demonstrate that ATRX plays a direct role in facilitating DNA replication. Ablation of ATRX alone, although leading to a DNA damage response at telomeres, is not sufficient to trigger the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

  17. Human Airway Epithelial Cells Direct Significant Rhinovirus Replication in Monocytic Cells by Enhancing ICAM1 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Lingxiang; Lizarraga, Rosa; Chen, Yin

    2017-08-01

    Human rhinovirus (RV) is the major cause of common cold, and it also plays a significant role in asthma and asthma exacerbation. The airway epithelium is the primary site of RV infection and production. In contrast, monocytic cells (e.g., monocytes and macrophages) are believed to be nonpermissive for RV replication. Instead, RV has been shown to modulate inflammatory gene expressions in these cells via a replication-independent mechanism. In the study presented here, replication of RV16 (a major-group RV) was found to be significantly enhanced in monocytes when it was cocultivated with airway epithelial cells. This effect appeared to be mediated by secretory components from epithelial cells, which stimulated RV16 replication and significantly elevated the expression of a number of proinflammatory cytokines. The lack of such an effect on RV1A, a minor-group RV that enters the cell by a different receptor, suggests that intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1), the receptor for major-group RVs, may be involved. Indeed, conditioned media from epithelial cells significantly increased ICAM1 expression in monocytes. Consistently, ICAM1 overexpression and ICAM1 knockdown enhanced and blocked RV production, respectively, confirming the role of ICAM1 in this process. Thus, this is the first report demonstrating that airway epithelial cells direct significant RV16 replication in monocytic cells via an ICAM1-dependent mechanism. This finding will open a new avenue for the study of RV infection in airway disease and its exacerbation.

  18. A transgenic mouse marking live replicating cells reveals in vivo transcriptional program of proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Moran, Maya

    2012-01-01

    biological material. We describe a transgenic mouse strain, expressing a CyclinB1-GFP fusion reporter, that marks replicating cells in the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Using flow cytometry, we isolate live replicating cells from the liver and compare their transcriptome to that of quiescent cells...

  19. Mir-29b Mediates the Neural Tube versus Neural Crest Fate Decision during Embryonic Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiajie; Wu, Yukang; Li, Guoping; Ma, Li; Feng, Ke; Guo, Xudong; Jia, Wenwen; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Guang; Li, Ping; Kang, Jiuhong

    2017-08-08

    During gastrulation, the neuroectoderm cells form the neural tube and neural crest. The nervous system contains significantly more microRNAs than other tissues, but the role of microRNAs in controlling the differentiation of neuroectodermal cells into neural tube epithelial (NTE) cells and neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unknown. Using embryonic stem cell (ESC) neural differentiation systems, we found that miR-29b was upregulated in NTE cells and downregulated in NCCs. MiR-29b promoted the differentiation of ESCs into NTE cells and inhibited their differentiation into NCCs. Accordingly, the inhibition of miR-29b significantly inhibited the differentiation of NTE cells. A mechanistic study revealed that miR-29b targets DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) to regulate neural differentiation. Moreover, miR-29b mediated the function of Pou3f1, a critical neural transcription factor. Therefore, our study showed that the Pou3f1-miR-29b-Dnmt3a regulatory axis was active at the initial stage of neural differentiation and regulated the determination of cell fate. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Host DNA damage response factors localize to merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication sites to support efficient viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Sabrina H; Wang, Xin; Li, Jing; Buck, Christopher B; You, Jianxin

    2014-03-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making MCPyV the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. With the high prevalence of MCPyV infection and the increasing amount of MCC diagnosis, there is a need to better understand the virus and its oncogenic potential. In this study, we examined the relationship between the host DNA damage response (DDR) and MCPyV replication. We found that components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways accumulate in MCPyV large T antigen (LT)-positive nuclear foci in cells infected with native MCPyV virions. To further study MCPyV replication, we employed our previously established system, in which recombinant MCPyV episomal DNA is autonomously replicated in cultured cells. Similar to native MCPyV infection, where both MCPyV origin and LT are present, the host DDR machinery colocalized with LT in distinct nuclear foci. Immunofluorescence in situ hybridization and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation analysis showed that these DDR proteins and MCPyV LT in fact colocalized at the actively replicating MCPyV replication complexes, which were absent when a replication-defective LT mutant or an MCPyV-origin mutant was introduced in place of wild-type LT or wild-type viral origin. Inhibition of DDR kinases using chemical inhibitors and ATR/ATM small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown reduced MCPyV DNA replication without significantly affecting LT expression or the host cell cycle. This study demonstrates that these host DDR factors are important for MCPyV DNA replication, providing new insight into the host machinery involved in the MCPyV life cycle. MCPyV is the first polyomavirus to be clearly associated with human cancer. However, the MCPyV life cycle and its oncogenic mechanism remain poorly understood. In this report, we show that, in cells infected with native MCPyV virions, components of the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR

  1. Replication of Norovirus in cell culture reveals a tropism for dendritic cells and macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane E Wobus

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are understudied because these important enteric pathogens have not been cultured to date. We found that the norovirus murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1 infects macrophage-like cells in vivo and replicates in cultured primary dendritic cells and macrophages. MNV-1 growth was inhibited by the interferon-alphabeta receptor and STAT-1, and was associated with extensive rearrangements of intracellular membranes. An amino acid substitution in the capsid protein of serially passaged MNV-1 was associated with virulence attenuation in vivo. This is the first report of replication of a norovirus in cell culture. The capacity of MNV-1 to replicate in a STAT-1-regulated fashion and the unexpected tropism of a norovirus for cells of the hematopoietic lineage provide important insights into norovirus biology.

  2. Analysis of Single-Locus Replication Timing in Asynchronous Cycling Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federica, Lo Sardo

    2016-01-01

    In higher eucaryotes, not all the genome is replicated simultaneously: there are parts of the genome that replicate at the beginning of S-phase (early S-phase), others that are replicated later. In each cell, early replicating genomic regions are alternated to late-replicating regions. In general, eucaryotic genomes are organized into structural domains where genes showing the same epigenetic state replicate at the same time.Here, we will describe the protocol that we routinely used for the analysis of replication timing of specific loci in Drosophila embryonic cell lines (S2 and S3) based on BrdU labeling and FACS sorting of different S-phase fractions (early, mid, late) of asynchronous cycling cells.

  3. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cremaschi

    Full Text Available Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  4. Repurposing Lesogaberan to Promote Human Islet Cell Survival and β-Cell Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jide Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The activation of β-cell’s A- and B-type gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs can promote their survival and replication, and the activation of α-cell GABAA-Rs promotes their conversion into β-cells. However, GABA and the most clinically applicable GABA-R ligands may be suboptimal for the long-term treatment of diabetes due to their pharmacological properties or potential side-effects on the central nervous system (CNS. Lesogaberan (AZD3355 is a peripherally restricted high-affinity GABAB-R-specific agonist, originally developed for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD that appears to be safe for human use. This study tested the hypothesis that lesogaberan could be repurposed to promote human islet cell survival and β-cell replication. Treatment with lesogaberan significantly enhanced replication of human islet cells in vitro, which was abrogated by a GABAB-R antagonist. Immunohistochemical analysis of human islets that were grafted into immune-deficient mice revealed that oral treatment with lesogaberan promoted human β-cell replication and islet cell survival in vivo as effectively as GABA (which activates both GABAA-Rs and GABAB-Rs, perhaps because of its more favorable pharmacokinetics. Lesogaberan may be a promising drug candidate for clinical studies of diabetes intervention and islet transplantation.

  5. Darwinian evolution in a translation-coupled RNA replication system within a cell-like compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Usui, Kimihito; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Sunami, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The ability to evolve is a key characteristic that distinguishes living things from non-living chemical compounds. The construction of an evolvable cell-like system entirely from non-living molecules has been a major challenge. Here we construct an evolvable artificial cell model from an assembly of biochemical molecules. The artificial cell model contains artificial genomic RNA that replicates through the translation of its encoded RNA replicase. We perform a long-term (600-generation) replication experiment using this system, in which mutations are spontaneously introduced into the RNA by replication error, and highly replicable mutants dominate the population according to Darwinian principles. During evolution, the genomic RNA gradually reinforces its interaction with the translated replicase, thereby acquiring competitiveness against selfish (parasitic) RNAs. This study provides the first experimental evidence that replicating systems can be developed through Darwinian evolution in a cell-like compartment, even in the presence of parasitic replicators.

  6. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.

    2016-01-01

    , and by taking into account the chromatin's fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement......We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations...... with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic...

  7. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells...... prokaryotes and eukaryotes are inactivated until the next cell cycle. Furthermore, in both systems the beta-clamp of the replicative polymerase associates with enzymatic activities that contribute to the inactivation of the helicase loaders. Finally, recent studies suggest that the control mechanism...

  8. MANF Promotes Differentiation and Migration of Neural Progenitor Cells with Potential Neural Regenerative Effects in Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Anttila, Jenni E; Khodosevich, Konstantin

    2018-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia activates endogenous reparative processes, such as increased proliferation of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migration of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) toward the ischemic area. However, this reparative process is limited because most of the NPCs...

  9. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-03-29

    The 'neural plate border' of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure.

  10. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  11. Folate receptor 1 is necessary for neural plate cell apical constriction during Xenopus neural tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashova, Olga A; Visina, Olesya; Borodinsky, Laura N

    2017-04-15

    Folate supplementation prevents up to 70% of neural tube defects (NTDs), which result from a failure of neural tube closure during embryogenesis. The elucidation of the mechanisms underlying folate action has been challenging. This study introduces Xenopus laevis as a model to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in folate action during neural tube formation. We show that knockdown of folate receptor 1 (Folr1; also known as FRα) impairs neural tube formation and leads to NTDs. Folr1 knockdown in neural plate cells only is necessary and sufficient to induce NTDs. Folr1-deficient neural plate cells fail to constrict, resulting in widening of the neural plate midline and defective neural tube closure. Pharmacological inhibition of folate action by methotrexate during neurulation induces NTDs by inhibiting folate interaction with its uptake systems. Our findings support a model in which the folate receptor interacts with cell adhesion molecules, thus regulating the apical cell membrane remodeling and cytoskeletal dynamics necessary for neural plate folding. Further studies in this organism could unveil novel cellular and molecular events mediated by folate and lead to new ways of preventing NTDs. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Multiple phenotypes in Huntington disease mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, James J; Valencia, Antonio; Alexander, Jonathan; Sapp, Ellen; Gatune, Leah; Sangrey, Gavin R; Sinha, Saurabh; Scherber, Cally M; Zeitlin, Scott; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh; Irimia, Daniel; Difiglia, Marian; Kegel, Kimberly B

    2012-05-01

    Neural stem (NS) cells are a limitless resource, and thus superior to primary neurons for drug discovery provided they exhibit appropriate disease phenotypes. Here we established NS cells for cellular studies of Huntington's disease (HD). HD is a heritable neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation resulting in an increased number of glutamines (Q) within a polyglutamine tract in Huntingtin (Htt). NS cells were isolated from embryonic wild-type (Htt(7Q/7Q)) and "knock-in" HD (Htt(140Q/140Q)) mice expressing full-length endogenous normal or mutant Htt. NS cells were also developed from mouse embryonic stem cells that were devoid of Htt (Htt(-/-)), or knock-in cells containing human exon1 with an N-terminal FLAG epitope tag and with 7Q or 140Q inserted into one of the mouse alleles (Htt(F7Q/7Q) and Htt(F140Q/7Q)). Compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells, HD Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells showed significantly reduced levels of cholesterol, increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and impaired motility. The heterozygous Htt(F140Q/7Q) NS cells had increased ROS and decreased motility compared to Htt(F7Q/7Q). These phenotypes of HD NS cells replicate those seen in HD patients or in primary cell or in vivo models of HD. Huntingtin "knock-out" NS cells (Htt(-/-)) also had impaired motility, but in contrast to HD cells had increased cholesterol. In addition, Htt(140Q/140Q) NS cells had higher phospho-AKT/AKT ratios than Htt(7Q/7Q) NS cells in resting conditions and after BDNF stimulation, suggesting mutant htt affects AKT dependent growth factor signaling. Upon differentiation, the Htt(7Q/7Q) and Htt(140Q/140Q) generated numerous Beta(III)-Tubulin- and GABA-positive neurons; however, after 15 days the cellular architecture of the differentiated Htt(140Q/140Q) cultures changed compared to Htt(7Q/7Q) cultures and included a marked increase of GFAP-positive cells. Our findings suggest that NS cells expressing endogenous mutant Htt will be useful for study of mechanisms of HD

  13. The neural crest and neural crest cells: discovery and significance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    such as sea urchins, flies, fish and humans. (ii) Embryos (and so larvae and adults) form by differentiation from these germ layers. (iii) Homologous structures in different animals arise from the same germ layers. The germ-layer theory exerted a profound influence on those claiming a neural crest — that is, an ectodermal.

  14. Helicobacter pylori usurps cell polarity to turn the cell surface into a replicative niche.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin Tan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (Hp intimately interacts with the gastric epithelial surface and translocates the virulence factor CagA into host cells in a contact-dependent manner. To study how Hp benefits from interacting with the cell surface, we developed live-cell microscopy methods to follow the fate of individual bacteria on the cell surface and find that Hp is able to replicate and form microcolonies directly over the intercellular junctions. On polarized epithelia, Hp is able to grow directly on the apical cell surface in conditions that do not support the growth of free-swimming bacteria. In contrast, mutants in CagA delivery are defective in colonization of the apical cell surface. Hp perturbs the polarized epithelium in a highly localized manner, since wild-type Hp does not rescue the growth defect of the CagA-deficient mutants upon co-infection. CagA's ability to disrupt host cell polarity is a key factor in enabling colonization of the apical cell surface by Hp, as disruption of the atypical protein kinase C/Par1b polarity pathway leads to rescue of the mutant growth defect during apical infection, and CagA-deficient mutants are able to colonize the polarized epithelium when given access to the basolateral cell surface. Our study establishes the cell surface as a replicative niche and the importance of CagA and its effects on host cell polarity for this purpose.

  15. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjadj, Djihad; Denecker, Thomas; Maric, Chrystelle; Fauchereau, Fabien; Baldacci, Giuseppe; Cadoret, Jean-Charles

    2016-09-01

    During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14), Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep), Picard et al. (2014 May 1) [1], [2], [3]), and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9), Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20) [5], [6]). On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb) [7], [8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16) [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308), RKO (GSM2111309), HEK 293T (GSM2111310), HeLa (GSM2111311), MRC5-SV (GSM2111312) and K562 (GSM2111313). A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines.

  16. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djihad Hadjadj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14, Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep, Picard et al. (2014 May 1 [1–3], and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9, Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20 [5,6]. On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb [7,8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16 [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308, RKO (GSM2111309, HEK 293T (GSM2111310, HeLa (GSM2111311, MRC5-SV (GSM2111312 and K562 (GSM2111313. A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines.

  17. How a replication origin and matrix attachment region accelerate gene amplification under replication stress in mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-suke Tanaka

    Full Text Available The gene amplification plays a critical role in the malignant transformation of mammalian cells. The most widespread method for amplifying a target gene in cell culture is the use of methotrexate (Mtx treatment to amplify dihydrofolate reductase (Dhfr. Whereas, we found that a plasmid bearing both a mammalian origin of replication (initiation region; IR and a matrix attachment region (MAR was spontaneously amplified in mammalian cells. In this study, we attempted to uncover the underlying mechanism by which the IR/MAR sequence might accelerate Mtx induced Dhfr amplification. The plasmid containing the IR/MAR was extrachromosomally amplified, and then integrated at multiple chromosomal locations within individual cells, increasing the likelihood that the plasmid might be inserted into a chromosomal environment that permits high expression and further amplification. Efficient amplification of this plasmid alleviated the genotoxicity of Mtx. Clone-based cytogenetic and sequence analysis revealed that the plasmid was amplified in a chromosomal context by breakage-fusion-bridge cycles operating either at the plasmid repeat or at the flanking fragile site activated by Mtx. This mechanism explains how a circular molecule bearing IR/MAR sequences of chromosomal origin might be amplified under replication stress, and also provides insight into gene amplification in human cancer.

  18. The CD85j+ NK cell subset potently controls HIV-1 replication in autologous dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Scott-Algara

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells and dendritic cells (DC are thought to play critical roles in the first phases of HIV infection. In this study, we examined changes in the NK cell repertoire and functions occurring in response to early interaction with HIV-infected DC, using an autologous in vitro NK/DC coculture system. We show that NK cell interaction with HIV-1-infected autologous monocyte-derived DC (MDDC modulates NK receptor expression. In particular, expression of the CD85j receptor on NK cells was strongly down-regulated upon coculture with HIV-1-infected MDDC. We demonstrate that CD85j(+ NK cells exert potent control of HIV-1 replication in single-round and productively HIV-1-infected MDDC, whereas CD85j(- NK cells induce a modest and transient decrease of HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 suppression in MDCC by CD85j(+ NK cells required cell-to-cell contact and did not appear mediated by cytotoxicity or by soluble factors. HIV-1 inhibition was abolished when NK-MDDC interaction through the CD85j receptor was blocked with a recombinant CD85j molecule, whereas inhibition was only slightly counteracted by blocking HLA class I molecules, which are known CD85j ligands. After masking HLA class I molecules with specific antibodies, a fraction of HIV-1 infected MDDC was still strongly stained by a recombinant CD85j protein. These results suggest that CD85j(+ NK cell inhibition of HIV-1 replication in MDDC is mainly mediated by CD85j interaction with an unknown ligand (distinct from HLA class I molecules preferentially expressed on HIV-1-infected MDDC.

  19. Adult Mammalian Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis: Five Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Allison M.; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2015-01-01

    Summary Adult somatic stem cells in various organs maintain homeostatic tissue regeneration and enhance plasticity. Since its initial discovery five decades ago, investigations of adult neurogenesis and neural stem cells have led to an established and expanding field that has significantly influenced many facets of neuroscience, developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Here we review recent progress and focus on questions related to adult mammalian neural stem cells that also apply to other somatic stem cells. We further discuss emerging topics that are guiding the field toward better understanding adult neural stem cells and ultimately applying these principles to improve human health. PMID:26431181

  20. Effect of monocular deprivation on rabbit neural retinal cell densities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  1. Altered Replication in Human Cells Promotes DMPK (CTG)n · (CAG)n Repeat Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomi; Gao, Yanzhe; Lewis, Todd; Barthelemy, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is associated with expansion of (CTG)n · (CAG)n trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the DMPK gene. Replication origins are cis-acting elements that potentiate TNR instability; therefore, we mapped replication initiation sites and prereplication complex protein binding within the ∼10-kb DMPK/SIX5 locus in non-DM1 and DM1 cells. Two origins, ISDMPK and ISSIX5, flanked the (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in control cells and in DM1 cells. Orc2 and Mcm4 bound near each of the replication initiation sites, but a dramatic change in (CTG)n · (CAG)n replication polarity was not correlated with TNR expansion. To test whether (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs are cis-acting elements of instability in human cells, model cell lines were created by integration of cassettes containing the c-myc replication origin and (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in HeLa cells. Replication forks were slowed by (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs in a length-dependent manner independent of replication polarity, implying that expanded (CTG)n · (CAG)n TNRs lead to replication stress. Consistent with this prediction, TNR instability increased in the HeLa model cells and DM1 cells upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the fork stabilization protein Claspin, Timeless, or Tipin. These results suggest that aberrant DNA replication and TNR instability are linked in DM1 cells. PMID:22354993

  2. Altered replication in human cells promotes DMPK (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Gao, Yanzhe; Lewis, Todd; Barthelemy, Joanna; Leffak, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is associated with expansion of (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the DMPK gene. Replication origins are cis-acting elements that potentiate TNR instability; therefore, we mapped replication initiation sites and prereplication complex protein binding within the ~10-kb DMPK/SIX5 locus in non-DM1 and DM1 cells. Two origins, IS(DMPK) and IS(SIX5), flanked the (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in control cells and in DM1 cells. Orc2 and Mcm4 bound near each of the replication initiation sites, but a dramatic change in (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) replication polarity was not correlated with TNR expansion. To test whether (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs are cis-acting elements of instability in human cells, model cell lines were created by integration of cassettes containing the c-myc replication origin and (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in HeLa cells. Replication forks were slowed by (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs in a length-dependent manner independent of replication polarity, implying that expanded (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) TNRs lead to replication stress. Consistent with this prediction, TNR instability increased in the HeLa model cells and DM1 cells upon small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of the fork stabilization protein Claspin, Timeless, or Tipin. These results suggest that aberrant DNA replication and TNR instability are linked in DM1 cells.

  3. Visualization and measurement of ATP levels in living cells replicating hepatitis C virus genome RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Ando

    Full Text Available Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is the primary energy currency of all living organisms and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Although ATP requirements during viral lifecycles have been examined in a number of studies, a method by which ATP production can be monitored in real-time, and by which ATP can be quantified in individual cells and subcellular compartments, is lacking, thereby hindering studies aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms by which viral replication energized by ATP is controlled. In this study, we investigated the fluctuation and distribution of ATP in cells during RNA replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family. We demonstrated that cells involved in viral RNA replication actively consumed ATP, thereby reducing cytoplasmic ATP levels. Subsequently, a method to measure ATP levels at putative subcellular sites of HCV RNA replication in living cells was developed by introducing a recently-established Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based ATP indicator, called ATeam, into the NS5A coding region of the HCV replicon. Using this method, we were able to observe the formation of ATP-enriched dot-like structures, which co-localize with non-structural viral proteins, within the cytoplasm of HCV-replicating cells but not in non-replicating cells. The obtained FRET signals allowed us to estimate ATP concentrations within HCV replicating cells as ∼5 mM at possible replicating sites and ∼1 mM at peripheral sites that did not appear to be involved in HCV replication. In contrast, cytoplasmic ATP levels in non-replicating Huh-7 cells were estimated as ∼2 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate changes in ATP concentration within cells during replication of the HCV genome and increased ATP levels at distinct sites within replicating cells. ATeam may be a powerful tool for the study of energy metabolism during replication of the viral genome.

  4. Rat cytomegalovirus replication in the salivary glands is exclusively confined to striated duct cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloover, JS; Hillebrands, JL; de Wit, G; Grauls, G; Rozing, J; Bruggeman, CA; Nieuwenhuis, P

    2000-01-01

    The salivary gland is the preferred organ for cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication and viral persistence. In order to identify the nature of infected cells and to study viral replication in more detail, several experiments were conducted. Using the rat CMV (RCMV) model, acutely infected young adult

  5. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  6. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  7. Enhanced expression of FNDC5 in human embryonic stem cell-derived neural cells along with relevant embryonic neural tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrizjani, Fatemeh Ahmadi; Ghaedi, Kamran; Salamian, Ahmad; Tanhaei, Somayeh; Nejati, Alireza Shoaraye; Salehi, Hossein; Nabiuni, Mohammad; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-02-25

    Availability of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) has enhanced the capability of basic and clinical research in the context of human neural differentiation. Derivation of neural progenitor (NP) cells from hESCs facilitates the process of human embryonic development through the generation of neuronal subtypes. We have recently indicated that fibronectin type III domain containing 5 protein (FNDC5) expression is required for appropriate neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Bioinformatics analyses have shown the presence of three isoforms for human FNDC5 mRNA. To differentiate which isoform of FNDC5 is involved in the process of human neural differentiation, we have used hESCs as an in vitro model for neural differentiation by retinoic acid (RA) induction. The hESC line, Royan H5, was differentiated into a neural lineage in defined adherent culture treated by RA and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). We collected all cell types that included hESCs, rosette structures, and neural cells in an attempt to assess the expression of FNDC5 isoforms. There was a contiguous increase in all three FNDC5 isoforms during the neural differentiation process. Furthermore, the highest level of expression of the isoforms was significantly observed in neural cells compared to hESCs and the rosette structures known as neural precursor cells (NPCs). High expression levels of FNDC5 in human fetal brain and spinal cord tissues have suggested the involvement of this gene in neural tube development. Additional research is necessary to determine the major function of FDNC5 in this process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

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    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  9. Replication of a hepatitis C virus replicon clone in mouse cells

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    Chisari Francis V

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is a significant public health burden and small animal models are needed to study the pathology and immunobiology of the virus. In effort to develop experimental HCV mouse models, we screened a panel of HCV replicons to identify clones capable of replicating in mouse hepatocytes. Results We report the establishment of stable HCV replication in mouse hepatocyte and fibroblast cell lines using replicons derived from the JFH-1 genotype 2a consensus sequence. Viral RNA replication efficiency in mouse cells was comparable to that observed in human Huh-7 replicon cells, with negative-strand HCV RNA and the viral NS5A protein being readily detected by Northern and Western Blot analysis, respectively. Although HCV replication was established in the absence of adaptive mutations that might otherwise compromise the in vitro infectivity of the JFH-1 clone, no infectious virus was detected when the culture medium from full length HCV RNA replicating mouse cells was titrated on Huh-7 cells, suggesting that the mouse cells were unable to support production of infectious progeny viral particles. Consistent with an additional block in viral entry, infectious JFH-1 particles produced in Huh-7 cells were not able to establish detectable HCV RNA replication in naïve mouse cells. Conclusion Thus, this report expands the repertoire of HCV replication systems and possibly represents a step toward developing mouse models of HCV replication, but it also highlights that other species restrictions might continue to make the development of a purely murine HCV infectious model challenging.

  10. Ultrastructural studies on the replication of herpes simplex virus in PK and XTC-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampor, F; Szántó, J

    1982-01-01

    Ultrastructural changes showed the following characteristics of restricted replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV 1) strains MA and HSZP in PK and XTC-2 cells: 1) minimal cytopathic changes in PK cells as compared to more pronounced alterations in XTC-2 cells; 2) formation of single nucleocapsids or their absence in the nuclei of PK cells infected with the HSZP strain; 3) lack of budding and envelopment and absence of reduplication of the nuclear membrane; 4) persistence of partially uncoated virions within the endocytic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of PK cells; and 5) formation of dense inclusion bodies in addition to the presence of defective virions in the cytoplasm of XTC-2 cells and vacuolation of their cytoplasmic membranes. The replication of HSV 1 in PK and XTC-2 cells seemed to be blocked at both early and late stages of virus replication. At low multiplicity of infection, no virus particles were formed.

  11. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

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    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  12. RECQ5 helicase promotes resolution of conflicts between replication and transcription in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Vaclav; Dobrovolna, Jana; Hühn, Daniela; Fryzelkova, Jana; Bartek, Jiri; Janscak, Pavel

    2016-08-15

    Collisions between replication and transcription machineries represent a significant source of genomic instability. RECQ5 DNA helicase binds to RNA-polymerase (RNAP) II during transcription elongation and suppresses transcription-associated genomic instability. Here, we show that RECQ5 also associates with RNAPI and enforces the stability of ribosomal DNA arrays. We demonstrate that RECQ5 associates with transcription complexes in DNA replication foci and counteracts replication fork stalling in RNAPI- and RNAPII-transcribed genes, suggesting that RECQ5 exerts its genome-stabilizing effect by acting at sites of replication-transcription collisions. Moreover, RECQ5-deficient cells accumulate RAD18 foci and BRCA1-dependent RAD51 foci that are both formed at sites of interference between replication and transcription and likely represent unresolved replication intermediates. Finally, we provide evidence for a novel mechanism of resolution of replication-transcription collisions wherein the interaction between RECQ5 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) promotes RAD18-dependent PCNA ubiquitination and the helicase activity of RECQ5 promotes the processing of replication intermediates. © 2016 Urban et al.

  13. Multiple Regulatory Systems Coordinate DNA Replication with Cell Growth in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes. PMID:25340815

  14. Autoradiographic studies of chromosome replication during the cell cycle of Streptococcus faecium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, M.L.; Koch, A.L.; Dicker, D.T.; Daneo-Moore, L.

    1986-11-01

    Analysis of the distribution of autoradiographic grains around cells of Streptococcus faecium which had been either continuously or pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine (mass doubling time, 90 min) showed a non-Poisson distribution even when the distribution of cell sizes in the populations studied was taken into account. These non-Poisson distributions of grains were assumed to reflect the discontinuous nature of chromosome replication. To study this discontinuous process further, an equation was fitted to the grain distribution observed for the pulse-labeled cells that assumed that in any population of cells there were subpopulations in which there were zero, one, or two replicating chromosomes. This analysis predicted an average time for chromosome replication and for the period between completion of rounds of chromosome replication and division of 55 and 43 min, respectively, which were in excellent agreement with estimates made by other techniques. The present investigation extended past studies in indicating that the initiation and completion of rounds of chromosome replication are poorly phased with increases in cell volume and that the amount of chromosome replication may be different in different cell halves.

  15. Pig Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Rosettes Developmentally Mimic Human Pluripotent Stem Cell Neural Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Cárdenas, Amalia; Webb, Robin; Jordan, Erin; West, Rachel; West, Franklin D; Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Wang, Kai; Stice, Steven L

    2015-08-15

    For diseases of the brain, the pig (Sus scrofa) is increasingly being used as a model organism that shares many anatomical and biological similarities with humans. We report that pig induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) can recapitulate events in early mammalian neural development. Pig iPSC line (POU5F1(high)/SSEA4(low)) had a higher potential to form neural rosettes (NR) containing neuroepithelial cells than either POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(low) or POU5F1(low)/SSEA4(high) lines. Thus, POU5F1 and SSEA4 pluripotency marker profiles in starting porcine iPSC populations can predict their propensity to form more robust NR populations in culture. The NR were isolated and expanded in vitro, retaining their NR morphology and neuroepithelial molecular properties. These cells expressed anterior central nervous system fate markers OTX2 and GBX2 through at least seven passages, and responded to retinoic acid, promoting a more posterior fate (HOXB4+, OTX2-, and GBX2-). These findings offer insight into pig iPSC development, which parallels the human iPSC in both anterior and posterior neural cell fates. These in vitro similarities in early neural differentiation processes support the use of pig iPSC and differentiated neural cells as a cell therapy in allogeneic porcine neural injury and degeneration models, providing relevant translational data for eventual human neural cell therapies.

  16. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  17. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B; Kuhn, Richard J

    2017-02-14

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.IMPORTANCE Reemerging mosquito-borne alphaviruses cause serious human epidemics worldwide. Several structural and imaging studies have helped to define the life cycle of alphaviruses in mammalian cells, but the mode of virus replication and

  18. Single-Cell and Single-Cycle Analysis of HIV-1 Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mowgli; Zhang, Fengwen; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of the late stages of the HIV-1 life cycle are poorly documented. Viral replication dynamics are typically measured in populations of infected cells, but asynchrony that is introduced during the early steps of HIV-1 replication complicates the measurement of the progression of subsequent steps and can mask replication dynamics and their variation in individual infected cells. We established microscopy-based methods to dynamically measure HIV-1-encoded reporter gene and antiviral gene expression in individual infected cells. We coupled these measurements with conventional analyses to quantify delays in the HIV-1 replication cycle imposed by the biphasic nature of HIV-1 gene expression and by the assembly-inhibiting property of the matrix domain of Gag. We further related the dynamics of restriction factor (APOBEC3G) removal to the dynamics of HIV-1 replication in individual cells. These studies provide a timeline for key events in the HIV-1 replication cycle, and reveal that the interval between the onset of early and late HIV-1 gene expression is only ~3h, but matrix causes a ~6–12h delay in the generation of extracellular virions. Interestingly, matrix delays particle assembly to a time at which APOBEC3G has largely been removed from the cell. Thus, a need to prepare infected cells to be efficient producers of infectious HIV-1 may provide an impetus for programmed delays in HIV-1 virion genesis. Our findings also emphasize the significant heterogeneity in the length of the HIV-1 replication cycle in homogenous cell populations and suggest that a typical infected cell generates new virions for only a few hours at the end of a 48h lifespan. Therefore, small changes in the lifespan of infected cells might have a large effect on viral yield in a single cycle and the overall clinical course in infected individuals. PMID:26086614

  19. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Jalasvuori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s. These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types.

  20. Late replication domains in polytene and non-polytene cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

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    Elena S Belyaeva

    Full Text Available In D. melanogaster polytene chromosomes, intercalary heterochromatin (IH appears as large dense bands scattered in euchromatin and comprises clusters of repressed genes. IH displays distinctly low gene density, indicative of their particular regulation. Genes embedded in IH replicate late in the S phase and become underreplicated. We asked whether localization and organization of these late-replicating domains is conserved in a distinct cell type. Using published comprehensive genome-wide chromatin annotation datasets (modENCODE and others, we compared IH organization in salivary gland cells and in a Kc cell line. We first established the borders of 60 IH regions on a molecular map, these regions containing underreplicated material and encompassing ∼12% of Drosophila genome. We showed that in Kc cells repressed chromatin constituted 97% of the sequences that corresponded to IH bands. This chromatin is depleted for ORC-2 binding and largely replicates late. Differences in replication timing between the cell types analyzed are local and affect only sub-regions but never whole IH bands. As a rule such differentially replicating sub-regions display open chromatin organization, which apparently results from cell-type specific gene expression of underlying genes. We conclude that repressed chromatin organization of IH is generally conserved in polytene and non-polytene cells. Yet, IH domains do not function as transcription- and replication-regulatory units, because differences in transcription and replication between cell types are not domain-wide, rather they are restricted to small "islands" embedded in these domains. IH regions can thus be defined as a special class of domains with low gene density, which have narrow temporal expression patterns, and so displaying relatively conserved organization.

  1. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... breakage, and, ultimately, cell death. Despite many years of intensive research into the molecular underpinnings of the eukaryotic replication checkpoint, the mechanisms underlying the dismal consequences of its failure remain enigmatic. A recent development offers a unifying model in which the replication...... checkpoint guards against global exhaustion of rate-limiting replication regulators. Here we discuss how such a mechanism can prevent catastrophic genome disruption and suggest how to harness this knowledge to advance therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells that inherently proliferate under...

  2. A Role of hIPI3 in DNA Replication Licensing in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Amin, Aftab; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ziyi; Jiang, Huadong; Liang, Lu; Shi, Linjing; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Ipi3p is required for DNA replication and cell viability in Sacharomyces cerevisiae. It is an essential component of the Rix1 complex (Rix1p/Ipi2p-Ipi1p-Ipi3p) that is required for the processing of 35S pre-rRNA in pre-60S ribosomal particles and for the initiation of DNA replication. The human IPI3 homolog is WDR18 (WD repeat domain 18), which shares significant homology with yIpi3p. Here we report that knockdown of hIPI3 resulted in substantial defects in the chromatin association of the MCM complex, DNA replication, cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Importantly, hIPI3 silencing did not result in a reduction of the protein level of hCDC6, hMCM7, or the ectopically expressed GFP protein, indicating that protein synthesis was not defective in the same time frame of the DNA replication and cell cycle defects. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of hIPI3 fluctuate in the cell cycle, with the highest levels from M phase to early G1 phase, similar to other pre-replicative (pre-RC) proteins. Moreover, hIPI3 interacts with other replication-initiation proteins, co-localizes with hMCM7 in the nucleus, and is important for the nuclear localization of hMCM7. We also found that hIPI3 preferentially binds to the origins of DNA replication including those at the c-Myc, Lamin-B2 and β-Globin loci. These results indicate that hIPI3 is involved in human DNA replication licensing independent of its role in ribosome biogenesis.

  3. Umbilical cord blood cells CD133+/CD133- cultivation in neural proliferation media differentiates towards neural cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovinska, Lucia; Novotna, Ivana; Kubes, Miroslav; Radonak, Jozef; Jergova, Stanislava; Cigankova, Viera; Rosocha, Jan; Cizkova, Dasa

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been identified as a good source of hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic stem cells that can be easily isolated. In the present study we investigated the possibility of whether stem cells in mononuclear UCB grown under defined conditions can produce progeny with neural phenotype. A combination of antigen-driven magnetic cell sorting (MACs) method and defined culture conditions specific for cells of neural lineages were used for isolation, expansion and differentiation of CD133+/- cells from UCB. Both UCB-derived fractions were expanded by exposure to growth factors (EGF, bFGF). Differentiation was induced by replacing them with fetal bovine serum. Using immunocytochemistry, the cell markers for neural (MAP2, GFAP, RIP) and non-neural lineages (S-100, von Willebrand factor) were detected. The analysis revealed occurrence of fully mature neural and non-neural lineages, which showed qualitative and quantitative differences between population of CD133+ and CD133- cells. The expression levels of MAP2 and RIP in CD133+ were significantly higher than in CD133-, more GFAP positive cells were found in the CD133-. At the same time, S-100 was expressed by 32.47 ± 6.24% of CD133- cells and 29.42 ± 1.32% of CD133- cell expressed a von Willebrand factor antigen. Our results indicate that stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood are easy to obtain, proliferate and are able to differentiate towards the cells of neural lineages, which represents a promising way for their utilization in cell-based therapies for CNS injuries and diseases. Copyright © 2011 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanical roles of apical constriction, cell elongation, and cell migration during neural tube formation in Xenopus.

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    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Makoto; Watanabe, Tadashi; Yasue, Naoko; Tateo, Itsuki; Adachi, Taiji; Ueno, Naoto

    2016-12-01

    Neural tube closure is an important and necessary process during the development of the central nervous system. The formation of the neural tube structure from a flat sheet of neural epithelium requires several cell morphogenetic events and tissue dynamics to account for the mechanics of tissue deformation. Cell elongation changes cuboidal cells into columnar cells, and apical constriction then causes them to adopt apically narrow, wedge-like shapes. In addition, the neural plate in Xenopus is stratified, and the non-neural cells in the deep layer (deep cells) pull the overlying superficial cells, eventually bringing the two layers of cells to the midline. Thus, neural tube closure appears to be a complex event in which these three physical events are considered to play key mechanical roles. To test whether these three physical events are mechanically sufficient to drive neural tube formation, we employed a three-dimensional vertex model and used it to simulate the process of neural tube closure. The results suggest that apical constriction cued the bending of the neural plate by pursing the circumference of the apical surface of the neural cells. Neural cell elongation in concert with apical constriction further narrowed the apical surface of the cells and drove the rapid folding of the neural plate, but was insufficient for complete neural tube closure. Migration of the deep cells provided the additional tissue deformation necessary for closure. To validate the model, apical constriction and cell elongation were inhibited in Xenopus laevis embryos. The resulting cell and tissue shapes resembled the corresponding simulation results.

  5. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA): a key factor in DNA replication and cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2011-05-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) has been found in the nuclei of yeast, plant and animal cells that undergo cell division, suggesting a function in cell cycle regulation and/or DNA replication. It subsequently became clear that PCNA also played a role in other processes involving the cell genome. This review discusses eukaryotic PCNA, with an emphasis on plant PCNA, in terms of the protein structure and its biochemical properties as well as gene structure, organization, expression and function. PCNA exerts a tripartite function by operating as (1) a sliding clamp during DNA synthesis, (2) a polymerase switch factor and (3) a recruitment factor. Most of its functions are mediated by its interactions with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination as well as in regulation of the cell cycle and chromatid cohesion. Moreover, post-translational modifications of PCNA play a key role in regulation of its functions. Finally, a phylogenetic comparison of PCNA genes suggests that the multi-functionality observed in most species is a product of evolution. Most plant PCNAs exhibit features similar to those found for PCNAs of other eukaryotes. Similarities include: (1) a trimeric ring structure of the PCNA sliding clamp, (2) the involvement of PCNA in DNA replication and repair, (3) the ability to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase δ and (4) the ability to interact with p21, a regulator of the cell cycle. However, many plant genomes seem to contain the second, probably functional, copy of the PCNA gene, in contrast to PCNA pseudogenes that are found in mammalian genomes.

  6. Pharmacokinetic study of neural stem cell-based cell carrier for oncolytic virotherapy: Targeted delivery of the therapeutic payload in an orthotopic brain tumor model

    OpenAIRE

    Thaci, Bart; Ahmed, Atique U.; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Tobias, Alex L.; Han, Yu; Aboody, Karen S.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2012-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising novel therapy for glioblastoma that needs to be optimized before introduced to clinic. The targeting of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) can be improved by relying on the tumor tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here, we report the characterization of an FDA approved NSC, HB1.F3-CD, as a cell carrier for CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-tropic oncolytic adenovirus. We show that NSCs replicate and release infectious CRAd-S-pk7 progeny capable ...

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  8. Virion-Independent Transfer of Replication-Competent Hepatitis C Virus RNA between Permissive Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Longatti, Andrea; Boyd, Bryan; Chisari, Francis V.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we show that replication-competent subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be transferred to permissive Huh7 cells, leading to the establishment of viral RNA replication. Further, we show that these events are mediated by exosomes rather than infectious virus particles. If similar events occur in vivo, this could represent a novel, albeit inefficient, mechanism of viral spread and immune escape.

  9. Virion-independent transfer of replication-competent hepatitis C virus RNA between permissive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longatti, Andrea; Boyd, Bryan; Chisari, Francis V

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we show that replication-competent subgenomic hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA can be transferred to permissive Huh7 cells, leading to the establishment of viral RNA replication. Further, we show that these events are mediated by exosomes rather than infectious virus particles. If similar events occur in vivo, this could represent a novel, albeit inefficient, mechanism of viral spread and immune escape. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Assessing the replicative history of human T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lier, R. A.; Baars, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Upon encountering antigen, T cells clonally expand and differentiate into effector cells that directly or indirectly eliminate antigen-bearing pathogens. When renewed contact with the same pathogen occurs the immune response is mounted in a faster and more accurate way, a process that is referred to

  11. Neural Cell Chip Based Electrochemical Detection of Nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Kafi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Development of a rapid, sensitive and cost-effective method for toxicity assessment of commonly used nanoparticles is urgently needed for the sustainable development of nanotechnology. A neural cell with high sensitivity and conductivity has become a potential candidate for a cell chip to investigate toxicity of environmental influences. A neural cell immobilized on a conductive surface has become a potential tool for the assessment of nanotoxicity based on electrochemical methods. The effective electrochemical monitoring largely depends on the adequate attachment of a neural cell on the chip surfaces. Recently, establishment of integrin receptor specific ligand molecules arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD or its several modifications RGD-Multi Armed Peptide terminated with cysteine (RGD-MAP-C, C(RGD4 ensure farm attachment of neural cell on the electrode surfaces either in their two dimensional (dot or three dimensional (rod or pillar like nano-scale arrangement. A three dimensional RGD modified electrode surface has been proven to be more suitable for cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation as well as electrochemical measurement. This review discusses fabrication as well as electrochemical measurements of neural cell chip with particular emphasis on their use for nanotoxicity assessments sequentially since inception to date. Successful monitoring of quantum dot (QD, graphene oxide (GO and cosmetic compound toxicity using the newly developed neural cell chip were discussed here as a case study. This review recommended that a neural cell chip established on a nanostructured ligand modified conductive surface can be a potential tool for the toxicity assessments of newly developed nanomaterials prior to their use on biology or biomedical technologies.

  12. Neural Crest Stem Cells from Dental Tissues: A New Hope for Dental and Neural Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaskon Ibarretxe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several stem cell sources persist in the adult human body, which opens the doors to both allogeneic and autologous cell therapies. Tooth tissues have proven to be a surprisingly rich and accessible source of neural crest-derived ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, which may be employed to repair disease-affected oral tissues in advanced regenerative dentistry. Additionally, one area of medicine that demands intensive research on new sources of stem cells is nervous system regeneration, since this constitutes a therapeutic hope for patients affected by highly invalidating conditions such as spinal cord injury, stroke, or neurodegenerative diseases. However, endogenous adult sources of neural stem cells present major drawbacks, such as their scarcity and complicated obtention. In this context, EMSCs from dental tissues emerge as good alternative candidates, since they are preserved in adult human individuals, and retain both high proliferation ability and a neural-like phenotype in vitro. In this paper, we discuss some important aspects of tissue regeneration by cell therapy and point out some advantages that EMSCs provide for dental and neural regeneration. We will finally review some of the latest research featuring experimental approaches and benefits of dental stem cell therapy.

  13. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  14. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O. (Univ. of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), ultraviolet light (UV), or gamma radiation (GR)) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes.

  15. Mechanotransduction of Neural Cells Through Cell–Substrate Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukel, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    Neurons and neural stem cells are sensitive to their mechanical and topographical environment, and cell–substrate binding contributes to this sensitivity to activate signaling pathways for basic cell functions. Many transmembrane proteins transmit signals into and out of the cell, including integrins, growth factor receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors, cadherins, cell adhesion molecules, and ion channels. Specifically, integrins are one of the main transmembrane proteins that transmit force across the cell membrane between a cell and its extracellular matrix, making them critical in the study of cell–material interactions. This review focuses on mechanotransduction, defined as the conversion of force a cell generates through cell–substrate bonds to a chemical signal, of neural cells. The chemical signals relay information via pathways through the cellular cytoplasm to the nucleus, where signaling events can affect gene expression. Pathways and the cellular response initiated by substrate binding are explored to better understand their effect on neural cells mechanotransduction. As the results of mechanotransduction affect cell adhesion, cell shape, and differentiation, knowledge regarding neural mechanotransduction is critical for most regenerative strategies in tissue engineering, where novel environments are developed to improve conduit design for central and peripheral nervous system repair in vivo. PMID:26669274

  16. HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines: evidence of ongoing replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Jori; Chopra, Abha; Malatinkova, Eva; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Abana, Chike O; Rhodes, Ajantha; Rezaei, Simin D; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Mallal, Simon; Lewin, Sharon R; Cameron, Paul U

    2017-01-13

    Assessing the location and frequency of HIV integration sites in latently infected cells can potentially inform our understanding of how HIV persists during combination antiretroviral therapy. We developed a novel high throughput sequencing method to evaluate HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines to determine whether there was virus replication or clonal expansion in these cell lines observed as multiple integration events at the same position. We modified a previously reported method using random DNA shearing and PCR to allow for high throughput robotic processing to identify the site and frequency of HIV integration in latently infected cell lines. Latently infected cell lines infected with intact virus demonstrated multiple distinct HIV integration sites (28 different sites in U1, 110 in ACH-2 and 117 in J1.1 per 150,000 cells). In contrast, cell lines infected with replication-incompetent viruses (J-Lat cells) demonstrated single integration sites. Following in vitro passaging of the ACH-2 cell line, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of unique HIV integration sites and there were multiple mutations and large deletions in the proviral DNA. When the ACH-2 cell line was cultured with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir, there was a significant decrease in the number of unique HIV integration sites and a transient increase in the frequency of 2-LTR circles consistent with virus replication in these cells. Cell lines latently infected with intact HIV demonstrated multiple unique HIV integration sites indicating that these cell lines are not clonal and in the ACH-2 cell line there was evidence of low level virus replication. These findings have implications for the use of latently infected cell lines as models of HIV latency and for the use of these cells as standards.

  17. Changes in nucleosome repeat lengths precede replication in the early replicating metallothionein II gene region of cells synchronized in early S phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Anna, J.A.; Tobey, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

    1989-04-04

    Previous investigations showed that inhibition of DNA synthesis by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine produced large changes in the composition and nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin. There the authors report results of investigations to determine whether the changes in nucleosome repeat lengths might be localized in the initiated replicons, as postulated. In most experiments, Chinese hamster (line CHO) cells were synchronized in G1, or they were synchronized in early S phase by allowing G1 cells to enter S phase in medium containing 1 mM hydroxyurea or 5 {mu}g mL{sup {minus}1} aphidicolin, a procedure believed to produce an accumulation of initiated replicons that arise from normally early replicating DNA. Measurements of nucleosome repeat lengths of bulk chromatin, the early replicating unexpressed metallothionein II (MTII) gene region, and a later replicating repeated sequence indicate that the changes in repeat lengths occur preferentially in the early replicating MTII gene region as G1 cells enter and become synchronized in early S phase. During that time, the MTII gene region is not replicated nor is there any evidence for induction of MTII messenger RNA. Thus, the results are consistent with the hypothesis that changes in chromatin structure occur preferentially in the early replicating (presumably initiated) replicons at initiation or that changes in chromatin structure can precede replication during inhibition of DNA synthesis. The shortened repeat lengths that precede MTII replication are, potentially, reversible, because they become elongated when the synchronized early S-phase cells are released to resume cell cycle progression.

  18. Identification of Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Proteins in Burkitt’s Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Traylen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The working model to describe the mechanisms used to replicate the cancer-associated virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is partly derived from comparisons with other members of the Herpes virus family. Many genes within the EBV genome are homologous across the herpes virus family. Published transcriptome data for the EBV genome during its lytic replication cycle show extensive transcription, but the identification of the proteins is limited. We have taken a global proteomics approach to identify viral proteins that are expressed during the EBV lytic replication cycle. We combined an enrichment method to isolate cells undergoing EBV lytic replication with SILAC-labeling coupled to mass-spectrometry and identified viral and host proteins expressed during the OPEN ACCESS Pathogens 2015, 4 740 EBV lytic replication cycle. Amongst the most frequently identified viral proteins are two components of the DNA replication machinery, the single strand DNA binding protein BALF2, DNA polymerase accessory protein BMRF1 and both subunits of the viral ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase enzyme (BORF2 and BaRF1. An additional 42 EBV lytic cycle proteins were also detected. This provides proteomic identification for many EBV lytic replication cycle proteins and also identifies post-translational modifications.

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  9. Isolating dividing neural and brain tumour cells for gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endaya, Berwini; Cavanagh, Brenton; Alowaidi, Faisal; Walker, Tom; de Pennington, Nicholas; Ng, Jin-Ming A; Lam, Paula Y P; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Neuzil, Jiri; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2016-01-15

    The characterisation of dividing brain cells is fundamental for studies ranging from developmental and stem cell biology, to brain cancers. Whilst there is extensive anatomical data on these dividing cells, limited gene transcription data is available due to technical constraints. We focally isolated dividing cells whilst conserving RNA, from culture, primary neural tissue and xenografted glioma tumours, using a thymidine analogue that enables gene transcription analysis. 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine labels the replicating DNA of dividing cells. Once labelled, cultured cells and tissues were dissociated, fluorescently tagged with a revised click chemistry technique and the dividing cells isolated using fluorescence-assisted cell sorting. RNA was extracted and analysed using real time PCR. Proliferation and maturation related gene expression in neurogenic tissues was demonstrated in acutely and 3 day old labelled cells, respectively. An elevated expression of marker and pathway genes was demonstrated in the dividing cells of xenografted brain tumours, with the non-dividing cells showing relatively low levels of expression. BrdU "immune-labelling", the most frequently used protocol for detecting cell proliferation, causes complete denaturation of RNA, precluding gene transcription analysis. This EdU labelling technique, maintained cell integrity during dissociation, minimized copper exposure during labelling and used a cell isolation protocol that avoided cell lysis, thus conserving RNA. The technique conserves RNA, enabling the definition of cell proliferation-related changes in gene transcription of neural and pathological brain cells in cells harvested immediately after division, or following a period of maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Chaperoning HMGA2 Protein Protects Stalled Replication Forks in Stem and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojie Yu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining genome integrity requires the accurate and complete replication of chromosomal DNA. This is of the utmost importance for embryonic stem cells (ESCs, which differentiate into cells of all lineages, including germ cells. However, endogenous and exogenous factors frequently induce stalling of replication forks in every cell cycle, which can trigger mutations and chromosomal instabilities. We show here that the oncofetal, nonhistone chromatin factor HMGA2 equips cells with a highly effective first-line defense mechanism against endonucleolytic collapse of stalled forks. This fork-stabilizing function most likely employs scaffold formation at branched DNA via multiple DNA-binding domains. Moreover, HMGA2 works independently of other human factors in two heterologous cell systems to prevent DNA strand breaks. This fork chaperone function seemingly evolved to preserve ESC genome integrity. It is hijacked by tumor (stem cells to also guard their genomes against DNA-damaging agents widely used to treat cancer patients.

  11. Survival of the replication checkpoint deficient cells requires MUS81-RAD52 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Murfuni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In checkpoint-deficient cells, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are produced during replication by the structure-specific endonuclease MUS81. The mechanism underlying MUS81-dependent cleavage, and the effect on chromosome integrity and viability of checkpoint deficient cells is only partly understood, especially in human cells. Here, we show that MUS81-induced DSBs are specifically triggered by CHK1 inhibition in a manner that is unrelated to the loss of RAD51, and does not involve formation of a RAD51 substrate. Indeed, CHK1 deficiency results in the formation of a RAD52-dependent structure that is cleaved by MUS81. Moreover, in CHK1-deficient cells depletion of RAD52, but not of MUS81, rescues chromosome instability observed after replication fork stalling. However, when RAD52 is down-regulated, recovery from replication stress requires MUS81, and loss of both these proteins results in massive cell death that can be suppressed by RAD51 depletion. Our findings reveal a novel RAD52/MUS81-dependent mechanism that promotes cell viability and genome integrity in checkpoint-deficient cells, and disclose the involvement of MUS81 to multiple processes after replication stress.

  12. Rotavirus replication is correlated with S/G2 interphase arrest of the host cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selene Glück

    Full Text Available In infected cells rotavirus (RV replicates in viroplasms, cytosolic structures that require a stabilized microtubule (MT network for their assembly, maintenance of the structure and perinuclear localization. Therefore, we hypothesized that RV could interfere with the MT-breakdown that takes place in mitosis during cell division. Using synchronized RV-permissive cells, we show that RV infection arrests the cell cycle in S/G2 phase, thus favoring replication by improving viroplasms formation, viral protein translation, and viral assembly. The arrest in S/G2 phase is independent of the host or viral strain and relies on active RV replication. RV infection causes cyclin B1 down-regulation, consistent with blocking entry into mitosis. With the aid of chemical inhibitors, the cytoskeleton network was linked to specific signaling pathways of the RV-induced cell cycle arrest. We found that upon RV infection Eg5 kinesin was delocalized from the pericentriolar region to the viroplasms. We used a MA104-Fucci system to identify three RV proteins (NSP3, NSP5, and VP2 involved in cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. Our data indicate that there is a strong correlation between the cell cycle arrest and RV replication.

  13. Effects of vitamin D on airway epithelial cell morphology and rhinovirus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Brockman-Schneider

    Full Text Available Vitamin D has been linked to reduced risk of viral respiratory illness. We hypothesized that vitamin D could directly reduce rhinovirus (RV replication in airway epithelium. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (hBEC were treated with vitamin D, and RV replication and gene expression were evaluated by quantitative PCR. Cytokine/chemokine secretion was measured by ELISA, and transepithelial resistance (TER was determined using a voltohmmeter. Morphology was examined using immunohistochemistry. Vitamin D supplementation had no significant effects on RV replication, but potentiated secretion of CXCL8 and CXCL10 from infected or uninfected cells. Treatment with vitamin D in the form of 1,25(OH2D caused significant changes in cell morphology, including thickening of the cell layers (median of 46.5 µm [35.0-69.0] vs. 30 µm [24.5-34.2], p<0.01 and proliferation of cytokeratin-5-expressing cells, as demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis. Similar effects were seen for 25(OHD. In addition to altering morphology, higher concentrations of vitamin D significantly upregulated small proline-rich protein (SPRR1β expression (6.3 fold-induction, p<0.01, suggestive of squamous metaplasia. Vitamin D treatment of hBECs did not alter repair of mechanically induced wounds. Collectively, these findings indicate that vitamin D does not directly affect RV replication in airway epithelial cells, but can influence chemokine synthesis and alters the growth and differentiation of airway epithelial cells.

  14. Effects of Friedreich's ataxia GAA repeats on DNA replication in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandok, Gurangad S; Patel, Mayank P; Mirkin, Sergei M; Krasilnikova, Maria M

    2012-05-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a common hereditary degenerative neuro-muscular disorder caused by expansions of the (GAA)n repeat in the first intron of the frataxin gene. The expanded repeats from parents frequently undergo further significant length changes as they are passed on to progeny. Expanded repeats also show an age-dependent instability in somatic cells, albeit on a smaller scale than during intergenerational transmissions. Here we studied the effects of (GAA)n repeats of varying lengths and orientations on the episomal DNA replication in mammalian cells. We have recently shown that the very first round of the transfected DNA replication occurs in the lack of the mature chromatin, does not depend on the episomal replication origin and initiates at multiple single-stranded regions of plasmid DNA. We now found that expanded GAA repeats severely block this first replication round post plasmid transfection, while the subsequent replication cycles are only mildly affected. The fact that GAA repeats affect various replication modes in a different way might shed light on their differential expansions characteristic for FRDA.

  15. Dexamethasone treatment decreases replication of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus in Epithelioma papulosum cyprini cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Sun; Lee, Su Jin; Choi, Seung Hyuk; Kang, Yue Jai; Kim, Ki Hong

    2017-05-01

    The expression of Mx1 in EPC cells after treatment with poly(I:C) or infection with viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) was significantly suppressed by treatment with dexamethasone. However, the titer of VHSV did not increase but instead decreased after dexamethasone treatment. This suggests that dexamethasone not only downregulates type I IFN but also affects certain factors that are necessary for VHSV replication. An important effect of HSP90 on replication of RNA viruses and downregulation of HSP90 by glucocorticoids have been reported. In this study, dexamethasone downregulated HSP90α expression in EPC cells that were stimulated with poly(I:C) or infected with VHSV. Furthermore, cells treated with an HSP90 inhibitor, geldanamycin, showed significantly decreased titers of VHSV, suggesting that HSP90 may be an important host component involved in VHSV replication, and HSP90 inhibition might be one of the causes for the observed reduction in viral titer caused by dexamethasone treatment.

  16. Neural Progenitor Cells Derived from Human Embryonic Stem Cells as an Origin of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parinya Noisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are able to proliferate in vitro indefinitely without losing their ability to differentiate into multiple cell types upon exposure to appropriate signals. Particularly, the ability of hESCs to differentiate into neuronal subtypes is fundamental to develop cell-based therapies for several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. In this study, we differentiated hESCs to dopaminergic neurons via an intermediate stage, neural progenitor cells (NPCs. hESCs were induced to neural progenitor cells by Dorsomorphin, a small molecule that inhibits BMP signalling. The resulting neural progenitor cells exhibited neural bipolarity with high expression of neural progenitor genes and possessed multipotential differentiation ability. CBF1 and bFGF responsiveness of these hES-NP cells suggested their similarity to embryonic neural progenitor cells. A substantial number of dopaminergic neurons were derived from hES-NP cells upon supplementation of FGF8 and SHH, key dopaminergic neuron inducers. Importantly, multiple markers of midbrain neurons were detected, including NURR1, PITX3, and EN1, suggesting that hESC-derived dopaminergic neurons attained the midbrain identity. Altogether, this work underscored the generation of neural progenitor cells that retain the properties of embryonic neural progenitor cells. These cells will serve as an unlimited source for the derivation of dopaminergic neurons, which might be applicable for treating patients with Parkinson’s disease.

  17. A cell junction pathology of neural stem cells leads to abnormal neurogenesis and hydrocephalus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esteban M; Guerra, María M; Vío, Karin; González, César; Ortloff, Alexander; Bátiz, Luis F; Rodríguez, Sara; Jara, María C; Muñoz, Rosa I; Ortega, Eduardo; Jaque, Jaime; Guerra, Francisco; Sival, Deborah A; den Dunnen, Wilfred F A; Jiménez, Antonio J; Domínguez-Pinos, María D; Pérez-Fígares, José M; McAllister, James P; Johanson, Conrad

    2012-01-01

    Most cells of the developing mammalian brain derive from the ventricular (VZ) and the subventricular (SVZ) zones. The VZ is formed by the multipotent radial glia/neural stem cells (NSCs) while the SVZ harbors the rapidly proliferative neural precursor cells (NPCs). Evidence from human and animal

  18. Replication of JC Virus DNA in the G144 Oligodendrocyte Cell Line Is Dependent Upon Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jesse N; Lin, Brian; Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J; Tsichlis, Philip; Schwob, James E; Bullock, Peter A

    2017-10-15

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an often-fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. PML results when oligodendrocytes within immunocompromised individuals are infected with the human JC virus (JCV). We have identified an oligodendrocyte precursor cell line, termed G144, that supports robust levels of JCV DNA replication, a central part of the JCV life cycle. In addition, we have determined that JC virus readily infects G144 cells. Furthermore, we have determined that JCV DNA replication in G144 cells is stimulated by myristoylated (i.e., constitutively active) Akt and reduced by the Akt-specific inhibitor MK2206. Thus, this oligodendrocyte-based model system will be useful for a number of purposes, such as studies of JCV infection, establishing key pathways needed for the regulation of JCV DNA replication, and identifying inhibitors of this process.IMPORTANCE The disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by the infection of particular brain cells, termed oligodendrocytes, by the JC virus. Studies of PML, however, have been hampered by the lack of an immortalized human cell line derived from oligodendrocytes. Here, we report that the G144 oligodendrocyte cell line supports both infection by JC virus and robust levels of JCV DNA replication. Moreover, we have established that the Akt pathway regulates JCV DNA replication and that JCV DNA replication can be inhibited by MK2206, a compound that is specific for Akt. These and related findings suggest that we have established a powerful oligodendrocyte-based model system for studies of JCV-dependent PML. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica Parisi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  20. Applicability of tooth derived stem cells in neural regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Ludovica; Manfredi, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    Within the nervous system, regeneration is limited, and this is due to the small amount of neural stem cells, the inhibitory origin of the stem cell niche and often to the development of a scar which constitutes a mechanical barrier for the regeneration. Regarding these aspects, many efforts have been done in the research of a cell component that combined with scaffolds and growth factors could be suitable for nervous regeneration in regenerative medicine approaches. Autologous mesenchymal stem cells represent nowadays the ideal candidate for this aim, thank to their multipotency and to their amount inside adult tissues. However, issues in their harvesting, through the use of invasive techniques, and problems involved in their ageing, require the research of new autologous sources. To this purpose, the recent discovery of a stem cells component in teeth, and which derive from neural crest cells, has came to the light the possibility of using dental stem cells in nervous system regeneration. In this work, in order to give guidelines on the use of dental stem cells for neural regeneration, we briefly introduce the concepts of regeneration and regenerative medicine, we then focus the attention on odontogenesis, which involves the formation and the presence of a stem component in different parts of teeth, and finally we describe some experimental approaches which are exploiting dental stem cells for neural studies.

  1. Chronic DNA Replication Stress Reduces Replicative Lifespan of Cells by TRP53-Dependent, microRNA-Assisted MCM2-7 Downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongshi Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumstances that compromise efficient DNA replication, such as disruptions to replication fork progression, cause a state known as DNA replication stress (RS. Whereas normally proliferating cells experience low levels of RS, excessive RS from intrinsic or extrinsic sources can trigger cell cycle arrest and senescence. Here, we report that a key driver of RS-induced senescence is active downregulation of the Minichromosome Maintenance 2-7 (MCM2-7 factors that are essential for replication origin licensing and which constitute the replicative helicase core. Proliferating cells produce high levels of MCM2-7 that enable formation of dormant origins that can be activated in response to acute, experimentally-induced RS. However, little is known about how physiological RS levels impact MCM2-7 regulation. We found that chronic exposure of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to either genetically-encoded or environmentally-induced RS triggered gradual MCM2-7 repression, followed by inhibition of replication and senescence that could be accelerated by MCM hemizygosity. The MCM2-7 reduction in response to RS is TRP53-dependent, and involves a group of Trp53-dependent miRNAs, including the miR-34 family, that repress MCM expression in replication-stressed cells before they undergo terminal cell cycle arrest. miR-34 ablation partially rescued MCM2-7 downregulation and genomic instability in mice with endogenous RS. Together, these data demonstrate that active MCM2-7 repression is a physiologically important mechanism for RS-induced cell cycle arrest and genome maintenance on an organismal level.

  2. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  3. Dynamic transcriptional signature and cell fate analysis reveals plasticity of individual neural plate border cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Daniela; Tan-Cabugao, Johanna; Esaian, Sevan; Bronner, Marianne E

    2017-01-01

    The ‘neural plate border’ of vertebrate embryos contains precursors of neural crest and placode cells, both defining vertebrate characteristics. How these lineages segregate from neural and epidermal fates has been a matter of debate. We address this by performing a fine-scale quantitative temporal analysis of transcription factor expression in the neural plate border of chick embryos. The results reveal significant overlap of transcription factors characteristic of multiple lineages in individual border cells from gastrula through neurula stages. Cell fate analysis using a Sox2 (neural) enhancer reveals that cells that are initially Sox2+ cells can contribute not only to neural tube but also to neural crest and epidermis. Moreover, modulating levels of Sox2 or Pax7 alters the apportionment of neural tube versus neural crest fates. Our results resolve a long-standing question and suggest that many individual border cells maintain ability to contribute to multiple ectodermal lineages until or beyond neural tube closure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21620.001 PMID:28355135

  4. Role of SDF1/CXCR4 Interaction in Experimental Hemiplegic Models with Neural Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Suzuki

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Much attention has been focused on neural cell transplantation because of its promising clinical applications. We have reported that embryonic stem (ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation significantly improved motor functions in a hemiplegic mouse model. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms governing neural regeneration of the damaged motor cortex after the transplantation. Recent investigations disclosed that chemokines participated in the regulation of migration and maturation of neural cell grafts. In this review, we summarize the involvement of inflammatory chemokines including stromal cell derived factor 1 (SDF1 in neural regeneration after ES cell derived neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation in mouse stroke models.

  5. [New evidence of an old problem: the coupling of genome replication to cell growth in bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebodarova, T M; Likhoshvaĭ, V A

    2014-09-01

    The problem of coordinating genome replication with cell growth in bacteria was posed over four decades ago. Unlike for eukaryotes, this problem has not been completely solved even for Escherichia coli, which has been comprehensively studied by molecular biologists, to say nothing of other bacteria. Current models of the bacterial life cycle solve the coupling problem by introducing a phenomenological hypothesis that considers the dynamic coordination of growth and replication but does not unveil the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we review the mechanisms regulating genome replication initiation with regards to their coupling to growth processes in the three best investigated bacterial species: E. coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Caulobacter crescentus. A putative correlation between the type of cell growth laws and the actual mechanisms regulating the replication of DNA formed during the process of evolution in various classes of bacteria, is discussed, including those intracellular parasites in which degenerative evolution his discarded most of their genomes. We contemplate the concept of a universal growth law for bacterial cells and some features in the formation of a primitive negative replication regulating mechanism in the context of the coupling problem.

  6. PEM Fuel Cell Modelling Using Artificial Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Doumbia, Mamadou Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of a reaction directly into dc electrical energy. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is a suitable alternative for both electrical transportation and stationary applications. In this article, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) modelling approach of a PEM fuel cell is developed. This model describes the behaviour of PEM fuel cell voltage under both steady-state and transient conditions. Moreover, the prediction of th...

  7. Cellular therapy after spinal cord injury using neural progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroemen, Maurice

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities and limitations of cell-based therapies after spinal cord injury are explored. Particularly, the potential of adult derived neural progenitor cell (NPC) grafts to function as a permissive substrate for axonal regeneration was investigated. It was found that syngenic

  8. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  9. Calorie restriction-mediated replicative lifespan extension in yeast is non-cell autonomous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chieh Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA, are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell.

  10. Inhibition of HIV replication by pokeweed antiviral protein targeted to CD4+ cells by monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarling, Joyce M.; Moran, Patricia A.; Haffar, Omar; Sias, Joan; Richman, Douglas D.; Spina, Celsa A.; Myers, Dorothea E.; Kuebelbeck, Virginia; Ledbetter, Jeffrey A.; Uckun, Fatih M.

    1990-09-01

    FUNCTIONAL impairment and selective depletion of CD4+ T cells, the hallmark of AIDS, are at least partly caused by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) type 1 binding to the CD4 molecule and infecting CD4+ cells1,2. It may, therefore, be of therapeutic value to target an antiviral agent to CD4+ cells to prevent infection and to inhibit HIV-1 production in patients' CD4+ cells which contain proviral DNA3,4. We report here that HIV-1 replication in normal primary CD4+ T cells can be inhibited by pokeweed antiviral protein, a plant protein of relative molecular mass 30,000 (ref. 5), which inhibits replication of certain plant RNA viruses6-8, and of herpes simplex virus, poliovirus and influenza virus9-11. Targeting pokeweed antiviral protein to CD4+ T cells by conjugating it to monoclonal antibodies reactive with CDS, CD7 or CD4 expressed on CD4+ cells, increased its anti-HIV potency up to 1,000-fold. HIV-1 replication is inhibited at picomolar concentrations of conjugates of pokeweed antiviral protein and monoclonal antibodies, which do not inhibit proliferation of normal CD4+ T cells or CD4-dependent responses. These conjugates inhibit HIV-1 protein synthesis and also strongly inhibit HIV-1 production in activated CD4+ T cells from infected patients.

  11. Enteric neurospheres are not specific to neural crest cultures : Implications for neural stem cell therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, E. (Ellen); D. Natarajan (Dipa); J.E. Cooper (Julie E.); Kronfli, R. (Rania); Cananzi, M. (Mara); J.-M. Delalande (Jean-Marie); C. Mccann; A.J. Burns (Alan); N. Thapar (Nikhil)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives Enteric neural stem cells provide hope of curative treatment for enteric neuropathies. Current protocols for their harvesting from humans focus on the generation of 'neurospheres' from cultures of dissociated gut tissue. The study aims to better understand the derivation,

  12. Persistent replication of the GBV-C subgenomic replicons in Huh7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ming-Mei; Ren, Hao; Zhao, Ping; Pan, Wei; Chen, Qiu-Li; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2009-05-01

    Studies of GB virus type C (GBV-C) replication in vitro have been limited because of poor growth of GBV-C in cell culture. In order to address the infection of GBV-C, two GBV-C subgenomic replicons (GBCrepEGFP and GBCrepTNF) were developed from a GBV-C full-length genomic cDNA. The viral replication, protein expression and the production of virus-like particles were evaluated in human hepatoma cell line Huh7. The results showed that the established GBCrepEGFP and GBCrepTNF replicons could be replicated autonomously and expressed in cell culture for at least 2 months and 1 month respectively. The replicon RNA could assemble RNA-containing structures in the HuhEH cells expressing GBV-C structural proteins. It suggests that a cell line supporting the replication of GBV-C was established. This replicon system might be used to understand better the biology of GBV-C.

  13. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  14. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Development of Its Replicative Niche: in Its Host Cell and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens can replicate efficiently only after they manipulate and modify their host cells to create an environment conducive to replication. While diverse cellular pathways are targeted by different pathogens, metabolism, membrane and cytoskeletal architecture formation, and cell death are the three primary cellular processes that are modified by infections. Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan that infects ∼30% of the world's population and causes severe and life-threatening disease in developing fetuses, in immune-comprised patients, and in certain otherwise healthy individuals who are primarily found in South America. The high prevalence of Toxoplasma in humans is in large part a result of its ability to modulate these three host cell processes. Here, we highlight recent work defining the mechanisms by which Toxoplasma interacts with these processes. In addition, we hypothesize why some processes are modified not only in the infected host cell but also in neighboring uninfected cells. PMID:24951442

  16. Possible promotion of neuronal differentiation in fetal rat brain neural progenitor cells after sustained exposure to static magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamichi, Noritaka; Ishioka, Yukichi; Hirai, Takao; Ozawa, Shusuke; Tachibana, Masaki; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Takarada, Takeshi; Yoneda, Yukio

    2009-08-15

    We have previously shown significant potentiation of Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, along with decreased microtubules-associated protein-2 (MAP2) expression, in hippocampal neurons cultured under static magnetism without cell death. In this study, we investigated the effects of static magnetism on the functionality of neural progenitor cells endowed to proliferate for self-replication and differentiate into neuronal, astroglial, and oligodendroglial lineages. Neural progenitor cells were isolated from embryonic rat neocortex and hippocampus, followed by culture under static magnetism at 100 mT and subsequent determination of the number of cells immunoreactive for a marker protein of particular progeny lineages. Static magnetism not only significantly decreased proliferation of neural progenitor cells without affecting cell viability, but also promoted differentiation into cells immunoreactive for MAP2 with a concomitant decrease in that for an astroglial marker, irrespective of the presence of differentiation inducers. In neural progenitors cultured under static magnetism, a significant increase was seen in mRNA expression of several activator-type proneural genes, such as Mash1, Math1, and Math3, together with decreased mRNA expression of the repressor type Hes5. These results suggest that sustained static magnetism could suppress proliferation for self-renewal and facilitate differentiation into neurons through promoted expression of activator-type proneural genes by progenitor cells in fetal rat brain.

  17. File list: ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  18. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  19. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells mm9 All antigens Neural Neural progenitor ...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells.bed ...

  20. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency...

  1. Cytomegalovirus-specific T-cell responses and viral replication in kidney transplant recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sester Urban

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytomegalovirus (CMV seronegative recipients (R- of kidney transplants (KT from seropositive donors (D+ are at higher risk for CMV replication and ganciclovir(GCV-resistance than CMV R(+. We hypothesized that low CMV-specific T-cell responses are associated with increased risk of CMV replication in R(+-patients with D(+ or D(- donors. Methods We prospectively evaluated 73 consecutive KT-patients [48 R(+, 25 D(+R(-] undergoing routine testing for CMV replication as part of a preemptive strategy. We compared CMV-specific interferon-γ (IFN-γ responses of CD4+CD3+ lymphocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using three different antigen preparation (CMV-lysate, pp72- and pp65-overlapping peptide pools using intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry. Results Median CD4+ and CD8+T-cell responses to CMV-lysate, pp72- and pp65-overlapping peptide pools were lower in D(+R(- than in R(+patients or in non-immunosuppressed donors. Comparing subpopulations we found that CMV-lysate favored CD4+- over CD8+-responses, whereas the reverse was observed for pp72, while pp65-CD4+- and -CD8+-responses were similar. Concurrent CMV replication in R(+-patients was associated with significantly lower T-cell responses (pp65 median CD4+ 0.00% vs. 0.03%, p = 0.001; CD8+ 0.01% vs. 0.03%; p = 0.033. Receiver operated curve analysis associated CMV-pp65 CD4+ responses of > 0.03% in R(+-patients with absence of concurrent (p = 0.003 and future CMV replication in the following 8 weeks (p = 0.036. GCV-resistant CMV replication occurred in 3 R(+-patients (6.3% with pp65- CD4+ frequencies Conclusion The data suggest that pp65-specific CD4+ T-cells might be useful to identify R(+-patients at increased risk of CMV replication. Provided further corroborating evidence, CMV-pp65 CD4+ responses above 0.03% in PBMCs of KT patients under stable immunosuppression are associated with lower risk of concurrent and future CMV replication during the

  2. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  3. Embryonic stem cell specific "master" replication origins at the heart of the loss of pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Julienne

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of the replication program during mammalian cell differentiation remains poorly understood. We performed an integrative analysis of eleven genome-wide epigenetic profiles at 100 kb resolution of Mean Replication Timing (MRT data in six human cell lines. Compared to the organization in four chromatin states shared by the five somatic cell lines, embryonic stem cell (ESC line H1 displays (i a gene-poor but highly dynamic chromatin state (EC4 associated to histone variant H2AZ rather than a HP1-associated heterochromatin state (C4 and (ii a mid-S accessible chromatin state with bivalent gene marks instead of a polycomb-repressed heterochromatin state. Plastic MRT regions (≲ 20% of the genome are predominantly localized at the borders of U-shaped timing domains. Whereas somatic-specific U-domain borders are gene-dense GC-rich regions, 31.6% of H1-specific U-domain borders are early EC4 regions enriched in pluripotency transcription factors NANOG and OCT4 despite being GC poor and gene deserts. Silencing of these ESC-specific "master" replication initiation zones during differentiation corresponds to a loss of H2AZ and an enrichment in H3K9me3 mark characteristic of late replicating C4 heterochromatin. These results shed a new light on the epigenetically regulated global chromatin reorganization that underlies the loss of pluripotency and lineage commitment.

  4. Nano-topography Enhances Communication in Neural Cells Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, V.

    2017-08-23

    Neural cells are the smallest building blocks of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Information in neural networks and cell-substrate interactions have been heretofore studied separately. Understanding whether surface nano-topography can direct nerve cells assembly into computational efficient networks may provide new tools and criteria for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this work, we used information theory approaches and functional multi calcium imaging (fMCI) techniques to examine how information flows in neural networks cultured on surfaces with controlled topography. We found that substrate roughness Sa affects networks topology. In the low nano-meter range, S-a = 0-30 nm, information increases with Sa. Moreover, we found that energy density of a network of cells correlates to the topology of that network. This reinforces the view that information, energy and surface nano-topography are tightly inter-connected and should not be neglected when studying cell-cell interaction in neural tissue repair and regeneration.

  5. Aberrant allele-specific replication, independent of parental origin, in blood cells of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Jacob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allelic counterparts of biallelically expressed genes display an epigenetic symmetry normally manifested by synchronous replication, different from genes subjected to monoallelic expression, which normally are characterized by an asynchronous mode of replication (well exemplified by the SNRPN imprinted locus. Malignancy was documented to be associated with gross modifications in the inherent replication-timing coordination between allelic counterparts of imprinted genes as well as of biallelically expressed loci. The cancer-related allelic replication timing aberrations are non-disease specific and appear in peripheral blood cells of cancer patients, including those with solid tumors. As such they offer potential blood markers for non-invasive cancer test. The present study was aimed to gain some insight into the mechanism leading to the replication timing alterations of genes in blood lymphocytes of cancer patients. Methods Peripheral blood samples derived from patients with prostate cancer were chosen to represent the cancerous status, and samples taken from patients with no cancer but with benign prostate hyperplasia were used to portray the normal status. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH replication assay, applied to phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated blood lymphocytes, was used to evaluate the temporal order (either synchronous or asynchronous of genes in the patients' cells. Results We demonstrated that: (i the aberrant epigenetic profile, as delineated by the cancer status, is a reversible modification, evidenced by our ability to restore the normal patterns of replication in three unrelated loci (CEN15, SNRPN and RB1 by introducing an archetypical demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine; (ii following the rehabilitating effect of demethylation, an imprinted gene (SNRPN retains its original parental imprint; and (iii the choice of an allele between early or late replication in the aberrant asynchronous replication

  6. Differentiation of reprogrammed human adipose mesenchymal stem cells toward neural cells with defined transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Xinjian; Liu, Tianqing; Song, Kedong; Li, Xiangqin; Ge, Dan

    2013-10-04

    Somatic cell reprogramming may become a powerful approach to generate specific human cell types for cell-fate determination studies and potential transplantation therapies of neurological diseases. Here we report a reprogramming methodology with which human adipose stem cells (hADSCs) can be differentiated into neural cells. After being reprogrammed with polycistronic plasmid carrying defined factor OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4 and c-MYC, and further treated with neural induce medium, the hADSCs switched to differentiate toward neural cell lineages. The generated cells had normal karyotypes and exogenous vector sequences were not inserted in the genomes. Therefore, this cell lineage conversion methodology bypasses the risk of mutation and gene instability, and provides a novel strategy to obtain patient-specific neural cells for basic research and therapeutic application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of Cell Division and DNA Replication Impair Mouse-Naïve Pluripotency Exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Ariel; Vazquez Echegaray, Camila; Solari, Claudia; Cosentino, María Soledad; Martyn, Iain; Deglincerti, Alessia; Ozair, Mohammad Zeeshan; Ruzo, Albert; Barañao, Lino; Miriuka, Santiago; Brivanlou, Ali; Guberman, Alejandra

    2017-09-01

    The cell cycle has gained attention as a key determinant for cell fate decisions, but the contribution of DNA replication and mitosis in stem cell differentiation has not been extensively studied. To understand if these processes act as "windows of opportunity" for changes in cell identity, we established synchronized cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells as they exit the ground state of pluripotency. We show that initial transcriptional changes in this transition do not require passage through mitosis and that conversion to primed pluripotency is linked to lineage priming in the G1 phase. Importantly, we demonstrate that impairment of DNA replication severely blocks transcriptional switch to primed pluripotency, even in the absence of p53 activity induced by the DNA damage response. Our data suggest an important role for DNA replication during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation, which could shed light on why pluripotent cells are only receptive to differentiation signals during G1, that is, before the S phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute inactivation of the replicative helicase in human cells triggers MCM8-9-dependent DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Nishimura, Kohei; Minocherhomji, Sheroy

    2017-01-01

    DNA replication fork progression can be disrupted at difficult to replicate loci in the human genome, which has the potential to challenge chromosome integrity. This replication fork disruption can lead to the dissociation of the replisome and the formation of DNA damage. To model the events....... This RAD51/MCM8-9 axis is distinct from the recently described RAD52-dependent DNA synthesis pathway that operates in early mitosis at common fragile sites. We propose that stalled replication forks can be restarted in S phase via homologous recombination using MCM8-9 as an alternative replicative helicase....... stemming from replisome dissociation during DNA replication perturbation, we used a degron-based system for inducible proteolysis of a subunit of the replicative helicase. We show that MCM2-depleted cells activate a DNA damage response pathway and generate replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks...

  9. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  10. Mycoviruses of an endophytic fungus can replicate in plant cells: evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerva, L; Varese, G C; Falk, B W; Turina, M

    2017-05-15

    So far there is no record of a specific virus able to infect both fungal and plant hosts in nature. However, experimental evidence shows that some plant virus RdRPs are able to perform replication in trans of genomic or DI RNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, tobacco mosaic virus was recently shown to replicate in a filamentous ascomycetous fungus. Thus, at least experimentally, some plant viruses can infect some fungi. Endophytic fungi have been reported from many plants and several of these fungi have been shown to contain viruses. Here we tested if mycoviruses derived from a marine plant endophyte can replicate in plant cells. For this purpose, we used partially purified viral particles from isolate MUT4330 of Penicillium aurantiogriseum var. viridicatum which harbors six virus species, some having dsRNA and some positive-strand ssRNA genomes. These were transfected into three distinct plant protoplast cell systems. Time-course analysis of absolute RNA accumulation provided for the first time evidence that viruses of two species belonging to the Partitiviridae and Totiviridae families, can replicate in plant cells without evidence of host adaptation, i.e, changes in their nucleotide sequence.

  11. Stalled DNA Replication Forks at the Endogenous GAA Repeats Drive Repeat Expansion in Friedreich's Ataxia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Bhalla, Angela D; Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Puckett, James W; Dervan, Peter B; Rosenwaks, Zev; Napierala, Marek

    2016-08-02

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is caused by the expansion of GAA repeats located in the Frataxin (FXN) gene. The GAA repeats continue to expand in FRDA patients, aggravating symptoms and contributing to disease progression. The mechanism leading to repeat expansion and decreased FXN transcription remains unclear. Using single-molecule analysis of replicated DNA, we detected that expanded GAA repeats present a substantial obstacle for the replication machinery at the FXN locus in FRDA cells. Furthermore, aberrant origin activation and lack of a proper stress response to rescue the stalled forks in FRDA cells cause an increase in 3'-5' progressing forks, which could enhance repeat expansion and hinder FXN transcription by head-on collision with RNA polymerases. Treatment of FRDA cells with GAA-specific polyamides rescues DNA replication fork stalling and alleviates expansion of the GAA repeats, implicating DNA triplexes as a replication impediment and suggesting that fork stalling might be a therapeutic target for FRDA. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Flavone Enhances Dengue Virus Type-2 (NGC Strain Infectivity and Replication in Vero Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Zandi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effects of 2-phenyl-1-benzopyran-4-one (flavone on DENV-2 infectivity in Vero cells. Virus adsorption and attachment and intracellular virus replication were investigated using a foci forming unit assay (FFUA and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. Addition of flavone (100 μg/mL significantly increased the number of DENV-2 foci by 35.66% ± 1.52 and 49.66% ± 2.51 when added during and after virus adsorption to the Vero cells, respectively. The average foci size after 4 days of infection increased by 33% ± 2.11 and 89% ± 2.13. The DENV-2 specific RNA copy number in the flavone-treated infected cells increased by 6.41- and 23.1-fold when compared to the mock-treated infected cells. Flavone (100 μg/mL did not promote or inhibit Vero cell proliferation. The CC50 value of flavone against Vero cells was 446 µg/mL. These results suggest that flavone might enhance dengue virus replication by acting antagonistically towards flavonoids known to inhibit dengue virus replication.

  13. Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis invades, survives and replicates in Atlantic cod cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkemo, Kathrine R; Mikkelsen, Helene; Johansen, Audny; Robertsen, Børre; Seppola, Marit

    2016-09-26

    Systemic infection caused by the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis remains a disease threat to Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. Future prophylactics could benefit from better knowledge on how the bacterium invades, survives and establishes infection in its host cells. Here, facilitated by the use of a gentamicin protection assay, this was studied in primary monocyte/macrophage cultures and an epithelial-like cell line derived from Atlantic cod larvae (ACL cells). The results showed that F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis is able to invade primary monocyte/macrophages, and that the actin-polymerisation inhibitor cytochalasin D blocked internalisation, demonstrating that the invasion is mediated through phagocytosis. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) treatment of cod macrophages prior to infection enhanced bacterial invasion, potentially by stimulating macrophage activation in an early step in host defence against F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infections. We measured a rapid drop of the initial high levels of internalised bacteria in macrophages, indicating the presence and action of a cellular immune defence mechanism before intracellular bacterial replication took place. Low levels of bacterial internalisation and replication were detected in the epithelial-like ACL cells. The capacity of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis to enter, survive and even replicate within an epithelial cell line may play an important role in its ability to infect live fish and transverse epithelial barriers to reach the bacterium's main target cells-the macrophage.

  14. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  15. Parvovirus B19 Replication and Expression in Differentiating Erythroid Progenitor Cells.

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    Gloria Bua

    Full Text Available The pathogenic Parvovirus B19 (B19V is characterized by a strict adaptation to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs, a heterogeneous population of differentiating cells with diverse phenotypic and functional properties. In our work, we studied the dynamics of B19V infection in EPCs in dependence on the cell differentiation stage, in terms of distribution of infected cells, synthesis of viral nucleic acids and production of infectious virus. EPCs at early differentiation stage led to an abortive infection, without viral genome replication and a very low transcriptional activity. EPCs at later stages were permissive, with highest levels of viral replicative activity at day 9 (+3.0 Log from 2 to 48 hpi and lower levels at day 18 (+1.5 Log from 2 to 48 hpi. B19V DNA increment was in accordance with the percentage of cells positive to flow-FISH assay (41.4% at day 9, 1.1% at day 18. Quantitation of total RNA indicated a close association of genome replication and transcription with viral RNA accumulation within infected cells related to viral DNA increase during the course of infection. Analysis of the different classes of mRNAs revealed two distinct pattern of genome expression profile with a fine regulation in the frequency utilization of RNA processing signals: an early phase, when cleavage at the proximal site leading to a higher relative production of mRNA for NS protein, and a late phase, when cleavage at the distal site was more frequent leading to higher relative abundance of mRNA for VP and 11 kDA proteins. Infectious virus was released from cells at day 6-15, but not at day 18. Our results, providing a detailed description of B19V replication and expression profile in differentiating EPCs, highlight the very tight adaptation of B19V to a specific cellular target defined both by its erythroid lineage and its differentiation stage.

  16. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relief of preintegration inhibition and characterization of additional blocks for HIV replication in primary mouse T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-xin Zhang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Development of a small animal model to study HIV replication and pathogenesis has been hampered by the failure of the virus to replicate in non-primate cells. Most studies aimed at achieving replication in murine cells have been limited to fibroblast cell lines, but generating an appropriate model requires overcoming blocks to viral replication in primary T cells. We have studied HIV-1 replication in CD4(+ T cells from human CD4/CCR5/Cyclin T1 transgenic mice. Expression of hCD4 and hCCR5 in mouse CD4(+ T cells enabled efficient entry of R5 strain HIV-1. In mouse T cells, HIV-1 underwent reverse transcription and nuclear import as efficiently as in human T cells. In contrast, chromosomal integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA was inefficient in activated mouse T cells. This process was greatly enhanced by providing a secondary T cell receptor (TCR signal after HIV-1 infection, especially between 12 to 24 h post infection. This effect was specific for primary mouse T cells. The pathways involved in HIV replication appear to be PKCtheta-, CARMA1-, and WASp-independent. Treatment with Cyclosporin A (CsA further relieved the pre-integration block. However, transcription of HIV-1 RNA was still reduced in mouse CD4(+ T cells despite expression of the hCyclin T1 transgene. Additional post-transcriptional defects were observed at the levels of Gag expression, Gag processing, Gag release and virus infectivity. Together, these post-integration defects resulted in a dramatically reduced yield of infectious virus (300-500 fold after a single cycle of HIV-1 replication. This study implies the existence of host factors, in addition to those already identified, that are critical for HIV-1 replication in mouse cells. This study also highlights the differences between primary T cells and cell lines regarding pre-integration steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle.

  18. HIV-1 Adapts To Replicate in Cells Expressing Common Marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliva, Alberto; Finzi, Andrés; Haim, Hillel; Menéndez-Arias, Luis; Sodroski, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that a major block to HIV-1 replication in common marmosets operates at the level of viral entry and that this block can be overcome by adaptation of the virus in tissue-cultured cells. However, our current studies indicate that HIV-1 encounters additional postentry blocks in common marmoset peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Here, we show that the common marmoset APOBEC3G (A3G) and BST2 proteins block HIV-1 in cell cultures. Using a directed-evolution method that takes advantage of the natural ability of HIV-1 to mutate during replication, we have been able to overcome these blocks in tissue-cultured cells. In the adapted viruses, specific changes were observed in gag, vif, env, and nef. The contribution of these changes to virus replication in the presence of the A3G and BST2 restriction factors was studied. We found that certain amino acid changes in Vif and Env that arise during adaptation to marmoset A3G and BST2 allow the virus to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors. The changes in Vif reduce expression levels and encapsidation of marmoset APOBEC3G, while the changes in Env increase viral fitness and discretely favor cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, allowing viral escape from these restriction factors. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 can infect only humans and chimpanzees. The main reason for this narrow tropism is the presence in many species of dominant-acting factors, known as restriction factors, that block viral replication in a species-specific way. We have been exploring the blocks to HIV-1 in common marmosets, with the ultimate goal of developing a new animal model of HIV-1 infection in these monkeys. In this study, we observed that common marmoset APOBEC3G and BST2, two known restriction factors, are able to block HIV-1 in cell cultures. We have adapted HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of these restriction factors and have characterized the mechanisms of escape. These studies can help in the

  19. TMPRSS2 and MSPL Facilitate Trypsin-Independent Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Replication in Vero Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wen; Fan, Wenlu; Bai, Jing; Tang, Yandong; Wang, Li; Jiang, Yanping; Tang, Lijie; Liu, Min; Cui, Wen; Xu, Yigang; Li, Yijing

    2017-05-18

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) facilitate the spread and replication of viruses such as influenza and human coronaviruses, although it remains unclear whether TTSPs play a role in the progression of animal coronavirus infections, such as that by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV). In this study, TTSPs including TMPRSS2, HAT, DESC1, and MSPL were tested for their ability to facilitate PEDV replication in Vero cells. Our results showed that TMPRSS2 and MSPL played significant roles in the stages of cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion, whereas HAT and DESC1 exhibited weaker effects. This activation may be involved in the interaction between TTSPs and the PEDV S protein, as the S protein extensively co-localized with TMPRSS2 and MSPL and could be cleaved by co-expression with TMPRSS2 or MSPL. Moreover, the use of Vero cells expressing TMPRSS2 and MSPL facilitated PEDV replication in the absence of exogenous trypsin. In sum, we identified two host proteases, TMPRSS2 and MSPL, which may provide insights and a novel method for enhancing viral titers, expanding virus production, and improving the adaptability of PEDV isolates in vitro.

  20. The Acid Test for Biological Science: STAP Cells, Trust, and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Cheryl

    2016-02-01

    In January 2014, a letter and original research article were published in Nature describing a process whereby somatic mouse cells could be converted into stem cells by subjecting them to stress. These "stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency" (STAP) cells were shown to be capable of contributing to all cell types of a developing embryo, and extra-embryonic tissues. The lead author of the publications, Haruko Obokata, became an overnight celebrity in Japan, where she was dubbed the new face of Japanese science. However, in the weeks that followed publication of the research, issues arose. Other laboratories and researchers (including authors on the original papers) found that they were unable to replicate Obokata et al.'s work. Closer scrutiny of the papers by the scientific community also suggested that there was manipulation of images that had been published, and Obokata was accused of misconduct. Those who should have been supervising her work (also her co-authors on the publications) were also heavily criticised. The STAP cell saga of 2014 is used as an example to highlight the importance of trust and replication in twenty-first century biological science. The role of trust in the scientific community is highlighted, and the effects on interactions between science and the public examined. Similarly, this essay aims to highlight the importance of replication, and how this is understood by researchers, the media, and the public. The expected behaviour of scientists in the twenty-first century is now more closely scrutinised.

  1. Methods for Derivation of Multipotent Neural Crest Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, John; Dalton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent, neural crest cells (NCCs) produce a wide range of cell types during embryonic development. This includes melanocytes, peripheral neurons, smooth muscle cells, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. The protocol described here allows for highly efficient differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells to a neural crest fate within 15 days. This is accomplished under feeder-free conditions, using chemically defined medium supplemented with two small molecule inhibitors that block glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) and bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling. This technology is well suited as a platform to understand in greater detail the pathogenesis of human disease associated with impaired neural crest development/migration.

  2. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwachaka, Philip Maseghe; Saidi, Hassan; Odula, Paul Ochieng; Mandela, Pamela Idenya

    2015-01-01

    To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of the retina were taken and imported into FIJI software for analysis. Neural retinal cell densities of deprived eyes were reduced along with increasing period of deprivation. The percentage of reductions were 60.9% (P < 0.001), 41.6% (P = 0.003), and 18.9% (P = 0.326) for ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In non-deprived eyes, cell densities in contrast were increased by 116% (P < 0.001), 52% (P < 0.001) and 59.6% (P < 0.001) in ganglion, inner nuclear, and outer nuclear cells, respectively. In this rabbit model, monocular deprivation resulted in activity-dependent changes in cell densities of the neural retina in favour of the non-deprived eye along with reduced cell densities in the deprived eye.

  3. Replicating DNA by cell factories: roles of central carbon metabolism and transcription in the control of DNA replication in microbes, and implications for understanding this process in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Precise regulation of DNA replication is necessary to ensure the inheritance of genetic features by daughter cells after each cell division. Therefore, determining how the regulatory processes operate to control DNA replication is crucial to our understanding and application to biotechnological processes. Contrary to early concepts of DNA replication, it appears that this process is operated by large, stationary nucleoprotein complexes, called replication factories, rather than by single enzymes trafficking along template molecules. Recent discoveries indicated that in bacterial cells two processes, central carbon metabolism (CCM) and transcription, significantly and specifically influence the control of DNA replication of various replicons. The impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the regulation of DNA synthesis is discussed in this review. It appears that CCM may influence DNA replication by either action of specific metabolites or moonlighting activities of some enzymes involved in this metabolic pathway. The role of transcription in the control of DNA replication may arise from either topological changes in nucleic acids which accompany RNA synthesis or direct interactions between replication and transcription machineries. Due to intriguing similarities between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory systems, possible implications of studies on regulation of microbial DNA replication on understanding such a process occurring in human cells are discussed. PMID:23714207

  4. Study of Vaccinia and Cowpox viruses' replication in Rac1-N17 dominant-negative cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Ana Paula Carneiro; Soares-Martins, Jamária Adriana Pinheiro; Andrade, Luciana Garcia; Albarnaz, Jonas Dutra; Ferreira, Paulo César Peregrino; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Bonjardim, Cláudio Antônio

    2013-01-01

    Interfering with cellular signal transduction pathways is a common strategy used by many viruses to create a propitious intracellular environment for an efficient replication. Our group has been studying cellular signalling pathways activated by the orthopoxviruses Vaccinia (VACV) and Cowpox (CPXV) and their significance to viral replication. In the present study our aim was to investigate whether the GTPase Rac1 was an upstream signal that led to the activation of MEK/ERK1/2, JNK1/2 or Akt pathways upon VACV or CPXV' infections. Therefore, we generated stable murine fibroblasts exhibiting negative dominance to Rac1-N17 to evaluate viral growth and the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt. Our results demonstrated that VACV replication, but not CPXV, was affected in dominant-negative (DN) Rac1-N17 cell lines in which viral yield was reduced in about 10-fold. Viral late gene expression, but not early, was also reduced. Furthermore, our data showed that Akt phosphorylation was diminished upon VACV infection in DN Rac1-N17 cells, suggesting that Rac1 participates in the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway leading to the activation of Akt. In conclusion, our results indicate that while Rac1 indeed plays a role in VACV biology, perhaps another GTPase may be involved in CPXV replication. PMID:23903969

  5. Study of Vaccinia and Cowpox viruses' replication in Rac1-N17 dominant-negative cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Carneiro Salgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Interfering with cellular signal transduction pathways is a common strategy used by many viruses to create a propitious intracellular environment for an efficient replication. Our group has been studying cellular signalling pathways activated by the orthopoxviruses Vaccinia (VACV and Cowpox (CPXV and their significance to viral replication. In the present study our aim was to investigate whether the GTPase Rac1 was an upstream signal that led to the activation of MEK/ERK1/2, JNK1/2 or Akt pathways upon VACV or CPXV' infections. Therefore, we generated stable murine fibroblasts exhibiting negative dominance to Rac1-N17 to evaluate viral growth and the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt. Our results demonstrated that VACV replication, but not CPXV, was affected in dominant-negative (DN Rac1-N17 cell lines in which viral yield was reduced in about 10-fold. Viral late gene expression, but not early, was also reduced. Furthermore, our data showed that Akt phosphorylation was diminished upon VACV infection in DN Rac1-N17 cells, suggesting that Rac1 participates in the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway leading to the activation of Akt. In conclusion, our results indicate that while Rac1 indeed plays a role in VACV biology, perhaps another GTPase may be involved in CPXV replication.

  6. Control of DNA replication in a transformed lymphoid cell line: coexistence of activator and inhibitor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Oglesby, I; Cohen, S

    1991-12-01

    Proliferating lymphocytes contain an intracellular factor, ADR (activator of DNA replication), which can initiate DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. Resting lymphocytes lack ADR activity and contain an intracellular inhibitory factor that suppresses DNA synthesis in normal but not transformed nuclei. In this study we describe a MOLT-4 subline that produces both the activator and inhibitory activities which can be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The inhibitor is heat stable and inhibits ADR-mediated DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. It does not inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity. The inhibitor must be present at the initiation of DNA replication to be effective, as it loses most of its effectiveness if it is added after replication has begun. The presence of inhibitory activity in proliferating MOLT-4 cells, taken with the previous observation that inhibitor derived from normal resting cells does not affect DNA synthesis by MOLT-4 nuclei, suggests that failure of a down-regulating signal may play an important role in proliferative disorder.

  7. Neural cell image segmentation method based on support vector machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Shiwei; Ren, Kan

    2015-10-01

    In the analysis of neural cell images gained by optical microscope, accurate and rapid segmentation is the foundation of nerve cell detection system. In this paper, a modified image segmentation method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed to reduce the adverse impact caused by low contrast ratio between objects and background, adherent and clustered cells' interference etc. Firstly, Morphological Filtering and OTSU Method are applied to preprocess images for extracting the neural cells roughly. Secondly, the Stellate Vector, Circularity and Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) features are computed to train SVM model. Finally, the incremental learning SVM classifier is used to classify the preprocessed images, and the initial recognition areas identified by the SVM classifier are added to the library as the positive samples for training SVM model. Experiment results show that the proposed algorithm can achieve much better segmented results than the classic segmentation algorithms.

  8. Virus and cell RNAs expressed during Epstein-Barr virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jing; Cahir-McFarland, Ellen; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott

    2006-03-01

    Changes in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell RNA levels were assayed following immunoglobulin G (IgG) cross-linking-induced replication in latency 1-infected Akata Burkitt B lymphoblasts. EBV replication as assayed by membrane gp350 expression was approximately 5% before IgG cross-linking and increased to more than 50% 48 h after induction. Seventy-two hours after IgG cross-linking, gp350-positive cells excluded propidium iodide as well as gp350-negative cells. EBV RNA levels changed temporally in parallel with previously defined sensitivity to inhibitors of protein or viral DNA synthesis. BZLF1 immediate-early RNA levels doubled by 2 h and reached a peak at 4 h, whereas BMLF1 doubled by 4 h with a peak at 8 h, and BRLF1 doubled by 8 h with peak at 12 h. Early RNAs peaked at 8 to 12 h, and late RNAs peaked at 24 h. Hybridization to intergenic sequences resulted in evidence for new EBV RNAs. Surprisingly, latency III (LTIII) RNAs for LMP1, LMP2, EBNALP, EBNA2, EBNA3A, EBNA3C, and BARTs were detected at 8 to 12 h and reached maxima at 24 to 48 h. EBNA2 and LMP1 were at full LTIII levels by 48 h and localized to gp350-positive cells. Thus, LTIII expression is a characteristic of late EBV replication in both B lymphoblasts and epithelial cells in immune-comprised people (J. Webster-Cyriaque, J. Middeldorp, and N. Raab-Traub, J. Virol. 74:7610-7618, 2000). EBV replication significantly altered levels of 401 Akata cell RNAs, of which 122 RNAs changed twofold or more relative to uninfected Akata cells. Mitogen-activated protein kinase levels were significantly affected. Late expression of LTIII was associated with induction of NF-kappaB responsive genes including IkappaBalpha and A20. The exclusion of propidium, expression of EBV LTIII RNAs and proteins, and up-regulation of specific cell RNAs are indicative of vital cell function late in EBV replication.

  9. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Passaging protocols for mammalian neural stem cells in suspension bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arindom; Kallos, Michael S; Behie, Leo A

    2002-01-01

    Mammalian neural stem cells (NSC) offer great promise as therapeutic agents for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. As a consequence of the large numbers of cells that will be needed for drug testing and transplantation studies, it is necessary to develop protocols for the large-scale expansion of mammalian NSC. Neural stem cells and early progenitor cells can be expanded in vitro as aggregates in controlled bioreactors using carefully designed media. The first objective of this study was to determine if it is possible to maintain a population of murine neural stem and progenitor cells as aggregates in suspension culture bioreactors over extended periods of time. We discovered that serial passaging of a mixture of aggregates sizes resulted in high viabilities, high viable cell densities, and good control of aggregate diameter. When the NSC aggregates were serially subcultured three times without mechanical dissociation, a total multiplication ratio of 2.9 x 10(3) was achieved over a period of 12 days, whereas the aggregate size was controlled (mean diameter less than 150 microm) below levels at which necrosis would occur. Moreover, cell densities of 1.0 x 10(6) cells/mL were repeatedly achieved in batch culture with viabilities exceeding 80%. The second objective was to examine the proliferative potential of single cells shed from the surface of these aggregates. We found that the single cells, when subcultured, retained the capacity to generate new aggregates, gave rise to cultures with high viable cell densities and were able to differentiate into all of the primary cell phenotypes in the central nervous system.

  11. Genomic Instability in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Arises from Replicative Stress and Chromosome Condensation Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Noa; Ben-David, Uri; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Storchová, Zuzana; Benvenisty, Nissim; Kerem, Batsheva

    2016-02-04

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) frequently acquire chromosomal aberrations such as aneuploidy in culture. These aberrations progressively increase over time and may compromise the properties and clinical utility of the cells. The underlying mechanisms that drive initial genomic instability and its continued progression are largely unknown. Here, we show that aneuploid hPSCs undergo DNA replication stress, resulting in defective chromosome condensation and segregation. Aneuploid hPSCs show altered levels of actin cytoskeletal genes controlled by the transcription factor SRF, and overexpression of SRF rescues impaired chromosome condensation and segregation defects in aneuploid hPSCs. Furthermore, SRF downregulation in diploid hPSCs induces replication stress and perturbed condensation similar to that seen in aneuploid cells. Together, these results suggest that decreased SRF expression induces replicative stress and chromosomal condensation defects that underlie the ongoing chromosomal instability seen in aneuploid hPSCs. A similar mechanism may also operate during initiation of instability in diploid cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 inhibits hepatitis A virus replication in Huh7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xia; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Saito, Kengo; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Haga, Yuki; Sasaki, Reina; Sakamoto, Naoya; Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2015-03-20

    The JAK2 inhibitor AZD1480 has been reported to inhibit La protein expression. We previously demonstrated that the inhibition of La expression could inhibit hepatitis A virus (HAV) internal ribosomal entry-site (IRES)-mediated translation and HAV replication in vitro. In this study, we analyzed the effects of AZD1480 on HAV IRES-mediated translation and replication. HAV IRES-mediated translation in COS7-HAV-IRES cells was inhibited by 0.1-1 μM AZD1480, a dosage that did not affect cell viability. Results showed a significant reduction in intracellular HAV HA11-1299 genotype IIIA RNA levels in Huh7 cells treated with AZD1480. Furthermore, AZD1480 inhibited the expression of phosphorylated-(Tyr-705)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and La in Huh7 cells. Therefore, we propose that AZD1480 can inhibit HAV IRES activity and HAV replication through the inhibition of the La protein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Temporal Proteomic Map of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication in B Cells

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    Ina Ersing

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication contributes to multiple human diseases, including infectious mononucleosis, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, B cell lymphomas, and oral hairy leukoplakia. We performed systematic quantitative analyses of temporal changes in host and EBV proteins during lytic replication to gain insights into virus-host interactions, using conditional Burkitt lymphoma models of type I and II EBV infection. We quantified profiles of >8,000 cellular and 69 EBV proteins, including >500 plasma membrane proteins, providing temporal views of the lytic B cell proteome and EBV virome. Our approach revealed EBV-induced remodeling of cell cycle, innate and adaptive immune pathways, including upregulation of the complement cascade and proteasomal degradation of the B cell receptor complex, conserved between EBV types I and II. Cross-comparison with proteomic analyses of human cytomegalovirus infection and of a Kaposi-sarcoma-associated herpesvirus immunoevasin identified host factors targeted by multiple herpesviruses. Our results provide an important resource for studies of EBV replication.

  14. Impact of Lipid Nutrition on Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells

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    Nobuyuki Sakayori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The neural system originates from neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs. Embryonic NSPCs first proliferate to increase their numbers and then produce neurons and glial cells that compose the complex neural circuits in the brain. New neurons are continually produced even after birth from adult NSPCs in the inner wall of the lateral ventricle and in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These adult-born neurons are involved in various brain functions, including olfaction-related functions, learning and memory, pattern separation, and mood control. NSPCs are regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Diet is one of such important extrinsic factors. Of dietary nutrients, lipids are important because they constitute the cell membrane, are a source of energy, and function as signaling molecules. Metabolites of some lipids can be strong lipid mediators that also regulate various biological activities. Recent findings have revealed that lipids are important regulators of both embryonic and adult NSPCs. We and other groups have shown that lipid signals including fat, fatty acids, their metabolites and intracellular carriers, cholesterol, and vitamins affect proliferation and differentiation of embryonic and adult NSPCs. A better understanding of the NSPCs regulation by lipids may provide important insight into the neural development and brain function.

  15. Aebp2 as an epigenetic regulator for neural crest cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Kim

    Full Text Available Aebp2 is a potential targeting protein for the mammalian Polycomb Repression Complex 2 (PRC2. We generated a mutant mouse line disrupting the transcription of Aebp2 to investigate its in vivo roles. Aebp2-mutant homozygotes were embryonic lethal while heterozygotes survived to adulthood with fertility. In developing mouse embryos, Aebp2 is expressed mainly within cells of neural crest origin. In addition, many heterozygotes display a set of phenotypes, enlarged colon and hypopigmentation, similar to those observed in human patients with Hirschsprung's disease and Waardenburg syndrome. These phenotypes are usually caused by the absence of the neural crest-derived ganglia in hindguts and melanocytes. ChIP analyses demonstrated that the majority of the genes involved in the migration and development process of neural crest cells are downstream target genes of AEBP2 and PRC2. Furthermore, expression analyses confirmed that some of these genes are indeed affected in the Aebp2 heterozygotes. Taken together, these results suggest that Aebp2 may regulate the migration and development of the neural crest cells through the PRC2-mediated epigenetic mechanism.

  16. Comparison of betanodavirus replication efficiency in ten Indian fish cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath Babu, V; Abdul Majeed, S; Nambi, K S N; Taju, G; Madan, N; Sundar Raj, N; Sahul Hameed, A S

    2013-06-01

    Ten cell lines established from Indian marine, brackishwater and freshwater fish were tested for their susceptibility to fish nodavirus. In addition, the efficiency of betanodavirus replication was tested in these cell lines. Multiple vacuolation, a typical cytopathic effect for virus infection, was observed in infected SISK, SISS, SIGE and ICF cells. Infection of the different fish cell lines was confirmed by RT-PCR, immunodot blot assay and indirect ELISA. The virus concentration in culture supernatant collected from infected sea bass and grouper cell lines increased progressively from 10(3) at day 1 postinfection to 10(8) TCID50 ml(-1) at day 9. The amount of virus in different cell lines was also quantified by real-time PCR. These results indicate the suitability of the SISK, SISS, and SIGE cell lines for fish nodavirus propagation for developing viral diagnostics and vaccines.

  17. Capacity of Human Dental Follicle Cells to Differentiate into Neural Cells In Vitro

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    Shingo Kanao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The dental follicle is an ectomesenchymal tissue surrounding the developing tooth germ. Human dental follicle cells (hDFCs have the capacity to commit to differentiation into multiple cell types. Here we investigated the capacity of hDFCs to differentiate into neural cells and the efficiency of a two-step strategy involving floating neurosphere-like bodies for neural differentiation. Undifferentiated hDFCs showed a spindle-like morphology and were positive for neural markers such as nestin, β-III-tubulin, and S100β. The cellular morphology of several cells was neuronal-like including branched dendrite-like processes and neurites. Next, hDFCs were used for neurosphere formation in serum-free medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and B27 supplement. The number of cells with neuronal-like morphology and that were strongly positive for neural markers increased with sphere formation. Gene expression of neural markers also increased in hDFCs with sphere formation. Next, gene expression of neural markers was examined in hDFCs during neuronal differentiation after sphere formation. Expression of Musashi-1 and Musashi-2, MAP2, GFAP, MBP, and SOX10 was upregulated in hDFCs undergoing neuronal differentiation via neurospheres, whereas expression of nestin and β-III-tubulin was downregulated. In conclusion, hDFCs may be another optimal source of neural/glial cells for cell-based therapies to treat neurological diseases.

  18. Regulation of SUMO2 Target Proteins by the Proteasome in Human Cells Exposed to Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bursomanno, Sara; McGouran, Joanna F; Kessler, Benedikt M

    2015-01-01

    In human cells, SUMO2 is predominantly conjugated to target proteins in response to cellular stress. Previous studies suggested that proteins conjugated to SUMO2, but not to SUMO1, could be regulated by the ubiquitin-mediated proteasome system. Hence, we set out to understand the role...... of the proteasome in determining the fate of proteins conjugated to SUMO2 when cells are treated with DNA replication stress conditions. We conducted a quantitative proteomic analysis in a U2OS cell line stably expressing SUMO2(Q87R) tagged with StrepHA in the presence or absence of epoxomicin (EPOX), a proteasome...

  19. Bioprinting for Neural Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Stephanie; Anand, Shivesh; Shah, Twisha; Tasoglu, Savas

    2018-01-01

    Bioprinting is a method by which a cell-encapsulating bioink is patterned to create complex tissue architectures. Given the potential impact of this technology on neural research, we review the current state-of-the-art approaches for bioprinting neural tissues. While 2D neural cultures are ubiquitous for studying neural cells, 3D cultures can more accurately replicate the microenvironment of neural tissues. By bioprinting neuronal constructs, one can precisely control the microenvironment by specifically formulating the bioink for neural tissues, and by spatially patterning cell types and scaffold properties in three dimensions. We review a range of bioprinted neural tissue models and discuss how they can be used to observe how neurons behave, understand disease processes, develop new therapies and, ultimately, design replacement tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ferret airway epithelial cell cultures support efficient replication of influenza B virus but not mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderfield, Ruth A; Parker, Lauren; Stilwell, Peter; Roberts, Kim L; Schepelmann, Silke; Barclay, Wendy S

    2015-08-01

    Ferrets have become the model animal of choice for influenza pathology and transmission experiments as they are permissive and susceptible to human influenza A viruses. However, inoculation of ferrets with mumps virus (MuV) did not lead to successful infections. We evaluated the use of highly differentiated ferret tracheal epithelium cell cultures, FTE, for predicting the potential of ferrets to support respiratory viral infections. FTE cultures supported productive replication of human influenza A and B viruses but not of MuV, whereas analogous cells generated from human airways supported replication of all three viruses. We propose that in vitro strategies using these cultures might serve as a method of triaging viruses and potentially reducing the use of ferrets in viral studies.

  1. Endogenous hepatitis C virus homolog fragments in European rabbit and hare genomes replicate in cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Silva

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses, non-retroviral RNA viruses and DNA viruses have been found in the mammalian genomes. The origin of Hepatitis C virus (HCV, the major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma in humans, remains unclear since its discovery. Here we show that fragments homologous to HCV structural and non-structural (NS proteins present in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus and hare (Lepus europaeus genomes replicate in bovine cell cultures. The HCV genomic homolog fragments were demonstrated by RT-PCR, PCR, mass spectrometry, and replication in bovine cell cultures by immunofluorescence assay (IFA and immunogold electron microscopy (IEM using specific MAbs for HCV NS3, NS4A, and NS5 proteins. These findings may lead to novel research approaches on the HCV origin, genesis, evolution and diversity.

  2. Structural Analysis of Three-dimensional Human Neural Tissue derived from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terrence Brooks, Patrick; Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hyttel, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed at establishing a method for production of a three-dimensional (3D) human neural tissue derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and analyzing the outcome by a combination of tissue ultrastructure and expression of neural markers. Methods: A two......-step cell culture procedure was implemented by subjecting human iPSCs to a 3D scaffoldbased neural differentiation protocol. First, neural fate-inducing small molecules were used to create a neuroepithelial monolayer. Second, the monolayer was trypsinized into single cells and seeded into a porous...... polystyrene scaffold and further cultured to produce a 3D neural tissue. The neural tissue was characterized by a combination of immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results: iPSCs developed into a 3D neural tissue expressing markers for neural progenitor cells, early neural...

  3. Enrichment of skin-derived neural precursor cells from dermal cell populations by altering culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, Vahid; Gazor, Rohoullah; Nejatbakhsh, Reza; Negad Dehbashi, Fereshteh

    2016-01-01

    As stem cells play a critical role in tissue repair, their manipulation for being applied in regenerative medicine is of great importance. Skin-derived precursors (SKPs) may be good candidates for use in cell-based therapy as the only neural stem cells which can be isolated from an accessible tissue, skin. Herein, we presented a simple protocol to enrich neural SKPs by monolayer adherent cultivation to prove the efficacy of this method. To enrich neural SKPs from dermal cell populations, we have found that a monolayer adherent cultivation helps to increase the numbers of neural precursor cells. Indeed, we have cultured dermal cells as monolayer under serum-supplemented (control) and serum-supplemented culture, followed by serum free cultivation (test) and compared. Finally, protein markers of SKPs were assessed and compared in both experimental groups and differentiation potential was evaluated in enriched culture. The cells of enriched culture concurrently expressed fibronectin, vimentin and nestin, an intermediate filament protein expressed in neural and skeletal muscle precursors as compared to control culture. In addition, they possessed a multipotential capacity to differentiate into neurogenic, glial, adipogenic, osteogenic and skeletal myogenic cell lineages. It was concluded that serum-free adherent culture reinforced by growth factors have been shown to be effective on proliferation of skin-derived neural precursor cells (skin-NPCs) and drive their selective and rapid expansion.

  4. Visualization and Measurement of ATP Levels in Living Cells Replicating Hepatitis C Virus Genome RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Tomomi Ando; Hiromi Imamura; Ryosuke Suzuki; Hideki Aizaki; Toshiki Watanabe; Takaji Wakita; Tetsuro Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is the primary energy currency of all living organisms and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Although ATP requirements during viral lifecycles have been examined in a number of studies, a method by which ATP production can be monitored in real-time, and by which ATP can be quantified in individual cells and subcellular compartments, is lacking, thereby hindering studies aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms by which viral replication energi...

  5. Llgl1 Connects Cell Polarity with Cell-Cell Adhesion in Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossin, Yves; Lee, Minhui; Klezovitch, Olga; Kon, Elif; Cossard, Alexia; Lien, Wen-Hui; Fernandez, Tania E; Cooper, Jonathan A; Vasioukhin, Valera

    2017-06-05

    Malformations of the cerebral cortex (MCCs) are devastating developmental disorders. We report here that mice with embryonic neural stem-cell-specific deletion of Llgl1 (Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl), a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila cell polarity gene lgl, exhibit MCCs resembling severe periventricular heterotopia (PH). Immunohistochemical analyses and live cortical imaging of PH formation revealed that disruption of apical junctional complexes (AJCs) was responsible for PH in Nestin-Cre/Llgl1fl/fl brains. While it is well known that cell polarity proteins govern the formation of AJCs, the exact mechanisms remain unclear. We show that LLGL1 directly binds to and promotes internalization of N-cadherin, and N-cadherin/LLGL1 interaction is inhibited by atypical protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of LLGL1, restricting the accumulation of AJCs to the basolateral-apical boundary. Disruption of the N-cadherin-LLGL1 interaction during cortical development in vivo is sufficient for PH. These findings reveal a mechanism responsible for the physical and functional connection between cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion machineries in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dengue virus replication in a polyploid mosquito cell culture grown in serum-free medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, G

    1982-01-01

    A subline of a polyploid cell line (TRA-284) derived from a nonbiting mosquito, Toxorhynchites amboinensis, was adapted to a serum-free medium. The sensitivity of the subline (TRA-284-SF) to all serotypes of adapted dengue viruses was generally comparable to that of Aedes albopictus (C6/36), and DEN 3 viruses replicated to higher titers in TRA-28F-SF cells than in C6/36 cells. The subline was found to be useful for isolation of dengue viruses from human serum, since isolation rates were higher in TRA-284-SF cells than in C6/36 cells. The advantages of using a serum-free medium and mosquito cells for virus isolation are discussed. PMID:6130104

  7. Blood-neural barrier: its diversity and coordinated cell-to-cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2008-05-31

    The cerebral microvessels possess barrier characteristics which are tightly sealed excluding many toxic substances and protecting neural tissues. The specialized blood-neural barriers as well as the cerebral microvascular barrier are recognized in the retina, inner ear, spinal cord, and cerebrospinal fluid. Microvascular endothelial cells in the brain closely interact with other components such as astrocytes, pericytes, perivascular microglia and neurons to form functional 'neurovascular unit'. Communication between endothelial cells and other surrounding cells enhances the barrier functions, consequently resulting in maintenance and elaboration of proper brain homeostasis. Furthermore, the disruption of the neurovascular unit is closely involved in cerebrovascular disorders. In this review, we focus on the location and function of these various blood-neural barriers, and the importance of the cell-to-cell communication for development and maintenance of the barrier integrity at the neurovascular unit. We also demonstrate the close relation between the alteration of the blood-neural barriers and cerebrovascular disorders.

  8. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by targeting broad host cell pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Marois

    Full Text Available Antivirals that are currently used to treat influenza virus infections target components of the virus which can mutate rapidly. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of resistant strains to one or many antivirals in recent years. Here we compared the antiviral effects of lysosomotropic alkalinizing agents (LAAs and calcium modulators (CMs, which interfere with crucial events in the influenza virus replication cycle, against avian, swine, and human viruses of different subtypes in MDCK cells. We observed that treatment with LAAs, CMs, or a combination of both, significantly inhibited viral replication. Moreover, the drugs were effective even when they were administered 8 h after infection. Finally, analysis of the expression of viral acidic polymerase (PA revealed that both drugs classes interfered with early events in the viral replication cycle. This study demonstrates that targeting broad host cellular pathways can be an efficient strategy to inhibit influenza replication. Furthermore, it provides an interesting avenue for drug development where resistance by the virus might be reduced since the virus is not targeted directly.

  9. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Urquiza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  10. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Javier M; Burgos, Juan M; Ojeda, Diego S; Pascuale, Carla A; Leguizamón, M Susana; Quarleri, Jorge F

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  11. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Javier M.; Burgos, Juan M.; Ojeda, Diego S.; Pascuale, Carla A.; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Quarleri, Jorge F.

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis. PMID:28824880

  12. Evidence of viral replication in circulating dendritic cells during hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutagny, Nadège; Fatmi, Ahmed; De Ledinghen, Victor; Penin, François; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Bain, Christine

    2003-06-15

    The existence of extrahepatic sites of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication has been proposed as a mechanism responsible for the poor antiviral immune response found in chronic infection. Dendritic cells (DCs), as unique antigen-presenting cells able to induce a primary immune response, are prime targets of persistent viruses. From 24 blood samples obtained from HCV-seropositive patients, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) were purified. HCV genomic sequences were specifically detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in 6 of 24 PBDC pellets, and replicative-strand RNA also was found in 3 of 24 cell purifications. Analysis of the HCV quasi-species distribution in the PBDC population of 1 patient showed the presence of a dominant variant different from that found in plasma with respect to the primary amino-acid sequence and physicochemical profile of the hypervariable region 1 of glycoprotein E2. These data strongly suggest that PBDCs constitute a reservoir in which HCV replication takes place during natural infection.

  13. HIV-1 replication in the central nervous system occurs in two distinct cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system (CNS can lead to the development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD. We examined the virological characteristics of HIV-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of HAD subjects to explore the association between independent viral replication in the CNS and the development of overt dementia. We found that genetically compartmentalized CCR5-tropic (R5 T cell-tropic and macrophage-tropic HIV-1 populations were independently detected in the CSF of subjects diagnosed with HIV-1-associated dementia. Macrophage-tropic HIV-1 populations were genetically diverse, representing established CNS infections, while R5 T cell-tropic HIV-1 populations were clonally amplified and associated with pleocytosis. R5 T cell-tropic viruses required high levels of surface CD4 to enter cells, and their presence was correlated with rapid decay of virus in the CSF with therapy initiation (similar to virus in the blood that is replicating in activated T cells. Macrophage-tropic viruses could enter cells with low levels of CD4, and their presence was correlated with slow decay of virus in the CSF, demonstrating a separate long-lived cell as the source of the virus. These studies demonstrate two distinct virological states inferred from the CSF virus in subjects diagnosed with HAD. Finally, macrophage-tropic viruses were largely restricted to the CNS/CSF compartment and not the blood, and in one case we were able to identify the macrophage-tropic lineage as a minor variant nearly two years before its expansion in the CNS. These results suggest that HIV-1 variants in CSF can provide information about viral replication and evolution in the CNS, events that are likely to play an important role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

  14. Jak Inhibitors Modulate Production of Replication Competent Zika Virus in Human Hofbauer, Trophoblasts, and Neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gavegnano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika Virus (ZIKV is a Flavivirus that has been implicated in brain deformations, birth defects, and microcephaly of unborn fetuses and associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.  Mechanisms responsible for transmission of ZIKV across the placenta to the fetus are incompletely understood.  Herein, we define key events modulating infection in clinically relevant cells, including primary placental macrophages (human hofbauer cells; HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with previous findings, HC and trophoblasts are permissive to ZIKV infection. Decrease of interferon signaling by Jak 1/2 inhibition (via ruxolitinib significantly increased ZIKV replicationin HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblasts. Enhanced ZIKV production in ruxolitinib treated HC was associated with increased expression of HLA-DR and DC-SIGN. Nucleoside analogs blocked ruxolitinib-mediated production of extracellular virus. Although low-level ZIKV infection occurred in untreated HC and trophoblasts, the produced virus was incapable of infecting naïve Vero cells.  These deficient virions from untreated HC present “thin-coats” suggesting immature virion structure. Blocking Jak 1/2 signaling (with ruxolitinib restored replication competence as virions produced under these conditions confer CPE in naïve Vero cells.  These data demonstrate that Jak-STAT signaling directly impacts the ability of primary placental cells to produce replication competent virus and is a key gatekeeper in production of mature virions in clinically relevant cells including HC and trophoblasts. Design of targeted agents to prevent ZIKV replication in the placenta should consider Jak 1/2 signaling and the impact of its block on ZIKV infection and subsequent transmission to the fetus.

  15. Comparative analysis of the molecular mechanisms controlling the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in yeast and in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Elena; Hasan, Md Mehedi; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes DNA replication takes place in the S phase of the cell cycle. It initiates from hundreds to thousands of replication origins in a coordinated manner, in order to efficiently duplicate the genome. The sequence of events leading to the onset of DNA replication is conventionally divided in two interdependent processes: licensing-a process during which replication origins acquire replication competence but are kept inactive- and firing-a process during which licensed origins are activated but not re-licensed. In this review we investigate the evolutionary conservation of the molecular machinery orchestrating DNA replication initiation both in yeast and in mammalian cells, highlighting a remarkable conservation of the general architecture of this central biological mechanism. Many steps are conserved down to molecular details and are performed by orthologous proteins with high sequence conservation, while differences in molecular structure of the performing proteins and their interactions are apparent in other steps. Tight regulation of initiation of DNA replication is achieved through protein phosphorylation, exerted mostly by Cyclin-dependent kinases in order to ensure that each chromosome is fully replicated once, and only once, during each cycle, and to avoid the formation of aberrant DNA structures and incorrect chromosomal duplication, that in mammalian cells are a prerequisite for genome instability and tumorigenesis. We then consider a molecular mathematical model of DNA replication, recently proposed by our group in a collaborative project, as a frame of reference to discuss similarities and differences observed in the regulatory program controlling DNA replication initiation in yeast and in mammalian cells and discuss whether they may be dependent upon different functional constraints. We conclude that a systems biology approach, integrating molecular analysis with modeling and computational investigations, is the best choice to investigate the

  16. Differentiation and Cell-Cell Interactions of Neural Progenitor Cells Transplanted into Intact Adult Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinich, K K; Kosykh, A V; Aleksandrova, M A

    2015-11-01

    We studied the behavior and cell-cell interactions of embryonic brain cell from GFP-reporter mice after their transplantation into the intact adult brain. Fragments or cell suspensions of fetal neocortical cells at different stages of development were transplanted into the neocortex and striatum of adult recipients. Even in intact brain, the processes of transplanted neurons formed extensive networks in the striatum and neocortical layers I and V-VI. Processes of transplanted cells at different stages of development attained the rostral areas of the frontal cortex and some of them reached the internal capsule. However, the cells transplanted in suspension had lower process growth potency than cells from tissue fragments. Tyrosine hydroxylase fibers penetrated from the recipient brain into grafts at both early and late stages of development. Our experiments demonstrated the formation of extensive reciprocal networks between the transplanted fetal neural cells and recipient brain neurons even in intact brain.

  17. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...

  18. Genome-wide copy number profiling of single cells in S-phase reveals DNA-replication domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Aa, Niels; Cheng, Jiqiu; Mateiu, Ligia; Esteki, Masoud Zamani; Kumar, Parveen; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Vanneste, Evelyne; Moreau, Yves; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell genomics is revolutionizing basic genome research and clinical genetic diagnosis. However, none of the current research or clinical methods for single-cell analysis distinguishes between the analysis of a cell in G1-, S- or G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate by means of array comparative genomic hybridization that charting the DNA copy number landscape of a cell in S-phase requires conceptually different approaches to that of a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Remarkably, despite single-cell whole-genome amplification artifacts, the log2 intensity ratios of single S-phase cells oscillate according to early and late replication domains, which in turn leads to the detection of significantly more DNA imbalances when compared with a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Although these DNA imbalances may, on the one hand, be falsely interpreted as genuine structural aberrations in the S-phase cell’s copy number profile and hence lead to misdiagnosis, on the other hand, the ability to detect replication domains genome wide in one cell has important applications in DNA-replication research. Genome-wide cell-type-specific early and late replicating domains have been identified by analyses of DNA from populations of cells, but cell-to-cell differences in DNA replication may be important in genome stability, disease aetiology and various other cellular processes. PMID:23295674

  19. Infected cell killing by HIV-1 protease promotes NF-kappaB dependent HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary D Bren

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute HIV-1 infection of CD4 T cells often results in apoptotic death of infected cells, yet it is unclear what evolutionary advantage this offers to HIV-1. Given the independent observations that acute T cell HIV-1 infection results in (1 NF-kappaB activation, (2 caspase 8 dependent apoptosis, and that (3 caspase 8 directly activates NF-kappaB, we questioned whether these three events might be interrelated. We first show that HIV-1 infected T cell apoptosis, NF-kappaB activation, and caspase 8 cleavage by HIV-1 protease are coincident. Next we show that HIV-1 protease not only cleaves procaspase 8, producing Casp8p41, but also independently stimulates NF-kappaB activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the HIV protease cleavage of caspase 8 is necessary for optimal NF-kappaB activation and that the HIV-1 protease specific cleavage fragment Casp8p41 is sufficient to stimulate HIV-1 replication through NF-kappaB dependent HIV-LTR activation both in vitro as well as in cells from HIV infected donors. Consequently, the molecular events which promote death of HIV-1 infected T cells function dually to promote HIV-1 replication, thereby favoring the propagation and survival of HIV-1.

  20. Control of neural stem cell survival by electroactive polymer substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Lundin

    Full Text Available Stem cell function is regulated by intrinsic as well as microenvironmental factors, including chemical and mechanical signals. Conducting polymer-based cell culture substrates provide a powerful tool to control both chemical and physical stimuli sensed by stem cells. Here we show that polypyrrole (PPy, a commonly used conducting polymer, can be tailored to modulate survival and maintenance of rat fetal neural stem cells (NSCs. NSCs cultured on PPy substrates containing different counter ions, dodecylbenzenesulfonate (DBS, tosylate (TsO, perchlorate (ClO(4 and chloride (Cl, showed a distinct correlation between PPy counter ion and cell viability. Specifically, NSC viability was high on PPy(DBS but low on PPy containing TsO, ClO(4 and Cl. On PPy(DBS, NSC proliferation and differentiation was comparable to standard NSC culture on tissue culture polystyrene. Electrical reduction of PPy(DBS created a switch for neural stem cell viability, with widespread cell death upon polymer reduction. Coating the PPy(DBS films with a gel layer composed of a basement membrane matrix efficiently prevented loss of cell viability upon polymer reduction. Here we have defined conditions for the biocompatibility of PPy substrates with NSC culture, critical for the development of devices based on conducting polymers interfacing with NSCs.

  1. Pharmacokinetic study of neural stem cell-based cell carrier for oncolytic virotherapy: targeted delivery of the therapeutic payload in an orthotopic brain tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaci, B; Ahmed, A U; Ulasov, I V; Tobias, A L; Han, Y; Aboody, K S; Lesniak, M S

    2012-06-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a promising novel therapy for glioblastoma that needs to be optimized before introduced to clinic. The targeting of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAds) can be improved by relying on the tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs). Here, we report the characterization of an FDA approved NSC, HB1.F3-CD, as a cell carrier for CRAd-S-pk7, a glioma-tropic oncolytic adenovirus. We show that NSCs replicate and release infectious CRAd-S-pk7 progeny capable of lysing glioma cell lines. Moreover, ex-vivo-loaded NSCs, injected intracranially in nude mice bearing human glioma xenografts (i) retained their tumor tropism, (ii) continued to replicate CRAd-S-pk7 for more than a week after reaching the tumor site and (iii) successfully handed off CRAd-S-pk7 to glioma cells in vivo. Delivery via carrier cells reduced non-specific adenovirus distribution in the mouse brain. Moreover, we assessed biodistribution of loaded NSCs after intracranial injection in animal models semi-permissive to adenovirus replication, the Syrian hamster and cotton rat. NSCs did not migrate to distant organs and high levels of CRAd-S-pk7 DNA were observed only in the injected hemisphere. In conclusion, this optimized carrier system, with high efficiency of adenovirus delivery and minimal systemic toxicity, poses considerable advantages for anti-glioma oncolytic virotherapy.

  2. Isolation and characterization of adult neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Vedam-Mai, Vinata; Azari, Hassan; Reynolds, Brent A; Deleyrolle, Loic P

    2011-01-01

    It has been thought for a long time that the adult brain is incapable of generating new neurons, or that neurons cannot be added to its complex circuitry. However, recent technology has resulted in an explosion of research demonstrating that neurogenesis, or the birth of new neurons from adult stem cells constitutively occurs in two specific regions of the mammalian brain; namely the subventricular zone and hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult CNS stem cells exhibit three main characteristics: (1) they are "self-renewing," i.e., they possess a theoretically unlimited ability to produce progeny indistinguishable from themselves, (2) they are proliferative (undergoing mitosis) and (3) they are multipotent for the different neuroectodermal lineages of the CNS, including the different neuronal, and glial subtypes. CNS stem cells and all progenitor cell types are broadly termed "precursors." In this chapter, we describe methods to identify, isolate and experimentally manipulate stem cells of the adult brain. We outline how to prepare a precursor cell culture from naive brain tissue and how to test the "stemness" potential of different cell types present in that culture, which is achieved in a three-step paradigm. Following their isolation, stem/progenitor cells are expanded in neurosphere culture. Single cells obtained from these neurospheres are sorted for the expression of surface markers by flow cytometry. Finally, putative stem cells from cell sorting will be subjected to the so-called neural colony-forming cell assay, which allows discrimination between stem and progenitor cells. At the end of this chapter we will also describe how to identify neural stem cells in vivo.

  3. Effect of ascorbic acid on rhinovirus replication in WI-38 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, P R; Schwerdt, C E

    1975-04-01

    Exposure of WI-38 cells to ascorbic acid plus glutathione mixtures in growth medium for 2 days prior to infection with rhinovirus serotype 20 and during virus replication suppressed multicyclic but not single-cycle growth of the virus. Multicyclic growth was suppressed over the range of multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) of 4 times 10-minus 1 minus 4 times 10-minus 4 PFU/cell. There was some suggestion that, in the presence of ascorbic acid plus glutathione, interferon was produced at the highest m.o.i. tested but at barely detectable levels.

  4. Oct4+ stem/progenitor swine lung epithelial cells are targets for influenza virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mahesh; Goyal, Sagar M; Saif, Yehia M

    2012-06-01

    We isolated stem/progenitor epithelial cells from the lungs of 4- to 6-week-old pigs. The epithelial progenitor colony cells were surrounded by mesenchymal stromal cells. The progenitor epithelial colony cells expressed stem cell markers such as octamer binding transcription factor 4 (Oct4) and stage-specific embryonic antigen 1 (SSEA-1), as well as the epithelial markers pancytokeratin, cytokeratin-18, and occludin, but not mesenchymal (CD44, CD29, and CD90) and hematopoietic (CD45) markers. The colony cells had extensive self-renewal potential and had the capacity to undergo differentiation to alveolar type I- and type II-like pneumocytes. Additionally, these cells expressed sialic acid receptors and supported the active replication of influenza virus, which was accompanied by cell lysis. The lysis of progenitor epithelial cells by influenza virus may cause a marked reduction in the potential of progenitor cells for self renewal and for their ability to differentiate into specialized cells of the lung. These observations suggest the possible involvement of lung stem/progenitor cells in influenza virus infection.

  5. Establishment of Human Neural Progenitor Cells from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells with Diverse Tissue Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayato Fukusumi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs have previously been generated from limited numbers of human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC clones. Here, 21 hiPSC clones derived from human dermal fibroblasts, cord blood cells, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were differentiated using two neural induction methods, an embryoid body (EB formation-based method and an EB formation method using dual SMAD inhibitors (dSMADi. Our results showed that expandable hNPCs could be generated from hiPSC clones with diverse somatic tissue origins. The established hNPCs exhibited a mid/hindbrain-type neural identity and uniform expression of neural progenitor genes.

  6. Host factor PRPF31 is involved in cccDNA production in HBV-replicating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Wataru; Ogura, Naoki; Watashi, Koichi; Wakita, Takaji

    2017-01-22

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) plays a central role in chronic HBV infection and replication, and is an important factor for HBV surface antigen loss indicating the endpoint of HBV treatment. However, there is a known problem that current anti-HBV drugs, including interferons and nucleos(t)ide analogues, reduce HBV replication but have a little or no effect on reducing cccDNA. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic agents is necessary to eradicate cccDNA. In this study, we identified pre-mRNA processing factor 31 (PRPF31) by siRNA screening as a factor associated with cccDNA. PRPF31 knockdown by siRNA decreased cccDNA formation without serious cytotoxicity. In rescue experiments, expression of siRNA-resistant PRPF31 recovered cccDNA formation. PRPF31 knockdown did not affect HBV core protein and HBV core DNA levels in HBV-replicating cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and immunoprecipitation assays revealed an association between PRPF31 and cccDNA. Furthermore, co-overexpression of PRPF31 and HBx enhanced cccDNA formation in HepAD38 cells. Taken together, the present findings suggest that the interaction between PRPF31 and HBx may be a novel target for anti-HBV treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A replication-dependent passive mechanism modulates DNA demethylation in mouse primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Rika; Nakayama, Megumi; Naruse, Chie; Okashita, Naoki; Takano, Osamu; Tachibana, Makoto; Asano, Masahide; Saitou, Mitinori; Seki, Yoshiyuki

    2013-07-01

    Germline cells reprogramme extensive epigenetic modifications to ensure the cellular totipotency of subsequent generations and to prevent the accumulation of epimutations. Notably, primordial germ cells (PGCs) erase genome-wide DNA methylation and H3K9 dimethylation marks in a stepwise manner during migration and gonadal periods. In this study, we profiled DNA and histone methylation on transposable elements during PGC development, and examined the role of DNA replication in DNA demethylation in gonadal PGCs. CpGs in short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) B1 and B2 were substantially demethylated in migrating PGCs, whereas CpGs in long interspersed nuclear elements (LINEs), such as LINE-1, were resistant to early demethylation. By contrast, CpGs in both LINE-1 and SINEs were rapidly demethylated in gonadal PGCs. Four major modifiers of DNA and histone methylation, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Glp and Uhrf1, were actively repressed at distinct stages of PGC development. DNMT1 was localised at replication foci in nascent PGCs, whereas the efficiency of recruitment of DNMT1 into replication foci was severely impaired in gonadal PGCs. Hairpin bisulphite sequencing analysis showed that strand-specific hemi-methylated CpGs on LINE-1 were predominant in gonadal PGCs. Furthermore, DNA demethylation in SINEs and LINE-1 was impaired in Cbx3-deficient PGCs, indicating abnormalities in G1 to S phase progression. We propose that PGCs employ active and passive mechanisms for efficient and widespread erasure of genomic DNA methylation.

  8. Host cell factors in HIV replication: meta-analysis of genome-wide studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic D Bushman

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We have analyzed host cell genes linked to HIV replication that were identified in nine genome-wide studies, including three independent siRNA screens. Overlaps among the siRNA screens were very modest (<7% for any pairwise combination, and similarly, only modest overlaps were seen in pairwise comparisons with other types of genome-wide studies. Combining all genes from the genome-wide studies together with genes reported in the literature to affect HIV yields 2,410 protein-coding genes, or fully 9.5% of all human genes (though of course some of these are false positive calls. Here we report an "encyclopedia" of all overlaps between studies (available at http://www.hostpathogen.org, which yielded a more extensively corroborated set of host factors assisting HIV replication. We used these genes to calculate refined networks that specify cellular subsystems recruited by HIV to assist in replication, and present additional analysis specifying host cell genes that are attractive as potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Expression profiling of colorectal cancer cells reveals inhibition of DNA replication licensing by extracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Abhishek; Schulz, Herbert; Manhardt, Teresa; Bilban, Martin; Thakker, Rajesh V; Kallay, Enikö

    2017-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in industrialised societies. Epidemiological studies, animal experiments, and randomized clinical trials have shown that dietary factors can influence all stages of colorectal carcinogenesis, from initiation through promotion to progression. Calcium is one of the factors with a chemoprophylactic effect in colorectal cancer. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular mechanisms of the anti-tumorigenic effects of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) in colon cancer cells. Gene expression microarray analysis of colon cancer cells treated for 1, 4, and 24h with 2mM [Ca(2+)]o identified significant changes in expression of 1571 probe sets (ANOVA, pcalcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a G protein-coupled receptor is a mediator involved in this process. To test whether these results were physiologically relevant, we fed mice with a standard diet containing low (0.04%), intermediate (0.1%), or high (0.9%) levels of dietary calcium. The main molecules regulating replication licensing were inhibited also in vivo, in the colon of mice fed high calcium diet. We show that among the mechanisms behind the chemopreventive effect of [Ca(2+)]o is inhibition of replication licensing, a process often deregulated in neoplastic transformation. Our data suggest that dietary calcium is effective in preventing replicative stress, one of the main drivers of cancer and this process is mediated by the calcium-sensing receptor. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Equine herpesvirus type 1 replication is delayed in CD172a+ monocytic cells and controlled by histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and disseminates through the body via a cell-associated viraemia in monocytic cells, despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 hijacks immune cells and uses them as 'Trojan horses' in order to disseminate inside its host is still unclear. Here, we hypothesize that EHV-1 delays its replication in monocytic cells in order to avoid recognition by the immune system. We compared replication kinetics in vitro of EHV-1 in RK-13, a cell line fully susceptible to EHV-1 infection, and primary horse cells from the myeloid lineage (CD172a(+)). We found that EHV-1 replication was restricted to 4 % of CD172a(+) cells compared with 100 % in RK-13 cells. In susceptible CD172a(+) cells, the expression of immediate-early (IEP) and early (EICP22) proteins was delayed in the cell nuclei by 2-3 h post-infection (p.i.) compared with RK-13, and the formation of replicative compartments by 15 h p.i. Virus production in CD172a(+) cells was significantly lower (from 10(1.7) to 10(3.1) TCID50 per 10(5) inoculated cells) than in RK-13 (from 10(5) to 10(5.7) TCID50 per 10(5) inoculated cells). Less than 0.02 % of inoculated CD172a(+) cells produced and transmitted infectious virus to neighbouring cells. Pre-treatment of CD172a(+) cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylase activity increased and accelerated viral protein expression at very early times of infection and induced productive infection in CD172a(+) cells. Our results demonstrated that the restriction and delay of EHV-1 replication in CD172a(+) cells are part of an immune evasive strategy and involve silencing of EHV-1 gene expression associated with histone deacetylases. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Replication of influenza A virus in swine umbilical cord epithelial stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Mahesh; Chattha, Kuldeep S

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we describe the isolation and characterization of epithelial stem-like cells from the swine umbilical cord and their susceptibility to influenza virus infection. Swine umbilical cord epithelial stem cells (SUCECs) expressed stem cell and pluripotency associated markers such as SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA 1-60 and TRA 1-81 and Oct4. Morphologically, cells displayed polygonal morphology and were found to express epithelial markers; pancytokeratin, cytokeratin-18 and occludin; mesenchymal cell markers CD44, CD90 and haematopoietic cell marker CD45 were not detected on these cells. The cells had extensive proliferation and self- renewal properties. The cells also possessed immunomodulatory activity and inhibited the proliferation of T cells. Also, higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 were detected in SUCEC-T cell co-cultures. The cells were multipotent and differentiated into lung epithelial cells when cultured in epithelial differentiation media. We also examined if SUCECs are susceptible to infection with influenza virus. SUCECs expressed sialic acid receptors, used by influenza virus for binding to cells. The 2009 pandemic influenza virus and swine influenza virus replicated in these cells. SUCECs due to their differentiation and immunoregulatory properties will be useful as cellular therapy in a pig model for human diseases. Additionally, our data indicate that influenza virus can infect SUCECs and may transmit influenza virus from mother to fetus through umbilical cord and transplantation of influenza virus-infected stem cells may transmit infection to recipients. Therefore, we propose that umbilical cord cells, in addition to other agents, should also be tested for influenza virus before cryopreservation for future use as a cell therapy for disease conditions.

  12. Gene dosage imbalance during DNA replication controls bacterial cell-fate decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoshin, Oleg

    Genes encoding proteins in a common regulatory network are frequently located close to one another on the chromosome to facilitate co-regulation or couple gene expression to growth rate. Contrasting with these observations, here we demonstrate a functional role for the arrangement of Bacillus subtilis sporulation network genes on opposite sides of the chromosome. We show that the arrangement of two sporulation network genes, one located close to the origin, the other close to the terminus leads to a transient gene dosage imbalance during chromosome replication. This imbalance is detected by the sporulation network to produce cell-cycle coordinated pulses of the sporulation master regulator Spo0A~P. This pulsed response allows cells to decide between sporulation and continued vegetative growth during each cell-cycle spent in starvation. Furthermore, changes in DNA replication and cell-cycle parameters with decreased growth rate in starvation conditions enable cells to indirectly detect starvation without the need for evaluating specific metabolites. The simplicity of the uncovered coordination mechanism and starvation sensing suggests that it may be widely applicable in a variety of gene regulatory and stress-response settings. This work is supported by National Science Foundation Grants MCB-1244135, EAGER-1450867, MCB-1244423, NIH NIGMS Grant R01 GM088428 and HHMI International Student Fellowship.

  13. Matrix elasticity, replicative senescence and DNA methylation patterns of mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, Anne; Joussen, Sylvia; Moser, Kristin; Hampe, Nico; Hersch, Nils; Hemeda, Hatim; Schnitker, Jan; Denecke, Bernd; Lin, Qiong; Pallua, Norbert; Zenke, Martin; Merkel, Rudolf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-08-01

    Matrix elasticity guides differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) but it is unclear if these effects are only transient - while the cells reside on the substrate - or if they reflect persistent lineage commitment. In this study, MSCs were continuously culture-expanded in parallel either on tissue culture plastic (TCP) or on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) gels of different elasticity to compare impact on replicative senescence, in vitro differentiation, gene expression, and DNA methylation (DNAm) profiles. The maximal number of cumulative population doublings was not affected by matrix elasticity. Differentiation towards adipogenic and osteogenic lineage was increased on soft and rigid biomaterials, respectively - but this propensity was no more evident if cells were transferred to TCP. Global gene expression profiles and DNAm profiles revealed relatively few differences in MSCs cultured on soft or rigid matrices. Furthermore, only moderate DNAm changes were observed upon culture on very soft hydrogels of human platelet lysate. Our results support the notion that matrix elasticity influences cellular behavior while the cells reside on the substrate, but it does not have major impact on cell-intrinsic lineage determination, replicative senescence or DNAm patterns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan; Ochalek, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency......), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells...... and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between...

  15. Proteome-wide analysis of neural stem cell differentiation to facilitate transition to cell replacement therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žižková, Martina; Suchá, Rita; Tylečková, Jiřina; Jarkovská, Karla; Mairychová, Kateřina; Kotrčová, Eva; Marsala, M.; Gadher, S. J.; Kovářová, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2015), s. 83-95 ISSN 1478-9450 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA01011466 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : cell therapy * immunomodulation * neural stem cell differentiation * neural subpopulation * neurodegenerative disease Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.465, year: 2015

  16. Rheum emodin inhibits enterovirus 71 viral replication and affects the host cell cycle environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ting; Zhang, Li-Ying; Wang, Zeng-Yan; Wang, Yue; Song, Feng-Mei; Zhang, Ya-Hong; Yu, Jing-Hua

    2017-03-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the primary causative agent of recent large-scale outbreaks of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) in Asia. Currently, there are no drugs available for the prevention and treatment of HFMD. In this study, we compared the anti-EV71 activities of three natural compounds, rheum emodin, artemisinin and astragaloside extracted from Chinese herbs Chinese rhubarb, Artemisia carvifolia and Astragalus, respectively, which have been traditionally used for the treatment and prevention of epidemic diseases. Human lung fibroblast cell line MRC5 was mock-infected or infected with EV71, and treated with drugs. The cytotoxicity of the drugs was detected with MTT assay. The cytopathic effects such as cell death and condensed nuclei were morphologically observed. The VP1-coding sequence required for EV71 genome replication was assayed with qRT-PCR. Viral protein expression was analyzed with Western blotting. Viral TCID50 was determined to evaluate EV71 virulence. Flow cytometry analysis of propidium iodide staining was performed to analyze the cell cycle distribution of MRC5 cells. Rheum emodin (29.6 μmol/L) effectively protected MRC5 cells from EV71-induced cytopathic effects, which resulted from the inhibiting viral replication: rheum emodin treatment decreased viral genomic levels by 5.34-fold, viral protein expression by less than 30-fold and EV71 virulence by 0.33107-fold. The fact that inhibition of rheum emodin on viral virulence was much stronger than its effects on genomic levels and viral protein expression suggested that rheum emodin inhibited viral maturation. Furthermore, rheum emodin treatment markedly diminished cell cycle arrest at S phase in MRC5 cells, which was induced by EV71 infection and favored the viral replication. In contrast, neither astragaloside (50 μmol/L) nor artemisinin (50 μmol/L) showed similar anti-EV71 activities. Among the three natural compounds tested, rheum emodin effectively suppressed EV71 viral replication

  17. Effect of Monocular Deprivation on Rabbit Neural Retinal Cell Densities

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Maseghe Mwachaka; Hassan Saidi; Paul Ochieng Odula; Pamela Idenya Mandela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the effect of monocular deprivation on densities of neural retinal cells in rabbits. Methods: Thirty rabbits, comprised of 18 subject and 12 control animals, were included and monocular deprivation was achieved through unilateral lid suturing in all subject animals. The rabbits were observed for three weeks. At the end of each week, 6 experimental and 3 control animals were euthanized, their retinas was harvested and processed for light microscopy. Photomicrographs of ...

  18. Neural network adapted to wound cell analysis in surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljanto, Jouko; Koski, Antti

    2011-01-01

    Assessment of the real state of wound healing of closed surgical wounds is uncertain both clinically and from conventional laboratory tests. Therefore, a novel approach based on early analysis of exactly timed wound cells, computerized further with an artificial neural network, was developed. At the end of routine surgery performed on 481 children under 18 years of age, a specific wound drain Cellstick™ was inserted subcutaneously between the wound edges to harvest wound cells. The Cellsticks™ were removed from 1 to 50 hours, mainly at hour 3 or 24 postsurgery. Immediately, the cellular contents were washed out using a pump constructed for the purpose. After cytocentrifugation, the cells were stained and counted differentially. Based on their relative proportions at selected time intervals, an artificial self-organizing neural map was developed. This was further transformed to a unidirectional linear graph where each node represents one set of relative cell quantities. As early as 3 hours, but more precisely 24 hours after surgery, the location of the nodes on this graph showed individually the patients' initial speed of wound inflammatory cell response. Similarly, timed Cellstick™ specimens from new surgical patients could be analyzed, computerized, and compared with these node values to assess their initial speed in wound inflammatory cell response. Location of the node on the graph does not express the time lapse after surgery but the speed of wound inflammatory cell response in relation to that of other patients. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  19. Integrating Biomaterials and Stem Cells for Neural Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclean, Francesca L; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-02-01

    The central nervous system has a limited capacity to regenerate, and thus, traumatic injuries or diseases often have devastating consequences. Therefore, there is a distinct need to develop alternative treatments that can achieve functional recovery without side effects currently observed with some pharmacological treatments. Combining biomaterials with pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), either embryonic or induced, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries. Biomaterials can mimic the extracellular matrix and present a myriad of relevant biochemical cues through rational design or further functionalization. Biomaterials such as nanofibers and hydrogels, including self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels can provide a superior cell culture environment. When these materials are then combined with PSCs, more accurate drug screening and disease modeling could be developed, and the generation of large number of cells with the appropriate phenotype can be achieved, for subsequent use in vitro. Biomaterials have also been shown to support endogenous cell growth after implantation, and, in particular, hydrogels and SAPs have effectively acted as cell delivery vehicles, increasing cell survival after transplantation. Few studies are yet to fully exploit the combination of PSCs and innovative biomaterials; however, initial studies with neural stem cells, for example, are promising, and, hence, such a combination for use in vitro and in vivo is an exciting new direction for the field of neural regeneration.

  20. Recombinant spider silk matrices for neural stem cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicka, Michalina; Hermanson, Ola; Rising, Anna U

    2012-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. Accordingly, NSCs hold great promise in drug screening and treatment of several common diseases. However, a major obstacle in applied stem cell research is the limitation of synthetic matrices for culturing stem cells. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of recombinant spider silk (4RepCT) matrices for growth of NSCs. NSCs isolated from the cerebral cortices of mid-gestation rat embryos were cultured on either 4RepCT matrices or conventional poly-L-ornithine and fibronectin (P + F) coated polystyrene plates. From 48 h of culture, no significant differences in cell proliferation or viability were detected in NSC cultures on 4RepCT compared to control matrices (polystyrene plates coated with P + F). The NSCs retained an undifferentiated state, displaying low or no staining for markers of differentiated cells. Upon stimulation NSCs grown on 4RepCT differentiated efficiently into neuronal and astrocytic cells to virtually the same degree as control cultures, but a slightly less efficient oligodendrocyte differentiation was noted. We suggest that recombinant spider silk matrices provide a functional microenvironment and represent a useful tool for the development of new strategies in neural stem cell research. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Interaction of RECQ4 and MCM10 is important for efficient DNA replication origin firing in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliszczak, Maciej; Sedlackova, Hana; Pitchai, Ganesha P

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly coordinated process that is initiated at multiple replication origins in eukaryotes. These origins are bound by the origin recognition complex (ORC), which subsequently recruits the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase in a Cdt1/Cdc6-dependent manner. In budding yeast, two...... essential replication factors, Sld2 and Mcm10, are then important for the activation of replication origins. In humans, the putative Sld2 homolog, RECQ4, interacts with MCM10. Here, we have identified two mutants of human RECQ4 that are deficient in binding to MCM10. We show that these RECQ4 variants...... are able to complement the lethality of an avian cell RECQ4 deletion mutant, indicating that the essential function of RECQ4 in vertebrates is unlikely to require binding to MCM10. Nevertheless, we show that the RECQ4-MCM10 interaction is important for efficient replication origin firing....

  2. Similarity on neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in transgenic brain tumor mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Guanqun; Li, Qingquan; Peng, Gang; Ma, Jun; Fan, Hongwei; Li, Yingbin

    2013-01-01

    Although it is believed that glioma is derived from brain tumor stem cells, the source and molecular signal pathways of these cells are still unclear. In this study, we used stable doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse brain tumor models (c-myc+/SV40Tag+/Tet-on+) to explore the malignant trans-formation potential of neural stem cells by observing the differences of neural stem cells and brain tumor stem cells in the tumor models. Results showed that chromosome instability occurred in brain t...

  3. Prostaglandin E2 promotes features of replicative senescence in chronically activated human CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer P Chou

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a pleiotropic immunomodulatory molecule, and its free radical catalyzed isoform, iso-PGE2, are frequently elevated in the context of cancer and chronic infection. Previous studies have documented the effects of PGE2 on the various CD4+ T cell functions, but little is known about its impact on cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes, the immune cells responsible for eliminating virally infected and tumor cells. Here we provide the first demonstration of the dramatic effects of PGE2 on the progression of human CD8+ T cells toward replicative senescence, a terminal dysfunctional state associated multiple pathologies during aging and chronic HIV-1 infection. Our data show that exposure of chronically activated CD8+ T cells to physiological levels of PGE2 and iso-PGE2 promotes accelerated acquisition of markers of senescence, including loss of CD28 expression, increased expression of p16 cell cycle inhibitor, reduced telomerase activity, telomere shortening and diminished production of key cytotoxic and survival cytokines. Moreover, the CD8+ T cells also produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that the resultant oxidative stress may have further enhanced telomere loss. Interestingly, we observed that even chronic activation per se resulted in increased CD8+ T cell production of PGE2, mediated by higher COX-2 activity, thus inducing a negative feedback loop that further inhibits effector function. Collectively, our data suggest that the elevated levels of PGE2 and iso-PGE2, seen in various cancers and HIV-1 infection, may accelerate progression of CD8+ T cells towards replicative senescence in vivo. Inhibition of COX-2 activity may, therefore, provide a strategy to counteract this effect.

  4. Eimeria bovis infection modulates endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism for successful replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Penny H; Hirzmann, Joerg; Kerner, Katharina; Gimpl, Gerald; Lochnit, Guenter; Hermosilla, Carlos R; Taubert, Anja

    2015-09-23

    During first merogony Eimeria bovis forms large macromeronts in endothelial host cells containing >120 000 merozoites I. During multiplication, large amounts of cholesterol are indispensable for the enormous offspring membrane production. Cholesterol auxotrophy was proven for other apicomplexan parasites. Consequently they scavenge cholesterol from their host cell apparently in a parasite-specific manner. We here analyzed the influence of E. bovis infection on endothelial host cell cholesterol metabolism and found considerable differences to other coccidian parasites. Overall, free cholesterol significantly accumulated in E. bovis infected host cells. Furthermore, a striking increase of lipid droplet formation was observed within immature macromeronts. Artificial host cell lipid droplet enrichment significantly improved E. bovis merozoite I production confirming the key role of lipid droplet contents for optimal parasite proliferation. The transcription of several genes being involved in both, cholesterol de novo biosynthesis and low density lipoprotein-(LDL) mediated uptake, was significantly up-regulated at a time in infected cells suggesting a simultaneous exploitation of these two cholesterol acquisition pathways. E. bovis scavenges LDL-derived cholesterol apparently through significantly increased levels of surface LDL receptor abundance and LDL binding to infected cells. Consequently, LDL supplementation significantly improved parasite replication. The up-regulation of the oxidized LDL receptor 1 furthermore identified this scavenger receptor as a key molecule in parasite-triggered LDL uptake. Moreover, cellular cholesterol processing was altered in infected cells as indicated by up-regulation of cholesterol-25-hydroxylase and sterol O-acyltransferase. Overall, these results show that E. bovis considerably exploits the host cell cholesterol metabolism to guarantee its massive intracellular growth and replication.

  5. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pss Rao

    Full Text Available While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1 and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold and both ROS (>2 fold and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold, and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold. In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in

  6. Comparative Analysis Between Flaviviruses Reveals Specific Neural Stem Cell Tropism for Zika Virus in the Mouse Developing Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Brault

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent Zika outbreak in South America and French Polynesia was associated with an epidemic of microcephaly, a disease characterized by a reduced size of the cerebral cortex. Other members of the Flavivirus genus, including West Nile virus (WNV, can cause encephalitis but were not demonstrated to cause microcephaly. It remains unclear whether Zika virus (ZIKV and other flaviviruses may infect different cell populations in the developing neocortex and lead to distinct developmental defects. Here, we describe an assay to infect mouse E15 embryonic brain slices with ZIKV, WNV and dengue virus serotype 4 (DENV-4. We show that this tissue is able to support viral replication of ZIKV and WNV, but not DENV-4. Cell fate analysis reveals a remarkable tropism of ZIKV infection for neural stem cells. Closely related WNV displays a very different tropism of infection, with a bias towards neurons. We further show that ZIKV infection, but not WNV infection, impairs cell cycle progression of neural stem cells. Both viruses inhibited apoptosis at early stages of infection. This work establishes a powerful comparative approach to identify ZIKV-specific alterations in the developing neocortex and reveals specific preferential infection of neural stem cells by ZIKV.

  7. Stage-specific control of neural crest stem cell proliferation by the small rho GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Herzog, Dominik; Sumara, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest (NC) generates a variety of neural and non-neural tissues during vertebrate development. Both migratory NC cells and their target structures contain cells with stem cell features. Here we show that these populations of neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) are differentially re...

  8. Cell delamination in the mesencephalic neural fold and its implication for the origin of ectomesenchyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Nagai, Hiroki; Nakaya, Yukiko; Sheng, Guojun; Trainor, Paul A.; Weston, James A.; Thiery, Jean Paul

    2013-01-01

    The neural crest is a transient structure unique to vertebrate embryos that gives rise to multiple lineages along the rostrocaudal axis. In cranial regions, neural crest cells are thought to differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes, pericytes and stromal cells, which are collectively termed ectomesenchyme derivatives, as well as pigment and neuronal derivatives. There is still no consensus as to whether the neural crest can be classified as a homogenous multipotent population of cells. This unresolved controversy has important implications for the formation of ectomesenchyme and for confirmation of whether the neural fold is compartmentalized into distinct domains, each with a different repertoire of derivatives. Here we report in mouse and chicken that cells in the neural fold delaminate over an extended period from different regions of the cranial neural fold to give rise to cells with distinct fates. Importantly, cells that give rise to ectomesenchyme undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition from a lateral neural fold domain that does not express definitive neural markers, such as Sox1 and N-cadherin. Additionally, the inference that cells originating from the cranial neural ectoderm have a common origin and cell fate with trunk neural crest cells prompted us to revisit the issue of what defines the neural crest and the origin of the ectomesenchyme. PMID:24198279

  9. Biphasic influence of Miz1 on neural crest development by regulating cell survival and apical adhesion complex formation in the developing neural tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerosuo, Laura; Bronner, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Myc interacting zinc finger protein-1 (Miz1) is a transcription factor known to regulate cell cycle– and cell adhesion–related genes in cancer. Here we show that Miz1 also plays a critical role in neural crest development. In the chick, Miz1 is expressed throughout the neural plate and closing neural tube. Its morpholino-mediated knockdown affects neural crest precursor survival, leading to reduction of neural plate border and neural crest specifier genes Msx-1, Pax7, FoxD3, and Sox10. Of interest, Miz1 loss also causes marked reduction of adhesion molecules (N-cadherin, cadherin6B, and α1-catenin) with a concomitant increase of E-cadherin in the neural folds, likely leading to delayed and decreased neural crest emigration. Conversely, Miz1 overexpression results in up-regulation of cadherin6B and FoxD3 expression in the neural folds/neural tube, leading to premature neural crest emigration and increased number of migratory crest cells. Although Miz1 loss effects cell survival and proliferation throughout the neural plate, the neural progenitor marker Sox2 was unaffected, suggesting a neural crest–selective effect. The results suggest that Miz1 is important not only for survival of neural crest precursors, but also for maintenance of integrity of the neural folds and tube, via correct formation of the apical adhesion complex therein. PMID:24307680

  10. Caffeine Abolishes the Ultraviolet-Induced REV3 Translesion Replication Pathway in Mouse Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Yamada

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available When a replicative DNA polymerase stalls upon encountering a photoproduct on the template strand, it is relieved by other low-processivity polymerase(s, which insert nucleotide(s opposite the lesion. Using an alkaline sucrose density gradient sedimentation technique, we previously classified this process termed UV-induced translesion replication (UV-TLS into two types. In human cancer cells or xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V cells, UV-TLS was inhibited by caffeine or proteasome inhibitors. However, in normal human cells, the process was insensitive to these reagents. Reportedly, in yeast or mammalian cells, REV3 protein (a catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase ζ is predominantly involved in the former type of TLS. Here, we studied UV-TLS in fibroblasts derived from the Rev3-knockout mouse embryo (Rev3KO-MEF. In the wild-type MEF, UV-TLS was slow (similar to that of human cancer cells or XP-V cells, and was abolished by caffeine or MG-262. In 2 cell lines of Rev3KO-MEF (Rev3−/− p53−/−, UV-TLS was not observed. In p53KO-MEF, which is a strict control for Rev3KO-MEF, the UV-TLS response was similar to that of the wild-type. Introduction of the Rev3 expression plasmid into Rev3KO-MEF restored the UV-TLS response in selected stable transformants. In some transformants, viability to UV was the same as that in the wild-type, and the death rate was increased by caffeine. Our findings indicate that REV3 is predominantly involved in UV-TLS in mouse cells, and that the REV3 translesion pathway is suppressed by caffeine or proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  12. Webs, cell assemblies, and chunking in neural nets: introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickelgren, W A

    1999-03-01

    This introduction to Wickelgren (1992), describes a theory of idea representation and learning in the cerebral cortex and seven properties of Hebb's (1949) formulation of cell assemblies that have played a major role in all such neural net models. Ideas are represented in the cerebral cortex by webs (innate cell assemblies), using sparse coding with sparse, all-or-none, innate linking. Recruiting a web to represent a new idea is called chunking. The innate links that bind the neurons of a web are basal dendritic synapses. Learning modifies the apical dendritic synapses that associate neurons in one web to neurons in another web.

  13. MDA5 Detects the Double-Stranded RNA Replicative Form in Picornavirus-Infected Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Feng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RIG-I and MDA5 are cytosolic RNA sensors that play a critical role in innate antiviral responses. Major advances have been made in identifying RIG-I ligands, but our knowledge of the ligands for MDA5 remains restricted to data from transfection experiments mostly using poly(I:C, a synthetic dsRNA mimic. Here, we dissected the IFN-α/β-stimulatory activity of different viral RNA species produced during picornavirus infection, both by RNA transfection and in infected cells in which specific steps of viral RNA replication were inhibited. Our results show that the incoming genomic plus-strand RNA does not activate MDA5, but minus-strand RNA synthesis and production of the 7.5 kbp replicative form trigger a strong IFN-α/β response. IFN-α/β production does not rely on plus-strand RNA synthesis and thus generation of the partially double-stranded replicative intermediate. This study reports MDA5 activation by a natural RNA ligand under physiological conditions.

  14. Targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 reduction in cancer cells inhibits self-sufficient growth and DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hyuk Yoo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin reductase 1 (TR1 is a major redox regulator in mammalian cells. As an important antioxidant selenoprotein, TR1 is thought to participate in cancer prevention, but is also known to be over-expressed in many cancer cells. Numerous cancer drugs inhibit TR1, and this protein has been proposed as a target for cancer therapy. We previously reported that reduction of TR1 levels in cancer cells reversed many malignant characteristics suggesting that deficiency in TR1 function is antitumorigenic. The molecular basis for TR1's role in cancer development, however, is not understood. Herein, we found that, among selenoproteins, TR1 is uniquely overexpressed in cancer cells and its knockdown in a mouse cancer cell line driven by oncogenic k-ras resulted in morphological changes characteristic of parental (normal cells, without significant effect on cell growth under normal growth conditions. When grown in serum-deficient medium, TR1 deficient cancer cells lose self-sufficiency of growth, manifest a defective progression in their S phase and a decreased expression of DNA polymerase alpha, an enzyme important in DNA replication. These observations provide evidence that TR1 is critical for self-sufficiency in growth signals of malignant cells, that TR1 acts largely as a pro-cancer protein and it is indeed a primary target in cancer therapy.

  15. Growth and replication of red rain cells at 121°C and their red fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangappa, Rajkumar; Wickramasinghe, Chandra; Wainwright, Milton; Kumar, A. Santhosh; Louis, Godfrey

    2010-09-01

    We have shown that the red cells found in the Red Rain (which fell on Kerala, India, in 2001) survive and grow after incubation for periods of up to two hours at 121°C . Under these conditions daughter cells appear within the original mother cells and the number of cells in the samples increases with length of exposure to 121°C. No such increase in cells occurs at room temperature, suggesting that the increase in daughter cells is brought about by exposure of the Red Rain cells to high temperatures. This is an independent confirmation of results reported earlier by two of the present authors, claiming that the cells can replicate under high pressure at temperatures upto 300°C. The flourescence behaviour of the red cells is shown to be in remarkable correspondence with the extended red emission observed in the Red Rectagle planetary nebula and other galactic and extragalactic dust clouds, suggesting, though not proving an extraterrestrial origin.

  16. Mechanisms of CD8+ T cell-mediated suppression of HIV/SIV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBrien, Julia Bergild; Kumar, Nitasha A; Silvestri, Guido

    2018-02-10

    In this article, we summarize the role of CD8+ T cells during natural and ART-treated HIV and SIV infections, discuss the mechanisms responsible for their suppressive activity, and review the rationale for CD8+ T cell-based HIV cure strategies. Evidence suggests that CD8+ T cells are involved in the control of virus replication during HIV and SIV infections. During early HIV infection, the cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is responsible for control of viremia. However, it has been proposed that CD8+ T cells also use non-cytolytic mechanisms to control SIV infection. More recently, CD8+ T cells were shown to be required to fully suppress virus production in ART-treated SIV-infected macaques, suggesting that CD8+ T cells are involved in the control of virus transcription in latently infected cells that persist under ART. A better understanding of the complex antiviral activities of CD8+ T cells during HIV/SIV infection will pave the way for immune interventions aimed at harnessing these functions to target the HIV reservoir. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Epigenetic landscaping during hESC differentiation to neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golebiewska, Anna; Atkinson, Stuart P; Lako, Majlinda; Armstrong, Lyle

    2009-06-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying pluripotency and lineage specification from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are still largely unclear. To address the role of chromatin structure in maintenance of pluripotency in human ESCs (hESCs) and establishment of lineage commitment, we analyzed a panel of histone modifications at promoter sequences of genes involved in maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal, and in early stages of differentiation. To understand the changes occurring at lineage-specific gene regulatory sequences, we have established an efficient purification system that permits the examination of two distinct populations of lineage committed cells; fluorescence activated cell sorted CD133(+) CD45(-)CD34(-) neural stem cells and beta-III-tubulin(+) putative neurons. Here we report the importance of other permissive marks supporting trimethylation of Lysine 4 H3 at the active stem cell promoters as well as poised bivalent and nonbivalent lineage-specific gene promoters in hESCs. Methylation of lysine 9 H3 was found to play a role in repression of pluripotency-associated and lineage-specific genes on differentiation. Moreover, presence of newly formed bivalent domains was observed at the neural progenitor stage. However, they differ significantly from the bivalent domains observed in hESCs, with a possible role of dimethylation of lysine 9 H3 in repressing the poised genes.

  18. Axonal Control of the Adult Neural Stem Cell Niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Cheuk Ka; Chen, Jiadong; Cebrián-Silla, Arantxa; Mirzadeh, Zaman; Obernier, Kirsten; Guinto, Cristina D.; Tecott, Laurence H.; García-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Kriegstein, Arnold; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) is an extensive germinal niche containing neural stem cells (NSC) in the walls of the lateral ventricles of the adult brain. How the adult brain’s neural activity influences the behavior of adult NSCs remains largely unknown. We show that serotonergic (5HT) axons originating from a small group of neurons in the raphe form an extensive plexus on most of the ventricular walls. Electron microscopy revealed intimate contacts between 5HT axons and NSCs (B1) or ependymal cells (E1) and these cells were labeled by a transsynaptic viral tracer injected into the raphe. B1 cells express the 5HT receptors 2C and 5A. Electrophysiology showed that activation of these receptors in B1 cells induced small inward currents. Intraventricular infusion of 5HT2C agonist or antagonist increased or decreased V-SVZ proliferation, respectively. These results indicate that supraependymal 5HT axons directly interact with NSCs to regulate neurogenesis via 5HT2C. PMID:24561083

  19. Replicative senescence of mesenchymal stem cells: a continuous and organized process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Wagner

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC comprise a promising tool for cellular therapy. These cells are usually culture expanded prior to their application. However, a precise molecular definition of MSC and the sequel of long-term in vitro culture are yet unknown. In this study, we have addressed the impact of replicative senescence on human MSC preparations. Within 43 to 77 days of cultivation (7 to 12 passages, MSC demonstrated morphological abnormalities, enlargement, attenuated expression of specific surface markers, and ultimately proliferation arrest. Adipogenic differentiation potential decreased whereas the propensity for osteogenic differentiation increased. mRNA expression profiling revealed a consistent pattern of alterations in the global gene expression signature of MSC at different passages. These changes are not restricted to later passages, but are continuously acquired with increasing passages. Genes involved in cell cycle, DNA replication and DNA repair are significantly down-regulated in late passages. Genes from chromosome 4q21 were over-represented among differentially regulated transcripts. Differential expression of 10 genes has been verified in independent donor samples as well as in MSC that were isolated under different culture conditions. Furthermore, miRNA expression profiling revealed an up-regulation of hsa-mir-371, hsa-mir-369-5P, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-499 and hsa-let-7f upon in vitro propagation. Our studies indicate that replicative senescence of MSC preparations is a continuous process starting from the first passage onwards. This process includes far reaching alterations in phenotype, differentiation potential, global gene expression patterns, and miRNA profiles that need to be considered for therapeutic application of MSC preparations.

  20. Identification of a high-efficiency baculovirus DNA replication origin that functions in insect and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yueh-Lung; Wu, Carol-P; Huang, Yu-Hui; Huang, Sheng-Ping; Lo, Huei-Ru; Chang, Hao-Shuo; Lin, Pi-Hsiu; Wu, Ming-Cheng; Chang, Chia-Jung; Chao, Yu-Chan

    2014-11-01

    The p143 gene from Autographa californica multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) has been found to increase the expression of luciferase, which is driven by the polyhedrin gene promoter, in a plasmid with virus coinfection. Further study indicated that this is due to the presence of a replication origin (ori) in the coding region of this gene. Transient DNA replication assays showed that a specific fragment of the p143 coding sequence, p143-3, underwent virus-dependent DNA replication in Spodoptera frugiperda IPLB-Sf-21 (Sf-21) cells. Deletion analysis of the p143-3 fragment showed that subfragment p143-3.2a contained the essential sequence of this putative ori. Sequence analysis of this region revealed a unique distribution of imperfect palindromes with high AT contents. No sequence homology or similarity between p143-3.2a and any other known ori was detected, suggesting that it is a novel baculovirus ori. Further study showed that the p143-3.2a ori can replicate more efficiently in infected Sf-21 cells than baculovirus homologous regions (hrs), the major baculovirus ori, or non-hr oris during virus replication. Previously, hr on its own was unable to replicate in mammalian cells, and for mammalian viral oris, viral proteins are generally required for their proper replication in host cells. However, the p143-3.2a ori was, surprisingly, found to function as an efficient ori in mammalian cells without the need for any viral proteins. We conclude that p143 contains a unique sequence that can function as an ori to enhance gene expression in not only insect cells but also mammalian cells. Baculovirus DNA replication relies on both hr and non-hr oris; however, so far very little is known about the latter oris. Here we have identified a new non-hr ori, the p143 ori, which resides in the coding region of p143. By developing a novel DNA replication-enhanced reporter system, we have identified and located the core region required for the p143 ori. This ori contains

  1. Human dental follicle cells express embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; Holanda-Afonso, Rosenilde Carvalho; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo; Bolognese, Ana Maria; DosSantos, Marcos Fabio; Souza, Margareth Maria

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify and characterize dental follicle stem cells (DFSCs) by analyzing expression of embryonic, mesenchymal and neural stem cells surface markers. Design Dental follicle cells (DFCs) were evaluated by immunocytochemistry using embryonic stem cells markers (OCT4 and SOX2), mesenchmal stem cells (MSCs) markers (Notch1, active Notch1, STRO, CD44, HLA-ABC, CD90), neural stem cells markers (Nestin and β-III-tubulin), neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) markers (p75 and HNK1) and a glial cells marker (GFAP). RT-PCR was performed to identify the expression of OCT4 and NANOG in DFCs and dental follicle tissue. Immunocytochemistry and RT-PCR analysis revealed that a significant proportion of the DFCs evaluated expressed human embryonic stem cells marker OCT4 (75%) whereas NANOG was weakly expressed. A considerable amount of MSCs (90%) expressed Notch1, STRO, CD44 and HLA-ABC. However, they were weakly positive for CD90. Moreover, it was possible to demonstrate that dental follicle contains a significant proportion of neural stem/progenitors cells, expressing β-III-tubulin (90%) and nestin (70%). Interestingly, immunocytochemistry showed DFCs positive for p75 (50%), HNK1 (cells. This is the first study reporting the presence of NCSCs and glial-like cells in the dental follicle. The results of the present study suggest the occurrence of heterogeneous populations of stem cells, particularly neural stem/progenitor cells, in the dental follicle, Therefore, the human dental follicle might be a promising source of adult stem cells for regenerative purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In vitro effects of Epidiferphane™ on adult human neural progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural stem cells have the capacity to respond to their environment, migrate to the injury site and generate functional cell types, and thus they hold great promise for cell therapies. In addition to representing a source for central nervous system (CNS) repair, neural stem and progenitor cells als...

  3. Dynamic regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription during mouse brown fat cell differentiation and recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    ) and a remarkably higher mitochondrial abundance in brown adipocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a comprehensive characterisation of gene expression linked to mitochondrial DNA replication, transcription and function during white and brown fat cell differentiation in vitro as well as in white...... precursor cells promotes mitochondrial DNA replication, and that silencing of PRDM16 expression during brown fat cell differentiation blunts mitochondrial biogenesis and expression of brown fat cell markers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using both in vitro and in vivo model systems of white and brown fat cell...

  4. A replication-casting device for manufacturing open-cell Mg foams

    OpenAIRE

    Lara-Rodriguez, G.A.; Figueroa, I.A.; Suarez, M.A.; Novelo-Peralta, O.; Alfonso, I.; Goodall, R.

    2016-01-01

    The development of a replication casting device with the capability of manufacturing open-cell pure Mg and Mg alloys foams, with melting points lower than 950 °C is described. The device consists of three basic parts: a cylindrical reaction chamber, a valve system for controlling the vacuum and the gas injection, and a heating system. The purpose of the present design was to improve the existing laboratory-scale devices, making them simpler than those reported in the literature, as well as to...

  5. DNA repair and replication links to pluripotency and differentiation capacity of pig iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Mao, Jian; Song, Lipu; Fan, Anran; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Jianyu; Fan, Nana; Liu, Na; Ye, Xiaoying; Fu, Haifeng; Zhou, Zhongcheng; Wang, Yong; Wei, Hong; Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Ziyi; Lai, Liangxue; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Pigs are proposed to be suitable large animal models for test of the efficacy and safety of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) for stem cell therapy, but authentic pig ES/iPS cell lines with germline competence are rarely produced. The pathways or signaling underlying the defective competent pig iPSCs remain poorly understood. By improving induction conditions using various small chemicals, we generated pig iPSCs that exhibited high pluripotency and differentiation capacity that can contribute to chimeras. However, their potency was reduced with increasing passages by teratoma formation test, and correlated with declined expression levels of Rex1, an important marker for naïve state. By RNA-sequencing analysis, genes related to WNT signaling were upregulated and MAPK signaling and TGFβ pathways downregulated in pig iPSCs compared to fibroblasts, but they were abnormally expressed during passages. Notably, pathways involving in DNA repair and replication were upregulated at early passage, but downregulated in iPSCs during prolonged passage in cluster with fibroblasts. Our data suggests that reduced DNA repair and replication capacity links to the instability of pig iPSCs. Targeting these pathways may facilitate generation of truly pluripotent pig iPSCs, with implication in translational studies.

  6. DNA repair and replication links to pluripotency and differentiation capacity of pig iPS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liu

    Full Text Available Pigs are proposed to be suitable large animal models for test of the efficacy and safety of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs for stem cell therapy, but authentic pig ES/iPS cell lines with germline competence are rarely produced. The pathways or signaling underlying the defective competent pig iPSCs remain poorly understood. By improving induction conditions using various small chemicals, we generated pig iPSCs that exhibited high pluripotency and differentiation capacity that can contribute to chimeras. However, their potency was reduced with increasing passages by teratoma formation test, and correlated with declined expression levels of Rex1, an important marker for naïve state. By RNA-sequencing analysis, genes related to WNT signaling were upregulated and MAPK signaling and TGFβ pathways downregulated in pig iPSCs compared to fibroblasts, but they were abnormally expressed during passages. Notably, pathways involving in DNA repair and replication were upregulated at early passage, but downregulated in iPSCs during prolonged passage in cluster with fibroblasts. Our data suggests that reduced DNA repair and replication capacity links to the instability of pig iPSCs. Targeting these pathways may facilitate generation of truly pluripotent pig iPSCs, with implication in translational studies.

  7. Oncolytic E1B 55KDa-deleted adenovirus replication is independent of p53 levels in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, B M; El-Mogy, M A; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2017-08-15

    Oncolytic adenoviruses represent a new approach for cancer therapy due to its tumor specificity. E1B 55kDa-deleted adenovirus type 5 (Ad5dlE1B 55kDa) is a promising therapeutic agent that can selectively replicate in and lyse p53 defective cancer cells. However, the overall efficacy has shown varying degrees of success with raised doubts about the correlation between p53 status and E1B-deleted adenovirus replication ability. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of Ad5dlE1B 55kDa replication and p53 levels in cancer cells. Five transient p53 expression vectors were engineered to expresses different p53 levels in transfected cells. Then, the effect of the variable p53 levels and cellular backgrounds on the replication efficiency of oncolytic Ad5dlE1B 55kDa was evaluated in H1299 and HeLa cell lines. We found that the replication efficiency of these oncolytic viruses is dependent on the status, but not the expression levels, of p53. Ad5dlE1B 55kDa was shown to have selective replication activity in H1299 cells (p53-null) and decreased viral replication in HeLa cells (p53-positive), relative to the wild-type adenovirus in both cell lines. Our findings suggest that there is a relation between the E1B-deleted adenovirus replication and the presence as well as the activity of p53, independent of its quantity.

  8. Equine Herpesvirus Type 1 Enhances Viral Replication in CD172a+ Monocytic Cells upon Adhesion to Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Kathlyn; Favoreel, Herman W; Poelaert, Katrien C K; Van Cleemput, Jolien; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2015-11-01

    Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a main cause of respiratory disease, abortion, and encephalomyelopathy in horses. Monocytic cells (CD172a(+)) are the main carrier cells of EHV-1 during primary infection and are proposed to serve as a "Trojan horse" to facilitate the dissemination of EHV-1 to target organs. However, the mechanism by which EHV-1 is transferred from CD172a(+) cells to endothelial cells (EC) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate EHV-1 transmission between these two cell types. We hypothesized that EHV-1 employs specific strategies to promote the adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC to facilitate EHV-1 spread. Here, we demonstrated that EHV-1 infection of CD172a(+) cells resulted in a 3- to 5-fold increase in adhesion to EC. Antibody blocking experiments indicated that α4β1, αLβ2, and αVβ3 integrins mediated adhesion of infected CD172a(+) cells to EC. We showed that integrin-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK/MAPK signaling pathways were involved in EHV-1-induced CD172a(+) cell adhesion at early times of infection. EHV-1 replication was enhanced in adherent CD172a(+) cells, which correlates with the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In the presence of neutralizing antibodies, approximately 20% of infected CD172a(+) cells transferred cytoplasmic material to uninfected EC and 0.01% of infected CD172a(+) cells transmitted infectious virus to neighboring cells. Our results demonstrated that EHV-1 infection induces adhesion of CD172a(+) cells to EC, which enhances viral replication, but that transfer of viral material from CD172a(+) cells to EC is a very specific and rare event. These findings give new insights into the complex pathogenesis of EHV-1. Equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) is a highly prevalent pathogen worldwide, causing frequent outbreaks of abortion and myeloencephalopathy, even in vaccinated horses. After primary replication in the respiratory tract, EHV-1 disseminates

  9. Topological defects control collective dynamics in neural progenitor cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Kyogo; Kageyama, Ryoichiro; Sano, Masaki

    2017-04-01

    Cultured stem cells have become a standard platform not only for regenerative medicine and developmental biology but also for biophysical studies. Yet, the characterization of cultured stem cells at the level of morphology and of the macroscopic patterns resulting from cell-to-cell interactions remains largely qualitative. Here we report on the collective dynamics of cultured murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which are multipotent stem cells that give rise to cells in the central nervous system. At low densities, NPCs moved randomly in an amoeba-like fashion. However, NPCs at high density elongated and aligned their shapes with one another, gliding at relatively high velocities. Although the direction of motion of individual cells reversed stochastically along the axes of alignment, the cells were capable of forming an aligned pattern up to length scales similar to that of the migratory stream observed in the adult brain. The two-dimensional order of alignment within the culture showed a liquid-crystalline pattern containing interspersed topological defects with winding numbers of +1/2 and -1/2 (half-integer due to the nematic feature that arises from the head-tail symmetry of cell-to-cell interaction). We identified rapid cell accumulation at +1/2 defects and the formation of three-dimensional mounds. Imaging at the single-cell level around the defects allowed us to quantify the velocity field and the evolving cell density; cells not only concentrate at +1/2 defects, but also escape from -1/2 defects. We propose a generic mechanism for the instability in cell density around the defects that arises from the interplay between the anisotropic friction and the active force field.

  10. Low immunogenicity of mouse induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Go; Ozaki, Masahiro; Nagoshi, Narihito; Kawabata, Soya; Nishiyama, Yuichiro; Sugai, Keiko; Iida, Tsuyoshi; Kashiwagi, Rei; Ookubo, Toshiki; Yastake, Kaori; Matsubayashi, Kohei; Kohyama, Jun; Iwanami, Akio; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hideyuki

    2017-10-11

    Resolving the immunogenicity of cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) remains an important challenge for cell transplant strategies that use banked allogeneic cells. Thus, we evaluated the immunogenicity of mouse fetal neural stem/progenitor cells (fetus-NSPCs) and iPSC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (iPSC-NSPCs) both in vitro and in vivo. Flow cytometry revealed the low expression of immunological surface antigens, and these cells survived in all mice when transplanted syngeneically into subcutaneous tissue and the spinal cord. In contrast, an allogeneic transplantation into subcutaneous tissue was rejected in all mice, and allogeneic cells transplanted into intact and injured spinal cords survived for 3 months in approximately 20% of mice. In addition, cell survival was increased after co-treatment with an immunosuppressive agent. Thus, the immunogenicity and post-transplantation immunological dynamics of iPSC-NSPCs resemble those of fetus-NSPCs.

  11. Copine1 regulates neural stem cell functions during brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Sung, Soo-Eun; Cheal Yoo, Jae; Park, Jae-Yong; Yi, Gwan-Su; Heo, Jun Young; Lee, Jae-Ran; Kim, Nam-Soon; Lee, Da Yong

    2018-01-01

    Copine 1 (CPNE1) is a well-known phospholipid binding protein in plasma membrane of various cell types. In brain cells, CPNE1 is closely associated with AKT signaling pathway, which is important for neural stem cell (NSC) functions during brain development. Here, we investigated the role of CPNE1 in the regulation of brain NSC functions during brain development and determined its underlying mechanism. In this study, abundant expression of CPNE1 was observed in neural lineage cells including NSCs and immature neurons in human. With mouse brain tissues in various developmental stages, we found that CPNE1 expression was higher at early embryonic stages compared to postnatal and adult stages. To model developing brain in vitro, we used primary NSCs derived from mouse embryonic hippocampus. Our in vitro study shows decreased proliferation and multi-lineage differentiation potential in CPNE1 deficient NSCs. Finally, we found that the deficiency of CPNE1 downregulated mTOR signaling in embryonic NSCs. These data demonstrate that CPNE1 plays a key role in the regulation of NSC functions through the activation of AKT-mTOR signaling pathway during brain development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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  4. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: DNS.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  16. File list: InP.Neu.20.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  17. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  1. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Neural_Stem_Cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  12. File list: InP.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  13. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Fetal_neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  14. miR-381 Regulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation via Regulating Hes1 Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Shi

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are self-renewing, multipotent and undifferentiated precursors that retain the capacity for differentiation into both glial (astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and neuronal lineages. Neural stem cells offer cell-based therapies for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease and spinal cord injuries. However, their cellular behavior is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small noncoding RNAs involved in cell development, proliferation and differentiation through regulating gene expression at post-transcriptional level. The role of miR-381 in the development of neural stem cells remains unknown. In this study, we showed that overexpression of miR-381 promoted neural stem cells proliferation. It induced the neural stem cells differentiation to neurons and inhibited their differentiation to astrocytes. Furthermore, we identified HES1 as a direct target of miR-381 in neural stem cells. Moreover, re-expression of HES1 impaired miR-381-induced promotion of neural stem cells proliferation and induce neural stem cells differentiation to neurons. In conclusion, miR-381 played important role in neural stem cells proliferation and differentiation.

  15. Replication of West Nile virus, Rabensburg lineage in mammalian cells is restricted by temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliota Matthew T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Flavivirus currently consists of approximately 80 single-strand positive-sense RNA viruses. These replicate in a range of hosts including myriad vertebrate, insect, and tick species. As a consequence of this broad host range, the majority of flaviviruses can be propagated in most vertebrate and insect cell cultures. This ability to infect arthropods and vertebrates usually is essential for maintenance of these viruses in nature. But recently, there has been the discovery of a number of flaviviruses that infect mosquitoes but not vertebrates. It remains largely unknown why certain flaviviruses infect vertebrates and mosquitoes while others infect mosquitoes or vertebrates exclusively. Methods Here, we initiated in vitro host range studies of Rabensburg virus (RABV, an intermediate between the mosquito-specific and horizontally transmitted flaviviruses, to provide information on the factor(s that underlie the varying host range of flaviviruses. RABV is an intermediate between the mosquito-specific and horizontally transmitted flaviviruses because it does not infect mammalian or avian cell cultures, house sparrows, or chickens, but it does share genetic characteristics with the Japanese Encephalitis serogroup of flaviviruses. Results In vitro growth kinetic assays revealed the complete abrogation of RABV growth on Vero and E6 cells incubated at temperatures 35°C and higher, but surprisingly RABV infected, replicated efficiently, and displayed overt cytopathic effects (CPE on Vero and E6 cell cultures incubated below 35°C. In contrast, RABV was fully viable, replicated efficiently, and displayed overt CPE on C6/36 cells incubated at 28°C or 37°C, thus implicating temperature as an important factor limiting the host range of RABV. Conclusions These data are critical for further study to more fully identify the determinants that mediate the evolution of biological transmission among flaviviruses. It also will be

  16. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Richardson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  17. SSEA4-positive pig induced pluripotent stem cells are primed for differentiation into neural cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jeong-Yeh; Mumaw, Jennifer L; Liu, Yubing; Stice, Steve L; West, Franklin D

    2013-01-01

    Neural cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have the potential for autologous cell therapies in treating patients with severe neurological disorders or injury. However, further study of efficacy and safety are needed in large animal preclinical models that have similar neural anatomy and physiology to humans such as the pig. The pig model for pluripotent stem cell therapy has been made possible for the first time with the development of pig iPSCs (piPSCs) capable of in vitro and in vivo differentiation into tissues of all three germ layers. Still, the question remains if piPSCs are capable of undergoing robust neural differentiation using a system similar to those being used with human iPSCs. In this study, we generated a new line of piPSCs from fibroblast cells that expressed pluripotency markers and were capable of embryoid body differentiation into all three germ layers. piPSCs demonstrated robust neural differentiation forming βIII-TUB/MAP2+ neurons, GFAP+ astrocytes, and O4+ oligodendrocytes and demonstrated strong upregulation of neural cell genes representative of all three major neural lineages of the central nervous system. In the presence of motor neuron signaling factors, piPSC-derived neurons showed expression of transcription factors associated with motor neuron differentiation (HB9 and ISLET1). Our findings demonstrate that SSEA4 expression is required for piPSCs to differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes and furthermore develop specific neuronal subtypes. This indicates that the pigs can fill the need for a powerful model to study autologous neural iPSC therapies in a system similar to humans.

  18. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  19. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two......Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) constitute a large class of plasma membrane-anchored proteins that mediate attachment between neighboring cells and between cells and the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, CAMs are more than simple mediators of cell adhesion. The neural cell adhesion...

  20. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  1. A chemical screen in zebrafish embryonic cells establishes that Akt activation is required for neural crest development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciarlo, Christie; Kaufman, Charles K.; Kinikoglu, Beste; Michael, Jonathan; Yang, Song; D’Amato, Christopher; Blokzijl-Franke, Sasja; den Hertog, Jeroen|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/096717696; Schlaeger, Thorsten M.; Zhou, Yi; Liao, Eric C; Zon, Leonard I.

    2017-01-01

    The neural crest is a dynamic progenitor cell population that arises at the border of neural and non-neural ectoderm. The inductive roles of FGF, Wnt, and BMP at the neural plate border are well established, but the signals required for subsequent neural crest development remain poorly

  2. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyebeh Saberbaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05. In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  3. Transient expression of Olig1 initiates the differentiation of neural stem cells into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; Timmer, N; Kust, B; Boddeke, E; Copray, S

    2004-01-01

    In order to develop an efficient strategy to induce the in vitro differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs), NSCs were isolated from E14 mice and grown in medium containing epidermal growth factor and fibroblast growth factor (FGF). Besides supplementing

  4. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-fei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco′s modified Eagle′s medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem

  5. Transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells improves the repair of injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Fei; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Gu, Rui; Liu, Jia-Bei; Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of erythropoietin on spinal cord injury have not been well described. Here, the eukaryotic expression plasmid pcDNA3.1 human erythropoietin was transfected into rat neural stem cells cultured in vitro. A rat model of spinal cord injury was established using a free falling object. In the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, transfected neural stem cells were injected into the rat subarachnoid cavity, while the neural stem cells group was injected with non-transfected neural stem cells. Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium/F12 medium was injected into the rats in the spinal cord injury group as a control. At 1-4 weeks post injury, the motor function in the rat lower limbs was best in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group, followed by the neural stem cells group, and lastly the spinal cord injury group. At 72 hours, compared with the spinal cord injury group, the apoptotic index and Caspase-3 gene and protein expressions were apparently decreased, and the bcl-2 gene and protein expressions were noticeably increased, in the tissues surrounding the injured region in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. At 4 weeks, the cavities were clearly smaller and the motor and somatosensory evoked potential latencies were remarkably shorter in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than those in the spinal cord injury group. These differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. More CM-Dil-positive cells and horseradish peroxidase-positive nerve fibers and larger amplitude motor and somatosensory evoked potentials were found in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group and neural stem cells group than in the spinal cord injury group. Again, these differences were particularly obvious in the human erythropoietin-neural stem cells group. These data indicate that transplantation of erythropoietin gene-modified neural stem cells into the

  6. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  7. The causes of replication stress and their consequences on genome stability and cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S; Pasero, Philippe; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-06-01

    Alterations of the dynamics of DNA replication cause genome instability. These alterations known as "replication stress" have emerged as a major source of genomic instability in pre-neoplasic lesions, contributing to cancer development. The concept of replication stress covers a wide variety of events that distort the temporal and spatial DNA replication program. These events have endogenous or exogenous origins and impact globally or locally on the dynamics of DNA replication. They may arise within a short window of time (acute stress) or during each S phase (chronic stress). Here, we review the known situations in which the dynamics of DNA replication is distorted. We have united them in four main categories: (i) inadequate firing of replication origins (deficiency or excess), (ii) obstacles to fork progression, (iii) conflicts between replication and transcription and (iv) DNA replication under inappropriate metabolic conditions (unbalanced DNA replication). Because the DNA replication program is a process tightly regulated by many factors, replication stress often appears as a cascade of events. A local stress may prevent the completion of DNA replication at a single locus and subsequently compromise chromosome segregation in mitosis and therefore have a global effect on genome integrity. Finally, we discuss how replication stress drives genome instability and to what extent it is relevant to cancer biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ezh2 Expression in Astrocytes Induces Their Dedifferentiation Toward Neural Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sher, Falak; Boddeke, Erik; Copray, Sjef

    Recently, we have demonstrated the expression of the polycomb group protein Ezh2 in embryonic and adult neural stem cells. Although Ezh2 remained highly expressed when neural stem cells differentiate into oligodendrocyte precursor cells, it is downregulated during the differentiation into neurons or

  9. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  10. Interleukin-10 blocks in vitro replication of human cytomegalovirus by inhibiting the virus-induced autophagy in MRC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Wang, Kanqing; Zhu, Jianxing

    2014-06-13

    Interleukin-10 is an important cytokine that regulates immune response. Previous studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus can trigger cell autophagy during the early stages of infection. To our knowledge, whether IL-10 inhibits HCMV-induced autophagy and virus replication has not been studied previously. We investigated whether IL-10 affects cell viability and autophagy under the conditions of starvation and HCMV infection by using the MRC5 cell line. We also explored the role of IL-10-mediated autophagy on HCMV replication. Our data showed that IL-10 inhibited the autophagic flux of the MRC5 cells irrespective of starvation or HCMV infection, and suppressed HCMV replication. The promotion of autophagy with either a pharmacological inducer (rapamycin), or a technique to over-express the BECN1 gene reversed the effect of IL-10 on virus replication. Furthermore, the PI3K/Akt signal pathway was activated when the cells were pretreated with IL-10. Our results indicated that IL-10 can suppress HCMV replication by inhibiting autophagy in host cells during the early stages of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neural Crest Cells in Craniofacial Skeletal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Morikawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial skeletal tissues are composed of tooth and bone, together with nerves and blood vessels. This composite material is mainly derived from neural crest cells (NCCs. The neural crest is transient embryonic tissue present during neural tube formation whose cells have high potential for migration and differentiation. Thus, NCCs are promising candidates for craniofacial tissue regeneration; however, the clinical application of NCCs is hindered by their limited accessibility. In contrast, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are easily accessible in adults, have similar potential for self-renewal, and can differentiate into skeletal tissues, including bones and cartilage. Therefore, MSCs may represent good sources of stem cells for clinical use. MSCs are classically identified under adherent culture conditions, leading to contamination with other cell lineages. Previous studies have identified mouse- and human-specific MSC subsets using cell surface markers. Additionally, some studies have shown that a subset of MSCs is closely related to neural crest derivatives and endothelial cells. These MSCs may be promising candidates for regeneration of craniofacial tissues from the perspective of developmental fate. Here, we review the fundamental biology of MSCs in craniofacial research.

  12. Proteome-wide analysis of SUMO2 targets in response to pathological DNA replication stress in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursomanno, Sara; Beli, Petra; Khan, Asif M; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Wagner, Sebastian A; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels; Choudhary, Chunaram; Hickson, Ian D; Liu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    SUMOylation is a form of post-translational modification involving covalent attachment of SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) polypeptides to specific lysine residues in the target protein. In human cells, there are four SUMO proteins, SUMO1-4, with SUMO2 and SUMO3 forming a closely related subfamily. SUMO2/3, in contrast to SUMO1, are predominantly involved in the cellular response to certain stresses, including heat shock. Substantial evidence from studies in yeast has shown that SUMOylation plays an important role in the regulation of DNA replication and repair. Here, we report a proteomic analysis of proteins modified by SUMO2 in response to DNA replication stress in S phase in human cells. We have identified a panel of 22 SUMO2 targets with increased SUMOylation during DNA replication stress, many of which play key functions within the DNA replication machinery and/or in the cellular response to DNA damage. Interestingly, POLD3 was found modified most significantly in response to a low dose aphidicolin treatment protocol that promotes common fragile site (CFS) breakage. POLD3 is the human ortholog of POL32 in budding yeast, and has been shown to act during break-induced recombinational repair. We have also shown that deficiency of POLD3 leads to an increase in RPA-bound ssDNA when cells are under replication stress, suggesting that POLD3 plays a role in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. Considering that DNA replication stress is a source of genome instability, and that excessive replication stress is a hallmark of pre-neoplastic and tumor cells, our characterization of SUMO2 targets during a perturbed S-phase should provide a valuable resource for future functional studies in the fields of DNA metabolism and cancer biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. CD8+ T cells from HLA-B*57 elite suppressors effectively suppress replication of HIV-1 escape mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Pohlmeyer, Christopher W.; Buckheit, Robert W.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Elite Controllers or Suppressors (ES) are HIV-1 positive individuals who maintain plasma viral loads below the limit of detection of standard clinical assays without antiretroviral therapy. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the control of viral replication in these patients is due to a strong and specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The ability of CD8+ T cells to control HIV-1 replication is believed to be impaired by the development of escape mutations. Surprising...

  14. Generation and properties of a new human ventral mesencephalic neural stem cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Ana; Liste, Isabel; Courtois, Elise T

    2009-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are powerful research tools for the design and discovery of new approaches to cell therapy in neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease. Several epigenetic and genetic strategies have been tested for long-term maintenance and expansion of these cells in vitro....... Here we report the generation of a new stable cell line of human neural stem cells derived from ventral mesencephalon (hVM1) based on v-myc immortalization. The cells expressed neural stem cell and radial glia markers like nestin, vimentin and 3CB2 under proliferation conditions. After withdrawal...

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis in induced neural stem cells reveals defined neural cell identities in vitro and after transplantation into the adult rodent brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Lena Hallmann

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Reprogramming technology enables the production of neural progenitor cells (NPCs from somatic cells by direct transdifferentiation. However, little is known on how neural programs in these induced neural stem cells (iNSCs differ from those of alternative stem cell populations in vitro and in vivo. Here, we performed transcriptome analyses on murine iNSCs in comparison to brain-derived neural stem cells (NSCs and pluripotent stem cell-derived NPCs, which revealed distinct global, neural, metabolic and cell cycle-associated marks in these populations. iNSCs carried a hindbrain/posterior cell identity, which could be shifted towards caudal, partially to rostral but not towards ventral fates in vitro. iNSCs survived after transplantation into the rodent brain and exhibited in vivo-characteristics, neural and metabolic programs similar to transplanted NSCs. However, iNSCs vastly retained caudal identities demonstrating cell-autonomy of regional programs in vivo. These data could have significant implications for a variety of in vitro- and in vivo-applications using iNSCs.

  16. Pharmacological manipulation of the akt signaling pathway regulates myxoma virus replication and tropism in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werden, Steven J; McFadden, Grant

    2010-04-01

    Viruses have evolved an assortment of mechanisms for regulating the Akt signaling pathway to establish a cellular environment more favorable for viral replication. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus that encodes many immunomodulatory factors, including an ankyrin repeat-containing host range protein termed M-T5 that functions to regulate tropism of MYXV for rabbit lymphocytes and certain human cancer cells. MYXV permissiveness in these human cancer cells is dependent upon the direct interaction between M-T5 and Akt, which has been shown to induce the kinase activity of Akt. In this study, an array of compounds that selectively manipulate Akt signaling was screened and we show that only a subset of Akt inhibitors significantly decreased the ability of MYXV to replicate in previously permissive human cancer cells. Furthermore, reduced viral replication efficiency was correlated with lower levels of phosphorylated Akt. In contrast, the PP2A-specific phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid promoted increased Akt kinase activation and rescued MYXV replication in human cancer cells that did not previously support viral replication. Finally, phosphorylation of Akt at residue Thr308 was shown to dictate the physical interaction between Akt and M-T5, which then leads to phosphorylation of Ser473 and permits productive MYXV replication in these human cancer cells. The results of this study further characterize the mechanism by which M-T5 exploits the Akt signaling cascade and affirms this interaction as a major tropism determinant that regulates the replication efficiency of MYXV in human cancer cells.

  17. In vivo neural stem cell imaging: current modalities and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Atul; Steinberg, Gary K; Guzman, Raphael

    2010-01-01

    Neural stem cells have been proposed as a promising therapy for treating a wide variety of neuropathologies. While several studies have demonstrated the therapeutic benefits of neural stem cells, the exact mechanism remains elusive. In order to facilitate research efforts to understand these mechanisms, and before neural stem cell-based therapies can be utilized in a clinical context, we must develop means of monitoring these cells in vivo. However, because of tissue depth and the blood-brain barrier, in vivo imaging of neural stem cells in the brain has unique challenges that do not apply to stem cells for other purposes. In this paper, we review contemporary methods for in vivo neural stem cell imaging, including MRI, PET and optical imaging techniques.

  18. Functional evaluation of neural stem cell differentiation by single cell calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiriz, Maria Francisca; Grade, Sofia; Rosa, Alexandra; Xapelli, Sara; Bernardino, Liliana; Agasse, Fabienne; Malva, João O

    2011-09-01

    Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian brain occurs in two specific brain areas, the subventricular zone (SVZ) bordering the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus. Although these regions are prone to produce new neurons, cultured cells from these neurogenic niches tend to be mixed cultures, containing both neurons and glial cells. Several reports highlight the potential of the self-healing capacity of the brain following injury. Even though much knowledge has been produced on the neurogenesis itself, brain repairing strategies are still far away from patients cure. Here we review general concepts in the neurogenesis field, also addressing the methods available to study neural stem cell differentiation. A major problem faced by research groups and companies dedicated to brain regenerative medicine resides on the lack of good methods to functionally identify neural stem cell differentiation and novel drug targets. To address this issue, we developed a unique single cell calcium imaging-based method to functionally discriminate different cell types derived from SVZ neural stem cell cultures. The unique functional profile of each SVZ cell type was correlated at the single cell level with the immunodetection of specific phenotypic markers. This platform was raised on the basis of the functional response of neurons, oligodendrocytes and immature cells to depolarising agents, to thrombin and to histamine, respectively. We also outline key studies in which our new platform was extremely relevant in the context of drug discovery and development in the area of brain regenerative medicine.

  19. YAP/TAZ enhance mammalian embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a Tead-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Dasol; Byun, Sung-Hyun; Park, Soojeong; Kim, Juwan; Kim, Inhee; Ha, Soobong; Kwon, Mookwang; Yoon, Keejung, E-mail: keejung@skku.edu

    2015-02-27

    Mammalian brain development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Here we show that YAP/TAZ enhance embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in a cell autonomous fashion using diverse experimental approaches. Introduction of retroviral vectors expressing YAP or TAZ into the mouse embryonic brain induced cell localization in the ventricular zone (VZ), which is the embryonic neural stem cell niche. This change in cell distribution in the cortical layer is due to the increased stemness of infected cells; YAP-expressing cells were colabeled with Sox2, a neural stem cell marker, and YAP/TAZ increased the frequency and size of neurospheres, indicating enhanced self-renewal- and proliferative ability of neural stem cells. These effects appear to be TEA domain family transcription factor (Tead)–dependent; a Tead binding-defective YAP mutant lost the ability to promote neural stem cell characteristics. Consistently, in utero gene transfer of a constitutively active form of Tead2 (Tead2-VP16) recapitulated all the features of YAP/TAZ overexpression, and dominant negative Tead2-EnR resulted in marked cell exit from the VZ toward outer cortical layers. Taken together, these results indicate that the Tead-dependent YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays important roles in neural stem cell maintenance by enhancing stemness of neural stem cells during mammalian brain development. - Highlights: • Roles of YAP and Tead in vivo during mammalian brain development are clarified. • Expression of YAP promotes embryonic neural stem cell characteristics in vivo in a cell autonomous fashion. • Enhancement of neural stem cell characteristics by YAP depends on Tead. • Transcriptionally active form of Tead alone can recapitulate the effects of YAP. • Transcriptionally repressive form of Tead severely reduces stem cell characteristics.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yan; Tang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Di; Wang, Sha-Li

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  2. Lack of beta1 integrins in enteric neural crest cells leads to a Hirschsprung-like phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breau, Marie A; Pietri, Thomas; Eder, Olivier

    2006-01-01

    The enteric nervous system arises mainly from vagal and sacral neural crest cells that colonise the gut between 9.5 and 14 days of development in mice. Using the Cre-LoxP system, we removed beta1 integrins in the neural crest cells when they emerge from the neural tube. beta1-null enteric neural ...

  3. File list: NoD.Neu.20.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  4. File list: NoD.Neu.05.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: NoD.Neu.50.AllAg.Neural_progenitor_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  6. Suppression of Zika virus infection and replication in endothelial cells and astrocytes by PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Huang, I-Chueh; Jung, Jae U; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2017-12-06

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), a re-emerging flavivirus, and its associated neurological disorders, such as Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly, have generated an urgent need for developing effective ZIKV vaccines and therapeutic agents. Here, we used human endothelial cells and astrocytes, both of which represent key cell types for ZIKV infection, to identify potential inhibitors for ZIKV replication. Because several pathways, including AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, have been reported to play important roles in flavivirus replication, we tested inhibitors or agonists of these pathways for their effects on ZIKV replication. We identified PKA inhibitor, PKI 14-22 (PKI), as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. PKI effectively suppressed the replication of ZIKV from both African and Asian/American lineages with high efficiency and minimal cytotoxicity. While ZIKV infection did not induce PKA activation, endogenous PKA activity was essential for supporting ZIKV replication. Interestingly, in addition to PKA, PKI also inhibited other unknown target(s) to block ZIKV replication. PKI inhibited ZIKV replication at the post-entry stage by preferentially affecting negative-sense RNA synthesis as well as viral protein translation. Together, these results have identified a potential inhibitor of ZIKV replication, which could be further explored for future therapeutic application.ImportanceThere is an urgent need to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents against Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, a re-emerging flavivirus associated with neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly. By screening for inhibitors of several cellular pathways, we have identified PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22 (PKI) as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. We have shown that PKI effectively suppresses the replication of ZIKV of all the strains

  7. Polyubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen by HLTF and SHPRH prevents genomic instability from stalled replication forks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Motegi (Akira); H.J. Liaw; K.Y. Lee; H.P. Roest (Henk); A. Maas (Alex); X. Wu; H. Moinova (Helen); S.D. Markowitz (Sanford); H. Ding (Hao); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Myung (Kyungjae)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractChronic stalling of DNA replication forks caused by DNA damage can lead to genomic instability. Cells have evolved lesion bypass pathways such as postreplication repair (PRR) to resolve these arrested forks. In yeast, one branch of PRR involves proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)

  8. The DNA replication, virogenesis and infection of canine minute virus in non-permissive and permissive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Zhang, Qian; Yao, Qing; Chen, Long; Li, Jianning; Qiu, Jianming; Sun, Yuning

    2014-01-22

    Canine minute virus (CnMV), a kind of autonomous parvovirus, is a member of genus bocavirus in parvovirdae family. In our previous study, we constructed and obtained infectious clones of CnMV, analyzed genome characteristics, RNA transcription profile, and revealed some molecular mechanisms of cytopathic effect of target cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate DNA replication, virogenesis and infectious tropism of CnMV in non-permissive and permissive cells. We demonstrated that the genomic DNA of CnMV, besides WRD cells, could replicate significantly in some non-permissive cells (CrFK, EBtR and COS-7) following transfection with infectious clone of CnMV, pI-MVC. Moreover, by using Western blotting and immunofluorescence, we found that the NS1 protein of CnMV was obviously expressed in both 293, CrFK, EBtR and COS-7 cells transfected with pI-MVC. Meanwhile, two-rounds of reinfection on WRD cells (blind passage) of the transfected cell lysates in CrFK, EBtR and COS-7 cells tranfected with pI-MVC showed that pI-MVC could produce infectious virions in these types of non-permissive cells. Furthermore, it is confirmed that CnMV only infected WRD cells (permissive cells for CnMV), could not infect any non-permissive cells including CrFK, EBtR, COS-7, HK293, A549 and A9 cells. Taken together, for the first time, we have demonstrated that bocavirus CnMV DNA could replicate and form infectious progeny virus in some non-permissive cells. And what is more, unlike other parvoviruses, CnMV did not infect some non-permissive cells, although the DNA replication of CnMV occurred in these cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Replicative bypass of abasic site in Escherichia coli and human cells: similarities and differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithri Weerasooriya

    Full Text Available Abasic [apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP] sites are the most common DNA damages, opposite which dAMP is frequently inserted ('A-rule' in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide insertion opposite the AP-site in eukaryotic cells depends on the assay system and the type of cells. Accordingly, a 'C-rule', 'A-rule', or the lack of specificity has been reported. DNA sequence context also modulates nucleotide insertion opposite AP-site. Herein, we have compared replication of tetrahydrofuran (Z, a stable analog of AP-site, in E. coli and human embryonic kidney 293T cells in two different sequences. The efficiency of translesion synthesis or viability of the AP-site construct in E. coli was less than 1%, but it was 7- to 8-fold higher in the GZGTC sequence than in the GTGZC sequence. The difference in viability increased even more in pol V-deficient strains. Targeted one-base deletions occurred in 63% frequency in the GZG and 68% frequency in GZC sequence, which dropped to 49% and 21%, respectively, upon induction of SOS. The full-length products with SOS primarily involved dAMP insertion opposite the AP-site, which occurred in 49% and 71% frequency, respectively, in the GZG and GZC sequence. dAMP insertion, largely carried out by pol V, was more efficient when the AP-site was a stronger replication block. In contrast to these results in E. coli, viability was 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher in human cells, and the 'A-rule' was more rigidly followed. The AP-site in the GZG and GZC sequences gave 76% and 89%, respectively, Z → T substitutions. In human cells, targeted one-base deletion was undetectable, and dTMP>dCMP were the next preferred nucleotides inserted opposite Z. siRNA knockdown of Rev1 or pol ζ established that both these polymerases are vital for AP-site bypass, as demonstrated by 36-67% reduction in bypass efficiency. However, neither polymerase was indispensable, suggesting roles of additional DNA polymerases in AP-site bypass in human cells.

  10. Dendritic cells in dengue virus infection: Targets of virus replication and mediators of immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of the immune system and detect pathogens at sites of entry, such as the skin. In addition to the ability of DCs to control infections directly via their innate immune functions, DCs help to prime adaptive B and T cell responses via antigen presentation in lymphoid tissues. Infected Aedes aegypti or Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes to humans while probing for small blood vessels in the skin. DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, yet no vaccine or specific therapeutic is currently approved. Although primary DENV infection confers life-long protective immunity against re-infection with the same DENV serotype, secondary infection with a different DENV serotype can lead to increased disease severity via cross-reactive T cells or enhancing antibodies. This review summarizes recent findings in humans and animal models about DENV infection of DCs, monocytes and macrophages. We discuss the dual role of DCs as both targets of DENV replication and mediators of innate and adaptive immunity, and summarize immune evasion strategies whereby DENV impairs the function of infected DCs. We suggest that DCs play a key role in priming DENV-specific neutralizing or potentially harmful memory B and T cell responses, and that future DC-directed therapies may help induce protective memory responses and reduce dengue pathogenesis.

  11. Dengue Virus Type 2: Protein Binding and Active Replication in Human Central Nervous System Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Isabel Salazar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased number of dengue cases with neurological complications have been reported in recent years. The lack of reliable animal models for dengue has hindered studies on dengue virus (DENV pathogenesis and cellular tropism in vivo. We further investigate the tropism of DENV for the human central nervous system (CNS, characterizing DENV interactions with cell surface proteins in human CNS cells by virus overlay protein binding assays (VOPBA and coimmunoprecipitations. In VOPBA, three membrane proteins (60, 70, and 130 kDa from the gray matter bound the entire virus particle, whereas only a 70 kDa protein bound in white matter. The coimmunoprecipitation assays revealed three proteins from gray matter consistently binding virus particles, one clearly distinguishable protein (~32 kDa and two less apparent proteins (100 and 130 kDa. Monoclonal anti-NS3 targeted the virus protein in primary cell cultures of human CNS treated with DENV-2, which also stained positive for NeuH, a neuron-specific marker. Thus, our results indicate (1 that DENV-2 exhibited a direct tropism for human neurons and (2 that human neurons sustain an active DENV replication as was demonstrated by the presence of the NS3 viral antigen in primary cultures of these cells treated with DENV-2.

  12. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Cells Survive and Mature in the Nonhuman Primate Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina E. Emborg

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs opens up the possibility for personalized cell therapy. Here, we show that transplanted autologous rhesus monkey iPSC-derived neural progenitors survive for up to 6 months and differentiate into neurons, astrocytes, and myelinating oligodendrocytes in the brains of MPTP-induced hemiparkinsonian rhesus monkeys with a minimal presence of inflammatory cells and reactive glia. This finding represents a significant step toward personalized regenerative therapies.

  13. Replication and spread of CJD, kuru and scrapie agents in vivo and in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Emmerling, Kaitlin; Manuelidis, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE) agents are defined by their virulence for particular species, their spread in the population, their incubation time to cause disease, and their neuropathological sequelae. Murine adapted human agents, including sporadic CJD (sCJD), New Guinea kuru, and Japanese CJD agents, display particularly distinct incubation times and maximal infectious brain titers. They also induce agent-specific patterns of neurodegeneration. When these TSE agents are transmitted to cultured hypothalamic GT1 cells they maintain their unique identities. Nevertheless, the human kuru (kCJD) and Japanese FU-CJD agents, as well as the sheep 22L and 263K scrapie agents display doubling times that are 8x to 33x faster in cells than in brain, indicating release from complex innate immune responses. These data are most consistent with a foreign viral structure, rather than an infectious form of host prion protein (PrP-res). Profound agent-specific inhibitory effects are also apparent in GT1 cells, and maximal titer plateau in kCJD and FU-CJD differed by 1,000-fold in a cell-based assay. Remarkably, the lower titer kCJD agent rapidly induced de novo PrP-res in GT1 cells, whereas the high titer FU-CJD agent replicated silently for multiple passages. Although PrP-res is often considered to be toxic, PrP-res instead may be part of a primal defense and/or clearance mechanism against TSE environmental agents. Limited spread of particular TSE agents through nanotubes and cell-to-cell contacts probably underlies the long peripheral phase of human CJD.

  14. Histophilus somni Stimulates Expression of Antiviral Proteins and Inhibits BRSV Replication in Bovine Respiratory Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Lin

    Full Text Available Our previous studies showed that bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV followed by Histophilus somni causes more severe bovine respiratory disease and a more permeable alveolar barrier in vitro than either agent alone. However, microarray analysis revealed the treatment of bovine alveolar type 2 (BAT2 epithelial cells with H. somni concentrated culture supernatant (CCS stimulated up-regulation of four antiviral protein genes as compared with BRSV infection or dual treatment. This suggested that inhibition of viral infection, rather than synergy, may occur if the bacterial infection occurred before the viral infection. Viperin (or radical S-adenosyl methionine domain containing 2--RSAD2 and ISG15 (IFN-stimulated gene 15--ubiquitin-like modifier were most up-regulated. CCS dose and time course for up-regulation of viperin protein levels were determined in treated bovine turbinate (BT upper respiratory cells and BAT2 lower respiratory cells by Western blotting. Treatment of BAT2 cells with H. somni culture supernatant before BRSV infection dramatically reduced viral replication as determined by qRT PCR, supporting the hypothesis that the bacterial infection may inhibit viral infection. Studies of the role of the two known H. somni cytotoxins showed that viperin protein expression was induced by endotoxin (lipooligosaccharide but not by IbpA, which mediates alveolar permeability and H. somni invasion. A naturally occurring IbpA negative asymptomatic carrier strain of H. somni (129Pt does not cause BAT2 cell retraction or permeability of alveolar cell monolayers, so lacks virulence in vitro. To investigate initial steps of pathogenesis, we showed that strain 129Pt attached to BT cells and induced a strong viperin response in vitro. Thus colonization of the bovine upper respiratory tract with an asymptomatic carrier strain lacking virulence may decrease viral infection and the subsequent enhancement of bacterial respiratory infection in vivo.

  15. Replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome in RNase HI-deficient cells: Multiple initiation regions and fork dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduike, Nkabuije Z; Tehranchi, Ashley K; Wang, Jue D; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2013-01-01

    DNA replication in Escherichia coli is normally initiated at a single origin, oriC, dependent on initiation protein DnaA. However, replication can be initiated elsewhere on the chromosome at multiple ectopic oriK sites. Genetic evidence indicates that initiation from oriK depends on RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops), which are normally removed by enzymes such as RNase HI to prevent oriK from misfiring during normal growth. Initiation from oriK sites occurs in RNase HI-deficient mutants, and possibly in wild-type cells under certain unusual conditions. Despite previous work, the locations of oriK and their impact on genome stability remain unclear. We combined 2D gel electrophoresis and whole genome approaches to map genome-wide oriK locations. The DNA copy number profiles of various RNase HI-deficient strains contained multiple peaks, often in consistent locations, identifying candidate oriK sites. Removal of RNase HI protein also leads to global alterations of replication fork migration patterns, often opposite to normal replication directions, and presumably eukaryote-like replication fork merging. Our results have implications for genome stability, offering a new understanding of how RNase HI deficiency results in R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflict, as well as inappropriate replication stalling or blockage at Ter sites outside of the terminus trap region and at ribosomal operons. PMID:24164596

  16. Autophagy induced by snakehead fish vesiculovirus inhibited its replication in SSN-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Chen, Nan; Hegazy, Abeer M; Liu, Xiaodan; Wu, Zhixin; Liu, Xueqin; Zhao, Lijuan; Qin, Qiwei; Lan, Jiangfeng; Lin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy plays an important role in host protection against pathogen infection through activating innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we observed that the infection of snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV) could induce apparent autophagy in striped snakehead fish cell line (SSN-1), including clear double-membrane vesicles, fluorescent punctate pattern of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (SSN-LC3B) and the conversion of SSN-LC3B-Ⅰ to SSN-LC3B-Ⅱ. Furthermore, we verified that autophagy inhibited the replication of SHVV by assessing mRNA and protein level of nucleoprotein as well as virus titer in the supernatant. These results will shed a new light on the prevention of the infection of SHVV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Visualizing the replication of respiratory syncytial virus in cells and in living mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameix-Welti, Marie-Anne; Le Goffic, Ronan; Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Sourimant, Julien; Rémot, Aude; Riffault, Sabine; Yu, Qin; Galloux, Marie; Gault, Elyanne; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2014-10-03

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of severe lower-respiratory tract disease in calves and young children, yet no human vaccine nor efficient curative treatments are available. Here we describe a recombinant human RSV reverse genetics system in which the red fluorescent protein (mCherry) or the firefly luciferase (Luc) genes are inserted into the RSV genome. Expression of mCherry and Luc are correlated with infection rate, allowing the monitoring of RSV multiplication in cell culture. Replication of the Luc-encoding virus in living mice can be visualized by bioluminescent imaging, bioluminescence being detected in the snout and lungs of infected mice after nasal inoculation. We propose that these recombinant viruses are convenient and valuable tools for screening of compounds active against RSV, and can be used as an extremely sensitive readout for studying effects of antiviral therapeutics in living mice.

  18. Role of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jun; He, Zhili; Ruan, Juan; Ma, Zilong; Liu, Ying; Gong, Chengxin; Iqbal, Khalid; Sun, Shenggang; Chen, Honghui

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that has been fully studied for its structure, receptor, and signaling pathways and its multiplex effects on neural system, skeletal muscle, and weight control. Recent research demonstrates that CNTF also plays an important role in neurogenesis and the differentiation of neural stem cells. In this article, we summarize the general characteristics of CNTF and its function on neural stem cells, which could be a valuable therapeutic strategy in treating neurological disorders.

  19. Gap Junction–mediated Cell–Cell Communication Modulates Mouse Neural Crest Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, G.Y.; Cooper, E.S.; Waldo, K.; Kirby, M L; Gilula, N B; Lo, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies showed that conotruncal heart malformations can arise with the increase or decrease in α1 connexin function in neural crest cells. To elucidate the possible basis for the quantitative requirement for α1 connexin gap junctions in cardiac development, a neural crest outgrowth culture system was used to examine migration of neural crest cells derived from CMV43 transgenic embryos overexpressing α1 connexins, and from α1 connexin knockout (KO) mice and FC transgenic mice expressi...

  20. Nifurtimox Is Effective Against Neural Tumor Cells and Is Synergistic with Buthionine Sulfoximine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Du; Linna Zhang; Scorsone, Kathleen A.; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Zage, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Children with aggressive neural tumors have poor survival rates and novel therapies are needed. Previous studies have identified nifurtimox and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) as effective agents in children with neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. We hypothesized that nifurtimox would be effective against other neural tumor cells and would be synergistic with BSO. We determined neural tumor cell viability before and after treatment with nifurtimox using MTT assays. Assays for DNA ladder formatio...

  1. Planar cell polarity-mediated induction of neural stem cell expansion during axolotl spinal cord regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost, Fabian; Nowoshilow, Sergej; Chara, Osvaldo; Tanaka, Elly M

    2015-01-01

    Axolotls are uniquely able to mobilize neural stem cells to regenerate all missing regions of the spinal cord. How a neural stem cell under homeostasis converts after injury to a highly regenerative cell remains unknown. Here, we show that during regeneration, axolotl neural stem cells repress neurogenic genes and reactivate a transcriptional program similar to embryonic neuroepithelial cells. This dedifferentiation includes the acquisition of rapid cell cycles, the switch from neurogenic to proliferative divisions, and the re-expression of planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway components. We show that PCP induction is essential to reorient mitotic spindles along the anterior-posterior axis of elongation, and orthogonal to the cell apical-basal axis. Disruption of this property results in premature neurogenesis and halts regeneration. Our findings reveal a key role for PCP in coordinating the morphogenesis of spinal cord outgrowth with the switch from a homeostatic to a regenerative stem cell that restores missing tissue. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10230.001 PMID:26568310

  2. Conditionally replicating adenovirus prevents pluripotent stem cell–derived teratoma by specifically eliminating undifferentiated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Mitsui

    Full Text Available Incomplete abolition of tumorigenicity creates potential safety concerns in clinical trials of regenerative medicine based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs. Here, we demonstrate that conditionally replicating adenoviruses that specifically target cancers using multiple factors (m-CRAs, originally developed as anticancer drugs, may also be useful as novel antitumorigenic agents in hPSC-based therapy. The survivin promoter was more active in undifferentiated hPSCs than the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter, whereas both promoters were minimally active in differentiated normal cells. Accordingly, survivin-responsive m-CRA (Surv.m-CRA killed undifferentiated hPSCs more efficiently than TERT-responsive m-CRAs (Tert.m-CRA; both m-CRAs exhibited efficient viral replication and cytotoxicity in undifferentiated hPSCs, but not in cocultured differentiated normal cells. Pre-infection of hPSCs with Surv.m-CRA or Tert.m-CRA abolished in vivo teratoma formation in a dose-dependent manner following hPSC implantation into mice. Thus, m-CRAs, and in particular Surv.m-CRAs, represent novel antitumorigenic agents that could facilitate safe clinical applications of hPSC-based regenerative medicine.

  3. Roles of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, researchers are using neural stem cell transplantation to promote regeneration after peripheral nerve injury, as neural stem cells play an important role in peripheral nerve injury repair. This article reviews recent research progress of the role of neural stem cells in the repair of peripheral nerve injury. Neural stem cells can not only differentiate into neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, but can also differentiate into Schwann-like cells, which promote neurite outgrowth around the injury. Transplanted neural stem cells can differentiate into motor neurons that innervate muscles and promote the recovery of neurological function. To promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury, neural stem cells secrete various neurotrophic factors, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, fibroblast growth factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor. In addition, neural stem cells also promote regeneration of the axonal myelin sheath, angiogenesis, and immune regulation. It can be concluded that neural stem cells promote the repair of peripheral nerve injury through a variety of ways.

  4. Type I interferons suppress viral replication but contribute to T cell depletion and dysfunction during chronic HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Yu, Haisheng; Li, Guangming; Li, Feng; Ma, Jianping; Li, Jingyun; Chi, Liqun; Zhang, Liguo

    2017-01-01

    The direct link between sustained type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling and HIV-1–induced immunopathogenesis during chronic infection remains unclear. Here we report studies using a monoclonal antibody to block IFN-α/β receptor 1 (IFNAR1) signaling during persistent HIV-1 infection in humanized mice (hu-mice). We discovered that, during chronic HIV-1 infection, IFNAR blockade increased viral replication, which was correlated with elevated T cell activation. Thus, IFN-Is suppress HIV-1 replication during the chronic phase but are not essential for HIV-1–induced aberrant immune activation. Surprisingly, IFNAR blockade rescued both total human T cell and HIV-specific T cell numbers despite elevated HIV-1 replication and immune activation. We showed that IFNAR blockade reduced HIV-1–induced apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. Importantly, IFNAR blockade also rescued the function of human T cells, including HIV-1–specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. We conclude that during persistent HIV-1 infection, IFN-Is suppress HIV-1 replication, but contribute to depletion and dysfunction of T cells. PMID:28614789

  5. miR-101 suppresses HBV replication and expression by targeting FOXO1 in hepatoma carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanjing; Tian, Hui

    2017-05-20

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified to participate in the progression of cancers and in the infection of viruses. miR-101 expression has been found to be suppressed by HBV, however, the regulatory relationship between miR-101 and HBV replication remains elusive. In this report, miR-101 was significantly downregulated in HepG2.2.15 cells with HBV expression. miR-101 overexpression dramatically suppressed HBV replication and expression. Oppositely, overexpression of FOXO1 significantly promoted HBV replication and expression. Moreover, luciferase reporter analysis, qRT-PCR analysis and western blot assay confirmed that FOXO1 was a functional target of miR-101. Furthermore, restored FOXO1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of miR-101 overexpression on HBV replication and expression in HepG2.2.15 cells. Our data suggested that miR-101 suppressed HBV replication and expression partially by targeting FOXO1, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of miR-101 in HBV-host interactions and a promising therapeutic target for HBV replication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The DNA replication program is altered at the FMR1 locus in fragile X embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Tomishima, Mark J.; Zaninovic, Nikica; Colak, Dilek; Yan, Zi; Zhan, Qiansheng; Rosenwaks, Zev; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Schildkraut, Carl L.

    2014-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by a CGG repeat expansion in the FMR1 gene that appears to occur during oogenesis and during early embryogenesis. One model proposes that repeat instability depends on the replication fork direction through the repeats such that (CNG)n hairpin-like structures form; causing DNA polymerase to stall and slip. Examining DNA replication fork progression on single DNA molecules at the endogenous FMR1 locus revealed that replication forks stall at CGG repeats in human cells. Furthermore, replication profiles of FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESC) compared to non-affected hESC showed that fork direction through the repeats is altered at the FMR1 locus in FXS hESC, such that predominantly the CCG strand serves as the lagging strand template. This is due to the absence of replication initiation that would typically occur upstream of FMR1; suggesting that altered replication origin usage combined with fork stalling promotes repeat instability during early embryonic development. PMID:24289922

  7. Angiogenic factors stimulate growth of adult neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Androutsellis-Theotokis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to grow a uniform cell type from the adult central nervous system (CNS is valuable for developing cell therapies and new strategies for drug discovery. The adult mammalian brain is a source of neural stem cells (NSC found in both neurogenic and non-neurogenic zones but difficulties in culturing these hinders their use as research tools.Here we show that NSCs can be efficiently grown in adherent cell cultures when angiogenic signals are included in the medium. These signals include both anti-angiogenic factors (the soluble form of the Notch receptor ligand, Dll4 and pro-angiogenic factors (the Tie-2 receptor ligand, Angiopoietin 2. These treatments support the self renewal state of cultured NSCs and expression of the transcription factor Hes3, which also identifies the cancer stem cell population in human tumors. In an organotypic slice model, angiogenic factors maintain vascular structure and increase the density of dopamine neuron processes.We demonstrate new properties of adult NSCs and a method to generate efficient adult NSC cultures from various central nervous system areas. These findings will help establish cellular models relevant to cancer and regeneration.

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  20. Almond Skin Extracts Abrogate HSV-1 Replication by Blocking Virus Binding to the Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Bisignano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to determine the effect of almond skin extracts on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 replication. Drug-resistant strains of HSV frequently develop following therapeutic treatment. Therefore, the discovery of novel anti-HSV drugs deserves great effort. Here, we tested both natural (NS and blanched (BS polyphenols-rich almond skin extracts against HSV-1. HPLC analysis showed that the prevalent compounds in NS and BS extracts contributing to their antioxidant activity were quercetin, epicatechin and catechin. Results of cell viability indicated that NS and BS extracts were not toxic to cultured Vero cells. Furthermore, NS extracts were more potent inhibitors of HSV-1 than BS extracts, and this trend was in agreement with different concentrations of flavonoids. The plaque forming assay, Western blot and real-time PCR were used to demonstrate that NS extracts were able to block the production of infectious HSV-1 particles. In addition, the viral binding assay demonstrated that NS extracts inhibited HSV-1 adsorption to Vero cells. Our conclusion is that natural products from almond skin extracts are an extraordinary source of antiviral agents and provide a novel treatment against HSV-1 infections.

  1. Effect of serum choice on replicative senescence in mesenchymal stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Yan-Qi; Wang, Hong-Yi; Li, Yan-Ju; Liu, Guang-Yang; Xu, Xiao; Wu, Xiao-Bing; Jing, Yong-Guang; Yao, Yao; Wu, Chu-Tse; Jin, Ji-De

    2015-07-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for innovative cell therapeutic applications. Before their use, however, they usually need to be expanded in vitro with serum-supplemented media. MSCs can undergo replicative senescence during in vitro expansion, but it is not yet clear how serum supplements influence this process. In the present study, we compared how media supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS) or calf serum (CS) affected morphology, proliferation, differentiation, senescence and other functional characteristics of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs). UC-MSCs cultured in both FBS- and CS-containing media were able to differentiate along osteogenic and adipogenic lineages but ultimately reached proliferation arrest. However, senescence-associated characteristics, such as β-galactosidase activity, reactive oxygen species levels, proliferation rate and gene expression, demonstrate that UC-MSCs grown with FBS have better proliferation potential and differentiation capacity. In contrast, UC-MSCs grown with CS have a higher proportion of apoptotic cells and senescent characteristics. Possible mechanisms for the observed phenotypes include changes in gene expression (Bax, p16, p21 and p53) and cytokine production (interleukin-6 and interleukin-8). This study demonstrates that FBS-supplemented media provides a better microenvironment for the expansion of UC-MSCs in vitro than CS-supplemented media. This work provides insight into MSCs generation practices for use in basic research and clinical therapies. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Small molecule GSK-3 inhibitors increase neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Christian; Mix, Eilhard; Frahm, Jana; Glass, Anne; Müller, Jana; Schmitt, Oliver; Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Klemm, Kristin; Ortinau, Stefanie; Hübner, Rayk; Frech, Moritz J; Wree, Andreas; Rolfs, Arndt

    2011-01-13

    Human neural progenitor cells provide a source for cell replacement therapy to treat neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, there is great interest in mechanisms and tools to direct the fate of multipotent progenitor cells during their differentiation to increase the yield of a desired cell type. We tested small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) for their functionality and their influence on neurogenesis using the human neural progenitor cell line ReNcell VM. Here we report the enhancement of neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells by treatment with GSK-3 inhibitors. We tested different small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 i.e. LiCl, sodium-valproate, kenpaullone, indirubin-3-monoxime and SB-216763 for their ability to inhibit GSK-3 in human neural progenitor cells. The highest in situ GSK-3 inhibitory effect of the drugs was found for kenpaullone and SB-216763. Accordingly, kenpaullone and SB-216763 were the only drugs tested in this study to stimulate the Wnt/β-catenin pathway that is antagonized by GSK-3. Analysis of human neural progenitor differentiation revealed an augmentation of neurogenesis by SB-216763 and kenpaullone, without changing cell cycle exit or cell survival. Small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3 enhance neurogenesis of human neural progenitor cells and may be used to direct the differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells in therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Review: the role of neural crest cells in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Meghan Sara; Bronner-Fraser, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    The neural crest is a pluripotent population of cells that arises at the junction of the neural tube and the dorsal ectoderm. These highly migratory cells form diverse derivatives including neurons and glia of the sensory, sympathetic, and enteric nervous systems, melanocytes, and the bones, cartilage, and connective tissues of the face. The neural crest has long been associated with the endocrine system, although not always correctly. According to current understanding, neural crest cells give rise to the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, chief cells of the extra-adrenal paraganglia, and thyroid C cells. The endocrine tumors that correspond to these cell types are pheochromocytomas, extra-adrenal paragangliomas, and medullary thyroid carcinomas. Although controversies concerning embryological origin appear to have mostly been resolved, questions persist concerning the pathobiology of each tumor type and its basis in neural crest embryology. Here we present a brief history of the work on neural crest development, both in general and in application to the endocrine system. In particular, we present findings related to the plasticity and pluripotency of neural crest cells as well as a discussion of several different neural crest tumors in the endocrine system.

  4. Reversible neural stem cell niche dysfunction in a model of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Stine; Imitola, Jaime; Ayuso-Sacido, Angel

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the brain constitutes a niche for neural stem and progenitor cells that can initiate repair after central nervous system (CNS) injury. In a relapsing-remitting model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the neural stem cells (NSCs) become...

  5. Distinct cell clusters touching islet cells induce islet cell replication in association with over-expression of Regenerating Gene (REG protein in fulminant type 1 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Aida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic islet endocrine cell-supporting architectures, including islet encapsulating basement membranes (BMs, extracellular matrix (ECM, and possible cell clusters, are unclear. PROCEDURES: The architectures around islet cell clusters, including BMs, ECM, and pancreatic acinar-like cell clusters, were studied in the non-diabetic state and in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes in humans. RESULT: Immunohistochemical and electron microscopy analyses demonstrated that human islet cell clusters and acinar-like cell clusters adhere directly to each other with desmosomal structures and coated-pit-like structures between the two cell clusters. The two cell-clusters are encapsulated by a continuous capsule composed of common BMs/ECM. The acinar-like cell clusters have vesicles containing regenerating (REG Iα protein. The vesicles containing REG Iα protein are directly secreted to islet cells. In the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes, the acinar-like cell clusters over-expressed REG Iα protein. Islet endocrine cells, including beta-cells and non-beta cells, which were packed with the acinar-like cell clusters, show self-replication with a markedly increased number of Ki67-positive cells. CONCLUSION: The acinar-like cell clusters touching islet endocrine cells are distinct, because the cell clusters are packed with pancreatic islet clusters and surrounded by common BMs/ECM. Furthermore, the acinar-like cell clusters express REG Iα protein and secrete directly to neighboring islet endocrine cells in the non-diabetic state, and the cell clusters over-express REG Iα in the inflamed milieu of fulminant type 1 diabetes with marked self-replication of islet cells.

  6. Comparison of 2D and 3D neural induction methods for the generation of neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Abinaya; Avci, Hasan X; Ochalek, Anna; Rösingh, Lone N; Molnár, Kinga; László, Lajos; Bellák, Tamás; Téglási, Annamária; Pesti, Krisztina; Mike, Arpad; Phanthong, Phetcharat; Bíró, Orsolya; Hall, Vanessa; Kitiyanant, Narisorn; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2017-12-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are frequently induced using 3D culture methodologies however, it is unknown whether spheroid-based (3D) neural induction is actually superior to monolayer (2D) neural induction. Our aim was to compare the efficiency of 2D induction with 3D induction method in their ability to generate NPCs, and subsequently neurons and astrocytes. Neural differentiation was analysed at the protein level qualitatively by immunocytochemistry and quantitatively by flow cytometry for NPC (SOX1, PAX6, NESTIN), neuronal (MAP2, TUBB3), cortical layer (TBR1, CUX1) and glial markers (SOX9, GFAP, AQP4). Electron microscopy demonstrated that both methods resulted in morphologically similar neural rosettes. However, quantification of NPCs derived from 3D neural induction exhibited an increase in the number of PAX6/NESTIN double positive cells and the derived neurons exhibited longer neurites. In contrast, 2D neural induction resulted in more SOX1 positive cells. While 2D monolayer induction resulted in slightly less mature neurons, at an early stage of differentiation, the patch clamp analysis failed to reveal any significant differences between the electrophysiological properties between the two induction methods. In conclusion, 3D neural induction increases the yield of PAX6+/NESTIN+ cells and gives rise to neurons with longer neurites, which might be an advantage for the production of forebrain cortical neurons, highlighting the potential of 3D neural induction, independent of iPSCs' genetic background. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of activating KIR copy number variation of NK cells with containment of SIV replication in rhesus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Hellmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available While the contribution of CD8⁺ cytotoxic T lymphocytes to early containment of HIV-1 spread is well established, a role for NK cells in controlling HIV-1 replication during primary infection has been uncertain. The highly polymorphic family of KIR molecules expressed on NK cells can inhibit or activate these effector cells and might therefore modulate their activity against HIV-1-infected cells. In the present study, we investigated copy number variation in KIR3DH loci encoding the only activating KIR receptor family in rhesus monkeys and its effect on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV replication during primary infection in rhesus monkeys. We observed an association between copy numbers of KIR3DH genes and control of SIV replication in Mamu-A*01⁻ rhesus monkeys that express restrictive TRIM5 alleles. These findings provide further evidence for an association between NK cells and the early containment of SIV replication, and underscore the potential importance of activating KIRs in stimulating NK cell responses to control SIV spread.

  8. miR-30a can inhibit DNA replication by targeting RPA1 thus slowing cancer cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhenyou; Ni, Mengjie; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Yongfeng; Ma, Hongyu; Qian, Shihan; Tang, Longhua; Tang, Jiamei; Yao, Hailun; Zhao, Chengbin; Lu, Xiongwen; Sun, Hongyang; Qian, Jue; Mao, Xiaoting; Lu, Xulin; Liu, Qun; Zen, Juping; Wu, Hanbing; Bao, Zhaosheng; Lin, Shudan; Sheng, Hongyu; Li, Yunlong; Liang, Yong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Zong, Dan

    2016-07-15

    Cell proliferation was inhibited following forced over-expression of miR-30a in the ovary cancer cell line A2780DX5 and the gastric cancer cell line SGC7901R. Interestingly, miR-30a targets the DNA replication protein RPA1, hinders the replication of DNA and induces DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) were phosphorylated after DNA damage, which induced p53 expression, thus triggering the S-phase checkpoint, arresting cell cycle progression and ultimately initiating cancer cell apoptosis. Therefore, forced miR-30a over-expression in cancer cells can be a potential way to inhibit tumour development. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Secretome analysis of human oligodendrocytes derived from neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Kyung Kim

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the secretome of human oligodendrocytes (F3.Olig2 cells generated from human neural stem cells by transduction with the gene encoding the Olig2 transcription factor. Using mRNA sequencing and protein cytokine arrays, we identified a number of biologically important secretory proteins whose expression has not been previously reported in oligodendrocytes. We found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete IL-6, PDGF-AA, GRO, GM-CSF, and M-CSF, and showed prominent expression of their corresponding receptors. Co-expression of ligands and receptors suggests that autocrine signaling loops may play important roles in both differentiation and maintenance of oligodendrocytes. We also found that F3.Olig2 cells secrete matrix metalloproteinases and matrix metalloproteinase-associated proteins associated with functional competence of oligodendrocytes. The results of our secretome analysis provide insights into the functional and molecular details of human oligodendrocytes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of the secretome of oligodendrocytes.

  10. Molecular basis for viral selective replication in cancer cells: activation of CDK2 by adenovirus-induced cyclin E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in cancer cells and have been used in cancer therapies. We have previously shown that Ad E1B55K protein is involved in induction of cyclin E for Ad replication, but this E1B55K function is not required in cancer cells in which deregulation of cyclin E is frequently observed. In this study, we investigated the interaction of cyclin E and CDK2 in Ad-infected cells. Ad infection significantly increased the large form of cyclin E (cyclin EL, promoted cyclin E/CDK2 complex formation and increased CDK2 phosphorylation at the T160 site. Activated CDK2 caused pRb phosphorylation at the S612 site. Repression of CDK2 activity with the chemical inhibitor roscovitine or with specific small interfering RNAs significantly decreased pRb phosphorylation, with concomitant repression of viral replication. Our results suggest that Ad-induced cyclin E activates CDK2 that targets the transcriptional repressor pRb to generate a cellular environment for viral productive replication. This study reveals a new molecular basis for oncolytic replication of E1b-deleted Ads and will aid in the development of new strategies for Ad oncolytic virotherapies.

  11. Raman spectroscopy for discrimination of neural progenitor cells and their lineages (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Keren; Ong, William; Chew, Sing Yian; Liu, Quan

    2017-02-01

    Neurological diseases are one of the leading causes of adult disability and they are estimated to cause more deaths than cancer in the elderly population by 2040. Stem cell therapy has shown great potential in treating neurological diseases. However, before cell therapy can be widely adopted in the long term, a number of challenges need to be addressed, including the fundamental research about cellular development of neural progenitor cells. To facilitate the fundamental research of neural progenitor cells, many methods have been developed to identify neural progenitor cells. Although great progress has been made, there is still lack of an effective method to achieve fast, label-free and noninvasive differentiation of neural progenitor cells and their lineages. As a fast, label-free and noninvasive technique, spontaneous Raman spectroscopy has been conducted to characterize many types of stem cells including neural stem cells. However, to our best knowledge, it has not been studied for the discrimination of neural progenitor cells from specific lineages. Here we report the differentiation of neural progenitor cell from their lineages including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and neurons using spontaneous Raman spectroscopy. Moreover, we also evaluate the influence of system parameters during spectral acquisition on the quality of measured Raman spectra and the accuracy of classification using the spectra, which yield a set of optimal system parameters facilitating future studies.

  12. Gene array analysis of neural crest cells identifies transcription factors necessary for direct conversion of embryonic fibroblasts into neural crest cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Motohashi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neural crest cells (NC cells are multipotent cells that emerge from the edge of the neural folds and migrate throughout the developing embryo. Although the gene regulatory network for generation of NC cells has been elucidated in detail, it has not been revealed which of the factors in the network are pivotal to directing NC identity. In this study we analyzed the gene expression profile of a pure NC subpopulation isolated from Sox10-IRES-Venus mice and investigated whether these genes played a key role in the direct conversion of Sox10-IRES-Venus mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs into NC cells. The comparative molecular profiles of NC cells and neural tube cells in 9.5-day embryos revealed genes including transcription factors selectively expressed in developing trunk NC cells. Among 25 NC cell-specific transcription factor genes tested, SOX10 and SOX9 were capable of converting MEFs into SOX10-positive (SOX10+ cells. The SOX10+ cells were then shown to differentiate into neurons, glial cells, smooth muscle cells, adipocytes and osteoblasts. These SOX10+ cells also showed limited self-renewal ability, suggesting that SOX10 and SOX9 directly converted MEFs into NC cells. Conversely, the remaining transcription factors, including well-known NC cell specifiers, were unable to convert MEFs into SOX10+ NC cells. These results suggest that SOX10 and SOX9 are the key factors necessary for the direct conversion of MEFs into NC cells.

  13. Cell culture replication of a genotype 1b hepatitis C virus isolate cloned from a patient who underwent liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Koutsoudakis

    Full Text Available The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV, allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1, and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV.

  14. Replication and virus-induced transcriptome of HAdV-5 in normal host cells versus cancer cells--differences of relevance for adenoviral oncolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik E Dorer

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads, especially HAdV-5, have been genetically equipped with tumor-restricted replication potential to enable applications in oncolytic cancer therapy. Such oncolytic adenoviruses have been well tolerated in cancer patients, but their anti-tumor efficacy needs to be enhanced. In this regard, it should be considered that cancer cells, dependent on their tissue of origin, can differ substantially from the normal host cells to which Ads are adapted by complex virus-host interactions. Consequently, viral replication efficiency, a key determinant of oncolytic activity, might be suboptimal in cancer cells. Therefore, we have analyzed both the replication kinetics of HAdV-5 and the virus-induced transcriptome in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC in comparison to cancer cells. This is the first report on genome-wide expression profiling of Ads in their native host cells. We found that E1A expression and onset of viral genome replication are most rapid in HBEC and considerably delayed in melanoma cells. In squamous cell lung carcinoma cells, we observed intermediate HAdV-5 replication kinetics. Infectious particle production, viral spread and lytic activity of HAdV-5 were attenuated in melanoma cells versus HBEC. Expression profiling at the onset of viral genome replication revealed that HAdV-5 induced the strongest changes in the cellular transcriptome in HBEC, followed by lung cancer and melanoma cells. We identified prominent regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and DNA metabolism, replication and packaging in HBEC, which is in accord with the necessity to induce S phase for viral replication. Strikingly, in melanoma cells HAdV-5 triggered opposing regulation of said genes and, in contrast to lung cancer cells, no weak S phase induction was detected when using the E2F promoter as reporter. Our results provide a rationale for improving oncolytic adenoviruses either by adaptation of viral infection to target tumor cells or by

  15. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo. PMID:24449840

  16. Generation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from human embryonic stem cell-derived spherical neural masses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Myung Soo; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Park, Jung Hyun; Lee, Haksup; Yoo, Dae Hoon; Park, Un Chul; Song, Seul Ae; Choi, Young Min; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2012-09-01

    Dysfunction and loss of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are major pathologic changes observed in various retinal degenerative diseases such as aged-related macular degeneration. RPE generated from human pluripotent stem cells can be a good candidate for RPE replacement therapy. Here, we show the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) toward RPE with the generation of spherical neural masses (SNMs), which are pure masses of hESCs-derived neural precursors. During the early passaging of SNMs, cystic structures arising from opened neural tube-like structures showed pigmented epithelial morphology. These pigmented cells were differentiated into functional RPE by neuroectodermal induction and mechanical purification. Most of the differentiated cells showed typical RPE morphologies, such as a polygonal-shaped epithelial monolayer, and transmission electron microscopy revealed apical microvilli, pigment granules, and tight junctions. These cells also expressed molecular markers of RPE, including Mitf, ZO-1, RPE65, CRALBP, and bestrophin. The generated RPE also showed phagocytosis of isolated bovine photoreceptor outer segment and secreting pigment epithelium-derived factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Functional RPE could be generated from SNM in our method. Because SNMs have several advantages, including the capability of expansion for long periods without loss of differentiation capability, easy storage and thawing, and no need for feeder cells, our method for RPE differentiation may be used as an efficient strategy for generating functional RPE cells for retinal regeneration therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  18. High power fuel cell simulator based on artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez-Ramirez, Abraham U.; Munoz-Guerrero, Roberto [Departamento de Ingenieria Electrica, CINVESTAV-IPN. Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional No. 2508, D.F. CP 07360 (Mexico); Duron-Torres, S.M. [Unidad Academica de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Campus Siglo XXI, Edif. 6 (Mexico); Ferraro, M.; Brunaccini, G.; Sergi, F.; Antonucci, V. [CNR-ITAE, Via Salita S. Lucia sopra Contesse 5-98126 Messina (Italy); Arriaga, L.G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica S.C., Parque Tecnologico Queretaro, Sanfandila, Pedro Escobedo, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2010-11-15

    Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has become a powerful modeling tool for predicting the performance of complex systems with no well-known variable relationships due to the inherent properties. A commercial Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack (5 kW) was modeled successfully using this tool, increasing the number of test into the 7 inputs - 2 outputs-dimensional spaces in the shortest time, acquiring only a small amount of experimental data. Some parameters could not be measured easily on the real system in experimental tests; however, by receiving the data from PEMFC, the ANN could be trained to learn the internal relationships that govern this system, and predict its behavior without any physical equations. Confident accuracy was achieved in this work making possible to import this tool to complex systems and applications. (author)

  19. Isolation and culture of porcine neural progenitor cells from embryos and pluripotent stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mikkel Aabech; Hall, Vanessa Jane; Hyttel, Poul

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and culture of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) from pluripotent stem cells has facilitated in vitro mechanistic studies of diseases related to the nervous system, as well as discovery of new medicine. In addition, NPCs are envisioned to play a crucial role in future cell replacement...... therapy. The pig has become recognized as an important large animal model and establishment of in vitro-derived porcine NPCs would allow for preclinical safety testing by transplantation in a porcine biomedical model. In this chapter, a detailed method for isolation and in vitro culture of porcine NPCs...... from porcine embryos or induced pluripotent stem cells is presented. The neural induction is performed in coculture and the isolation of rosette structures is carried out manually to ensure a homogenous population of NPCs. Using this method, multipotent NPCs can be obtained in approximately 1 month...

  20. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8 weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12 weeks after injury and in the 8 weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  1. Alternative Routes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Revealed by Reprogramming of the Neural Lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Steven A.; Zachariah P.G. Olufs; Tran, Khoa A.; Zaidan, Nur Zafirah; Sridharan, Rupa

    2016-01-01

    Summary During the reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to induced pluripotent stem cells, the activation of pluripotency genes such as NANOG occurs after the mesenchymal to epithelial transition. Here we report that both adult stem cells (neural stem cells) and differentiated cells (astrocytes) of the neural lineage can activate NANOG in the absence of cadherin expression during reprogramming. Gene expression analysis revealed that only the NANOG+E-cadherin+ populations expres...

  2. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Harish eBabu; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Jan-Hendrik eClaasen; Suresh eKannan; Annette E. Rünker; Theo ePalmer; Gerd eKempermann; Gerd eKempermann

    2011-01-01

    In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., Enriched monolayer precursor cell cultures from micro-dissected adult mouse dentate gyrus yield functional granule cell-like neurons, PLoS One 2007, 2:e388) to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and pro...

  3. Single Cell Analysis of Human RAD18-Dependent DNA Post-Replication Repair by Alkaline Bromodeoxyuridine Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mórocz, Mónika; Gali, Himabindu; Raskó, István; Downes, C. Stephen; Haracska, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Damage to DNA can block replication progression resulting in gaps in the newly synthesized DNA. Cells utilize a number of post-replication repair (PRR) mechanisms such as the RAD18 controlled translesion synthesis or template switching to overcome the discontinuities formed opposite the DNA lesions and to complete DNA replication. Gaining more insights into the role of PRR genes promotes better understanding of DNA damage tolerance and of how their malfunction can lead to increased genome instability and cancer. However, a simple and efficient method to characterise gene specific PRR deficiencies at a single cell level has not been developed. Here we describe the so named BrdU comet PRR assay to test the contribution of human RAD18 to PRR at a single cell level, by which we kinetically characterized the consequences of the deletion of human RAD18 on the replication of UV-damaged DNA. Moreover, we demonstrate the capability of our method to evaluate PRR at a single cell level in unsynchronized cell population. PMID:23936422

  4. The histone acetyltransferases CBP and Chameau integrate developmental and DNA replication programs in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Kristopher H; Dixon, Michael; Calvi, Brian R

    2012-10-01

    DNA replication origin activity changes during development. Chromatin modifications are known to influence the genomic location of origins and the time during S phase that they initiate replication in different cells. However, how chromatin regulates origins in concert with cell differentiation remains poorly understood. Here, we use developmental gene amplification in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells as a model to investigate how chromatin modifiers regulate origins in a developmental context. We find that the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) Chameau (Chm) binds to amplicon origins and is partially required for their function. Depletion of Chm had relatively mild effects on origins during gene amplification and genomic replication compared with previous knockdown of its ortholog HBO1 in human cells, which has severe effects on origin function. We show that another HAT, CBP (Nejire), also binds amplicon origins and is partially required for amplification. Knockdown of Chm and CBP together had a more severe effect on nucleosome acetylation and amplicon origin activity than knockdown of either HAT alone, suggesting that these HATs collaborate in origin regulation. In addition to their local function at the origin, we show that Chm and CBP also globally regulate the developmental transition of follicle cells into the amplification stages of oogenesis. Our results reveal a complexity of origin epigenetic regulation by multiple HATs during development and suggest that chromatin modifiers are a nexus that integrates differentiation and DNA replication programs.

  5. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Goffart, Nicolas; KROONEN, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays sti...

  6. Directed Migration of Embryonic Stem Cell-derived Neural Cells In An Applied Electric Field

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yongchao; Weiss, Mark; Yao, Li

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury or diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, can cause the loss of motor neurons and therefore results in the paralysis of muscles. Stem cells may improve functional recovery by promoting endogenous regeneration, or by directly replacing neurons. Effective directional migration of grafted neural cells to reconstruct functional connections is crucial in the process. Steady direct current electric fields (EFs) play an important role in the development of the central ne...

  7. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi K Berg

    Full Text Available HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  8. Potent inhibition of late stages of hepadnavirus replication by a modified cell penetrating peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Abdul

    Full Text Available Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip are agents for the delivery of (uncharged biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication of Duck Hepatitis B Virus (DHBV, a reference model for human HBV. Amongst twelve CatLip peptides we identified Deca-(Arg₈ having a particularly potent antiviral activity, leading to a drastic inhibition of viral particle secretion without detectable toxicity. Inhibition of virion secretion was correlated with a dose-dependent increase in intracellular viral DNA. Deca-(Arg₈ peptide did neither interfere with DHBV entry, nor with formation of mature nucleocapsids nor with their travelling to the nucleus. Instead, Deca-(Arg₈ caused envelope protein accumulation in large clusters as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy indicating severe structural changes of preS/S. Sucrose gradient analysis of supernatants from Deca-(Arg₈-treated cells showed unaffected naked viral nucleocapsids release, which was concomitant with a complete arrest of virion and surface protein-containing subviral particle secretion. This is the first report showing that a CPP is able to drastically block hepadnaviral release from infected cells by altering late stages of viral morphogenesis via interference with enveloped particle formation, without affecting naked nucleocapsid egress, thus giving a view inside the mode of inhibition. Deca-(Arg₈ may be a useful tool for elucidating the hepadnaviral secretory pathway, which is not yet fully understood. Moreover we provide the first evidence that a modified CPP displays a novel antiviral mechanism targeting another step of viral life cycle compared to what has been so far described for other enveloped viruses.

  9. Delayed IFN response differentiates replication of West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Yuki; Uchida, Leo; Morita, Kouichi

    2015-08-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are important causes of human encephalitis cases, which result in a high mortality ratio and neurological sequelae after recovery. Understanding the mechanism of neuropathogenicity in these viral infections is important for the development of specific antiviral therapy. Here, we focused on human-derived neuronal and glial cells to understand the cellular responses against WNV and JEV infection. It was demonstrated that early IFN-β induction regulated virus replication in glioblastoma tbl98G cells, whereas delayed IFN-β induction resulted in efficient virus replication in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells. Moreover, the concealing of viral dsRNA in the intracellular membrane resulted in the delayed IFN response in SK-N-SH cells. These results, which showed different IFN responses between human neuronal and glial cells after WNV or JEV infection, are expected to contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for neuropathology in these viral infections.

  10. Neural stem cell biology in vertebrates and invertebrates: more alike than different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Andrea H; Livesey, Frederick J

    2011-05-26

    Many of the regulatory mechanisms controlling neural stem cell behavior are proving to be conserved between organisms as diverse as worms and man. Common principles are emerging with respect to the regulation of neural stem cell division and the specification of distinct stem and progenitor cell types. Great progress has been made in recent years in identifying the cellular mechanisms underpinning these processes, thanks in large part to the cross-fertilization of research on different model systems. We review here recent findings that highlight hitherto unappreciated similarities in the cell and molecular biology of neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation between invertebrates and vertebrates. As well as underscoring the possible conservation of stem cell mechanisms across phyla, these similarities are proving to be practically useful in studying neural stem cell biology in health and disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glioma migration: clues from the biology of neural progenitor cells and embryonic CNS cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, P B

    2001-06-01

    Neural stem cells have recently come to the forefront in neurobiology because of the possibilities for CNS repair by transplantation. Further understanding of the biology of these cells is critical for making their use in CNS repair possible. It is likely that these discoveries will also have spin-offs for neuro-oncology as primary brain tumors may arise from a CNS progenitor cell. An understanding of the normal migratory ability of these cells is also likely to have a very important impact on the knowledge of brain tumor invasion.

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